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Sample records for hydrogen permeable metals

  1. Hydrogen-permeable composite metal membrane and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.

    1993-06-08

    Various hydrogen production and hydrogen sulfide decomposition processes are disclosed that utilize composite metal membranes that contain an intermetallic diffusion barrier separating a hydrogen-permeable base metal and a hydrogen-permeable coating metal. The barrier is a thermally stable inorganic proton conductor.

  2. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  3. Metal/ceramic composites with high hydrogen permeability

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, Stephen E.; Lee, Tae H.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2003-05-27

    A membrane for separating hydrogen from fluids is provided comprising a sintered homogenous mixture of a ceramic composition and a metal. The metal may be palladium, niobium, tantalum, vanadium, or zirconium or a binary mixture of palladium with another metal such as niobium, silver, tantalum, vanadium, or zirconium.

  4. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  5. System level permeability modeling of porous hydrogen storage materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Voskuilen, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    A permeability model for hydrogen transport in a porous material is successfully applied to both laboratory-scale and vehicle-scale sodium alanate hydrogen storage systems. The use of a Knudsen number dependent relationship for permeability of the material in conjunction with a constant area fraction channeling model is shown to accurately predict hydrogen flow through the reactors. Generally applicable model parameters were obtained by numerically fitting experimental measurements from reactors of different sizes and aspect ratios. The degree of channeling was experimentally determined from the measurements and found to be 2.08% of total cross-sectional area. Use of this constant area channeling model and the Knudsen dependent Young & Todd permeability model allows for accurate prediction of the hydrogen uptake performance of full-scale sodium alanate and similar metal hydride systems.

  6. Effect of a Nickel-Iron Mixture of Weld Metal on Hydrogen Permeability at Various Temperatures in 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takahisa; Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Suzumura, Akio; Kobayashi, Daigo; Kamono, Shumpei

    It is important to prevent from hydrogen embrittlement cracking in the heat-affected zone of welded steels. The hydrogen permeation rate for bulk nickel at high temperatures is higher than that of stainless steel, although the reverse is true at low temperatures. Low carbon stainless 316L steel, which contained 12-15% nickel, was selected as the parent material for welding. We have investigated the affect of nickel near the heat-affected zone by measuring the hydrogen permeation at various temperatures. We performed hydrogen permeation tests into the bead on plate specimens using nickel filler. A stationary hydrogen gas flux through the stainless steel specimen was measured by using an orifice and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). The partial pressure difference for hydrogen that was applied to the specimen was able to be kept constant by maintaining a constant gas flow rate through the orifice in a low- pressure room. An orifice with a 3 mm diameter maintained stationary steady-state hydrogen gas flux from the specimen at 620K, while a 1.2 mm diameter orifice maintained the steady pressure at 520 K. The hydrogen permeability, K was calculated based on the measured steady-state hydrogen gas fluxes at various temperatures. These results plotted as log K versus 1/T (reciprocal temperature) could not be interpolated linearly. The permeability values of the specimen at 570 K and 520 K were less than interpolated ones between the value at 620 K and the value at 520K of the 316 L stainless steel substrate as received.

  7. Determination of hydrogen permeability in commercial and modified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The results of hydrogen permeability measurements on several iron- and cobalt-base alloys as well as on two long-ranged ordered alloys over the range of 705 to 870 C (1300 to 1600 F) are summarized. The test alloys included wrought alloys N-155, IN 800, A-286, 19-9DL, and 19-9DL modifications with aluminum, niobium, and misch metal. In addition, XF-818, CRM-6D, SA-F11, and HS-31 were evaluated. Two wrought long-range ordered alloys, Ni3Al and (Fe,Ni)3(V,Al) were also evaluated. All tests were conducted at 20.7 MPa pressure in either pure and/or 1% CO2-doped H2 for test periods as long as 133 h. Detailed analyses were conducted to determine the relative permeability rankings of these alloys and the effect of doping, exit surface oxidation, specimen design variations, and test duration on permeability coefficient, and permeation activation energies were determined. The two long-range ordered alloys had the lowest permeability coefficients in pure H2 when compared with the eight commercial alloys and their modifications. With CO2 doping, significant decrease in permeability was observed in commercial alloys--no doped tests were conducted with the long-range ordered alloys.

  8. Determination of hydrogen permeability in commercial and modified superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of hydrogen permeability measurements on several iron- and cobalt-base alloys as well as on two long-range ordered alloys over the range of 705/sup 0/ to 870/sup 0/C (1300/sup 0/ to 1600/sup 0/F). The test alloys included wrought alloys N-155, IN 800, A-286, 19-9DL, and 19-9DL modifications with aluminum, niobium, and misch metal. In addition, XF-818, CRM-6D, SA-F11, and HS-31 were evaluated. Two wrought long-range ordered alloys, Ni/sub 3/Al and (Fe,Ni)/sub 3/(V,Al) were also evaluated. All tests were conducted at 20.7 MPa pressure in either pure and/or 1% CO/sub 2/-doped H/sub 2/ for test periods as long as 133 h. Detailed analyses were conducted to determine the relative permeability rankings of these alloys and the effect of doping, exit surface oxidation, specimen design variations, and test duration on permeability coefficient, and permeation activation energies were determined. The two long-range ordered alloys had the lowest permeability coefficients in pure H/sub 2/ when compared with the eight commercial alloys and their modifications. With CO/sub 2/ doping, significant decrease in permeability was observed in the commercial alloys - no doped tests were conducted with the long-range ordered alloys.

  9. The interaction of hydrogen with metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured for several alloys, and these were determined to be about the same at 25 C for all alloys investigated. The relation of structure, both metallurgical and crystallographic, to the observed hydrogen distribution on charging was investigated, as well as the role of hydride formation in the hydrogen resistance of metal alloys. An attempt was made to correlate the structures and compositions of metal alloys as well as other parameters with the ratios of their notched tensile strengths in hydrogen to that in helium, R(H2/He), which are believed to represent a measure of their hydrogen resistance. Evidence supports the belief that hydrogen permeability and hydrogen resistance are increased by smaller grain sizes for a given alloy composition.

  10. Stable catalyst layers for hydrogen permeable composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Way, J. Douglas; Wolden, Colin A

    2014-01-07

    The present invention provides a hydrogen separation membrane based on nanoporous, composite metal carbide or metal sulfide coated membranes capable of high flux and permselectivity for hydrogen without platinum group metals. The present invention is capable of being operated over a broad temperature range, including at elevated temperatures, while maintaining hydrogen selectivity.

  11. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  12. The hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Casey; Miller, James; Gellman, Andrew; Morreale, Bryan

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen permeates rapidly through pure Pd membranes, but H{sub 2}S, a common minor component in hydrogen-containing streams, produces a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that severely retards hydrogen permeation. Hydrogen still permeates through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd structure, indicating that the Pd{sub 4}S surface is active for H{sub 2} dissociation; the low hydrogen permeability of the Pd4S film is responsible for the decreased rate of hydrogen transport. In this work, the hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S was determined experimentally in the 623-773 K temperature range. Bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were produced by exposing pure Pd foils to H{sub 2}S. H{sub 2} fluxes through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were measured during exposure to both pure H{sub 2} and a 1000 ppm H{sub 2}S in H{sub 2} gas mixture. Our results show that H{sub 2}S slows hydrogen permeation through Pd mainly by producing a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that is roughly an order-of-magnitude less permeable to hydrogen (k{sub Pd{sub 4}S} = 10{sup ?7.5} exp(?0.22 eV/k{sub B}T) molH{sub 2}/m/s/Pa{sup 1/2}) than pure Pd. The presence of H{sub 2}S in the gas stream results in greater inhibition of hydrogen transport than can be explained by the very low permeability of Pd{sub 4}S. H{sub 2}S may block H2 dissociation sites at the Pd{sub 4}S surface.

  13. Hydrogen permeability over the joint weld of the steel parts of fusion reactor with magnet confinement of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V. V.; Dyomina, E. V.; Zasadny, T. M.; Ivanov, L. I.; Prusakova, M. D.; Vinogradova, N. A.; Zabelin, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    Hydrogen and its isotopes diffusion and permeability over the laser joint weld of low-activation 10Cr9WVA ferritic steels have been studied. Welding of steel sheets were produced with the help of Russian gas laser TL-5M type ( l=10.6 mm, P=2.5 kW) in He atmosphere with the rate of 66 mm/s. Hydrogen diffusion over the joint welds was detected by the conventional method of electrical resistance measurement. By this way, the kinetics of resistance changes during hydrogenation of specimens engraved from weld metal, neighboring zone of thermal effect as well as basic metal have been determined. Coefficients of hydrogen diffusion were measured in the temperature range from 773 to 1073 K. So, for 10Cr9WVA steel at 873 K it was established that the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the weld metal is approximately 10 times higher than in the basic metal, and three times higher than that in the zone of thermal effect. Hydrogen permeability over the joint weld specimens was measured by the Dines-Barrer method on the volummetric setup. It was established that the hydrogen flux over the laser joint weld is significantly (up to two orders) more than that over the basic metal. Using the data on the hydrogen permeability and diffusion coefficient, the hydrogen solubility in the weld metal was estimated, which is several ten times higher than that in the basic metal of the steel investigated. As a result, it was concluded that welding the steel parts of the first wall of thermonuclear reactors with magnet confinement of plasma is undesirable due to possible tritium leaking into the environment. A possible way of decreasing the joint welds hydrogen permeability, including application of protective impermeable for hydrogen coatings, is considered.

  14. Metallization of fluid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Louis, A.A.; Ashcroft, N.W.

    1997-05-14

    The electrical activity of liquid hydrogen has been measured at the high dynamic pressures, and temperatures that can be achieved with a reverberating shock wave. The resulting data are most naturally interpreted in terms of a continuous transition from a semiconducting to a metallic, largely diatomic fluid, the latter at 140 CPa, (ninefold compression) and 3000 K. While the fluid at these conditions resembles common liquid metals by the scale of its resistivity of 500 micro-ohm-cm, it differs by retaining a strong pairing character, and the precise mechanism by which a metallic state might be attained is still a matter of debate. Some evident possibilities include (i) physics of a largely one-body character, such as a band-overlap transition, (ii) physics of a strong-coupling or many-body character,such as a Mott-Hubbard transition, and (iii) process in which structural changes are paramount.

  15. Hydrogen Permeability of Polymer Matrix Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, Ray W.; Gates, Thomas S

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents experimental methods and results of an ongoing study of the correlation between damage state and hydrogen gas permeability of laminated composite materials under mechanical strains and thermal loads. A specimen made from IM-7/977-2 composite material has been mechanically cycled at room temperature to induce microcrack damage. Crack density and tensile modulus were observed as functions of number of cycles. Damage development was found to occur most quickly in the off-axis plies near the outside of the laminate. Permeability measurements were made after 170,000 cycles and 430,000 cycles. Leak rate was found to depend on applied mechanical strain, crack density, and test temperature.

  16. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, R. P.; Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.; Frohmberg, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement refers to metals stressed while exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere. Tested in air, even after exposure to hydrogen under pressure, this effect is not observed on similar specimens. Much high purity hydrogen is prepared by evaporation of liquid hydrogen, and thus has low levels for potential impurities which could otherwise inhibit or poison the absorbent reactions that are involved. High strength steels and nickel-base allows are rated as showing extreme embrittlement; aluminum alloys and the austenitic stainless steels, as well as copper, have negligible susceptibility to this phenomenon. The cracking that occurs appears to be a surface phenomenon, is unlike that of internal hydrogen embrittlement.

  17. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  18. Characterization of tungsten films and their hydrogen permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Nemani?, Vincenc Kova?, Janez; Lungu, Cristian; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Zajec, Bojan

    2014-11-01

    Prediction of tritium migration and its retention within fusion reactors is uncertain due to a significant role of the structural disorder that is formed on the surface layer after plasma exposure. Tungsten films deposited by any of the suitable methods are always disordered and contain a high density of hydrogen traps. Experiments on such films with hydrogen isotopes present a suitable complementary method, which improves the picture of the hydrogen interaction with fusion relevant materials. The authors report on the morphology, composition, and structure of tungsten films deposited by the thermionic vacuum arc method on highly permeable Eurofer substrates. Subsequently, hydrogen permeation studies through these films were carried out in a wide pressure range from 20 to 1000 mbars at 400?°C. The final value of the permeation coefficient for four samples after 24?h at 400?°C was between P?=?3.2?×?10{sup ?14}?mol?H{sub 2}/(m?s?Pa{sup 0.5}) and P?=?1.1?×?10{sup ?15}?mol H{sub 2}/(m s Pa{sup 0.5}). From the time evolution of the permeation flux, it was shown that diffusivity was responsible for the difference in the steady fluxes, as solubility was roughly the same. This is confirmed by XRD data taken on these samples.

  19. Effects of hydrogen on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, C. E.

    1969-01-01

    Several rules to guide choice of materials, and methods of welding, electroplating, and heat treatment will provide a method for minimizing failures in storage tanks and related hardware. Failures are caused by high-pressure hydrogen effects, the formation of hydrides in titanium, and hydrogen absorption through various metals processing techniques.

  20. Hydrogen Permeability of Incoloy 800H, Inconel 617, and Haynes 230 Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-07-01

    A potential issue in the design of the NGNP reactor and high-temperature components is the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product from downstream hydrogen generation through high-temperature components. Such permeation can result in the loss of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system. The issue will be addressed in the engineering design phase, and requires knowledge of permeation characteristics of the candidate alloys. Of three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, the hydrogen permeability has been documented well only for Incoloy 800H, but at relatively high partial pressures of hydrogen. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. The hydrogen permeability of Haynes 230 has not been published. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the hydrogen permeability of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory. The performance of the system was validated using Incoloy 800H as reference material, for which the permeability has been published in several journal articles. The permeability of Incoloy 800H, Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 °C and at hydrogen partial pressures of 10-3 and 10-2 atm, substantially lower pressures than used in the published reports. The measured hydrogen permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 were in good agreement with published values obtained at higher partial pressures of hydrogen. The hydrogen permeability of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were similar, about 50% greater than for Incoloy 800H and with similar temperature dependence.

  1. Composite Metal-hydrogen Electrodes for Metal-Hydrogen Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckman, M W; Wiesmann, H; Strongin, M; Young, K; Fetcenko, M

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries. The anodes could be incorporated in thin film solid state Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding and fast hydrogen charging and Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with those of commercially available metal hydride materials discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films-and multiiayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 µm thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  2. Metallic Hydrogen and Nano-Tube Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John W.

    2004-01-01

    When hydrogen is subjected to enough pressure the atoms will be pressed into close enough proximity that each electron is no longer bound to a single proton. The research objectives is to find whether metallic hydrogen can be produced and once produced will the metallic hydrogen be metastable and remain in the metallic form when the pressure is released.

  3. Hydrogen Permeability of a Polymer Based Composite Tank Material Under Tetra-Axial Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Eric H.

    2003-01-01

    In order to increase the performance of future expendable and reusable launch vehicles and reduce per-pound payload launch costs, weight reductions have been sought in vehicle components. Historically, the cryogenic propellant tanks for launch vehicles have been constructed from metal. These are some of the largest structural components in the vehicle and contribute significantly to the vehicles total dry weight. A successful replacement material will be conformable, have a high strength to weight ratio, and have a low gas-permeability to the cryogens being stored, i.e., oxygen and hydrogen. Polymer-based composites are likely candidates to fill this role. Polymer and polymer-based composites in general are known to have acceptable gas permeation properties in their as-cured state.1 The use of polymer-based composites for this application has been proposed for some time.2 Some successes have been reported with oxygen3, but other than the DC-XA experience, those with hydrogen have been limited. The primary reason for this has been the small molecular diameter of hydrogen, the lower temperatures of the liquid, and that the composite materials examined to date have all been susceptible to microcrack formation in response to the thermal-mechanical cycles experienced in the use-environment. There have been numerous accounts of composite materials with reported acceptable resistance to the formation of microcracks when exposed to various mechanical and/or thermal cycles. However, virtually all of these studies have employed uniaxial loads and there has been no discussion or empirical evidence pertaining to how these loads relate to the biaxial state of stress in the material in its use environment. Furthermore, many of these studies have suffered from a lack of instrument sensitivity in detecting hydrogen permeability, no standards, insufficient documentation of test conditions, testing of cycled materials in their unload state, and/or false assumptions about the nature of the microcracks in the material. This paper documents the results of hydrogen permeability testing on a Bismaleimide (BMI) based graphite fiber composite material under a variety of tetra-axial strain states.

  4. Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen

    E-print Network

    Louis, Ard

    Chapter 3 Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen 3.1.1 Some background on dense hydrogen Hydrogen, out of it the Universe evolved, every atom and leaf, marine iguana and apricot­smelling chanterelle. But my, my, what alchemy: nondescript H 2 --Diane Ackerman 1 -- Hydrogen

  5. Interaction Of Hydrogen With Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on interaction of hydrogen with number of metal alloys. Discusses relationship between metallurgical and crystallographic aspects of structures of alloys and observed distributions of hydrogen on charging. Also discusses effect of formation of hydrides on resistances of alloys to hydrogen. Describes attempt to correlate structures and compositions of alloys with their abilities to resist embrittlement by hydrogen.

  6. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  7. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  8. Novel Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer

    2011-02-27

    To reduce dependence on oil and emission of greenhouse gases, hydrogen is favored as an energy carrier for the near future. Hydrogen can be converted to electrical energy utilizing fuel cells and turbines. One way to produce hydrogen is to gasify coal which is abundant in the U.S. The coal gasification produces syngas from which hydrogen is then separated. Designing metallic alloys for hydrogen separation membranes which will work in a syngas environment poses significant challenges. In this presentation, a review of technical targets, metallic membrane development activities at NETL and challenges that are facing the development of new technologies will be given.

  9. Hydrogen trapping and the interaction of hydrogen with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of trapped hydrogen in metal alloys, involving the determination of mobile hydrogen using the electrochemical method and the determination of total hydrogen with the fusion method, the difference in hydrogen concentrations being due to trapped hydrogen. It has been found that hydrogen enters body-centered cubic structures through the grain bodies rather than through the grain boundaries. Hydrogen also diffuses much more rapidly in body-centered cubic structures on charging than in face-centered cubic structures, the hydrogen distribution being more uniform in nature. The energy necessary to cause hydrogen embrittlement is postulated to arise from the changes in crystal lattice energies brought about through interaction of hydrogen with atoms in the metal lattice. The total energy change is more negative for body-centered cubic structures, believed to be the cause of a greater tendency toward hydrogen embrittlement. Finally, the agreement of hydrogen concentrations obtained at 25 C by the electrochemical method with those obtained by the fusion method are taken as a strong indication of the power and validity of the electrochemical method.

  10. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  11. Permeability of Molecular Hydrogen and Water Vapor Through Butyl Rubber at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    1992-04-09

    The preparation of the Safety Analysis Report for the 233-H Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) requires permeation constants of hydrogen isotopes through butyl rubber, to estimate possible worker exposure given a certain level of tritium in the confinement gloveboxes. Literature values of the permeability constants for hydrogen isotopes and water vapor through butyl rubber at ambient temperature (22-25 C) have been converted to common units and are tabulated (Tables I and II). Permeation rates of tritiated species are the same as that of protium species, within experimental error. Thus, molecular protium and normal water vapor data serve to estimate tritium permeation rates. Because of vendor-to-vendor variability of permeability, especially of water vapor, vendor measurements of water vapor permeability should continue to be used to estimate permeation in SRS processes.

  12. Permeability of Molecular Hydrogen and Water Vapor Through Butyl Rubber at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K.

    1992-04-09

    The preparation of the Safety Analysis Report for the 233-H Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) requires permeation constants of hydrogen isotopes through butyl rubber, to estimate possible worker exposure given a certain level of tritium in the confinement gloveboxes. Literature values of the permeability constants for hydrogen isotopes and water vapor through butyl rubber at ambient temperature (22-25 C) have been converted to common units and are tabulated (Tables I and II). Permeation rates of tritiated species are the same as that of protium species, within experimental error. Thus, molecular protium and normal water vapor data serve to estimate tritium permeation rates. Because of vendor to vendor variability of permeability, especially of water vapor, vendor measurements of water vapor permeability should continue to be used to estimate permeation in SRS processes.

  13. Conceptual Launch Vehicles Using Metallic Hydrogen Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, John W.; Silvera, Isaac F.; Foote, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Solid molecular hydrogen is predicted to transform into an atomic solid with metallic properties under pressures >4.5 Mbar. Atomic metallic hydrogen is predicted to be metastable, limited by some critical temperature and pressure, and to store very large amounts of energy. Experiments may soon determine the critical temperature, critical pressure, and specific energy availability. It is useful to consider the feasibility of using metastable atomic hydrogen as a rocket propellant. If one assumes that metallic hydrogen is stable at usable temperatures and pressures, and that it can be affordably produced, handled, and stored, then it may be a useful rocket propellant. Assuming further that the available specific energy can be determined from the recombination of the atoms into molecules (216 MJ/kg), then conceptual engines and launch vehicle concepts can be developed. Under these assumptions, metallic hydrogen would be a revolutionary new rocket fuel with a theoretical specific impulse of 1700 s at a chamber pressure of 100 atm. A practical problem that arises is that rocket chamber temperatures may be too high for the use of this pure fuel. This paper examines an engine concept that uses liquid hydrogen or water as a diluent coolant for the metallic hydrogen to reduce the chamber temperature to usable values. Several launch vehicles are then conceptually developed. Results indicate that if metallic hydrogen is experimentally found to have the properties assumed in this analysis, then there are significant benefits. These benefits become more attractive as the chamber temperatures increase.

  14. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  15. Pulsed-plasma-nitrided API 5L X-65 steel: hydrogen permeability and microstructural aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, A. H.; Brühl, S. P.; Gómez, B.; Zampronio, M. A.; Miranda, P. E. V.; Feugeas, J. N.

    1998-12-01

    Nitriding of an API 5L X-65 steel was performed using a low-frequency dc pulsed-plasma technique. A 6 h treatment was found to produce a compact surface nitride layer composed of 0022-3727/31/24/010/img8 0022-3727/31/24/010/img9 and 0022-3727/31/24/010/img10 0022-3727/31/24/010/img11 nitrides with a thickness of around 0022-3727/31/24/010/img12. The plasma-nitriding treatment resulted in a significant reduction in hydrogen permeability, from 0022-3727/31/24/010/img13 (for the untreated steel) to 0022-3727/31/24/010/img14 for electrolytic hydrogen charging via the nitrided surface. When the sample was oriented with the nitrided surface as the hydrogen-exit face, the permeability was reduced even further, to 0022-3727/31/24/010/img15.

  16. The hydrogen permeability of Pd4S

    SciTech Connect

    O’Brien, Casey P.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Morreale, Bryan D.; Miller, James B.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen permeates rapidly through pure Pd membranes, but H2S, a common minor component in hydrogencontaining streams, produces a Pd4S film on the Pd surface that severely retards hydrogen permeation. Hydrogen still permeates through the bi-layered Pd4S/Pd structure, indicating that the Pd4S surface is active for H2 dissociation; the low hydrogen permeability of the Pd4S film is responsible for the decreased rate of hydrogen transport. In this work, the hydrogen permeability of Pd4S was determined experimentally in the 623-773 K temperature range. Bi-layered Pd4S/Pd foils were produced by exposing pure Pd foils to H2S. H2 fluxes through the bi-layered Pd4S/Pd foils were measured during exposure to both pure H2 and a 1000 ppm H2S in H2 gas mixture. Our results show that H2S slows hydrogen permeation through Pd mainly by producing a Pd4S film on the Pd surface that is roughly an order-of-magnitude less permeable to hydrogen (kPd4S = 10-7.5 exp(-0.22 eV/kBT)molH2/m/s/Pa-1/2) than pure Pd. The presence of H2S in the gas stream results in greater inhibition of hydrogen transport than can be explained by the very low permeability of Pd4S. H2S may block H2 dissociation sites at the Pd4S surface.

  17. Process for forming a nickel foil with controlled and predetermined permeability to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Kansas City, MO)

    1981-09-22

    The present invention provides a novel process for forming a nickel foil having a controlled and predetermined hydrogen permeability. This process includes the steps of passing a nickel plating bath through a suitable cation exchange resin to provide a purified nickel plating bath free of copper and gold cations, immersing a nickel anode and a suitable cathode in the purified nickel plating bath containing a selected concentration of an organic sulfonic acid such as a napthalene-trisulfonic acid, electrodepositing a nickel layer having the thickness of a foil onto the cathode, and separating the nickel layer from the cathode to provide a nickel foil. The anode is a readily-corrodible nickel anode. The present invention also provides a novel nickel foil having a greater hydrogen permeability than palladium at room temperature.

  18. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore »the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  19. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

  20. Abundant Metals Give Precious Hydrogenation Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-11-29

    Homogeneous catalysts based on precious (noble) metals have had a profound influence on modern synthetic methods, enabling highly selective synthesis of organic compounds but typically require precious metal catalysts (Ru, Rh, Ir, Pt, and Pd). Increasing efforts have been devoted to the design and discovery of homogeneous catalysts using base metals (e.g., Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo). Morris et al. report Fe catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of C=O bonds. Cobalt catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of C=C bonds are described by Chirik et al., and Beller et al. report new nanoscale iron catalysts for synthesis of functionalized anilines through hydrogenation of nitroarenes. The author’s work in this area is supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Noble Metals Would Prevent Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, N. E.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    According to proposal, addition of small amounts of noble metals makes iron- and nickel-based alloys less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen. Metallurgists demonstrated adding 0.6 to 1.0 percent by weight of Pd or Pt eliminates stress/corrosion cracking in type 4130 steel. Proposal based on assumption that similar levels (0.5 to 1.0 weight percent) of same elements effective against hydrogen embrittlement.

  2. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    SciTech Connect

    McWatters, Bruce Ray; Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  3. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  4. Method for controlling density and permeability of sintered powdered metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, H. H.

    1968-01-01

    Improved, relatively low-cost method has been developed to produce porous metals with predetermined pore size, pore spacing, and density, utilizing powder-metal processes. The method uses angular not spherical tungsten powder.

  5. Thermodynamics of hydrogen and vacancies in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Juanjuan

    This thesis studies metal-hydrogen systems. The interaction between hydrogen-atoms and vacancies in metals have been elucidated in Fermi-Dirac statistics. Calculations have been presented and compared for specific models in which H-atoms act both as simple interstitial species and form either decorated vacancies or substitutional defects. A model has been presented to explain the superabundant vacancy formation under high hydrogen pressures. The solutions based on these models apply to much lower temperatures and higher concentrations than the traditional ones. These results show abundant vacancies will be formed in the presence of hydrogen; the vacancy concentration is many orders of magnitude larger than those in the H-free lattice. A study of the diffusion of hydrogen in the crack tip area has been provided. The slow diffusivity of H-atoms at low temperatures and the interaction between H-atoms and vacancies in the crack tip plastic zone give an explanation of the experimental data which show a maximum crack growth rate at room temperature. This work is associated with the embrittlement of steel by hydrogen.

  6. Optical properties of inhomogeneous metallic hydrogen plasmas

    E-print Network

    Broeck, N Van den; Tempere, J; Silvera, I F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of hydrogen as it undergoes a transition from the insulating molecular to the metallic atomic phase, when heated by a pulsed laser at megabar pressures in a diamond anvil cell. Most current experiments attempt to observe this transition by detecting a change in the optical reflectance and/or transmittance. Theoretical models for this change are based on the dielectric function calculated for bulk, homogeneous slabs of material. Experimentally, one expects a hydrogen plasma density that varies on a length scale not substantially smaller than the wave length of the probing light. We show that taking this inhomogeneity into account can lead to significant corrections in the reflectance and transmittance. We present a technique to calculate the optical properties of systems with a smoothly varying density of charge carriers, determine the optical response for metallic hydrogen in the diamond anvil cell experiment and contrast this with the standard results. Analyzing recent e...

  7. Metallic Hydrogen - Potentially a High Energy Rocket Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John; Silvera, Ike

    2007-01-01

    Pure metallic hydrogen is predicted to have a specific impulse (Isp) of 1700 seconds, but the reaction temperature is too high for current engine materials. Diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen can reduce the reaction temperature to levels compatible with current material limits and still provide an Isp greater than 900 s. Metallic hydrogen has not yet been produced on earth, but experimental techniques exist that may change this situation. This paper will provide a brief description of metallic hydrogen and the status of experiments that may soon produce detectable quantities of this material in the lab. Also provided are some characteristics for diluted metallic hydrogen engines and launch vehicles.

  8. PERMEABILITY, SOLUBILITY, AND INTERACTION OF HYDROGEN IN POLYMERS- AN ASSESSMENT OF MATERIALS FOR HYDROGEN TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M

    2008-02-05

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) piping has been identified as a leading candidate for use in a transport system for the Hydrogen Economy. Understanding the permeation and leakage of hydrogen through the candidate materials is vital to effective materials system selection or design and development of safe and efficient materials for this application. A survey of the literature showed that little data on hydrogen permeation are available and no mechanistically-based models to quantitatively predict permeation behavior have been developed. However, several qualitative trends in gaseous permeation have been identified and simple calculations have been performed to identify leakage rates for polymers of varying crystallinity. Additionally, no plausible mechanism was found for the degradation of polymeric materials in the presence of pure hydrogen. The absence of anticipated degradation is due to lack of interactions between hydrogen and FRP and very low solubility coefficients of hydrogen in polymeric materials. Recommendations are made to address research and testing needs to support successful materials development and use of FRP materials for hydrogen transport and distribution.

  9. Powered by DFT: Screening methods that accelerate materials development for hydrogen in metals applications.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kelly M; Chandrasekhar, Nita; Sholl, David S

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Not only is hydrogen critical for current chemical and refining processes, it is also projected to be an important energy carrier for future green energy systems such as fuel cell vehicles. Scientists have examined light metal hydrides for this purpose, which need to have both good thermodynamic properties and fast charging/discharging kinetics. The properties of hydrogen in metals are also important in the development of membranes for hydrogen purification. In this Account, we highlight our recent work aimed at the large scale screening of metal-based systems with either favorable hydrogen capacities and thermodynamics for hydrogen storage in metal hydrides for use in onboard fuel cell vehicles or promising hydrogen permeabilities relative to pure Pd for hydrogen separation from high temperature mixed gas streams using dense metal membranes. Previously, chemists have found that the metal hydrides need to hit a stability sweet spot: if the compound is too stable, it will not release enough hydrogen under low temperatures; if the compound is too unstable, the reaction may not be reversible under practical conditions. Fortunately, we can use DFT-based methods to assess this stability via prediction of thermodynamic properties, equilibrium reaction pathways, and phase diagrams for candidate metal hydride systems with reasonable accuracy using only proposed crystal structures and compositions as inputs. We have efficiently screened millions of mixtures of pure metals, metal hydrides, and alloys to identify promising reaction schemes via the grand canonical linear programming method. Pure Pd and Pd-based membranes have ideal hydrogen selectivities over other gases but suffer shortcomings such as sensitivity to sulfur poisoning and hydrogen embrittlement. Using a combination of detailed DFT, Monte Carlo techniques, and simplified models, we are able to accurately predict hydrogen permeabilities of metal membranes and screen large libraries of candidate alloys, selections of which are described in this Account. To further increase the number of membrane materials that can be studied with DFT, computational costs need to be reduced either through methods development to break bottlenecks in the performance prediction algorithm, particularly related to transition state identification, or through screening techniques that take advantage of correlations to bypass constraints. PMID:24937509

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

  11. Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas by using oxygen-permeable ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hongwei Cheng; Yuwen Zhang; Xionggang Lu; Weizhong Ding; Qian Li

    2009-01-15

    Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas (HCOG) was investigated in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor combined with a Ni/Mg(Al)O catalyst by the partial oxidation with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. The reaction results indicated that toluene was completely converted to H{sub 2} and CO in the catalytic reforming of the simulated HCOG in the temperature range from 825 to 875{sup o}C. Both thermodynamically predicated values and experimental data showed that the selective oxidation of toluene took precedence over that of CH{sub 4} in the reforming reaction. At optimized reaction conditions, the dense oxygen-permeable membrane has an oxygen permeation flux around 12.3 mL cm{sup -2} min{sup -1}, and a CH{sub 4} conversion of 86%, a CO{sub 2} conversion of 99%, a H{sub 2} yield of 88%, and a CO yield of 87% have been achieved. When the toluene and methane were reformed, the amount of H{sub 2} in the reaction effluent gas was about 2 times more than that of original H{sub 2} in simulated HCOG. The results reveal that it is feasible for hydrogen production from HCOG by reforming hydrocarbon compounds in a ceramic oxygen-permeable membrane reactor. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 abs.

  12. Hydrogen storage in metal-hydrogen systems and their derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, U.; Arnold, G.; von Helmolt, R.

    During the last years, the power densities of automotive fuel cell systems have been raised dramatically. However, a major technology improvement is still needed for the on-board fuel storage system since hydrogen exhibits a rather low volumetric energy density (regardless whether it is stored as a liquid at cryogenic temperatures or as a compressed gas). Furthermore, the cost for current hydrogen containers is far from what gasoline tanks cost. Therefore, alternatives like solid-state absorbers of hydrogen (e.g. metal hydrides or complex hydrides) are investigated for their feasibility by the car industry. These kinds of systems show very high volumetric storage densities on a materials basis. Unfortunately, the host compounds are usually quite heavy and thus possess a low gravimetric storage density. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of the absorption/desorption reactions and their impact on the tank design in general (and on the heat management in particular) have to be considered. Within the framework of this paper, the properties of the most promising solid-state storage systems are discussed and compared to those of the liquid and compressed gaseous hydrogen technologies.

  13. A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR TREATMENT OF HEAVY METALS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-00327 Ludwig*, R., McGregor, R.G., Blowes, D.W., Benner, S.G., and Mountjoy, K. A Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treatment of Heavy Metals. Ground Water 40 (1):59-66 (2002) Historical storage of ore concentrate containing sulfid...

  14. Hydrogen sorption in metal-polymer composites: The role of interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checchetto, R.; Bazzanella, N.; Miotello, A.; Carotenuto, G.; Nicolais, L.

    2009-04-01

    We studied the hydrogen storage capacity and sorption kinetics of composite materials made of hydride forming metal particles (LaNi5 or Pd, particle size of ˜1 ?m) embedded into hydrogen permeable polymers. Experimental analysis shows that (i) the composite material consisting of LaNi5 particles dispersed into polysiloxane (PS-LaNi5) shows negligible H2 storage capacity while the LaNi5 particles dispersed into polyethylene (PE-LaNi5) are completely hydrogenated and (ii) the Pd particles dispersed both into polysiloxane (PS-Pd) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-Pd) are completely hydrogenated. The interfacial interactions in the PE-LaNi5 and in the PS-Pd composite materials have weak Van der Waals character while strong interfacial interactions occur in the PS-LaNi5 and in the PVP-Pd composites due to the formation of chemical bonds between polymer side groups and the metal surface atoms. Results indicate that in the metal-polymer composites the hydrogenation of the metallic phase cannot be obtained when the interfacial interactions between metal and polymer impede the surface activation of the metallic phase as in the PS-LaNi5 composite.

  15. Supported Molten Metal Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Ravindra; Ma, Yi Hua; Yen, Pei-Shan; Deveau, Nicholas; Fishtik, Ilie; Mardilovich, Ivan

    2013-09-30

    We describe here our results on the feasibility of a novel dense metal membrane for hydrogen separation: Supported Molten Metal Membrane, or SMMM.1 The goal in this work was to develop these new membranes based on supporting thin films of low-melting, non- precious group metals, e.g., tin (Sn), indium (In), gallium (Ga), or their alloys, to provide a flux and selectivity of hydrogen that rivals the conventional but substantially more expensive palladium (Pd) or Pd alloy membranes, which are susceptible to poisoning by the many species in the coal-derived syngas, and further possess inadequate stability and limited operating temperature range. The novelty of the technology presented numerous challenges during the course of this project, however, mainly in the selection of appropriate supports, and in the fabrication of a stable membrane. While the wetting instability of the SMMM remains an issue, we did develop an adequate understanding of the interaction between molten metal films with porous supports that we were able to find appropriate supports. Thus, our preliminary results indicate that the Ga/SiC SMMM at 550 ºC has a permeance that is an order of magnitude higher than that of Pd, and exceeds the 2015 DOE target. To make practical SMM membranes, however, further improving the stability of the molten metal membrane is the next goal. For this, it is important to better understand the change in molten metal surface tension and contact angle as a function of temperature and gas-phase composition. A thermodynamic theory was, thus, developed, that is not only able to explain this change in the liquid-gas surface tension, but also the change in the solid-liquid surface tension as well as the contact angle. This fundamental understanding has allowed us to determine design characteristics to maintain stability in the face of changing gas composition. These designs are being developed. For further progress, it is also important to understand the nature of solution and permeation process in these molten metal membranes. For this, a comprehensive microkinetic model was developed for hydrogen permeation in dense metal membranes, and tested against data for Pd membrane over a broad range of temperatures.3 It is planned to obtain theoretical and experimental estimates of the parameters to corroborate the model against mental results for SMMM.

  16. Chemical Bonding Forces and Metallization of Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan; Hemley, Russell; Carnegie Inst of Washington Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies reveal that compressed molecular hydrogen at 200-350 GPa transforms to layered structures consisting of distorted graphene sheets. The new phases of dense solid hydrogen contrast with the long-held view that symmetric close-packed, ambient alkali-metal-like structures form at these high pressures -this raises the question about the nature and fate of molecular bonding in hydrogen on compression. The realization of such unexpected structures can be explained by consideration of simple low-dimensional model systems- H6 rings and graphene-like monolayers. Both molecular quantum chemistry and well-tested solid state approaches show that these model systems like aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit a special stability, associated with the completely filled set of bonding orbitals or valence bands. This close-shell effect persists in progressing to the real layered structures where it prevents the dielectric energy gap from closing, thus delaying the pressure-induced metallization. The latter nevertheless can occur upon further compression via destroying the closed shell electronic structure which is mainly determined by the 1s electrons. The most likely scenario is the lowering of the bonding bands (their bottoms) stemming from the unoccupied atomic 2s and 2p orbitals. This research was supported by EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DESC0001057.

  17. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  18. Metallic hydrogen: The most powerful rocket fuel yet to exist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Cole, John W.

    2010-03-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metastable metallic hydrogen to rocketry. Metastable metallic hydrogen would be a very light-weight, low volume, powerful rocket propellant. One of the characteristics of a propellant is its specific impulse, Isp. Liquid (molecular) hydrogen-oxygen used in modern rockets has an Isp of ~460s; metallic hydrogen has a theoretical Isp of 1700s! Detailed analysis shows that such a fuel would allow single-stage rockets to enter into orbit or carry economical payloads to the moon. If pure metallic hydrogen is used as a propellant, the reaction chamber temperature is calculated to be greater than 6000 K, too high for currently known rocket engine materials. By diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen or water, the reaction temperature can be reduced, yet there is still a significant performance improvement for the diluted mixture.

  19. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals: A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Frohmber, R. P.; Lewett, R. P.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Walter, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Study includes extensive tests examining effects of hydrogen environment on different high-strength metals and alloys. Recommendations for preventing metal failure include use of hydrogen-resistant coatings and inhibitors. Study includes references to related investigations and discussion of work in progress.

  20. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  1. Noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts for water splitting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Sustainable hydrogen production is an essential prerequisite of a future hydrogen economy. Water electrolysis driven by renewable resource-derived electricity and direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion based on photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting are promising pathways for sustainable hydrogen production. All these techniques require, among many things, highly active noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts to make the water splitting process more energy-efficient and economical. In this review, we highlight the recent research efforts toward the synthesis of noble metal-free electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and their catalytic properties for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We review several important kinds of heterogeneous non-precious metal electrocatalysts, including metal sulfides, metal selenides, metal carbides, metal nitrides, metal phosphides, and heteroatom-doped nanocarbons. In the discussion, emphasis is given to the synthetic methods of these HER electrocatalysts, the strategies of performance improvement, and the structure/composition-catalytic activity relationship. We also summarize some important examples showing that non-Pt HER electrocatalysts could serve as efficient cocatalysts for promoting direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion in both photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting systems, when combined with suitable semiconductor photocatalysts. PMID:25886650

  2. Permeable Reactive Treatment (PeRT) Wall for Rads and Metals. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    Organic and inorganic contamination of groundwater is widespread at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), other federal, and industrial sites. Contamination at a majority of these sites is present in shallow, unconfined aquifers, which may impact human health and the environment. Although there are many treatment methods, for organic contamination, relatively few technologies are effective in treating inorganic contamination, such as metals and radionuclide, in situ. Because metals are commonly adsorbed to clays and organic matter in an aquifer, groundwater pump and treat technology can be expensive and ineffective. Desorption of these metals into the aquifer is a long-term issue, difficult to address. A permeable reactive treatment (PeRT) wall, also referred to as a permeable reactive barrier, is a zone of reactive material that is placed in a contaminated aquifer so that the concentrations of dissolved inorganic contaminants are reduced as the groundwater passes through the material. The reactive material can be emplaced directly in the path of groundwater flow via trenching or injection or as a reactive liner in a landfill. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

  3. Thermochemical Ablation Therapy of VX2 Tumor Using a Permeable Oil-Packed Liquid Alkali Metal

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ziyi; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alkali metal appears to be a promising tool in thermochemical ablation, but, it requires additional data on safety is required. The objective of this study was to explore the effectiveness of permeable oil-packed liquid alkali metal in the thermochemical ablation of tumors. Methods Permeable oil-packed sodium–potassium (NaK) was prepared using ultrasonic mixing of different ratios of metal to oil. The thermal effect of the mixture during ablation of muscle tissue ex vivo was evaluated using the Fluke Ti400 Thermal Imager. The thermochemical effect of the NaK-oil mixture on VX2 tumors was evaluated by performing perfusion CT scans both before and after treatment in 10 VX2 rabbit model tumors. VX2 tumors were harvested from two rabbits immediately after treatment to assess their viability using trypan blue and hematoxylin and eosin (H.E.) staining. Results The injection of the NaK–oil mixture resulted in significantly higher heat in the ablation areas. The permeable oil controlled the rate of heat released during the NaK reaction with water in the living tissue. Perfusion computed tomography and its parameter map confirmed that the NaK–oil mixture had curative effects on VX2 tumors. Both trypan blue and H.E. staining showed partial necrosis of the VX2 tumors. Conclusions The NaK–oil mixture may be used successfully to ablate tumor tissue in vivo. With reference to the controlled thermal and chemical lethal injury to tumors, using a liquid alkali in ablation is potentially an effective and safe method to treat malignant tumors. PMID:25885926

  4. Hydrogen separation membrane on a porous substrate

    DOEpatents

    Song, Sun-Ju (Orland Park, IL); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL); Chen, Ling (Woodridge, IL); Dorris, Stephen E. (LaGrange Park, IL); Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

    2011-06-14

    A hydrogen permeable membrane is disclosed. The membrane is prepared by forming a mixture of metal oxide powder and ceramic oxide powder and a pore former into an article. The article is dried at elevated temperatures and then sintered in a reducing atmosphere to provide a dense hydrogen permeable portion near the surface of the sintered mixture. The dense hydrogen permeable portion has a higher initial concentration of metal than the remainder of the sintered mixture and is present in the range of from about 20 to about 80 percent by volume of the dense hydrogen permeable portion.

  5. Determination of the Darcy permeability of porous media including sintered metal plugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Feng, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Sintered-metal porous plugs with a normal size of the order of 1-10 microns are used to evaluate the Darcy permeability of laminar flow at very small velocities in laminar fluids. Porous media experiment results and data adduced from the literature are noted to support the Darcy law analog for normal fluid convection in the laminar regime. Low temperature results suggest the importance of collecting room temperature data prior to runs at liquid He(4) temperatures. The characteristic length diagram gives a useful picture of the tolerance range encountered with a particular class of porous media.

  6. NOVEL COMPOSITE HYDROGEN-PERMEABLE MEMBRANES FOR NON-THERMAL PLASMA REACTORS FOR THE DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Ji-Jun Zhang; Guibing Zhao; Robyn J. Alcanzare; Linna Wang; Ovid A. Plumb

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Experiments involving methane conversion reactions were conducted with a preliminary pulsed corona discharge reactor design in order to test and improve the reactor and membrane designs using a non-toxic reactant. This report details the direct methane conversion experiments to produce hydrogen, acetylene, and higher hydrocarbons utilizing a co-axial cylinder (CAC) corona discharge reactor, pulsed with a thyratron switch. The reactor was designed to accommodate relatively high flow rates (655 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s) representing a pilot scale easily converted to commercial scale. Parameters expected to influence methane conversion including pulse frequency, charge voltage, capacitance, residence time, and electrode material were investigated. Conversion, selectivity and energy consumption were measured or estimated. C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbon products were analyzed with a residual gas analyzer (RGA). In order to obtain quantitative results, the complex sample spectra were de-convoluted via a linear least squares method. Methane conversion as high as 51% was achieved. The products are typically 50%-60% acetylene, 20% propane, 10% ethane and ethylene, and 5% propylene. First Law thermodynamic energy efficiencies for the system (electrical and reactor) were estimated to range from 38% to 6%, with the highest efficiencies occurring at short residence time and low power input (low specific energy) where conversion is the lowest (less than 5%). The highest methane conversion of 51% occurred at a residence time of 18.8 s with a flow rate of 39.4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s (5 ft{sup 3}/h) and a specific energy of 13,000 J/l using niobium and platinum coated stainless steel tubes as cathodes. Under these conditions, the First Law efficiency for the system was 8%. Under similar reaction conditions, methane conversions were {approx}50% higher with niobium and platinum coated stainless steel cathodes than with a stainless steel cathode.

  7. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-01

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking. PMID:17775040

  8. High-Pressure Multi-Mbar Conductivity Experiments on Hydrogen: The Quest for Solid Metallic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D

    2007-02-07

    Ultra-dense hydrogen has long been the subject of intense experimental and theoretical research due to the fascinating physics which arises from this supposedly simple system. The properties of ultra-dense hydrogen also have important implications for planetary physics, since the interiors of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn are believed to consist of cores of dense, metallic hydrogen. Finally, ultra-dense hydrogen is of direct programmatic interest, and multiple-shock compression experiments on hydrogen to the metallic state have stimulated the accelerated development of new hydrogen equation-of-state (EOS) models used for ICF and other applications. The focus of our research has often been described as the ''Holy Grail'' of high-pressure physics research: The metallization of solid hydrogen. Metallic hydrogen has long been considered to be the prototypical system for the study of insulator-to-metal (I-M) transitions. Although metallic hydrogen (Z=1) may superficially appear to be a very simple material, it is in fact an extremely challenging system for theoretical analysis due to the presence of large zero-point atomic motions and the complete absence of any core electrons. Thus, solid metallic hydrogen promises to be a fascinating material. Among its predicted properties is the possibility of being a high temperature superconductor with a critical temperature T{sub c} of the order of {approx} 100K [1]. The successful metallization of solid hydrogen would be a groundbreaking scientific discovery and open up new frontiers in science and possibly technology as well.

  9. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  10. Metal Dichalcogenides Monolayers: Novel Catalysts for Electrochemical Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Catalyst-driven electrolysis of water is considered as a “cleanest” way for hydrogen production. Finding cheap and abundant catalysts is critical to the large-scale implementation of the technology. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides nanostructures have attracted increasing attention because of their catalytic performances in water electrolysis. In this work, we systematically investigate the hydrogen evolution reduction of metal dichalcogenides monolayers based on density-functional-theory calculations. We find that metal disulfide monolayers show better catalytic performance on hydrogen production than other metal dichalcogenides. We show that their hydrogen evolution reduction strongly depends on the hydrogen coverage and the catalytic performance reduces with the increment of coverage because of hydrogenation-induced lower conductivity. We further show that the catalytic performance of vanadium disulfide monolayer is comparable to that of Pt at lower hydrogen coverage and the performance at higher coverage can be improved by hybridizing with conducting nanomaterials to enhance conductivity. These metal disulfide monolayers with lower overpotentials may apply to water electrolysis for hydrogen production. PMID:24967679

  11. A superconductor to superfluid phase transition in liquid metallic hydrogen

    E-print Network

    Egor Babaev; Asle Sudbo; N. W. Ashcroft

    2004-10-18

    Although hydrogen is the simplest of atoms, it does not form the simplest of solids or liquids. Quantum effects in these phases are considerable (a consequence of the light proton mass) and they have a demonstrable and often puzzling influence on many physical properties, including spatial order. To date, the structure of dense hydrogen remains experimentally elusive. Recent studies of the melting curve of hydrogen indicate that at high (but experimentally accessible) pressures, compressed hydrogen will adopt a liquid state, even at low temperatures. In reaching this phase, hydrogen is also projected to pass through an insulator-to-metal transition. This raises the possibility of new state of matter: a near ground-state liquid metal, and its ordered states in the quantum domain. Ordered quantum fluids are traditionally categorized as superconductors or superfluids; these respective systems feature dissipationless electrical currents or mass flow. Here we report an analysis based on topological arguments of the projected phase of liquid metallic hydrogen, finding that it may represent a new type of ordered quantum fluid. Specifically, we show that liquid metallic hydrogen cannot be categorized exclusively as a superconductor or superfluid. We predict that, in the presence of a magnetic field, liquid metallic hydrogen will exhibit several phase transitions to ordered states, ranging from superconductors to superfluids.

  12. Effects of high pressure hydrogen on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement causes failure of hydrogen storage vessels at and below design pressures of 5000 to 6000 psi. Investigation of thirty-five alloys determines their susceptibility to such embrittlement.

  13. Disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and tritiated hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniazzi, A. B.; Morton, C. S.

