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Sample records for hydrogen peroxide catalyzed

  1. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  2. MEMS-Based Satellite Micropropulsion Via Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Thomas, Michael A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques offer great potential in satisfying the mission requirements for the next generation of "micro-scale" satellites being designed by NASA and Department of Defense agencies. More commonly referred to as "nanosats", these miniature satellites feature masses in the range of 10-100 kg and therefore have unique propulsion requirements. The propulsion systems must be capable of providing extremely low levels of thrust and impulse while also satisfying stringent demands on size, mass, power consumption and cost. We begin with an overview of micropropulsion requirements and some current MEMS-based strategies being developed to meet these needs. The remainder of the article focuses the progress being made at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center towards the development of a prototype monopropellant MEMS thruster which uses the catalyzed chemical decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide as a propulsion mechanism. The products of decomposition are delivered to a micro-scale converging/diverging supersonic nozzle which produces the thrust vector; the targeted thrust level approximately 500 N with a specific impulse of 140-180 seconds. Macro-scale hydrogen peroxide thrusters have been used for satellite propulsion for decades; however, the implementation of traditional thruster designs on a MEMS scale has uncovered new challenges in fabrication, materials compatibility, and combustion and hydrodynamic modeling. A summary of the achievements of the project to date is given, as is a discussion of remaining challenges and future prospects.

  3. MINERALIZATION OF A SORBED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON IN TWO SOILS USING CATALYZED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R826163)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) catalyzed by soluble iron or naturally occurring soil minerals, (i.e., modified Fenton's reagent) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing sorbed and NAPL-phase benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic a...

  4. Oxidation of benzene with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with ferrocene in the presence of pyrazine carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shul'pina, L. S.; Durova, E. L.; Kozlov, Yu. N.; Kudinov, A. R.; Strelkova, T. V.; Shul'pin, G. B.

    2013-12-01

    It is found that ferrocene in the presence of small amounts of pyrazine carboxylic acid (PCA) effectively catalyzes the oxidation of benzene to phenol with hydrogen peroxide. Two main differences upon the oxidation of two different substrates, i.e., cyclohexane and benzene, with the same H2O2-ferrocene-PCA catalytic system are revealed: the rates of benzene oxidation and hydrogen peroxide decomposition are several times lower than the rate of cyclohexane oxidation at close concentrations of both substrates, and the rate constant ratios for the reactions of oxidizing particles with benzene and acetonitrile are significantly lower than would be expected for reactions involving free hydroxyl radicals. The overall rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition, including both the catalase and oxidase routes, is lower in the presence of benzene than in the presence of cyclohexane. It is suggested on the grounds of these data that a catalytically active particle different from the one generated in the absence of benzene is formed in the presence of benzene. This particle catalyzes hydrogen peroxide decomposition less efficiently than the initial complex and generates a dissimilar oxidizing particle that exhibits higher selectivity. It is shown that reactivity of the system at higher concentrations of benzene differs from that of an initial system not containing an aromatic component with the capability of π-coordination with metal ions.

  5. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  6. Acetyl xylan esterase of Aspergillus ficcum catalyzed the synthesis of peracetic acid from ethyl acetate and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Moon

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant acetyl xylan esterase (rAXE) of Aspergillus ficcum catalyzed the synthesis of peracetic acid (PAA) from ethyl acetate and hydrogen peroxide. Ten micrograms of rAXE catalyzed the synthesis of 1.34 mM of PAA, which can be used for the pretreatment of cellulosic biomass in situ. PMID:21824816

  7. Contaminated Groundwater Remediation by Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide and Persulfate Oxidants System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, N.; Wang, Y.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    A binary oxidant system, catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) coupled with persulfate (S2O82-), was investigated for use in in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) applications. Trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,4-dioxane were used as target contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the catalytic efficiency between ferrous ion (Fe2+) and base (NaOH), oxidant decomposition rates, and contaminant degradation efficiency. For the base-catalyzed H2O2-S2O82- system, oxidant release was moderate and sustained over the entire test period of 96 hours. Conversely, the oxidants were depleted within 24 hours for the Fe2+-catalyzed system. Solution pH decreased slightly for the Fe2+-catalyzed system, whereas the pH increased for the base-catalyzed system. The rates of degradation for TCE and 1,4-dioxane are compared as a function of system conditions. The results of this study indicate that the binary H2O2-S2O82- oxidant system is effective for oxidation of the tested contaminants.

  8. [Removal of fluorescent whitening agent by hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Xia; Jiao, Ru-Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of fluorescent whitening agent VBL in the processes of activated carbon (AC) and activated carbon modified (ACM) adsorptions, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation, and hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon were studied. Mechanism of the above catalytic oxidation was also investigated by adding tert-Butyl alcohol (TBA), the free radical scavenger, and detecting the released gases. The results showed that: the activated carbon modified by Fe (NO3)3 (ACM)exhibited better adsorption removal than AC. Catalytic oxidation showed efficient removal of VBL, and the catalytic removal of AC (up to 95%) was significantly higher than that of ACM (58% only). Catalytic oxidation was inhibited by TBA, which indicates that the above reaction involved *OH radicals and atom oxygen generated by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of AC. The results of H2O2 decomposition and released gases detection involved in the process showed that activated carbon enhanced the decomposition of H2O2 which released oxygen and heat. More O2 was produced and higher temperature of the reactor was achieved, which indicated that H2O2 decomposition catalyzed by ACM was significantly faster than that of AC. Combining the results of VBL removal, it could be concluded that the rate of active intermediates (*OH radicals and atom oxygen) production by ACM catalytic reaction was faster than that of AC. These intermediates consumed themselves and produced O2 instead of degrading VBL. It seemed that the improper mutual matching of the forming rate of activating intermediates and the supply rate of reactants was an important reason for the lower efficiency of ACM catalytic reaction comparing with AC. PMID:25158496

  9. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2•−). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2•− in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA. PMID:26633563

  10. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... peroxide is used in these products: Hydrogen peroxide Hair bleach Some contact lens cleaners Note: Household hydrogen peroxide ... it contains 97% water and 3% hydrogen peroxide. Hair bleaches are stronger. They usually have a concentration of ...

  11. Biomimetic iron-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation of aromatic alkenes by using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Gelalcha, Feyissa Gadissa; Anilkumar, Gopinathan; Tse, Man Kin; Brückner, Angelika; Beller, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    A novel and general biomimetic non-heme Fe-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation of aromatic alkenes by using hydrogen peroxide is reported herein. The catalyst consists of ferric chloride hexahydrate (FeCl(3)6 H(2)O), pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (H(2)(pydic)), and readily accessible chiral N-arenesulfonyl-N'-benzyl-substituted ethylenediamine ligands. The asymmetric epoxidation of styrenes with this system gave high conversions but poor enantiomeric excesses (ee), whereas larger alkenes gave high conversions and ee values. For the epoxidation of trans-stilbene (1 a), the ligands (S,S)-N-(4-toluenesulfonyl)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine ((S,S)-4 a) and its N'-benzylated derivative ((S,S)-5 a) gave opposite enantiomers of trans-stilbene oxide, that is, (S,S)-2 a and (R,R)-2 a, respectively. The enantioselectivity of alkene epoxidation is controlled by steric and electronic factors, although steric effects are more dominant. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest the in situ formation of several chiral Fe-complexes, such as [FeCl(L*)(2)(pydic)]HCl (L*=(S,S)-4 a or (S,S)-5 a in the catalyst mixture), which were identified by ESIMS. A UV/Vis study of the catalyst mixture, which consisted of FeCl(3)6 H(2)O, H(2)(pydic), and (S,S)-4 a, suggested the formation of a new species with an absorbance peak at lambda=465 nm upon treatment with hydrogen peroxide. With the aid of two independent spin traps, we could confirm by EPR spectroscopy that the reaction proceeds via radical intermediates. Kinetic studies with deuterated styrenes showed inverse secondary kinetic isotope effects, with values of k(H)/k(D)=0.93 for the beta carbon and k(H)/k(D)=0.97 for the alpha carbon, which suggested an unsymmetrical transition state with stepwise O transfer. Competitive epoxidation of para-substituted styrenes revealed a linear dual-parameter Hammett plot with a slope of 1.00. Under standard conditions, epoxidation of 1 a in the presence of ten equivalents of H(2) (18)O resulted in an absence

  12. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  13. EFFECTS OF AQUATIC HUMIC SUBSTANCES ON ANALYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE USING PEROXIDASE-CATALYZED OXIDATIONS OF TRIARYLMETHANES OR P-HYDROXYPENYLACETIC ACID (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sensitive procedure is described for trace analysis of hydrogen peroxide in water. The process involves the peroxide-catalyzed oxidation of the leuco forms of two dyes, crystal violet and malachite green. The sensitivity of this procedure, as well as of another procedure based ...

  14. Selenium-catalyzed oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. 2. Baeyer-Villiger reactions in homogeneous solution.

    PubMed

    ten Brink, G J; Vis, J M; Arends, I W; Sheldon, R A

    2001-04-01

    Several diselenides were tested for catalytic activity in Baeyer-Villiger reactions with 60% aqueous hydrogen peroxide. Bis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] diselenide forms the corresponding 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene seleninic acid in situ, which is a highly reactive and selective catalyst for the oxidation of carbonyl compounds in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, or dichloromethane. PMID:11281784

  15. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  16. Synthesis of propylene oxide from propylene and hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by titanium silicalite

    SciTech Connect

    Clerici, M.G.; Bellussi, G. ); Romano, U. )

    1991-05-01

    The epoxidation of propylene with hydrogen peroxide in the liquid phase, in the presence of titanium silicalite catalyst (TS-1), is described. The best solvents are methonol and methanol/water mixtures. The temperature is normally between room temperature and 60{degree}C. Under these conditions, reaction rates are fast, yields on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are quantitative, and selectivity to propylene oxide is very high. Propylene glycol and its monomethyl ethers and trace amounts of formaldehyde are the only by-products formed. Selectivity is further improved and the hydrolysis of the epoxide is almost suppressed when the residual acidity of the catalyst is completely neutralized. The activity of spent catalyst is recovered by calcining at 550{degree}C or, more simply, by washing with solvents. Complete activity recovery shows that Ti is not removed from the crystalline framework during the epoxidation reactions.

  17. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of thiocyanate by hydrogen peroxide: sup 15 N nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectral studies

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, S.; Deodhar, S.S.; Behere, D.V.; Mitra, S. )

    1991-01-01

    To establish the agent(s) responsible for the activity of the lactoperoxidase (LPO)/SCN{sup {minus}}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system, the oxidation of thiocyanate with hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by lactoperoxidase, has been studied by {sup 15}N NMR and optical spectroscopy at different concentrations of thiocyanate and hydrogen peroxide and at different pHs. The formation of hypothiocyanite ion (OSCN{sup {minus}}) as one of the oxidation products correlated well with activity of the LPO/SCN{sup {minus}}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system and was maximum when the concentrations of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and SCN{sup {minus}} were nearly the same and the pH was <6.0. At (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})/(SCN{sup {minus}}) = 1, OSCN{sup {minus}} decomposed very slowly back to thiocyanate. When the ratio (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})/(SCN{sup {minus}}) was above 2, formation of CN{sup {minus}} was observed, which was confirmed by {sup 15}N NMR and also by changes in the optical spectrum of LPO. The oxidation of thiocyanate by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of LPO does not take place at pH >8.0. Since thiocyanate does not bind to LPO above this pH, the binding of thiocyanate to LPO is considered to be prerequisite for the oxidation of thiocyanate. Maximum inhibition of oxygen uptake by Streptococcus cremoris 972 bacteria was observed when hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate were present in equimolar amounts and the pH was below 6.0.