    2008-07-15

    Kinectrics and its predecessor company Ontario Hydro Research Div. (a division of Ontario Hydro) had a fully operational tritium laboratory on site since the early 1980's. During those years numerous projects and experiments were undertaken using hydrogen and tritium for the most part. Metals with an affinity for hydrogen are commonly employed as scavengers of hydrogenic gases from process streams or as hydrogen storage mediums. The two most common of these metals used were depleted uranium and a zirconium-iron alloy (SAES St198). The break-up of Ontario Hydro through deregulation activities resulted in the building of a new, smaller, tritium laboratory and the decommissioning of the original tritium laboratory. Decommissioning activities resulted in the need to safely dispose of these reactive metals. Disposal of these metals is not straight forward. For safe, long term, disposal it has been decided to oxidize the metals in a controlled fashion. The oxidized beds, containing the metals, will be sent to a radioactive waste site for long term storage. Options for disposal of tritiated hydrogen gas are presented and discussed. This paper provides a disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and hydrogen thereby closing the loop in tritium handling. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen permeation through metal membrane with protective coating in contact with atomic or ionized hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. M.

    2002-12-01

    The use of protective coatings is one of the most common methods to reduce the hydrogen permeation through structural materials. Considering the hydrogen permeation through such multilayer membrane it is usually suggested that the ratio of hydrogen concentrations at the interface is equal to that of the hydrogen equilibrium solubilities in these materials. However, during diffusion permeation the hydrogen concentrations at the interface are not equilibrium values but they are determined by diffusion input D1/ d1 and output D2/ d2 rates and by passage rate through interface which is proportional to the ratio of equilibrium solubilities S1 and S2 ( di, Di - thickness of and hydrogen diffusivity in i-layer, respectively). Therefore the ratio of hydrogen concentrations at the interface can be adopted by the ratio ( S1D1/ d1)/( S2D2/ d2). By this approximation the analysis of hydrogen permeation through the duplex membrane in a diffusion-limited regime showed that the coating of the same materials can both decrease and increase the hydrogen permeability of the system depending on the ratio of these parameters. In this case it is possible to explain the contradictory results of experiments on hydrogen permeation through duplex membranes.

  15. Hydrogen From MillHydrogen From Mill--Scale Waste Via MetalScale Waste Via Metal--Steam ReformingSteam Reforming INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    1 Hydrogen From MillHydrogen From Mill--Scale Waste Via MetalScale Waste Via Metal--Steam ReformingSteam and supplying hydrogen to the end user in more reversible, much simpler and far safer ways. Metal-steam (N2 as blanket gas at 1atm.) Sodium borohydride: 20°C/ instantaneous (aq. solution) Metal-steam

  16. Electrode formulation to reduce weld metal hydrogen and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1994-12-31

    Residual weld metal hydrogen is a major concern in high strength steel welding, especially when the weld is performed under high cooling rate conditions. In the case of underwater wet welding, weld metal porosity is also of importance because of the water environment. The control of both problems can be achieved by means of pyrochemical reactions in the weld pool. The hydrogen-oxygen reaction and carbon-oxygen reaction are fundamental in the control of residual hydrogen in the weld metal and the amount of gas pores entrapped. A simple model was proposed to estimate weld metal residual hydrogen content by monitoring the weld pool deoxidation reactions. Potent deoxidizers such as aluminum will first react with oxygen in the liquid weld pool, followed by other elements present such as silicon and manganese. Carbon and hydrogen will be the last ones to react with oxygen prior to the iron atoms. The Ellingham-Richardson diagram frequently applied in describing steel and iron making processes was used in the modeling. Following the sequence of deoxidation, the chemical make-up of the gas pores and the amount of each chemical species in the pores could be estimated. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen were determined to be the major components in the weld pores. To minimize the amount of weld metal porosity and residual hydrogen content, specially designed consumables that will control the oxygen potential of the weld pool must be developed.

  17. A Selective, Cell-Permeable Optical Probe for Hydrogen Peroxide in Living Michelle C. Y. Chang, Arnd Pralle, Ehud Y. Isacoff, and Christopher J. Chang*,

    E-print Network

    Pralle, Arnd

    A Selective, Cell-Permeable Optical Probe for Hydrogen Peroxide in Living Cells Michelle C. Y-mail: chrischang@berkeley.edu Hydrogen peroxide is a major reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms for H2O2 as a second messenger in cellular signal transduction.6-8 For example, peroxide bursts trigger

  18. Hydrogen sensors based on catalytic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemyshev, V. I.; Berezine, V.; Bykov, Victor A.; Kiselev, L.; Makhonin, I.; Pevgov, V.; Pustovoy, V.; Semynov, A.; Sencov, Y.; Shkuropat, I.; Shokin, A.

    1999-11-01

    On the base of microelectronical and micromechanical technology were designed and developed converters of hydrogen concentration to electrical signals. The devices of controlling concentration of hydrogen in the air were developed. These devices were applied for ensuring fire and explosion security of complex technological teste of missile oxygen-hydrogen engine, developed for cryogenic accelerations block. The sensor block of such device was installed directly on the armor-plate, to which was attached tested engine.

  19. Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhakainen, Kati

    Metal hydride materials have been intensively studied for hydrogen storage applications. In addition to potential hydrogen economy applications, metal hydrides offer a wide variety of other interesting properties. For example, hydrogen-dominant materials, which are hydrides with the highest hydrogen content for a particular metal/semimetal composition, are predicted to display high-temperature superconductivity. On the other side of the spectrum are hydrides with small amounts of hydrogen (0.1 - 1 at.%) that are investigated as viable magnetic, thermoelectric or semiconducting materials. Research of metal hydride materials is generally important to gain fundamental understanding of metal-hydrogen interactions in materials. Hydrogenation of Zintl phases, which are defined as compounds between an active metal (alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth) and a p-block metal/semimetal, were attempted by a hot sintering method utilizing an autoclave loaded with gaseous hydrogen (< 9 MPa). Hydride formation competes with oxidative decomposition of a Zintl phase. The oxidative decomposition, which leads to a mixture of binary active metal hydride and p-block element, was observed for investigated aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) containing Zintl phases. However, a new phase Li2Al was discovered when Zintl phase precursors were synthesized. Using the single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD), the Li2Al was found to crystallize in an orthorhombic unit cell (Cmcm) with the lattice parameters a = 4.6404(8) Å, b = 9.719(2) Å, and c = 4.4764(8) Å. Increased demand for materials with improved properties necessitates the exploration of alternative synthesis methods. Conventional metal hydride synthesis methods, like ball-milling and autoclave technique, are not responding to the demands of finding new materials. A viable alternative synthesis method is the application of high pressure for the preparation of hydrogen-dominant materials. Extreme pressures in the gigapascal ranges can open access to new metal hydrides with novel structures and properties, because of the drastically increased chemical potential of hydrogen. Pressures up to 10 GPa can be easily achieved using the multi-anvil (MA) hydrogenations while maintaining sufficient sample volume for structure and property characterization. Gigapascal MA hydrogenations using ammonia borane (BH3hydrogen source were employed in the search for new hydrogen-dominant materials. Ammonia borane has high gravimetric volume of hydrogen, and additionally the thermally activated decomposition at high pressures lead to a complete hydrogen release at reasonably low temperature. These properties make ammonia borane a desired hydrogen source material. The missing member Li2PtH6 of the series of A2PtH6 compounds (A = Na to Cs) was accessed by employing MA technique. As the known heavier analogs, the Li2PtH6 also crystallizes in a cubic K2PtCl6-type structure with a cell edge length of 6.7681(3) Å. Further gigapascal hydrogenations afforded the compounds K2SiH6 and Rb2SiH6 which are isostructural to Li2PtH6. The cubic K2SiH6 and Rb2SiH6 are built from unique hypervalent SiH62 entities with the lattice parameters of 7.8425(9) and 8.1572(4) Å, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of hexasilicides confirmed the presence of hypervalent bonding. The Si-H stretching frequencies at 1550 cm-1 appeared considerably decreased in comparison with a normal-valent (2e2c) Si-H stretching frequencies in SiH4 at around 2200 cm-1. However, the observed stretching modes in hypervalent hexasilicides were in a reasonable agreement with Ph3SiH2- (1520 cm-1) where the hydrogen has the axial (3e4c bonded) position in the trigoal bipyramidal environment.

  20. Interactions of hydrogen isotopes and oxides with metal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G. R.; Cleaver, J.

    2008-07-15

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results. (authors)

  1. Interactions of Hydrogen Isotopes and Oxides with Metal Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2008-08-01

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results.

  2. Graphenes in the absence of metals as carbocatalysts for selective acetylene hydrogenation and alkene hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Primo, Ana; Neatu, Florentina; Florea, Mihaela; Parvulescu, Vasile; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2014-01-01

    Catalysis makes possible a chemical reaction by increasing the transformation rate. Hydrogenation of carbon-carbon multiple bonds is one of the most important examples of catalytic reactions. Currently, this type of reaction is carried out in petrochemistry at very large scale, using noble metals such as platinum and palladium or first row transition metals such as nickel. Catalysis is dominated by metals and in many cases by precious ones. Here we report that graphene (a single layer of one-atom-thick carbon atoms) can replace metals for hydrogenation of carbon-carbon multiple bonds. Besides alkene hydrogenation, we have shown that graphenes also exhibit high selectivity for the hydrogenation of acetylene in the presence of a large excess of ethylene. PMID:25342228

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A NON-NOBLE METAL HYDROGEN PURIFICATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; Kyle Brinkman, K; Thad Adams, T; George Rawls, G

    2008-11-25

    Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focus of the reported work was to develop a scaled reactor with a VNi-Ti alloy membrane to replace a production Pd-alloy tube-type purification/diffuser system.

  4. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  5. Geochemistry of a permeable reactive barrier for metals and acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, S.G.; Blowes, D.W.; Herbert, R.B. Jr.; Ptacek, C.J.; Gould, W.D.

    1999-08-15

    A permeable reactive barrier, designed to remove metals and generate alkalinity by promoting sulfate reduction and metal sulfide precipitation, was installed in August 1995 into an aquifer containing effluent from mine tailings. Passage of groundwater through the barrier results in striking improvement in water quality. Dramatic changes in concentrations of SO{sub 4}, Fe, trace metals, and alkalinity are observed. Populations of sulfate reducing bacteria are 10,000 times greater, and bacterial activity, as measured by dehydrogenase activity, is 10 times higher within the barrier compared to the up-gradient aquifer. Dissolved sulfide concentrations increase by 0.2--120 mg/L, and the isotope {sup 34}S is enriched relative to {sup 32}S in the dissolved phase SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} within the barrier. Water chemistry, coupled with geochemical speciation modeling, indicates the pore water in the barrier becomes supersaturated with respect to amorphous Fe sulfide. Solid phase analysis of the reactive mixture indicates the accumulation of Fe monosulfide precipitates. Shifts in the saturated states of carbonate, sulfate, and sulfide minerals and most of the observed changes in water chemistry in the barrier and down-gradient aquifer can be attributed, either directly or indirectly, to bacterially mediated sulfate reduction.

  6. Influence of gaseous hydrogen on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Tensile, fracture toughness, threshold stress intensity for sustained-load crack growth, and cyclic and sustained load crack growth rate measurements were performed on a number of alloys in high-pressure hydrogen and helium environments. The results of tensile tests performed in 34.5 MN/m2 (5000 psi) hydrogen indicated that Inconel 625 was considerable embrittled at ambient temperature but was not embrittled at 144 K (-200 F). The tensile properties of AISI 321 stainless steel were slightly reduced at ambient temperature and 144 K (-200 F). The tensile properties of Ti-5Al-2.5 Sn ELI were essentially unaffected by hydrogen at 144 K (-200 F). OFHC copper was not embrittled by hydrogen at ambient temperature or at 144 K (-200 F).

  7. Technology for gelled liquid cryogenic propellants - Metallized hydrogen/aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkovich, John; Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    The theoretical basis for solid-loaded or densified liquid hydrogen propellants for advanced space applications is outlined. Metallized propellants make it possible to increase the safety of propulsion systems as well as the payloads of future vehicles. Nanogellant formulated liquid hydrogen gels and other fuel gels are characterized by excellent settling stability, low yield point, and a high shear thinning index which makes them attractive for propulsion applications.

  8. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation From Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation From Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming Abdul of certain metals with steam, called metal- steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not gen- erate any: hydrogen generation; metal-steam reform- ing; mill-scale; nanoscale iron; electron microscopy Hydrogen

  9. Composite hydrogen separation element and module

    DOEpatents

    Edlund, D.J.

    1996-03-12

    There are disclosed improvements in multicomponent composite metal membranes useful for the separation of hydrogen, the improvements comprising the provision of a flexible porous intermediate layer between a support layer and a nonporous hydrogen-permeable coating metal layer, and the provision of a textured coating metal layer. 15 figs.

  10. Composite hydrogen separation element and module

    DOEpatents

    Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR)

    1996-03-12

    There are disclosed improvements in multicomponent composite metal membranes useful for the separation of hydrogen, the improvements comprising the provision of a flexible porous intermediate layer between a support layer and a nonporous hydrogen-permeable coating metal layer, and the provision of a textured coating metal layer.

  11. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J.; Wolden, Colin

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo{sub 2}C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo{sub 2}C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo{sub 2}C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo{sub 2}C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo{sub 2}C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H{sub 2} flux of 238 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ?99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi. However, during testing of a Mo{sub 2}C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with the 2010 DOE target flux. Lastly, the Mo{sub 2}C/V composite membranes were shown to be stable for at least 168 hours = one week, including cycling at high temperature and alternating He/H{sub 2} exposure.

  12. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1990-08-28

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

  13. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

  14. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  15. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

  16. Ultra-low percolation threshold in ferrite-metal cofired ceramics brings both high permeability and high permittivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Bai, Yang; Lu, Xuefei; Cao, Jiang-Li; Qiao, Li-Jie

    2015-01-01

    High permeability and high permittivity are hard to be achieved simultaneously, either in single-phased materials or in composite materials, such as ferrite-ferroelectric ceramic composites and ferrite-metal percolative composites. In this work, ultra-low percolation threshold is achieved in NiZnCu ferrite-Ag cofired ceramics, which endows the composite with both high permeability and high permittivity by minimizing the negative effect of nonmagnetic conductive fillers on magnetic properties. The percolation threshold is controlled by the temperature matching between ferrite densification and Ag melting. A thin and long percolative net forms between large ferrite grains under a proper cofiring process, which brings a low percolation threshold of 1.21vol%, more than one order of magnitude lower than the theoretical value of 16vol%. Near the ultra-low threshold, the composite exhibits a high permeability of 585 and a high permittivity of 78. PMID:25557935

  17. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gulseren,1,2

    E-print Network

    Yildirim, Taner

    Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gu of carbon nanotubes undergo dramatic changes with hydrogen chemisorption from first principle calculations other isomers can be insulating. For both zigzag and armchair nanotubes, hydrogenation of each carbon

  18. HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF METALS: A PRIMER FOR THE FAILURE ANALYST

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M

    2008-01-31

    Hydrogen reduces the service life of many metallic components. Such reductions may be manifested as blisters, as a decrease in fatigue resistance, as enhanced creep, as the precipitation of a hydride phase and, most commonly, as unexpected, macroscopically brittle failure. This unexpected, brittle fracture is commonly termed hydrogen embrittlement. Frequently, hydrogen embrittlement occurs after the component has been is service for a period of time and much of the resulting fracture surface is distinctly intergranular. Many failures, particularly of high strength steels, are attributed to hydrogen embrittlement simply because the failure analyst sees intergranular fracture in a component that served adequately for a significant period of time. Unfortunately, simply determining that a failure is due to hydrogen embrittlement or some other form of hydrogen induced damage is of no particular help to the customer unless that determination is coupled with recommendations that provide pathways to avoid such damage in future applications. This paper presents qualitative and phenomenological descriptions of the hydrogen damage processes and outlines several metallurgical recommendations that may help reduce the susceptibility of a particular component or system to the various forms of hydrogen damage.

  19. Using Hydrogen Balloons to Display Metal Ion Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, James H.

    2008-01-01

    We have optimized a procedure for igniting hydrogen-filled balloons containing metal salts to obtain the brightest possible flash while minimizing the quantity of airborne combustion products. We report air quality measurements in a lecture hall immediately after the demonstration. While we recommend that this demonstration be done outdoors or in…

  20. TRANSITION METAL ACTIVATION AND FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON-HYDROGEN BONDS

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    TRANSITION METAL ACTIVATION AND FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON-HYDROGEN BONDS William D. Jones-H and C-C bond functionalization, and (4) carbon-fluorine bond activation. We have made progress in each in our proposal where we have had success. These include: (1) carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions, (2

  1. The metallization and superconductivity of dense hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yinwei Hao, Jian; Li, Yanling; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming

    2014-05-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a prototype molecular system and a sister molecule of water (H{sub 2}O). The phase diagram of solid H{sub 2}S at high pressures remains largely unexplored arising from the challenges in dealing with the pressure-induced weakening of S–H bond and larger atomic core difference between H and S. Metallization is yet achieved for H{sub 2}O, but it was observed for H{sub 2}S above 96 GPa. However, the metallic structure of H{sub 2}S remains elusive, greatly impeding the understanding of its metallicity and the potential superconductivity. We have performed an extensive structural study on solid H{sub 2}S at pressure ranges of 10–200 GPa through an unbiased structure prediction method based on particle swarm optimization algorithm. Besides the findings of candidate structures for nonmetallic phases IV and V, we are able to establish stable metallic structures violating an earlier proposal of elemental decomposition into sulfur and hydrogen [R. Rousseau, M. Boero, M. Bernasconi, M. Parrinello, and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1254 (2000)]. Our study unravels a superconductive potential of metallic H{sub 2}S with an estimated maximal transition temperature of ?80 K at 160 GPa, higher than those predicted for most archetypal hydrogen-containing compounds (e.g., SiH{sub 4}, GeH{sub 4}, etc.)

  2. A crossover from metal to plasma in dense fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, Tomonari; Sekino, Hideo

    2006-11-01

    Thermodynamic properties in dense fluid hydrogen are studied by using a density-functional theory for electron-proton binary mixtures that is called quantal hypernetted-chain (QHNC) integral equation. A nonlocal approximation for the exchange-correlation potential in a finite-temperature Kohn-Sham equation is presented. Results obtained from the QHNC with the nonlocal approximation are compared with those obtained from the QHNC with a local density approximation. Temperature variation of thermodynamic quantities between 104 and 106K are investigated along an isochor specified by a dimensionless density parameter of rs=0.5. These quantities obtained from the QHNCs show that a crossover from metal to plasma occurs around a temperature of T =1.78×105K. Electrical resistivity Re of the dense fluid hydrogen evaluated from a Ziman formula [The Properties of Liquid Metals, edited by S. Takenohi (Wiley, New York, 1973)] extended to finite temperature is about 0.7??cm at T =104K. The dense fluid hydrogen at the temperature can be considered as a metallic fluid, because the value is smaller than typical values of Re in alkali metals at room temperature. The Re slightly increases with the temperature increase, and the temperature valuation of Re is monotonic. We clearly show that the contribution from the electronic excited states plays an important role for the sharp crossover from the metal to the plasma, and that the crossover is interpreted as a crossover from degenerate electron gas to nondegenerate electron gas.

  3. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%. PMID:23437664

  4. On-board hydrogen storage system using metal hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1997-07-01

    A hydrogen powered hybrid electric bus has been developed for demonstration in normal city bus service in the City of Augusta, Georgia, USA. The development team, called H2Fuel Bus Team, consists of representatives from government, industry and research institutions. The bus uses hydrogen to fuel an internal combustion engine which drives an electric generator. The generator charges a set of batteries which runs the electric bus. The hydrogen fuel and the hybrid concept combine to achieve the goal of near-zero emission and high fuel efficiency. The hydrogen fuel is stored in a solid form using an on-board metal hydride storage system. The system was designed for a hydrogen capacity of 25 kg. It uses the engine coolant for heat to generate a discharge pressure higher than 6 atm. The operation conditions are temperature from ambient to 70 degrees C, hydrogen discharge rate to 6 kg/hr, and refueling time 1.5 hours. Preliminary tests showed that the performance of the on-board storage system exceeded the design requirements. Long term tests have been planned to begin in 2 months. This paper discusses the design and performance of the on-board hydrogen storage system.

  5. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; Wang, Tiefeng

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo?C and Ni/Mo?C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO? for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO?, Mo?C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo?C could be completely regenerated by H? treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo?C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Nimore »modified Mo?C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo?C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO?. Compared to Pd/SiO?, both Mo?C and Ni/Mo?C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.« less

  6. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; Wang, Tiefeng

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo?C and Ni/Mo?C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO? for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO?, Mo?C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo?C could be completely regenerated by H? treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo?C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Ni modified Mo?C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo?C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO?. Compared to Pd/SiO?, both Mo?C and Ni/Mo?C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.

  7. Interplay between metal???? interactions and hydrogen bonds: some unusual synergetic effects of coinage metals and substituents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Jianbo; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Loffredo, Robert E

    2013-10-01

    The ternary systems of C(2)H(4) (C(2)H(2) or C(6)H(6))-MCN-HF (M=Cu, Ag, Au) and the respective binary systems were investigated to study the interplay between metal???? interactions and hydrogen bonds. The metal???? interactions in C(2)H(4)-MCN become stronger with the irregular order Aghydrogen bonds in MCN-HF become weaker following the same order. The metal???? interactions are weakened as the H atoms in the ? system are replaced with electron-withdrawing groups and enhanced by electron-donating groups. Type 1 of these ternary systems, in which MCN acts as Lewis base and acid simultaneously, is more stable than type 2, in which C(2)H(4) acts as a double Lewis base. Negative cooperativity is present in type 2 ternary systems with a weakening of the metal???? interactions and the hydrogen bonds. Positive cooperativity is found in type 1 ternary systems with an enhancement of the metal???? interactions and the hydrogen bonds, except for C(2)(CN)(4)-AuCN-HF-1. The weaker metal???? interaction in C(6)H(6)-AuCN has a greater enhancing effect on the hydrogen bond in AuCN-HF than those in C(2)H(4)-AuCN and C(2)H(2)-AuCN. These synergetic effects were analyzed with the natural bond orbital and energy decomposition. PMID:23893522

  8. Noble-metal-free plasmonic photocatalyst: hydrogen doped semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangchao; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2014-01-01

    The unique capacity of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) offers a new opportunity to overcome the limited efficiency of semiconductor photocatalyst. Here we unravel that LSPR, which usually occurs in noble metal nanoparticles, can be realized by hydrogen doping in noble-metal-free semiconductor using TiO2 as a model photocatalyst. Moreover, its LSPR is located in infrared region, which supplements that of noble metal whose LSPR is generally in the visible region, making it possible to extend the light response of photocatalyst to infrared region. The near field enhancement is shown to be comparable with that of noble-metal nanoparticles, indicating that highly enhanced light absorption rate can be expected. The present work can provide a key guideline for the creation of highly efficient noble-metal-free plasmonic photocatalysts and have a much wider impact in infrared bioimaging and spectroscopy where infrared LSPR is essential. PMID:24496400

  9. Investigation of heat and mass transfer process in metal hydride hydrogen storage reactors, suitable for a solar powered water pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldea, I.; Popeneciu, G.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Blanita, G.; Ardelean, O.

    2012-02-01

    The paper analyzes heat and mass transfer process in metal hydride hydrogen storage systems as key element in the development of a solar powered pump system. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of the developed reactors are investigated according to the type of metal alloys, the metal hydride bed parameters and system operating conditions. To reach the desired goal, some metal hydride from groups AB5 and AB2 were synthesized and characterized using elements substitution for tailoring their properties: reversible hydrogen absorption capacity between the hydrogen absorption and desorption pressures at equilibrium at small temperature differences. For the designed hydrogen storage reactors, a new technical solution which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity of MH bed and good permeability to hydrogen gas circulation, was implemented and tested. The results permitted us to develop a heat engine with metal hydride, the main element of the functional model of a heat operated metal hydride based water pumping system using solar energy. This is a free energy system able to deliver water, at a convenience flow and pressure, in remote places without conventional energy access.

  10. Nanoparticulate gellants for metallized gelled liquid hydrogen with aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Starkovich, John; Adams, Scott

    1996-01-01

    Gelled liquid hydrogen was experimentally formulated using sol-gel technology. As a follow-on to work with cryogenic simulants, hydrogen was gelled with an alkoxide material: BTMSE. Initial results demonstrated that gellants with a specific surface area of 1000 m(exp 2)/g could be repeatably fabricated. Gelled hexane and metallized gelled hexane (with 13.8-wt% Al) were produced. Propellant settling testing was conducted for acceleration levels of 2 to 10 times normal gravity and a minimum gellant percentage was determined for stable gelled hexane and metalized gelled hexane. A cryogenic capillary rheometer was also designed, constructed, and used to determine the viscosity of gelled hydrogen. Small volumes of liquid hydrogen were gelled with a 7- to 8-wt% gellant level. The gelled H2 viscosity was 1.5 to 3.7 times that of liquid hydrogen: 0.048 to 0.116 mPa-s versus 0.03 mPa-s for liquid H2 (at 16 K and approximately 1 atm pressure).

  11. Hydrogen and Materials: Influence of the Hydrogen Environment on the Metallic Materials Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lamani, Emil; Jouinot, Patrice

    2010-01-21

    The materials sensitivity to hydrogen is studied and measured in this work using the disk pressure testing, whose principle is the comparison of the rupture parameters obtained with metallic membranes tested similarly under helium and hydrogen. Such technique allows various studies and reveals parameters that remain not significant with less sensitive methods. This work presents an overview of numerous experimental results concerning the influence of various factors (material and gas composition, mechanical and heat treatments, type of microstructure...) on the hydrogen embrittlement of ferrous and nonferrous alloys. There are shown synergies between such factors, related to physical and metallurgical phenomena and we give some practical considerations, which can be useful for the evaluation of the safety offered by different materials in contact with hydrogen and for searching ways to improve their behavior.

  12. Hydrogen evolution from water through metal sulfide reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2013-11-28

    Transition metal sulfides play an important catalytic role in many chemical reactions. In this work, we have conducted a careful computational study of the structures, electronic states, and reactivity of metal sulfide cluster anions M{sub 2}S{sub X}{sup ?} (M = Mo and W, X = 4–6) using density functional theory. Detailed structural analysis shows that these metal sulfide anions have ground state isomers with two bridging sulfide bonds, notably different in some cases from the corresponding oxides with the same stoichiometry. The chemical reactivity of these metal sulfide anions with water has also been carried out. After a thorough search on the reactive potential energy surface, we propose several competitive, energetically favorable, reaction pathways that lead to the evolution of hydrogen. Selectivity in the initial water addition and subsequent hydrogen migration are found to be the key steps in all the proposed reaction channels. Initial adsorption of water is most favored involving a terminal metal sulfur bond in Mo{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup ?} isomers whereas the most preferred orientation for water addition involves a bridging metal sulfur bond in the case of W{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup ?} and M{sub 2}S{sub 5}{sup ?} isomers. In all the lowest energy H{sub 2} elimination steps, the interacting hydrogen atoms involve a metal hydride and a metal hydroxide (or thiol) group. We have also observed a higher energy reaction channel where the interacting hydrogen atoms in the H{sub 2} elimination step involve a thiol (–SH) and a hydroxyl (–OH) group. For all the reaction pathways, the Mo sulfide reactions involve a higher barrier than the corresponding W analogues. We observe for both metals that reactions of M{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup ?} and M{sub 2}S{sub 5}{sup ?} clusters with water to liberate H{sub 2} are exothermic and involve modest free energy barriers. However, the reaction of water with M{sub 2}S{sub 6}{sup ?} is highly endothermic with a considerable barrier due to saturation of the local bonding environment.

  13. Hot Hydrogen Testing of Refractory Metals and Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Cohron, Jon

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a technique with which refractory metal carbide samples can be exposed to hydrogen containing gases at high temperatures, and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate processes involved in hydrogen degradation in these materials. Five types of carbides were examined including WC, NbC, HfC, ZrC, and TaC. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. The temperature range investigated was from 850 to 1600 C with a hydrogen pressure of one atmosphere. Control experiments, in vacuum, were also conducted for comparison so that the net effects due to hydrogen could be isolated. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. Gas samples were collected in selected experiments and analyzed using gas chromography. Characterization of the resulting microstructure after exposure to hydrogen was conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. It was found that all samples lost weight after exposure, both in hydrogen and vacuum. Results from the microstructure analyses show that the degradation processes are different among the five types of ceramics involved. In addition, the apparent activation energy for the degradation process is a function of temperature even within the same material. This indicates that there are more than one mechanism involved in each material, and that the mechanisms are temperature dependent.

  14. Thermal method for fabricating a hydrogen separation membrane on a porous substrate

    DOEpatents

    Song, Sun-Ju (Orland Park, IL); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL); Chen, Ling (Woodridge, IL); Dorris, Stephen E. (LaGrange Park, IL); Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

    2009-10-20

    A thermal method of making a hydrogen permeable composition is disclosed. A mixture of metal oxide powder and ceramic oxide powder and optionally a pore former is formed and pressed to form an article. The article is dried at elevated temperatures and then sintered in a reducing atmosphere to provide a dense hydrogen permeable portion near the surface of the sintered mixture. The dense hydrogen permeable portion has a higher initial concentration of metal than the remainder of the sintered mixture and is present in the range of from about 20 to about 80 percent by volume of the dense hydrogen permeable portion.

  15. Metal-free transfer hydrogenation of olefins via dehydrocoupling catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Manuel; Caputo, Christopher B.; Dobrovetsky, Roman; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    A major advance in main-group chemistry in recent years has been the emergence of the reactivity of main-group species that mimics that of transition metal complexes. In this report, the Lewis acidic phosphonium salt [(C6F5)3PF][B(C6F5)4] 1 is shown to catalyze the dehydrocoupling of silanes with amines, thiols, phenols, and carboxylic acids to form the Si-E bond (E = N, S, O) with the liberation of H2 (21 examples). This catalysis, when performed in the presence of a series of olefins, yields the concurrent formation of the products of dehydrocoupling and transfer hydrogenation of the olefin (30 examples). This reactivity provides a strategy for metal-free catalysis of olefin hydrogenations. The mechanisms for both catalytic reactions are proposed and supported by experiment and density functional theory calculations. PMID:25002489

  16. Air-stable magnesium nanocomposites provide rapid and high-capacity hydrogen storage without using heavy-metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ki-Joon; Moon, Hoi Ri; Ruminski, Anne M; Jiang, Bin; Kisielowski, Christian; Bardhan, Rizia; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen is a promising alternative energy carrier that can potentially facilitate the transition from fossil fuels to sources of clean energy because of its prominent advantages such as high energy density (142 MJ kg(-1); ref. 1), great variety of potential sources (for example water, biomass, organic matter), light weight, and low environmental impact (water is the sole combustion product). However, there remains a challenge to produce a material capable of simultaneously optimizing two conflicting criteria--absorbing hydrogen strongly enough to form a stable thermodynamic state, but weakly enough to release it on-demand with a small temperature rise. Many materials under development, including metal-organic frameworks, nanoporous polymers, and other carbon-based materials, physisorb only a small amount of hydrogen (typically 1-2 wt%) at room temperature. Metal hydrides were traditionally thought to be unsuitable materials because of their high bond formation enthalpies (for example MgH(2) has a ?Hf~75 kJ mol(-1)), thus requiring unacceptably high release temperatures resulting in low energy efficiency. However, recent theoretical calculations and metal-catalysed thin-film studies have shown that microstructuring of these materials can enhance the kinetics by decreasing diffusion path lengths for hydrogen and decreasing the required thickness of the poorly permeable hydride layer that forms during absorption. Here, we report the synthesis of an air-stable composite material that consists of metallic Mg nanocrystals (NCs) in a gas-barrier polymer matrix that enables both the storage of a high density of hydrogen (up to 6 wt% of Mg, 4 wt% for the composite) and rapid kinetics (loading in <30 min at 200 °C). Moreover, nanostructuring of the Mg provides rapid storage kinetics without using expensive heavy-metal catalysts. PMID:21399630

  17. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  18. Role of exposed metal sites in hydrogen storage in MOFs.

    PubMed

    Vitillo, Jenny G; Regli, Laura; Chavan, Sachin; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Spoto, Giuseppe; Dietzel, Pascal D C; Bordiga, Silvia; Zecchina, Adriano

    2008-07-01

    The role of exposed metal sites in increasing the H2 storage performances in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been investigated by means of IR spectrometry. Three MOFs have been considered: MOF-5, with unexposed metal sites, and HKUST-1 and CPO-27-Ni, with exposed Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), respectively. The onset temperature of spectroscopic features associated with adsorbed H2 correlates with the adsorption enthalpy obtained by the VTIR method and with the shift experienced by the H-H stretching frequency. This relationship can be ascribed to the different nature and accessibility of the metal sites. On the basis of a pure energetic evaluation, it was observed that the best performance was shown by CPO-27-Ni that exhibits also an initial adsorption enthalpy of -13.5 kJ mol(-1), the highest yet observed for a MOF. Unfortunately, upon comparison of the hydrogen amounts stored at high pressure, the hydrogen capacities in these conditions are mostly dependent on the surface area and total pore volume of the material. This means that if control of MOF surface area can benefit the total stored amounts, only the presence of a great number of strong adsorption sites can make the (P, T) storage conditions more economically favorable. These observations lead to the prediction that efficient H2 storage by physisorption can be obtained by increasing the surface density of strong adsorption sites. PMID:18533719

  19. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Scott; Bridgewater, Jon S; Ward, John W; Allen, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is exothermically absorbed in many transition metals, all rare earths and the actinides. The hydrogen gas adsorbs, dissociates and diffuses into these metals as atomic hydrogen. Absorbed hydrogen is generally detrimental to Pu, altering its properties and greatly enhancing corrosion. Measuring the heat of solution of hydrogen in Pu and its alloys provides significant insight into the thermodynamics driving these changes. Hydrogen is present in all Pu metal unless great care is taken to avoid it. Heats of solution and formation are provided along with evidence for spinodal decomposition.

  20. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  1. Photobiotechnology: Algal hydrogen production and photoconductivity of metalized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1991-01-01

    Sustained hydrogen photoevolution from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and C. moewusii was measured under an anoxic, CO{sub 2}-containing atmosphere. It has been discovered that light intensity and temperature influence the partitioning of reductant between the hydrogen photoevolution pathway and the Calvin cycle. Under low incident light intensity (1-3 W m{sup {minus}2}) or low temperature (approx. O{degrees}C), the flow of photosynthetic reductant to the Calvin cycle was reduced, and reductant was partitioned to the hydrogen pathway as evidenced by sustained H{sub 2} photoevolution. Under saturating light (25 W m{sup {minus}2}) and moderate temperature 20 {plus minus} 5{degrees}C, the Calvin cycle became the absolute sink for reductant with the exception of a burst of H{sub 2} occurring at light on. A novel photobiophysical phenomenon was observed in isolated spinach chloroplasts that were metalized by precipitating colloidal platinum onto the surface of the thylakoid membranes. A two-point irradiation and detection system was constructed in which a continuous beam helium-neon laser ({lambda} = 632.8 nm) was used to irradiate the platinized chloroplasts at varying perpendicular distances from a single linear platinum electrode in pressure contact with the platinized chloroplasts. No external voltage bias was applied to the system. The key objective of the experiments reported in this report was to measure the relative photoconductivity of the chloroplast-metal composite matrix. 46 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  3. Hydrogen and helium entrapment in flowing liquid metal plasma-facing surfaces

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Hydrogen and helium entrapment in flowing liquid metal plasma-facing surfaces Ahmed Hassanein. Hydrogen isotope (DT) particles are likely be trapped in the liquid metal surface (e.g., lithium) due liquid metal surfaces offer sig- nificant advantages over the standard solid components. However

  4. Transport properties of liquid metal hydrogen under high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. C.; March, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    A theory is developed for the compressibility and transport properties of liquid metallic hydrogen, near to its melting point and under high pressure. The interionic force law is assumed to be of the screened Coulomb type, because hydrogen has no core electrons. The random phase approximation is used to obtain the structure factor S(k) of the system in terms of the Fourier transform of this force law. The long wavelenth limit of the structure factor S(o) is related to the compressibility, which is much lower than that of alkali metals at their melting points. The diffusion constant at the melting point is obtained in terms of the Debye frequency, using a frequency spectrum analogous with the phonon spectrum of a solid. A similar argument is used to obtain the combined shear and bulk viscosities, but these depend also on S(o). The transport coefficients are found to be about the same size as those of alkali metals at their melting points.

  5. Capture of liquid hydrogen boiloff with metal hydride absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosso, M. J.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure which uses metal hydrides to capture some of this low pressure (,1 psig) hydrogen for subsequent reliquefaction is described. Of the five normally occurring sources of boil-off vapor the stream associated with the off-loading of liquid tankers during dewar refill was identified as the most cost effective and readily recoverable. The design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept capture device, operating at a rate that is commensurate with the evolution of vapor by the target stream, is described. Liberation of the captured hydrogen gas at pressure .15 psig at normal temperatures (typical liquefier compressor suction pressure) are also demonstrated. A payback time of less than three years is projected.

  6. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen.

    PubMed

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A; Ceperley, David M; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3) a0. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin's GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results. PMID:26590549

  7. Phase separation of metallic hydrogen-helium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Beck, H.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the thermodynamic functions and phase separation boundaries of solid metallic hydrogen helium alloys at temperatures between 0 K and 19,000 K and at pressures between 15 and 90 megabars. Expressions for the band structure energy of a randomly disordered alloy (including third order in the electron ion interaction) are derived and evaluated. Short and long range order are included by the quasi-chemical method, and lattice dynamics in the virtual crystal harmonic approximation. We conclude that at temperatures below 4,000 K there is complete phase separation of hydrogen helium alloys, and that a miscibility gap remains at the highest temperatures and pressures considered. The relevance of these results to models of the deep interior of Jupiter is briefly discussed.

  8. A coupled theory for diffusion of hydrogen and large elastic-plastic deformations of metals

    E-print Network

    Di Leo, Claudio V

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamically-consistent coupled-theory which accounts for diffusion of hydrogen, trapping of hydrogen, diffusion of heat, and large elastic-plastic deformations of metals is developed. Our theoretical framework ...

  9. High strength cored wire weld metal hydrogen content, and weld metal cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hannerz, N.E.; Xu, L.C.

    1993-12-31

    Cored wires for high strength steel were tested for weld metal cracking with the G-BOP (Gap Bead on Plate) test. In all, 29 wires were gathered to yield rather a broad mixture of types and strength levels. Ten rutile, twelve basic flux cored wires, and seven metal cored wires were tested. G-BOP testing was performed at ambient but also at higher temperatures so that the preheating temperature could be evaluated. Gas shielding was used, wire diameter being 1.2 and 1.6 mm. Strength class of the wires varied from AWS E70 up to AWS E110. Altogether some 180 welds were studied for weld cracking, cracked bead area ranging from 2 to 100%. The 10% cracking preheat temperature, i.e., the temperature that might be recommended for practical welding ranged from ambient up to 150 C, at an arc energy of 1 kJ/mm. Distinct correlations were found between hydrogen content, weld metal carbon equivalent, heat input and tendency for cracking. Thus, from a weld metal cracking point of view, preheat and interpass temperatures must be considered important when going to low E{sub w} steels, like spray cooled TMCP steels, QT steels and the like. Hydrogen content varied from 1.45 ml/100 g of as deposited weld metal up to 14.8 ml/100 g, rutile wires yielding the highest hydrogen content. Weld metals within the strength classes AWS E90 to AWS E110 generally have low hydrogen content and basic flux formulation.

  10. Metal-Hydrogen Phase Diagrams in the Vicinity of Melting Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I.

    1999-01-06

    Hydrogen-metal interaction phenomena belong to the most exciting challenges of today's physical metallurgy and physics of solids due to the uncommon behavior of hydrogen in condensed media and to the need for understanding hydrogen's strong negative impact on properties of some high-strength steels and.alloys. The paper cites and summarizes research data on fundamental thermodynamic characteristics of hydrogen in some metals that absorb it endothermally at elevated temperatures. For a number of metal-hydrogen systems, information on some phase diagrams previously not available to the English-speaking scientific community is presented.

  11. Microscopic characterization of metal-carbon-hydrogen composites (metal = Li, Mg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Shigehito; Yamada, Sumito; Wang, Yongming; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei; Miyaoka, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2013-09-01

    Li-C-H system, which can store about 5.0 mass% of rechargeable H2, has been reported as a promising hydrogen storage system by Ichikawa et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 241914 (2005); Mater. Trans. 46, 1757 (2005)]. This system was investigated from the thermodynamic and structural viewpoints. However, hydrogen absorption/desorption mechanism and the state of hydrogen atoms absorbed in the composite have not been clarified yet. In order to find new or better hydrogen storage system, graphite powder and nano-structural graphite ball-milled under H2 and Ar atmosphere were prepared and milled with Li and Mg under Ar atmosphere in this study. Microstructural analysis for those samples by transmission electron microscope revealed that LiC6 and/or LiC12 were formed in Li-C-H system. On the other hand, MgC2 was found in Mg-C-H system ball-milled under H2 atmosphere, but not in the system ball-milled under Ar atmosphere. These results indicated that nano-structure in composites of nano-structural graphite is different from that of alkali (-earth) metal. For these reasons, metal-C-H system can be recognized to be a new family of hydrogen storage materials.

  12. All solution-processed inorganic/organic hybrid permeable metal-base transistor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong H; Yu, Hyeonggeun; Liu, Rui; Kim, Do Young; So, Franky

    2014-09-24

    All solution-processed inorganic/organic hybrid permeable-base transistor (PMBT) based on nickel oxide emitter and P3HT collector is developed. Due to the high charge injection properties of nickel oxide and spontaneously formed nano-pinholes in the base electrode, the devices exhibit high common-base and common-emitter current gains up to 0.98 and 304, respectively with saturated output current. PMID:24811137

  13. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  14. The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion in metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion has been determined for Type 303 stainless steel, A286 CRES, and Waspaloy and IN100 nickel-base alloys. It was found that hydrogen diffusion coefficients are not significantly affected by stress, while the hydrogen permeabilities are greatly affected in Type 303 stainless steel and A286 CRES (iron-based alloys), but are affected little in Waspaloy (nickel-base) and not affected in all in IN100 (nickel base). These observations might be taken as an indication that hydrogen permeabilities are affected by stress in iron-based alloys, but only slightly affected in nickel-based alloys. However, it is too early to make such a generalization based on the study of only these four alloys.

  15. High-Pressure Techniques for Discovering and Re-hydrogenation of Metal Hydride Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2010-08-01

    With the future demand for clean alternative energy, there is a need to develop suitable materials for energy storage. One of the most promising technologies involves storing hydrogen as an energy carrier. Many metals and alloys can form chemical bonds with hydrogen in so called metal hydrides, but wiht limited amount of hydrogen per metal atoms. The complex metal hydrides are much more hydrogen rich and thus has potential to be utilized in high-power applications. Here we will briefly discuss the features of different types of hydrogen storage materials. High-pressure techniques have proven to be a useful approach to efficiently discover light-weight, high-capacity hydrogen storage materials in the solid state. Focus will be on three different materials systems; Mg-based transition metal hydrides, alanates and borohydrides, their crystal structures and properties, prepared by high-pressure sintering, high-energy ball milling or in a cubic anvil.

  16. Hydrogen Sensors Using Nitride-Based Semiconductor Diodes: The Role of Metal/Semiconductor Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Irokawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I review my recent results in investigating hydrogen sensors using nitride-based semiconductor diodes, focusing on the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with the devices. Firstly, effects of interfacial modification in the devices on hydrogen detection sensitivity are discussed. Surface defects of GaN under Schottky electrodes do not play a critical role in hydrogen sensing characteristics. However, dielectric layers inserted in metal/semiconductor interfaces are found to cause dramatic changes in hydrogen sensing performance, implying that chemical selectivity to hydrogen could be realized. The capacitance-voltage (C–V) characteristics reveal that the work function change in the Schottky metal is not responsible mechanism for hydrogen sensitivity. The interface between the metal and the semiconductor plays a critical role in the interaction of hydrogen with semiconductor devises. Secondly, low-frequency C–V characterization is employed to investigate the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with diodes. As a result, it is suggested that the formation of a metal/semiconductor interfacial polarization could be attributed to hydrogen-related dipoles. In addition, using low-frequency C–V characterization leads to clear detection of 100 ppm hydrogen even at room temperature where it is hard to detect hydrogen by using conventional current-voltage (I–V) characterization, suggesting that low-frequency C–V method would be effective in detecting very low hydrogen concentrations. PMID:22346597

  17. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals and its control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed together with characteristics of hydrogen-environment embrittlement, the degree of hydrogen-environment embrittlement of a wide variety of alloys, the effect of hydrogen environments on various properties, (tension, fatigue, creep and fracture mechanics), and the influence of hydrogen exposure parameters on the degree of embrittlement. Design methods for high-pressure hydrogen service and for prevention of hydrogen-environment embrittlement are also covered.

  18. Increasing the density of adsorbed hydrogen with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Kabbour, Houria; Brown, Craig M; Neumann, Dan A; Ahn, Channing C

    2008-05-01

    Storing molecular hydrogen in porous media is one of the promising avenues for mobile hydrogen storage. In order to achieve technologically relevant levels of gravimetric density, the density of adsorbed H2 must be increased beyond levels attained for typical high surface area carbons. Here, we demonstrate a strong correlation between exposed and coordinatively unsaturated metal centers and enhanced hydrogen surface density in many framework structures. We show that the MOF-74 framework structure with open Zn(2+) sites displays the highest surface density for physisorbed hydrogen in framework structures. Isotherm and neutron scattering methods are used to elucidate the strength of the guest-host interactions and atomic-scale bonding of hydrogen in this material. As a metric with which to compare adsorption density with other materials, we define a surface packing density and model the strength of the H(2-)surface interaction required to decrease the H(2)-H(2) distance and to estimate the largest possible surface packing density based on surface physisorption methods. PMID:18366228

  19. Selective adsorption of metal-phthalocyanine on Au(111) surface with hydrogen atoms

    E-print Network

    Gao, Hongjun

    Selective adsorption of metal-phthalocyanine on Au(111) surface with hydrogen atoms L. W. Liu, K adsorption of metal-phthalocyanine on Au(111) surface with hydrogen atoms L. W. Liu, K. Yang, W. D. Xiao, Y to the change of the molecules' selective adsorption from fcc to hcp regions at low coverage. The two

  20. Frustrated Lewis pairs: metal-free hydrogen activation and more.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W; Erker, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Sterically encumbered Lewis acid and Lewis base combinations do not undergo the ubiquitous neutralization reaction to form "classical" Lewis acid/Lewis base adducts. Rather, both the unquenched Lewis acidity and basicity of such sterically "frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs)" is available to carry out unusual reactions. Typical examples of frustrated Lewis pairs are inter- or intramolecular combinations of bulky phosphines or amines with strongly electrophilic RB(C(6)F(5))(2) components. Many examples of such frustrated Lewis pairs are able to cleave dihydrogen heterolytically. The resulting H(+)/H(-) pairs (stabilized for example, in the form of the respective phosphonium cation/hydridoborate anion salts) serve as active metal-free catalysts for the hydrogenation of, for example, bulky imines, enamines, or enol ethers. Frustrated Lewis pairs also react with alkenes, aldehydes, and a variety of other small molecules, including carbon dioxide, in cooperative three-component reactions, offering new strategies for synthetic chemistry. PMID:20025001

  1. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, K. Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2014-10-07

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12 H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  2. Optimization of metal dispersion in doped graphitic materials for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyubong; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Park, Noejung; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2008-08-01

    The noncovalent hydrogen binding on transition-metal atoms dispersed on carbon clusters and graphene is studied with the use of the pseudopotential density-functional method. It is found that the presence of acceptorlike states in the absorbents is essential for enhancing the metal adsorption strength and for increasing the number of hydrogen molecules attached to the metal atoms. Particular configurations of boron substitutional doping are found to be very efficient for providing such states and thus enhancing storage capacity. Optimal doping conditions are suggested based on our calculations for the binding energy and ratio between metal and hydrogen molecules.

  3. Hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangqin; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Taylor, Jared M; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen is an essential component in many industrial processes. As a result of the recent increase in the development of shale gas, steam reforming of shale gas has received considerable attention as a major source of H2, and the more efficient use of hydrogen is strongly demanded. Palladium is well known as a hydrogen-storage metal and an effective catalyst for reactions related to hydrogen in a variety of industrial processes. Here, we present remarkably enhanced capacity and speed of hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 (copper(II) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The Pd nanocrystals covered with the MOF have twice the storage capacity of the bare Pd nanocrystals. The significantly enhanced hydrogen storage capacity was confirmed by hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms and solid-state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The speed of hydrogen absorption in the Pd nanocrystals is also enhanced by the MOF coating. PMID:25017188

  4. Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong; Cao, Juexian

    2012-12-15

    The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

  5. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (CO = carbonyl; PR{sub 3} = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H{sub 2} exchanges easily with D{sub 2}. This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H{sub 2} bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H{sub 2})(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PR{sub 2}){sub 2} were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig.