  18. Degradation of phenolic compounds with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by enzyme from Serratia marcescens AB 90027.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ri-Sheng; Sun, Min; Wang, Chun-Ling; Deng, Sheng-Song

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, the degradation of phenolic compounds using hydrogen peroxide as oxidizer and the enzyme extract from Serratia marcescens AB 90027 as catalyst was reported. With such an enzyme/H2O2 combination treatment, a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was achieved, e.g., degradation of hydroquinone exceeded 96%. From UV-visible and IR spectra, the degradation mechanisms were judged as a process of phenyl ring cleavage. HPLC analysis shows that in the degradation p-benzoquinone, maleic acid and oxalic acid were formed as intermediates and that they were ultimately converted to CO2 and H2O. With the enzyme/H2O2 treatment, vanillin, hydroquinone, catechol, o-aminophenol, p-aminophenol, phloroglucinol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde were readily degraded, whereas the degradation of phenol, salicylic acid, resorcinol, p-cholorophenol and p-nitrophenol were limited. Their degradability was closely related to the properties and positions of their side chain groups. Electron-donating groups, such as -OH, -NH2 and -OCH3 enhanced the degradation, whereas electron-withdrawing groups, such as -NO2, -Cl and -COOH, had a negative effect on the degradation of these compounds in the presence of enzyme/H2O2. Compounds with -OH at ortho and para positions were more readily degraded than those with -OH at meta positions. PMID:16890975

  19. Degradation of trichloroethene by siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide and persulfate: Investigation of reaction mechanisms and degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ni; Liu, Fei; Xue, Qiang; Brusseau, Mark L.; Liu, Yali; Wang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    A binary catalytic system, siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) coupled with persulfate (S2O82−), was investigated for the remediation of trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate reaction mechanisms, oxidant decomposition rates, and degradation products. By using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we identified four radicals (hydroxyl (HO·), sulfate (SO4−·), hydroperoxyl (HO2·), and superoxide (O2−·)) in the siderite-catalyzed H2O2-S2O82− system. In the absence of S2O82− (i.e., siderite-catalyzed H2O2), a majority of H2O2 was decomposed in the first hour of the experiment, resulting in the waste of HO·. The addition of S2O82− moderated the H2O2 decomposition rate, producing a more sustainable release of hydroxyl radicals that improved the treatment efficiency. Furthermore, the heat released by H2O2 decomposition accelerated the activation of S2O82−, and the resultant SO4−· was the primary oxidative agent during the first two hours of the reaction. Dichloroacetic acid was firstly detected by ion chromatography (IC). The results of this study indicate a new insight to the reaction mechanism for the catalytic binary H2O2-S2O82− oxidant system, and the delineation of radicals and the discovery of the chlorinated byproduct provide useful information for efficient treatment of chlorinated-solvent contamination in groundwater. PMID:26236152

  20. Process conditions for the mineralization of a biorefractory polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in soils using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, P.C.; Watts, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and soluble iron or mineral catalysts) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in two soils of varied complexity. The process is based on Fenton`s reagent, which can be implemented in soils to generate hydroxyl radicals. This short-lived species reacts with most organic contaminants at near diffusion-controlled rates, providing a mechanism for potential rapid soil remediation. Benzo[a]pyrene labeled with {sup 14}C was added to silica sand and a silt loam loess soil; mineralization processes were then optimized using central composite rotatable experimental designs. Variables investigated during the optimization included H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, slurry volume, iron (II) amendment, and pH. Experimental data were evaluated by linear regression to develop empirical relationships and interactions between the variables. The equations were then used to develop three-dimensional response surfaces to describe BaP mineralization. The results from the response surfaces showed that 74% and 78% BaP mineralization was achieved in the silica sand and loess soils, respectively. The balance of the contaminant carbon remained with the soil fraction and was probably irreversibly sorbed. Desorption measurements over 5 d confirmed negligible desorption; however, oxidation reactions, which were complete within 24 h, documented >78% BaP mineralization, suggesting that the contaminant was oxidized, at least in part, in the sorbed phase. The results show that catalyzed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} has the ability to rapidly mineralize BaP that is not irreversibly sorbed.

  1. Manganese(II) catalyzes the bicarbonate-dependent oxidation of amino acids by hydrogen peroxide and the amino acid-facilitated dismutation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Berlett, B S; Chock, P B; Yim, M B; Stadtman, E R

    1990-01-01

    In bicarbonate/CO2 buffer, Mn(II) and Fe(II) catalyze the oxidation of amino acids by H2O2 and the dismutation of H2O2. As the Mn(II)/Fe(II) ratio is increased, the yield of carbonyl compounds per mole of leucine oxidized is essentially constant, but the ratio of alpha-ketoisocaproate to isovaleraldehyde formed increases, and the fraction of H2O2 converted to O2 increases. In the absence of Fe(II), the rate of Mn(II)-catalyzed leucine oxidation is directly proportional to the H2O2, Mn(II), and amino acid concentrations and is proportional to the square of the HCO3- concentration. The rate of Mn(II)-catalyzed O2 production in the presence of 50 mM alanine or leucine is about 4-fold the rate observed in the absence of amino acids and accounts for about half of the H2O2 consumed; the other half of the H2O2 is consumed in the oxidation of the amino acids. In contrast, O2 production is increased nearly 18-fold by the presence of alpha-methylalanine and accounts for about 90% of the H2O2 consumed. The data are consistent with the view that H2O2 decomposition is an inner sphere (cage-like) process catalyzed by a Mn coordination complex of the composition Mn(II), amino acid, (HCO3-)2. Oxidation of the amino acid in this complex most likely proceeds by a free radical mechanism involving hydrogen abstraction from the alpha-carbon as a critical step. The results demonstrate that at physiological concentrations of HCO3- and CO2, Mn(II) is able to facilitate Fenton-type reactions. PMID:2296594

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Vale, J Allister

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidising agent that is used in a number of household products, including general-purpose disinfectants, chlorine-free bleaches, fabric stain removers, contact lens disinfectants and hair dyes, and it is a component of some tooth whitening products. In industry, the principal use of hydrogen peroxide is as a bleaching agent in the manufacture of paper and pulp. Hydrogen peroxide has been employed medicinally for wound irrigation and for the sterilisation of ophthalmic and endoscopic instruments. Hydrogen peroxide causes toxicity via three main mechanisms: corrosive damage, oxygen gas formation and lipid peroxidation. Concentrated hydrogen peroxide is caustic and exposure may result in local tissue damage. Ingestion of concentrated (>35%) hydrogen peroxide can also result in the generation of substantial volumes of oxygen. Where the amount of oxygen evolved exceeds its maximum solubility in blood, venous or arterial gas embolism may occur. The mechanism of CNS damage is thought to be arterial gas embolisation with subsequent brain infarction. Rapid generation of oxygen in closed body cavities can also cause mechanical distension and there is potential for the rupture of the hollow viscus secondary to oxygen liberation. In addition, intravascular foaming following absorption can seriously impede right ventricular output and produce complete loss of cardiac output. Hydrogen peroxide can also exert a direct cytotoxic effect via lipid peroxidation. Ingestion of hydrogen peroxide may cause irritation of the gastrointestinal tract with nausea, vomiting, haematemesis and foaming at the mouth; the foam may obstruct the respiratory tract or result in pulmonary aspiration. Painful gastric distension and belching may be caused by the liberation of large volumes of oxygen in the stomach. Blistering of the mucosae and oropharyngeal burns are common following ingestion of concentrated solutions, and laryngospasm and haemorrhagic gastritis have been

  5. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  6. Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of cyclic ketones with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by cationic complexes of platinum(II): Selectivity properties and mechanistic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Del Todesco Frisone, M.; Pinna, F.; Strukul, G. )

    1993-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of simple cyclic ketones with hydrogen peroxide to give the corresponding lactones is reported. The reaction is catalyzed by complexes of Pt(II) of the type [(P-P)Pt(CF[sub 3])(solv)][sup +] (P-P = diphosphine) that may be deactivated by the hydroxy acids formed by hydrolysis of the lactones. The selectivity of the catalyst is studied in the oxidation of substrates like camphor, 2-cyclohexene-1-one, menthone, carvone, and indanones. Cyclobutanone is used to determine the mechanism of the reaction from initial rates studies. The reaction scheme proposed, which accounts for the observed effects of the various reactants, involves the coordination of the ketone on the vacant coordination site of the complex followed by nucleophilic attack of free hydrogen peroxide on the carbonyl carbon. The involvement of a quasi-peroxymetallacyclic intermediate is suggested which rearranges to give the lactone and the starting complex. A comparison with the mechanistic behavior of organic peroxy acids is given. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Dechlorination and destruction of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant catalyzed by molybdate ions under basic condition.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Jiang, Guibin

    2005-04-01

    The dechlorination and destruction of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) under basic condition using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant catalyzed by molybdate ions have been studied. Under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure, more than 95% of millimolar solutions of TCP and PCP can be converted to CO2 and CO, chlorinated and nonchlorinated carboxylic acid in 40 min. Up to 2.4 chloride ions per TCP and 3.5 chloride ions per PCP were released. TOC measurements indicated that 18% and 11% of the carbon was mineralized for TCP and PCP respectively after an hour of reaction. The results of ESR measurements suggested that the reaction possibly proceeded via the pathway with singlet oxygen. PMID:15763084

  8. Oxidative Cyclization of 1,5-Dienes with Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by an Osmium(III) Complex: Synthesis of cis-Tetrahydrofurans.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Kanetake, Takayuki; Maeda, Kazuki; Itoh, Shinobu

    2016-03-18

    Stereoselective oxidative cyclization of 1,5-dienes with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by [Os(III)(OH)(H2O)(L-N4Me2)](PF6)2 (1: L-N4Me2 = N,N'-dimethyl-2,11-diaza-[3,3](2,6)pyridinophane) is explored. 1,5-Dienes involving geraniol derivatives are converted to the corresponding tetrahydrofurans in modest to high yields. The products exclusively have the cis-conformation with respect to the substituents at the 2- and 5-positions of the tetrahydrofuran ring. The products also have a syn-conformation with respect to the furan oxygen atom and the hydroxyl groups. Mechanistic studies including a direct reaction of the oxo-hydroxo-osmium(V) complex, 2, with a dihydroxylated geraniol derivative are performed. PMID:26950609

  9. Effect of benzoic acid on the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane by a siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide and persulfate system.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengpin; Li, Mengjiao; Luo, Ximing; Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Chen, Honghan

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acid can affect the iron-oxide mineral dissolution and react with hydroxyl radical. This study investigated its effect on 1,2-dichloroethane removal process by siderite-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide and persulfate. The variation of benzoic acid concentrations can affect pH value and soluble iron concentrations; when benzoic acid varied from 0 to 0.5 mmol/L, pH increased while Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) concentrations decreased, resulting in 1,2-dichloroethane removal efficiency which decreased from 91.2 to 5.0%. However, when benzoic acid varied from 0.5 to 10 mmol/L, pH decreased while Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) concentrations increased, resulting in 1,2-dichloroethane removal efficiency which increased from 5.0 to 83.4%. PMID:26308917

  10. Greener Selective Cycloalkane Oxidations with Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Copper-5-(4-pyridyl)tetrazolate Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luísa; Nasani, Rajendar; Saha, Manideepa; Mobin, Shaikh; Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Pombeiro, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Microwave assisted synthesis of the Cu(I) compound [Cu(µ₄-4-ptz)]n [1, 4-ptz=5-(4-pyridyl)tetrazolate] has been performed by employing a relatively easy method and within a shorter period of time compared to its sister compounds. The syntheses of the Cu(II) compounds [Cu₃(µ₃-4-ptz)₄(µ₂-N₃)₂(DMF)₂]n∙(DMF)2n (2) and [Cu(µ₂-4-ptz)₂(H₂O)₂]n (3) using a similar method were reported previously by us. MOFs 1-3 revealed high catalytic activity toward oxidation of cyclic alkanes (cyclopentane, -hexane and -octane) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide, under very mild conditions (at room temperature), without any added solvent or additive. The most efficient system (2/H₂O₂) showed, for the oxidation of cyclohexane, a turnover number (TON) of 396 (TOF of 40 h(-1)), with an overall product yield (cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone) of 40% relative to the substrate. Moreover, the heterogeneous catalytic systems 1-3 allowed an easy catalyst recovery and reuse, at least for four consecutive cycles, maintaining ca. 90% of the initial high activity and concomitant high selectivity. PMID:26506333

  11. Demonstration of the Catalytic Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Alfred R. Jr.; Kessinger, Angela

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration known as Elephant's Toothpaste in which the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by iodide. Oxygen is released and soap bubbles are produced. The foam produced is measured, and results show a good relationship between the amount of foam and the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide. (DDR)

  12. Stabilized aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, M.J.; Sciafani, L.D.

    1988-05-17

    This patent describes a stabilized aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution having a pH below 7 and an amount of Ferric ion up to about 2 ppm comprising hydrogen peroxide, acetanilide having a concentration which ranges between 0.74 M Mol/L and 2.22 mMol/L, and o-benzene disulfonic acid or salt thereof at a concentration between about 0.86 mMol/L to about 1.62 mMol/L.

  13. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  14. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  18. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  20. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  1. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart L.; Matthews, Donna

    1993-11-01

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  2. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  3. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  4. Improved Electrolytic Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Patrick I.

    2005-01-01

    An improved apparatus for the electrolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide dissolved in water has been developed. The apparatus is a prototype of H2O2 generators for the safe and effective sterilization of water, sterilization of equipment in contact with water, and other applications in which there is need for hydrogen peroxide at low concentration as an oxidant. Potential applications for electrolytic H2O2 generators include purification of water for drinking and for use in industrial processes, sanitation for hospitals and biotechnological industries, inhibition and removal of biofouling in heat exchangers, cooling towers, filtration units, and the treatment of wastewater by use of advanced oxidation processes that are promoted by H2O2.

  5. NASA Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, Ronald; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation is to provide the current status of NASA's efforts in the development of hydrogen peroxide in both mono-propellant and bi-propellant applications, consistent with the Space Launch Initiative goals of pursuing low toxicity and operationally simpler propellants for application in the architectures being considered for the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle, also known as the Space Launch Initiative, or SLI.