  6. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  7. Enhanced chitosan beads-supported Fe(0)-nanoparticles for removal of heavy metals from electroplating wastewater in permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingyi; Yang, Xi; Wang, Zhong-Liang; Yan, Xiaoxing

    2013-11-01

    The removal of heavy metals from electroplating wastewater is a matter of paramount importance due to their high toxicity causing major environmental pollution problems. Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) became more effective to remove heavy metals from electroplating wastewater when enhanced chitosan (CS) beads were introduced as a support material in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). The removal rate of Cr (VI) decreased with an increase of pH and initial Cr (VI) concentration. However, the removal rates of Cu (II), Cd (II) and Pb (II) increased with an increase of pH while decreased with an increase of their initial concentrations. The initial concentrations of heavy metals showed an effect on their removal sequence. Scanning electron microscope images showed that CS-NZVI beads enhanced by ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDE) had a loose and porous surface with a nucleus-shell structure. The pore size of the nucleus ranged from 19.2 to 138.6 ?m with an average aperture size of around 58.6 ?m. The shell showed a tube structure and electroplating wastewaters may reach NZVI through these tubes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) demonstrated that the reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was complete in less than 2 h. Cu (II) and Pb (II) were removed via predominant reduction and auxiliary adsorption. However, main adsorption and auxiliary reduction worked for the removal of Cd (II). The removal rate of total Cr, Cu (II), Cd (II) and Pb (II) from actual electroplating wastewater was 89.4%, 98.9%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. The findings revealed that EGDE-CS-NZVI-beads PRBs had the capacity to remediate actual electroplating wastewater and may become an effective and promising technology for in situ remediation of heavy metals. PMID:24075723

  8. First principles analysis of metal and oxide-metal interfacial catalysis for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Current and growing interest in the development of new catalytic materials for complex chemistries has challenged the methods traditionally employed by practitioners of computational catalysis. Explicit Density Functional Theory (DFT) analysis of all possible reaction pathways in biomass reaction networks, for example, is computationally prohibitive, and to make progress at a reasonable rate, strategies to accelerate the predictions made by DFT-based methods must be developed. In this talk, we will review some recent work in our group focusing on first principles analyses of the production of hydrogen from the decomposition of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons on heterogeneous catalytic surfaces. We will discuss, in particular, the development of accelerated DFT-based strategies to map the complex reaction networks associated with biomass decomposition at metal and oxide-metal interfaces, and we will show how these strategies can efficiently produce semi-quantitative predictions of activity and selectivity trends in hydrogen production on these surfaces. We will also briefly describe the development of reactivity trends for another chemical process that is relevant to biomass chemistry, the water-gas shift reaction, at metal-oxide interfaces, and will describe how bifunctional properties of these interfaces may promote this important chemistry.

  9. Hydrogen Adsorption, Absorption and Diffusion on and in Transition Metal Surfaces: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter A.; Kandoi, Shampa; Nilekar, Anand U.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2012-01-04

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA(PW91) calculations are used to study the interaction of hydrogen with different facets of seventeen transition metals—the (100) and (111) facets of face-centered cubic (fcc) metals, the (0001) facet of hexagonal-close packed (hcp) metals, and the (100) and (110) facets of body-centered cubic (bcc) metals. Calculated geometries and binding energies for surface and subsurface hydrogen are reported and are, in general, in good agreement with both previous modeling studies and experimental data. There are significant differences between the binding on the close-packed and more open (100) facets of the same metal. Geometries of subsurface hydrogen on different facets of the same metal are generally similar; however, binding energies of hydrogen in the subsurface of the different facets studied showed significant variation. Formation of surface hydrogen is exothermic with respect to gas-phase H? on all metals studied with the exception of Ag and Au. For each metal studied, hydrogen in its preferred subsurface state is always less stable than its preferred surface state. The magnitude of the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion from the surface layer into the first subsurface layer is dominated by the difference in the thermodynamic stability of these two states. Diffusion from the first subsurface layer to one layer further into the bulk does not generally have a large thermodynamic barrier but still has a moderate kinetic barrier. Despite the proximity to the metal surface, the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion from the first to the second subsurface layer is generally similar to experimentally-determined activation energies for bulk diffusion found in the literature. There are also some significant differences in the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion into the bulk through different facets of the same metal.

  10. Hydrogen absorption induced metal deposition on palladium and palladium-alloy particles

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jia X. (East Setauket, NY); Adzic, Radoslav R. (East Setauket, NY)

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to methods for producing metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The method includes contacting hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles with one or more metal salts to produce a sub-monoatomic or monoatomic metal- or metal-alloy coating on the surface of the hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The invention also relates to methods for producing catalysts and methods for producing electrical energy using the metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles of the present invention.

  11. Polymerization Effect of Electrolytes on Hydrogen-Bonding Cryoprotectants: Ion–Dipole Interactions between Metal Ions and Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protectants which are cell membrane permeable, such as glycerol, have been used effectively in the cryopreservation field for a number of decades, for both slow cooling and vitrification applications. In the latter case, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the vitrification composition is key to its application, dictating the ultimate storage conditions. It has been observed that the addition of some electrolytes to glycerol, such as MgCl2, could elevate the Tg of the mixture, thus potentially providing more storage condition flexibility. The microscopic mechanisms that give rise to the Tg-enhancing behavior of these electrolytes are not yet well understood. The current study focuses on molecular dynamics simulation of glycerol mixed with a variety of metal chlorides (i.e., NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), covering a temperature range that spans both the liquid and glassy states. The characteristics of the ion–dipole interactions between metal cations and hydroxyl groups of glycerol were analyzed. The interruption of the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules by the addition of ions was also investigated in the context of hydrogen-bonding quantity and lifetime. Divalent metal cations were found to significantly increase the Tg by strengthening the interacting network in the electrolyte/glycerol mixture via strong cation–dipole attractions. In contrast, monovalent cations increased the Tg insignificantly, as the cation–dipole attraction was only slightly stronger than the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules. The precursor of crystallization of NaCl and KCl was also observed in these compositions, potentially contributing to weak Tg-enhancing ability. The Tg-enhancing mechanisms elucidated in this study suggest a structure-enhancing role for divalent ions that could be of benefit in the design of protective formulations for biopreservation purposes. PMID:25405831

  12. Polymerization effect of electrolytes on hydrogen-bonding cryoprotectants: ion-dipole interactions between metal ions and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Elliott, Gloria D

    2014-12-11

    Protectants which are cell membrane permeable, such as glycerol, have been used effectively in the cryopreservation field for a number of decades, for both slow cooling and vitrification applications. In the latter case, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the vitrification composition is key to its application, dictating the ultimate storage conditions. It has been observed that the addition of some electrolytes to glycerol, such as MgCl2, could elevate the Tg of the mixture, thus potentially providing more storage condition flexibility. The microscopic mechanisms that give rise to the Tg-enhancing behavior of these electrolytes are not yet well understood. The current study focuses on molecular dynamics simulation of glycerol mixed with a variety of metal chlorides (i.e., NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), covering a temperature range that spans both the liquid and glassy states. The characteristics of the ion-dipole interactions between metal cations and hydroxyl groups of glycerol were analyzed. The interruption of the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules by the addition of ions was also investigated in the context of hydrogen-bonding quantity and lifetime. Divalent metal cations were found to significantly increase the Tg by strengthening the interacting network in the electrolyte/glycerol mixture via strong cation-dipole attractions. In contrast, monovalent cations increased the Tg insignificantly, as the cation-dipole attraction was only slightly stronger than the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules. The precursor of crystallization of NaCl and KCl was also observed in these compositions, potentially contributing to weak Tg-enhancing ability. The Tg-enhancing mechanisms elucidated in this study suggest a structure-enhancing role for divalent ions that could be of benefit in the design of protective formulations for biopreservation purposes. PMID:25405831

  13. Modeling hydrogen and helium entrapment in flowing liquid metal surfaces as plasma-facing components in

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Modeling hydrogen and helium entrapment in flowing liquid metal surfaces as plasma will likely be trapped in the liquid­metal surface (e.g., lithium) due to the high chemical solubility and particle fluxes during normal and abnor- mal events. Renewable liquid metal surfaces offer sig- nificant

  14. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  15. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x ). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  16. Miniaturized Metal (Metal Alloy)/PdO(x)/SiC Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO(x)). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600 C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sided sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  17. Oxidative Dissolution of Nickel Metal in Hydrogenated Hydrothermal Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S. E.; Guilmette, P. A.; Turcotte, R. A.; Tunison, H. M.

    2007-03-27

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility behavior of metallic nickel in hydrogenated ammonia and sodium hydroxide solutions between 175 and 315 C. The solubility measurements were interpreted by means of an oxidative dissolution reaction followed by a sequence of Ni(II) ion hydrolysis reactions: Ni(s) + 2H+(aq) = Ni2+(aq) + H2(g) and Ni{sup 2+}(aq) + nH{sub 2}O = Ni(OH){sub n}{sup 2-n}(aq) + nH{sup +}(aq) where n = 1 and 2. Gibbs energies associated with these reaction equilibria were determined from a least-squares analysis of the data. The extracted thermochemical properties ({Delta}fG{sup 0}, {Delta}fH{sup 0} and S{sup 0}) for Ni2{sup +}(aq), Ni(OH){sup +}(aq) and Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were found to be consistent with those determined in a previous solubility study of NiO/Ni(OH){sub 2} conducted in our laboratory. The thermodynamic basis of the Ni/NiO phase boundary in aqueous solutions is examined to show that Ni(s) is stable relative to NiO(s) in solutions saturated at 25 C with 1 atm H{sub 2} for temperatures below 309 C.

  18. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  19. Metal-inorganic-organic matrices as efficient sorbents for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Abdelkrim; Nousir, Saadia; Bouazizi, Nabil; Roy, René

    2015-03-01

    Stabilization of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) without re-aggregation is a major challenge. An unprecedented strategy is developed for achieving high dispersion of copper(0) or palladium(0) on montmorillonite-supported diethanolamine or thioglycerol. This results in novel metal-inorganic-organic matrices (MIOM) that readily capture hydrogen at ambient conditions, with easy release under air stream. Hydrogen retention appears to involve mainly physical interactions, slightly stronger on thioglycerol-based MIOM (S-MIOM). Thermal enhancement of desorption suggests also a contribution of chemical interactions. The increase of hydrogen uptake with prolonged contact times arises from diffusion hindrance, which appears to be beneficial by favoring hydrogen entrapment. Even with compact structures, MIOMs act as efficient sorbents with much higher efficiency factor (1.14-1.17?mmol?H?2?m(-2)) than many other sophisticated adsorbents reported in the literature. This opens new prospects for hydrogen storage and potential applications in microfluidic hydrogenation reactions. PMID:25663131

  20. First principles study of hydrogen storage in non-transition metal decorated graphitic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyubong; Park, Noejung; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogen has been considered an ideal material that can replace fossil-based fuels as its byproduct is simply water without emitting green house gases. Recently, transition metal (TM)- dispersed porous materials have been suggested as plausible candidates for hydrogen storages that possess optimal hydrogen binding characteristics. A serious problem in this approach is that TM atoms tend to aggregate instead of being atomistically dispersed, which results in the deterioration of hydrogen uptake. Here we study the hydrogen adsorption on non-transition metal (NTM) atoms dispersed on graphene using ab initio methods. We observe that the clustering energy of NTM atoms is much smaller than that of TM atoms, which indicates that NTM can be almost free of clustering on graphene. We also study hydrogen adsorption on those NTM atoms to find comparable storage capacity to that in TM dispersed graphene.

  1. Discovery of spontaneous deformation of Pd metal during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu; Sato, Masaharu; Itoh, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    A drastic deformation was observed in Pd metal of various shapes after hydrogen absorption and desorption cycles at 150 °C at a gas pressure of 1–5 MPa. All of the phenomena observed indicate that some strong internal force is induced spontaneously during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to produce a collective deformation so as to minimize the surface. PMID:19444010

  2. Highly mobile and reactive state of hydrogen in metal oxide semiconductors at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wan Ping; He, Ke Feng; Wang, Yu; Chan, Helen Lai Wah; Yan, Zijie

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen in metal oxides usually strongly associates with a neighboring oxygen ion through an O-H bond and thus displays a high stability. Here we report a novel state of hydrogen with unusually high mobility and reactivity in metal oxides at room temperature. We show that freshly doped hydrogen in Nb2O5 and WO3 polycrystals via electrochemical hydrogenation can reduce Cu2+ ions into Cu0 if the polycrystals are immersed in a CuSO4 solution, while this would not happen if the hydrogenated polycrystals have been placed in air for several hours before the immersion. Time-dependent studies of electrochemically hydrogenated rutile single crystals reveal two distinct states of hydrogen: one as protons covalently bonded to oxygen ions, while the other one is highly unstable with a lifetime of just a few hours. Observation of this mobile and reactive state of hydrogen will provide new insight into numerous moderate and low temperature interactions between metal oxides and hydrogen. PMID:24193143

  3. Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Solar Energy to Hydrogen Fuel Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabio, Erwin Murillo

    Photoactive metal oxide nanomaterials enable full or partial water splitting by reducing water to hydrogen and oxidizing water into oxygen through transfer of photogenerated electrons and holes, respectively, upon absorption of light of certain frequencies. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) is one of the useful instruments to study these materials through observation of their atomic structures using high resolution imaging and through chemical analyses using complementary analytical techniques. Combinations of z-contrast imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to elucidate the structures of IrO2, H2Ti4O 9, H2K2Nb6O17 and WO 3 photocatalysts. STEM techniques were also employed to observe the reduction of V2O5 nanoribbons into photoactive VO 2 and to monitor the effect of sonication on the size and crystallinity of TBACa2Nb3O10 (TBA = tetrabutylammonium) nano sheets. Aberration-corrected STEM equipped with a fluid stage was utilized to examine water catalysis by TBACa2Nb3O10 in situ under the electron beam. Phenomena associated with calcium niobate catalysis such as photodeposition of Pt and IrO2 co-catalysts and the surface poisoning with Ag particles during water oxidation were observed in real time. Formation of gas bubbles during water reduction was also detected as it occurs using dark field imaging and EELS. Electron microscopy was also employed to probe charge separation and distribution of redox-active sites on photolabeled TBACa2Nb 3O10. The sizes, shapes, and particle densities vary with the precursor concentration and the presence of sacrificial agents. Photogenerated electrons and holes were shown to be accessible throughout the nanosheets, without evidence for spatial charge separation across the sheet. To measure the relative catalytic activities of multiple photocatalysts, a comparative quantum efficiency (QE) study was carried out on the H 2Ti4O9 nanobelts, H2K2Nb 6O17 nanoscrolls, PA2K2Nb6O 17 (PA = propylammonium) and TBACa2Nb3O10 nanosheets, and their platinated counterparts. Hydrogen and oxygen evolved upon irradiation with a Xe lamp were measured using gas chromatography (GC). The QEs of these catalysts were found to be dependent on the quasi-Fermi levels (QFLs) and the mobility of the charge carriers as measured by surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPV). A similar photocatalytic study was employed to measure the effects of exfoliation, sacrificial charge donors, presence of co-catalysts, and co-catalyst deposition conditions on the TBACa2Nb3O10 nanosheets. Factorial analysis on the hydrogen and oxygen evolution results showed the degree of dependence of catalytic activity on these factors. High resolution STEM and cyclic voltammetry showed the structural and electronic features of the nanosheets that give rise to the observed effects of the factors studied.

  4. Metal-nonmetal transition in dense hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Reinholz, H.; Redmer, R.; Nagel, S.

    1995-12-31

    A quantum statistical approach to the equation of state and the transport properties of partially ionized hydrogen plasma is utilized to determine the region of thermodynamic instability and the location of the metal-nonmetal transition. The elementary electrons e and protons p as well as two-particle states are treated correctly within a physical picture. The influence of higher clusters such as dimers H{sub 2} and molecular ions H{sub 2}{sup +}, however, is studied within the chemical picture. For this, the two-particle partition function is calculated by means of an improved Beth-Uhlenbeck formula. Nonideality corrections due to the interaction between the various species are considered in the respective laws of mass action. A thermodynamic instability is found for the strongly coupled plasma domain. The critical point at T{sub c} = 16.5 x 10{sup 3} K, {wp}{sub c} = 0.42 g/cm{sup 3}, and p{sub c} = 57 GPa coincides with earlier results for this hypothetical plasma phase transition. Near the instability region, all species have strongly varying concentrations which indicates the significant influence of nonideality corrections on the thermodynamic functions. The transport properties are studied from the weakly coupled, nondegenerate region up to strongly coupled, degenerate domain. Such a universal approach which includes the Spitzer as well as the Ziman theory as limiting cases can be formulated within linear response theory. Again, two-particle correlations have been accounted for by the correct quantum cross sections for electron scattering at ions and free electrons. Electron scattering at neutral atoms was considered on T matrix level with respect to an effective optical potential. Strong ion-ion correlations are of special importance at high densities. The respective ion-ion structure factor was determined numerically within the HNC scheme, taking into account local-field corrections to the screening function of the effective ion-ion interaction potential.

  5. Vanadium diaphragm electrode serves as hydrogen diffuser in lithium hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouthamel, C. E.; Heinrich, R. R.; Johnson, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Lithium hydride cell uses vanadium diaphragm electrode as a hydrogen diffuser. Vanadium is high in hydrogen gas solubility and permeability, is least sensitive to adverse surface effects, maintains good mechanical strength in hydrogen atmospheres, and appears to be compatible with all alkali-halide electrolytes and lithium metals.

  6. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, for use in fuel cells, engines, and turbines for transportation or mobile applications. Hydrogen is desirable as an energy carrier, because its oxidation by air releases substantial energy (thermally or electrochemically) and produces only water as a product. In contrast, hydrocarbon energy carriers inevitably produce CO2, contributing to global warming. While CO2 capture may prove feasible in large stationary applications, implementing it in transportation and mobile applications is a daunting challenge. Thus a zero-emission energy carrier like hydrogen is especially needed in these cases. Use of H2 as an energy carrier also brings new challenges such as safe handling of compressed hydrogen and implementation of new transport, storage, and delivery processes and infrastructure. With current storage technologies, hydrogen's energy per volume is very low compared to other automobile fuels. High density storage of compressed hydrogen requires combinations of high pressure and/or low temperature that are not very practical. An alternative for storage is use of solid light weight hydrogenous material systems which have long durability, good adsorption properties and high activity. Substantial research has been conducted on carbon materials like activated carbon, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes due to their high theoretical hydrogen capacities. However, the theoretical values have not been achieved, and hydrogen uptake capacities in these materials are below 10 wt. %. In this thesis we investigated the use of silicon for hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation via water oxidation of silicon had been ignored due to slow reaction kinetics. We hypothesized that the hydrogen generation rate could be improved by using high surface area silicon nanoparticles. Our laser-pyrolysis-produced nanoparticles showed surprisingly rapid hydrogen generation and high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical maximum of two moles of H2 per mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (<100nm diameter) and ball-milled silicon powder (325 mesh). The increase in rate upon decreasing the particle size to 10 nm was even greater than would be expected based upon the increase in surface area. While specific surface area increased by a factor of 6 in going from <100 nm to ˜10 nm particles, the hydrogen production rate increased by a factor of 150. However, in all cases, silicon requires a base (e.g. NaOH, KOH, hydrazine) to catalyze its reaction with water. Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  7. Compensation effect and volcano curve in toluene hydrogenation catalyzed by transition metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Guernalec, N; Geantet, C; Cseri, T; Vrinat, M; Toulhoat, H; Raybaud, P

    2010-09-28

    Within the framework of volcano curves, a kinetic study of toluene hydrogenation catalyzed by transition metal sulfides highlights the variation of the apparent kinetic parameters as a function of the ab initio sulfur-metal bond energy descriptor and sulfo-reductive reaction conditions. PMID:20424734

  8. Determination of the Molar Volume of Hydrogen from the Metal-Acid Reaction: An Experimental Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin; Chapman, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Describes an alternative technique for determining the molar volume of hydrogen from the metal-acid reaction in which the metal sample is encased in a specially prepared cage and a pipette filler is used to fill an inverted burette with water. Eliminates some difficulties encountered with the conventional technique. (JRH)

  9. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation from Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kesavan, Sathees

    2006-01-01

    An economically viable and environmental friendly method of generating hydrogen for fuel cells is by the reaction of certain metals with steam, called metal-steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not generate any toxic by-products nor contributes to the undesirable greenhouse effect. From the standpoint of favorable thermodynamics, total…

  10. A comparative study for Hydrogen storage in metal decorated graphyne nanotubes and graphyne monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinlian; Guo, Yanhua; Zhang, Yun; Tang, Yingru; Cao, Juexian

    2015-11-01

    A comparative study for hydrogen storage in metal decorated graphyne nanotubes and graphyne monolayers has been investigated within the framework of first-principle calculations. Our results show that the binding energies of Li, Ca, Sc, Ti on graphyne nanotubes are stronger than that on graphyne monolayers. Such strong binding would prevent the formation of metal clusters on graphyne nanotubes. From the charge transfer and partial density of states, it is found that the curvature effect of nanotubes plays an important role for the strong binding strength of metal on graphyne nanotubes. And the hydrogen storage capacity is 4.82 wt%, 5.08 wt%, 4.88 wt%, 4.76 wt% for Li, Ca, Sc, Ti decorated graphyne nanotubes that promise a potential material for storing hydrogen. Twenty-four hydrogen molecules absorb to Ti-decorated graphyne nanotube.

  11. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core. PMID:17746396

  12. Change in soft magnetic properties of Fe-based metallic glasses during hydrogen absorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, L.; Lovas, A.; Kiss, L.F.

    2005-08-15

    The stress level can be altered in soft magnetic amorphous alloys by hydrogen absorption. The resulting changes in the soft magnetic parameters are reversible or irreversible, depending on the chemical composition. Some of these effects are demonstrated in Fe-B, Fe-W-B, and Fe-V-B glassy ribbons, in which various magnetic parameters are measured mainly during hydrogen desorption. The rate of hydrogen desorption is also monitored by measuring the pressure change in a hermetically closed bomb. The observed phenomena are interpreted on the basis of induced stresses and chemical interactions between the solute metal and hydrogen.

  13. Improved retort for cleaning metal powders with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1969-01-01

    Improved cleaning retort produces uniform temperature distribution in the heated zone and minimizes hydrogen channeling through the powder bed. Retort can be used for nonmetallic powders, sintering in a reducing atmosphere, and for cleaning powders in reduction atmospheres other than hydrogen.

  14. Metal chelator combined with permeability enhancer ameliorates oxidative stress-associated neurodegeneration in rat eyes with elevated intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, P; Zhang, M; Shoeb, M; Hogan, D; Tang, Luosheng; Syed, M F; Wang, C Z; Campbell, G A; Ansari, N H

    2014-04-01

    Because as many as half of glaucoma patients on intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering therapy continue to experience optic nerve toxicity, it is imperative to find other effective therapies. Iron and calcium ions play key roles in oxidative stress, a hallmark of glaucoma. Therefore, we tested metal chelation by means of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) combined with the permeability enhancer methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) applied topically on the eye to determine if this noninvasive treatment is neuroprotective in rat optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells exposed to oxidative stress induced by elevated IOP. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was injected into the anterior chamber of the rat eye to elevate the IOP. EDTA-MSM was applied topically to the eye for 3 months. Eyeballs and optic nerves were processed for histological assessment of cytoarchitecture. Protein-lipid aldehyde adducts and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were detected immunohistochemically. HA administration increased IOP and associated oxidative stress and inflammation. Elevated IOP was not affected by EDTA-MSM treatment. However, oxidative damage and inflammation were ameliorated as reflected by a decrease in formation of protein-lipid aldehyde adducts and COX-2 expression, respectively. Furthermore, EDTA-MSM treatment increased retinal ganglion cell survival and decreased demyelination of optic nerve compared with untreated eyes. Chelation treatment with EDTA-MSM ameliorates sequelae of IOP-induced toxicity without affecting IOP. Because most current therapies aim at reducing IOP and damage occurs even in the absence of elevated IOP, EDTA-MSM has the potential to work in conjunction with pressure-reducing therapies to alleviate damage to the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells. PMID:24509160

  15. Metal chelator combined with permeability enhancer ameliorates oxidative stress-associated neurodegeneration in rat eyes with elevated intraocular pressure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P.; Zhang, M.; Shoeb, M.; Hogan, D.; Tang, Luosheng; Syed, M. F.; Wang, C. Z.; Campbell, G.A.; Ansari, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    Since as many as half of glaucoma patients on intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering therapy continue to experience optic nerve toxicity, it is imperative to find other effective therapies. Iron and calcium ions play key roles in oxidative stress, a hallmark of glaucoma. Therefore, we tested metal chelation by means of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) combined with the permeability enhancer methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM) applied topically on the eye to determine if this non-invasive treatment is neuroprotective in rat optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells exposed to oxidative stress induced by elevated IOP. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was injected in the anterior chamber of the rat eye to elevate the IOP. EDTA-MSM was applied topically to the eye for 3 months. Eyeballs and optic nerves were processed for histological assessment of cytoarchitecture. Protein-lipid aldehyde adducts, and cyclooxygnease-2 (COX-2) were detected immunohistochemically. HA administration increased IOP and associated oxidative stress and inflammation. Elevated IOP was not affected by EDTA-MSM treatment. However oxidative damage and inflammation were ameliorated as reflected by decrease in formation of protein-lipid aldehyde adducts and COX-2 expression, respectively. Furthermore, EDTA-MSM treatment increased retinal ganglion cell survival and decreased demyelinization of optic nerve compared with untreated eyes. Chelation treatment with EDTA-MSM ameliorates sequelae of IOP-induced toxicity without affecting IOP. Since most current therapies aim at reducing IOP and damage occurs even in the absence of elevated IOP, EDTA-MSM has the potential to work in conjunction with pressure-reducing therapies to alleviate damage to the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells. PMID:24509160

  16. Synchrotron radiation photoemission study of metal overlayers on hydrogenated amorphous silicon at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, J.

    1990-09-21

    In this dissertation, metals deposited on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film at room temperature are studied. The purpose of this work is mainly understanding the electronic properties of the interface, using high-resolution synchrotron radiation photoemission techniques as a probe. Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in passivating dangling bonds of a-Si:H films, thus reducing the gap-state distribution. In addition, singly bonded hydrogen also reduces states at the top of the valence band which are now replaced by deeper Si-H bonding states. The interface is formed by evaporating metal on an a-Si:H film in successive accumulations at room temperature. Au, Ag, and Cr were chosen as the deposited metals. Undoped films were used as substrates. Since some unique features can be found in a-Si:H, such as surface enrichment of hydrogen diffused from the bulk and instability of the free surface, we do not expect the metals/a-Si:H interface to behave exactly as its crystalline counterpart. Metal deposits, at low coverages, are found to gather preferentially around regions deficient in hydrogen. As the thickness is increased, some Si atoms in those regions are likely to leave their sites to intermix with metal overlayers like Au and Cr. 129 refs., 30 figs.

  17. Method of CO and/or CO.sub.2 hydrogenation using doped mixed-metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A.; Haynes, Daniel J.; Abdelsayed, Victor; Smith, Mark W.; Spivey, James J.

    2015-10-06

    A method of hydrogenation utilizing a reactant gas mixture comprising a carbon oxide and a hydrogen agent, and a hydrogenation catalyst comprising a mixed-metal oxide containing metal sites supported and/or incorporated into the lattice. The mixed-metal oxide comprises a perovskite, a pyrochlore, a fluorite, a brownmillerite, or mixtures thereof doped at the A-site or the B-site. The metal site may comprise a deposited metal, where the deposited metal is a transition metal, an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, or mixtures thereof. Contact between the carbon oxide, hydrogen agent, and hydrogenation catalyst under appropriate conditions of temperature, pressure and gas flow rate generate a hydrogenation reaction and produce a hydrogenated product made up of carbon from the carbon oxide and some portion of the hydrogen agent. The carbon oxide may be CO, CO.sub.2, or mixtures thereof and the hydrogen agent may be H.sub.2. In a particular embodiment, the hydrogenated product comprises an alcohol, an olefin, an aldehyde, a ketone, an ester, an oxo-product, or mixtures thereof.

  18. Post-synthetic Ti Exchanged UiO-66 Metal-Organic Frameworks that Deliver Exceptional Gas Permeability in Mixed Matrix Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stefan J. D.; Ladewig, Bradley P.; Hill, Anita J.; Lau, Cher Hon; Hill, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Gas separation membranes are one of the lowest energy technologies available for the separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Key to handling the immense scale of this separation is maximised membrane permeability at sufficient selectivity for CO2 over N2. For the first time it is revealed that metals can be post-synthetically exchanged in MOFs to drastically enhance gas transport performance in membranes. Ti-exchanged UiO-66 MOFs have been found to triple the gas permeability without a loss in selectivity due to several effects that include increased affinity for CO2 and stronger interactions between the polymer matrix and the Ti-MOFs. As a result, it is also shown that MOFs optimized in previous works for batch-wise adsorption applications can be applied to membranes, which have lower demands on material quantities. These membranes exhibit exceptional CO2 permeability enhancement of as much as 153% when compared to the non-exchanged UiO-66 mixed-matrix controls, which places them well above the Robeson upper bound at just a 5 wt.% loading. The fact that maximum permeability enhancement occurs at such low loadings, significantly less than the optimum for other MMMs, is a major advantage in large-scale application due to the more attainable quantities of MOF needed. PMID:25592747

  19. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  20. Hot hydrogen testing of metallic turbo pump materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Inamdar, Rohit

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to expose heat resistant alloys to hydrogen at elevated temperatures and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate process involved in degradation of these materials due to hydrogen environment. Inconel 718 and NASA-23 (wrought and cast) are candidate materials. The degradation of these materials in the presence of 1 to 5 atmospheric pressure of hydrogen from 450 C to 1100 C was examined. The hydrogen facility at Auburn University was used for this purpose. Control experiments were also conducted wherein the samples were exposed to vacuum so that a direct comparison of the results would separate the thermal contribution from the hydrogen effects. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. A residual gas collection system was used to determine the gaseous species produced by any chemical reaction that may have occurred during the exposure. Analysis of this gas sample shows only the presence of H2 as expected. Analyses of the samples were conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. There appears to be no change in weight of the samples as a result of hydrogen exposure. In addition no visible change on the surface structure was detected. This indicates that the materials of interest do not have strong interaction with hot hydrogen. This is consistent with the microstructure results.

  1. Applications of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation on noble metal catalysts 

    E-print Network

    Wang, Bo

    2009-05-15

    into the reactor model to simulate an industrial adiabatic reactor. In the second part the production of hydrogen from hydrocarbons was investigated. In both cyclohexane and decalin dehydrogenations, conversions higher than 98% could be obtained over Pt...

  2. Systems and methods for selective hydrogen transport and measurement

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C

    2013-10-29

    Systems and methods for selectively removing hydrogen gas from a hydrogen-containing fluid volume are disclosed. An exemplary system includes a proton exchange membrane (PEM) selectively permeable to hydrogen by exclusively conducting hydrogen ions. The system also includes metal deposited as layers onto opposite sides or faces of the PEM to form a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA), each layer functioning as an electrode so that the MEA functions as an electrochemical cell in which the ionic conductors are hydrogen ions, and the MEA functioning as a hydrogen selective membrane (HSM) when located at the boundary between a hydrogen-containing fluid volume and a second fluid.

  3. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  4. Mechanistic Insights on the Hydrogenation of ?,?-Unsaturated Ketones and Aldehydes to Unsaturated Alcohols over Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ide, Matthew S.; Hao, Bing; Neurock, Matthew; Davis, Robert J.

    2012-04-06

    The selective hydrogenation of unsaturated ketones (methyl vinyl ketone and benzalacetone) and unsaturated aldehydes (crotonaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde) was carried out with H? at 2 bar absolute over Pd/C, Pt/C, Ru/C, Au/C, Au/TiO?, or Au/Fe?O? catalysts in ethanol or water solvent at 333 K. Comparison of the turnover frequencies revealed Pd/C to be the most active hydrogenation catalyst, but the catalyst failed to produce unsaturated alcohols, indicating hydrogenation of the C=C bond was highly preferred over the C=O bond on Pd. The Pt and Ru catalysts were able to produce unsaturated alcohols from unsaturated aldehydes, but not from unsaturated ketones. Although Au/ Fe?O? was able to partially hydrogenate unsaturated ketones to unsaturated alcohols, the overall hydrogenation rate over gold was the lowest of all of the metals examined. First-principles density functional theory calculations were therefore used to explore the reactivity trends of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and benzalacetone (BA) hydrogenation over model Pt(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces. The observed selectivity over these metals is likely controlled by the significantly higher activation barriers to hydrogenate the C=O bond compared with those required to hydrogenate the C=C bond. Both the unsaturated alcohol and the saturated ketone, which are the primary reaction products, are strongly bound to Ru and can react further to the saturated alcohol. The lower calculated barriers for the hydrogenation steps over Pt compared with Ru account for the higher observed turnover frequencies for the hydrogenation of MVK and BA over Pt. The presence of a phenyl substituent ? to the C=C bond in BA increased the barrier for C=C hydrogenation over those associated with the C=C bond in MVK; however, the increase in barriers with phenyl substitution was not adequate to reverse the selectivity trend.

  5. Hydrogen production using metal nanoparticle modified silicon thin film photoelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yae, Shinji; Onaka, Ayumi; Abe, Makoto; Fukumuro, Naoki; Ogawa, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Norimitsu; Nonomura, Shuichi; Nakato, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Hitoshi

    2007-09-01

    Hydrogen production using water splitting by photoelectrochemical solar cells equipped with a TiO II photoelectrode has been attracting much attention. However, TiO II encounters serious difficulty in achieving hydrogen evolution. One solution to this difficulty is using a hydrogen-producing semiconductor, such as silicon, and an oxidation reaction other than oxygen evolution, such as oxidation of iodide ions into iodine (triiodide ion). In this study, microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si:H) thin films are used as photoelectrodes in the photodecomposition of HI for low-cost and efficient production of solar hydrogen. An n-?c-3C-SiC:H and an i-?c-Si:H layer are deposited on glassy carbon substrates using the hot-wire cat-CVD method. The ?c-Si:H electrodes are modified with platinum nanoparticles through electroless displacement deposition. The platinum nanoparticles improve the electrode's stability and catalytic activity. The electrodes produce hydrogen gas and iodine via photoelectrochemical decomposition of HI with no external bias under simulated solar illumination. We also attempt solar water splitting using a multi-photon system equipped with the ?c-Si:H thin film and TiO II photoelectrodes in series.

  6. Ab initio investigation on hydrogen adsorption capability in Zn and Cu-based metal organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuwijaya, V. V.; Hidayat, N. N.; Agusta, M. K.; Dipojono, H. K.

    2015-09-01

    One of the biggest challenge in material technology for hydrogen storage application is to increase hydrogen uptake in room temperature and pressure. As a class of highly porous material, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) holds great potential with its tunable structure. However, little is known about the effect of metal cluster to its hydrogen storage capability. Investigation on this matter has been carried out carefully on small cluster of Zn and Cu-based MOF using first principles method. The calculation of two distinct building units of MOFs, namely octahedral and paddle-wheel models, have been done with B3LYP density functional method using 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. From geometry optimization of Zn-based MOF linked by benzene-dicarboxylate (MOF-5), it is found that hydrogen tends to keep distance from metal cluster group and stays above benzene ring. In the other hand, hydrogen molecule prefers to stay atop of the exposed Cu atom in Cu-based MOF system linked by the same linker group (Cu-bdc). Calculated hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu octahedral cages at ZnO3 sites are 1.64kJ/mol and 2.73kJ/mol respectively, while hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu paddle-wheel cages calculated on top of metal atoms are found to be at 6.05kJ/mol and 6.10kJ/mol respectively. Major difference between Zn-MOF-5 and Cu-bdc hydrogen uptake performance might be caused by unsaturated metal sites present in Cu-bdc system and the influence of their geometric structures, although a small difference on binding energy in the type of transition metal used is also observed. The comparison between Zn and Cu-based MOF may contribute to a comprehensive understanding of metal clusters and the importance of selecting best transition metal for design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks.

  7. A fast response hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating onto a fiber's end-face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haitao; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Qiu-Ze; Cao, Jingxiao; Han, Dao-Fu; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated an integrated hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating fabricated on a fiber end-face. The grating consists of three thin metal layers in stacks, Au, WO3 and Pd. The WO3 is used as a waveguide layer between the Pd and Au layer. The Pd layer is etched by using a focused ion beam (FIB) method, forming a Pd metallic grating with period of 450 nm. The sensor is experimentally exposed to hydrogen gas environment. Changing the concentration from 0% to 4% which is the low explosive limit (LEL), the resonant wavelength measured from the reflection experienced 28.10 nm spectral changes in the visible range. The results demonstrated that the sensor is sensitive for hydrogen detection and it has fast response and low temperature effect.

  8. Stability of noble metal catalysts for the hydrogen-oxygen reaction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. E.; Jennings, T. J.; Voge, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Stability of various supported noble metal catalysts for initiation of the hydrogen-oxygen reaction was tested by means of steam-hydrogen treatment at 1000-1200 C followed by a simple activity test. Many catalysts were stable to 1100 C, but all lost some activity at 1200 C. The most active with very good stability was an iridium/alumina catalyst of high iridium content.

  9. A Biomimetic Approach to New Adsorptive Hydrogen Storage Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hongcai J

    2015-08-12

    In the past decades, there has been an escalation of interest in the study of MOFs due to their fascinating structures and intriguing application potentials. Their exceptionally high surface areas, uniform yet tunable pore sizes, and well-defined adsorbate-MOF interaction sites make them suitable for hydrogen storage. Various strategies to increase the hydrogen capacity of MOFs, such as constructing pore sizes comparable to hydrogen molecules, increasing surface area and pore volume, utilizing catenation, and introducing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers (UMCs) have been widely explored to increase the hydrogen uptake of the MOFs. MOFs with hydrogen uptake approaching the DOE gravimetric storage goal under reasonable pressure but cryo- temperature (typically 77 K) were achieved. However, the weak interaction between hydrogen molecules and MOFs has been the major hurdle limiting the hydrogen uptake of MOFs at ambient temperature. Along the road, we have realized both high surface area and strong interaction between framework and hydrogen are equally essential for porous materials to be practically applicable in Hydrogen storage. Increasing the isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen through the introduction of active centers into the framework could have great potential on rendering the framework with strong interaction toward hydrogen. Approaches on increasing the surface areas and improving hydrogen affinity by optimizing size and structure of the pores and the alignment of active centers around the pores in frameworks have been pursued, for example: (a) the introduction of coordinatively UMC (represents a metal center missing multiple ligands) with potential capability of multiple dihydrogen-binding (Kubas type, non-dissociative) per UMC, (b) the design and synthesis of proton-rich MOFs in which a + H3 binds dihydrogen just like a metal ion does, and (c) the preparation of MOFs and PPNs with well aligned internal electric fields. We believe the accomplishments of this DOE supported research will greatly benefit the future pursuit of hydrogen storage materials. The ultimate goal to increase the gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacity to meet DOE targets for Light-Duty Vehicles is achievable.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia removal on activated carbon fiber cloth-supported metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Le Leuch, L M; Subrenat, A; Le Cloirec, P

    2005-11-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide mechanisms for the influence of metal catalysts on carbon supports in odorous gas removal. For this purpose, an activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) was subjected to successive metal impregnation to modify its surface properties and so increase its treatment capacity. The carbon fiber cloth adsorbent was prepared by classical incipient wetness impregnation followed by calcination in order to obtain metal oxide phases. Different impregnation parameters (type of metal, level of impregnation, calcination temperature) in the removal of hydrogen sulfide and ammonia were studied. Adsorption kinetics and capacities were carried out in a batch reactor at room temperature. It was found that removal activity depended on metal loading as well as on the order of the metal addition and calcination phase. The capacity of ACFC-supported metal oxides to adsorb both pollutants showed great improvement compared to the virgin adsorbent. PMID:16335599

  11. PIG charged particle source with hydrogen supply from a metal-hydride cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgun, Ie V.; Ryabchikov, D. L.; Sereda, I. N.; Tseluyko, A. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of a Penning-type charged-particles source with a metal-hydride cathode. The main characteristic of the experiment is internal hydrogen supply from the metal-hydride cathode under the conditions of ion-stimulated desorption; we studied its influence on the source's emissive characteristics. An additional mode of source operation was observed involving axial electron emission; the decisive effect was revealed of the desorbed hydrogen on the axial electron emission. The ion energy distribution function was measured and its dependence on the external discharge parameters was determined.

  12. Metal?organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Phoebe K.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M. Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Megson, Ian L.; Chapman, Karena W.; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E.

    2012-04-02

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  13. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  14. Metal-organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Allan, Phoebe K; Wheatley, Paul S; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A; Megson, Ian L; Chapman, Karena W; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E

    2012-04-14

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis. PMID:22378060

  15. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  16. Long-term atomistic simulation of hydrogen diffusion in metals

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Michael

    for more efficient energy storage. As part of this effort, the pre- dictive characterization with a time scale of the order of seconds to hoursefar beyond the characteristic time windows of MD by electrochemical cycling experiments. Copyright © 2015, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier

  17. Nickel-hydrogen. [metal hydrides, electrochemical corrosion, and structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Because of the disintegration of LaNi5 as the lattice expands on absorbing hydrogen, a nickel hydrogen cell similar to a nickel cadmium cell was designed. The positive electrode is wrapped in a microporous separator and the leads are insulated. A negative conducting grid is inserted and welded to the top of the can into an open ended container which is then turned upside down and filled so that LiNa5 powder occupies all the space not used by the rest of the components. The bottom of the can is then welded on. A fill tube is located either on the bottom or on the top of the can. When welded shut, the cell is put into a pressure bomb and the lanthanum nickel is activated at about 1,000 pounds of hydrogen. Electrolytes are added to the cell as well as whatever amount of hydrogen precharge desired, and the cell is sealed. Advantages and disadvantages of the cell are discussed.

  18. Dynamic high pressure: Why it makes metallic fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2015-09-01

    Metallic fluid H has been made by dynamic compression decades after Wigner and Huntington (WH) predicted its existence in 1935. The density at which it was made is within a few percent of the density predicted by WH. Metallic fluid H was achieved by multiple-shock compression of liquid H2, which is quasi-isentropic and thermally equilibrated. That is, the compressions were isentropic but for enough temperature and entropy to drive the crossover to completion from H2 to H at 9-fold compression. The metallic fluid is highly degenerate: T/TF?0.014. The basic ideas of dynamic compression, also known as supersonic, adiabatic, nonlinear hydrodynamics, were developed in the last half of the Nineteenth Century in European universities. Today dynamic compression is generally unfamiliar to the scientific community, which impedes general understanding as to why fluid H becomes metallic at a pressure observable in a laboratory. The purposes of this paper are to (i) present a brief review of dynamic compression and its affects on materials, (ii) review considerations that led to the sample holder designed specifically to make metallic fluid H, and (iii) present a brief inter-comparison of dynamic and static methods to achieve high pressure relative to their prospects for making metallic H.

  19. Influence of Specific Surface Area of Powder on Hydrogen Desorption Kinetics for Metal Hydrides

    E-print Network

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The observable results for desorption kinetics by powder of metal hydride on the example of mangesium hydride are reproduced with the model formulated in terms of specific surface of powder. A volumetric measurement of hydrogen desorption process is evaluated on an example of wet ball milled magnesium hydride, and can be applied generally for any metal hydride. The exact solution of the model reproduces the shape of experimental curves for desorption process providing a satisfying agreement with experimental data.

  20. NOBLE METAL CHEMISTRY AND HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-06-25

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell vessels were performed with the primary purpose of producing melter feeds for the beaded frit program plus obtaining samples of simulated slurries containing high concentrations of noble metals for off-site analytical studies for the hydrogen program. Eight pairs of 22-L simulations were performed of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. These sixteen simulations did not contain mercury. Six pairs were trimmed with a single noble metal (Ag, Pd, Rh, or Ru). One pair had all four noble metals, and one pair had no noble metals. One supporting 4-L simulation was completed with Ru and Hg. Several other 4-L supporting tests with mercury have not yet been performed. This report covers the calculations performed on SRNL analytical and process data related to the noble metals and hydrogen generation. It was originally envisioned as a supporting document for the off-site analytical studies. Significant new findings were made, and many previous hypotheses and findings were given additional support as summarized below. The timing of hydrogen generation events was reproduced very well within each of the eight pairs of runs, e.g. the onset of hydrogen, peak in hydrogen, etc. occurred at nearly identical times. Peak generation rates and total SRAT masses of CO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen were reproduced well. Comparable measures for hydrogen were reproduced with more variability, but still reasonably well. The extent of the reproducibility of the results validates the conclusions that were drawn from the data.

  1. DWPF Hydrogen Generation Study-Form of Noble Metal SRAT Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, investigate the factors that contribute to hydrogen generation to determine if current conservatism in setting the DWPF processing window can be reduced. A phased program has been undertaken to increase understanding of the factors that influence hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell, CPC. The hydrogen generation in the CPC is primarily due to noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid with a minor contribution from radiolytic processes. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Two sludge simulants were obtained, one with co-precipitated noble metals and one without noble metals. Co-precipitated noble metals were expected to better match real waste behavior than using trimmed noble metals during CPC simulations. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The two original and two heat-treated sludge simulants were then used as feeds to Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. Testing was done at relatively high acid stoichiometries, {approx}175%, and without mercury in order to ensure significant hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation rates were monitored during processing to assess the impact of the form of noble metals. The following observations were made on the data: (1) Co-precipitated noble metal simulant processed similarly to trimmed noble metal simulant in most respects, such as nitrite to nitrate conversion, formate destruction, and pH, but differently with respect to hydrogen generation: (A) The peak hydrogen generation rate occurred three to five hours later for the regular and heat-treated co-precipitated noble metal slurries than for the slurries with trimmed noble metals. (B) The peak hydrogen generation rate was lower during processing of the co-precipitated noble metal simulant relative to the trimmed noble metal simulant data. (C) Trimmed noble metals appeared to be conservative relative to co-precipitated noble metals under the conditions of these tests as long as the peak hydrogen generation rate occurred early in the SRAT boiling period. (2) If the peak hydrogen generation rate with trimmed noble metals is near or above the DWPF limit, and if the peak occurs late in the SRAT cycle, then a potential SME cycle hydrogen generation rate issue could be anticipated when using co-precipitated noble metals, since the peak is expected to be delayed relative to trimmed noble metals. (3) The peak hydrogen generation rate increased from about 1.3 to about 3.7 lbs H{sub 2}/hr on the range of 170-190% stoichiometry, or about 0.1 lbs. H{sub 2}/hr per % change in the stoichiometric factor at DWPF scale. (4) The peak generation rate was slightly higher during processing of the heat-treated coprecipitated noble metal simulant relative to the trimmed noble metal heat-treated simulant, but this probably due to somewhat more excess acid being added to the co-precipitated noble metal test than intended. (5) The variations in the peak hydrogen generation rate appeared to track the quantity of dissolved rhodium in the SRAT product. (6) A noble metal apparently activated and then de-activated during the final hour of formic acid addition. The associated peak generation rate was <3% of the maximum rate seen in each test. Palladium may have been responsible based on literature data. (7) Planned comparisons between heat-treated and un-heat-treated simulants were complicated by the significantly altered base equivalents following heat-treatment. This necessitated making small adjustments to the stoichiometric acid factor to attempt to match the excess acid contents

  2. TREATMENT OF METALS IN GROUND WATER USING AN ORGANIC-BASED SULFATE-REDUCING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI) filings, limestone and pea gravel was evaluated at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. The PRB is designed to treat arsenic and heavy met...

  3. Enantioselective hydrogenation. IV. Hydrogen isotope exchange in 10,11-dihydrocinchonidine and in quinoline catalyzed by platinum group metals

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, G.; Wells, P.B.

    1994-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope (H/D) exchange in the alkaloid 10,11-dihydrocinchonidine has been studied over 6.4% Pt/silica (EUROPT-1), 5% Ru/alumina, 5% Rh/alumina, and 5% Pd/alumina at 293 K using C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OD and D{sub 2} as solvent and deuterium source. Exchange was accompanied by hydrogenation. Over Pt, fast exchange occurred in the hydroxyl group followed by multiple exchange in which alkaloid molecules containing, 2, 3, 4 and 5 deuterium atoms were formed simultaneously. Mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H NMR showed that this multiple exchange occurred in the quinoline ring system and at C{sub 9}, but not in the quinuclidine ring system. The pattern of exchange in Ru was similar. Over Rh extensive hydrogenolysis of the quinuclidine ring system occurred, and over Pd the quinoline ring system was rapidly hydrogenated. Quinoline exchange and hydrogenation were also studied at 293 K; relatively rapid exchange occurred over Pt, Ru, and Rh, particularly at the 2- and 8-positions, whereas hydrogenation without significant exchange occurred over Pd. 10,11-Dihydrocinchonidine is adsorbed on Pt and Ru via the quinoline ring system and the multiple nature of the exchange indicates that the quinoline moiety is adsorbed approximately parallel to the metal surface by multicenter {pi}-bonding. An additional interaction of the alkaloid molecule with the surface occurs at carbon atom C{sub 9}, which may interpret the slower exchange in the alkaloid by comparison with that in quinoline. This study supports and enhances the model proposed to interpret the origin of enantioselectivity in pyruvate hydrogenation over Pt and Ir modified by cinchona alkaloids. The similarities of exchange over Pt and Ru suggest that enantioselective catalysis should be achievable over Ru. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Turning On Catalysis: Incorporation of a Hydrogen-Bond-Donating Squaramide Moiety into a Zr Metal-Organic Framework

    E-print Network

    Turning On Catalysis: Incorporation of a Hydrogen-Bond-Donating Squaramide Moiety into a Zr Metal-Organic,10,11 Hydrogen-bond-donating organocatalysts are a unique family of simple pseudo-Lewis-acidic organic compounds Information ABSTRACT: Herein, we demonstrate that the incorporation of an acidic hydrogen-bond-donating

  5. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  6. Crustal Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebritsen, S.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing data and models support a distinction between the hydrodynamics of the brittle upper crust, where topography, permeability contrasts, and magmatic heat sources dominate patterns of flow and externally derived (meteoric) fluids are common, and the ductile lower crust, dominated by devolatilization reactions and internally derived fluids. The permeability structure of the uppermost (~<1 km) crust is highly heterogeneous, and controls include primary lithology, porosity, rheology, geochemistry, and tectonic and time-temperature histories of the rocks. Systematic permeability differences among original lithologies persist to contact-metamorphic depths of 3-10 km, but are not evident at regional-metamorphic depths of 10-30+ km - presumably because, at such depths, metamorphic textures become largely independent of the original lithology. Permeability can vary in time as well as space, and its temporal evolution may be gradual or abrupt: streamflow responses to moderate to large earthquakes demonstrate that dynamic stresses can instantaneously change permeability by factors of up to 20 on a regional scale, whereas a 10-fold decrease in the permeability of a package of shale in a compacting basin may require 107years. Temporal variation is enhanced by strong chemical and thermal disequilibrium; thus lab experiments involving hydrothermal flow in crystalline rocks under pressure, temperature, and chemistry gradients often result in 10-fold permeability decreases over daily to sub-annual time scales. Recent research on enhanced geothermal reservoirs, ore-forming systems, and the hydrologic effects of earthquakes consistently shows that shear dislocation caused by tectonic forcing or fluid injection can increase near-to intermediate-field permeability by factors of 100 to 1000. Nonetheless, considering permeability as static parameter is often a reasonable assumption for low-temperature hydrogeologic investigations with time scales of days to decades.