  6. Degradation of 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Using Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron Supported on Ion Exchange Resin.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; She, Jiaping; Yin, Yongguang; Zhao, Tongqian; Wu, Li

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) supported on ion exchange resin was prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy, with a simple model developed for describing the catalyst. The degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) by hydrogen peroxide using NZVI supported on ion exchange resin as the catalyst, was studied. The results showed that 2,4,6-TCP with a concentration of 1 mmol L(-1) could be well degraded into low molecule weight organic acids in two hours. The optimized condition was as follows: pH, 3.0; temperature, 35 degrees C; catalyst dosage, 1.5 g; and hydrogen peroxide, 0.16 mmol L(-1). The catalyst has good reusability, with no catalytic efficiency decreasing even after ten times recycles. A possible mechanism of 2,4,6-TCP degradation was proposed, based on the products indentified by GC-MS after derived using trimethylsulfonium hydroxide. PMID:27427643

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of alkenes and silanes by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) and a novel application of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the hydrolysis of MTO

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Haisong

    1999-11-08

    Conjugated dienes were oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as catalyst. Methylrhenium bis-peroxide was the major reactive catalyst present. Hydroxyalkenes and trisubstituted silane were also tested. Mechanisms for each of these reactions are presented.

  8. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  9. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  10. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  11. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  12. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  13. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Evidence for the Crucial Role of Compound 0 in the P450cam -Catalyzed Hydroxylation of Camphor by Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Franke, Alicja; van Eldik, Rudi

    2015-10-19

    The hydroperoxo iron(III) intermediate P450cam Fe(III) -OOH, being the true Compound 0 (Cpd 0) involved in the natural catalytic cycle of P450cam , could be transiently observed in the peroxo-shunt oxidation of the substrate-free enzyme by hydrogen peroxide under mild basic conditions and low temperature. The prolonged lifetime of Cpd 0 enabled us to kinetically examine the formation and reactivity of P450cam Fe(III) -OOH species as a function of varying reaction conditions, such as pH, and concentration of H2 O2 , camphor, and potassium ions. The mechanism of hydrogen peroxide binding to the substrate-free form of P450cam differs completely from that observed for other heme proteins possessing the distal histidine as a general acid-base catalyst and is mainly governed by the ability of H2 O2 to undergo deprotonation at the hydroxo ligand coordinated to the iron(III) center under conditions of pH≥p${K{{{\\rm P450}\\hfill \\atop {\\rm a}\\hfill}}}$. Notably, no spectroscopic evidence for the formation of either Cpd I or Cpd II as products of heterolytic or homolytic OO bond cleavage, respectively, in Cpd 0 could be observed under the selected reaction conditions. The kinetic data obtained from the reactivity studies involving (1R)-camphor, provide, for the first time, experimental evidence for the catalytic activity of the P450Fe(III) -OOH intermediate in the oxidation of the natural substrate of P450cam . PMID:26353996

  14. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Anderson, M.S.; Johnson, R.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Hendrix, A.R.; Barth, C.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Dalton, J.B.; Clark, R.N.; Shirley, J.H.; Ocampo, A.C.; Matson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  15. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  16. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Anderson, M S; Johnson, R E; Smythe, W D; Hendrix, A R; Barth, C A; Soderblom, L A; Hansen, G B; McCord, T B; Dalton, J B; Clark, R N; Shirley, J H; Ocampo, A C; Matson, D L

    1999-03-26

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis. PMID:10092224

  18. Hydrogen peroxide, from Wieland to Sies.

    PubMed

    Koppenol, Willem H

    2016-04-01

    A history of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in vivo is presented, starting with the discovery of catalase. The first hypothesis was formulated by Heinrich Wieland, who assumed that dioxygen reacted directly with organic molecules. This view was strongly criticised by Otto Warburg, Helmut Sies' academic grandfather. The involvement of hydrogen peroxide in physiological processes was investigated by Theodor Bücher, the "Doktorvater" of Helmut. Helmut's research made it possible to quantitate hydrogen peroxide in tissues. PMID:27095207

  19. Oxidative cleavage of cycloalkanones by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Starostin, E.K.; Aleksandrov, A.V.; Nikishin, G.I.

    1986-07-10

    The authors have studied the reaction of cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, cycloheptanone, and cyclododecanone with aqueous hydrogen peroxide over the temperature range 110-150/sup 0/C. The effects of temperature, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the molar proportions of the reagents on the composition and yields of the products have been examined in the case of cyclohexanone. Oxidation of cyclohexanone by aqueous hydrogen peroxide at 110-150/sup 0/C gives 1,10-decanedicarboxylic acid and hexanoic acid as the principal products. Cyclopentanone and cycloheptanone react with hydrogen peroxide similarly to cyclohexanone, giving sebacic and pentanoic acids, and 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acids, respectively.

  20. Improving the hydrogen peroxide bleaching efficiency of aspen chemithermomechanical pulp by using chitosan.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongquan; Dou, Hongyan; Fu, Yingjuan; Qin, Menghua

    2015-11-01

    The presence of transition metals during the hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp results in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which decreases the bleaching efficiency. In this study, chitosans were used as peroxide stabilizer in the alkaline hydrogen peroxide bleaching of aspen chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP). The results showed that the brightness of the bleached CTMP increased 1.5% ISO by addition of 0.1% chitosan with 95% degree of deacetylation during peroxide bleaching. Transition metals in the form of ions or metal colloid particles, such as iron, copper and manganese, could be adsorbed by chitosans. Chitosans could inhibit the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by different transition metals under alkaline conditions. The ability of chitosans to inhibit peroxide decomposition depended on the type of transition metals, chitosan concentration and degree of deacetylation applied. The addition of chitosan slightly reduced the concentration of the hydroxyl radical formed during the hydrogen peroxide bleaching of aspen CTMP. PMID:26256367

  1. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  2. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  3. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  4. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  5. Hydrogen peroxide as a greenhouse soil amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are anecdotal reports that hydrogen peroxide provides growth benefits beyond controlling plant infection and plant stress. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of soil applications of hydrogen peroxide solutions on plant growth and flowering. Nasturtium (Tropaeolum maju...

  6. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen peroxide is a common oxidant that has been applied extensively with in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Because of its widespread use in this and other fields, it has been extensively researched. This research has revealed that hydrogen peroxide has very complex chemistry...

  7. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  8. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  9. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zauche, Timothy

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  10. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  11. Hydrogen Peroxide-Resistant CotA and YjqC of Bacillus altitudinis Spores Are a Promising Biocatalyst for Catalyzing Reduction of Sinapic Acid and Sinapine in Rapeseed Meal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanzhou; Li, Xunhang; Hao, Zhikui; Xi, Ruchun; Cai, Yujie; Liao, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    For the more efficient detoxification of phenolic compounds, a promising avenue would be to develop a multi-enzyme biocatalyst comprising peroxidase, laccase and other oxidases. However, the development of this multi-enzyme biocatalyst is limited by the vulnerability of fungal laccases and peroxidases to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inactivation. Therefore, H2O2-resistant peroxidase and laccase should be exploited. In this study, H2O2-stable CotA and YjqC were isolated from the outer coat of Bacillus altitudinis SYBC hb4 spores. In addition to the thermal and alkali stability of catalytic activity, CotA also exhibited a much higher H2O2 tolerance than fungal laccases from Trametes versicolor and Trametes trogii. YjqC is a sporulation-related manganese (Mn) catalase with striking peroxidase activity for sinapic acid (SA) and sinapine (SNP). In contrast to the typical heme-containing peroxidases, the peroxidase activity of YjqC was also highly resistant to inhibition by H2O2 and heat. CotA could also catalyze the oxidation of SA and SNP. CotA had a much higher affinity for SA than B. subtilis CotA. CotA and YjqC rendered from B. altitudinis spores had promising laccase and peroxidase activities for SA and SNP. Specifically, the B. altitudinis spores could be regarded as a multi-enzyme biocatalyst composed of CotA and YjqC. The B. altitudinis spores were efficient for catalyzing the degradation of SA and SNP in rapeseed meal. Moreover, efficiency of the spore-catalyzed degradation of SA and SNP was greatly improved by the presence of 15 mM H2O2. This effect was largely attributed to synergistic biocatalysis of the H2O2-resistant CotA and YjqC toward SA and SNP. PMID:27362423

  12. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by a surface copper(II)-2,4,6-tris(2-piridil)-1,3,5-triazine complex adsorbed on a graphite electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Vera L. N.; Fernandes, Elizabeth N.; da Silva, Leila M. S.; Marques, Edmar P.; Zhang, Jiujun; Marques, Aldaléa L. Brandes

    A graphite electrode irreversibly adsorbed by 2,4,6-tris(2-piridil)-1,3,5-triazine (abbreviated as TPT) was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The adsorbed TPT exhibited two irreversible reduction waves in the potential range of -0.7 and -1.0 V (versus SCE). Upon strong adsorption, TPT can serve as a coordination ligand for copper ions to form a surface complex. Its three adjacent nitrogen positions provide strong affinity to the metal ions and bond copper(II) to an electrode surface. A 1:1 coordination between Cu(II) or Cu(I) and the TPT ligand to form [Cu(II)(TPT)] 2+ or [Cu(I)(TPT)] + is the predominant process, evidenced by spectrophotometry, surface cyclic voltammetry, and coordinated structural feasibility of Cu(II)/Cu(I)-TPT complexes. The predominant copper(II)-TPT surface complex shows a reversible redox wave, which is identified as one-electron process of [Cu(II)(TPT)] 2+ ↔ [Cu(I)(TPT)] +. The electrode adsorbed by [Cu(II)(TPT)] 2+ complex showed electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide reductions. The catalyzed reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were identified as four-electron and two-electron process to form water. It is suggested that the possible electrocatalytic reductions were due to an inner-sphere mechanism, which involved a coordination between substrate (O 2 or H 2O 2) and [Cu(I)(TPT)] +. The reduction kinetics were also investigated by a rotating disk electrode method.

  13. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  14. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  15. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  17. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  18. NASA Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant Hazards Technical Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David L.; Greene, Ben; Frazier, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The Fire, Explosion, Compatibility and Safety Hazards of Hydrogen Peroxide NASA technical manual was developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility. NASA Technical Memorandum TM-2004-213151 covers topics concerning high concentration hydrogen peroxide including fire and explosion hazards, material and fluid reactivity, materials selection information, personnel and environmental hazards, physical and chemical properties, analytical spectroscopy, specifications, analytical methods, and material compatibility data. A summary of hydrogen peroxide-related accidents, incidents, dose calls, mishaps and lessons learned is included. The manual draws from art extensive literature base and includes recent applicable regulatory compliance documentation. The manual may be obtained by United States government agencies from NASA Johnson Space Center and used as a reference source for hazards and safe handling of hydrogen peroxide.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vinegar Amount sufficient for the purpose Remove sulfur dioxide from wine prior to fermentation to produce vinegar. Emulsifiers containing fatty acid esters 1.25 Bleaching agent. (d) Residual hydrogen peroxide...

  20. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  1. [Hydrogen peroxide in artificial photosynthesizing systems].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, A V; Komissarov, G G

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of the concepts of hydrogen peroxide as a source of photosynthetic oxygen (hydrogen) coordination and photochemical properties of chlorophyll and its aggregates towards hydrogen peroxide were considered. The binding energy of H2O and H2O2 with chlorophyll and chlorophyllide depending on their form (monomers, dimers and trimers) was estimated by quantum chemical calculations. It is shown that at an increase of the degree of the pigment aggregation binding energy of H2O2 was more than the energy of H2O. Analysis of experimental results of the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using chlorophyll was carried out. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (deltaG degrees and deltaH degrees) of the formation of organic compounds from CO2 with water and hydrogen peroxide were compared. The interaction of CO2 with H2O2 requires much less energy consumption than with water for all considered cases. The formation of organic products (formaldehyde, alcohols, carboxylic and carbonylic compounds) and simultaneous production of O2 under the influence of visible light in the systems of inorganic carbon--hydrogen peroxide--chlorophyll (phthalocyanine) is detected by GC/MS method, FTIR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. PMID:25702472

  2. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  3. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  4. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  5. Catalyst Development for Hydrogen Peroxide Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morlan, P. W.; Wu, P.-K.; Ruttle, D. W.; Fuller, R. P.; Nejad, A. S.; Anderson, W. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of various catalysts of hydrogen peroxide was conducted for the applications of liquid rocket engines. The catalyst development includes silver screen technology, solid catalyst technology, and homogeneous catalyst technology. The silver screen technology development was performed with 85% (by weight) hydrogen peroxide. The results of this investigation were used as the basis for the catalyst design of a pressure-fed liquid-fueled upper stage engine. Both silver-plated nickel 200 screens and pure silver screens were used as the active metal catalyst during the investigation, The data indicate that a high decomposition efficiency (greater than 90%) of 85% hydrogen peroxide can be achieved at a bed loading of 0.5 lbm/sq in/sec with both pure silver and silver plated screens. Samarium oxide coating, however, was found to retard the decomposition process and the catalyst bed was flooded at lower bed loading. A throughput of 200 lbm of hydrogen peroxide (1000 second run time) was tested to evaluate the catalyst aging issue and performance degradation was observed starting at approximately 400 seconds. Catalyst beds of 3.5 inch in diameter was fabricated using the same configuration for a 1,000-lbf rocket engine. High decomposition efficiency was obtained with a low pressure drop across the bed. Solid catalyst using precious metal was also developed for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide from 85% to 98% by weight. Preliminary results show that the catalyst has a strong reactivity even after 15 minutes of peroxide decomposition. The development effort also includes the homogeneous catalyst technology. Various non-toxic catalysts were evaluated with 98% peroxide and hydrocarbon fuels. The results of open cup drop tests indicate an ignition delay around 11 ms.

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide - Material Compatibility Studied by Microcalorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homung, Steven D.; Davis, Dennis D.; Baker, David; Popp, Christopher G.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental and toxicity concerns with current hypergolic propellants have led to a renewed interest in propellant grade hydrogen peroxide (HP) for propellant applications. Storability and stability has always been an issue with HP. Contamination or contact of HP with metallic surfaces may cause decomposition, which can result in the evolution of heat and gas leading to increased pressure or thermal hazards. The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility has developed a technique to monitor the decompositions of hydrogen peroxide at temperatures ranging from 25 to 60 C. Using isothermal microcalorimetry we have measured decomposition rates at the picomole/s/g level showing the catalytic effects of materials of construction. In this paper we will present the results of testing with Class 1 and 2 materials in 90 percent hydrogen peroxide.

  7. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.356...

  8. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    DOEpatents

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  9. An upper limit for stratospheric hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Traub, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    It has been postulated that hydrogen peroxide is important in stratospheric chemistry as a reservoir and sink for odd hydrogen species, and for its ability to interconvert them. The present investigation is concerned with an altitude dependent upper limit curve for stratospheric hydrogen peroxide, taking into account an altitude range from 21.5 to 38.0 km for January 23, 1983. The data employed are from balloon flight No. 1316-P, launched from the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) in Palestine, Texas. The obtained upper limit curve lies substantially below the data reported by Waters et al. (1981), even though the results are from the same latitude and are both wintertime measurements.

  10. Impact of hydrogen peroxide as a soil amendment on nasturtiums

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, is a highly reactive oxidizing agent naturally occurring in plants and animals. Plants produce hydrogen peroxide to destroy either their infected plant cells or the pathogens within their cells. Hydrogen peroxide also acts as a stress signal to plants. It is approved for c...

  11. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  12. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  13. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  14. Experimental investigation of hydrogen peroxide RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Decina, A.; Zanini, S.; D'Orazio, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a detailed experimental study of the plasma properties in low pressure RF discharges in hydrogen peroxide and a comparison with argon under the same operating conditions. H2O2 plasmas have been proposed for sterilization purposes. Electrical properties of the discharge were shown to be similar, as for the RF and DC voltages of the driving electrode. Bulk plasma volume remains stable, concentrated in an almost cylindrical region between the two facing electrodes. It was found that the electron temperature is almost uniform across the plasma and independent of the power level. This is higher than in argon discharges: T e  =  4.6  ±  0.9 eV versus T e  =  3.3  ±  1.1 eV. The plasma density increases almost linearly with the power level and a substantial negative ion component has been ruled out in hydrogen peroxide. Dissociation in the plasma gas phase was revealed by atomic hydrogen and hydroxyl radical emission in the discharge spectra. Emission from hydroxyl and atomic oxygen demonstrates that oxidizing radicals are produced by hydrogen peroxide discharges, revealing its usefulness for plasma processing other than sterilization, for instance to increase polymer film surface energy. On the other hand, argon could be considered as a candidate for the sterilization purposes due to the intense production of UV radiation.

  15. Microwave-assisted FLP-catalyzed hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Tussing, S; Paradies, J

    2016-03-30

    FLP-catalyzed hydrogenations of 15 substrates were compared using microwave irradiation and conventional heating. The direct comparison revealed that a rate acceleration of up to 2.5 was achieved in the presence of microwaves. This heating method is particularly promising for the hydrogenation of nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Acridine, quinines and especially 1-methyl indole were reduced very efficiently under mild conditions and only 4 bar hydrogen pressure in high yields. PMID:26580129

  16. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  17. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization of freeze dryers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J W; Arnold, J F; Nail, S L; Renzi, E

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to steam sterilization has been examined using a pilot plant freeze dryer equipped with a prototype vapor generator. Specific objectives of the study discussed in this presentation were to: 1. Identify critical process variables affecting the lethality of VHP to Bacillus stearothermophilus spores, particularly within dead legs in the system. 2. Measure the efficacy of system degassing after sterilization. 3. Determine the effect of repeated sterilization cycles on the integrity of elastomeric components of the freeze dryer. Penetration of adequate concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor into small diameter piping, such as tubing connected to pressure gauges, is the most challenging aspect of VHP sterilization of freeze dryers. Prior to equipment modifications, spore strips placed within such dead legs remained positive irrespective of the number of gas/degas pulses and system pressure. Equipment modifications necessary to effect complete kill of biological indicators placed in system dead legs is discussed. Results of this study support the conclusion that vaporized hydrogen peroxide shows promise as an alternative sterilization method for freeze dryers. PMID:1474433

  18. Time-course diffusion of hydrogen peroxide using modern technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, F. L. E.; Vollet-Filho, J. D.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2009-02-01

    The concern with the hydrogen penetration towards the pulp can be observed on the literature by the great number of papers published on this topic; Those measurements often uses chemical agents to quantify the concentration of the bleaching agent that cross the enamel and dentin. The objective of this work was the quantification of oxygen free radicals by fluorescence that are located in the interface between enamel and dentin. It was used to accomplish our objectives a Ruthenium probe (FOXY R - Ocean Optics) a 405nm LED, a bovine tooth and a portable diagnostic system (Science and support LAB - LAT - IFSC/USP). The fluorescence of the probe is suppressed in presence of oxygen free radicals in function of time. The obtained results clearly shows that the hydrogen peroxide when not catalyzed should be kept in contact with the tooth for longer periods of time.

  19. Reducing the Allergenic Properties of Peanut Allergens by Copper/Hydrogen Peroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copper ions (Cu2+) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) together are reported to catalyze the cross-linking of proteins through oxidation of their tyrosine residues. Such protein cross-links, which contain dityrosine, can also occur when proteins are treated with peroxidase (POD). Previously, we have shown ...

  20. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Au, Ming

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide excretion by oral streptococci and effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, J; Iwami, Y; Yamada, T

    1983-01-01

    Approved type strains of Streptococcus sanguis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. salivarius were grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rate of hydrogen peroxide excretion, oxygen uptake, and acid production from glucose by washed-cell suspensions of these strains were studied, and the levels of enzymes in cell-free extracts which reduced oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, or hypothiocyanite (OSCN-) in the presence of NADH or NADPH were assayed. The effects of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide on the rate of acid production and oxygen uptake by intact cells, the activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts, and the levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates were also studied. All strains consumed oxygen in the presence of glucose. S. sanguis, S. mitis, and anaerobically grown S. mutans excreted hydrogen peroxide. There was higher NADH oxidase and NADH peroxidase activity in aerobically grown cells than in anaerobically grown cells. NADPH oxidase activity was low in all species. Acid production, oxygen uptake, and, consequently, hydrogen peroxide excretion were inhibited in all the strains by lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide. S. sanguis and S. mitis had a higher capacity than S. mutans and S. salivarius to recover from this inhibition. Higher activity in the former strains of an NADH-OSCN oxidoreductase, which converted OSCN- into thiocyanate, explained this difference. The change in levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates after inhibition of glycolysis by OSCN- and the actual activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts in the presence of OSCN- indicated that the primary target of OSCN- in the glycolytic pathway was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. PMID:6832837

  2. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  3. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  4. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  5. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  6. Hazard Assessment of Personal Protective Clothing for Hydrogen Peroxide Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Ben; McClure, Mark B.; Johnson, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Selection of personal protective equipment (PPE) for hydrogen peroxide service is an important part of the hazard assessment process. But because drip testing of chemical protective clothing for hydrogen peroxide service has not been reported for about 40 years, it is of great interest to test new protective clothing materials with new, high-concentration hydrogen peroxide following similar procedures. The suitability of PPE for hydrogen peroxide service is in part determined by observations made when hydrogen peroxide is dripped onto swatches of protective clothing material. Protective clothing material was tested as received, in soiled condition, and in grossly soiled condition. Materials were soiled by pretreating the material with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solution then drying to promote a reaction. Materials were grossly soiled with solid KMnO4 to greatly promote reaction. Observations of results including visual changes to the hydrogen peroxide and materials, times to ignition, and self-extinguishing characteristics of the materials are reported.

  7. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobaloximes.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jillian L; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2009-12-21

    Natural photosynthesis uses sunlight to drive the conversion of energy-poor molecules (H(2)O, CO(2)) to energy-rich ones (O(2), (CH(2)O)(n)). Scientists are working hard to develop efficient artificial photosynthetic systems toward the "Holy Grail" of solar-driven water splitting. High on the list of challenges is the discovery of molecules that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons to H(2). In this Account, we report on one promising class of molecules: cobalt complexes with diglyoxime ligands (cobaloximes). Chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical methods all have been utilized to explore proton reduction catalysis by cobaloxime complexes. Reduction of a Co(II)-diglyoxime generates a Co(I) species that reacts with a proton source to produce a Co(III)-hydride. Then, in a homolytic pathway, two Co(III)-hydrides react in a bimolecular step to eliminate H(2). Alternatively, in a heterolytic pathway, protonation of the Co(III)-hydride produces H(2) and Co(III). A thermodynamic analysis of H(2) evolution pathways sheds new light on the barriers and driving forces of the elementary reaction steps involved in proton reduction by Co(I)-diglyoximes. In combination with experimental results, this analysis shows that the barriers to H(2) evolution along the heterolytic pathway are, in most cases, substantially greater than those of the homolytic route. In particular, a formidable barrier is associated with Co(III)-diglyoxime formation along the heterolytic pathway. Our investigations of cobaloxime-catalyzed H(2) evolution, coupled with the thermodynamic preference for a homolytic route, suggest that the rate-limiting step is associated with formation of the hydride. An efficient water splitting device may require the tethering of catalysts to an electrode surface in a fashion that does not inhibit association of Co(III)-hydrides. PMID:19928840

  8. Regioselective alkene carbon-carbon bond cleavage to aldehydes and chemoselective alcohol oxidation of allylic alcohols with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by [cis-Ru(II)(dmp)2(H2O)2]2+ (dmp = 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline).

    PubMed

    Kogan, Vladimir; Quintal, Miriam M; Neumann, Ronny

    2005-10-27

    [reaction: see text] [cis-Ru(II)(dmp)2(H2O)2]2+ (dmp = 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline) was found to be a selective oxidation catalyst using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Thus, primary alkenes were very efficiently oxidized via direct carbon-carbon bond cleavage to the corresponding aldehydes as an alternative to ozonolysis. Secondary alkenes were much less reactive, leading to regioselective oxidation of substrates such as 4-vinylcyclohexene and 7-methyl-1,6-octadiene at the terminal position. Primary allylic alcohols were chemoselectively oxidized to the corresponding allylic aldehydes, e.g., geraniol to citral. PMID:16235952

  9. Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide by DAB Staining in Arabidopsis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Daudi, Arsalan; O’Brien, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    In this protocol, the in situ detection of hydrogen peroxide (one of several reactive oxygen species) is described in mature Arabidopsis rosette leaves by staining with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using an adaptation of previous methods (Thordal-Christensen et al., 1997; Bindschedler et al., 2006; Daudi et al., 2012). DAB is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of some haem-containing proteins, such as peroxidases, to generate a dark brown precipitate. This precipitate is exploited as a stain to detect the presence and distribution of hydrogen peroxide in plant cells. The protocol can be modified slightly to detect hydrogen peroxide in different types of plant tissue.

  10. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  11. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide induces spawning in mollusks, with activation of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Morse, D E; Duncan, H; Hooker, N; Morse, A

    1977-04-15

    Addition of hydrogen peroxide to seawater causes synchronous spawning in gravid male and female abalones, and certain other mollusks as well. This effect is blocked by exposure of the animals to aspirin, an inhibitor of the enzyme catalyzing oxidative synthesis of prostaglandin endoperoxide. Hydrogen peroxide activates this enzymatic reaction in cell-free extracts prepared from abalone eggs (a very rich source of the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase); this effect appears to reveal a fundamental property of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthesis. Applicability of these findings to both mariculture and medical purposes is suggested. PMID:403609

  13. PROPULSE 980: A Hydrogen Peroxide Enrichment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, Robert; Bromley, G.; Wanger, Robert; Pauls, Dan; Maynard, Bryon; McNeal, Curtis; Dumbacher, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The PROPULSE 980 unit is a transportable processing plant that enriches aerospace grade hydrogen peroxide from 90% to 98% final concentration. The unit was developed by Degussa-H Is, in cooperation with Orbital, NASA Marshall Space Center, and NASA Stennis Space Center. The system is a self-contained unit that houses all of the process equipment, instrumentation and controls to perform the concentration operation nearly autonomously. It is designed to produce non-bulk quantities of 98% hydrogen peroxide. The enrichment unit design also maintains system, personnel and environmental safety during all aspects of the enrichment process and final product storage. As part of the Propulse 980 checkout and final buyoff, it will be disassembled at the Degussa-H Is Corporation plant in Theodore, AL, transported to the Stennis Space Center, reassembled and subjected to a series of checkout tests to verify design objectives have been met. This paper will summarize the basic project elements and provide an update on the present status of the project.