  7. Method for hydrogen production and metal winning, and a catalyst/cocatalyst composition useful therefor

    DOEpatents

    Dhooge, Patrick M. (Corrales, NM)

    1987-10-13

    A catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition of matter is useful in electrolytically producing hydrogen or electrowinning metals. Use of the catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition causes the anode potential and the energy required for the reaction to decrease. An electrolyte, including the catalyst/cocatalyst composition, and a reaction medium composition further including organic material are also described.

  8. Assembly of Hydrogen Bonded Diamondoid Networks Based on Synthetic Metal-Organic Tetrahedral Nodes

    E-print Network

    Gao, Song

    Bao-Qing Ma,* Hao-Ling Sun, and Song Gao* State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications and PKU-HKU Joint Laboratory on Rare Earth Materials and Bioinorganic Chemistry, CollegeAssembly of Hydrogen Bonded Diamondoid Networks Based on Synthetic Metal-Organic Tetrahedral Nodes

  9. Phonons in quantum solids with defects. [lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobi, N.; Zmuidzinas, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    A formalism was developed for temperature-dependent, self-consistent phonons in quantum solids with defects. Lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen, as well as electronic excitations in solid helium, were treated as defects that modify properties of these systems. The information to be gained from the modified phonon spectrum is discussed.

  10. Butterfly valve with metal seals controls flow of hydrogen from cryogenic through high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Butterfly valve with metal seals operates over a temperature range of minus 423 degrees to plus 440 degrees F with hydrogen as a medium and in a radiation environment. Media flow is controlled by an internal butterfly disk which is rotated by an actuation shaft.

  11. Trends in Selective Hydrogen Peroxide Production on Transition Metal Surfaces from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Rees B.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.

    2012-10-19

    We present a comprehensive, Density Functional Theory-based analysis of the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, on twelve transition metal surfaces. We determine the full thermodynamics and selected kinetics of the reaction network on these metals, and we analyze these energetics with simple, microkinetically motivated rate theories to assess the activity and selectivity of hydrogen peroxide production on the surfaces of interest. By further exploiting Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationships and scaling relationships between the binding energies of different adsorbates, we express the results in the form of a two dimensional contour volcano plot, with the activity and selectivity being determined as functions of two independent descriptors, the atomic hydrogen and oxygen adsorption free energies. We identify both a region of maximum predicted catalytic activity, which is near Pt and Pd in descriptor space, and a region of selective hydrogen peroxide production, which includes Au. The optimal catalysts represent a compromise between activity and selectivity and are predicted to fall approximately between Au and Pd in descriptor space, providing a compact explanation for the experimentally known performance of Au-Pd alloys for hydrogen peroxide synthesis, and suggesting a target for future computational screening efforts to identify improved direct hydrogen peroxide synthesis catalysts. Related methods of combining activity and selectivity analysis into a single volcano plot may be applicable to, and useful for, other aqueous phase heterogeneous catalytic reactions where selectivity is a key catalytic criterion.

  12. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  13. Investigation of the Alkaline Electrochemical Interface and Development of Composite Metal/Metal-Oxides for Hydrogen and Oxygen Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Michael

    Understanding the fundamentals of electrochemical interfaces will undoubtedly reveal a path forward towards a society based on clean and renewable energy. In particular, it has been proposed that hydrogen can play a major role as an energy carrier of the future. To fully utilize the clean energy potential of a hydrogen economy, it is vital to produce hydrogen via water electrolysis, thus avoiding co-production of CO2 inherent to reformate hydrogen. While significant research efforts elsewhere are focused on photo-chemical hydrogen production from water, the inherent low efficiency of this method would require a massive land-use footprint to achieve sufficient hydrogen production rates to integrate hydrogen into energy markets. Thus, this research has primarily focused on the water splitting reactions on base-metal catalysts in the alkaline environment. Development of high-performance base-metal catalysts will help move alkaline water electrolysis to the forefront of hydrogen production methods, and when paired with solar and wind energy production, represents a clean and renewable energy economy. In addition to the water electrolysis reactions, research was conducted to understand the de-activation of reversible hydrogen electrodes in the corrosive environment of the hydrogen-bromine redox flow battery. Redox flow batteries represent a promising energy storage option to overcome the intermittency challenge of wind and solar energy production methods. Optimization of modular and scalable energy storage technology will allow higher penetration of renewable wind and solar energy into the grid. In Chapter 1, an overview of renewable energy production methods and energy storage options is presented. In addition, the fundamentals of electrochemical analysis and physical characterization of the catalysts are discussed. Chapter 2 reports the development of a Ni-Cr/C electrocatalyst with unprecedented mass-activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte. The HER kinetics of numerous binary & ternary Ni-alloys and composite Ni/metal-oxide/C samples were evaluated in aqueous 0.1 M KOH electrolyte. Furthermore a model of the double layer interface is proposed, which helps explain the observed ensemble effect in the presence of AEI. In Chapter 3, Ni-Fe and Ni-Fe-Co mixed-metal-oxide (MMO) films were investigated for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity in 0.1M KOH on high surface area Raney-Nickel supports. During investigations of MMO activity, aniline was identified as a useful "capping agent" for synthesis of high-surface area MMO-polyaniline (PANI) composite materials. A Ni-Fe-Co/PANI-Raney-Ni catalyst was developed which exhibits enhanced mass-activity compared to state-of-the-art Ni-Fe OER electrocatalysts reported to date. The morphology of the MMO catalyst film on PANI/Raney-Ni support provides excellent dispersion of active-sites and should maintain high active-site utilization for catalyst loading on gas-diffusion electrodes. In Chapter 4, the de-activation of reversible-hydrogen electrode catalysts was investigated and the development of a Pt-Ir-Nx/C catalyst is reported, which exhibits significantly increased stability in the HBr/Br 2 electrolyte. In contrast a Pt-Ir/C catalyst exhibited increased tolerance to high-voltage cycling and in particular showed recovery of electrocatalytic activity after reversible de-activation (presumably from bromide adsorption and subsequent oxidative bromide stripping). Under the harshest testing conditions of high-voltage cycling or exposure to Br2 the Pt-based catalyst showed a trend in stability: Pt < Pt-Ir < Pt-Ir-Nx. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  14. Dynamic high pressure: why it makes metallic fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, William

    2015-06-01

    Metallic fluid H (MFH) was made by dynamic compression decades after Wigner and Huntington (WH) predicted it in 1935. The density of MFH is within a few percent of the density predicted by WH. MFH was made by multiple-shock compression of liquid H2, which process is quasi-isentropic and thermally equilibrated. The compressions were isentropic but produced enough dissipation as temperature T and entropy S to drive the crossover from insulating H2 to metallic H at 9-fold compressed atomic H density. T and S were tuned by temporally shaping the applied pressure pulse such that H2 dissociated to H at sufficiently high density to make a highly degenerate metal. The basic ideas of dynamic compression, also known as supersonic, adiabatic, nonlinear hydrodynamics, were developed in the last half of the Nineteenth Century. Our purposes are to (i) present a brief review of dynamic compression and its affects on materials, (ii) review considerations that led to the sample holder designed specifically to make MFH, and (iii) present a inter-comparison of dynamic and static methods relative to their prospects for making metallic H.

  15. Phase transition into the metallic state in hypothetical (without molecules) dense atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2013-10-15

    A simple physical model of the metal-dielectric (vapor-liquid) phase transition in hypothetical (without molecules) atomic hydrogen is proposed. The reason for such a transition is the quantum collective cohesive energy occurring due to quantum electron-electron exchange similar to the cohesive energy in the liquid-metal phase of alkali metals. It is found that the critical parameters of the transition are P{sub c} ? 41000 atm, ?{sub c} ? 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}, and T{sub c} ? 9750 K.

  16. The hydrogenation of metals upon interaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreyev, L. A.; Gelman, B. G.; Zhukhovitskiy, A. A.; Polosina, Y. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution at 600 deg and 5 x 10 to the 7th power - 10 to the 6th power torr from AVOOO Al samples, which were pickled in 10 percent NaOH, is discussed. An H evolution kinetic equation is derived for samples of equal vol. and different surfaces (5 and 20 sq cm). The values of the H evolution coefficient K indicated an agreement with considered H diffusion mechanism through an oxide layer. The activation energy for the H evolution process, obtained from the K-temp. relation, was 13,000 2000 cal/g-atom.

  17. Grain-boundary engineering markedly reduces susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Sabine; Kumar, Mukul; Somerday, Brian P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-10

    The feasibility of using 'grain-boundary engineering' techniques to reduce the susceptibility of a metallic material to intergranular embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen is examined. Using thermomechanical processing, the fraction of 'special' grain boundaries was increased from 46% to 75% (by length) in commercially pure nickel samples. In the presence of hydrogen concentrations between 1200 and 3400 appm, the high special fraction microstructure showed almost double the tensile ductility; also, the proportion of intergranular fracture was significantly lower and the J{sub c} fracture toughness values were some 20-30% higher in comparison with the low special fraction microstructure. We attribute the reduction in the severity of hydrogen-induced intergranular embrittlement to the higher fraction of special grain boundaries, where the degree of hydrogen segregation at these boundaries is reduced.

  18. Hydrogen mimicking the properties of coinage metal atoms in Cu and Ag monohydride clusters.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Karsten; Proch, Sebastian; Ganteför, Gerd F; Behera, Swayamprabha; Jena, Puru

    2013-12-28

    A systematic study of the electronic structure and equilibrium geometries of Cun, Cun-1H, Agn, and Agn-1H; n = 2-5 clusters is carried out using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments and density functional theory based calculations. Our objective is to see if the substitution of a coinage metal atom by hydrogen would retain the electronic structure of the parent metal cluster since both systems are isoelectronic. For clusters with n ? 3, we find that the measured PES and vertical detachment energies (VDEs) (i.e. energies necessary to remove an electron from the anionic Mn(-) (M = Cu, Ag) clusters without changing their geometries) are close to those of Mn-1H(-) clusters, suggesting that substitution of a metal atom with hydrogen does not perturb the electronic structure of the parent cluster anion significantly. Calculated VDEs agree very well with experiment validating the theoretical methods used as well as the geometries of the neutral and anionic clusters. PMID:24217243

  19. Oxidation of metal sulfites by iodine for use in thermochemical hydrogen cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, C.F.V.; Bowman, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Thermochemical hydrogen cycles involving metal sulfates offer an alternative to sulfuric acid which is corrosion and has high energy requirements for drying prior to its thermal decomposition. The formation of such metal sulfates in conjunction with a low-temperature hydrogen formation step is discussed. The following reaction was studied: MgSO/sub 3/(c) + MgO(c) + I/sub 2/ (g) ..-->.. MgSO/sub 4/(c) + MgI/sub 2/(c). Although magnesium sulfite appears promising for this oxidation, a search was conducted for alternative metal sulfites which fit the following criteria for use: (a) sulfate must decompose in the temperature range available (< 1400/sup 0/K); (b) iodide must hydrolyze easily; and (c) salts must not be rare, toxic, or expensive. Lanthanum and titanium fit these criteria and will be investigated.

  20. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Lovley, Derek; Komlos, John; Brown, Derick

    2004-03-17

    The design and operation of a trace-metal or radionuclide bioremediation scheme requires that specific redox conditions be achieved at given zones of an aquifer for a pre-determined duration. Tools are therefore needed to identify and quantify the terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) that are being achieved during bioremediation in an aquifer, and that this be done at a high spatial resolution. Dissolved hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations have been shown to correlate with specific TEAPs during bioremediation in an aquifer (Table 1). Theoretical analysis has shown that these steady-state hydrogen levels are solely dependent upon the physiological parameters of the hydrogen-consuming microorganisms, with hydrogen concentrations increasing as each successive TEAP yields less energy for bacterial growth. The assumptions for this statement may not hold during a bioremediation scheme in which an organic substrate is injected into the subsurface and where organisms may consume hydrogen and carbon simultaneously. This research examines the effects of simultaneous hydrogen and carbon utilization through obtaining kinetic parameters of both hydrogen and carbon consumption under iron reducing conditions in batch experiments. A dual-donor model was formulated and compared to flow-through column experiments.

  1. Vacancy trapping mechanism for hydrogen bubble formation in metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yuelin; Zhang Ying; Zhou Hongbo; Lu Guanghong; Liu Feng; Luo, G.-N.

    2009-05-01

    We reveal the microscopic vacancy trapping mechanism for H bubble formation in W based on first-principles calculations of the energetics of H-vacancy interaction and the kinetics of H segregation. Vacancy provides an isosurface of optimal charge density that induces collective H binding on its internal surface, a prerequisite for the formation of H{sub 2} molecule and nucleation of H bubble inside the vacancy. The critical H density on the vacancy surface before the H{sub 2} formation is found to be 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} H atoms per m{sup 2}. We believe that such mechanism is generally applicable for H bubble formation in metals and metal alloys.

  2. Influence of surface contaminations on the hydrogen storage behaviour of metal hydride alloys.

    PubMed

    Schülke, Mark; Paulus, Hubert; Lammers, Martin; Kiss, Gábor; Réti, Ferenc; Müller, Karl-Heinz

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides is a promising alternative to common storage methods. The surface of a metal hydride plays an important part in the absorption of hydrogen, since important partial reaction steps take place here. The development of surface contaminations and their influence on hydrogen absorption is examined by means of absorption experiments and surface analysis, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS) and secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), in this work. All investigations were carried out on a modern AB(2) metal hydride alloy, namely Ti(0.96)Zr(0.04)Mn(1.43)V(0.45)Fe(0.08). Surface analysis (SNMS, XPS) shows that long-term air storage (several months) leads to oxide layers about 15 nm thick, with complete oxidation of all main alloy components. By means of in situ oxygen exposure at room temperature and XPS analysis, it can be shown that an oxygen dose of about 100 Langmuirs produces an oxide layer comparable to that after air storage. Manganese enrichment (segregation) is also clearly observed and is theoretically described here. This oxide layer hinders hydrogen absorption, so an activation procedure is necessary in order to use the full capacity of the metal hydride. This procedure consists of heating (T = 120 degrees C) in vacuum and hydrogen flushing at pressures like p = 18 bar. During the activation process the alloy is pulverized to particles of approximately 20 microm through lattice stretches. It is shown that this pulverization of the metal hydride (creating clean surface) during hydrogen flushing is essential for complete activation of the material. Re-activation of powder contaminated by small doses of air (p approximately 0.1 bar) does not lead to full absorption capacity. In ultrahigh vacuum, hydrogen is only taken up by the alloy after sputtering of the surface (which is done in order to remove oxide layers from it), thus creating adsorption sites for the hydrogen. This is shown by TDMS measurements with and without sputtering and oxygen exposure. PMID:18210095

  3. Partial and complete reduction of O2 by hydrogen on transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise; Nilekar, Anand Udaykumar; Xu, Ye; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2010-01-01

    The metal-catalyzed reduction of di-oxygen (O{sub 2}) by hydrogen is at the heart of direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (HOOH) and power generation by proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Despite its apparent simplicity, how the reaction proceeds on different metals is not yet well understood. We present a systematic study of O{sub 2} reduction on the (111) facets of eight transition metals (Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au) based on periodic density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations. Analysis of ten surface elementary reaction steps suggests three selectivity regimes as a function of the binding energy of atomic oxygen (BEO), delineated by the opposite demands to catalyze O-O bond scission and O-H bond formation: The dissociative adsorption of O{sub 2} prevails on Ni, Rh, Ir, and Cu; the complete reduction to water via associative (peroxyl, peroxide, and aquoxyl) mechanisms prevails on Pd, Pt, and Ag; and HOOH formation prevails on Au. The reducing power of hydrogen is decreased electrochemically by increasing the electrode potential. This hinders the hydrogenation of oxygen species and shifts the optimal selectivity for water to less reactive metals. Our results point to the important role of the intrinsic reactivity of metals in the selectivity of O{sub 2} reduction, provide a unified basis for understanding the metal-catalyzed reduction of O{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O and HOOH, and offer useful insights for identifying new catalysts for desired oxygen reduction products.

  4. First principles assessment of ideal fracture energies of materials with mobile impurities: implications for hydrogen embrittlement of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, D.E.; Carter, Emily A. . E-mail: eac@chem.ucla.edu

    2004-09-20

    We propose that the ideal fracture energy of a material with mobile bulk impurities can be obtained within the framework of a Born-Haber thermodynamic cycle. We show that such a definition has the advantage of initial and final states at equilibrium, connected by well-defined and measurable energetic quantities, which can also be calculated from first principles. Using this approach, we calculate the ideal fracture energy of metals (Fe and Al) in the presence of varying amounts of hydrogen, using periodic density functional theory. We find that the metal ideal fracture energy decreases almost linearly with increasing hydrogen coverage, dropping by {approx}45% at one-half monolayer of hydrogen, indicating a substantial reduction of metal crystal cohesion in the presence of hydrogen atoms and providing some insight into the cohesion-reduction mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in metals.

  5. Functionalization of carbon-based nanostructures with light transition-metal atoms for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgun, E.; Ciraci, S.; Yildirim, T.

    2008-02-01

    In a recent letter [T. Yildirim and S. Ciraci, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 175501 (2005)], the unusual hydrogen storage capacity of Ti decorated carbon nanotubes has been revealed. The present paper extends this study further to investigate the hydrogen uptake by light transition-metal atoms decorating various carbon-based nanostructures in different types of geometry and dimensionality, such as carbon linear chain, graphene, and nanotubes. Using first-principles plane-wave method we show that not only outer but also inner surface of a large carbon nanotube can be utilized to bind more transition-metal atoms and hence to increase the storage capacity. We also found that scandium and vanadium atoms adsorbed on a carbon nanotube can bind up to five hydrogen molecules. Similarly, light transition-metal atoms can be adsorbed on both sides of graphene and each adsorbate can hold up to four hydrogen molecules yielding again a high-storage capacity. Interestingly, our results suggest that graphene can be considered as a potential high-capacity H2 storage medium. We also performed transition state analysis on the possible dimerization of Ti atoms adsorbed on the graphene and single-wall carbon nanotube.

  6. Dissolution of Uranium Metal Without Hydride Formation or Hydrogen Gas Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Oliver, Brian M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2008-09-01

    This study shows that metallic uranium will cleanly dissolve in carbonate-peroxide solution without generation of hydrogen gas or uranium hydride. Metallic uranium shot, 0.5 to 1 mm diameter, were reacted with ammonium carbonate - hydrogen peroxide solution ranging in concentration from 0.13M to 1.0M carbonate and 0.50M to 2.0M peroxide. The uranium beads were weighed before and after reacting with the etch solution, and from the weights of the beads, their diameters were calculated, before and after the etch. The etch rate on the beads was then calculated from the reduction in bead diameter, and independently by uranium analysis of the solution. The calculated etch rate ranged from about 4 x 10-4 to 8 x 10-4 cm per hour, dependent primarily on the peroxide concentration. A hydrogen analysis of the etched beads showed that no detectable hydrogen was introduced into the uranium metal by the etching process.

  7. Hydrogen Spillover between Single Gold Nanorods and Metal Oxide Supports: A Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean S E; Cittadini, Michela; Pecharromán, Carlos; Martucci, Alessandro; Mulvaney, Paul

    2015-08-25

    We used dark field spectroscopy to monitor the dissociation of hydrogen on single gold nanoparticles embedded in metal oxide supports. Individual gold nanorods were monitored in real time to reveal the peak position, the full width at half-maximum, and the relative intensity of the surface plasmon resonances during repeated N2-H2-N2 and air-H2-air cycles. Shifts in the spectra are shown to be due to changes in electron density and not to refractive index shifts in the environment. We demonstrate that hydrogen does not dissociate on gold nanorods (13 nm × 40 nm) at room temperature when in contact with silica and that electrons or hydrogen atoms migrate from Pt nanoparticles to Au nanoparticles through the supporting metal oxide at room temperature. However, this spillover mechanism only occurs for semiconducting oxides (anatase TiO2 and ZnO) and does not occur for Au and Pt nanoparticles embedded in silica. Finally, we show that hydrogen does dissociate directly on anatase surfaces at room temperature during air-H2-air cycles. Our results show that hydrogen spillover, surface dissociation of reactants, and surface migration of chemical intermediates can be detected and monitored in real time at the single particle level. PMID:26154166

  8. The Role of Water in the Storage of Hydrogen in Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Michael D.; Lomness, Janice K.; Giannuzzi, Lucille A.

    2001-01-01

    One major problem with the use of hydrogen is safe and efficient storage. In the pure form, bulky and heavy containers are required greatly reducing the efficiency of its use. Safety is also a great concern. Storage of hydrogen in the form of a metal hydride offers distinct advantages both in terms of volumetric efficiency and in terms of safety. As a result, an enormous amount of research is currently being done on metal-hydrogen systems. Practical application of these systems to storage of hydrogen can only occur when they are very well understood. In this paper, the preliminary results of a study of the surfaces of magnesium nickel alloys will be presented. Alloys that have been rendered totally unreactive with hydrogen as well as those that have been activated with liquid water and with water vapor were studied. Data obtained from XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer) analysis, with samples held in vacuum for the shortest possible time to minimize the hydroxide degradation will be presented. Furthermore, TEM data on samples prepared in a new way that largely protects the surface from the high vacuum will be discussed.

  9. In situ treatment of groundwater using zero-valent metal and permeable treatment walls: Fundamentals and approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, S.D.; Gallinatti, J.D.; Yamane, C.L.; Szerdy, F.S.; Hankins, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    The remediation of groundwater affected by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals continues to be one of the primary challenges facing the environmental industry. With documented evidence that the traditional pump-and-treat method of remediating contaminated groundwater is highly inefficient in most cases, efforts have focused on developing innovative techniques for treating groundwater in situ. One innovative treatment technology that has been applied to in situ treatment of groundwater and has received a great deal of attention in the past two years, can be referred to as zero-valent metal-enhanced treatment (ZMET) of organic compounds and dissolved metals. The ZMET method actually includes two treatment process groups: metal-enhanced reductive dehalogenation for VOCs and metal-enhanced reductive immobilization for metals. Theorized as a two-step reaction involving the oxidation of zero-valent metal and the reduction of water, the metal-enhanced reductive dehalogenation process has been shown to be successful in degrading chlorinated VOCs. The metal immobilization process has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the mobility of oxidized metals through reduction and precipitation of low-solubility compounds.

  10. Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation iron pincer catalysts capable of metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization/dearomatization.

    PubMed

    Zell, Thomas; Milstein, David

    2015-07-21

    The substitution of expensive and potentially toxic noble-metal catalysts by cheap, abundant, environmentally benign, and less toxic metals is highly desirable and in line with green chemistry guidelines. We have recently discovered a new type of metal-ligand cooperation, which is based on the reversible dearomatization/aromatization of different heteroaromatic ligand cores caused by deprotonation/protonation of the ligand. More specifically, we have studied complexes of various transition metals (Ru, Fe, Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Re) bearing pyridine- and bipyridine-based PNP and PNN pincer ligands, which have slightly acidic methylene protons. In addition, we have discovered long-range metal-ligand cooperation in acridine-based pincer ligands, where the cooperation takes place at the electrophilic C-9 position of the acridine moiety leading to dearomatization of its middle ring. This type of metal-ligand cooperation was used for the activation of chemical bonds, including H-H, C-H (sp(2) and sp(3)), O-H, N-H, and B-H bonds. This unusual reactivity likely takes place in various catalytic hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, and related reactions. In this Account, we summarize our studies on novel bifunctional iron PNP and PNN pincer complexes, which were designed on the basis of their ruthenium congeners. Iron PNP pincer complexes serve as efficient (pre)catalysts for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions under remarkably mild conditions. Their catalytic applications include atom-efficient and industrially important hydrogenation reactions of ketones, aldehydes, and esters to the corresponding alcohols. Moreover, they catalyze the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to sodium formate in the presence of sodium hydroxide, the selective decomposition of formic acid to carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and the E-selective semihydrogenation of alkynes to give E-alkenes. These catalysts feature, compared to other iron-based catalysts, very high catalytic activities which in some cases can even exceed those of state-of-the-art noble-metal catalysts. For the iron PNP systems, we describe the synthesis of the pyridine- and acridine-based PNP iron complexes and their performances and limitations in catalytic reactions, and we present studies on their reactivity with relevance to their catalytic mechanisms. In the case of the bipyridine-based PNN system, we summarize the synthesis of new complexes and describe studies on the noninnocence of the methylene position, which can be reversibly deprotonated, as well as on the noninnocence of the bipyridine unit. Overall, this Account underlines that the combination of cheap and abundant iron with ligands that are capable of metal-ligand cooperation can result in the development of novel, versatile, and efficient catalysts for atom-efficient catalytic reactions. PMID:26079678

  11. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bücherl, T.; Söllradl, S.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-10-01

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  12. Minimum metallic conductivity of fluid hydrogen at 140 GPa (1.4 Mbar)

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Weir, S.T.; Mitchell, A.C.

    1999-02-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements indicate that fluid hydrogen achieves the minimum conductivity of a metal at 140 GPa, ninefold initial liquid-H{sub 2} density, and 2600 K. Metallization density is defined to be that at which the electronic mobility gap E{sub g} is reduced by pressure to E{sub g}{approximately}k{sub B}T, at which point E{sub g} is filled in by fluid disorder to produce a metallic density of states with a Fermi surface and the minimum conductivity of a metal. High pressures and temperatures were obtained with a two-stage gun, which accelerates an impactor up to 7 km/sec. A strong shock wave is generated on impact with a holder containing liquid hydrogen at 20 K. The impact shock is split into a shock wave reverberating in hydrogen between two stiff Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} anvils. This compression heats hydrogen quasi-isentropically to about twice its melting temperature and lasts {approximately}100 ns, sufficiently long to achieve equilibrium and sufficiently short to preclude loss of hydrogen by diffusion and chemical reactions. The measured conductivity increases four orders of magnitude in the range 93 to 140 GPa and is constant at 2000 ({Omega}&hthinsp;cm){sup {minus}1} from 140 to 180 GPa. This conductivity is that of fluid Cs and Rb undergoing the same transition at 2000 K. This measured value is within a factor of 5 or less of hydrogen conductivities calculated with (i) minimum conductivity of a metal, (ii) Ziman model of a liquid metal, and (iii) tight-binding molecular dynamics. At metallization this fluid is {approximately}90 at.&hthinsp;{percent} H{sub 2} and 10 at.&hthinsp;{percent} H with a Fermi energy of {approximately}12 eV. Fluid hydrogen at finite temperature undergoes a Mott transition at D{sub m}{sup 1/3}a{sup {asterisk}}=0.30, where D{sub m} is the metallization density and a{sup {asterisk}} is the Bohr radius of the molecule. Metallization occurs at a lower pressure in the fluid than predicted for the solid probably because crystalline and orientational phase transitions in the ordered solid do not occur in the fluid and because of many-body and structural effects. Tight-binding molecular dynamics calculations by Lenosky {ital et al.} suggest that fluid metallic hydrogen is a novel state of condensed matter. Protons are paired transiently and exchange on a timescale of a few molecular vibrational periods, {approximately}10{sup {minus}14}&hthinsp;sec. Also, the kinetic, vibrational, and rotational energies of the dynamically paired protons are comparable. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Reverse hydrogen spillover in supported subnanosize clusters of the metals of groups 8 to 11. A computational model study.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Rösch, Notker

    2005-12-01

    In a recent computational study [G. N. Vayssilov, B. C. Gates and N. Rösch, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. Eng., 2003, 42, 1391], we found zeolite-supported Rh6 clusters, interacting with hydroxyl groups of the support, to undergo partial oxidation due to reverse spillover of hydrogen onto the metal cluster. Now, we have extended this model study to transition metal clusters M6 of the platinum and gold groups. According to the model calculations, reverse spillover of hydrogen onto the zeolite-supported metal clusters is energetically favored for all 12 metals. For most metals, the clusters M6 exhibit a compact form in either of the two states--bare supported and with hydrogen impurities. However, for Cu and Ag, the structures of the clusters with H impurities were determined to be more open, whereas Au6 exhibited an almost planar structure in either state. The estimated energy for reverse hydrogen spillover is lowest for the clusters Au6 and Ag6, 18 and 52 kJ mol(-1) per transferred hydrogen, and highest for the clusters Ir6 and Os6, 229 and 247 kJ mol(-1), respectively. Because of these model results, one would expect small metal clusters, supported on OH covered surfaces, likely to be oxidized and partially covered by hydrogen, substantially affecting the electron distribution and the chemical reactivity of the clusters. To assist in the experimental discrimination of hydrogen impurities of adsorbed metal clusters, we propose two criteria: metal core levels are predicted to be stabilized in the case of reverse hydrogen spillover and the number of metal-oxygen contacts is calculated to be twice as large in clusters with hydrogen impurities. PMID:19810333

  14. Considerations for Storage of High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Utilizing Non-Metal Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Robin E.; Scott, Joseph P.; Wise, Harry

    2005-01-01

    When working with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, it is critical that the storage container be constructed of the proper materials, those which will not degrade to the extent that container breakdown or dangerous decomposition occurs. It has been suggested that the only materials that will safely contain the peroxide for a significant period of time are metals of stainless steel construction or aluminum use as High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Containers. The stability and decomposition of HTP will be also discussed as well as various means suggested in the literature to minimize these problems. The dangers of excess oxygen generation are also touched upon.

  15. SOLUBILITY OF WATER ICE IN METALLIC HYDROGEN: CONSEQUENCES FOR CORE EROSION IN GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, H. F.; Militzer, B.

    2012-01-20

    Using ab initio simulations we investigate whether water ice is stable in the cores of giant planets, or whether it dissolves into the layer of metallic hydrogen above. By Gibbs free energy calculations we find that for pressures between 10 and 40 Mbar the ice-hydrogen interface is thermodynamically unstable at temperatures above approximately 3000 K, far below the temperature of the core-mantle boundaries in Jupiter and Saturn. This implies that the dissolution of core material into the fluid layers of giant planets is thermodynamically favored, and that further modeling of the extent of core erosion is warranted.

  16. HYDROGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

    1999-08-01

    A likely membrane for future testing of high-temperature hydrogen separation from a gasification product stream was targeted as an inorganic analog of a dense-metal membrane, where the hydrogen would dissolve into and diffuse through the membrane structure. An amorphous membrane such as zinc sulfide appeared to be promising. Previously, ZnS film coating tests had been performed using an electron-beam vacuum coating instrument, with zinc films successfully applied to glass substrates. The coatings appeared relatively stable in air and in a simple simulated gasification atmosphere at elevated temperature. Because the electron-beam coating instrument suffered irreparable breakdown, several alternative methods were tested in an effort to produce a nitrogen-impermeable, hydrogen-permeable membrane on porous sintered steel substrates. None of the preparation methods proved successful in sealing the porous substrate against nitrogen gas. To provide a nitrogen-impermeable ZnS material to test for hydrogen permeability, two ZnS infrared sample windows were purchased. These relatively thick ''membranes'' did not show measurable permeation of hydrogen, either due to lack of absorption or a negligible permeation rate due to their thickness. To determine if hydrogen was indeed adsorbed, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses tests were performed on samples of ZnS powder. A significant uptake of hydrogen gas occurred, corresponding to a maximum of 1 mole H{sub 2} per 1 mole ZnS at a temperature of 175 C. The hydrogen remained in the material at ambient temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere, but approximately 50% would be removed in argon. Reheating in a hydrogen atmosphere resulted in no additional hydrogen uptake. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the hydrogen uptake was probably due to the formation of a zinc-sulfur-hydrogen species resulting in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The zinc sulfide was found to be unstable above approximately 200 C, probably with the reduction to metallic zinc with the evolution of hydrogen sulfide. The work has shown that ZnS is not a viable candidate for a high-temperature hydrogen separation membrane.

  17. Degradation of metallic surfaces under space conditions, with particular emphasis on Hydrogen recombination processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajder, Maciej; Geppert, Ulrich; Dudek, Miros?aw

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of metallic structures in space technology brings risk of degradation which occurs under space conditions. New types of materials dedicated for space applications, that have been developed in the last decade, are in majority not well tested for different space mission scenarios. Very little is known how material degradation may affect the stability and functionality of space vehicles and devices during long term space missions. Our aim is to predict how the solar wind and electromagnetic radiation degrade metallic structures. Therefore both experimental and theoretical studies of material degradation under space conditions have been performed. The studies are accomplished at German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Bremen (Germany) and University of Zielona Góra (Poland). The paper presents the results of the theoretical part of those studies. It is proposed that metal bubbles filled with Hydrogen molecular gas, resulting from recombination of the metal free electrons and the solar protons, are formed on the irradiated surfaces. A thermodynamic model of bubble formation has been developed. We study the creation process of H2 -bubbles as function of, inter alia, the metal temperature, proton dose and energy. Our model has been verified by irradiation experiments completed at the DLR facility in Bremen. Consequences of the bubble formation are changes of the physical and thermo-optical properties of such degraded metals. We show that a high surface density of bubbles (up to 108cm-2) with a typical bubble diameter of ? 0.4 ?m will cause a significant increase of the metallic surface roughness. This may have serious consequences to any space mission. Changes in the thermo-optical properties of metallic foils are especially important for the solar sail propulsion technology because its efficiency depends on the effective momentum transfer from the solar photons onto the sail structure. This transfer is proportional to the reflectivity of a sail. Therefore, the propulsion abilities of sail material will be affected by the growing population of the molecular Hydrogen bubbles on metallic foil surfaces.

  18. Micro-machined thin film hydrogen gas sensor, and method of making and using the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMeo, Jr., Frank (Inventor); Bhandari, Gautam (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor including a thin film sensor element formed, e.g., by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD), on a microhotplate structure. The thin film sensor element includes a film of a hydrogen-interactive metal film that reversibly interacts with hydrogen to provide a correspondingly altered response characteristic, such as optical transmissivity, electrical conductance, electrical resistance, electrical capacitance, magnetoresistance, photoconductivity, etc., relative to the response characteristic of the film in the absence of hydrogen. The hydrogen-interactive metal film may be overcoated with a thin film hydrogen-permeable barrier layer to protect the hydrogen-interactive film from deleterious interaction with non-hydrogen species. The hydrogen sensor of the invention may be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently configured as a hand-held apparatus.

  19. DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

    2005-08-01

    The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

  20. Cold three-body collisions in hydrogen-hydrogen-alkali-metal atomic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yujun; Esry, B. D.; D'Incao, J. P.

    2011-03-15

    We have studied hydrogen-hydrogen-alkali three-body systems in the adiabatic hyperspherical representation. For the spin-stretched case, there exists a single XH molecular state when X is one of the bosonic alkali atoms: {sup 7}Li, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 87}Rb, or {sup 133}Cs. As a result, the only recombination process is the one that leads to formation of XH molecules, H+H+X{yields}XH+H, and such molecules will be stable against vibrational relaxation. We have calculated the collision rates for recombination and collision-induced dissociation as well as the elastic cross sections for H+XH collisions up to a temperature of 0.5 K, including the partial wave contributions from J{sup {Pi}=}0{sup +} to 5{sup -}. We have also found that there is just one three-body bound state for such systems for J{sup {Pi}=}0{sup +} and no bound states for higher angular momenta.

  1. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  2. Hydrogen purifier module and method for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    DeVries, Peter David (Spokane, WA)

    2012-02-07

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen permeable membrane, and a gas-tight seal, where the seal is uses a low temperature melting point metal, which upon heating above the melting point subsequently forms a seal alloy with adjacent metals, where the alloy has a melting point above the operational temperature of the purifier. The purifier further is constructed such that a degree of isolation exists between the metal that melts to form the seal and the active area of the purifier membrane, so that the active area of the purifier membrane is not corrupted. A method of forming a hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen permeable membrane with a seal of the same type is also disclosed.

  3. Cleavage of hydrogen by activation at a single non-metal centre - towards new hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, S?awomir J

    2015-05-28

    Molecular surfaces of non-metal species are often characterized by both positive and negative regions of electrostatic potential (EP) at a non-metal centre. This centre may activate molecular hydrogen which further leads to the addition reaction. The positive EP regions at the non-metal centres correspond to ?-holes; the latter sites are enhanced by electronegative substituents. This is why the following simple moieties; PFH2, SFH, AsFH2, SeFH, BrF3, PF(CH3)2 and AsF(CH3)2, were chosen here to analyze the H2 activation and its subsequent splitting at the P, As, S, Se and Br centres. Also the reverse H-H bond reforming process is analyzed. MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed for systems corresponding to different stages of these processes. The sulphur centre in the SFH moiety is analyzed in detail since the potential barrier height for the addition reaction for this species is the lowest of the moieties analyzed here. The results of calculations show that the SFH + H2 ? SFH3 reaction in the gas phase is endothermic but it is exothermic in polar solvents. PMID:25939477

  4. Hydrogen storage properties of light metal adatoms (Li, Na) decorated fluorographene monolayer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, T; Islam, M S; Rao, G S; Panigrahi, P; Gupta, D; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-07-10

    Owing to its high energy density, the potential of hydrogen (H2) as an energy carrier has been immense, however its storage remains a big obstacle and calls for an efficient storage medium. By means of density functional theory (DFT) in spin polarized generalized gradient approximation (GGA), we have investigated the structural, electronic and hydrogen storage properties of a light alkali metal (Li, Na) functionalized fluorographene monolayer (FG). Metal adatoms bind to the FG with significantly high binding energy, much higher than their cohesive energies, which helps to achieve a uniform distribution of metal adatoms on the monolayer and consequently ensure reversibility. Due to a difference of electronegativities, each metal adatom transfers a substantial amount of its charge to the FG monolayer and attains a partial positive state, which facilitates the adsorption of multiple H2 molecules around the adatoms by electrostatic as well as van der Waals interactions. To get a better description of H2 adsorption energies with metal-doped systems, we have also performed calculations using van der Waals corrections. For both the functionalized systems, the results indicate a reasonably high H2 storage capacity with H2 adsorption energies falling into the range for the practical applications. PMID:26066734

  5. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  6. Ab initio study of adsorption of molecular hydrogen on microporous metal-organic frameworks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Sébastien; Côté, Michel

    2004-03-01

    In the ongoing search for promising compounds for hydrogen storage, novel porous metal-organic frameworks (MOF) have been discovered recently [1]. Well defined binding sites were deduced from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy of the rotational transitions of the adsorbed molecular hydrogen. In light of this discovery we performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on this class of microporous MOF to compare different adsorption sites. Different approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials were accessed for a set of relevant properties such as binding energy, energetically favored configuration and distance between the adsorbents and adsorbates. In particular, theoretical rotational spectra of the adsorbed H2 were obtained that could be compared to the experimental INS spectra. [1] Rosi et al., Science Vol. 300, 1127 (2003)

  7. Cryogenic Gellant and Fuel Formulation for Metallized Gelled Propellants: Hydrocarbons and Hydrogen with Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wing; Starkovich, John; Adams, Scott; Palaszewski, Bryan; Davison, William; Burt, William; Thridandam, Hareesh; Hu-Peng, Hsiao; Santy, Myrrl J.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the viability of nanoparticulate gellant materials for gelled hydrocarbons and gelled liquid hydrogen was conducted. The gellants included alkoxides (BTMSE and BTMSH) and silica-based materials. Hexane, ethane, propane and hydrogen were gelled with the newly-formulated materials and their rheological properties were determined: shear stress versus shear rate and their attendant viscosities. Metallized hexane with aluminum particles was also rheologically characterized. The propellant and gellant formulations were selected for the very high surface area and relatively-high energy content of the gellants. These new gellants can therefore improve rocket engine specific impulse over that obtained with traditional cryogenic-fuel gellant materials silicon dioxide, frozen methane, or frozen ethane particles. Significant reductions in the total mass of the gellant were enabled in the fuels. In gelled liquid hydrogen, the total mass of gellant was reduced from 10-40 wt percent of frozen hydrocarbon particles to less that 8 wt percent with the alkoxide.

  8. Cryogenic gellant and fuel formulation for metallized gelled propellants: Hydrocarbons and hydrogen with aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wing; Starkovich, John; Adams, Scott; Palaszewski, Bryan; Davison, William; Burt, William; Thridandam, Hareesh; Hu-Peng, Hsiao; Santy, Myrrl J.

    1994-08-01

    An experimental program to determine the viability of nanoparticulate gellant materials for gelled hydrocarbons and gelled liquid hydrogen was conducted. The gellants included alkoxides (BTMSE and BTMSH) and silica-based materials. Hexane, ethane, propane and hydrogen were gelled with the newly-formulated materials and their rheological properties were determined: shear stress versus shear rate and their attendant viscosities. Metallized hexane with aluminum particles was also rheologically characterized. The propellant and gellant formulations were selected for the very high surface area and relatively-high energy content of the gellants. These new gellants can therefore improve rocket engine specific impulse over that obtained with traditional cryogenic-fuel gellant materials silicon dioxide, frozen methane, or frozen ethane particles. Significant reductions in the total mass of the gellant were enabled in the fuels. In gelled liquid hydrogen, the total mass of gellant was reduced from 10-40 wt percent of frozen hydrocarbon particles to less that 8 wt percent with the alkoxide.

  9. Magnetic Fields of Uranus and Neptune: Metallic Fluid Hydrogen

    E-print Network

    Nellis, W J

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic fields of the Ice Giant Planets Uranus and Neptune (U/N) are unique in the solar system. Based on a substantial database measured on Earth for representative planetary fluids at representative dynamic pressures up to 200 GPa (2 Mbar) and a few 1000 K, the complex magnetic fields of U/N are (i) probably made primarily by degenerate metallic fluid H (MFH) at or near the crossover from the H-He envelopes to Ice cores at ~100 GPa (Mbar) pressures and normalized radii of ~90% of the radii of U/N; (ii) because those magnetic fields are made relatively close to the surfaces of U/N, non-dipolar fields can be expected; (iii) the Ice cores are most probably a heterogeneous fluid mixture of H, N, O, C, Fe/Ni and silicate-oxides and their mutual reaction products at high pressures and temperatures; (iv) the shapes of the magnetic fields are probably caused by weak coupling between rotational motions of U/N and convective motions of conducting fluids in dynamos that make those magnetic fields. Ironically, the...

  10. On the lattice dynamics of metallic hydrogen and other Coulomb systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, H.; Straus, D.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical results for the phonon spectra of metallic hydrogen and other Coulomb systems in cubic lattices are presented. In second order in the electron-ion interaction, the behavior of the dielectric function of the interacting electron gas for arguments around the seond Fermi harmonic leads to drastic Kohn anomalies and even to imaginary phonon frequencies. Third-order band-structure corrections are also calculated. Properties of self-consistent phonons and the validity of the adiabatic approximation are discussed.

  11. Liquid metallic hydrogen and the structure of brown dwarfs and giant planets

    E-print Network

    W. B. Hubbard; T. Guillot; J. I. Lunine; A. Burrows; D. Saumon; M. S. Marley; R. S. Freedman

    1997-03-02

    Electron-degenerate, pressure-ionized hydrogen (usually referred to as metallic hydrogen) is the principal constituent of brown dwarfs, the long-sought objects which lie in the mass range between the lowest-mass stars (about eighty times the mass of Jupiter) and the giant planets. The thermodynamics and transport properties of metallic hydrogen are important for understanding the properties of these objects, which, unlike stars, continually and slowly cool from initial nondegenerate (gaseous) states. Within the last year, a brown dwarf (Gliese 229 B) has been detected and its spectrum observed and analyzed, and several examples of extrasolar giant planets have been discovered. The brown dwarf appears to have a mass of about forty to fifty Jupiter masses and is now too cool to be fusing hydrogen or deuterium, although we predict that it will have consumed all of its primordial deuterium. This paper reviews the current understanding of the interrelationship between its interior properties and its observed spectrum, and also discusses the current status of research on the structure of giant planets, both in our solar system and elsewhere.

  12. Modelling of hydrogen adsorption in the metal organic framework MOF5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, F. M.; Dingemans, T. J.; Wagemaker, M.; Kearley, G. J.

    2005-10-01

    Metal organic frameworks are formed by rigid organic spacer molecules linked by metal ions into a three-dimensional nano porous structure. The large internal surface (up to 4500 m 2 g -1) provides abundant sites for the adsorption of small molecules like hydrogen, which currently generates significant interest for their potential application as reversible hydrogen storage matrix. A prerequisite for hydrogen storage at ambient conditions is that the interaction strength is sufficiently large. Using VASP ab initio computer calculations the adsorption interaction strength for MOF5 is found to be of the order of 70 meV per H 2 molecule, where the main adsorption interaction is with the oxygen atoms. Such value compares well with adsorption experiments on MOF5 and it exceeds that obtained in nanostructured pure carbon materials. The J = 0 to J = 1 rotational transition of the H 2 determined from inelastic neutron scattering results of Rosi et al. [N.L. Rosi, J. Eckert, M. Eddaoudi, D.T. Vodak, J. Kim, M. O'Keeffe, O.M. Yaghi, Science 300 (2003) 1127] is compared to the simulation results, and a hydrogen self diffusion coefficient is estimated.

  13. Neutron and Thermodynamic Studies of Hydrogen on Pd Decorated Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Paige; Ramirez-Cuesta, A.; Cruz Silvia, E.; Sumpter, B.; Larese, J. Z.

    2011-03-01

    We report our investigations of thermodynamic, inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (INS and QENS) studies of H2 adsorbed on bare and Pd decorated metal oxide (MO) surfaces, specifically ZnO, SBA-15 silica, and alumina. Guided by our volumetric adsorption measurements, we used INS and QENS to probe the dynamics of the adsorbed hydrogen molecules. These measurements provide insight into how the microscopic behavior of hydrogen is changed when it is confined at interfaces or interacts with a Pd catalyst. Using INS, the motion of the adsorbed hydrogen are examined as a function of surface adsorbate composition. For rotational motion we use the ortho-to-para transition as a guide and find that the rotational barrier for H2 adsorbed on some of these MO surfaces shift to lower energy (relative to bulk H2). For comparison, the hydrogen adsorption and microscopic behavior when the MO are decorated with 1% Pd metal will be discussed. Evidence for the presence of adsorbed H2, Zn hydroxide and the potential role of spillover will be discussed. This work was partially supported by the U.S. DOE, BES under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with ORNL managed and operated by UT-Battelle, LLC, the NSF under grant DMR-0412231 and a grant from the University of Tennessee, JINS.

  14. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

  15. A thermo-mechanically-coupled theory accounting for hydrogen diffusion and large elastic–viscoplastic deformations of metals

    E-print Network

    Anand, Lallit

    In this paper we develop a thermodynamically-consistent coupled-theory which accounts for diffusion of hydrogen, diffusion of heat, and large elastic–viscoplastic deformations of metals. The theory should be of utility in ...

  16. Getter trap for removing hydrogen and oxygen from a liquid metal

    SciTech Connect

    Grundy, B.R

    1989-05-16

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor system is described comprising: a primary coolant loop including a primary liquid metal coolant, a liquid metal nuclear reactor and a first heat exchanger; a secondary coolant loop including a secondary liquid metal coolant, and first heat exchanger and a second heat exchanger; a third coolant loop including a water coolant, the second heat exchanger and a steam driven device wherein heat from the secondary liquid metal coolant of the secondary liquid metal coolant loop is transferred to the water coolant through the second heat exchanger, and the water coolant flow through the second heat exchanger, the steam driven device and back to the second heat exchanger; a getter trap, disposed in at least one of the primary and the secondary coolant loops, being capable of removing hydrogen and oxygen from the liquid metal flowing in the loops and comprising: an elongated, closed housing having an inlet at one end thereof and an outlet at the other end; a getter material randomly disposed within the housing, the getter material comprising a zirconium-containing substrate of hollow, tubular sections having a coating thereon of a gettering alloy of zirconium, vanadium, and iron.

  17. Curvature and ionization-induced reversible hydrogen storage in metalized hexagonal B36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; Wang, Xiangfu; Ye, Xiao-Juan; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-01

    The synthesis of quasiplanar boron clusters (B36) with a central hexagonal hole provides the first experimental evidence that a single-atomic-layer borophene with hexagonal vacancies is potentially viable [Z. Piazza, H. Hu, W. Li, Y. Zhao, J. Li, and L. S. Wang, Nat. Commun. 5, 3113 (2014)]. However, owing to the hexagonal holes, tunning the electronic and physical properties of B36 through chemical modifications is not fully understood. Based on (van der Waals corrected-) density functional theory, we show that Li adsorbed on B36 and B^-_{36} clusters can serve as reversible hydrogen storage media. The present results indicate that the curvature and ionization of substrates can enhance the bond strength of Li due to the energetically favorable B 2p-Li 2p orbitals hybridization. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridization between H-s orbitals and Li-2s2p orbitals contribute to the adsorption of H2 molecules and the resulting adsorption energy lies between the physisorbed and chemisorbed states. Interestingly, the number of H2 in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the appearance of the negative differential resistance behavior at different bias voltage regions. Furthermore, the cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials constructed by metalized B36 clusters do not cause a decrease in the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules per Li. The system reported here is favorable for the reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at ambient conditions.