  14. Monolithic Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyst Bed Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponzo, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    With recent increased industry and government interest in rocket grade hydrogen peroxide as a viable propellant, significant effort has been expended to improve on earlier developments. This effort has been predominately centered in improving heterogeneous. typically catalyst beds; and homogeneous catalysts, which are typically solutions of catalytic substances. Heterogeneous catalyst beds have traditionally consisted of compressed wire screens plated with a catalytic substance, usually silver, and were used m many RCS applications (X-1, Mercury, and Centaur for example). Aerojet has devised a heterogeneous catalyst design that is monolithic (single piece), extremely compact, and has pressure drops equal to or less than traditional screen beds. The design consists of a bonded stack of very thin, photoetched metal plates, silver coated. This design leads to a high surface area per unit volume and precise flow area, resulting in high, stable, and repeatable performance. Very high throughputs have been demonstrated with 90% hydrogen peroxide. (0.60 lbm/s/sq in at 1775-175 psia) with no flooding of the catalyst bed. Bed life of over 900 seconds has also been demonstrated at throughputs of 0.60 lbm/s/sq in across varying chamber pressures. The monolithic design also exhibits good starting performance, short break-in periods, and will easily scale to various sizes.

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide Probes Directed to Different Cellular Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Zhou, You; Belousov, Vsevolod V.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular compartments, HyPer occurred in the reduced state in the nucleus, cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondrial intermembrane space and mitochondrial matrix, but low levels of the oxidized form of the biosensor were also observed in each of these compartments, consistent with a low peroxide tone in mammalian cells. In contrast, HyPer was mostly oxidized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using this system, we characterized control of hydrogen peroxide in various cell systems, such as cells deficient in thioredoxin reductase, sulfhydryl oxidases or subjected to selenium deficiency. Generation of hydrogen peroxide could also be monitored in various compartments following signaling events. Conclusions We found that HyPer can be used as a valuable tool to monitor hydrogen peroxide generated in different cellular compartments. The data also show that hydrogen peroxide generated in one compartment could translocate to other compartments. Our data provide information on compartmentalization, dynamics and homeostatic control of hydrogen peroxide in mammalian cells. PMID:21283738

  16. SAMPLING AND DETERMINATION OF GAS-PHASE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF OZONE BY GAS-PHASE REACTION WITH NITRIC OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for determination of hydrogen peroxide in the ambient atmosphere is described, using impinger or diffusion scrubber collection of hydrogen peroxide with aqueous-phase analysis by an enzyme-catalyzed fluorescence technique. Interference from ozone at ambient levels is rem...

  17. [Continuous Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Water Containing Very Low Concentrations of Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine].

    PubMed

    Bruskov, V I; Yaguzhinsky, L S; Masalimov, Z K; Chernikov, A V; Emelyanenko, V I; Gudkov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Continuous generation of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by low concentrations of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (heptyl)--a rocket fuel component--in air saturated water was shown by the method of enhanced chemiluminescence in the system of luminol-p-iodophenol-peroxidase. The concentration dependence and the influence of heat and light on the formation of hydrogen peroxide in the water under the influence of dimethylhydrazine at concentrations considerably lower than maximum allowable concentrations were studied, and the physical-chemical mechanism of this process was considered. It is supposed that dimethylhydrazine at ultra-low concentrations is associated with air nanobubbles and represents a long-lived complex performing catalysis of hydrogen peroxide formation under the influence of heat and light. We put forward the new concept of.toxicity of dimethylhydrazine at very low concentrations due to violation of homeostasis of reactive oxygen species formation in aqueous solutions entering the body of humans and animals. PMID:26394466

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) Potential for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafwallner, F.

    2004-10-01

    Low toxicity or "green" propellants are now under study by organizations around the world. Especially ultra high concentrated hydrogen peroxide (HP) may be a significant step toward less toxic, storable und safer operation of upper stages and spacecrafts. HP can be used as a monopropellant, when catalytically decomposed or as a bipropellant constituting the propellant combination`s oxidizer. Serving as a monopropellant, catalytic decomposition will result in exhaust of superheated steam and oxygen which can be used to drive gas turbines and feed life support systems or provide thrust as a monopropellant, provide the oxidizer, or function as an igniter for bipropellant engines. HP can be used in fuel cells to produce electrical power, heat and water.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Heng, Lee Yook; Hashim, Uda

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a biosensor utilizing modified titania, TiO2 particles using aminopropyl-triethoxy-silane, (APTS) for developing hydrogen peroxide biosensor is presented. The surface of Ti-APTS particles is used as a support for hemoglobin immobilization via covalent bonding. The performance of the biosensor is determined by differential pulse voltammetry. The linear response was observed at the reduction current of redox mediator probe [FeCN6]3-/4- at potential between 0.22 V to 0.24 V. The preliminary result for electrochemistry study on this modified electrode is reported. The preliminary linear range is obtained from 1×10-2 M to 1×10-8 M.

  1. Bactericidal effect of hydrogen peroxide on spacecraft isolates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, M. D.; Renninger, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on both sporeforming and nonsporeforming spacecraft isolates as an initial step in determining its suitability for microbiological decontamination of certain United States spacecraft. Survivor data were obtained for eight bacterial isolates (six sporeformers and two nonsporeformers) recovered before launch Mariner 9 and exposed to concentrations of 3, 10, and 15% hydrogen peroxide. The effects of various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide on the spores are presented in tabular form, along with the percentage of survival of nonsporeformers exposed to hydrogen peroxide. No viable vegetative cells were recovered after a 10-min exposure time to any of the three concentration of hydrogen peroxide.

  2. What are the sources of hydrogen peroxide production by heart mitochondria?

    PubMed Central

    Grivennikova, Vera G.; Kareyeva, Alexandra V.; Vinogradov, Andrei D.

    2010-01-01

    Coupled rat heart mitochondria produce externally hydrogen peroxide at the rates which correspond to about 0.8 and 0.3 per cent of the total oxygen consumption at State 4 with succinate and glutamate plus malate as the respiratory substrates, respectively. Stimulation of the respiratory activities by ADP (State 4–State 3 transition) decreases the succinate- and glutamate plus malate-supported H2O2 production 8- and 1.3-times, respectively. NH4+ strongly stimulates hydrogen peroxide formation with either substrate without any effect on State 4 and/or State 3 respiration. Rotenone-treated, alamethicin-permeabilized mitochondria catalyze NADH-supported H2O2 production at a rate about 10-fold higher than that seen in intact mitochondria under optimal (State 4 succinate-supported respiration in the presence of ammonium chloride) conditions. NADH-supported hydrogen peroxide production by the rotenone-treated mitochondria devoid of a permeability barrier for H2O2 diffusion by alamethicin treatment are only partially (~50%) sensitive to the Complex I NADH binding site-specific inhibitor, NADH-OH. The residual activity is strongly (~6-fold) stimulated by ammonium chloride. NAD+ inhibits both Complex I-mediated and ammonium-stimulated H2O2 production. In the absence of stimulatory ammonium about half of the total NADH-supported hydrogen peroxide production is catalyzed by Complex I. In the presence of ammonium about 90% of the total hydrogen peroxide production is catalyzed by matrix located, ammonium-dependent enzyme(s). PMID:20170624

  3. RESULTS OF COPPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CCPO) OF TANK 48H SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Pareizs, J.; Newell, J.; Fondeur, F.; Nash, C.; White, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-08-14

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed a series of laboratory-scale experiments that examined copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) aided destruction of organic components, most notably tetraphenylborate (TPB), in Tank 48H simulant slurries. The experiments were designed with an expectation of conducting the process within existing vessels of Building 241-96H with minimal modifications to the existing equipment. Results of the experiments indicate that TPB destruction levels exceeding 99.9% are achievable, dependent on the reaction conditions. The following observations were made with respect to the major processing variables investigated. A lower reaction pH provides faster reaction rates (pH 7 > pH 9 > pH 11); however, pH 9 reactions provide the least quantity of organic residual compounds within the limits of species analyzed. Higher temperatures lead to faster reaction rates and smaller quantities of organic residual compounds. Higher concentrations of the copper catalyst provide faster reaction rates, but the highest copper concentration (500 mg/L) also resulted in the second highest quantity of organic residual compounds. Faster rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition lead to faster reaction rates and lower quantities of organic residual compounds. Testing with simulated slurries continues. Current testing is examining lower copper concentrations, refined peroxide addition rates, and alternate acidification methods. A revision of this report will provide updated findings with emphasis on defining recommended conditions for similar tests with actual waste samples.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    PubMed

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  5. Intraoral chemical burn from use of 3% hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Arash M; Brooks, John K

    2011-01-01

    Injudicious use of over-the-counter 3% hydrogen peroxide, a relatively potent oxidative agent, can result in a chemical burn to the oral mucosa. This article describes a patient who rinsed with 3% hydrogen peroxide for periods of more than two minutes as a self-prescribed remedy for oral discomfort following seafood ingestion. Subsequently, the patient experienced pain and extensive chemical burns of the sublingual and buccal mucosa and gingiva. In addition, the buccal mucosa underwent necrosis. Prolonged oral mucosal contact with 3% hydrogen peroxide is ill-advised. PMID:22313923

  6. The electrochemistry of SIMFUEL in dilute alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldik, Jon

    The work described in this thesis is a study of the electrochemistry of SIMFUEL (SIMulated nuclear FUEL) in dilute, alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions. In the first set of experiments, the reaction of H2O 2 on SIMFUEL electrodes was studied electrochemically and under open circuit conditions in 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl solutions at pH 9.8. The composition of the oxidized UO2 surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hydrogen peroxide reduction was found to be catalyzed by the formation of a mixed UIV/UV (UO 2+x) surface layer, but to be blocked by the accumulation of UVI species (UO3· yH2O or adsorbed (UO2)2+) on the electrode surface. The formation of this UVI layer blocks both H2O2 reduction and oxidation, thereby inhibiting the potentially rapid H2O2 decomposition reaction to H2O and O2. Decomposition is found to proceed at a rate controlled by the desorption of the adsorbed (UO2)2+ or reduction of adsorbed O2 species. Reduction of (O2) ads is coupled to the slow oxidative dissolution of UO2 and formation of a corrosion product deposit of UO3· yH2O. In the second series of experiments, the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on SIMFUEL was studied using the steady-state polarization technique. Kinetic parameters for the reaction, such as Tafel slopes and reaction orders, were determined. The results were interpreted in terms of a chemical-electrochemical mechanism involving UIV/UV donor-acceptor reduction sites. The large values of the Tafel slopes and the fractional reaction orders with respect to H2O2 can be understood in terms of the potential-dependent surface coverage of active sites, similar to that observed in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide on oxidized copper surfaces. The effects of pH over the range 10-13 were also investigated. The H2O 2 reduction currents were nearly independent of pH in the range 10-11, but were slowed at more alkaline values. The change in pH dependence appears to be related to the acid-base properties

  7. Inactivation of rabies virus by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elghaffar, Asmaa A; Ali, Amal E; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-02-01

    Development of safe and protective vaccines against infectious pathogens remains a challenge. Inactivation of rabies virus is a critical step in the production of vaccines and other research reagents. Beta-propiolactone (βPL); the currently used inactivating agent for rabies virus is expensive and proved to be carcinogenic in animals. This study aimed to investigate the ability of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to irreversibly inactivate rabies virus without affecting its antigenicity and immunogenicity in pursuit of finding safe, effective and inexpensive alternative inactivating agents. H2O2 3% rapidly inactivated a Vero cell adapted fixed rabies virus strain designated as FRV/K within 2h of exposure without affecting its antigenicity or immunogenicity. No residual infectious virus was detected and the H2O2-inactivated vaccine proved to be safe and effective when compared with the same virus harvest inactivated with the classical inactivating agent βPL. Mice immunized with H2O2-inactivated rabies virus produced sufficient level of antibodies and were protected when challenged with lethal CVS virus. These findings reinforce the idea that H2O2 can replace βPL as inactivating agent for rabies virus to reduce time and cost of inactivation process. PMID:26731189

  8. Vibrationally mediated photodissociation of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ticich, T.M.; Likar, M.D.; Duebal, H.; Butler, L.J.; Crim, F.F.

    1987-11-15

    Vibrationally mediated photodissociation is a means of studying the spectroscopy of bound vibrational overtone states and of probing the electronic photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In these experiments, a highly vibrationally excited hydrogen peroxide molecule prepared by initial excitation in the region of the third (4..nu../sub OH/) or fourth (5..nu../sub OH/) overtone of the OH stretching vibration absorbs an additional photon to dissociate to OH fragments whose individual quantum state populations are measured by laser induced fluorescence. This technique is a means of obtaining excitation spectra for bound highly vibrationally excited states and confirms the accuracy of a model that incorporates the role of the torsional vibration in the vibrational overtone spectroscopy. The photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules are substantially different from those observed for dissociation by single photons of comparable or greater energy. Approximately 11% of the OH fragments formed in the vibrationally mediated photodissociation through 4..nu../sub OH/ are vibrationally excited as compared to an unobservable amount (less than or equal to2%) in the single photon ultraviolet dissociation.

  9. Molecular evolution of hydrogen peroxide degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2012-09-15

    For efficient removal of intra- and/or extracellular hydrogen peroxide by dismutation to harmless dioxygen and water (2H(2)O(2) → O(2) + 2H(2)O), nature designed three metalloenzyme families that differ in oligomeric organization, monomer architecture as well as active site geometry and catalytic residues. Here we report on the updated reconstruction of the molecular phylogeny of these three gene families. Ubiquitous typical (monofunctional) heme catalases are found in all domains of life showing a high structural conservation. Their evolution was directed from large subunit towards small subunit proteins and further to fused proteins where the catalase fold was retained but lost its original functionality. Bifunctional catalase-peroxidases were at the origin of one of the two main heme peroxidase superfamilies (i.e. peroxidase-catalase superfamily) and constitute a protein family predominantly present among eubacteria and archaea, but two evolutionary branches are also found in the eukaryotic world. Non-heme manganese catalases are a relatively small protein family with very old roots only present among bacteria and archaea. Phylogenetic analyses of the three protein families reveal features typical (i) for the evolution of whole genomes as well as (ii) for specific evolutionary events including horizontal gene transfer, paralog formation and gene fusion. As catalases have reached a striking diversity among prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, understanding their phylogenetic and molecular relationship and function will contribute to drug design for prevention of diseases of humans, animals and plants. PMID:22330759

  10. Materials Compatibility Testing in Concentrated Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, R.; Bromley, G.; Mason, D.; Crockett, D.; Martinez, L.; McNeal, C.; Lyles, G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Materials test methods from the 1960's have been used as a starting point in evaluating materials for today's space launch vehicles. These established test methods have been modified to incorporate today's analytical laboratory equipment. The Orbital test objective was to test a wide range of materials to incorporate the revolution in polymer and composite materials that has occurred since the 1960's. Testing is accomplished in 3 stages from rough screening to detailed analytical tests. Several interesting test observations have been made during this testing and are included in the paper. A summary of the set-up, test and evaluation of long-term storage sub-scale tanks is also included. This sub-scale tank test lasted for a 7-month duration prior to being stopped due to a polar boss material breakdown. Chemical evaluations of the hydrogen peroxide and residue left on the polar boss surface identify the material breakdown quite clearly. The paper concludes with recommendations for future testing and a specific effort underway within the industry to standardize the test methods used in evaluating materials.

  11. Locating bomb factories by detecting hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Connell, Samantha; Ferrari, Carlotta; Suarez, Guillaume; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-11-01

    The analytical capability to detect hydrogen peroxide vapour can play a key role in localizing a site where a H2O2 based Improvised Explosive (IE) is manufactured. In security activities it is very important to obtain information in a short time. For this reason, an analytical method to be used in security activity needs portable devices. The authors have developed the first analytical method based on a portable luminometer, specifically designed and validated to locate IE manufacturing sites using quantitative on-site vapour analysis for H2O2. The method was tested both indoor and outdoor. The results demonstrate that the detection of H2O2 vapours could allow police forces to locate the site, while terrorists are preparing an attack. The collected data are also very important in developing new sensors, able to give an early alarm if located at a proper distance from a site where an H2O2 based IE is prepared. PMID:27591582

  12. Catalytic hydroxylation of benzoic acid by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pulippurasseril, C.R.; Filippova, T.Yu.; Dedov, A.G.

    1992-12-31

    An effective catalytic system based on Fe(III) and surfactants is proposed for the hydroxylation of benozic acid by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium at a temperature of 30-80{degrees}C. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  14. Prediction and assignment of the FIR spectrum of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helminger, P.; Messer, J. K.; De Lucia, F. C.; Bowman, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Millimeter and submillimeter microwave studies are used to predict and assign the FIR rotational-torsional spectrum of hydrogen peroxide. Special attention is given to the strong Q-branch features that have recently been used by Traub and Chance to place an upper limit on the atmospheric abundance of hydrogen peroxide. In addition, 67 new transitions are reported in the 400-1000 GHz region.

  15. Comparative Study on Oxidative Treatments of NAPL Containing Chlorinated Ethanes and Ethenes using Hydrogen Peroxide and Persulfate in Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to assess the oxidation of NAPL in soil, 30% of which were composed of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes, using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (CHP), activated persulfate (AP), and H2O2–persulfate (HP) co-amendment systems. Citrate, a buffer and iron ligand,...

  16. Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

    2004-03-22

    This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide in Groundwater at Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Nico, P. S.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Davis, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as a reactive transient presenting ubiquitously in natural surface waters, can react with a large suite of biologically important and redox-sensitive trace elements. The dominant source of H2O2 in natural waters has long been thought to be photo-oxidation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by molecular oxygen to produce superoxide radical, which then proceeds via dismutation to generate H2O2. However, recent studies have indicated that dark production of H2O2 in deep seawater, principally by biological production, is potentially on par with photochemical generation. Here, we present evidence for abiotic dark generation of H2O2 in groundwater in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO. Background H2O2 concentrations were determined in situ using a sensitive chemiluminescence-based method. Our results suggest H2O2 concentrations ranged from lower than the detection limit (1 nM) to 54 nM in different monitoring wells at the site, and the concentrations exhibited close correlations with profiles of dissolved oxygen and iron concentrations in the wells, indicating a possible metal redox cycling mechanism. In addition, dissolved natural organic matter, which could potentially coordinate the interconversion of ferric and ferrous species, might also play an important role in H2O2 formation. While biologically mediated activities have been recognized as the major sink of H2O2, the detected H2O2 pattern in groundwater suggests the existence of a balance between H2O2 source and decay, which potentially involves a cascade of biogeochemically significant processes, including the interconversion of ferrous/ferric species, the generation of more reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radical, the depletion of dissolved oxygen and further transformation of natural organic matter and other chemical pollutants.

  18. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and Eoarchean iron formations.

    PubMed

    Pecoits, E; Smith, M L; Catling, D C; Philippot, P; Kappler, A; Konhauser, K O

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that photosynthetic bacteria played a crucial role in Fe(II) oxidation and the precipitation of iron formations (IF) during the Late Archean-Early Paleoproterozoic (2.7-2.4 Ga). It is less clear whether microbes similarly caused the deposition of the oldest IF at ca. 3.8 Ga, which would imply photosynthesis having already evolved by that time. Abiological alternatives, such as the direct oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) by ultraviolet radiation may have occurred, but its importance has been discounted in environments where the injection of high concentrations of dissolved iron directly into the photic zone led to chemical precipitation reactions that overwhelmed photooxidation rates. However, an outstanding possibility remains with respect to photochemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere that might generate hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), a recognized strong oxidant for ferrous iron. Here, we modeled the amount of H2 O2 that could be produced in an Eoarchean atmosphere using updated solar fluxes and plausible CO2 , O2 , and CH4 mixing ratios. Irrespective of the atmospheric simulations, the upper limit of H2 O2 rainout was calculated to be <10(6) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) . Using conservative Fe(III) sedimentation rates predicted for submarine hydrothermal settings in the Eoarchean, we demonstrate that the flux of H2 O2 was insufficient by several orders of magnitude to account for IF deposition (requiring ~10(11) H2 O2 molecules cm(-2) s(-1) ). This finding further constrains the plausible Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms in Eoarchean seawater, leaving, in our opinion, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms the most likely mechanism responsible for Earth's oldest IF. PMID:25324177

  19. Localised hydrogen peroxide sensing for reproductive health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Schartner, Erik P.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2015-05-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to affect the developmental competence of embryos. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) an important reactive oxygen species, is also known to causes DNA damage and defective sperm function. Current techniques require incubating a developing embryo with an organic fluorophore which is potentially hazardous for the embryo. What we need is a localised ROS sensor which does not require fluorophores in solution and hence will allow continuous monitoring of H2O2 production without adversely affect the development of the embryo. Here we report studies on such a fibre-based sensor for the detection of H2O2 that uses a surface-bound aryl boronate fluorophore carboxyperoxyfluor-1(CPF1). Optical fibres present a unique platform due to desirable characteristics as dip sensors in biological solutions. Attempts to functionalise the fibre tips using polyelectrolyte layers and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) coatings resulted in a limited signal and poor fluorescent response to H2O2 due to a low tip surface density of the fluorophore. To increase the surface density, CPF1 was integrated into a polymer matrix formed on the fibre tip by a UV-catalysed polymerisation process of acrylamide onto a methacrylate silane layer. The polyacrylamide containing CPF1 gave a much higher surface density than previous surface attachment methods and the sensor was found to effectively detect H2O2. Using this method, biologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 were detected, enabling remote sensing studies into ROS releases from embryos throughout early development.

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Oral Streptococci Induces Macrophage Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 human macrophage cell line at multiplicities of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited the cytotoxic effect of S. oralis. S. oralis deletion mutants lacking the spxB gene, which encodes pyruvate oxidase, and are therefore deficient in H2O2 production, showed reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, H2O2 alone was capable of inducing cell death. The cytotoxic effect seemed to be independent of inflammatory responses, because H2O2 was not a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages. These results indicate that streptococcal H2O2 plays a role as a cytotoxin, and is implicated in the cell death of infected human macrophages. PMID:23658745

  1. Hydrogen peroxide photocycling in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yeala; Harris, Raviv; Klein-Kedem, Nir

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was investigated from December 2007 to October 2008 in the Gulf of Aqaba, which in the absence of H(2)O(2) contribution from biological production, rain and runoff, turned out to be a unique natural photochemical laboratory. A distinct seasonal pattern emerged, with highest midday surface H(2)O(2) concentrations in spring-summer (30-90 nM) as compared to winter (10-30 nM). Similarly, irradiation normalized net H(2)O(2) formation rates obtained in concurrent ship-board experiments were faster in spring-summer than in winter. These seasonal patterns were attributed to changes in water characteristics, namely elevated spring-summer chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The role of trace elements in H(2)O(2) photoformation was studied by simultaneously measuring superoxide (O(2)(-)), Fe(II), and H(2)O(2) formation and loss in ambient seawater and in the presence of superoxide dismutase, iron and copper. O(2)(-) was found to decay fast in the Gulf water, with a half-life of 15-28 s, primarily due to catalytic reactions with trace metals (predominantly copper). Hence, H(2)O(2) formation in the Gulf involves metal-catalyzed O(2)(-) disproptionation. Added iron moderately lowered net H(2)O(2) photoformation, probably due to its participation in Fe(II) oxidation, a process that may also modify H(2)O(2) formation in situ. PMID:20377174

  2. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and methyl hydroperoxide in Yanbian, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Ji, B.; Lee, M.; Kim, K.; Lee, G.

    2003-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides are photochemical byproducts. They are referred as the indicator of oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Further, they are related with the production and removal of ozone in photochemistry. To better understand the photochemical processes in the troposphere, it is essential to know the correct concentration of hydroperoxides. Hydrogen peroxide and methyl Hydroperoxide were measured from 24 Aug to 3 Sep in Yanbian, China. Measurements were made for continuously during the whole course of the experiments. After collected in aqueous solution using continuous scrubbing coil, hydroperoxides were separated by HPLC, and then quantified by fluorescence produced using postcolumn enzyme derivatization. Collection and analysis were done automatically Average concentration of hydrogen peroxide and methyl hydroperoxide were 0.9ppbc and 1.6 ppb, respectively. In general, hydroperoxides showed typical diurnal variations with the maximum concentration during day. It was the first study of air pollution conducted in Yanbian, China. Detailed results will be presented in the meeting.