  18. Curvature and ionization-induced reversible hydrogen storage in metalized hexagonal B36.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; Wang, Xiangfu; Ye, Xiao-Juan; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-21

    The synthesis of quasiplanar boron clusters (B36) with a central hexagonal hole provides the first experimental evidence that a single-atomic-layer borophene with hexagonal vacancies is potentially viable [Z. Piazza, H. Hu, W. Li, Y. Zhao, J. Li, and L. S. Wang, Nat. Commun. 5, 3113 (2014)]. However, owing to the hexagonal holes, tunning the electronic and physical properties of B36 through chemical modifications is not fully understood. Based on (van der Waals corrected-) density functional theory, we show that Li adsorbed on B36 and B36 (-) clusters can serve as reversible hydrogen storage media. The present results indicate that the curvature and ionization of substrates can enhance the bond strength of Li due to the energetically favorable B 2p-Li 2p orbitals hybridization. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridization between H-s orbitals and Li-2s2p orbitals contribute to the adsorption of H2 molecules and the resulting adsorption energy lies between the physisorbed and chemisorbed states. Interestingly, the number of H2 in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the appearance of the negative differential resistance behavior at different bias voltage regions. Furthermore, the cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials constructed by metalized B36 clusters do not cause a decrease in the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules per Li. The system reported here is favorable for the reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at ambient conditions. PMID:25416890

  19. The Combined Ortho / Para Hydrogen Assignments in H_2 Metal Chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenchain, Daniel A.; Grubbs, G. S., II; Frank, Derek S.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Novick, Stewart E.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational spectra of H_2-AgCl and H_2-AuCl have been measured using a cavity FTMW spectrometer equipped with a laser ablation source. A combination of isotopic substitution, including HD and D_2 substitutions, and the spin-spin interaction of ortho hydrogen were used to determine the structures of these species. Trends in these structures and the strengths of the H_2 interaction will be discussed. Previous work with hydrogen containing complexes have shown that separate spectra are observed for the both the ortho and para hydrogen species. In this work, ortho and para hydrogen are assigned together. The a-axis in the present species is coincident with internal rotation axis of hydrogen. This symmetry, along with a covalent interaction of the H_2 with the metal chlorides, allows for a straightforward global assignment of the ortho and para species. The differences in the present study from the previous works will be discussed, as well as the assignment of the combined ortho and para fits. Y. Zhenhong, K. J. Higgins, W. Klemperer, M. C. McCarthy and P. Thaddeus, J. Chem. Phys., 123(2005) 221106. J. M. Michaug, W. C. Topic, W. Jäger, J. Phys. Chem. A., 115(2011) 9456 M. Ishiguro, K Harada, K. Tanaka, Y. Sumiyoshi, Y. Endo, Chem. Phys. Lett., 554(2012) 33.

  20. Porous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons synthesized via confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao Bin; Xia, Bao Yu; Yu, Le; Yu, Xin-Yao; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical water splitting has been considered as a promising approach to produce clean and sustainable hydrogen fuel. However, the lack of high-performance and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction hinders the large-scale application. As a new class of porous materials with tunable structure and composition, metal-organic frameworks have been considered as promising candidates to synthesize various functional materials. Here we demonstrate a metal-organic frameworks-assisted strategy for synthesizing nanostructured transition metal carbides based on the confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks matrix. Starting from a compound consisting of copper-based metal-organic frameworks host and molybdenum-based polyoxometalates guest, mesoporous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons composed of ultrafine nanocrystallites are successfully prepared as a proof of concept, which exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both acidic and basic solutions. The present study provides some guidelines for the design and synthesis of nanostructured electrocatalysts. PMID:25758159

  1. Porous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons synthesized via confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao Bin; Xia, Bao Yu; Yu, Le; Yu, Xin-Yao; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-03-01

    Electrochemical water splitting has been considered as a promising approach to produce clean and sustainable hydrogen fuel. However, the lack of high-performance and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction hinders the large-scale application. As a new class of porous materials with tunable structure and composition, metal-organic frameworks have been considered as promising candidates to synthesize various functional materials. Here we demonstrate a metal-organic frameworks-assisted strategy for synthesizing nanostructured transition metal carbides based on the confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks matrix. Starting from a compound consisting of copper-based metal-organic frameworks host and molybdenum-based polyoxometalates guest, mesoporous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons composed of ultrafine nanocrystallites are successfully prepared as a proof of concept, which exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both acidic and basic solutions. The present study provides some guidelines for the design and synthesis of nanostructured electrocatalysts.

  2. Porous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons synthesized via confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao Bin; Xia, Bao Yu; Yu, Le; Yu, Xin-Yao; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical water splitting has been considered as a promising approach to produce clean and sustainable hydrogen fuel. However, the lack of high-performance and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction hinders the large-scale application. As a new class of porous materials with tunable structure and composition, metal-organic frameworks have been considered as promising candidates to synthesize various functional materials. Here we demonstrate a metal-organic frameworks-assisted strategy for synthesizing nanostructured transition metal carbides based on the confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks matrix. Starting from a compound consisting of copper-based metal-organic frameworks host and molybdenum-based polyoxometalates guest, mesoporous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons composed of ultrafine nanocrystallites are successfully prepared as a proof of concept, which exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both acidic and basic solutions. The present study provides some guidelines for the design and synthesis of nanostructured electrocatalysts. PMID:25758159

  3. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  4. Metal-and hydrogen-bonding competition during water absorption on Pd(111) and Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarkhanov, Mouslim; Ogletree, D. Frank; Rose, Franck; Mitsui, Toshiyuki; Fomin, Evgeny; Rose, Mark; Cerda, Jorge I.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-09-03

    The initial stages of water adsorption on the Pd(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces have been investigated experimentally by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy in the temperature range between 40 K and 130 K, and theoretically with Density Functional Theory (DFT) total energy calculations and STM image simulations. Below 125 K water dissociation does not occur at any appreciable rate and only molecular films are formed. Film growth starts by the formation of flat hexamer clusters where the molecules bind to the metal substrate through the O-lone pair while making H-bonds with neighboring molecules. As coverage increases, larger networks of linked hexagons are formed with a honeycomb structure, which requires a fraction of the water molecules to have their molecular plane perpendicular to the metal surface with reduced water-metal interaction. Energy minimization favors the growth of networks with limited width. As additional water molecules adsorb on the surface they attach to the periphery of existing islands, where they interact only weakly with the metal substrate. These molecules hop along the periphery of the clusters at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures they bind to the metal to continue the honeycomb growth. The water-Ru interaction is significantly stronger than the water-Pd interaction, which is consistent with the greater degree of hydrogen-bonded network formation and reduced water-metal bonding observed on Pd relative to Ru.

  5. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR?+?PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions. PMID:26486449

  6. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR?+?PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions. PMID:26486449

  7. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR?+?PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions.

  8. Effect of hydrogen bonding and complexation with metal ions on the fluorescence of luotonin A.

    PubMed

    Miskolczy, Zsombor; Biczók, László

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescence characteristics of a biologically active natural alkaloid, luotonin A (LuA), were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The rate constant of the radiationless deactivation from the singlet-excited state diminished by more than one order of magnitude when the solvent polarity was changed from toluene to water. Dual emission was found in polyfluorinated alcohols of large hydrogen bond donating ability due to photoinitiated proton displacement along the hydrogen bond. In CH2Cl2, LuA produced both 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 hydrogen-bonded complexes with hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) in the ground state. Photoexcitation of the 1 : 2 complex led to protonated LuA, whose fluorescence appeared at a long wavelength. LuA served as a bidentate ligand forming 1 : 1 complexes with metal ions in acetonitrile. The stability of the complexes diminished in the series of Cd(2+) > Zn(2+) > Ag(+), and upon competitive binding of water to the metal cations. The effect of chelate formation on the fluorescent properties was revealed. PMID:23487318

  9. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-08-20

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H{sub 2}O, MgO, and SiO{sub 2} dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures.

  10. Turning aluminium into a noble-metal-like catalyst for low-temperature activation of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Irinder S.; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Veyan, Jean François; Chabal, Yves J.

    2011-11-01

    Activation of molecular hydrogen is the first step in producing many important industrial chemicals that have so far required expensive noble-metal catalysts and thermal activation. We demonstrate here that aluminium doped with very small amounts of titanium can activate molecular hydrogen at temperatures as low as 90?K. Using an approach that uses CO as a probe molecule, we identify the atomistic arrangement of the catalytically active sites containing Ti on Al(111) surfaces, combining infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and first-principles modelling. CO molecules, selectively adsorbed on catalytically active sites, form a complex with activated hydrogen that is removed at remarkably low temperatures (115?K possibly as a molecule). These results provide the first direct evidence that Ti-doped Al can carry out the essential first step of molecular hydrogen activation under nearly barrierless conditions, thereby challenging the monopoly of noble metals in hydrogen activation.

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  12. Hydrogen purification: MOF membranes put to the test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-05-01

    Membranes are key components for the removal of greenhouse gases during fuel generation processes, such as hydrogen production, but simultaneous permeability and selectivity is difficult to obtain. This has now been achieved in ultrathin membranes that use the size-selective porosity of metal-organic frameworks to separate CO2 from H2.

  13. Theoretical insights into the hydrogen evolution activity of layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Charlie; Chan, Karen; Nørskov, Jens K.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2015-10-01

    A thermodynamic descriptor-based approach using density functional theory calculations was used to investigate the activity and stability of 26 different transition metal dichalcogenide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We considered variations in the transition metal (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Pd, Pt), the chalcogen (S and Se), the crystal structure (1T and 2H), and the surface termination (basal plane or edge). We find that the HER activity is strongly related to the stability of the catalyst, setting practical limitations on their potential application in HER. For the basal planes, the metallicity is found to be the most important parameter in determining the activity rather than structure or composition. However, systematic improvements in activity are strongly limited by a decrease in stability. For the edges, the activity and stability relationship are similar regardless of structure or chalcogen, and it is possible to achieve optimal hydrogen binding with a stable surface. Nudged elastic band calculations were carried out to probe the possible mechanisms for HER; the insurmountably high barrier for the Tafel mechanism suggests that HER may occur solely via the Volmer-Heyrovsky route for these materials.

  14. Molecular metal-Nx centres in porous carbon for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Brüller, Sebastian; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of precious platinum with efficient and low-cost catalysts for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy devices. Here we report a novel type of robust cobalt-nitrogen/carbon catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that is prepared by the pyrolysis of cobalt-N4 macrocycles or cobalt/o-phenylenediamine composites and using silica colloids as a hard template. We identify the well-dispersed molecular CoNx sites on the carbon support as the active sites responsible for the HER. The CoNx/C catalyst exhibits extremely high turnover frequencies per cobalt site in acids, for example, 0.39 and 6.5?s(-1) at an overpotential of 100 and 200?mV, respectively, which are higher than those reported for other scalable non-precious metal HER catalysts. Our results suggest the great promise of developing new families of non-precious metal HER catalysts based on the controlled conversion of homogeneous metal complexes into solid-state carbon catalysts via economically scalable protocols. PMID:26250525

  15. Non-precious metal electrocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Bivens, AP; Myint, M; Zhuang, ZB; Forest, RV; Fang, QR; Chen, JG; Yan, YS

    2014-05-01

    A ternary metallic CoNiMo catalyst is electrochemically deposited on a polycrystalline gold (Au) disk electrode using pulse voltammetry, and characterized for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity by temperature-controlled rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The catalyst exhibits the highest HOR activity among all non-precious metal catalysts (e.g., 20 fold higher than Ni). At a sufficient loading, the CoNiMo catalyst is expected to outperform Pt and thus provides a promising low cost pathway for alkaline or alkaline membrane fuel cells. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and parallel H-2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on structurally much simpler model alloy systems show a trend that CoNiMo has a hydrogen binding energy (HBE) similar to Pt and much lower than Ni, suggesting that the formation of multi-metallic bonds modifies the HBE of Ni and is likely a significant contributing factor for the enhanced HOR activity.

  16. Molecular metal-Nx centres in porous carbon for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Brüller, Sebastian; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Replacement of precious platinum with efficient and low-cost catalysts for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy devices. Here we report a novel type of robust cobalt-nitrogen/carbon catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that is prepared by the pyrolysis of cobalt-N4 macrocycles or cobalt/o-phenylenediamine composites and using silica colloids as a hard template. We identify the well-dispersed molecular CoNx sites on the carbon support as the active sites responsible for the HER. The CoNx/C catalyst exhibits extremely high turnover frequencies per cobalt site in acids, for example, 0.39 and 6.5 s-1 at an overpotential of 100 and 200 mV, respectively, which are higher than those reported for other scalable non-precious metal HER catalysts. Our results suggest the great promise of developing new families of non-precious metal HER catalysts based on the controlled conversion of homogeneous metal complexes into solid-state carbon catalysts via economically scalable protocols.

  17. Uranium metal reactions with hydrogen and water vapour and the reactivity of the uranium hydride produced

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, H.; Broan, C.; Goddard, D.; Hodge, N.; Woodhouse, G.; Diggle, A.; Orr, R.

    2013-07-01

    Within the nuclear industry, metallic uranium has been used as a fuel. If this metal is stored in a hydrogen rich environment then the uranium metal can react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride which can be pyrophoric when exposed to air. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has been carrying out a programme of research for Sellafield Limited to investigate the conditions required for the formation and persistence of uranium hydride and the reactivity of the material formed. The experimental results presented here have described new results characterising uranium hydride formed from bulk uranium at 50 and 160 C. degrees and measurements of the hydrolysis kinetics of these materials in liquid water. It has been shown that there is an increase in the proportion of alpha-uranium hydride in material formed at lower temperatures and that there is an increase in the rate of reaction with water of uranium hydride formed at lower temperatures. This may at least in part be attributable to a difference in the reaction rate between alpha and beta-uranium hydride. A striking observation is the strong dependence of the hydrolysis reaction rate on the temperature of preparation of the uranium hydride. For example, the reaction rate of uranium hydride prepared at 50 C. degrees was over ten times higher than that prepared at 160 C. degrees at 20% extent of reaction. The decrease in reaction rate with the extent of reaction also depended on the temperature of uranium hydride preparation.

  18. Performance of a metal hydride store on the "Ross Barlow" hydrogen powered canal boat.

    PubMed

    Bevan, A I; Züttel, A; Book, D; Harris, I R

    2011-01-01

    This project involved the conversion of a British Waterways maintenance craft to a canal boat, powered by a combination of a solid-state hydrogen store, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, lead-acid battery pack and a high-efficiency, permanent magnet (NdFeB) electric motor. These replaced the conventional diesel engine thus eliminating water, noise, local and general atmospheric pollution. The "Protium" project applies modern technologies to a traditional mode of transportation. The TiMn2-based metal hydride store exhibited excellent performance as an effective means of storing 4 kg of hydrogen with a suitable desorption flow rate and temperature adequate for the operation of a 1 kW PEM fuel cell in a water-based environment. PMID:22455080

  19. Hydrogen peroxide modification enhances the ability of biochar (hydrochar) produced from hydrothermal carbonization of peanut hull to remove aqueous heavy metals: Batch and column tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental and modeling investigations were conducted to examine the effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on hydrothermally produced biochar (hydrochar) from peanut hull to remove aqueous heavy metals. Characterization measurements showed that hydrogen peroxide modification increased the oxygen-c...

  20. Surface science and electrochemical studies of metal-modified carbides for fuel cells and hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Thomas Glenn

    Carbides of the early transition metals have emerged as low-cost catalysts that are active for a wide range of reactions. The surface chemistry of carbides can be altered by modifying the surface with small amounts of admetals. These metal-modified carbides can be effective replacements for Pt-based bimetallic systems, which suffer from the drawbacks of high cost and low thermal stability. In this dissertation, metal-modified carbides were studied for reactions with applications to renewable energy technologies. It is demonstrated that metal-modified carbides possess high activity for alcohol reforming and electrochemical hydrogen production. First, the surface chemistry of carbides towards alcohol decomposition is studied using density functional theory (DFT) and surface science experiments. The Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) was used to calculate the binding energies of alcohols and decomposition intermediates on metal-modified carbides. The calculated binding energies were then correlated to reforming activity determined experimentally using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the case of methanol decomposition, it was found that tungsten monocarbide (WC) selectively cleaved the C-O bond to produce methane. Upon modifying the surface with a single layer of metal such as Ni, Pt, or Rh, the selectivity shifted towards scission of the C-H bonds while leaving the C-O bond intact, producing carbon monoxide (CO) and H2. High resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to examine the bond breaking sequence as a function of temperature. From HREELS, it was shown that the surfaces followed an activity trend of Rh > Ni > Pt. The Au-modified WC surface possessed too low of a methanol binding energy, and molecular desorption of methanol was the most favorable pathway on this surface. Next, the ability of Rh-modified WC to break the C-C bond of C2 and C3 alcohols was demonstrated. HREELS showed that ethanol decomposed through an acetaldehyde intermediate on Rh/WC, and that the C-C bond was broken by 200 K. Finally, the suitability of metal-modified molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) as an ethanol decomposition catalyst was studied. A new reaction pathway of partial dehydrogenation to an acetaldehyde product was achieved by using Cu as an admetal. The second section of this dissertation was the study of metal-modified carbides for electrochemical hydrogen evolution. Previously, DFT calculations had predicted a similar hydrogen binding energy (HBE) between Pd-modified carbides and bulk Pd. Linear sweep voltammograms (LSV) demonstrated that Pd-modified WC and Mo2C possessed hydrogen evolution activity orders of magnitude greater than the bare carbides. The long-term stability of these surfaces under operating conditions was also examined. A two-hour chronopotentiometry experiment was performed, after which x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) found that negligible loss of the Pd overlayer occurred. As an extension of this work, a DFT study was performed for several admetal/Mo2C combinations. It was shown that the HBE of these surfaces mostly correlated with the pure metal HBE. Some of these combinations were tested experimentally, but were unstable in the acidic electrolyte.

  1. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to formic acid by transition-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junzhong; Li, Z.; Wang, H.; Wang, C.

    1993-12-31

    For the unfavorable effects of carbon dioxide on the environment and ecology and for the increasing scarcity of organic carbon carriers for the future, the study of conversion of CO{sub 2} into organic compounds is currently attracting widespread interest. The production of formic acid from the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide in alcohol by transition metals (Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Fe, Co, Ni) and their complexes as catalysts is reported. RuH{sub 2}(CO)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}, RhH(CO)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}, and IrH(CO)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}, have been found to be effective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} in hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} in alcohol`s under mild conditions (loading pressures of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, 2.5MPa each, and 333K) to provide formic acid. Ru and its complex RuH{sub 2}(CO)(Ph{sub 3}){sub 3} were shown to be most effective. Its activity reached at 40 mol HCOOH/mol cat-hr under conditions mention above. A catalytic cycle is proposed, which starts with formation of RuH{sub 2}(C)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3} as the catalytic activity species, then CO{sub 2} insertion taking place to form metal-formate intermediate, and last releasing formic acid from metal center, either by reductive elimination of the hydrido formato ligands or ligand-assisted heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen with loss of formic acid.

  2. Unusual hydrogen bonding behavior in binary complexes of coinage metal anions with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Holger; Boese, A. Daniel; Weber, J. Mathias

    2005-08-01

    We have studied the interaction of atomic coinage metal anions with water molecules by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of M-•H2O•Arn clusters (M =Cu, Ag, Au; n =1, 2). We compare our observations with calculations on density-functional and coupled cluster levels of theory. The gold anion is bound to the water molecule by a single ionic hydrogen bond, similar to the halide-water complexes. In contrast, zero-point motion in the silver and copper complexes leads to a deviation from this motif.

  3. Unusual hydrogen bonding behavior in binary complexes of coinage metal anions with water

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Holger; Boese, A. Daniel; Weber, J. Mathias

    2005-08-22

    We have studied the interaction of atomic coinage metal anions with water molecules by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of M{sup -}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O{center_dot}Ar{sub n} clusters (M=Cu, Ag, Au; n=1, 2). We compare our observations with calculations on density-functional and coupled cluster levels of theory. The gold anion is bound to the water molecule by a single ionic hydrogen bond, similar to the halide-water complexes. In contrast, zero-point motion in the silver and copper complexes leads to a deviation from this motif.

  4. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions of transition-metal hydrides. Utilization of a radical rearrangement in the determination of hydrogen atom transfer rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R.M.; Samsel, E.G.

    1987-10-14

    The reaction of a transition-metal hydride with an unsaturated substrate is a critical step in several catalytic reactions. Commonly accepted mechanisms for homogeneous hydrogenation and hydroformylation have traditionally involved even-electron intermediates conforming to the 16- and 18-electron rule. Recently, kinetic and spectroscopic (CIDNP) evidence has been reported in support of odd-electron pathways for reactions of metal hydrides with substituted styrenes, anthracenes, allenes, and conjugated dienes, all of which form stabilized (benzylic or allylic) radicals. The authors report a new approach, in which metal hydrides are reacted with vinylcyclopropanes, which contain a radical clock.

  5. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  6. Bifacial Base-Pairing Behaviors of 5-Hydroxyuracil DNA Bases through Hydrogen Bonding and Metal Coordination.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Mashima, Tsukasa; Katahira, Masato; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2015-10-12

    A novel bifacial ligand-bearing nucleobase, 5-hydroxyuracil (U(OH) ), which forms both a hydrogen-bonded base pair (U(OH) -A) and a metal-mediated base pair (U(OH) -M-U(OH) ) has been developed. The U(OH) -M-U(OH) base pairs were quantitatively formed in the presence of lanthanide ions such as Gd(III) when U(OH) -U(OH) pairs were consecutively incorporated into DNA duplexes. This result established metal-assisted duplex stabilization as well as DNA-templated assembly of lanthanide ions. Notably, a duplex possessing U(OH) -A base pairs was destabilized by addition of Gd(III) ions. This observation suggests that the hybridization behaviors of the U(OH) -containing DNA strands are altered by metal complexation. Thus, the U(OH) nucleobase with a bifacial base-pairing property holds great promise as a component for metal-responsive DNA materials. PMID:26332356

  7. Structures of alkali metals in silica gel nanopores: new materials for chemical reductions and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Shatnawi, Mouath; Paglia, Gianluca; Dye, James L; Cram, Kevin C; Lefenfeld, Michael; Billinge, Simon J L

    2007-02-01

    Alkali metals and their alloys can be protected from spontaneous reaction with dry air by intercalation (with subsequent heating) into the pores of silica gel (SG) at loadings up to 40 wt %. The resulting loose, black powders are convenient materials for chemical reduction of organic compounds and the production of clean hydrogen. The problem addressed in this paper is the nature of the reducing species present in these amorphous materials. The atomic pair distribution function (PDF), which considers both Bragg and diffuse scattering components, was used to examine their structures. Liquid Na-K alloys added to silica gel at room temperature (stage 0) or heated to 150 degrees C (stage I) as well as stage I Na-SG, retain the overall pattern of pure silica gel. Broad oscillations in the PDF show that added alkali metals remain in the pores as nanoscale metal clusters. 23Na MAS NMR studies confirm the presence of Na(0) and demonstrate that Na+ ions are formed as well. The relative amounts of Na(0) and Na(+) depend on both the overall metal loading and the average pore size. The results suggest that ionization occurs near or in the SiO2 walls, with neutral metal present in the larger cavities. The fate of the electrons released by ionization is uncertain, but they may add to the silica gel lattice, or form an "electride-like plasma" near the silica gel walls. A remaining mystery is why the stage I material does not show a melting endotherm of the encapsulated metal and does not react with dry oxygen. Na-SG when heated to 400 degrees C (stage II) yields a dual-phase reaction product that consists of Na(4)Si(4) and Na(2)SiO(3). PMID:17263423

  8. First-Principles Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Systems

    SciTech Connect

    J. Karl Johnson

    2011-05-20

    The objective of this project is to complement experimental efforts of MHoCE partners by using state-of-the-art theory and modeling to study the structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. Specific goals include prediction of the heats of formation and other thermodynamic properties of alloys from first principles methods, identification of new alloys that can be tested experimentally, calculation of surface and energetic properties of nanoparticles, and calculation of kinetics involved with hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes. Discovery of new metal hydrides with enhanced properties compared with existing materials is a critical need for the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. New materials discovery can be aided by the use of first principles (ab initio) computational modeling in two ways: (1) The properties, including mechanisms, of existing materials can be better elucidated through a combined modeling/experimental approach. (2) The thermodynamic properties of novel materials that have not been made can, in many cases, be quickly screened with ab initio methods. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to explore millions of possible reaction conditions consisting of different element spaces, compositions, and temperatures. We have identified potentially promising single- and multi-step reactions that can be explored experimentally.

  9. Metal diselenide nanoparticles as highly active and stable electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jia; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Jingjie; Dong, Pei; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhang, Gengmin; Lou, Jun

    2015-09-01

    In this communication, nickel diselenide (NiSe2) nanoparticles are synthesized by a facile and low-cost hydrothermal method. The synthesis method can be extended to other metal diselenides as well. The electrode made of NiSe2 exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). A low Tafel slope of 31.1 mV per decade is achieved for NiSe2, which is comparable to that of platinum (~30 mV per decade). Moreover, the catalytic activity of NiSe2 is very stable and no obvious degradation is found even after 1000 cyclic voltammetric sweeps.In this communication, nickel diselenide (NiSe2) nanoparticles are synthesized by a facile and low-cost hydrothermal method. The synthesis method can be extended to other metal diselenides as well. The electrode made of NiSe2 exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). A low Tafel slope of 31.1 mV per decade is achieved for NiSe2, which is comparable to that of platinum (~30 mV per decade). Moreover, the catalytic activity of NiSe2 is very stable and no obvious degradation is found even after 1000 cyclic voltammetric sweeps. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, additional figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03724g

  10. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J; Liriano, Melissa L; Baber, Ashleigh E; Lewis, Emily A; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:25005297

  11. Influence of oxygen on permeation of hydrogen isotopes through group 5 metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Busnyuk, A.; Alimov, V.; Livshits, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Matsuyama, M.

    2008-07-15

    Group 5 metals (V, Nb and Ta) are potential candidates of tube material in vacuum permeator for tritium recovery from Pb-17Li liquid blanket system. From this viewpoint, the influence of oxygen on the surface reaction rates of hydrogen on V and Ta were examined in an ultra-high vacuum apparatuses at elevated temperatures, and the results were compared with the data on Nb acquired in a previous study. The surface reaction rates of hydrogen on V and Ta, and consequently permeation rates, decreased with increasing oxygen concentration in the bulk as previously observed for Nb. These observations were ascribed to the increase in surface oxygen coverage with increasing bulk oxygen concentration. The weakest influence of oxygen on hydrogen permeation rate was observed for V. The expected permeation rate through V under typical blanket conditions, however, was not necessarily high due to high oxygen solubility in V. The evaluation indicated that the highest permeation rate should be obtained with Nb under typical blanket conditions. (authors)

  12. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 â?? LiAlH4 â??Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the alanate from alkali hydride, Al and hydrogen, was hampering reversibility. The reverse reaction was then studied for the same phase diagram, starting with LiH, NaH, and MgH2, and Al. The study was extended to phase diagrams including KH and CaH2 as well. The observed hydrogen storage capacity in the Al hexahydrides was less than 4 wt. %, well short of DOE targets. The HT assay came on line and after certification with studies on NaAlH4, was first applied to the LiNH2 - LiBH4 - MgH2 phase diagram. The 60-point study elucidated trends within the system locating an optimum material of 0.6 LiNH2 â?? 0.3 MgH2 â?? 0.1 LiBH4 that stored about 4 wt. % H2 reversibly and operated below 220 °C. Also present was the phase Li4(NH2)3BH4, which had been discovered in the LiNH2 -LiBH4 system. This new ternary formulation performed much better than the well-known 2 LiNH2 â?? MgH2 system by 50 °C in the HT assay. The Li4(NH2)3BH4 is a low melting ionic liquid under our test conditions and facilitates the phase transformations required in the hydrogen storage reaction, which no longer relies on a higher energy solid state reaction pathway. Further study showed that the 0.6 LiNH2 â?? 0.3 MgH2 â?? 0.1 LiBH4 formulation was very stable with respect to ammonia and diborane desorption, the observed desorption was from hydrogen. This result could not have been anticipated and was made possible by the efficiency of HT combinatorial methods. Investigation of the analogous LiNH2 â?? LiBH4 â?? CaH2 phase diagram revealed new reversible hydrogen storage materials 0.625 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 and 0.375 LiNH2 + 0.25 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 operating at 1 wt. % reversible hydrogen below 175 °C. Powder x-ray diffraction revealed a new structure for the spent materials which had not been previously observed. While the storage capacity was not impressive, an important aspect is that it boron appears to participate in a low temperature reversible reaction. The last major area of study also focused

  13. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    PubMed Central

    Lederhos, Cecilia R.; Badano, Juan M.; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M. Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673?K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX > PdNRX > PtClRX ? RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX = PdNRX > RuClRX > PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  14. Boryl-metal bonds facilitate cobalt/nickel-catalyzed olefin hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Pin; Peters, Jonas C

    2014-10-01

    New approaches toward the generation of late first-row metal catalysts that efficiently facilitate two-electron reductive transformations (e.g., hydrogenation) more typical of noble-metal catalysts is an important goal. Herein we describe the synthesis of a structurally unusual S = 1 bimetallic Co complex, [((Cy)PBP)CoH]2 (1), supported by bis(phosphino)boryl and bis(phosphino)hydridoborane ligands. This complex reacts reversibly with a second equivalent of H2 (1 atm) and serves as an olefin hydrogenation catalyst under mild conditions (room temperature, 1 atm H2). A bimetallic Co species is invoked in the rate-determining step of the catalysis according to kinetic studies. A structurally related Ni(I)Ni(I) dimer, [((Ph)PBP)Ni]2 (3), has also been prepared. Like Co catalyst 1, Ni complex 3 displays reversible reactivity toward H2, affording the bimetallic complex [((Ph)PBHP)NiH]2 (4). This reversible behavior is unprecedented for Ni(I) species and is attributed to the presence of a boryl-Ni bond. Lastly, a series of monomeric ((tBu)PBP)NiX complexes (X = Cl (5), OTf (6), H (7), OC(H)O (8)) have been prepared. The complex ((tBu)PBP)NiH (7) shows enhanced catalytic olefin hydrogenation activity when directly compared with its isoelectronic/isostructural analogues where the boryl unit is substituted by a phenyl or amine donor, a phenomenon that we posit is related to the strong trans influence exerted by the boryl ligand. PMID:25181350

  15. Calcium as a superior coating metal in functionalization of carbon fullerenes for high-capacity hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Yang, Shenyuan; Hicke, Christian; Wang, Enge; Geohegan, David B; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    We explore theoretically the feasibility of functionalizing carbon nanostructures for hydrogen storage, focusing on the coating of C60 fullerenes with light alkaline-earth metals. Our first-principles density functional theory studies show that both Ca and Sr can bind strongly to the C60 surface, and highly prefer monolayer coating, thereby explaining existing experimental observations. The strong binding is attributed to an intriguing charge transfer mechanism involving the empty d levels of the metal elements. The charge redistribution, in turn, gives rise to electric fields surrounding the coated fullerenes, which can now function as ideal attractors upon molecular hydrogen adsorption with binding strengths strong enough for potential room temperature applications but weak enough to avoid H2 dissociation. With a hydrogen uptake of >8.4wt% on Ca32C60, Ca is superior to all the recently suggested metal coating elements.

  16. Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support

    DOEpatents

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

    2012-07-24

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

  17. First-Principles Study on the Grain Boundary Embrittlement of Metals by Solute Segregation: Part II. Metal (Fe, Al, Cu)-Hydrogen (H) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masatake; Ebihara, Ken-Ichi; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kadoyoshi, Tomoko; Suzudo, Tomoaki; Kaburaki, Hideo

    2011-02-01

    The microscopic mechanism of grain boundary (GB) embrittlement in metals by hydrogen segregation (trapping) has been not well understood for many years. From first-principles calculations, we show here that the calculated cohesive energy of bcc Fe ?3(111) and fcc Al(Cu) ?5(012) symmetrical tilt GBs can be significantly reduced if many hydrogen atoms segregate at the GBs. This indicates that the reduction of the cohesive energy of the GB may cause the hydrogen-induced GB embrittlement in Fe, Al, and Cu. Considering the "mobile" effect of hydrogen during fracture, especially for the Fe system, more hydrogen atoms coming from solid solution state can segregate on the gradually formed two fracture surfaces and reduce further the cohesive energy. We suggest a new idea about the upper and lower critical stresses observed in the constant-load test of hydrogen-induced delayed fracture in high-strength steels; the upper critical stress is determined by the amount (density) of "immobile" hydrogen atoms segregated at the GB before fracture, and the lower critical stress is determined by the total amount (density) of immobile and mobile hydrogen atoms, the latter of which segregate on the two fracture surfaces during fracture.

  18. Flexible Sandwich Diaphragms Are Less Permeable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalovic, John G.; Vassallo, Franklin A.

    1993-01-01

    Diaphragms for use in refrigerator compressors made as laminates of commercially available elastomers and metals. Diaphragms flexible, but less permeable by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant fluids than diaphragms made of homogeneous mixtures of materials.

  19. Metallic WO2-Carbon Mesoporous Nanowires as Highly Efficient Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Zhang, Jingfang; Shi, Yanmei; Liu, Dali; Zhang, Bin

    2015-06-10

    The development of electrocatalysts to generate hydrogen, with good activity and stability, is a great challenge in the fields of chemistry and energy. Here we demonstrate a "hitting three birds with one stone" method to synthesize less toxic metallic WO2-carbon mesoporous nanowires with high concentration of oxygen vacancies (OVs) via calcination of inorganic/organic WO3-ethylenediamine hybrid precursors. The products exhibit excellent performance for H2 generation: the onset overpotential is only 35 mV, the required overpotentials for 10 and 20 mA/cm(2) are 58 and 78 mV, the Tafel slope is 46 mV/decade, the exchange current density is 0.64 mA/cm(2), and the stability is over 10 h. Further studies, in combination with density functional theory, demonstrate that the unusual electronic structure and the large amount of active sites, generated by the high concentration of OVs, as well as the closely attached carbon materials, were key factors for excellent performance. Our results experimentally and theoretically establish metallic transition metal oxides (TMOs) as intriguing novel electrocatalysts for H2 generation. Such TMOs with OVs might be promising candidates for other energy storage and conversion applications. PMID:25992910

  20. From hydrogen bonding to metal coordination and back: Porphyrin-based networks on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Studener, F. Müller, K.; Stöhr, M.; Marets, N.; Bulach, V. Hosseini, M. W.

    2015-03-14

    The self-assembly of a metal-free porphyrin bearing two pyridyl coordinating sites and two pentyl chains at trans meso positions was investigated under ultrahigh vacuum on a Ag(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The STM measurements revealed a well-ordered close-packed structure with a rhombic unit cell for coverages ?1 monolayer with their molecular plane parallel to the surface. The growth direction of the molecular islands is aligned along the step edges, which are restructured due to molecule-substrate interactions. The shorter unit cell vector of the molecular superstructure follows the ?1-10? direction of the Ag(111) substrate. Hydrogen bonds between pyridyl and pyrrole groups of neighboring molecules as well as weak van der Waals forces between the pentyl chains stabilize the superstructure. Deposition of cobalt atoms onto the close-packed structure at room temperature leads to the formation of a hexagonal porous network stabilized by metal-ligand bonding between the pyridyl ligands and the cobalt atoms. Thermal annealing of the Co-coordination network at temperatures >450 K results in the transformation of the hexagonal network into a second close-packed structure. Changes in the molecule-substrate interactions due to metalation of the porphyrin core with Co as well as intermolecular interactions can explain the observed structural transformations.

  1. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Used to Manufacture Gas Storage Tanks With Reduced Permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi G.; Johnston, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been considerable research in the area of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. This research has shown that the dispersion of small amounts of an organically modified layered silicate improves the polymer strength, modulus, thermal stability, and barrier properties. There have been several reports on the dispersion of layered silicates in an epoxy matrix. Potential enhancements to the barrier properties of epoxy/silicate nanocomposites make this material attractive for low permeability tankage. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have several advantages for cryogenic storage tanks. They are lightweight, strong, and stiff; therefore, a smaller fraction of a vehicle's potential payload capacity is used for propellant storage. Unfortunately, the resins typically used to make PMC tanks have higher gas permeability than metals. This can lead to hydrogen loss through the body of the tank instead of just at welds and fittings. One approach to eliminate this problem is to build composite tanks with thin metal liners. However, although these tanks provide good permeability performance, they suffer from a substantial mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion, which can lead to failure of the bond between the liner and the body of the tank. Both problems could be addressed with polymersilicate nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced hydrogen permeability, making them potential candidates for linerless PMC tanks. Through collaboration with Northrop Grumman and Michigan State University, nanocomposite test tanks were manufactured for the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the helium permeability was measured. An organically modified silicate was prepared at Michigan State University and dispersed in an epoxy matrix (EPON 826/JeffamineD230). The epoxy/silicate nanocomposites contained either 0 or 5 wt% of the organically modified silicate. The tanks were made by filament winding carbon fibers with the nanocomposite resin. Helium permeability was measured by Northrop Grumman, showing that the leak rate/day of the nanocomposite matrix tank was approximately 80-percent less than that of the neat epoxy matrix tank.

  2. A Phenomenological Study of the Metal-Oxide Interface: The Role of Catalysis in Hydrogen Production from Renewable Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Idriss, H.; Llorca, J; Chan, S; Blackford, M; Pas, S; Hill, A; Alamgir, F; Rettew, R; Petersburg, C; Barteau, M

    2008-01-01

    The truth about Cats: The metal-oxide interface of a Pd-Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalyst was studied in the context of developing active, selective and durable solid catalytic materials for the production of hydrogen from renewables. The presence of a stable contact between finely dispersed transition-metal clusters (Pd and Rh) on the nanoparticles of the CeO{sub 2} support leads to a highly active and stable catalyst for the steam reforming of ethanol.

  3. Charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon capacitors in the presence of hydrogen deactivated dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Witczak, Steven C.; Winokur, Peter S.; Lacoe, Ronald C.; Mayer, Donald C.

    2000-06-01

    An improved charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors is presented which accounts for the deactivation of substrate dopants by hydrogen at elevated irradiation temperatures or small irradiation biases. Using high-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements, radiation-induced inversion voltage shifts are separated into components due to oxide trapped charge, interface traps, and deactivated dopants, where the latter is computed from a reduction in Si capacitance. In the limit of no radiation-induced dopant deactivation, this approach reduces to the standard midgap charge separation technique used widely for the analysis of room-temperature irradiations. The technique is demonstrated on a p-type MOS capacitor irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays at 100 degree sign C and zero bias, where the dopant deactivation is significant.(c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon capacitors in the presence of hydrogen deactivated dopants

    SciTech Connect

    WITCZAK,STEVEN C.; WINOKUR,PETER S.; LACOE,RONALD C.; MAYER,DONALD C.

    2000-02-01

    An improved charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors is presented which accounts for the deactivation of substrate dopants by hydrogen at elevated irradiation temperatures or small irradiation biases. Using high-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, radiation-induced inversion voltage shifts are separated into components due to oxide trapped charge, interface traps and deactivated dopants, where the latter is computed from a reduction in Si capacitance. In the limit of no radiation-induced dopant deactivation, this approach reduces to the standard midgap charge separation technique used widely for the analysis of room-temperature irradiations. The technique is demonstrated on a p-type MOS capacitor irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays at 100 C and zero bias, where the dopant deactivation is significant.

  5. Low-temperature thermostatics of face-centered-cubic metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    The thermostatic properties of a high-symmetry phase of metallic hydrogen with atomic sphere radius between 0.1 and 1.5 bohr are studied, with special emphasis accorded to electronic screening and quantum proton motion. The electron-proton and proton-proton interactions receive a perturbation treatment based on the Singwi dielectric function, while the proton motion is handled by self-consistent harmonic approximation. Quantum behavior is found to be less pronounced than expected, and nuclear magnetism is absent. The phonon spectrum is, however, affected by screening and large proton motion. The zero-point vibrational energy and the superconducting critical temperature are below previous estimates. The crystalline-defect formation energies are a few times the Debye energy, which implies that defects contribute significantly to melting at the lower particle densities.

  6. Methods for producing hydrogen (BI) sulfide and/or removing metals

    DOEpatents

    Truex, Michael J [Richland, WA; Peyton, Brent M [Pullman, WA; Toth, James J [Kennewick, WA

    2002-05-14

    The present invention is a process wherein sulfide production by bacteria is efficiently turned on and off, using pH adjustment. The adjustment of pH impacts sulfide production by bacteria by altering the relative amounts of H.sub.2 S and HS-- in solution and thereby control the inhibition of the bacterial metabolism that produces sulfide. This process can be used to make a bioreactor produce sulfide "on-demand" so that the production of sulfide can be matched to its use as a metal precipitation reagent. The present invention is of significance because it enables the use of a biological reactor, a cost effective sulfide production system, by making the biological reactor produce hydrogen sulfide "on demand", and therefore responsive to production schedules, waste stream generation rate, and health and safety requirements/goals.

  7. Effective thermal conductivities of four metal ceramic composite coatings in hydrogen-oxygen rocket firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacht, R. L.; Price, H. G., Jr.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effective conductivities of four plasma-arc-sprayed, metal-ceramic gradated coatings on hydrogen-oxygen thrust chambers. The effective thermal conductivities were not a function of pressure or oxidant-to-fuel ratio. The various materials that made up these composites do not seem to affect the thermal conductivity values as much as the differences in the thermal conductivities of the parent materials would lead one to expect. Contact resistance evolving from the spraying process seems to be the controlling factor. The thermal conductivities of all the composites tested fell in the range of 0.75 to 7.5 watts per meter kelvin.

  8. Metal-organic framework based highly selective fluorescence turn-on probe for hydrogen sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S.; Saha, Tanmoy; Desai, Aamod V.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is known to play a vital role in human physiology and pathology which stimulated interest in understanding complex behaviour of H2S. Discerning the pathways of H2S production and its mode of action is still a challenge owing to its volatile and reactive nature. Herein we report azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) as a selective turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection. The MOF shows highly selective and fast response towards H2S even in presence of other relevant biomolecules. Low cytotoxicity and H2S detection in live cells, demonstrate the potential of MOF towards monitoring H2S chemistry in biological system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of MOF that exhibit fast and highly selective fluorescence turn-on response towards H2S under physiological conditions.

  9. Metal-organic framework based highly selective fluorescence turn-on probe for hydrogen sulphide

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S.; Saha, Tanmoy; Desai, Aamod V.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is known to play a vital role in human physiology and pathology which stimulated interest in understanding complex behaviour of H2S. Discerning the pathways of H2S production and its mode of action is still a challenge owing to its volatile and reactive nature. Herein we report azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) as a selective turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection. The MOF shows highly selective and fast response towards H2S even in presence of other relevant biomolecules. Low cytotoxicity and H2S detection in live cells, demonstrate the potential of MOF towards monitoring H2S chemistry in biological system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of MOF that exhibit fast and highly selective fluorescence turn-on response towards H2S under physiological conditions. PMID:25394493

  10. Platinum-nickel frame within metal-organic framework fabricated in situ for hydrogen enrichment and molecular sieving.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yu, Rong; Huang, Jinglu; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Diyang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dingsheng; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Developing catalysts that provide the effective activation of hydrogen and selective absorption of substrate on metal surface is crucial to simultaneously improve activity and selectivity of hydrogenation reaction. Here we present an unique in situ etching and coordination synthetic strategy for exploiting a functionalized metal-organic framework to incorporate the bimetallic platinum-nickel frames, thereby forming a frame within frame nanostructure. The as-grown metal-organic framework serves as a 'breath shell' to enhance hydrogen enrichment and activation on platinum-nickel surface. More importantly, this framework structure with defined pores can provide the selective accessibility of molecules through its one-dimensional channels. In a mixture containing four olefins, the composite can selectively transport the substrates smaller than its pores to the platinum-nickel surface and catalyse their hydrogenation. This molecular sieve effect can be also applied to selectively produce imines, which are important intermediates in the reductive imination of nitroarene, by restraining further hydrogenation via cascade processes. PMID:26391605

  11. Platinum-nickel frame within metal-organic framework fabricated in situ for hydrogen enrichment and molecular sieving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Yu, Rong; Huang, Jinglu; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Diyang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dingsheng; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-09-01

    Developing catalysts that provide the effective activation of hydrogen and selective absorption of substrate on metal surface is crucial to simultaneously improve activity and selectivity of hydrogenation reaction. Here we present an unique in situ etching and coordination synthetic strategy for exploiting a functionalized metal-organic framework to incorporate the bimetallic platinum-nickel frames, thereby forming a frame within frame nanostructure. The as-grown metal-organic framework serves as a `breath shell' to enhance hydrogen enrichment and activation on platinum-nickel surface. More importantly, this framework structure with defined pores can provide the selective accessibility of molecules through its one-dimensional channels. In a mixture containing four olefins, the composite can selectively transport the substrates smaller than its pores to the platinum-nickel surface and catalyse their hydrogenation. This molecular sieve effect can be also applied to selectively produce imines, which are important intermediates in the reductive imination of nitroarene, by restraining further hydrogenation via cascade processes.

  12. Platinum–nickel frame within metal-organic framework fabricated in situ for hydrogen enrichment and molecular sieving

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yu, Rong; Huang, Jinglu; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Diyang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dingsheng; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Developing catalysts that provide the effective activation of hydrogen and selective absorption of substrate on metal surface is crucial to simultaneously improve activity and selectivity of hydrogenation reaction. Here we present an unique in situ etching and coordination synthetic strategy for exploiting a functionalized metal-organic framework to incorporate the bimetallic platinum–nickel frames, thereby forming a frame within frame nanostructure. The as-grown metal-organic framework serves as a ‘breath shell' to enhance hydrogen enrichment and activation on platinum–nickel surface. More importantly, this framework structure with defined pores can provide the selective accessibility of molecules through its one-dimensional channels. In a mixture containing four olefins, the composite can selectively transport the substrates smaller than its pores to the platinum–nickel surface and catalyse their hydrogenation. This molecular sieve effect can be also applied to selectively produce imines, which are important intermediates in the reductive imination of nitroarene, by restraining further hydrogenation via cascade processes. PMID:26391605

  13. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D; Peters, Aaron W; Kubiak, Cliff P; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200?mV at a benchmark current density of 10?mA?cm(-2). Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst. PMID:26365764

  14. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm-2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  15. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, RD; Krungleviciute, V; Clingerman, DJ; Mondloch, JE; Peng, Y; Wilmer, CE; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK; Mirkin, CA

    2013-09-10

    A Cu-carborane-based metal organic framework (MOF), NU-135, which contains a quasi-spherical para-carborane moiety, has been synthesized and characterized. NU-135 exhibits a pore volume of 1.02 cm(3)/g and a gravimetric BET surface area of ca. 2600 m(2)/g, and thus represents the first highly porous carborane-based MOF. As a consequence of the, unique geometry of the carborane unit, NU-135 has a very high volumetric BET surface area of ca. 1900 m(2)/cm(3). CH4, CO2, and H-2 adsorption isotherms were measured over a broad range of pressures and temperatures and are in good agreement with computational predictions. The methane storage capacity of NU-135 at 35 bar and 298 K is ca. 187 v(STP)/v. At 298 K, the pressure required to achieve a methane storage density comparable to that of a compressed natural gas (CNG) tank pressurized to 212 bar, which is a typical storage pressure, is only 65 bar. The methane working capacity (5-65 bar) is 170 v(STP)/v. The volumetric hydrogen storage capacity at 55 bar and 77 K is 49 g/L. These properties are comparable to those of current record holders in the area of methane and hydrogen storage. This initial example lays the groundwork for carborane-based materials with high surface areas.

  16. Final LDRD report : metal oxide films, nanostructures, and heterostructures for solar hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect

    Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuels-those chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

  17. Hydrogen segregation and its roles in structural stability and metallization: silane under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenwen; Shi, Jingming; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun; Wang, Hui; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    We present results from first-principles calculations on silane (SiH4) under pressure. We find that a three dimensional P-3 structure becomes the most stable phase above 241?GPa. A prominent structural feature, which separates the P-3 structure from previously observed/predicted SiH4 structures, is that a fraction of hydrogen leaves the Si-H bonding environment and forms segregated H2 units. The H2 units are sparsely populated in the system and intercalated with a polymeric Si-H framework. Calculations of enthalpy of formation suggest that the P-3 structure is against the decomposition into Si-H binaries and/or the elemental crystals. Structural stability of the P-3 structure is attributed to the electron-deficient multicenter Si-H-Si interactions when neighboring silicon atoms are linked together through a common hydrogen atom. Within the multicenter bonds, electrons are delocalized and this leads to a metallic state, possibly also a superconducting state, for SiH4. An interesting outcome of the present study is that the enthalpy sum of SiH4 (P-3 structure) and Si (fcc structure) appears to be lower than the enthalpy of disilane (Si2H6) between 200 and 300?GPa (for all previously predicted crystalline forms of Si2H6), which calls for a revisit of the stability of Si2H6 under high pressure. PMID:26266340

  18. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks: The role of nuclear quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Walther, Christian F. J.; Heine, Thomas

    2014-08-14

    The role of nuclear quantum effects on the adsorption of molecular hydrogen in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been investigated on grounds of Grand-Canonical Quantized Liquid Density-Functional Theory (GC-QLDFT) calculations. For this purpose, we have carefully validated classical H{sub 2}-host interaction potentials that are obtained by fitting Born-Oppenheimer ab initio reference data. The hydrogen adsorption has first been assessed classically using Liquid Density-Functional Theory and the Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo methods. The results have been compared against the semi-classical treatment of quantum effects by applying the Feynman-Hibbs correction to the Born-Oppenheimer-derived potentials, and by explicit treatment within the GC-QLDFT. The results are compared with experimental data and indicate pronounced quantum and possibly many-particle effects. After validation calculations have been carried out for IRMOF-1 (MOF-5), GC-QLDFT is applied to study the adsorption of H{sub 2} in a series of MOFs, including IRMOF-4, -6, -8, -9, -10, -12, -14, -16, -18, and MOF-177. Finally, we discuss the evolution of the H{sub 2} quantum fluid with increasing pressure and lowering temperature.