  3. Microbiologic evaluation of a hydrogen peroxide sterilization system.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, D L; Chung, P Y; Tsuchiya, P Y; Wessels, I F; Zuccarelli, A J

    1994-01-01

    The reliability of chemical sterilizers (acetone and/or 30-percent hydrogen peroxide at 25 degrees C and at 60 degrees C) was tested against Bacillus subtilis inoculated onto glass slides, commercial biological indicator discs (Bacillus stearothermophilus and B. subtilis), and B. subtilis spore survival. Acetone alone was not sporicidal. Hydrogen-peroxide-sterilized glass slides were sterile after 5 minutes. The indicator discs required 25 minutes at 25 degrees C, and less than 3 minutes at 60 degrees C (P < .0001). The D value of B. subtilis in 27-percent hydrogen peroxide at 25 degrees C is 2 minutes, with z values of 22 degrees C and 26 degrees C at 25 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. For delicate instruments, a 30-percent peroxide solution followed by an acetone rinse provides an effective alternative to classic heat sterilization. PMID:7898862

  4. Different Modes of Hydrogen Peroxide Action During Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyla, Łukasz; Lechowska, Katarzyna; Kubala, Szymon; Garnczarska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was initially recognized as a toxic molecule that causes damage at different levels of cell organization and thus losses in cell viability. From the 1990s, the role of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule in plants has also been discussed. The beneficial role of H2O2 as a central hub integrating signaling network in response to biotic and abiotic stress and during developmental processes is now well established. Seed germination is the most pivotal phase of the plant life cycle, affecting plant growth and productivity. The function of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and seed aging has been illustrated in numerous studies; however, the exact role of this molecule remains unknown. This review evaluates evidence that shows that H2O2 functions as a signaling molecule in seed physiology in accordance with the known biology and biochemistry of H2O2. The importance of crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and a number of signaling molecules, including plant phytohormones such as abscisic acid, gibberellins, and ethylene, and reactive molecules such as nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide acting on cell communication and signaling during seed germination, is highlighted. The current study also focuses on the detrimental effects of H2O2 on seed biology, i.e., seed aging that leads to a loss of germination efficiency. The dual nature of hydrogen peroxide as a toxic molecule on one hand and as a signal molecule on the other is made possible through the precise spatial and temporal control of its production and degradation. Levels of hydrogen peroxide in germinating seeds and young seedlings can be modulated via pre-sowing seed priming/conditioning. This rather simple method is shown to be a valuable tool for improving seed quality and for enhancing seed stress tolerance during post-priming germination. In this review, we outline how seed priming/conditioning affects the integrative role of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and aging. PMID:26870076

  5. Improvement of adventitious root formation in flax using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takáč, Tomáš; Obert, Bohuš; Rolčík, Jakub; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-09-25

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important crop for the production of oil and fiber. In vitro manipulations of flax are used for genetic improvement and breeding while improvements in adventitious root formation are important for biotechnological programs focused on regeneration and vegetative propagation of genetically valuable plant material. Additionally, flax hypocotyl segments possess outstanding morphogenetic capacity, thus providing a useful model for the investigation of flax developmental processes. Here, we investigated the crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and auxin with respect to reprogramming flax hypocotyl cells for root morphogenetic development. Exogenous auxin induced the robust formation of adventitious roots from flax hypocotyl segments while the addition of hydrogen peroxide further enhanced this process. The levels of endogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) were positively correlated with increased root formation in response to exogenous auxin (1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; NAA). Histochemical staining of the hypocotyl segments revealed that hydrogen peroxide and peroxidase, but not superoxide, were positively correlated with root formation. Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that endogenous levels of hydrogen peroxide were controlled by peroxidases during root formation from hypocotyl segments. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide positively affected flax adventitious root formation by regulating the endogenous auxin levels. Consequently, this agent can be applied to increase flax regeneration capacity for biotechnological purposes such as improved plant rooting. PMID:26921706

  6. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  7. Fluorescent hydrogen peroxide sensor based on cupric oxide nanoparticles and its application for glucose and L-lactate detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ai-Ling; Liu, Yin-Huan; Deng, Hao-Hua; Hong, Guo-Lin; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xin-Hua; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-15

    A novel fluorescent hydrogen peroxide sensor was developed based on the peroxidase-like activity of cupric oxide nanoparticles. Cupric oxide nanoparticles effectively catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into hydroxyl radicals. Then terephthalic acid was oxidized by hydroxyl radical to form a highly fluorescent product. The linear range of hydrogen peroxide estimated to be 5.0 × 10(-6)-2.0 × 10(-4)M with a detection limit of 3.4 × 10(-7)M. Moreover, this detection system enabled the sensing of analytes which can enzymatically generate hydrogen peroxide. By coupling the oxidation of glucose or L-lactate catalyzed by their corresponding oxidase enzymes with terephthalic acid oxidation catalyzed by cupric oxide nanoparticles, sensitive assays of glucose and l-lactate with detection limits of 1.0 × 10(-6) and 4.5 × 10(-8)M were realized. The successful applications of this approach in human serum samples have also been demonstrated. PMID:24912038

  8. Comparison of chemiluminescence methods for analysis of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehrman, R.; Amme, M.; Cachoir, C.

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of alpha radiolysis influence on the chemistry of geologically disposed spent fuel demands analytical methods for radiolytic product determination at trace levels. Several chemiluminescence methods for the detection of radiolytic oxidants hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are tested. Two of hydrogen peroxide methods use luminol, catalyzed by either μ-peroxidase or hemin, one uses 10-methyl-9-(p-formylphenyl)-acridinium carboxylate trifluoromethanesulfonate and one potassium periodate. All recipes are tested as batch systems in basic conditions. For hydroxyl radical detection luminophores selected are 3-hydroxyphthalic hydrazide and rutin. Both methods are tested as batch systems. The results are compared and the applicability of the methods for near-field dissolution studies is discussed.

  9. Enhanced chemiluminescence of the luminol-hydrogen peroxide system by colloidal cupric oxide nanoparticles as peroxidase mimic.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Hong, Lei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Liu, Jian-Qing; Lin, Xin-Hua; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2012-09-15

    As a peroxidase mimic, cupric oxide nanoparticles were found to enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) of luminol-H(2)O(2) system up to 400 folds. The CL spectra and radical scavengers were conducted to investigate the possible CL enhancement mechanism. It was suggested that the enhanced CL could be attributed to the peroxidase-like activity of CuO nanoparticles, which effectively catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into hydroxyl radicals. The effects of the reactant concentrations and some organic compounds were also investigated. The proposed method could be used as a sensitive detection tool for hydrogen peroxide and glucose. PMID:22967606

  10. Simulated afterburner performance with hydrogen peroxide injection for thrust augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, Allen J; Grobman, Jack S

    1956-01-01

    Combustion performance of three afterburner configurations was evaluated at simulated altitude flight conditions with liquid augmentation to the primary combustor. Afterburner combustion efficiency and stability were better with injection of high-strength hydrogen peroxide than with no injection or with water injection. Improvements were observed in afterburner configurations with and without flameholders and in a short-length afterburner. At a peroxide-air ratio of 0.3, combustion was stable and 85 to 90 percent efficient in all configurations tested. Calculated augmented net-thrust ratios for peroxide injection with afterburning were approximately 60 percent greater than those for water injection.

  11. Proline dehydrogenase is essential for proline protection against hydrogen peroxide induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhu, Weidong; Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Demers, Andrew J.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Simpson, Melanie A.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism has an underlying role in apoptotic signaling that impacts tumorigenesis. Proline is oxidized to glutamate in the mitochondria with the rate limiting step catalyzed by proline dehydrogenase (PRODH). PRODH expression is inducible by p53 leading to increased proline oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and induction of apoptosis. Paradoxical to its role in apoptosis, proline also protects cells against oxidative stress. Here we explore the mechanism of proline protection against hydrogen peroxide stress in melanoma WM35 cells. Treatment of WM35 cells with proline significantly increased cell viability, diminished oxidative damage of cellular lipids and proteins, and retained ATP and NADPH levels after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRODH abolished proline protection against oxidative stress whereas knockdown of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis, had no impact on proline protection. Potential linkages between proline metabolism and signaling pathways were explored. The combined inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 eliminated proline protection. A significant increase in Akt activation was observed in proline treated cells after hydrogen peroxide stress along with a corresponding increase in the phosphorylation of the fork head transcription factor class O3a (FoxO3a). The role of PRODH in proline mediated protection was validated in the prostate carcinoma cell line, PC3. Knockdown of PRODH in PC3 cells attenuated phosphorylated levels of Akt and FoxO3a and decreased cell survival during hydrogen peroxide stress. The results provide evidence that PRODH is essential in proline protection against hydrogen peroxide mediated cell death and that proline/PRODH helps activate Akt in cancer cells. PMID:22796327

  12. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  13. Reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide generation in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Rudzka, Dominika A; Cameron, Jenifer M; Olson, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell migration is a complex process that requires spatially and temporally co-ordinated regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In response to external cues, signals are transduced to elicit cytoskeletal responses. It has emerged that reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide, are important second messengers in pathways that influence the actin cytoskeleton, although the identities of key proteins regulated by hydrogen peroxide are largely unknown. We recently showed that oxidation of cofilin1 is elevated in migrating cells relative to stationary cells, and that the effect of this post-translational modification is to reduce cofilin1-actin binding and to inhibit filamentous-actin severing by cofilin1. These studies revealed that cofilin1 regulation by hydrogen peroxide contributes to directional cell migration, and established a template for discovering additional proteins that are regulated in an analogous manner. PMID:27066166

  14. Oxidative desulfurization of Tufanbeyli coal by hydrogen peroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guru, M.; Sarioz, B.V.; Cakanyildirim, C.

    2008-07-01

    It is becoming popular to use fossil fuels efficiently since the necessary energy is mostly supplied from fossil fuels. Altough there are high lignite reserves, high sulfur content limits the efficient use of them. In this article, we aimed to convert combustible sulfur in coal to non-combustible sulfate form in the ash by oxidizing it with a hydrogen peroxide solution. The parameters affecting the sulfur conversion were determined to be: hydrogen peroxide concentration, reaction time, mean particle size at constant room temperature and shaking rate. The maximum desulfurization efficiency reached was 74% of the original combustible sulfur with 15% (w/w) hydrogen peroxide solution, 12 hours of reaction time, and 0.25 mm mean particle size.

  15. Modeling the oxidation of phenolic compounds by hydrogen peroxide photolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi; Cheng, Long; Ma, Lin; Meng, Fanchao; Arnold, Robert G; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide UV photolysis is among the most widely used advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for the destruction of trace organics in waters destined for reuse. Previous kinetic models of hydrogen peroxide photolysis focus on the dynamics of hydroxyl radical production and consumption, as well as the reaction of the target organic with hydroxyl radicals. However, the rate of target destruction may also be affected by radical scavenging by reaction products. In this work, we build a predictive kinetic model for the destruction of p-cresol by hydrogen peroxide photolysis based on a complete reaction mechanism that includes reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. The results show that development of a predictive kinetic model to evaluate process performance requires consideration of the complete reaction mechanism, including reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. PMID:27448315

  16. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, wemore » show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.« less

  17. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  18. Thermal Screening Of Residues From Acidification And Copper-Catalyzed Peroxide Oxidation Of Tank 48H Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F. F.; Newell, J. D.; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-04

    This study evaluated the residues generated from copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) of Tank 48H simulant. The first step of the CCPO calls for pH adjustment of the simulant, and early testing used either 15wt% or 50wt % nitric acid to reach a slurry pH of between 12 and 5. Residues obtained by ambient temperature pH adjustment with 50wt % nitric acid followed by oxidation with 50 wt % hydrogen peroxide at 35, 50, and 65°C (from a recently conducted Copper Catalyzed Peroxide Oxidation or CCPO) were also analyzed. Slurry samples at pH 7 or lower especially made from adding nitric acid at the process equivalent of one gallon per minute had the largest enthalpy of decomposition. The thermogravimetric characteristics of some samples from the CCPO test generated at pH 9 or lower exhibited rapid weight loss. Taken together, residues generated at pH 9 or lower may be classified as energetic upon decomposition in confined spaces or under adiabatic conditions. Therefore, additional testing is recommended with larger (up to 50mL) samples in an adiabatic calorimeter. To minimize risk of formation of energetic byproducts, an intermediate slurry pH of 9 or greater is recommended following the acidification step in the CCPO and prior to start of peroxide addition. In practice, process temperature needs to reach 150°C or greater to decompose residues obtained a pH 9 or lower which is unlikely. Oxidation temperature had no significant effect on the thermal characteristics of the final residues generated.

  19. Formation of hydrogen peroxide in electron irradiated secondary effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.J.; Sosa, D.; Cadavid, E.M. ); Waite, T.D.; Kurucz, C.N. )

    1989-01-01

    The results of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in a chlorinated secondary wastewater are presented in this paper. This research project utilizes a large scale 1.5 MeV, 50 mA, electron accelerator located at the Virginia Key Wastewater Treatment Plant in Miami, Florida. Secondary chlorinated wastewater is connected to the influent of the electron beam facility and can be treated at 120 gpm. The formation of the oxidant hydrogen peroxide has been related to electron dose. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  20. Photochemistry of hydrogen peroxide in Kr and Xe matrixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Pettersson, Mika; Jolkkonen, Santtu; Pehkonen, Susanna; Räsänen, Markku

    2000-02-01

    UV photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in various rare-gas matrixes is comparatively studied. The photorecovery of H2O2 from the tight H2O⋯O complex is observed in Kr and Xe matrixes, in addition to this reaction in an Ar matrix found previously. The similarity of spectral position and efficiency of the photorecovery reaction in various rare-gas solids indicates its fundamental character, supports charge-transfer excitation of H2O⋯O as its origin, and preserves promises to find this photoreaction in media of environmental importance. In UV photolysis of H2O2, the relatively small concentration of isolated OH radicals is found in a Kr matrix, and no OH radicals appear in a Xe matrix, and this trend is discussed in terms of delayed cage exit. Moreover, additional species photogenerated from H2O2 in a Xe matrix as well as the absence of OH radicals might be connected with participation of some hidden intermediates (HOXeOH, HXeOOH, etc.) in the dynamics, thus, catalyzing new photodissociation channels. Among the photolysis products, the loose H2O//O complex is suggested to be stabilized in Kr and Xe matrixes. This loosely bound complex is quasistable and decomposes at relatively low temperatures (below 20 K) quantitatively forming the known tight H2O⋯O structure. This low-temperature process offers one additional example of short-range atomic mobility introduced recently in the literature.