  19. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200?mV at a benchmark current density of 10?mA?cm?2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst. PMID:26365764

  20. Enhanced Photochemical Hydrogen Production by a Molecular Diiron Catalyst Incorporated into a Metal–Organic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A molecular proton reduction catalyst [FeFe](dcbdt)(CO)6 (1, dcbdt = 1,4-dicarboxylbenzene-2,3-dithiolate) with structural similarities to [FeFe]-hydrogenase active sites has been incorporated into a highly robust Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework (MOF) by postsynthetic exchange (PSE). The PSE protocol is crucial as direct solvothermal synthesis fails to produce the functionalized MOF. The molecular integrity of the organometallic site within the MOF is demonstrated by a variety of techniques, including X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In conjunction with [Ru(bpy)3]2+ as a photosensitizer and ascorbate as an electron donor, MOF-[FeFe](dcbdt)(CO)6 catalyzes photochemical hydrogen evolution in water at pH 5. The immobilized catalyst shows substantially improved initial rates and overall hydrogen production when compared to a reference system of complex 1 in solution. Improved catalytic performance is ascribed to structural stabilization of the complex when incorporated in the MOF as well as the protection of reduced catalysts 1– and 12– from undesirable charge recombination with oxidized ascorbate. PMID:24116734

  1. of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal needed is an advanced plastic membrane coated with a platinum catalyst. That's where the production of electricity takes technology is the reduction or even the elimination of platinum, which is very expensive. "We have to reduce

  2. Nitrogen and hydrogen pick-up of ST-52-3 weld metal and delayed cracking in hyperbaric GMA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Aune, R.; Hoffmeister, H.; Huismann, G.

    1994-12-31

    The pulsed GMA process has been analyzed at pressures from 1 to 16 bar with respect to required pulse parameters for stable droplet transfer and defect free welding of double V TEKKEN test joints. The effects of nitrogen and moisture contaminations of the Ar shielding gas on nitrogen and hydrogen in the weld metal were identified. In accordance with earlier literature, also the pulsed GMA process provides less nitrogen and hydrogen in the weld metal at increased ambient pressure. Consequently, the hydrogen induced cracking is reduced at increasing ambient pressure in such a way that for the present parameters, a water vapor pressure of 20 mbar in the shielding gas may be tolerable at pressures above 2--4 bar.

  3. Ultrafine Metal Phosphide Nanocrystals in Situ Decorated on Highly Porous Heteroatom-Doped Carbons for Active Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Pei; Xu, Xueyan; Su, Huan; Liu, Yu-Ping; Chen, Tiehong; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2015-12-30

    In spite of being technologically feasible, electrochemical water reduction to facilitate hydrogen production is confronted with issues mainly due to the lack of affordable and efficient catalysts for the water reduction half reaction. Reported herein is the fabrication of metal phosphides nanocrystals uniformly loaded on highly porous heteroatom-modified carbons through one-step carbonization-phosphization methodology. Remarkably, the well-structured porosity and the increased electrochemically accessible active sites ensure the high catalytic efficiency for electrochemical hydrogen evolution in acidic medium in terms of small onset potentials (33 mV) and large cathodic current density (0.481 mA cm(-2)), even comparable to the state-of-the-art Pt/C benchmark. The easily prepared composite catalysts of structural and textural peculiarities may serve as promising non-noble metal catalysts for realistic hydrogen evolution. PMID:26633079

  4. AB initio free energy calculations of the solubility of silica in metallic hydrogen and application to giant planet cores

    SciTech Connect

    González-Cataldo, F.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, B.

    2014-05-20

    By combining density functional molecular dynamics simulations with a thermodynamic integration technique, we determine the free energy of metallic hydrogen and silica, SiO{sub 2}, at megabar pressures and thousands of degrees Kelvin. Our ab initio solubility calculations show that silica dissolves into fluid hydrogen above 5000 K for pressures from 10 and 40 Mbars, which has implications for the evolution of rocky cores in giant gas planets like Jupiter, Saturn, and a substantial fraction of known extrasolar planets. Our findings underline the necessity of considering the erosion and redistribution of core materials in giant planet evolution models, but they also demonstrate that hot metallic hydrogen is a good solvent at megabar pressures, which has implications for high-pressure experiments.

  5. Highly Active Supported Pt Nanocatalysts Synthesized by Alcohol Reduction towards Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde: Synergy of Metal Valence and Hydroxyl Groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; He, Wanhong; Wang, Liren; Yang, Junjiao; Xiang, Xu; Zhang, Bing; Li, Feng

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogenation of ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes to allylic alcohols or saturated aldehydes provides a typical example to study the catalytic effect on structure-sensitive reactions. In this work, supported platinum nanocatalysts over hydrotalcite were synthesized by an alcohol reduction method. The Pt catalyst prepared by the reduction with a polyol (ethylene glycol) outperforms those prepared with ethanol and methanol in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. The selectivity towards the C=O bond is the highest over the former, although its mean size of Pt particles is the smallest. The hydroxyl groups on hydrotalcite could act as an internally accessible promoter to enhance the selectivity towards the C=O bond. The optimal Pt catalyst showed a high activity with an initial turnover frequency (TOF) of 2.314?s(-1). This work unveils the synergic effect of metal valence and in situ promoter on the chemoselective hydrogenation, which could open up a new direction in designing hydrogenation catalysts. PMID:25882904

  6. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO?, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO? hydrogenation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo?C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu?(MoO?)?(OH)?, a-NiMoO? and CoMoO?•nH?O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was ?-Mo?C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²?, Ni²? and Co²? cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo?C, Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C catalysts were highlymore »active for the hydrogenation of CO?. The metal/Mo?C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo?C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO?, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).« less

  7. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO?, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO? hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo?C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu?(MoO?)?(OH)?, a-NiMoO? and CoMoO?•nH?O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was ?-Mo?C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²?, Ni²? and Co²? cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo?C, Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C catalysts were highly active for the hydrogenation of CO?. The metal/Mo?C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo?C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO?, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).

  8. Crucial aspects in the design of chirally modified noble metal catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of activated ketones.

    PubMed

    Baiker, Alfons

    2015-10-19

    In view of the importance of optically pure chiral products there is ample reason to develop methods that facilitate their efficient production. Compared to the mostly applied homogeneous catalysts based on transition metals coordinated to suitable chiral ligands, heterogeneous chiral catalysts could offer several features that are beneficial for practical application such as stability, ease of catalyst separation and regeneration as well as straightforward access to continuous process operation. Various strategies have been developed for imparting chirality to catalytic active surfaces, among which the chiral modification of active metal surfaces by adsorption of suitable chiral organic compounds has so far been among the most successful. In this tutorial review lessons learned from research on asymmetric hydrogenation on chirally modified noble metals will be presented. Key aspects for the design of such catalysts will be elucidated using chirally modified platinum catalysts for the asymmetric hydrogenation of ?-activated ketones as an example. PMID:26186057

  9. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  10. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  11. Metal aminoboranes

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  12. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ?SºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ?SºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ?SºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ?HºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |?SºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ?Sºvib. The common assumption that ?SºHAT ? 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |?SºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ?SºET, in aprotic solvents. ?SºET and ?SºHAT are both affected by ?Sºvib and vary significantly with the metal center involved. The close connection between ?SºHAT and ?SºET provides an important link between these two fields and provides a starting point from which to predict which HAT systems will have important ground-state entropy effects. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Examining the role of hydrogen in the electrical performance of in situ fabricated metal-insulator-metal trilayers using an atomic layer deposited Al2O3 dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozen, Alexander C.; Schroeder, Marshall A.; Osborn, Kevin D.; Lobb, C. J.; Rubloff, Gary W.

    2013-04-01

    Defects in electronic devices can lead to poor performance and device failure. We used deuterium doping to investigate the source of hydrogen defects in Atomic Layer Deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films and in situ fabrication techniques to produce ultraclean metal-insulator-metal trilayers. We compare leakage current and defect density of ALD Al2O3 dielectrics deposited using different oxidation conditions. The plasma O2 ALD process has lowest number of entrained defects and exhibits a leakage current 104 times lower than the thermal ALD process. Deuterium doping during the ALD process shows that the majority of the hydrogen defects contained in the ALD films are due to entrained water.

  14. The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature water is studied by in situ monitoring corrosion potential (Ecorr), contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS), and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The Ecorr and film resistance show large change when the environment is changed from hydrogenated water to oxygenated water and changeable with changing environment while the morphology and composition only show obvious distinction in the first cycle. The main factor controlling the electric/electrochemical properties of the oxide film is Ecorr.

  15. A comparative theoretical study of metal functionalized carbon nanocones and carbon nanocone sheets as potential hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, A S; Soliman, K A; Taha, H O

    2014-09-28

    The hydrogen storage of Ti functionalized carbon nanocones and carbon nanocone sheets is investigated by using the state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations. The Ti atom prefers to bind at the hollow site of the hexagonal ring. The average adsorption energies corrected for dispersion forces are -0.54 and -0.39 eV per hydrogen molecule. With no metal clustering, the system gravimetric capacities are expected to be as large as 9.31 and 11.01 wt%. The hydrogen storage reactions are characterized in terms of simulated infrared spectra, projected densities of states, kinetics, and statistical thermodynamics. The free energies and enthalpies of the Ti functionalized carbon nanocone meet the ultimate targets of the Department of Energy for all temperatures and pressures. The closest reactions to zero free energy occur at 378.15 K/2.961 atm for carbon nanocones and 233.15 K/2.961 atm for carbon nanocone sheets. The translational component is found to exert a dominant effect on the total entropy change with temperature. More promising thermodynamics are assigned to the hydrogenation of Ti functionalized carbon nanocone sheets at 233.15 K. As the temperature is increased, the lifetimes of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at the surface drop and the rate constants increase. At fixed pressure, the rate constants of hydrogenation of Ti functionalized carbon nanocones are smaller than those of Ti functionalized carbon nanocone sheets, while the lifetimes are greater. PMID:25099825

  16. Studies on metal-organic frameworks of Cu(II) with isophthalate linkers for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong; Yang, Sihai; Blake, Alexander J; Schröder, Martin

    2014-02-18

    Hydrogen (H2) is a promising alternative energy carrier because of its environmental benefits, high energy density, and abundance. However, development of a practical storage system to enable the "Hydrogen Economy" remains a huge challenge. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an important class of crystalline coordination polymers constructed by bridging metal centers with organic linkers. MOFs show promise for H2 storage owing to their high surface area and tuneable properties. In this Account, we summarize our research on novel porous materials with enhanced H2 storage properties and describe frameworks derived from 3,5-substituted dicarboxylates (isophthalates) that serve as versatile molecular building blocks for the construction of a range of interesting coordination polymers with Cu(II) ions. We synthesized a series of materials by connecting linear tetracarboxylate linkers to {Cu(II)2} paddlewheel moieties. These materials exhibit high structural stability and permanent porosity. Varying the organic linker modulates the pore size, geometry, and functionality to control the overall H2 adsorption. Our top-performing material in this series has a H2 storage capacity of 77.8 mg g(-1) at 77 K, 60 bar. H2 adsorption at low, medium, and high pressures correlates with the isosteric heat of adsorption, surface area, and pore volume, respectively. Another series, using tribranched C3-symmetric hexacarboxylate ligands with Cu(II), gives highly porous (3,24)-connected frameworks incorporating {Cu(II)2} paddlewheels. Increasing the length of the hexacarboxylate struts directly tunes the porosity of the resultant material from micro- to mesoporosity. These materials show exceptionally high H2 uptakes owing to their high surface area and pore volume. The first member of this family reported adsorbs 111 mg g(-1) of H2, or 55.9 g L(-1), at 77 K, 77 bar, while at 77 K, 1 bar, the material adsorbs 2.3 wt % H2. We and others have since achieved enhanced H2 adsorption in these frameworks using combinations of polyphenyl groups linked by alkynes. The maximum storage achieved for one of the enhanced materials is 164 mg g(-1) at 77 K, 70 bar, but because of its low density, its volumetric capacity is only 45.7 g L(-1). We attribute the significant adsorption of H2 at low pressures to the arrangement of the {Cu24(isophthalate)24} cuboctahedral cages within the polyhedral structure. Free metal coordination positions are the first binding sites for D2, and these frameworks have two types of Cu(II) centers, one with its vacant site pointing into the cuboctahedral cage and another pointing externally. D2 molecules bind first at the former position and then at the external open metal sites. Design of ligands and complexes is key for enhancing and maximizing H2 storage, and although current materials operate at 77 K, research continues to explore routes to high capacity H2 storage materials that can function at higher temperatures. PMID:24168725

  17. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)-imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reaction of [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer, ?41 ± 2 cal mol?1 K?1. This is even more negative than the ?SoHAT = ?30 ± 2 cal mol?1 K?1 for the two iron complexes and the ?SoHAT for RuII(acac)2(py-imH) + TEMPO, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol?1 K?1, as reported earlier. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ?SoHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ?HoHAT = ?11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol?1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. A brief evaluation of the literature thermochemistry of TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH supports the common assumption that ?SoHAT ? 0 for HAT reactions of organic and small gas-phase molecules. However, this assumption does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |?SoHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ?SoET, in aprotic solvents. This is because both ?SoET and ?SoHAT have substantial contributions from vibrational entropy, which varies significantly with the metal center involved. The close connection between ?SoHAT and ?SoET provides an important link between these two fields and provides a starting point from which to predict which HAT systems will have important ground-state entropy effects. PMID:19275235

  18. Dense, layered membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOEpatents

    Roark, Shane E.; MacKay, Richard; Mundschau, Michael V.

    2006-02-21

    This invention provides hydrogen-permeable membranes for separation of hydrogen from hydrogen-containing gases. The membranes are multi-layer having a central hydrogen-permeable layer with one or more catalyst layers, barrier layers, and/or protective layers. The invention also relates to membrane reactors employing the hydrogen-permeable membranes of the invention and to methods for separation of hydrogen from a hydrogen-containing gas using the membranes and reactors. The reactors of this invention can be combined with additional reactor systems for direct use of the separated hydrogen.

  19. Supported transition metal catalysts for para- to ortho-hydrogen conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Christopher J.; Wang, Wei; Eyman, Darrell P.

    1994-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop and improve on existing catalysts for the conversion of ortho- to para-hydrogen. Starting with a commercially available Air Products nickel silicate, which had a beta value of 20, we were trying to synthesize catalysts that would be an improvement to AP. This was accomplished by preparing silicates with various metals as well as different preparation methods. We also prepared supported ruthenium catalysts by various techniques using several metal precursors to improve present technology. What was also found was that the activation conditions prior to catalytic testing was highly important for both the silicates and the supported ruthenium catalysts. While not the initial focus of the research, we made some interesting observations into the adsorption of H2 on ruthenium. This helped us to get a better understanding of how ortho- to para-H2 conversion takes place, and what features in a catalyst are important to optimize activity. Reactor design was the final area in which some interesting conclusions were drawn. As discussed earlier, the reactor catalyst bed must be constructed using straight 1/8 feet OD stainless steel tubing. It was determined that the use of 1/4 feet OD tubing caused two problems. First, the radius from the center of the bed to the wall was too great for thermal equilibrium. Since the reaction of ortho- to para-H2 is exothermic, the catalyst bed center was warmer than the edges. Second, the catalyst bed was too shallow using a 1/4 feet tube. This caused reactant blow-by which was thought to decrease the measured activity when the flow rate was increased. The 1/8 feet tube corrected both of these concerns.

  20. A high stability Ni-La0.5Ce0.5O2-? asymmetrical metal-ceramic membrane for hydrogen separation and generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Sun, Wenping; Wang, Zhongtao; Cao, Jiafeng; Dong, Yingchao; Liu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    In this work, hydrogen permeation properties of Ni-La0.5Ce0.5O2-? (LDC) asymmetrical cermet membrane are investigated, including hydrogen fluxes (JH2) under different hydrogen partial pressures, the influence of water vapor on JH2 and the long-term stability of the membrane operating under the containing-CO2 atmosphere. Ni-LDC asymmetrical membrane shows the best hydrogen permeability among LDC-based hydrogen separation membranes, inferior to Ni-BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.2O3-? asymmetrical membrane. The water vapor in feed gas is beneficial to hydrogen transport process, which promote an increase of JH2 from 5.64 × 10-8 to 6.83 × 10-8 mol cm-2 s-1 at 900 °C. Stability testing of hydrogen permeation suggests that Ni-LDC membrane remains stable against CO2. A dual function of combining hydrogen separation and generation can be realized by humidifying the sweep gas and enhance the hydrogen output by 1.0-1.5 times. Ni-LDC membrane exhibits desirable performance and durability in dual-function mode. Morphologies and phase structures of the membrane after tests are also characterized by SEM and XRD.

  1. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  2. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  3. Nature of water and hydrogen reactions on transition metal surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarkhanov, Mouslim Magomedovich

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) has already been established as a tool for the investigation of simple reaction mechanisms. In this work I present results of two parallel studies using STM: first, hydrogen on Ru(0001) surface and second, water on Ru(0001) and Pd(111). In both studies initial stages of adsorption up to saturation monolayer coverage were investigated by variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (VT STM). The first step of the hydrogen adsorption study was the identification and characterization of the various coverage structures on clean Ru(0001). Hydrogen was found to adsorb dissociatively forming ( 3x3 )R30°, 3 domains of (2x1), (2x2)-3H and (1x1) for increasing coverages of theta=0.3 ML, 0.5 ML, 0.75 ML and 0.1 ML respectively. Some of these structures were observed to coexist at intermediate coverage values. In addition effects of impurities such as oxygen and carbon on hydrogen adsorption has been discussed. Next, near saturation coverage the interesting mechanism of how H 2 dissociates and binds to the surface of Ru(0001) has been observed. We found that the H2 dissociation takes place only on Ru sites where the metal atom is not bound to any H atom. Such active sites are formed when at least 3 H-vacancies aggregate by thermal diffusion. Sites formed by single H-vacancies (i.e. unoccupied Ru sites) or pairs of adjoining vacancies were found to be unreactive toward H2. H-vacancies were observed as single entities diffusing on the surface at 50 K and able to form transient triangular shaped aggregations where H2 molecules dissociated. It was found that the diffusion and aggregation of the H-vacancies is essential in creation of active sites where dissociative adsorption of hydrogen occurs. The first step of water studies was the initial stages of growth of water on the hexagonal surfaces of Pd(111) and Ru(0001) in the temperature range between 40 K and 130 K. In addition, DFT calculations and STM image simulations were used to validate the models. Below 130 K water dissociation does not occur at any appreciable rate and only molecular films are formed. At these temperatures the kinetics of water growth leads to structures where the molecules bind to the metal substrate through the O-lone pair while making 3 H-bonds with neighboring molecules and form clusters of hexagonal units with a honeycomb structure. This bonding geometry imposes limitations to the size of the clusters, with unsaturated H-bonds confined to the cluster periphery. It is found that growth proceeds by attachement of water molecules to the edge of the clusters by H-bonds. These molecules bind only weakly to the metal substrate and can hop around the edges. Comparison of DFT and STM image calculations with experiments shows that on Pd the edge-attached molecules form two different structures, a metastable one where the molecule is elevated by 2.7 A with respect to the cluster molecules, and another where they are elevated by only 0.4 A. On Ru only the less elevated (0.4 A higher) edge-attached molecules are observed. In next final step, water structures on Ru(0001) were studied at temperatures above 140K. STM findings were backed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Additional DFT calculations and STM simulations provided validation of proposed models. It was found that while undissociated water layers are metastable below 140 K, heating above this temperature produces drastic transformations whereby a fraction of the water molecules partially dissociate and form mixed H 2O-OH structures. XPS and XAS revealed the presence of hydroxyl groups with their O-H bond essentiallymostly parallel to the surface. STM images show that the mixed H2O-OH structures consist of long narrow stripes aligned with the three crystallographic directions perpendicular to the close-packed atomic rows of the Ru(0001) substrate. The internal structure of the stripes is a honeycomb network of H-bonded water and hydroxyl species. We found that the metastable low temperature molecular phase can also be converted to a mixed H2O-OH phase through excitation

  4. A Theoretical Study of Methanol Synthesis from CO(2) Hydrogenation on Metal-doped Cu(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu P.; Yang, Y.; White, M.G.

    2012-01-12

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were employed to investigate the methanol synthesis reaction from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on metal-doped Cu(111) surfaces. Both the formate pathway and the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction followed by a CO hydrogenation pathway (RWGS + CO-Hydro) were considered in the study. Our calculations showed that the overall methanol yield increased in the sequence: Au/Cu(111) < Cu(111) < Pd/Cu(111) < Rh/Cu(111) < Pt/Cu(111) < Ni/Cu(111). On Au/Cu(111) and Cu(111), the formate pathway dominates the methanol production. Doping Au does not help the methanol synthesis on Cu(111). Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ni are able to promote the methanol production on Cu(111), where the conversion via the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathway is much faster than that via the formate pathway. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the methanol yield on Cu(111) was controlled by three factors: the dioxomethylene hydrogenation barrier, the CO binding energy, and the CO hydrogenation barrier. Accordingly, two possible descriptors are identified which can be used to describe the catalytic activity of Cu-based catalysts toward methanol synthesis. One is the activation barrier of dioxomethylene hydrogenation, and the other is the CO binding energy. An ideal Cu-based catalyst for the methanol synthesis via CO{sub 2} hydrogenation should be able to hydrogenate dioxomethylene easily and bond CO moderately, being strong enough to favor the desired CO hydrogenation rather than CO desorption but weak enough to prevent CO poisoning. In this way, the methanol production via both the formate and the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathways can be facilitated.

  5. Tristate electrochemical metallization memory based in the hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. B.; Chen, Y. F.; Hao, H.; Zhang, E. P.; Shi, S. S.; Lou, J. Z.; Liu, Q.

    2014-08-18

    The hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films have been fabricated as resistive switching medium by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology. The constructed Ag/nc-Si:H/Pt structure exhibits stable three nonvolatile resistance states. Tristate resistive states with large ratio 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 5}, less variation of resistance, and long retention exceeding 2.3?×?10{sup 5?}s are observed in Ag/nc-Si:H/Pt stack. The temperature dependence of high resistance state (HRS) and intermediate resistance state (IRS) both show semiconductor behavior, and the temperature dependence of low resistance state (LRS) represents metallic property. Fitting results demonstrated that the conduction mechanism of HRS, IRS, and LRS showed space charge limited conduction (SCLC), tunneling, and ohmic characteristics, respectively. The discrete Ag filament with Si nanocrystalline and complete Ag filament is proposed to be responsible for the performance IRS and LRS. We supposed that the Ag{sup +} ions prefer to be reduced to Ag atoms near the Si nanocrystalline location. Si nanocrystalline between Ag nanoparticles contribute to the current transport at IRS.

  6. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 timesmore »better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.« less

  7. Metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electro- and photochemical reduction of water to hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zee, David Z; Chantarojsiri, Teera; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-07-21

    Climate change, rising global energy demand, and energy security concerns motivate research into alternative, sustainable energy sources. In principle, solar energy can meet the world's energy needs, but the intermittent nature of solar illumination means that it is temporally and spatially separated from its consumption. Developing systems that promote solar-to-fuel conversion, such as via reduction of protons to hydrogen, could bridge this production-consumption gap, but this effort requires invention of catalysts that are cheap, robust, and efficient and that use earth-abundant elements. In this context, catalysts that utilize water as both an earth-abundant, environmentally benign substrate and a solvent for proton reduction are highly desirable. This Account summarizes our studies of molecular metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electrochemical and photochemical reduction of protons to hydrogen. Inspired by concept transfer from biological and materials catalysts, these scaffolds are remarkably resistant to decomposition in water, with fast and selective electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversions that are sustainable for several days. Their modular nature offers a broad range of opportunities for tuning reactivity by molecular design, including altering ancillary ligand electronics, denticity, and/or incorporating redox-active elements. Our first-generation complex, [(PY4)Co(CH3CN)2](2+), catalyzes the reduction of protons from a strong organic acid to hydrogen in 50% water. Subsequent investigations with the pentapyridyl ligand PY5Me2 furnished molybdenum and cobalt complexes capable of catalyzing the reduction of water in fully aqueous electrolyte with 100% Faradaic efficiency. Of particular note, the complex [(PY5Me2)MoO](2+) possesses extremely high activity and durability in neutral water, with turnover frequencies at least 8500 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst per hour and turnover numbers over 600?000 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst over 3 days at an overpotential of 1.0 V, without apparent loss in activity. Replacing the oxo moiety with a disulfide affords [(PY5Me2)MoS2](2+), which bears a molecular MoS2 triangle that structurally and functionally mimics bulk molybdenum disulfide, improving the catalytic activity for water reduction. In water buffered to pH 3, catalysis by [(PY5Me2)MoS2](2+) onsets at 400 mV of overpotential, whereas [(PY5Me2)MoO](2+) requires an additional 300 mV of driving force to operate at the same current density. Metalation of the PY5Me2 ligand with an appropriate Co(ii) source also furnishes electrocatalysts that are active in water. Importantly, the onset of catalysis by the [(PY5Me2)Co(H2O)](2+) series is anodically shifted by introducing electron-withdrawing functional groups on the ligand. With the [(bpy2PYMe)Co(CF3SO3)](1+) system, we showed that introducing a redox-active moiety can facilitate the electro- and photochemical reduction of protons from weak acids such as acetic acid or water. Using a high-throughput photochemical reactor, we examined the structure-reactivity relationship of a series of cobalt(ii) complexes. Taken together, these findings set the stage for the broader application of polypyridyl systems to catalysis under environmentally benign aqueous conditions. PMID:26101803

  8. Roles of hydrogenation, annealing and field in the structure and magnetic entropy change of Tb-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qiang; Schwarz, Björn; Mattern, Norbert; Shen, Jun; Eckert, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    The reduction of open-volume regions in Tb-based metallic glass (MG) by annealing and hydrogen charging was found to rearrange the atomic structure and tune the magnetic behaviors. After crystallization, the magnetic structure and magnetic entropy change (MEC) alters due to the structural transformation, and a plateau-like-MEC behavior can be obtained. The hydrogen concentration after charging at 1mA/cm2 for 576 h reaches as high as 3290 w-ppm. The magnetization behavior and the MEC change due to the modification of the exchange interaction and the random magnetic anisotropy (RMA) upon hydrogenation. At low temperatures, irreversible positive MEC was obtained, which is related to the internal entropy production. The RMA-to-exchange ratio acts as a switch to control the irreversible entropy production channel and the reversible entropy transfer channel. The field dependence of the MEC is discussed in term of the competition among Zeeman energy, exchange interaction and RMA.

  9. Action of some foreign cations and anions on the chloride permeability of frog muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, O. F.; Warner, Anne E.

    1967-01-01

    1. Evidence for the existence in skeletal muscle of a specific cation binding system capable of lowering the chloride permeability was obtained by testing the effect of several metal ion species upon the efflux of 36Cl from frog muscles equilibrated in high-KCl solution. 2. Cu2+, Zn2+ and UO22+ ions, when present in concentrations of approximately 10-4 M in inactive wash solution at pH 7·4 slowed the efflux of 36Cl to half its original value. At pH 5·0, when the chloride permeability was already low as a consequence of hydrogen ion binding, these metal ions had little further effect. 3. Presence of Ni2+, Co2+, Pb2+, Ce3+ and La3+ in 10-4 M or higher concentrations had no detectable influence on the 36Cl efflux. Wide variations in Ca2+ concentration were similarly ineffective. 4. The influence of more adsorbable anions on the chloride permeability was examined at different pH values. Extracellular iodide greatly slowed the rapid efflux of 36Cl into alkaline solution. In acid solutions, when the chloride permeability was already low, the effect of iodide was less pronounced, but still demonstrable. The chloride permeability was consequently increased to a lesser extent by a rise in pH in the presence of iodide. 5. The efflux of iodide and bromide was measured at different pH values under conditions of self exchange. In alkaline solution the permeabilities to iodide and bromide were considerably lower than that to chloride. In acid solution the membrane differentiated less between anion species of different adsorbability. PMID:6040156

  10. Selective Permeability Jackie Bonds

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    ;Selective Permeability ­ What · Selective permeability means that the cell membrane has some control overSelective Permeability Jackie Bonds January 23, 2012 Neus 586 Monday, January 30, 2012 #12 what can cross it, so that only certain molecules either enter or leave the cell. Monday, January 30

  11. Atomistic Models of Long-Term Hydrogen Diffusion in Metals M. P. Ariza1,a

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Michael

    and efficient storage of hydrogen is one of the key challenges in developing a hydrogen economy. Recently scale of the order of seconds to hours­far be- yond the time windows of existing simulation technologies cyclic behaviors. Introduction Hydrogen is an ideal energy carrier and considered as a potential

  12. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  13. The role of grain boundaries in hydrogen diffusion in metals at 25 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of grain size on hydrogen diffusion at 25 C was examined for 4340 steel (body-centered cubic) and for Inconel 718 (face-centered cubic). It was found that the effect of grain size is important for body-centered cubic structures, but plays a much less important role in face centered cubic structures. Accurate measurements of hydrogen desorption coefficients during hydrogen desorption show that these are not greatly different for both types of structures.

  14. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-25

    The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were all above 99.5% can keep about 300h using 80g/40g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) concentration of 20.0mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed. PMID:26521089

  16. In situ spectroscopic detection of SMSI effect in a Ni/CeO2 system: hydrogen-induced burial and dig out of metallic nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Alfonso; Holgado, Juan P.; Gonzalez-delaCruz, Victor M.; Habas, Susan e.; Herranz, Tirma; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-06-29

    In situ APPES technique demonstrates that the strong metal support interaction effect (SMSI) in the Ni-ceria system is associated with the decoration and burial of metallic particles by the partially reduced support, a phenomenon reversible by evacuation at high temperature of the previously absorbed hydrogen.

  17. First-principles study of half-metallicity in semi-hydrogenated BC3, BC5, BC7, and B-doped graphone sheets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Using first principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structures of semi-hydrogenated BC3, BC5, BC7, and B-doped graphone sheets. We find that all the semi-hydrogenated boron-carbon sheets exhibit half-metallic behaviors. The magnetism originates from the non-bonding pz orbitals of carbon atoms, which cause the flat bands to satisfy the Stoner criterion. On the other hand, boron atoms weaken the magnetic moments of nearby carbon atoms and act as holes doped in the sheets. It induces the down shift of the Fermi level and the half-metallicity in semi-hydrogenated sheets. Our studies demonstrate that the semi-hydrogenation is an effective route to achieve half-metallicity in the boron-carbon systems. PMID:21711690

  18. Multilayer sulfur-resistant composite metal membranes and methods of making and repairing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J. Douglas; Hatlevik, Oyvind

    2014-07-15

    The invention relates to thin, hydrogen-permeable, sulfur-resistant membranes formed from multi-layers of palladium or palladium-alloy coatings on porous, ceramic or metal supports, methods of making these membranes, methods of repairing layers of these membranes and devices that incorporate these membranes.

  19. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  20. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Stewart Schesnack; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2003-04-30

    Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (i) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (ii) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (iii) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (iv) hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This report describes resent results for long-term hydrogen permeation and chemical stability measurements, new mixed conducting cermets, progress in cermet, thin film, and thin-walled tube fabrication, hydrogen absorption measurements for selected compositions, and membrane facilitated alkane to olefin conversion.

  1. Processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- Dissolution of metal foil targets by alkaline hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, D.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Amini, S.; Hersubeno, J.B.; Nasution, H.; Nampira, Y.

    1995-09-01

    In FY 1995, the authors started studies on a new process for dissolution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for {sup 99}Mo production. In this process, an LEU metal foil target is dissolved in a mixture of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide, then {sup 99}Mo is recovered from the dissolved solution. They focused on the dissolution kinetics to develop a mechanistic model for predicting the products and the rate of uranium dissolution under process conditions. They thoroughly studied the effects of hydrogen peroxide concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration, and temperature on the rate of uranium dissolution. It was found that uranium dissolution can be classified into a low-base (< 0.2M) and a high-base (> 0.2M) process. In the low-base process, both the equilibrium hydrogen peroxide and hydroxide concentrations affect the rate of uranium dissolution; in the high base process, uranium dissolution is a 0.25th order reaction with respect to the equilibrium hydrogen peroxide. The dissolution activation energy was experimentally determined to be 48.8 kJ/mol. Generally, the rate of uranium dissolution increases to a maximum as the hydroxide concentration is increased from 0.01 to about 1.5M, then it decreases as the hydroxide concentration is further increased. The alkalinity of the dissolution solution is an important factor that affects not only the dissolution rate, but also the amount of radioactive waste.

  2. Striving toward noble-metal-free photocatalytic water splitting: The hydrogenated-graphene-TiO2 prototype

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen-Phan, Thuy -Duong; Luo, Si; Liu, Zongyuan; Gamalski, Andrew D.; Tao, Jing; Xu, Wenqian; Stach, Eric A.; Polyansky, Dmitry E.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Fujita, Etsuko; et al

    2015-08-20

    Graphane, graphone and hydrogenated graphene (HG) have been extensively studied in recent years due to their interesting properties and potential use in commercial and industrial applications. The present study reports investigation of hydrogenated graphene/TiO2-x (HGT) nanocomposites as photocatalysts for H2 and O2 production from water without the assistance of a noble metal co-catalyst. By combination of several techniques, the morphologies, bulk/atomic structure and electronic properties of all the powders were exhaustively interrogated. Hydrogenation treatment efficiently reduces TiO2 nanoparticles, while the graphene oxide sheets undergo the topotactic transformation from a graphene-like structure to a mixture of graphitic and turbostratic carbon (amorphous/disordered)more »upon altering the calcination atmosphere from a mildly reducing to a H2-abundant environment. Remarkably, the hydrogenated graphene-TiO2-x composite that results upon H2-rich reduction exhibits the highest photocatalytic H2 evolution performance equivalent to low loading of Pt (~0.12 wt%), whereas the addition of HG suppresses the O2 production. As a result, we propose that such an enhancement can be attributed to a combination of factors including the introduction of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ states, retarding the recombination of charge carriers and thus, facilitating the charge transfer from TiO2-x to the carbonaceous sheet.« less

  3. Direct Decomposition of Methane to Hydrogen on Metal-Loaded Zeolite Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

    2005-08-01

    The regeneration of a Ru-Mo/ZSM5 catalyst used to produce hydrogen by decomposition reactions was examined at 873 K in either flowing hydrogen or air. The Ru-Mo/ZSM5 catalyst was deactivated under methane decomposition reaction conditions at temperatures of 873, 973, and 1073 K. The effect of reaction and regeneration conditions on catalyst activity, BET surface area and temperature programmed oxidation profiles is discussed. Regeneration using hydrogen was found to be less effective than air oxidation for the conditions explored. The methane decomposition reactions produced hydrogen primarily through the formation of liquid aromatics. The highest hydrogen production rates were obtained at 1073 K, however, deactivation was greatest at this temperature and the catalyst was not fully regenerated. A better selectivity to liquids combined with a relatively stable catalyst activity indicates that 973 K may be adequate for longer term catalyst and cycled regeneration analyses.

  4. Kinetics of dissolution of uranium metal foil by alkaline hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, D.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1996-11-01

    To develop a new process for the production of {sup 99}Mo using low-enriched uranium targets, uranium dissolution in alkaline hydrogen peroxide was studied. Molybdenum-99 is a parent of the widely used medical isotope {sup 99m}Tc. The rates of uranium dissolution in alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution were measured in an open, batch-type reactor and were found to be a 0.25th order reaction with respect to equilibrium hydrogen peroxide concentration. In general, uranium dissolution can be classified as a low-base (<0.2 M hydroxide) and a high-base (>0.2 M hydroxide) process. In the low-base process, both the equilibrium hydrogen peroxide and the hydroxide concentrations affect the rate of uranium dissolution. In the high-base process, uranium dissolution is independent of alkali concentration; the presence of base affects only the equilibrium concentration of hydrogen peroxide. An empirical kinetics model is proposed and discussed.

  5. High-purity hydrogen generation by ultraviolet illumination with the membrane composed of titanium dioxide nanotube array and Pd layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masashi; Noda, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2011-09-01

    High-purity hydrogen generation was observed by using a membrane composed of a bilayer of an anodized titanium dioxide nanotube array (TNA) and a hydrogen permeable metal. This membrane was fabricated by transferring a TNA embedded in a titanium foil onto a sputtered 10-?m-thick palladium film. Alcohols are reformed photocatalytically and concurrently generated hydrogen is purified through the Pd layer. H2 with a purity of more than 99% was obtained from liquid alcohols under ultraviolet illumination onto the membrane. Thus, we demonstrated the integration of photocatalytic hydrogen production and purification within a single membrane.

  6. Emission spectroscopic properties of water soluble porphyrins in hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence system with d- and f-electron metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staninski, Krzysztof; Kaczmarek, Ma?gorzata; Lis, Stefan; Elbanowski, Marian

    2003-02-01

    Two water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4',4'',4'''-(porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)-tetrakis (benzoic acid) (TCPPH 2) and 4,4',4'',4'''-(porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)-tetrakis (benzenesulfonic acid) (TSPPH 2) have been subjected to spectroscopic study in the presence of d-electron metals: Zn(II) and Cu(II) and f-electron metals: La(III), Eu(III), Gd (III) and Yb(III). Results of the spectrophotometric study have provided evidence proving the complexation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) cations by porphine in water solutions and the complexation of lanthanide ions exclusively by peripheral carboxyl and sulfonic groups. For the first time, chemiluminescence of the systems containing porphyrins has been measured without the use of strongly luminescent reagents such as TCPO or luminol. The emission spectra of the systems porphyrin/metal ion/H 2O 2 have been recorded and the quantum yield of their luminescence has been measured. The absorption spectra of the systems recorded before and after the reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide are identical, which means that the porphyrin ring does not undergo destruction. A significant similarity between the fluorescence and chemiluminescence spectra indicates a possibility of excitation of porphyrins and their complexes in the reaction with hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Peter R. Jaffe, John Komlos, Derick Brown

    2005-09-27

    Trace-metal and/or radionuclide bioremediation schemes require that specific redox conditions be achieved at given zones of an aquifer. Tools are therefore needed to identify the terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs) that are being achieved during bioremediation in an aquifer. Dissolved hydrogen (H2) concentrations have been shown to correlate with specific TEAPs during bioremediation in an aquifer. Theoretical analysis has shown that these steady-state H2 levels are solely dependent upon the physiological parameters of the hydrogen-consuming microorganisms, with H2 concentrations increasing as each successive TEAP yields less energy for bacterial growth. The objective of this research was to determine if H2 can still be used as an indicator of TEAPs during a uranium bioremediation scheme where an organic substrate is injected into the subsurface and organisms may consume H2 and carbon simultaneously. In addition, the effect of iron bioavailability on H2 concentrations during iron reduction was observed. The first phase of research determined the effect of a competing electron donor (acetate) on the kinetics of H2 utilization by Geobacter sulfurreducens in batch cultures under iron reducing conditions. The results indicate that, though the Monod kinetic coefficients describing the rate of H2 utilization under iron-reducing conditions correlate energetically with the coefficients found in previous experiments under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions, conventionally measured growth kinetics do not predict the steady state H2 levels typical for each TEAP. In addition, with acetate and H2 as simultaneous electron donors, there is slight inhibition between the two electron donors for G. sulfurreducens, and this can be modeled through competitive inhibition terms in the classic Monod formulation, resulting in slightly higher H2 concentrations under steady state conditions in the presence of acetate. This dual-donor model indicates that the steady state H2 concentration in the presence of an organic as electron donor is not only dependent on the biokinetic coefficients of the TEAP, but also the concentration of the organic substrate, and that the H2 concentration does not start to change very dramatically as long as the organic substrate concentration remains below the half saturation constant. The results for this phase of research are provided in Section 1. The second phase of research measured steady-state H2 concentrations under iron reducing conditions using NABIR Field Research Center background soil in a simulated bioremediation scenario involving acetate injection to stimulate indigenous microbial activity in a flow-through column. Steady-state H2 concentrations measured during this long-term (500 day) column experiment were higher than observed for iron-reducing conditions in the field even though evidence suggests that iron reduction was the dominant TEAP in the column. Additional column experiments were performed to determine the effect of iron bioavailability on steady-state H2 concentrations using the humics analogue, AQDS (9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid). The iron reduction rate in the column with AQDS was double the rate in a parallel column without AQDS and lower steady state H2 levels were observed in the presence of AQDS, indicating that even though iron reduction does occur, a decreased bioavailability of iron may inhibit iron reduction such that H2 concentrations increase to levels that are more typical for less energetically favorable reactions (sulfate-reduction, methanogenigesis). The results for this phase of research are in Section 2. A final phase of research measured the effect of carbon concentration and iron bioavailability on surface bound iron reduction kinetics and steady-state H2 levels using synthetic iron oxide coated sand (IOCS). Results show a significant decrease in the microbial iron reduction and acetate oxidation rates for systems with surface bound Fe(III) (IOCS) compared to soluble Fe(III) (ferric citrate). The addition of AQDS did not affect the rate of iron r

  8. Synergetic effect of metal nickel and graphene as a cocatalyst for enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen evolution via dye sensitization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiying; Li, Yuexiang; Zeng, Xianping; Peng, Shaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting new, low-cost and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is important to resolve the energy crisis and environment pollution. In this work, graphene decorated with Ni nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via one-pot reduction using graphene oxide (GO, the obtained composite was denoted as GN) as a precursor. The as-prepared composite GN exhibits much better electrocatalytic and dye-sensitized HER activities than single Ni and reduced graphene oxide (RGO), namely, a great synergetic effect of RGO and Ni for HER. The coupling of metal Ni with the defect carbons of RGO plays a key role in the synergetic effect. The structure of GN composites is another key factor to the synergetic effect. The highest apparent quantum yield (AQY) for dye-sensitized photocatalytic hydrogen evolution at 470?nm reaches 30.3% under the optimal conditions. PMID:26068540

  9. Synergetic effect of metal nickel and graphene as a cocatalyst for enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen evolution via dye sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiying; Li, Yuexiang; Zeng, Xianping; Peng, Shaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting new, low-cost and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is important to resolve the energy crisis and environment pollution. In this work, graphene decorated with Ni nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via one-pot reduction using graphene oxide (GO, the obtained composite was denoted as GN) as a precursor. The as-prepared composite GN exhibits much better electrocatalytic and dye-sensitized HER activities than single Ni and reduced graphene oxide (RGO), namely, a great synergetic effect of RGO and Ni for HER. The coupling of metal Ni with the defect carbons of RGO plays a key role in the synergetic effect. The structure of GN composites is another key factor to the synergetic effect. The highest apparent quantum yield (AQY) for dye-sensitized photocatalytic hydrogen evolution at 470?nm reaches 30.3% under the optimal conditions. PMID:26068540

  10. Noble metal catalyzed aqueous phase hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived pyrolysis oil and related model compounds.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wei; Ben, Haoxi; Du, Xiaotang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Fan; Liu, Wei; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin pyrolysis oil and related model compounds were investigated using four noble metals supported on activated carbon. The hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol has three major reaction pathways and the demethylation reaction, mainly catalyzed by Pd, Pt and Rh, produces catechol as the products. The presence of catechol and guaiacol in the reaction is responsible for the coke formation and the catalysts deactivation. As expected, there was a significant decrease in the specific surface area of Pd, Pt and Rh catalysts during the catalytic reaction because of the coke deposition. In contrast, no catechol was produced from guaiacol when Ru was used so a completely hydrogenation was accomplished. The lignin pyrolysis oil upgrading with Pt and Ru catalysts further validated the reaction mechanism deduced from model compounds. Fully hydrogenated bio-oil was produced with Ru catalyst. PMID:25280108

  11. Hydrogen adsorption strength and sites in the metal organic framework MOF5: Comparing experiment and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, F. M.; Dingemans, T. J.; Schimmel, H. G.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Kearley, G. J.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in porous, high surface area, and stable metal organic frameworks (MOF's) appears a novel route towards hydrogen storage materials [N.L. Rosi, J. Eckert, M. Eddaoudi, D.T. Vodak, J. Kim, M. O'Keeffe, O.M. Yaghi, Science 300 (2003) 1127; J.L.C. Rowsell, A.R. Millward, K. Sung Park, O.M. Yaghi, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126 (2004) 5666; G. Ferey, M. Latroche, C. Serre, F. Millange, T. Loiseau, A. Percheron-Guegan, Chem. Commun. (2003) 2976; T. Loiseau, C. Serre, C. Huguenard, G. Fink, F. Taulelle, M. Henry, T. Bataille, G. Férey, Chem. Eur. J. 10 (2004) 1373]. A prerequisite for such materials is sufficient adsorption interaction strength for hydrogen adsorbed on the adsorption sites of the material because this facilitates successful operation under moderate temperature and pressure conditions. Here we report detailed information on the geometry of the hydrogen adsorption sites, based on the analysis of inelastic neutron spectroscopy (INS). The adsorption energies for the metal organic framework MOF5 equal about 800 K for part of the different sites, which is significantly higher than for nanoporous carbon materials (˜550 K) [H.G. Schimmel, G.J. Kearley, M.G. Nijkamp, C.T. Visser, K.P. de Jong, F.M. Mulder, Chem. Eur. J. 9 (2003) 4764], and is in agreement with what is found in first principles calculations [T. Sagara, J. Klassen, E. Ganz, J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2004) 12543; F.M. Mulder, T.J. Dingemans, M. Wagemaker, G.J. Kearley, Chem. Phys. 317 (2005) 113]. Assignments of the INS spectra is realized using comparison with independently published model calculations [F.M. Mulder, T.J. Dingemans, M. Wagemaker, G.J. Kearley, Chem. Phys. 317 (2005) 113] and structural data [T. Yildirim, M.R. Hartman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 (2005) 215504].

  12. USE OF HYDROGEN RESPIROMETRY TO DETERMINE METAL TOXICITY TO SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), an acidic metal-bearing wastewater poses a severe pollution problem attributed to post-mining activities. The metals (metal sulfates) encountered in AMD and considered of concern for risk assessment are: arsenic, cadmium, aluminum, manganese, iron, zinc ...

  13. The Use of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Recovery from Industrial Off-Gas Streams 

    E-print Network

    Rebello, W. J.; Guerrero, P. S.; Goodell, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    that was technically feasible. The cost of delivered hydrogen ranged from $1.31 to $1.72/MSCF for a refinery hydrotreater and an ammonia purge gas stream based on an alloy life of a year. These costs, though lower than that for hydrogen produced from steam... reforming of natural gas, are at best marginal relative to the competing technologies such as cryogenic, membrane and pressure s~ing adsorption systems. INTRODUCTION Hydrogen is one of the most important chemical species that is used in the chemical...

  14. The role of the molecular-metallic transition of hydrogen in the evolution of Jupiter, Saturn, and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Hubbard, William B.; Chabrier, Gilles; Van Horn, Hugh M.

    1992-01-01

    An equation of state for hydrogen which predicts a molecular-metallic phase transition at finite temperatures has become available recently. The effect of this phase transition on the cooling histories of these two giant planets and of substellar brown dwarfs is studied. The phase transition alters the present age of Jupiter and of Saturn by a few percent. Interestingly, the cooling of brown dwarfs is most strongly affected at the time when the interior adiabat crosses the critical point of the phase transition.

  15. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Scott; Bridgewater, Jon S; Ward, John W; Allen, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  16. Molecular simulation studies of metal organic frameworks focusing on hydrogen purification 

    E-print Network

    Banu, Ana Maria

    2014-06-30

    The process of purifying hydrogen gas using pressure swing adsorption columns heavily relies on highly efficient adsorbents. Such materials must be able to selectively adsorb a large amount of impurities, and must also ...

  17. Influence of grain boundary phosphorus concentration on liquid metal and hydrogen embrittlement of Monel 400

    SciTech Connect

    Funkenbusch, A.W.; Heldt, L.A.; Stein, D.F.

    1982-04-01

    Susceptibility to embrittlement by mercury and hydrogen was measured as affected by thermal treatment. Specimens were annealed at 900/degree/C and either quenched or furnace cooled. Fractures in air were ductile, and not affected by thermal treatment. Fractures of mercury-coated and hydrogen-charged samples were brittle and intergranular; elongation to fracture increased with increasing concentration of grain boundary phosphorus. 45 refs.

  18. Development of membranes for hydrogen separation: Pd-coated V-10Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieri, Stephen N; Wermer, Joseph R; Buxbaum, Robert E; Ciocco, Michael V; Howard, Bret H; Morreale, Bryan D

    2009-01-01

    Numerous Group IVB and VB alloys were prepared and tested as potential membrane materials but most of these materials were brittle or exhibited cracking during hydrogen exposure. One of the more ductile alloys, V-10Pd (at. %), was fabricated into a thin (107-{micro}m thick) composite membrane coated with 100 nm of Pd on each side. The material was tested for hydrogen permeability, resistance to hydrogen embrittlement, and long term hydrogen flux stability. The hydrogen permeability, {phi}, of the V-10Pd membrane was 3.86 x 10{sup -8} mol H{sub 2} m{sup -1} s{sup -1} Pa{sup -0.5} (avg. of three different samples) at 400 C, which is slightly higher than the permeability of Pd-23Ag at that temperature. A 1400 h hydrogen flux test at 400 C demonstrated that the rate of metallic interdiffusion was slow between the V-10Pd foil and the 100-nm-thick Pd coating on the surface. However, at the end of testing the membrane cracked at 118 C because of hydrogen embrittlement.

  19. Simultaneous determination of oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen in metals by pulse heating and time of flight mass spectrometric method.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xuejing; Wang, Peng; Hu, Shaocheng; Yang, Zhigang; Ma, Hongquan; Gao, Wei; Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Haizhou

    2011-05-30

    The inert gas fusion and infrared absorption and thermal conductivity methods are widely used for quantitative determination of oxygen(O), nitrogen(N) and hydrogen(H) in metals. However, O, N and H cannot be determined simultaneously with this method in most cases and the sensitivity cannot meet the requirement of some new metal materials. Furthermore, there is no equipment or method reported for determination of Argon(Ar) or Helium(He) in metals till now. In this paper, a new method for simultaneous quantitative determination of O, N, H and Ar(or He) in metals has been described in detail, which combined the pulse heating inert gas fusion with time of flight mass spectrometric detection. The whole analyzing process was introduced, including sample retreatment, inert gas fusion, mass spectral line selection, signal acquisition, data processing and calibration. The detection limit, lower quantitative limit and linear range of each element were determined. The accuracy and precision of the new method have also been verified by measurements of several kinds of samples. The results were consistent with that obtained by the traditional method. It has shown that the new method is more sensitive and efficient than the existing method. PMID:21530779

  20. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-03-20

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H{sub 2} formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}.

  1. High-Performance Palladium Based Membrane for Hydrogen Separation and Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Hopkins

    2012-01-31

    The mission of the DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies'�Hydrogen Fuels R&D effort is to research, develop, and validate technologies for producing, storing, and delivering hydrogen in an efficient, clean, safe, reliable, and affordable manner. A key program technical milestone for hydrogen technology readiness is to produce hydrogen from diverse, domestic resources at $2.00-$3.00 per gallon of gasoline equivalent (gge) delivered, untaxed. Low-cost, high-temperature hydrogen separation membranes represent a key enabling technology for small-scale distributed hydrogen production units. Availability of such membranes with high selectivity and high permeability for hydrogen will allow their integration with hydrocarbon reforming and water gas shift reactions, potentially reducing the cost of hydrogen produced. Pd-metal-based dense membranes are known for their excellent hydrogen selectivity and permeability characteristics, however, utilization of these membranes has so far been limited to small scale niche markets for hydrogen purification primarily due to the relatively high cost of Pd-alloy tubes compared to pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. This project was aimed at development of thin-film Pd-alloy membranes deposited on Pall Corporation's DOE-based AccuSep® porous metal tube substrates to form a composite hydrogen separation membrane for these applications. Pall's composite membrane development addressed the typical limitations of composite structures by developing robust membranes capable of withstanding thermal and mechanical stresses resulting from high temperature (400C), high pressure (400 psi steam methane reformer and 1000 psi coal) operations and thermal cycling involved in conventional hydrogen production. In addition, the Pd-alloy membrane composition was optimized to be able to offer the most stability in the typical synthesis gas environments produced by reforming of natural gas and bio-derived liquid fuels (BILI) validating the technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of the technology demonstrated. Results from this research added technology and product design information that offers the potential to significantly advance the commercial viability of hydrogen production.

  2. Hydrogen-doping stabilized metallic VO{sub 2} (R) thin films and their application to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances in the terahertz regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yong; Pan, Xuan; Bernussi, Ayrton A.; Fan, Zhaoyang; Karaoglan-Bebek, Gulten; Holtz, Mark

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate that catalyst-assisted hydrogen spillover doping of VO{sub 2} thin films significantly alters the metal-insulator transition characteristics and stabilizes the metallic rutile phase at room temperature. With hydrogen inserted into the VO{sub 2} lattice, high resolution X-ray diffraction reveals expansion of the V-V chain separation when compared to the VO{sub 2}(R) phase. The donated free electrons, possibly from O-H bond formation, stabilize the VO{sub 2}(R) to low temperatures. By controlling the amount of dopants to obtain mixed insulating and metallic phases, VO{sub 2} resistivity can be continuously tuned until a critical condition is achieved that suppresses Fabry-Perot resonances. Our results demonstrate that hydrogen spillover is an effective technique to tune the electrical and optical properties of VO{sub 2} thin films.

  3. Mechanistic aspects of dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation to produce ammonia in catalysis and organometallic chemistry: relevance of metal hydride bonds and dihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Peng; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra

    2014-01-21

    Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by transition-metal centers to produce ammonia is central in industry and in Nature. After an introductory section on the thermodynamic and kinetic challenges linked to N2 splitting, this tutorial review discusses three major classes of transition-metal systems (homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological) capable of achieving dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen. Molecular complexes, solid-state Haber-Bosch catalytic systems, silica-supported tantalum hydrides and nitrogenase will be discussed. Emphasis is focused on the reaction mechanisms operating in the process of dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen, and in particular on the key role played by metal hydride bonds and by dihydrogen in such reactions. PMID:24108246

  4. Velocity of action of oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, and halogens on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tammann, Gustav; Koster, Werner

    1952-01-01

    This report discusses a method of determining the rate of surface oxidation of a metal by the change in the color of the surface film produced by reactions with oxygen, chlorine, or iodine. The metals studied included iron, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, cobalt, and manganese. Tables are given for surface film thickness versus color for various times.

  5. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUELS PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Stewart Schesnack; Scott Morrison; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2003-07-31

    Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This report presents hydrogen permeation data during long term tests and tests at high pressure in addition to progress with cermet, ceramic/ceramic, and thin film membranes.

  6. The effect of metal-support interactions on the hydrogenation of benzaldehyde and benzyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Vannice, M.A.; Poondi, D.

    1997-07-01

    The hydrogenation of benzaldehyde hydrogenation on Pt/TiO{sub 2} after a high-temperature reduction (HTR) step, compared to either Pt/TiO{sub 2} after a low-temperature reduction (LTR) step, Pt/SiO{sub 2} or Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is discussed. Pt/TiO{sub 2} (HTR) retained a selectivity to benzyl alcohol of 100% up to conversions of 80%, whereas significant amounts of toluene and benzene began to be formed at conversions above 20% with the other Pt catalysts, including Pt powder. 39 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Striving toward noble-metal-free photocatalytic water splitting: The hydrogenated-graphene-TiO2 prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen-Phan, Thuy -Duong; Luo, Si; Liu, Zongyuan; Gamalski, Andrew D.; Tao, Jing; Xu, Wenqian; Stach, Eric A.; Polyansky, Dmitry E.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Fujita, Etsuko; Rodriguez, Jose A.

    2015-08-20

    Graphane, graphone and hydrogenated graphene (HG) have been extensively studied in recent years due to their interesting properties and potential use in commercial and industrial applications. The present study reports investigation of hydrogenated graphene/TiO2-x (HGT) nanocomposites as photocatalysts for H2 and O2 production from water without the assistance of a noble metal co-catalyst. By combination of several techniques, the morphologies, bulk/atomic structure and electronic properties of all the powders were exhaustively interrogated. Hydrogenation treatment efficiently reduces TiO2 nanoparticles, while the graphene oxide sheets undergo the topotactic transformation from a graphene-like structure to a mixture of graphitic and turbostratic carbon (amorphous/disordered) upon altering the calcination atmosphere from a mildly reducing to a H2-abundant environment. Remarkably, the hydrogenated graphene-TiO2-x composite that results upon H2-rich reduction exhibits the highest photocatalytic H2 evolution performance equivalent to low loading of Pt (~0.12 wt%), whereas the addition of HG suppresses the O2 production. As a result, we propose that such an enhancement can be attributed to a combination of factors including the introduction of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ states, retarding the recombination of charge carriers and thus, facilitating the charge transfer from TiO2-x to the carbonaceous sheet.

  8. Interpretation of the electron-energy-loss spectrum for hydrogen-covered transition-metal surfaces in terms of a configuration-interaction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sancho, M. P.; López-Sancho, J. M.; Rubio, J.

    1985-04-01

    Experimental data obtained with electron-energy-loss spectroscopy for hydrogen adsorbed on tungsten and nickel surfaces are interpreted by means of a configuration-interaction approach rewritten in trems of excitation energies, in such a way that generalization from discrete levels to the adsorbate-metal problem is feasible in a simple way. It appears that the two hydrogen-induced losses at around 8 and 15 eV could correspond to the transitions MH-->M+H- and MH-->M-H+, respectively. The same transitions (Redhead type) could produce negative and positive ions by metal neutralization.

  9. Surface Functionalization of g-C3 N4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin; Lin, Bin; Yu, Weili; Yang, Yong; Bashir, Shahid M; Wang, Hong; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Idriss, Hicham; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-13

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3 N4 . This catalyst family (with less than 0.1?wt?% of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3?wt?% platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24?h. PMID:26073972

  10. Influence of clamping plate permeability and metal screen structures on three-dimensional magnetic field and eddy current loss in end region of a turbo-generator by numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likun, Wang; Weili, Li; Yi, Xue; Chunwei, Guan

    2013-11-01

    A significant problem of turbogenerators on complex end structures is overheating of local parts caused by end losses in the end region. Therefore, it is important to investigate the 3-D magnetic field and eddy current loss in the end. In end region of operating large turbogenerator at thermal power plants, magnetic leakage field distribution is complex. In this paper, a 3-D mathematical model used for the calculation of the electromagnetic field in the end region of large turbo-generators is given. The influence of spatial locations of end structures, the actual shape and material of end windings, clamping plate, and copper screen are considered. Adopting the time-step finite element (FE) method and taking the nonlinear characteristics of the core into consideration, a 3-D transient magnetic field is calculated. The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of clamping plate permeability and metal screen structures on 3-D electromagnetic field distribution and eddy current loss in end region of a turbo-generator. To reduce the temperature of copper screen, a hollow metal screen is proposed. The eddy current loss, which is gained from the 3D transient magnetic field, is used as heat source for the thermal field of end region. The calculated temperatures are compared with test data.

  11. Start Up of Biohydrogen Production System and Effect of Metal Ions on Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, An-ying; Li, Yong-feng; Yue, Li-ran; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is a promising biochemical route to produce renewable H2. The effect of organic loading rate on the biohydrogen production during the start-up phase and effect of Fe2+ and Mg2+ concentration on biohydrogen production of a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater as substrate were investigated. It was found that an initial biomass of 14.07 gVSS/L and an organic loading rate of 6.0 kgCOD/m3?d, an equilibrial microbial community in the butyric-type fermentation could be established with in 30 days. It was demonstrated that both Fe2+ and Mg2+ were able to enhance the hydrogen production capacity of microorganism flora. Different concentration of Fe2+ was added to the biohydrogen producing system (50 mg/L, 100 mg/L, 200 mg/L and 500 mg/L), the maximum biogas production yield of 6.78 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.1 ml/gVSS?h were obtained at Fe2+ concentration of 500 mg/L and 200 mg/L, respectively. The maximum biogas production yield of 6.84 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.2 ml/gVSS?h were obtained at Mg2+ concentration of 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively.

  12. Metalized T graphene: A reversible hydrogen storage material at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zhong, Wei E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn; Du, You-Wei; Liu, Chun-Sheng E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-09-21

    Lithium (Li)-decorated graphene is a promising hydrogen storage medium due to its high capacity. However, homogeneous mono-layer coating graphene with lithium atoms is metastable and the lithium atoms would cluster on the surface, resulting in the poor reversibility. Using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory, we demonstrated that lithium atoms can be homogeneously dispersed on T graphene due to a nonuniform charge distribution in T graphene and strong hybridizations between the C-2p and Li-2p orbitals. Thus, Li atoms are not likely to form clusters, indicating a good reversible hydrogen storage. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of hydrogen molecules (storage capacity of 7.7 wt. %) with an optimal adsorption energy of 0.19 eV/H?. The adsorption/desorption of H? at ambient temperature and pressure is also discussed. Our results can serve as a guide in the design of new hydrogen storage materials based on non-hexagonal graphenes.

  13. Determination of the Relative Atomic Masses of Metals by Liberation of Molecular Hydrogen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghorne, W. Earle; Rous, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Students determine the relative atomic masses of calcium, magnesium, and aluminum by reaction with hydrochloric acid and measurement of the volume of hydrogen gas liberated. The experiment demonstrates stoichiometry and illustrates clearly that mass of the reagent is not the determinant of the amounts in chemical reactions. The experiment is…

  14. An investigation of the kinetics for hydrogen chemisorption on iron metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    A quasi-isothermal approach was used to study the kinetics of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide chemisorption onto iron film in an effort to understand the environmental degradation of steels. The coverage of chemisorbed hydrogen or chemisorbed sulfur was observed as a function of time for fixed conditions of substrate temperature. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to observe the sulfur and chemisorption-induced resistance change was employed to monitor hydrogen coverage. To compare the results obtained from studying the kinetics by two different techniques, the kinetics of oxygen chemisorption onto iron films was also studied. A reaction model utilized to interpret the H2/Fe2 chemisorption kinetics was applied to data from an earlier study on the desorption kinetics for H2 chemisorbed onto nicket films in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of the film. This analysis permitted a separation of the gross desorption process into individual components so that the influence of the magnetic phase transition on the rate constants could be determined.

  15. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  16. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T. (Ann Arbor, MI); Li, Yingwel (Ann Arbor, MI); Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  17. Permeability of edible coatings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Khatkar, B S; Garg, M K; Wilson, L A

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of water vapour, O2 and CO2 were determined for 18 coating formulations. Water vapour transmission rate ranged from 98.8 g/m(2).day (6% beeswax) to 758.0 g/m(2).day (1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose with glycerol). O2 permeability at 14 ± 1°C and 55 ± 5% RH ranged from 1.50 to 7.95 cm(3)cm cm(-2)s(-1)Pa(-1), with CO2 permeability 2 to 6 times as high. Permeability to noncondensable gases (O2 and CO2) was higher for hydrophobic (peanut oil followed by beeswax) coatings as compared to hydrophilic (whey protein concentrate and carboxymethyl cellulose). PMID:23572611

  18. In situ/operando studies for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift on metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Hanson, Jonathan C; Stacchiola, Dario; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2013-08-01

    In this perspective article, we show how a series of in situ techniques {X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair-distribution-function analysis (PDF), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS)} can be combined to perform detailed studies of the structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal oxide catalysts used for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O ? H2 + CO2). Under reaction conditions most WGS catalysts undergo chemical transformations that drastically modify their composition with respect to that obtained during the synthesis process. Experiments of time-resolved in situ XRD, XAFS, and PDF indicate that the active phase of catalysts which combine Cu, Au or Pt with oxides such as ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, CeOx/TiO2 and Fe2O3 essentially involves nanoparticles of the reduced noble metals. The oxide support undergoes partial reduction and is not a simple spectator, facilitating the dissociation of water and in some cases modifying the chemical properties of the supported metal. Therefore, to optimize the performance of these catalysts one must take into consideration the properties of the metal and oxide phases. IR and AP-XPS have been used to study the reaction mechanism for the WGS on metal oxide catalysts. Data of IR spectroscopy indicate that formate species are not necessarily involved in the main reaction path for the water-gas shift on Cu-, Au- and Pt-based catalysts. Thus, a pure redox mechanism or associative mechanisms that involve either carbonate-like (CO3, HCO3) or carboxyl (HOCO) species should be considered. In the last two decades, there have been tremendous advances in our ability to study catalytic materials under reaction conditions and we are moving towards the major goal of fully understanding how the active sites for the production of hydrogen through the WGS actually work. PMID:23660768

  19. Cross sections for x-ray photoelectron-induced desorption of hydrogen ions from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Anderson, R.A.

    1985-09-20

    We have measured the cross sections for x-ray photoelectron-induced desorption of hydrogen ions from beryllium, carbon, aluminum, tantalum, and gold surfaces. This report describes the results of the cross-section measurements, and discusses a time-of-flight technique that allows the determination of ionic-desorption cross sections as small as 10/sup -25/ cm/sup 2/ per photoelectron. 19 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Spectacular photocatalytic hydrogen evolution using metal-phosphide/CdS hybrid catalysts under sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuang; Chen, Yong; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lv, Xiao-Jun; Fu, Wen-Fu

    2015-05-21

    A highly efficient and robust heterogeneous photocatalytic hydrogen evolution system was established for the first time by using the CoP/CdS hybrid catalyst in water under solar irradiation. The H2-production rate can reach up to 254,000 ?mol h(-1) g(-1) during 4.5 h of sunlight irradiation, which is one of the highest values ever reported on CdS photocatalytic systems in the literature. PMID:25913814

  1. Metal-organic frameworks derived CoxFe1-xP nanocubes for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jinhui; Yang, Wenshu; Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Jilin

    2015-06-01

    Designing and developing active, cost-effective and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are still an ongoing challenge. Herein, we report the synthesis of binary transition metal phosphide (CoxFe1-xP) nanocubes with different Co and Fe ratios through a phosphidation process using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates. MOF templates contribute well-defined nanocube architectural features after phosphidation, while a suitable phosphidation temperature could allow formation of a crystal structure and maintain the well-defined structure. The incorporation of a binary transition metal results in redistribution of the valence electrons in CoxFe1-xP. The changes imply anionic states of the P and Fe atoms, which act as active sites and thus have stronger electron-donating ability. When CoxFe1-xP nanocubes are employed as electrocatalysts, these characteristic features facilitate the performance of HER. Remarkably, Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes prepared at 450 °C afford a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a low overpotential of 72 mV in acidic conditions and 92 mV in alkaline conditions. Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes also exhibit a small Tafel slope of 52 mV decade-1 in acidic conditions and 72 mV decade-1 in alkaline conditions. Moreover, Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes show good stability in both acidic and alkaline conditions. Our method produces the highly active HER catalyst based on binary transition metal MOF templates, providing a new avenue for designing excellent electrocatalysts.Designing and developing active, cost-effective and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are still an ongoing challenge. Herein, we report the synthesis of binary transition metal phosphide (CoxFe1-xP) nanocubes with different Co and Fe ratios through a phosphidation process using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates. MOF templates contribute well-defined nanocube architectural features after phosphidation, while a suitable phosphidation temperature could allow formation of a crystal structure and maintain the well-defined structure. The incorporation of a binary transition metal results in redistribution of the valence electrons in CoxFe1-xP. The changes imply anionic states of the P and Fe atoms, which act as active sites and thus have stronger electron-donating ability. When CoxFe1-xP nanocubes are employed as electrocatalysts, these characteristic features facilitate the performance of HER. Remarkably, Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes prepared at 450 °C afford a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a low overpotential of 72 mV in acidic conditions and 92 mV in alkaline conditions. Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes also exhibit a small Tafel slope of 52 mV decade-1 in acidic conditions and 72 mV decade-1 in alkaline conditions. Moreover, Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes show good stability in both acidic and alkaline conditions. Our method produces the highly active HER catalyst based on binary transition metal MOF templates, providing a new avenue for designing excellent electrocatalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, FESEM images, TEM images, XRD patterns, N2 adsorption-desorption curves, and polarization curves. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01955a

  2. Structure and screening in molecular and metallic hydrogen at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    A variational wavefunction is used to express the (spin restricted) Hartree-Fock energy as reciprocal lattice sums for static lattice FCC monatomic hydrogen and diatomic Pa3 molecular hydrogen. In the monatomic phase the hydrogenic orbital range closely parallels the inverse Thomas-Fermi wavevector; the corresponding energy E has a minimum of -0.929 Ryd/electron at r sub s = 1.67. For the diatomic phase E(r sub s) is similar, but the constituent energies, screening, and bond length reflect a qualitative change in the nature of the solid at r sub s = 2.8. This change is interpreted in terms of a transition from protons as structural units (at high density) to weakly interacting models (at low density). Insensitivity of the total energy to a rapid fall in the bond length suggests association with the rotational transition where the rapid molecular orientations characteristic of high pressures disappear and the molecules rotate freely at low pressure.

  3. A homogeneous transition metal complex for clean hydrogen production from methanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Lugo, Rafael E.; Trincado, Mónica; Vogt, Matthias; Tewes, Friederike; Santiso-Quinones, Gustavo; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2013-04-01

    The development of an efficient catalytic process that mimics the enzymatic function of alcohol dehydrogenase is critical for using biomass alcohols for both the production of H2 as a chemical energy carrier and fine chemicals under waste-free conditions. Dehydrogenation of alcohol-water mixtures into their corresponding acids with molecular hydrogen as the sole by-product from the reaction can be catalysed by a ruthenium complex with a chelating bis(olefin) diazadiene ligand. This complex, [K(dme)2][Ru(H)(trop2dad)], stores up to two equivalents of hydrogen intramolecularly, and catalyses the production of H2 from alcohols in the presence of water and a base under homogeneous conditions. The conversion of a MeOH-H2O mixture proceeds selectively to CO2/H2 gas formation under neutral conditions, thereby allowing the use of the entire hydrogen content (12% by weight). Isolation and characterization of the ruthenium complexes from these reactions suggested a mechanistic scenario in which the trop2dad ligand behaves as a chemically ‘non-innocent’ co-operative ligand.

  4. Metal-organic frameworks derived CoxFe1-xP nanocubes for electrochemical hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jinhui; Yang, Wenshu; Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Jilin

    2015-07-01

    Designing and developing active, cost-effective and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are still an ongoing challenge. Herein, we report the synthesis of binary transition metal phosphide (CoxFe1-xP) nanocubes with different Co and Fe ratios through a phosphidation process using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates. MOF templates contribute well-defined nanocube architectural features after phosphidation, while a suitable phosphidation temperature could allow formation of a crystal structure and maintain the well-defined structure. The incorporation of a binary transition metal results in redistribution of the valence electrons in CoxFe1-xP. The changes imply anionic states of the P and Fe atoms, which act as active sites and thus have stronger electron-donating ability. When CoxFe1-xP nanocubes are employed as electrocatalysts, these characteristic features facilitate the performance of HER. Remarkably, Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes prepared at 450 °C afford a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at a low overpotential of 72 mV in acidic conditions and 92 mV in alkaline conditions. Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes also exhibit a small Tafel slope of 52 mV decade(-1) in acidic conditions and 72 mV decade(-1) in alkaline conditions. Moreover, Co0.59Fe0.41P nanocubes show good stability in both acidic and alkaline conditions. Our method produces the highly active HER catalyst based on binary transition metal MOF templates, providing a new avenue for designing excellent electrocatalysts. PMID:26052656

  5. Micelle-Template Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Graphene as an Efficient Metal-Free Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Yufei; Ao, Zhimin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of mesoporous graphene materials by soft-template methods remains a great challenge, owing to the poor self-assembly capability of precursors and the severe agglomeration of graphene nanosheets. Herein, a micelle-template strategy to prepare porous graphene materials with controllable mesopores, high specific surface areas and large pore volumes is reported. By fine-tuning the synthesis parameters, the pore sizes of mesoporous graphene can be rationally controlled. Nitrogen heteroatom doping is found to remarkably render electrocatalytic properties towards hydrogen evolution reactions as a highly efficient metal-free catalyst. The synthesis strategy and the demonstration of highly efficient catalytic effect provide benchmarks for preparing well-defined mesoporous graphene materials for energy production applications. PMID:25523276

  6. Generalized Intermolecular Interaction Tensor Applied to Long-Range Interactions in Hydrogen and Coinage Metal (Cu, Ag, and Au) Clusters.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Richard; Korpinen, Markus; Hänninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel formulation for the intermolecular interaction tensor, which is used to describe the long-range electrostatic, induction, and dispersion interactions. Our formulation is based on concepts drawn from combinatorial analysis and Clifford calculus and enables us to present the interaction tensor in a form that is simple to use and suitable for both numerical and symbolic analyses. We apply the derived formulas to calculate the long-range interaction coefficients in hydrogen and coinage metal (Cu, Ag, and Au) clusters. The electronic structure calculations are performed at the CCSD(T) level, with triple-? and quadruple-? basis sets. The multipole moments and dispersion coefficients are obtained as fits to the derived interaction formulas. The most important interaction parameters are obtained accurately and are in good agreement with other results. PMID:26501212

  7. Metallic Iron-Nickel Sulfide Ultrathin Nanosheets As a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Long, Xia; Li, Guixia; Wang, Zilong; Zhu, HouYu; Zhang, Teng; Xiao, Shuang; Guo, Wenyue; Yang, Shihe

    2015-09-23

    We report on the synthesis of iron-nickel sulfide (INS) ultrathin nanosheets by topotactic conversion from a hydroxide precursor. The INS nanosheets exhibit excellent activity and stability in strong acidic solutions as a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, lending an attractive alternative to the Pt catalyst. The metallic ?-INS nanosheets show an even lower overpotential of 105 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) and a smaller Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec. With the help of DFT calculations, the high specific surface area, facile ion transport and charge transfer, abundant electrochemical active sites, suitable H(+) adsorption, and H2 formation kinetics and energetics are proposed to contribute to the high activity of the INS ultrathin nanosheets toward HER. PMID:26338434

  8. A Noble-Metal-Free Nickel(II) Polypyridyl Catalyst for Visible-Light-Driven Hydrogen Production from Water.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Lu, Hong-Wei; Tu, Ji-Ren; Fang, Yong; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Fan, Xiao-Xing; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2015-10-01

    The complex [Ni(bpy)3 ](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) is an active catalyst for visible-light-driven H2 production from water when employed with [Ir(dfppy)2 (Hdcbpy)] [dfppy=2-(3,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine, Hdcbpy=4-carboxy-2,2'-bipyridine-4'-carboxylate] as the photosensitizer and triethanolamine as the sacrificial electron donor. The highest turnover number of 520 with respect to the nickel(II) catalyst is obtained in a 8:2 acetonitrile/water solution at pH 9. The H2 -evolution system is more stable after the addition of an extra free bpy ligand, owing to faster catalyst regeneration. The photocatalytic results demonstrate that the nickel(II) polypyridyl catalyst can act as a more effective catalyst than the commonly utilized [Co(bpy)3 ](2+) . This study may offer a new paradigm for constructing simple and noble-metal-free catalysts for photocatalytic hydrogen production. PMID:26264140

  9. Oxidation of phenol by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by metal-containing poly(amidoxime) grafted starch.

    PubMed

    El-Hamshary, Hany; El-Newehy, Mohamed H; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2011-01-01

    Polyamidoxime chelating resin was obtained from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) grafted starch. The nitrile groups of the starch-grafted polyacrylonitrile (St-g-PAN) were converted into amidoximes by reaction with hydroxylamine under basic conditions. The synthesized graft copolymer and polyamidoxime were characterized by FTIR, TGA and elemental microanalysis. Metal chelation of the polyamidoxime resin with iron, copper and zinc has been studied. The produced metal-polyamidoxime polymer complexes were used as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol using H(2)O(2) as oxidizing agent. The oxidation of phenol depends on the central metal ion present in the polyamidoxime complex. Reuse of M-polyamidoxime catalyst/H(2)O(2) system showed a slight decrease in catalytic activities for all M-polyamidoxime catalysts. PMID:22127293

  10. Long-Term Evolution and Revival Structure of Rydberg Wave Packets for Hydrogen and Alkali-Metal Atoms

    E-print Network

    Robert Bluhm; Alan Kostelecky

    1995-06-07

    This paper begins with an examination of the revival structure and long-term evolution of Rydberg wave packets for hydrogen. We show that after the initial cycle of collapse and fractional/full revivals, which occurs on the time scale $t_{\\rm rev}$, a new sequence of revivals begins. We find that the structure of the new revivals is different from that of the fractional revivals. The new revivals are characterized by periodicities in the motion of the wave packet with periods that are fractions of the revival time scale $t_{\\rm rev}$. These long-term periodicities result in the autocorrelation function at times greater than $t_{\\rm rev}$ having a self-similar resemblance to its structure for times less than $t_{\\rm rev}$. The new sequence of revivals culminates with the formation of a single wave packet that more closely resembles the initial wave packet than does the full revival at time $t_{\\rm rev}$, i.e., a superrevival forms. Explicit examples of the superrevival structure for both circular and radial wave packets are given. We then study wave packets in alkali-metal atoms, which are typically used in experiments. The behavior of these packets is affected by the presence of quantum defects that modify the hydrogenic revival time scales and periodicities. Their behavior can be treated analytically using supersymmetry-based quantum-defect theory. We illustrate our results for alkali-metal atoms with explicit examples of the revival structure for radial wave packets in rubidium.

  11. Metal-free, polyether-mediated H2-release from ammonia borane: roles of hydrogen bonding interactions in promoting dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongmin; Baek, Hyunjae; Lee, Jin Hee; Yeo, Shinyoung; Kim, Kibum; Hwang, Son-Jong; Eun, Bit; Nam, Suk Woo; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Yoon, Chang Won

    2013-12-01

    Polyetheral additives were found to be efficient promoters to enhance the rate of H2-release from ammonia borane (AB) at various temperatures. In particular, tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (T4EGDE, 29 wt% relative to AB + T4EGDE) exhibited significantly improved activities for AB dehydrogenation, with the material-based hydrogen storage capacity of 10.3 wt% at 125 °C within 40 min. In situ FT-IR spectroscopy indicated the formation of B-(cyclodiborazanyl)amino-borohydride (BCDB), borazine, and ?-aminodiborane as gaseous byproducts. In addition, (11)B nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy further revealed that diammoniate of diborane (DADB) was initially formed to give polyaminoborane as liquid and/or solid spent-fuel, consistent with previous reports. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations suggested that hydrogen bonding interactions between AB and a polyetheral promoter initially played an important role in increasing the reactivity of B-H bonds of AB by transferring electron density from oxygen atoms of the promoter into B-H bonds of AB. These partially activated, hydridic B-H bonds were proposed to help promote the formation of diammoniate of diborane (DADB), which is considered as a reactive intermediate, eventually enhancing the rate of H2-release from AB. In addition, our in situ solid state (11)B magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements further confirmed that the rate of DADB formation from AB with a small quantity of T4EGDE was found to be much faster than that of pristine AB even at 50 °C. This metal-free method for H2-release from AB with an added, small quantity of polyethers would be helpful to develop feasible hydrogen storage systems for long-term fuel cell applications. PMID:24068365

  12. Transition-metal dispersion on carbon-doped boron nitride nanostructures: Applications for high-capacity hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Liao, Ji-Hai; Yang, Xiao-Bao

    2012-07-01

    Using density-functional theory calculations, we investigated the adsorption of transition-metal (TM) atoms (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) on carbon doped hexagonal boron nitride (BN) sheet and the corresponding cage (B12N12). With carbon substitution of nitrogen, Sc, V, Cr, and Mn atoms were energetically favorable to be dispersed on the BN nanostructures without clustering or the formation of TM dimers, due to the strong binding between TM atoms and substrate, which contains the half-filled levels above the valence bands maximum. The carbon doped BN nanostructures with dispersed Sc could store up to five and six H2, respectively, with the average binding energy of 0.3 ˜ 0.4 eV, indicating the possibility of fabricating hydrogen storage media with high capacity. We also demonstrated that the geometrical effect is important for the hydrogen storage, leading to a modulation of the charge distributions of d levels, which dominates the binding between H2 and TM atoms.

  13. Effect of alkaline earth metals on the liquid-phase hydrogenation of hydroquinone over Ru-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongwei; Ji, Dong; Li, Yu; Liang, Yalan; Li, Gui Xian

    2015-12-01

    A series of Ru-based catalysts modified by alkaline earth metals were prepared by the impregnation-precipitation method and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ICP optical emission spectroscopy, Infrared Spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine analysis and surface area analysis. The performance of the catalysts was measured via liquid-phase hydroquinone hydrogenation reaction. Results show that the Ru-Sr/NaY catalyst has the best activity and selectivity among those Ru-based catalysts. The conversion of hydroquinone and the selectivity to 1,4-cyclohexanediol reached up to 99.6% and 89.6% at optimum reaction condition (700 r/min, 423 K and 5 MPa pressure of H2 in 3 h). This may be attributed to the fact that the right amount of Strontium is beneficial to the good dispersion of the ruthenium nanoclusters on the surface of NaY and modify the acidic properties of the catalyst. Moreover, IR of adsorbed pyridine analysis suggested the proper ratio of L/B acid of the catalysts played an important role in the performance of the hydroquinone hydrogenation reaction.

  14. Tuning the acid/metal balance of carbon nanofiber-supported nickel catalysts for hydrolytic hydrogenation of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Van de Vyver, Stijn; Geboers, Jan; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Eloy, Pierre; Dornez, Emmie; Seo, Jin Won; Courtin, Christophe M; Gaigneaux, Eric M; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2012-08-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are a class of graphitic support materials with considerable potential for catalytic conversion of biomass. Earlier, we demonstrated the hydrolytic hydrogenation of cellulose over reshaped nickel particles attached at the tip of CNFs. The aim of this follow-up study was to find a relationship between the acid/metal balance of the Ni/CNFs and their performance in the catalytic conversion of cellulose. After oxidation and incipient wetness impregnation with Ni, the Ni/CNFs were characterized by various analytical methods. To prepare a selective Ni/CNF catalyst, the influences of the nature of oxidation agent, Ni activation, and Ni loading were investigated. Under the applied reaction conditions, the best result, that is, 76 % yield in hexitols with 69 % sorbitol selectivity at 93 % conversion of cellulose, was obtained on a 7.5 wt % Ni/CNF catalyst prepared by chemical vapor deposition of CH(4) on a Ni/?-Al(2)O(3) catalyst, followed by oxidation in HNO(3) (twice for 1 h at 383 K), incipient wetness impregnation, and reduction at 773 K under H(2). This preparation method leads to a properly balanced Ni/CNF catalyst in terms of Ni dispersion and hydrogenation capacity on the one hand, and the number of acidic surface-oxygen groups responsible for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis on the other. PMID:22730195

  15. A rationally designed amino-borane complex in a metal organic framework: a novel reusable hydrogen storage and size-selective reduction material.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinbo; Xie, Linhua; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Lai, Zhiping

    2015-05-01

    A novel amino-borane complex inside a stable metal organic framework was synthesized for the first time. It releases hydrogen at a temperature of 78 °C with no volatile contaminants and can be well reused. Its application as a size-selective reduction material in organic synthesis was also demonstrated. PMID:25735485

  16. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  17. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  18. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Adsorbents for Hydrogen Purification and Precombustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Herm, Zoey R; Swisher, Joe A; Smit, Berend; Krishna, Rajamani; Long, Jeffrey R

    2011-04-20

    Selected metal–organic frameworks exhibiting representative properties—high surface area, structural flexibility, or the presence of open metal cation sites—were tested for utility in the separation of CO? from H? via pressure swing adsorption. Single-component CO? and H? adsorption isotherms were measured at 313 K and pressures up to 40 bar for Zn?O(BTB)? (MOF-177, BTB3- = 1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate), Be12(OH)12(BTB)? (Be-BTB), Co(BDP) (BDP2- = 1,4-benzenedipyrazolate), H?[(Cu?Cl)?(BTTri)?] (Cu-BTTri, BTTri3- = 1,3,5-benzenetristriazolate), and Mg?(dobdc) (dobdc4- = 1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate). Ideal adsorbed solution theory was used to estimate realistic isotherms for the 80:20 and 60:40 H?/CO? gas mixtures relevant to H? purification and precombustion CO? capture, respectively. In the former case, the results afford CO?/H? selectivities between 2 and 860 and mixed-gas working capacities, assuming a 1 bar purge pressure, as high as 8.6 mol/kg and 7.4 mol/L. In particular, metal–organic frameworks with a high concentration of exposed metal cation sites, Mg?(dobdc) and Cu-BTTri, offer significant improvements over commonly used adsorbents, indicating the promise of such materials for applications in CO?}/H? separations.

  19. Hydrogen transport through tubular membranes of palladium-coated tantalum and niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Buxbaum, R.E.; Kinney, A.B.

    1996-02-01

    Palladium-based membranes have been used for decades in hydrogen extraction because of their high permeability and good surface properties and because palladium, like all metals, is 100% selective for hydrogen transport. The authors describe experiments with hydrogen-extraction membranes made of palladium-coated niobium and tantalum heat-exchanger tubers. The cost was about $45/ft of 3/8 inch tubular membrane, and the fluxes were as high as 0.001 47 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa{sup 1/2} at 420 C. The main transport resistance is in the refractory metal substrate. Durability tests showed a 15% reduction in flux for 31 days of continuous membrane operation. Assuming durability is maintained for at least 1 year, this price and flux should allow competitive application for hydrogen recovery in petrochemical plants and for membrane reactors.

  20. Metallic Membrane Materials Development for Hydrogen Production from Coal Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Dogan; B.H. Howard; D.E. Alman

    2012-02-26

    The goals of Office of Clean Coal are: (1) Improved energy security; (2) Reduced green house gas emissions; (3) High tech job creation; and (4) Reduced energy costs. The goals of the Hydrogen from Coal Program are: (1) Prove the feasibility of a 40% efficient, near zero emissions IGCC plant that uses membrane separation technology and other advanced technologies to reduce the cost of electricity by at least 35%; and (2) Develop H{sub 2} production and processing technologies that will contribute {approx}3% in improved efficiency and 12% reduction in cost of electricity.

  1. Real-time detection of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metallic palladium using vibrating wire method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Yuji; Nishimura, Atsuki; Yokooji, Honoka; Takata, Hiroki; Kawae, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    A vibrating wire (VW) method was applied to investigate the hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of palladium. At room temperature, a considerable shift in resonance frequency was successfully observed in VW spectra under H2 gas exposure. The shift is reversible in the initial stage of the exposure and is attributed to changes in the density and Young’s modulus of the VW sensor. Irreversibility of the shift because of embrittlement is detected after a sufficient exposure time. H absorption is slowed down enormously at T = 200 K owing to suppression of the thermal activation process.

  2. In situ synthesis of TiH{sub 2} layer on metallic titanium foil through gaseous hydrogen free acid-hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Na; Wang, Guancong; Liu, Hong; Ohachi, Tadashi

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: The reaction mechanism for in situ synthesizing TiH{sub 2} layer on titanium foil by a gaseous hydrogen free acid-hydrothermal methodology. - Highlights: • A dense TiH{sub 2} layer is synthesized by a hydrogen free acid-hydrothermal method. • Hydrogen in a TiH{sub 2} layer synthesized can release at low temperature. • During the dehydrogenation process, there is no any intermediate phase forming. • We report a method of low-cost, low-risk and convenience toward productive TiH{sub 2}. - Abstract: A novel strategy for synthesis of TiH{sub 2} layer on surface of metallic titanium by using an acid-hydrothermal method was proposed. During the synthesis process, no any elemental hydrogen was involved. X-ray powder diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy results confirmed that a TiH{sub 2} layer of 20 ?m thickness on a Ti foil surface can be formed in situ by an interface reaction of metallic titanium with sulfuric acid solution, hydrochloric acid, or phosphoric acid, which is a hydrogen self-storage process. By tuning reaction parameters, for example, concentration of acid, composition and morphology of TiH{sub 2}-Ti hybrid materials can be adjusted. The TiH{sub 2} layer on a metallic titanium surface can be decompounded completely heated below 400 °C. This convenient, safe and low-cost method is a promising gaseous hydrogen free approach for the synthesis of hydride-based hydrogen storage materials.

  3. Plasma Membrane Ca2+-Permeable Channels are Differentially Regulated by Ethylene and Hydrogen Peroxide to Generate Persistent Plumes of Elevated Cytosolic Ca2+ During Transfer Cell Trans-Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Ming; van Helden, Dirk F; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2015-09-01

    The enhanced transport capability of transfer cells (TCs) arises from their ingrowth wall architecture comprised of a uniform wall on which wall ingrowths are deposited. The wall ingrowth papillae provide scaffolds to amplify plasma membranes that are enriched in nutrient transporters. Using Vicia faba cotyledons, whose adaxial epidermal cells spontaneously and rapidly (hours) undergo a synchronous TC trans-differentiation upon transfer to culture, has led to the discovery of a cascade of inductive signals orchestrating deposition of ingrowth wall papillae. Auxin-induced ethylene biosynthesis initiates the cascade. This in turn drives a burst in extracellular H2O2 production that triggers uniform wall deposition. Thereafter, a persistent and elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, resulting from Ca(2+) influx through plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels, generates a Ca(2+) signal that directs formation of wall ingrowth papillae to specific loci. We now report how these Ca(2+)-permeable channels are regulated using the proportionate responses in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration as a proxy measure of their transport activity. Culturing cotyledons on various combinations of pharmacological agents allowed the regulatory influence of each upstream signal on Ca(2+) channel activity to be evaluated. The findings demonstrated that Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity was insensitive to auxin, but up-regulated by ethylene through two independent routes. In one route ethylene acts directly on Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, through an ethylene receptor-dependent pathway. The other route is mediated by an ethylene-induced production of extracellular H2O2 which then acts translationally and post-translationally to up-regulate Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity. A model describing the differential regulation of Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity is presented. PMID:26139237

  4. Photovoltaic Hydrogen Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, Taher; Janesick, James R.; Lambe, John

    1989-01-01

    Photovoltaic device senses hydrogen developed to test degradation of diodes with platinum flash gates on backs. Sensing element is p/n junction rather than conventional Schottky barrier or metal oxide/silicon field-effect transistor. Hydrogen-indicating electrical signal modulated optically rather than electrically. Layered structure of hydrogen detector and principle of operation resemble silicon solar photovoltaic cell. Hydrogen detector responds to hydrogen in atmosphere within minutes and recovers quickly when hydrogen removed.

  5. Electrolytic process for producing hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, J.B.

    1984-02-07

    An electrolytic process for producing hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous alkaline solution includes simultaneously passing an aqueous alkaline electrolyte and oxygen through a fluid permeable conductive cathode comprising reticulated vitreous carbon foam, separating the fluid permeable conductive cathode from an anode by a barrier and connecting the fluid permeable conductive electrode and the anode with an external power source to cause generation of hydrogen peroxide ion within the aqueous alkaline solution.

  6. A Metal-Nitride Nanowire Dual-Photoelectrode Device for Unassisted Solar-to-Hydrogen Conversion under Parallel Illumination.

    PubMed

    AlOtaibi, B; Fan, S; Vanka, S; Kibria, M G; Mi, Z

    2015-10-14

    A dual-photoelectrode device, consisting of a photoanode and photocathode with complementary energy bandgaps, has long been perceived as an ideal scheme for achieving high efficiency, unassisted solar-driven water splitting. Previously reported 2-photon tandem devices, however, generally exhibit an extremely low efficiency (<0.1%), which has been largely limited by the incompatibility between the two photoelectrode materials. Here we show that the use of metal-nitride nanowire photoelectrodes, together with the scheme of parallel illumination by splitting the solar spectrum spatially and spectrally, can break the efficiency bottleneck of conventional 2-photon tandem devices. We have first investigated a dual-photoelectrode device consisting of a GaN nanowire photoanode and an InGaN nanowire photocathode, which exhibited an open circuit potential of 1.3 V and nearly 20-fold enhancement in the power conversion efficiency under visible light illumination (400-600 nm), compared to the individual photoelectrodes in 1 mol/L HBr. We have further demonstrated a dual-photoelectrode device consisting of parallel-connected metal-nitride nanowire photoanodes and a Si/InGaN nanowire photocathode, which can perform unassisted, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion. A power conversion efficiency of 2% was measured under AM1.5G 1 sun illumination. PMID:26360182

  7. Reliability and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite insulating coatings on cooled hydrogen-oxygen rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. G., Jr.; Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structural integrity and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite coatings was conducted. These coatings were plasma sprayed onto the combustion side of water-cooled, 12.7-centimeter throat diameter, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chambers operating at 2.07 to 4.14 meganewtons per square meter chamber pressure. The metallic-ceramic composites functioned for six to 17 cycles and for as long as 213 seconds of rocket operations and could have probably provided their insulating properties for many additional cycles. The effective thermal conductivity of all the coatings was in the range of 0.7472 to 4.483 w/(m)(K), which makes the coatings a very effective thermal barrier. Photomicrographic studies of cross-sectioned coolant tubes seem to indicate that the effective thermal conductivity of the coatings is controlled by contact resistance between the particles, as a result of the spraying process, and not the thermal conductivity of the bulk materials.

  8. Investigation of the Cold Fusion Phenomenon in the Surface Region of Hydrogen Non-occlusive Metal Catalysts; W, Pt, and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozima, Hideo; Mizuno, Tadahiko

    2009-03-01

    There are several experimental data sets showing occurrence of the cold fusion phenomenon (CFP) in such contact metallic catalysts which do not occlude hydrogen isotopes such as tungsten (W), platinum (Pt) and gold (Au). These metals do not occlude hydrogen isotopes and are different from such hydrogen occlusive transition metals usually used in the cold fusion (CF) experiments such as Ti, Ni, and Pd. The non-occlusive isotopes and give us precious information about mechanisms facilitating formation of specific matter for the CFP (CF matter) in the cold fusion material. In the electrolysis experiments with these metals as electrodes and with several electrolytes in light or heavy water, transmuted nuclides were observed in the surface layer of the electrodes. The generated nuclides were localized in areas with a diameter of around a few ?m in the surface layer of thickness less than 103 nm. These specific nuclides observed in the host metals, W, Pt and Au, depend on the composition of the electrolyte.

  9. Molecular electrocatalysts for oxidation of hydrogen using earth-abundant metals: shoving protons around with proton relays.

    PubMed

    Bullock, R Morris; Helm, Monte L

    2015-07-21

    Sustainable, carbon-neutral energy is needed to supplant the worldwide reliance on fossil fuels in order to address the persistent problem of increasing emissions of CO2. Solar and wind energy are intermittent, highlighting the need to develop energy storage on a huge scale. Electrocatalysts provide a way to convert between electrical energy generated by renewable energy sources and chemical energy in the form of chemical bonds. Oxidation of hydrogen to give two electrons and two protons is carried out in fuel cells, but the typical catalyst is platinum, a precious metal of low earth abundance and high cost. In nature, hydrogenases based on iron or iron/nickel reversibly oxidize hydrogen with remarkable efficiencies and rates. Functional models of these enzymes have been synthesized with the goal of achieving electrocatalytic H2 oxidation using inexpensive, earth-abundant metals along with a key feature identified in the [FeFe]-hydrogenase: an amine base positioned near the metal. The diphosphine ligands P(R)2N(R')2 (1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane with alkyl or aryl groups on the P and N atoms) are used as ligands in Ni, Fe, and Mn complexes. The pendant amines facilitate binding and heterolytic cleavage of H2, placing the hydride on the metal and the proton on the amine. The pendant amines also serve as proton relays, accelerating intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfers. Electrochemical oxidations and deprotonations by an exogeneous amine base lead to catalytic cycles for oxidation of H2 (1 atm) at room temperature for catalysts derived from [Ni(P(Cy)2N(R')2)2](2+), Cp(C6F5)Fe(P(tBu)2N(Bn)2)H, and MnH(P(Ph)2N(Bn)2)(bppm)(CO) [bppm = (PAr(F)2)2CH2]. In the oxidation of H2 catalyzed by [Ni(P(Cy)2N(R')2)2](2+), the initial product observed experimentally is a Ni(0) complex in which two of the pendant amines are protonated. Two different pathways can occur from this intermediate; deprotonation followed by oxidation occurs with a lower overpotential than the alternate pathway involving oxidation followed by deprotonation. The Mn cation [Mn(P(Ph)2N(Bn)2)(bppm)(CO)](+) mediates the rapid (>10(4) s(-1) at -95 °C), reversible heterolytic cleavage of H2. Obtaining the optimal benefit of pendant amines incorporated into the ligand requires that the pendant amine be properly positioned to interact with a M-H or M(H2) bond. In addition, ligands are ideally selected such that the hydride-acceptor ability of the metal and the basicity of a pendant are tuned to give low barriers for heterolytic cleavage of the H-H bond and subsequent proton transfer reactions. Using these principles allows the rational design of electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation using earth-abundant metals. PMID:26079983

  10. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

  11. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    PubMed

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation. PMID:25702992

  12. Mechanistic study on ultrasound assisted pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse using metal salt with hydrogen peroxide for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Govindarajan; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the ultrasound assisted pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse (SCB) using metal salt with hydrogen peroxide for bioethanol production. Among the different metal salts used, maximum holocellulose recovery and delignification were achieved with ultrasound assisted titanium dioxide (TiO2) pretreatment (UATP) system. At optimum conditions (1% H2O2, 4 g SCB dosage, 60 min sonication time, 2:100 M ratio of metal salt and H2O2, 75°C, 50% ultrasound amplitude and 70% ultrasound duty cycle), 94.98 ± 1.11% holocellulose recovery and 78.72 ± 0.86% delignification were observed. The pretreated SCB was subjected to dilute acid hydrolysis using 0.25% H2SO4 and maximum xylose, glucose and arabinose concentration obtained were 10.94 ± 0.35 g/L, 14.86 ± 0.12 g/L and 2.52 ± 0.27 g/L, respectively. The inhibitors production was found to be very less (0.93 ± 0.11 g/L furfural and 0.76 ± 0.62 g/L acetic acid) and the maximum theoretical yield of glucose and hemicellulose conversion attained were 85.8% and 77%, respectively. The fermentation was carried out using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and at the end of 72 h, 0.468 g bioethanol/g holocellulose was achieved. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of pretreated SCB was made and its morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compounds formed during the pretreatment were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. PMID:26384901

  13. Noble-Metal-Free Molybdenum Disulfide Cocatalyst for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Lu, Hong-Wei; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2015-12-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting using powered semiconductors as photocatalysts represents a promising strategy for clean, low-cost, and environmentally friendly production of H2 utilizing solar energy. The loading of noble-metal cocatalysts on semiconductors can significantly enhance the solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency. However, the high cost and scarcity of noble metals counter their extensive utilization. Therefore, the use of alternative cocatalysts based on non-precious metal materials is pursued. Nanosized MoS2 cocatalysts have attracted considerable attention in the last decade as a viable alternative to improve solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency because of its superb catalytic activity, excellent stability, low cost, availability, environmental friendliness, and chemical inertness. In this perspective, the design, structures, synthesis, and application of MoS2 -based composite photocatalysts for solar H2 generation are summarized, compared, and discussed. Finally, this Review concludes with a summary and remarks on some challenges and opportunities for the future development of MoS2 -based photocatalysts. PMID:26586523

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  15. Hydrogen dynamics in heavy alkali metal hydrides obtained through inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffermann, G.; Barrera, G. D.; Colognesi, D.; Corradi, G.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Zoppi, M.

    2004-08-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra from polycrystalline NaH, KH, RbH and CsH, measured at low temperature in the energy transfer range 3 meVhydrogen-projected densities of phonon states are extracted and compared to ab initio lattice dynamics results. The overall agreement is very good. Further lattice dynamics calculations, based on a pairwise Born-Mayer semi-empirical potential scheme, were also performed, providing only limited and qualitative agreement with the experimental data. In conclusion, incoherent inelastic neutron spectroscopy proves to be a stringent validation tool for lattice dynamics simulations of H-containing materials.

  16. Carbons and hydrogen by persistent metal radicals. Final report, April 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of complexed rhenium radicals is demonstrated from the reaction of sterically demanding phosphine with the triphenylmethyl complex [n{sup 5}-CPh{sub 3}]Re(CO){sub 3}. Low yields are experienced unless high concentrations of phosphine ligands are employed with the mechanism of this reaction yet unknown. A complexed rhenium dimer is also synthesized, but in low yield. X-ray crystallography reveals that the sixth coordination site of the electron deficient rhenium cation (an extremely strong Lewis acid) is occupied by an agostic interaction with one of the pendant C-H bonds of the cyclohexyl ring of the complex. Preliminary results show that the rhenium complexes have a significantly different chemistry from similar tungsten analogs in reactivity and isotope exchange rates. It is hypothesized that the rhenium complexes would be useful in catalyzing the isotope exchange between water and hydrogen.

  17. Exploiting metal-ligand bifunctional reactions in the design of iron asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morris, Robert H

    2015-05-19

    This is an Account of our development of iron-based catalysts for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) and asymmetric pressure hydrogenation (AH) of ketones and imines. These chemical processes provide enantiopure alcohols and amines for use in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, fragrance, and other fine chemical industries. Fundamental principles of bifunctional reactivity obtained by studies of ruthenium catalysts by Noyori's group and our own with tetradentate ligands with tertiary phosphine and secondary amine donor groups were applied to improve the performance of these first iron(II) catalysts. In particular the correct positioning of a bifunctional H-Fe-NH unit in an iron hydride amine complex leads to exceptional catalyst activity because of the low energy barrier of dihydrogen transfer to the polar bond of the substrate. In addition the ligand structure with this NH group along with an asymmetric array of aryl groups orients the incoming substrate by hydrogen-bonding, and steric interactions provide the hydrogenated product in high enantioselectivity for several classes of substrates. Enantiomerically pure diamines or diphenylphosphino-amine compounds are used as the source of the asymmetry in the tetradentate ligands formed by the condensation of the amines with dialkyl- or diaryl-phosphinoaldehydes, a synthesis that is templated by Fe(II). The commercially available ortho-diphenylphosphinobenzaldehyde was used in the initial studies, but then diaryl-phosphinoacetaldehydes were found to produce much more effective ligands for iron(II). Once the mechanism of catalysis became clearer, the iron-templated synthesis of (S,S)-PAr2CH2CH2NHCHPhCHPhNH2 ligand precursors was developed to specifically introduce a secondary amine in the precatalyst structures. The reaction of a precatalyst with strong base yields a key iron-amido complex that reacts with isopropanol (in ATH) or dihydrogen (in AH) to generate an iron hydride with the Fe-H bond parallel to the secondary amine N-H. In the AH reactions, the correct acidity of the intermediate iron-dihydrogen complex and correct basicity of the amide are important factors for the heterolytic splitting of the dihydrogen to generate the H-Fe-N-H unit; the acidity of dihydrogen complexes including those found in hydrogenases can be estimated by a simple additive ligand acidity constant method. The placement of the hydridic-protonic Fe-H···HN interaction in the asymmetric catalyst structure influences the enantioinduction. The sense of enantioinduction is predictable from the structure of the H-Fe-N-H-containing catalyst interacting with the ketone in the same way as related H-Ru-N-H-containing catalysts. The modular construction of the catalysts permits large variations in order to produce alcohol or amine products with enantiomeric excess in the 90-100% range in several cases. PMID:25897779

  18. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, and/or CaH2) Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-04-19

    Ammonia borane (AB = NH3BH3) is one of the most attractive materials for chemical hydrogen storage due to its high hydrogen contents of 19.6 wt.%, however, impurity levels of borazine, ammonia and diborane in conjunction with foaming and exothermic hydrogen release calls for finding ways to mitigate the decomposition reactions. In this paper we present a solution by mixing AB with metal hydrides (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2 and CaH2) which have endothermic hydrogen release in order to control the heat release and impurity levels from AB upon decomposition. The composite materials were prepared by mechanical ball milling, and their H2 release properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The formation of volatile products from decomposition side reactions, such as borazine (N3B3H6) was determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Sieverts type pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) gas-solid reaction instrument was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the combined systems and neat AB. In situ 11B MAS-NMR revealed a destabilized decomposition pathway. We found that by adding specific metal hydrides to AB we can eliminate the impurities and mitigate the heat release.

  19. Composite metal membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  20. Composite metal membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1998-04-14

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  1. Ultrastable Polymolybdate-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Highly Active Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Water.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun-Sheng; Du, Dong-Ying; Guan, Wei; Bo, Xiang-Jie; Li, Ya-Fei; Guo, Li-Ping; Su, Zhong-Min; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Lan, Ya-Qian; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-06-10

    Two novel polyoxometalate (POM)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), [TBA]3[?-PMo(V)8Mo(VI)4O36(OH)4Zn4][BTB]4/3·xGuest (NENU-500, BTB = benzene tribenzoate, TBA(+) = tetrabutylammonium ion) and [TBA]3[?-PMo(V)8Mo(VI)4O37(OH)3Zn4][BPT] (NENU-501, BPT = [1,1'-biphenyl]-3,4',5-tricarboxylate), were isolated. In these compounds, the POM fragments serving as nodes were directly connected with organic ligands giving rise to three-dimensional (3D) open frameworks. The two anionic frameworks were balanced by TBA(+) ions residing inside the open channels. They exhibit not only good stability in air but also tolerance to acidic and basic media. Furthermore, they were employed as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) owing to the combination of the redox activity of a POM unit and the porosity of a MOF. Meanwhile, the HER activities of ?(trim)(4/3), NENU-5, and HKUST-1 were also studied for comparison. Remarkably, as a 3D hydrogen-evolving cathode operating in acidic electrolytes, NENU-500 exhibits the highest activity among all MOF materials. It shows an onset overpotential of 180 mV and a Tafel slope of 96 mV·dec(-1), and the catalytic current density can approach 10 mA·cm(-2) at an overpotential of 237 mV. Moreover, NENU-500 and NENU-501 maintain their electrocatalytic activities after 2000 cycles. PMID:25933041

  2. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  3. Permeability anisotropy of resedimented mudrocks

    E-print Network

    Nordquist, Taylor James

    2015-01-01

    Permeability anisotropy (ratio of horizontal to vertical permeability) is an important but uncertain parameter used in characterizing underground formations. While it is a fairly unknown parameter, it is integral for the ...

  4. IMPACT OF NOBLE METALS AND MERCURY ON HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING HIGH LEVEL WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T; David Koopman, D

    2009-03-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are added to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing was used to identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests and was spiked with the required amount of noble metals immediately prior to performing the test. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. SME cycles were also performed during six of the tests.

  5. Metal/graphene nanocomposites synthesized with the aid of supercritical fluid for promoting hydrogen release from complex hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, De-Hao; Yang, Cheng-Hsien; Tseng, Chuan-Ming; Lee, Sheng-Long; Chang, Jeng-Kuei

    2014-10-01

    With the aid of supercritical CO2, Fe-, Ni-, Pd-, and Au-nanoparticle-decorated nanostructured carbon materials (graphene, activated carbon, carbon black, and carbon nanotubes) are synthesized for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of LiAlH4. The effects of the metal nanoparticle size and distribution, and the type of carbon structure on the hydrogen release properties are investigated. The Fe/graphene nanocomposite, which consists of ~2 nm Fe particles highly dispersed on graphene nanosheets, exhibits the highest catalytic performance. With this nanocomposite, the initial dehydrogenation temperature can be lowered (from ~135 °C for pristine LiAlH4) to ~40 °C without altering the reaction route (confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction), and 4.5 wt% H2 can be released at 100 °C within 6 min, which is faster by more than 135-fold than the time required to release the same amount of H2 from pristine LiAlH4.With the aid of supercritical CO2, Fe-, Ni-, Pd-, and Au-nanoparticle-decorated nanostructured carbon materials (graphene, activated carbon, carbon black, and carbon nanotubes) are synthesized for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of LiAlH4. The effects of the metal nanoparticle size and distribution, and the type of carbon structure on the hydrogen release properties are investigated. The Fe/graphene nanocomposite, which consists of ~2 nm Fe particles highly dispersed on graphene nanosheets, exhibits the highest catalytic performance. With this nanocomposite, the initial dehydrogenation temperature can be lowered (from ~135 °C for pristine LiAlH4) to ~40 °C without altering the reaction route (confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction), and 4.5 wt% H2 can be released at 100 °C within 6 min, which is faster by more than 135-fold than the time required to release the same amount of H2 from pristine LiAlH4. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03357d

  6. B-Methylated Amine-Boranes: Substituent Redistribution, Catalytic Dehydrogenation, and Facile Metal-Free Hydrogen Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Naomi E; Schäfer, André; Robertson, Alasdair P M; Leitao, Erin M; Jurca, Titel; Sparkes, Hazel A; Woodall, Christopher H; Haddow, Mairi F; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    Although the dehydrogenation chemistry of amine-boranes substituted at nitrogen has attracted considerable attention, much less is known about the reactivity of their B-substituted analogues. When the B-methylated amine-borane adducts, RR'NH·BH2Me (1a: R = R' = H; 1b: R = Me, R' = H; 1c: R = R' = Me; 1d: R = R' = iPr), were heated to 70 °C in solution (THF or toluene), redistribution reactions were observed involving the apparent scrambling of the methyl and hydrogen substituents on boron to afford a mixture of the species RR'NH·BH3-xMex (x = 0-3). These reactions were postulated to arise via amine-borane dissociation followed by the reversible formation of diborane intermediates and adduct reformation. Dehydrocoupling of 1a-1d with Rh(I), Ir(III), and Ni(0) precatalysts in THF at 20 °C resulted in an array of products, including aminoborane RR'N?BHMe, cyclic diborazane [RR'N-BHMe]2, and borazine [RN-BMe]3 based on analysis by in situ (11)B NMR spectroscopy, with peak assignments further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Significantly, very rapid, metal-free hydrogen transfer between 1a and the monomeric aminoborane, iPr2N?BH2, to yield iPr2NH·BH3 (together with dehydrogenation products derived from 1a) was complete within only 10 min at 20 °C in THF, substantially faster than for the N-substituted analogue MeNH2·BH3. DFT calculations revealed that the hydrogen transfer proceeded via a concerted mechanism through a cyclic six-membered transition state analogous to that previously reported for the reaction of the N-dimethyl species Me2NH·BH3 and iPr2N?BH2. However, as a result of the presence of an electron donating methyl substituent on boron rather than on nitrogen, the process was more thermodynamically favorable and the activation energy barrier was reduced. PMID:26535961

  7. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  8. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

    1998-01-01

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  9. Lithium inclusion in indium metal-organic frameworks showing increased surface area and hydrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Mathieu; Zhang, Muwei; Feng, Dawei; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Ying-Pin; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of counterion exchange in two anionic In-Metal-Organic Frameworks (In-MOFs) showed that partial replacement of disordered ammonium cations was achieved through the pre-synthetic addition of LiOH to the reaction mixture. This resulted in a surface area increase of over 1600% in (Li [In(1,3 ? BDC){sub 2}]){sub n} and enhancement of the H{sub 2} uptake of approximately 275% at 80?000 Pa at 77 K. This method resulted in frameworks with permanent lithium content after repeated solvent exchange as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lithium counterion replacement appears to increase porosity after activation through replacement of bulkier, softer counterions and demonstrates tuning of pore size and properties in MOFs.

  10. Transition metals (Ti and Co) in silicon and their complexes with hydrogen: A Laplace DLTS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Scheffler, L.; Weber, J.

    2014-04-01

    The electrical properties of transition metals (TM) in Si were often determined by means of the conventional deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. In the present study we demonstrate that the poor resolution of the conventional DLTS technique could lead to the wrong interpretation of the experimental data. On the example of well-known lifetime killers such as titanium and cobalt we show that the dominant defects appeared in samples doped with these impurities were previously wrongly attributed to different charged states of interstitial Ti and substitutional Co. Applying the high-resolution Laplace DLTS technique we re-examine the origin of these defects. Some of these defects will be shown to react with H and shallow acceptors leading to the appearance of new complex defects in the band gap of Si. Their nature will also be discussed in the present paper.

  11. PS1-10bzj: A FAST, HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA IN A METAL-POOR HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lunnan, R.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Milisavljevic, D.; Drout, M.; Sanders, N. E.; Challis, P. M.; Czekala, I.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Leibler, C.; Marion, G. H.; Narayan, G.; Huber, M. E.; McCrum, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Rest, A.; Roth, K. C.; Scolnic, D.; and others

    2013-07-10

    We present observations and analysis of PS1-10bzj, a superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey at a redshift z = 0.650. Spectroscopically, PS1-10bzj is similar to the hydrogen-poor SLSNe 2005ap and SCP 06F6, though with a steeper rise and lower peak luminosity (M{sub bol} {approx_equal} -21.4 mag) than previous events. We construct a bolometric light curve, and show that while PS1-10bzj's energetics were less extreme than previous events, its luminosity still cannot be explained by radioactive nickel decay alone. We explore both a magnetar spin-down and circumstellar interaction scenario and find that either can fit the data. PS1-10bzj is located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South and the host galaxy is imaged in a number of surveys, including with the Hubble Space Telescope. The host is a compact dwarf galaxy (M{sub B} Almost-Equal-To -18 mag, diameter {approx}< 800 pc), with a low stellar mass (M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }), young stellar population ({tau}{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr), and a star formation rate of {approx}2-3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The specific star formation rate is the highest seen in an SLSN host so far ({approx}100 Gyr{sup -1}). We detect the [O III] {lambda}4363 line, and find a low metallicity: 12 + (O/H) = 7.8 {+-} 0.2 ({approx_equal} 0.1 Z{sub Sun }). Together, this indicates that at least some of the progenitors of SLSNe come from young, low-metallicity populations.

  12. Solubility of, and hydrogen ion adsorption on, some metal oxides in aqueous solutions to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Benezeth, P.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Anovitz, L.M.; Machesky, M.L.; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Hyde, K.E.

    1997-08-01

    Solubility of boehmite (AlOOH), ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH)2)/magnetite (Fe3O4), zincite (ZnO), and brucite (Mg(OH)2) were measured over a range of temperatures (AlOOH, 100-290 C; Fe(OH)2/Fe3O4, 100-250 C; ZnO, 50-290 C; Mg(OH)2, 60-200 C) using in situ pH measurements. A hydrogen-electrode concentration cell was used; the pH range depended on the oxide. The solubility results for boehmite mainly demonstrate the method viability, while those for zincite are mainly restricted to mildly acidic to neutral pH where Zn{sup 2+} predominates in solution. The magnetite (presumably coated with Fe(OH)2) solubilities extend from pHs > 5 and, because of relevance to water/steam cycles of power plants, are compared in detail with previous studies. The same cell was used to investigate the surface adsorption-desorption thermodynamics of H ions on rutile (TiO2) and zincite to 290 C. Behavior of pH at zero-point-of-charge as function of temperature and application of the Stern-3-layer model were determined for this solid. The zincite study is still incomplete; preliminary results show trends that can be rationalized only qualitatively now with the zero- point-of-charge being apparently affected by hydration of the surface in basic solutions and specific adsorption of Na ions under the same conditions.

  13. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  14. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  15. Influence of hydrogen on the structure and stability of ultra-thin ZnO on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniek, Bjoern; Hofmann, Oliver T.; Rinke, Patrick

    2015-03-30

    We investigate the atomic and electronic structure of ultra-thin ZnO films (1 to 4 layers) on the (111) surfaces of Ag, Cu, Pd, Pt, Ni, and Rh by means of density-functional theory. The ZnO monolayer is found to adopt an ?-BN structure on the metal substrates with coincidence structures in good agreement with experiment. Thicker ZnO layers change into a wurtzite structure. The films exhibit a strong corrugation, which can be smoothed by hydrogen (H) adsorption. An H over-layer with 50% coverage is formed at chemical potentials that range from low to ultra-high vacuum H{sub 2} pressures. For the Ag substrate, both ?-BN and wurtzite ZnO films are accessible in this pressure range, while for Cu, Pd, Pt, Rh, and Ni wurtzite films are favored. The surface structure and the density of states of these H passivated ZnO thin films agree well with those of the bulk ZnO(0001{sup ¯})-2×1-H surface.

  16. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 times better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.

  17. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael (Longmont, CO); Xie, Xiaobing (Foster City, CA); Evenson, IV, Carl (Lafayette, CO); Grimmer, Paul (Longmont, CO); Wright, Harold (Longmont, CO)

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  18. The effect of surface hydrogenation of metal oxides on the nanomorphology and the charge generation efficiency of polymer blend solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilopoulou, Maria

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the effect of surface hydrogenation of different metal oxides, in particular molybdenum and tungsten oxides widely used to enhance hole extraction and zinc and titanium oxides widely used to enhance electron extraction, on the nanomorphology and the charge generation efficiency of polymer blend solar cells is investigated. It was found that photoactive layers based on blends using different polymers, in particular poly(3-hexythiophene) (P3HT) and poly[(9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl)-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl] (PCDTBT), which normally differ in both morphology and electronic structure, benefited, for both polymers, from deposition on metal oxides with high surface hydrogen content, in the sense that they exhibited improved crystallinity/order as revealed from X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption and elipsometric measurements. As a result, increased charge generation efficiencies and reduced recombination losses were measured in solar cells using metal oxides with highly hydrogenated surfaces at bottom electrodes and based on blends of either P3HT or PCDTBT, with a fullerene acceptor, as was verified by transient photocurrent measurements. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of those cells reached values of 4.5% and 7.2%, respectively, an increase of about 30% compared with the cells using metal oxides with low surface hydrogen content.In this work, the effect of surface hydrogenation of different metal oxides, in particular molybdenum and tungsten oxides widely used to enhance hole extraction and zinc and titanium oxides widely used to enhance electron extraction, on the nanomorphology and the charge generation efficiency of polymer blend solar cells is investigated. It was found that photoactive layers based on blends using different polymers, in particular poly(3-hexythiophene) (P3HT) and poly[(9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl)-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl] (PCDTBT), which normally differ in both morphology and electronic structure, benefited, for both polymers, from deposition on metal oxides with high surface hydrogen content, in the sense that they exhibited improved crystallinity/order as revealed from X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption and elipsometric measurements. As a result, increased charge generation efficiencies and reduced recombination losses were measured in solar cells using metal oxides with highly hydrogenated surfaces at bottom electrodes and based on blends of either P3HT or PCDTBT, with a fullerene acceptor, as was verified by transient photocurrent measurements. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of those cells reached values of 4.5% and 7.2%, respectively, an increase of about 30% compared with the cells using metal oxides with low surface hydrogen content. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures (XPS, UPS, FT-IR, Raman, conductivity measurements and steady-state photoluminescence spectra) are included in ESI (Fig. S1-S14 and Tables S1-S3). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04408h

  19. In situ growth of CdS nanoparticles on UiO-66 metal-organic framework octahedrons for enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Jian; Wang, Rong; Liu, Xin-Ling; Peng, Fu-Min; Li, Chuan-Hao; Teng, Fei; Yuan, Yu-Peng

    2015-08-01

    CdS nanoparticles acting as photosensitizer was grown in situ upon UiO-66 metal-organic framework octahedrons through a hydrothermal process. The resultant CdS/UiO-66 hybrid photocatalysts show remarkably active hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation as compared to CdS and UiO-66 alone. The optimum hybrid with 16 wt% CdS loading shows a hydrogen production rate of 235 ?mol h-1, corresponding to 1.2% quantum efficiency at 420 nm. The improved photocatalytic hydrogen production over hybrid CdS/UiO-66 is ascribed to the efficient interfacial charge transfer from CdS to UiO-66, which effectively suppresses the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and thereby enhancing the photocatalytic efficiency.

  20. Design and Synthesis of Novel Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) Toward High Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Eddaoudi; Zaworotko, Michael; Space, Brian; Eckert, Juergen

    2013-05-08

    Statement of Objectives: 1. Synthesize viable porous MOFs for high H2 storage at ambient conditions to be assessed by measuring H2 uptake. 2. Develop a better understanding of the operative interactions of the sorbed H2 with the organic and inorganic constituents of the sorbent MOF by means of inelastic neutron scattering (INS, to characterize the H2-MOF interactions) and computational studies (to interpret the data and predict novel materials suitable for high H2 uptake at moderate temperatures and relatively low pressures). 3. Synergistically combine the outcomes of objectives 1 and 2 to construct a made-to-order inexpensive MOF that is suitable for super H2 storage and meets the DOE targets - 6% H2 per weight (2kWh/kg) by 2010 and 9% H2 per weight (3kWh/kg) by 2015. The ongoing research is a collaborative experimental and computational effort focused on assessing H2 storage and interactions with pre-selected metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolite-like MOFs (ZMOFs), with the eventual goal of synthesizing made-to-order high H2 storage materials to achieve the DOE targets for mobile applications. We proposed in this funded research to increase the amount of H2 uptake, as well as tune the interactions (i.e. isosteric heats of adsorption), by targeting readily tunable MOFs:

  1. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  2. Semi-Coke–Supported Mixed Metal Oxides for Hydrogen Sulfide Removal at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Mi; Yongyan, Zhang; Yongsheng, Zhu; Ting, Guo; Huiling, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To improve the desulfurization efficiency of sorbents at low cost, modified semi-coke was used as the substrate for mixed metal oxides (ZFM; oxides of zinc [Zn], iron [Fe], and manganese [Mn]) in hot gas desulfurization. Performance of the prepared ZFM/modified semi-coke (MS) sorbents were evaluated in a fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range 400–550°C. Results showed that the molar ratio of Mn to Zn, effect of the substrate, the calcination temperature, and the sulfidation temperature influenced the performance of the sorbents. Optimum conditions for the preparation of the ZFM/MS sorbents were molar ratio of Mn(NO3)2·6H2O, Zn(NO3)2, and Fe(NO3)3, 0.6:1:2; mass ratio of ZFM0.6 to modified semi-coke support, 1:1; and calcination temperature, 600°C. The ZFM0.6/MS sorbent thus prepared exhibited the best sorption sulfur capacity of 27.46% at 450°C. PMID:22783061

  3. Differences in argon and water permeability of phyllosilicate powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnsen, J.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Phyllosilicates, such as clays and micas, are abundant throughout the upper crust. They are commonly found in upper crustal faults and constitute a large percentage of the sediments that make up accretionary wedges. Phyllosilicate-rich rocks are known to have low permeability, but the influence of the mineralogy on the permeability is poorly characterized. We present results of water and argon permeability measurements of eight phyllosilicate powders at room temperature. Phyllosilicates included talc, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite (all particle size <2 ?m), and muscovite, phlogopite, and biotite (particle size <20 ?m). Tests were performed under hydrostatic conditions, with a constant pore pressure of 10 MPa (water or argon) and varying confining pressure up to 160 MPa. Results show that phyllosilicate powders have very low permeabilities between 10-19 m2 and 10-24 m2, depending on mineral, pore fluid, and effective pressure. Lowest permeabilities were found for montmorillonite and talc, while muscovite was the most permeable phyllosilicate powder. Permeability decreases with increased compaction of powders, and for fully compacted powders (after 10 pressure cycles), pressure dependency of permeability follows an exponential relationship with a pressure sensitive gradient of 0.004 MPa-1 to 0.015 MPa-1. Permeability for water is always lower (up to 1.8 orders of magnitude) than for argon. The difference in argon-water permeability can be related to the hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bonding surface properties of minerals tested. Talc, the most hydrophobic mineral tested, showed the smallest difference between argon and water permeability, while montmorillonite showed the largest. Permeability might also be affected by packing controlled by frictional strength of particles, as well as by particle size and shape. Additional tests of the frictional strength of those phyllosilicate powders show a relationship between dry or wet friction coefficients of the powders and their argon or water permeability. The results indicate that type of phyllosilicate, pore water chemistry and grain size distribution will strongly affect permeability in phyllosilicate-rich regions of the upper crust such as faults.

  4. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  5. Heterostructure of Si and CoSe?: A Promising Photocathode Based on a Non-noble Metal Catalyst for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Basu, Mrinmoyee; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chen, Po-Tzu; Yang, Kai-Chih; Ma, Chong-Geng; Lin, Chun Che; Hu, Shu-Fen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2015-05-18

    Development of a solar water splitting device requires design of a low-cost, efficient, and non-noble metal compound as alternative to noble metals. For the first time, we showed that CoSe2 can function as co-catalyst in phototoelectrochemical hydrogen production. We designed a heterostructure of p-Si and marcasite-type CoSe2 for solar-driven hydrogen production. CoSe2 successively coupled with p-Si can act as a superior photocathode in the solar-driven water splitting reaction. Photocurrents up to 9?mA?cm(-2) were achieved at 0?V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the high photocurrents can be attributed to low charge transfer resistance between the Si and CoSe2 interfaces and that between the CoSe2 and electrolyte interfaces. Our results suggest that this CoSe2 is a promising alternative co-catalyst for hydrogen evolution. PMID:25925794

  6. Binding of hydrocarbons and other extremely weak ligands to transition metal complexes that coordinate hydrogen: Investigation of cis-interactions and delocalized bonding involving sigma bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J.; Luo, X.L.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the forefront of chemistry are efforts to catalytically transform the inert C-H bonds in alkanes to more useful products using metal compounds. The goal is to observe binding and cleavage of alkane C-H bonds on metals or to use related silane Si-H bonding as models, analogous to the discovery of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) binding to metals. Studies of these unique sigma complexes (M{hor_ellipsis}H-Y; Y{double_bond}H, Si, C) will aid in developing new catalysts or technologies relevant to DOE interest, e.g., new methods for tritium isotope separation. Several transition metals (Mo, W, Mn, and Pt) were found to reversibly bind and cleave H{sub 2}, silanes, and halocarbons. The first metal-SiH{sub 4} complexes, thus serving as a model for methane reactions. A second goal is to study the dynamics and energetics of H-Y bonds on metals by neutron scattering, and evidence for interactions between bound H-Y and nearby H atoms on metal complexes has been found.

  7. Examining the role of hydrogen in the electrical performance of in situ fabricated metal-insulator-metal trilayers using an atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Kozen, Alexander C.; Schroeder, Marshall A.; Osborn, Kevin D.; Lobb, C. J.; Rubloff, Gary W.; Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742

    2013-04-29

    Defects in electronic devices can lead to poor performance and device failure. We used deuterium doping to investigate the source of hydrogen defects in Atomic Layer Deposited (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and in situ fabrication techniques to produce ultraclean metal-insulator-metal trilayers. We compare leakage current and defect density of ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectrics deposited using different oxidation conditions. The plasma O{sub 2} ALD process has lowest number of entrained defects and exhibits a leakage current 10{sup 4} times lower than the thermal ALD process. Deuterium doping during the ALD process shows that the majority of the hydrogen defects contained in the ALD films are due to entrained water.

  8. Super hydrogen and helium barrier with polyelectolyte nanobrick wall thin film.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ping; Lugo, Elva L; Mai, Garret D; Wilhite, Benjamin A; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to impart light gas (i.e., H2 and He) barrier to polymer substrates, thin films of polyethylenimine (PEI), poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), and montmorrilonite (MMT) clay are deposited via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. A five "quadlayer" (122 nm) coating deposited on 51 ?m polystyrene is shown to lower both hydrogen and helium permeability three orders of magnitude against bare polystyrene, demonstrating better performance than thick-laminated ethylene vinyl-alcohol (EVOH) copolymer film and even metallized polyolefin/polyester film. These excellent barrier properties are attributed to a "nanobrick wall" structure. This highly flexible coating represents the first demonstration of an LbL deposited film with low hydrogen and helium permeability and is an ideal candidate for several packaging and protection applications. PMID:25429915

  9. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal-oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.J.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxides - such as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxide - was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H{sub 2}S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H{sub 2}S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H{sub 2}S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H{sub 2}S for all four metal oxides.

  10. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal---oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxidesssuch as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxideswas investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H2S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H2S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H2S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H2S for all four metal oxides.

  11. Process for selectively reducing the permeability of a subterranean sandstone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D.; Gucwa, P.R.; Stonecipher, S.A.

    1981-11-24

    A caustic aqueous solution containing an amphoteric metal ion is injected into a subterranean sandstone formation. The caustic solution reacts with the sandstone formation to form caustic soluble silicates. The amphoteric metal ion reacts with the caustic soluble silicates to form an amphoteric metal silicate precipitate, which preferentially reduces the permeability of the relatively highly permeable zones of the formation. This improves conformance and flow profiles of fluids subsequently injected into or produced from the formation. 12 claims.

  12. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Stewart R. Schesnack; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2003-01-30

    Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize hydrogen permeation without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, a composite metal membrane based on an inexpensive hydrogen permeable metal achieved permeation rates in excess of 25 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Preliminary attempts to incorporate this metal into a cermet were successful, and a thick cermet membrane (0.83 mm) with 40 vol.% metal phase achieved a permeation rate of nearly 0.4 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Increasing the metal phase content and decreasing membrane thickness should significantly increase permeation, while maintaining the benefits derived from cermets. Two-phase ceramic/ceramic composite membranes had low hydrogen permeability, likely due to interdiffusion of constituents between the phases. However, these materials did demonstrate high resistance to corrosion, and might be good candidates for other composite membranes. Temperature-programmed reduction measurements indicated that model cermet materials absorbed 2.5 times as much hydrogen than the pure ceramic analogs. This characteristic, in addition to higher electron conductivity, likely explains the relatively high permeation for these cermets. Incorporation of catalysts with ceramics and cermets increased hydrogen uptake by 800 to more than 900%. Finally, new high-pressure seals were developed for cermet membranes that maintained a pressure differential of 250 psi. This result indicated that the approach for high-pressure seal development could be adapted for a range of compositions. Other items discussed in this report include mechanical testing, new proton conducting ceramics, supported thin films, and alkane to olefin conversion.

  13. Constant permeability of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting

    SciTech Connect

    Bitoh, T.; Shibata, D.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting on the soft magnetic properties of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by casting has been investigated. Ring-shaped bulk specimens that were prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting (fluxed specimens) show a flat hysteresis curve, indicating a good linear relationship between the magnetic induction and the applied magnetic field. Although the permeability of the fluxed specimens is lower than that of the specimens prepared by conventional Cu-mold casting by one order of magnitude, their coercivities are almost same. These results show that it is possible to develop a new soft magnetic material that exhibits constant permeability with low core loss.

  14. Permeabilities of radiation cured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sax, J. E.; Thalacker, V. P.; Boettcher, T. E.; Larson, E. G.

    The permeability of radiation cured materials to oxygen and water molecules was investigated. Several classes of radiation curable materials were studied, including: epoxy, urethane, polyether, polyester, and aliphatic acrylates. Permeabilities were measured as a function of irradiation dose for Ultra-Violet and Electron Beam sources. The effect of cross-link density on permeability was examined by varying the functionality of the molecule and the degree of cure. The results were interpreted in terms of structure/property relationships.

  15. STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

    2010-05-10

    The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

  16. Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

    2008-05-31

    This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

  17. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  18. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi (Mito, JP); Ikemoto, Ichiro (Mito, JP)

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  19. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  20. Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair

    E-print Network

    Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair James G. Berryman University features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical cor­ relation functions using modern

  1. Unusual non-bifunctional mechanism for Co-PNP complex catalyzed transfer hydrogenation governed by the electronic configuration of metal center.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cheng; Jiang, Jingxing; Li, Yinwu; Zhang, Zhihan; Zhao, Cunyuan; Ke, Zhuofeng

    2015-10-01

    The mimic of hydrogenases has unleashed a myriad of bifunctional catalysts, which are widely used in the catalytic hydrogenation of polar multiple bonds. With respect to ancillary ligands, the bifunctional mechanism is generally considered to proceed via the metal-ligand cooperation transition state. Inspired by the interesting study conducted by Hanson et al. (Chem Commun., 2013, 49, 10151), we present a computational study of a distinctive example, where a Co(II)-PNP catalyst with an ancillary ligand exhibits efficient transfer hydrogenation through a non-bifunctional mechanism. Both the bifunctional and non-bifunctional mechanisms are discussed. The calculated results, which are based on a full model of the catalyst, suggest that the inner-sphere non-bifunctional mechanism is more favorable (by ?11 kcal mol(-1)) than the outer-sphere bifunctional mechanism, which is in agreement with the experimental observations. The origin of this mechanistic preference of the Co(II)-PNP catalyst can be attributed to its preference for the square planar geometry. A traditional bifunctional mechanism is less plausible for Co(II)-PNP due to the high distortion energy caused by the change in electronic configuration with the varied ligand field. Considering previous studies that focus on the development of ligands more often, this computational study indicates that the catalytic hydrogenation mechanism is controlled not only by the structure of the ligand but also by the electronic configuration of the metal center. PMID:26332273

  2. The role of carbon dioxide in chemoselective hydrogenation of halonitroaromatics over supported noble metal catalysts in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Shinichiro; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro; Ikariya, Takao

    2005-02-21

    Chemoselective hydrogenation of halogenated nitrobenzenes over Pt/C catalysts proceeds effectively in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) to produce halogenated anilines with excellent selectivity; the rate of the hydrogenation of nitro groups is markedly enhanced in scCO2 compared to the neat reaction, and the dehalogenation reaction is significantly suppressed. PMID:15700083

  3. Hydrogen storage methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at T<100 K), (4) absorbed on interstitial sites in a host metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is 70.8 kg.m-3, and large volumes, where the thermal losses are small, can cause hydrogen to reach a system mass ratio close to one. The highest volumetric densities of hydrogen are found in metal hydrides. Many metals and alloys are capable of reversibly absorbing large amounts of hydrogen. Charging can be done using molecular hydrogen gas or hydrogen atoms from an electrolyte. The group one, two and three light metals (e.g. Li, Mg, B, Al) can combine with hydrogen to form a large variety of metal-hydrogen complexes. These are especially interesting because of their light weight and because of the number of hydrogen atoms per metal atom, which is two in many cases. Hydrogen can also be stored indirectly in reactive metals such as Li, Na, Al or Zn. These metals easily react with water to the corresponding hydroxide and liberate the hydrogen from the water. Since water is the product of the combustion of hydrogen with either oxygen or air, it can be recycled in a closed loop and react with the metal. Finally, the metal hydroxides can be thermally reduced to metals in a solar furnace. This paper reviews the various storage methods for hydrogen and highlights their potential for improvement and their physical limitations.

  4. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Ka King

    2013-05-02

    A series of organometallic compounds containing the tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand are described. The potassium carbanions KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} and KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA are synthesized by deprotonation of the hydrocarbon HC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} with potassium benzyl. KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA crystallizes as a dimer with two types of three-center-two-electron KH- Si interactions. Homoleptic Ln(III) tris(silylalkyl) complexes containing ?-SiH groups M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) are synthesized from salt elimination of the corresponding lanthanide halide and 3 equiv. of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The related reactions with Sc yield bis(silylalkyl) ate-complexes containing either LiCl or KCl. The divalent calcium and ytterbium compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) are prepared from MI{sub 2} and 2 equiv of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} react with 1 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to give 1,3- disilacyclobutane {Me2Si-C(SiHMe2)2}2 and MC(SiHMe2)3HB(C6F5)3L, and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}, respectively. The corresponding reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu) give the ?-SiH abstraction product [{(Me{sub 2}HSi){sub 3}C}{sub 2}LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}SiMe{sub 2}][HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}] (Ln = Y, Lu), but the silene remains associated with the Y or Lu center. The abstraction reactions of M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2 }or TMEDA) and Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) and 2 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} give the expected dicationic M{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and dicationic mono(silylalkyl) LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2} (Ln = Y, Lu, La), respectively. Salt metathesis reactions of Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrX (X = Cl, I, OTf; R = t-Bu, SiHMe{sub 2}) and lithium hydrosilazide ultimately afford hydride products Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrH that suggest unusual ?-hydrogen elimination processes. A likely intermediate in one of these reactions, Cp{sub 2}Zr[N(SiHMe{sub 2})t-Bu][N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}], is isolated under controlled synthetic conditions. Addition of alkali metal salts to this zirconium hydrosilazide compound produces the corresponding zirconium hydride. However as conditions are varied, a number of other pathways are also accessible, including C-H/Si-H dehydrocoupling, ?-abstraction of a CH, and ?-abstraction of a SiH. Our observations suggest that the conversion of (hydrosilazido)zirconocene to zirconium hydride does not follow the classical four-center ?- elimination mechanism. Elimination and abstraction reactions dominate the chemistry of ligands containing ?- hydrogen. In contrast, Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}H and Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}Me undergo selective ?-CH bond activation to yield the azasilazirconacycle Cp{sub 2Zr}{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}}, even though there are reactive ?-hydrogen available for abstraction. The ?-SiH groups in metallacycle provide access to new pathways for sixteen-electron zirconium alkyl compounds, in which Cp{sub 2}Zr{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}} undergoes a rare ?-bond metathesis reaction with ethylene. The resulting vinyl intermediate undergoes ?-hydrogen abstraction to reform ethylene and a silanimine zirconium species that reacts with ethylene to give a metallacyclopentane as the isolated product. The pendent ?-SiH in metallocycle also reacts with paraformaldehyde through an uncatalyzed hydrosilylation to form an exocyclic methoxysilyl moiety, while the zirconium-carbon bond in metallocycle is surprisingly inert toward formaldehyde. Still, the Zr-C moiety in metallocycle is available for chemistry, and it interacts with the carbon monoxide and strong electrophile B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to provide Cp{sub 2}Zr[?{sup 2}- OC(=CH{sub 2})SiMeHN(SiHMe

  5. NEGATIVE ION PRODUCTION BY BACK-SCATTERING FROM ALKALI-METAL SURFACES BOMBARDED BY IONS OF HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM.

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Peter Juergen

    2010-01-01

    from thin alkali metal targets. The heated (cooled) targetmetal targets, and the other allowed the target to be heatedheated target, and since a cooled target would allow deposition of thick alkali metal

  6. Hydrogen and Hydrogen-Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Milva; Colognesi, Daniele; Zoppi, Marco

    Currently, neutron applications in the field of hydrogen and hydrogen-storage materials represent a large and promising research area, both from the fundamental and the applied points of view. In this chapter we review some relevant topics from this subject area, including hydrogen bulk properties (concerning both the solid and the liquid phases), hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials (mainly carbon nanotubes, zeolites, and metal organic frameworks), and hydrogen storage in solid matrices (particularly ionic hydrides). For each class of materials, the current state of neutron research on their structural and dynamic properties is presented in detail. Future perspectives in this area are also outlined.

  7. Effects of van der Waals Density Functional Corrections on Trends in Furfural Adsorption and Hydrogenation on Close-Packed Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on Pd(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111) is studied with both standard Density Functional Theory (DFT)-GGA functionals and with van der Waals-corrected density functionals. VdWDF functionals, including optPBE, optB88, optB86b, and Grimme's method, are used to optimize the adsorption configurations of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and related intermediates resulting from hydrogenation of furfural, and the results are compared to corresponding values determined with GGA functionals, including PW91 and PBE. On Pd(111) and Pt(111), the adsorption geometries of the intermediates are not noticeably different between the two classes of functionals, while on Cu(111), modest changes are seen in both the erpendicular distance and the orientation of the aromatic ringwith respect to the planar surface. In general, the binding energies increase substantially in magnitude as a result of van derWaals contributions on all metals. In contrast, however, dispersion effects on the kinetics of hydrogenation are relatively small. It is found that activation barriers are not significantly affected by the inclusion of dispersion effects, and a Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationship developed solely fromPW91 calculations on Pd(111) is capable of describing corresponding results on Cu(111) and Pt(111), even when the dispersion effects are included. Finally, the reaction energies and barriers derived from the dispersion-corrected and pure GGA calculations are used to plot simple potential energy profiles for furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol on the three considered metals, and an approximately constant downshift of the energetics due to the dispersion corrections is observed.

  8. Effects of van der Waals density functional corrections on trends in furfural adsorption and hydrogenation on close-packed transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry; Greeley, Jeffrey

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on Pd(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111) is studied with both standard Density Functional Theory (DFT)-GGA functionals and with van der Waals-corrected density functionals. VdW-DF functionals, including optPBE, optB88, optB86b, and Grimme's method, are used to optimize the adsorption configurations of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and related intermediates resulting from hydrogenation of furfural, and the results are compared to corresponding values determined with GGA functionals, including PW91 and PBE. On Pd(111) and Pt(111), the adsorption geometries of the intermediates are not noticeably different between the two classes of functionals, while on Cu(111), modest changes are seen in both the perpendicular distance and the orientation of the aromatic ring with respect to the planar surface. In general, the binding energies increase substantially in magnitude as a result of van der Waals contributions on all metals. In contrast, however, dispersion effects on the kinetics of hydrogenation are relatively small. It is found that activation barriers are not significantly affected by the inclusion of dispersion effects, and a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship developed solely from PW91 calculations on Pd(111) is capable of describing corresponding results on Cu(111) and Pt(111), even when the dispersion effects are included. Finally, the reaction energies and barriers derived from the dispersion-corrected and pure GGA calculations are used to plot simple potential energy profiles for furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol on the three considered metals, and an approximately constant downshift of the energetics due to the dispersion corrections is observed.

  9. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOEpatents

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  10. MICROBIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MANURE BASED PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The implementation of permeable reactive barriers (PRB) provides a viable option for the remediation of contaminants of environmental significance such as dissolved metals (i.e., chromium), chlorinated solvents, and nitrate/ammonia. The designs of PRBs are usually based on the a...

  11. 3D architecture constructed via the confined growth of MoS2 nanosheets in nanoporous carbon derived from metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoli; Ding, Tao; Wang, Chunde; Yang, Qing

    2015-10-01

    The design and synthesis of robust, high-performance and low-cost three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structured materials for the electrochemical reduction of water to generate hydrogen is of great significance for practical water splitting applications. In this study, we develop an in situ space-confined method to synthesize an MoS2-based 3D hierarchical structure, in which the MoS2 nanosheets grow in the confined nanopores of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-derived 3D carbons as electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production. Benefiting from its unique structure, which has more exposed active sites and enhanced conductivity, the as-prepared MoS2/3D nanoporous carbon (3D-NPC) composite exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a small onset overpotential of ~0.16 V, large cathodic currents, small Tafel slope of 51 mV per decade and good durability. We anticipate that this in situ confined growth provides new insights into the construction of high performance catalysts for energy storage and conversion.The design and synthesis of robust, high-performance and low-cost three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structured materials for the electrochemical reduction of water to generate hydrogen is of great significance for practical water splitting applications. In this study, we develop an in situ space-confined method to synthesize an MoS2-based 3D hierarchical structure, in which the MoS2 nanosheets grow in the confined nanopores of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-derived 3D carbons as electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production. Benefiting from its unique structure, which has more exposed active sites and enhanced conductivity, the as-prepared MoS2/3D nanoporous carbon (3D-NPC) composite exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a small onset overpotential of ~0.16 V, large cathodic currents, small Tafel slope of 51 mV per decade and good durability. We anticipate that this in situ confined growth provides new insights into the construction of high performance catalysts for energy storage and conversion. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03810c

  12. Use of Interface Treatment to Reduce Emissions from Residuals in Lower Permeability Zones to Groundwater flowing Through More Permeable Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P.; Cavanagh, B.; Clifton, L.; Daniels, E.; Dahlen, P.

    2013-12-01

    Many soil and groundwater remediation technologies rely on fluid flow for contaminant extraction or reactant delivery (e.g., soil vapor extraction, pump and treat, in situ chemical oxidation, air sparging, enhanced bioremediation). Given that most unconsolidated and consolidated settings have permeability contrasts, the outcome is often preferential treatment of more permeable zones and ineffective treatment of the lower permeability zones. When this happens, post-treatment contaminant emissions from low permeability zone residuals can cause unacceptable long-term impacts to groundwater in the transmissive zones. As complete remediation of the impacted lower permeability zones may not be practicable with conventional technologies, one might explore options that lead to reduction of the contaminant emissions to acceptable levels, rather than full remediation of the lower permeability layers. This could be accomplished either by creating a sustained emission reaction/attenuation zone at the high-low permeability interface, or by creating a clean soil zone extending sufficiently far into the lower permeability layer to cause the necessary reduction in contaminant concentration gradient and diffusive emission. These options are explored in proof-of-concept laboratory-scale physical model experiments. The physical models are prepared with two layers of contrasting permeability and either dissolved matrix storage or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the lower permeability layer. A dissolved oxidant is then delivered to the interface via flow across the higher permeability layer and changes in contaminant emissions from the low permeability zone are monitored before, during, and after oxidant delivery. The use of three oxidants (dissolved oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and sodium persulfate) for treatment of emissions from petroleum hydrocarbon residuals is examined.

  13. Studies of hollow carbon nanospheres and grain boundary phase transitions in metals as examples of plasma material science

    SciTech Connect

    Skovoroda, A. A. Andreev, V. F.; Kas'yanova, N. V.; Spitsyn, A. V.

    2013-07-15

    Results are presented from studies of the material of hollow carbon nanospheres (nanocapsules) that form in tokamaks as a result of plasma interaction with the chamber wall and are similar in structure to meteorite onions. The possibility is demonstrated of studying the material properties in the grain boundary phase transitions in solid materials (metals) by using the plasma-stimulated permeability for hydrogen. The term 'plasma material science' is proposed for such material studies.

  14. Monodisperse colloidal metal particle from nonaqueous solutions: catalytic behavior in hydrogenation of but-1-ene of platinum, palladium, and rhodium particles supported on pumice

    SciTech Connect

    Boutonnet, M.; Kizling, J.; Mintsa-Eya, V.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Maire, G.; Stenius, P.

    1987-01-01

    Metal catalysts have been prepared by depositing monodisperse particles of platinum (2-3 nm), rhodium (2-3 nm), or palladium (5 nm) prepared in reversed micellar solutions on pumice. The particles are well dispersed on the support whereas particles deposited from aqueous or alcoholic solution give large aggregates. The catalytic properties of these different catalysts in the deuteration, isomerization, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange of but-1-ene have been compared. The activities calculated per metal surface atom are similar. However, platinum prepared from microemulsions show unusually high selectivity in the isomerization reaction, and for such particles dehydrogenated species are active in the exchange reaction. The specificity of rhodium and palladium catalysts is independent of the mode of preparation. The reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Hydrogen permeation characteristics of Incoloy 907 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Sun, X.K.; Liu, Q.Q.; Zhao, X.; Fan, C.G. )

    1993-05-15

    The problem of brittle fracture induced by hydrogen ingress from environment must be considered for some high-strength alloys, particularly for the superalloys strengthened by [gamma][prime] precipitation, used in fields such as aerospace and nuclear power. Therefore, a number of studies on hydrogen performance of superalloys have been recently carried out. The understanding of hydrogen transport characteristics in these alloys is important to clarify the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. Although hydrogen permeabilities and diffusivities of some superalloys have been reported, the study of the hydrogen permeation and diffusion in Incoloy 907 alloy, a type of Fe-Ni-Co based superalloy, is still absent to date. In the present work, a gaseous permeation technique was employed to measure hydrogen permeability and diffusivity in this alloy, in order to understand the relationship between hydrogen permeation and microstructure.

  16. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  17. PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER AT U.S. COAST GUARD SITE, ELIZABETH CITY, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are innovative and cost-effective remedial technologies and are becoming more desirable methods for in-situ passive remediation of ground water contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons and redox-sensitive metals. As contaminated water passes through ...

  18. BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUN: A PERMEABLE BARRIER MATERIAL FOR THE DEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum is an innovative remedial material for the treatment of gasoline oxygenates in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs represent a promising environmental technology for remediation of groundwater contamination. Although zero-valent metals (ZVM) have been...

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Hydrogen and moisture getter and absorber for sealed devices

    DOEpatents

    Smith, H.M.; Schicker, J.R.

    1999-03-30

    The present invention is a hydrogen getter and method for formulating and using the getter. This getter effectively removes hydrogen gas typically present in many hermetically-sealed electronic applications where the presence of such gas would otherwise be harmful to the electronics. The getter is a non-organic composition, usable in a wide range of temperatures as compared to organic getters. Moreover, the getter is formulated to be used without the need for the presence of oxygen. The getter is comprised of effective amounts of an oxide of a platinum group metal, a desiccant, and a gas permeable binder which preferably is cured after composition in an oxygen-bearing environment at about 150 to about 205 degrees centigrade.