  1. Distillation Kinetics of Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Peroxide and Water and the Isolation of Pure Hydrogen Peroxide in Ultrahigh Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the growth of thin films of crystalline H2O2 and H2O2.2H2O (dihydrate) in ultrahigh vacuum by distilling an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. We traced the process using infrared reflectance spectroscopy, mass loss on a quartz crystal microbalance, and in a few cases ultraviolet-visible reflectance. We find that the different crystalline phases-water, dihydrate, and hydrogen peroxide-have very different sublimation rates, making distillation efficient to isolate the less volatile component, crystalline H2O2.

  2. Oxygen Mass Flow Rate Generated for Monitoring Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with non-toxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because peroxide is sensitive to contaminants, material interactions, stability and storage issues, monitoring decomposition rates is important. Stennis Space Center (SSC) uses thermocouples to monitor bulk fluid temperature (heat evolution) to determine reaction rates. Unfortunately, large temperature rises are required to offset the heat lost into the surrounding fluid. Also, tank penetration to accomodate a thermocouple can entail modification of a tank or line and act as a source of contamination. The paper evaluates a method for monitoring oxygen evolution as a means to determine peroxide stability. Oxygen generation is not only directly related to peroxide decomposition, but occurs immediately. Measuring peroxide temperature to monitor peroxide stability has significant limitations. The bulk decomposition of 1% / week in a large volume tank can produce in excess of 30 cc / min. This oxygen flow rate corresponds to an equivalent temperature rise of approximately 14 millidegrees C, which is difficult to measure reliably. Thus, if heat transfer were included, there would be no temperature rise. Temperature changes from the surrounding environment and heat lost to the peroxide will also mask potential problems. The use of oxygen flow measurements provides an ultra sensitive technique for monitoring reaction events and will provide an earlier indication of an abnormal decomposition when compared to measuring temperature rise.

  3. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the...

  4. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030 or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section...

  5. A PORTABLE MICROREACTOR SYSTEM TO SYNTHESIZE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the event that vehicles of buildings become contaminated by hazardous chemical or biological materials, a well-studied and effective decontaminant is hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV).  Unfortunately, the current technology for generating HPV requires 35 weight percent hydro...

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide Producing Lactobacilli in Women with Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Min; Kim, Chol Hong; Kim, Seok Mo; Oh, Jong Seok

    2006-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical neoplasia, and hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli are the most important microorganisms for maintaining the balance of the vaginal ecosystem. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship of hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli, cervical neoplasia and high-risk HPV. Materials and Methods We enrolled 1138 women with abnormal cervical smears or cervicograms who were referred to the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Chonnam National University Medical School. In all of them, 1,138 vaginal swabs were collected for the qualitative assay of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli and 150 cervical swabs were used for the HPV hybrid capture II test without regard to the subjects' pregnancy status. In the non-pregnant women, 880 cervical biopsies and/or loop electrosurgical excision procedures were performed for making the histological diagnosis. Results There was no significant difference not only between the distribution of H2O2 producing lactobacilli and the cervical histology, but also between the distribution of H2O2 producing lactobacilli and the positivity for high-risk HPV. Conclusions Both cervical neoplasia and high-risk HPV may not be influenced by the existence of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli in the vagina. PMID:19771268

  7. RESPONSE OF PLANT-COLONIZING PSEUDOMONADS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colonization of plant root surfaces by Pseudomonas putida may require mechanisms that protect this bacterium against superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide produced by the root. atalase and superoxide dismutase may be important in this bacterial defense system. tationary-phase ce...

  8. Hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Antifungal agents are needed to maintain healthy stocks of fish in the intensive culture systems currently employed in fish hatcheries. Malachite green has been the most widely used antifungal agent; however, its potential for producing teratology in animals and fish precludes further use in fish culture. Preliminary studies at the National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI, USA (La Crosse Center) indicate that hydrogen peroxide is effective for control of Saprolegnia sp. fungus on incubating eggs of rainbow trout. It is also effective against a wide variety of other organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, viruses, and spores, and has been proposed as a treatment for sea lice on salmon. Hydrogen peroxide and its primary decomposition products, oxygen and water, are not systemic poisons and are considered environmentally compatible. In response to a petition from the La Crosse Center, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently classified hydrogen peroxide as a 'low regulatory priority' when used for control of fungus on fish and fish eggs. Preliminary tests conducted at the La Crosse Center suggest that prophylactic treatments of 250 to 500 ppm (based on 100% active ingredient) for 15 minutes every other day will inhibit fungal infections on healthy rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs. This treatment regime also seems to inhibit fungal development and increase hatching success among infected eggs. Efficacy and safety of hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish are currently being evaluated.

  9. Toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to rainbow trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Rach, J.J.; Olson, J.J.; Ramsay, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 0, 500, 1,000, and 3,000 I?L/L, concentrations that were multiples of the Low Regulatory Priority limit of 500 I?L/L, were administered for 15 min every weekday (Mondaya??Friday) to eggs of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and steelhead (anadromous rainbow trout) to determine the margin of safety existing for standard egg treatments. All untreated and treated eggs remained free of fungal infection throughout incubation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs by 1.4a??5.9% among those treated at 500 I?L/L, 6.8a??15.4% among those treated at 1,000 I?L/L, and 13.2a??25.3% among those treated at 3,000 I?L/L. Mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated at 1,000 I?L H2O2/L was 7% lower than that for eggs treated at 500 I?L H2O2/L. Mean percent hatch of Skamania strain steelhead was significantly reduced by hydrogen peroxide treatment, whereas the mean percent hatch of Ganaraska strain steelhead was similar to the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs. Daily percent mortality of rainbow trout eggs increased significantly from day 6 to day 10 (78a??135 daily temperature units, DTUsA?C) of incubation. Discontinuing hydrogen peroxide treatments to Skamania strain steelhead eggs from day 7 to day 11 (78a??105 DTUsA?C) of incubation significantly increased the probability of eggs reaching the eyed egg stage. The mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated with hydrogen peroxide at concentrations up to 1,000 I?L/L may be increased if no treatments are administered between 70 and 140 DTUsA?C. Mortality of sac fry was not observed at hydrogen peroxide concentrations of 1,000 I?L/L or lower. Fish culturists should be aware that other species or strains may be more sensitive than rainbow trout. Other species and strains should be initially treated with hydrogen peroxide at 500 I?L/L until monitoring of egg mortality identifies the presence or absence of a sensitive period.

  10. 78 FR 73697 - New Animal Drugs; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ...; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of Sponsor AGENCY: Food and Drug... interest in, NADA 141-255 for PEROX-AID (hydrogen peroxide) 35% Solution to Western Chemical, Inc.,...

  11. Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, Follow All Instructions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, ... warning label and red tip remind you that contact lens solutions with hydrogen peroxide require special handling. ( ...

  12. Hydrogen peroxide oxidant fuel cell systems for ultra-portable applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will address the issues of using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant fuel in a miniature DMFC system. Cell performance for DMFC based fuel cells operating on hydrogen peroxide will be presented and discussed.

  13. Application of a newly developed hydrogen peroxide vapor phase sensor to HPV sterilizer.

    PubMed

    Taizo, I; Sinichi, A; Kawamura, K

    1998-01-01

    A new type of concentration sensor for hydrogen peroxide vapor has been developed by making use of a semiconductor. Output from the vapor sensor has been shown to have a good linear relationship with the logarithm of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor. Concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor introduced into the sterilization chamber could be kept constant by monitoring the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide vapor continuously and controlling the vapor supply. Temperature and humidity have also been kept constant. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined by using the combination system of the hydrogen peroxide vapor sensor, the hydrogen peroxide vapor supplier, thermosensor and humidity sensor. D-values at the temperature of 30 degrees C and the absolute humidity of 0.7 mg H2O/L thus obtained, were 0.2 minutes at hydrogen peroxide concentration of 600 ppm and 1.2 minutes at 200 ppm at the temperature of 30 degrees C and 0.7 mg/L absolute humidity. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various temperatures, humidity and levels of hydrogen peroxide concentration have also been determined. These fundamental data indicate that the sterilization by hydrogen peroxide vapor can be validated as precisely as steam sterilization by measuring and controlling the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor using a combination of the hydrogen peroxide concentration sensor and the vapor generator. Influence of temperature and humidity have also been studied. The hydrogen peroxide sensor has been calibrated and standardized by using the standard hydrogen peroxide vapor whose concentration has been determined by calculating partial pressure of hydrogen peroxide over the water-hydrogen peroxide solution. PMID:9542409

  14. A spectrometric method for hydrogen peroxide concentration measurement with a reusable and cost-efficient sensor.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Lo, Yuan-Rong; Lin, Yu-Chian; Shi, Yi-Cen; Li, Pang-Lung

    2015-01-01

    In this study we developed a low cost sensor for measuring the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in liquids utilizing a spectrometric method. The sensor was tested using various concentrations of a peroxidase enzyme immobilized on a glass substrate. H₂O₂ can be catalyzed by peroxidase and converted into water and oxygen. The reagent 4-amino-phenazone takes up oxygen together with phenol to form a colored product that has absorption peaks at 510 nm and 450 nm. The transmission intensity is strongly related to the hydrogen peroxide concentration, so can be used for quantitative analysis. The measurement range for hydrogen peroxide is from 5 × 10(-)⁵% to 1 × 10(-3)% (0.5 ppm to 10 ppm) and the results show high linearity. This device can achieve a sensitivity and resolution of 41,400 (photon count/%) and 3.49 × 10(-5)% (0.35 ppm), respectively. The response time of the sensor is less than 3 min and the sensor can be reused for 10 applications with similar performance. PMID:26473862

  15. Iron prochelator BSIH protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L; Franz, Katherine J

    2008-12-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide) prochelators that are converted by hydrogen peroxide into SIH (salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone) chelating agents that inhibit iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical generation. Here, we show that BSIH protects a cultured cell model for retinal pigment epithelium against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. BSIH is more stable than SIH in cell culture medium and is more protective during long-term experiments. Repetitive exposure of cells to BSIH is nontoxic, whereas SIH and desferrioxamine induce cell death after repeated exposure. Combined, our results indicate that cell protection by BSIH involves iron sequestration that occurs only when the cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that prochelators discriminate toxic iron from healthy iron and are promising candidates for neuro- and retinal protection. PMID:18835041

  16. Amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide by functionalized carbon nanotubes through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jeykumari, D R Shobha; Narayanan, S Sriman

    2007-06-01

    The electrochemistry of the redox mediator Toluidine blue (TB) which was covalently linked to the carboxyl group of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by coupling reactions, in which N-hydroxysuccinimide was used to assist 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride catalyzed amidation reaction is described. The results from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry suggested that the redox mediator is linked to the surface of the MWNTs and the nanotubes showed an obvious promotion for the direct electron-transfer between the redox mediator and the electrode. A couple of well-defined redox peak of TB was observed in a phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0). The redox mediator immobilized to MWNTs exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The analytical applicability of the modified electrode for the determination of hydrogen peroxide was examined. A linear response in the concentration range of 6.8 x 10(-7)-3.4 x 10(-2) M (r = 0.9958) was obtained with detection limit of 3.4 x 10(-7) M for the determination of hydrogen peroxide. The modified electrode has advantages of being highly stable, sensitive, ease of construction and use. PMID:17654948

  17. A Spectrometric Method for Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration Measurement with a Reusable and Cost-Efficient Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Lo, Yuan-Rong; Lin, Yu-Chian; Shi, Yi-Cen; Li, Pang-Lung

    2015-01-01

    In this study we developed a low cost sensor for measuring the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in liquids utilizing a spectrometric method. The sensor was tested using various concentrations of a peroxidase enzyme immobilized on a glass substrate. H2O2 can be catalyzed by peroxidase and converted into water and oxygen. The reagent 4-amino-phenazone takes up oxygen together with phenol to form a colored product that has absorption peaks at 510 nm and 450 nm. The transmission intensity is strongly related to the hydrogen peroxide concentration, so can be used for quantitative analysis. The measurement range for hydrogen peroxide is from 5 × 10−5% to 1 × 10−3% (0.5 ppm to 10 ppm) and the results show high linearity. This device can achieve a sensitivity and resolution of 41,400 (photon count/%) and 3.49 × 10−5% (0.35 ppm), respectively. The response time of the sensor is less than 3 min and the sensor can be reused for 10 applications with similar performance. PMID:26473862

  18. Investigation on regeneration of basic hydrogen peroxide by electrochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Changchun; Chen, Wenwu; Xu, Xiaobo; Wang, Jinglong; Liu, Yushi; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Two electrochemical methods for regeneration of Basic Hydrogen Peroxide (BHP) were investigated in this paper, which could be called one-step method and two-step method, respectively, distinguished by the number of steps during the regeneration process. The one-step method converts potassium chloride solution and oxygen directly to chlorine and BHP by a modified chlor-alkali cell with an oxygen cathode. For the one-step method, two reactors of different structure and corresponding regenerating process were designed. The experimental results showed that, for the continuous-type reactor, the highest peroxide concentration was 0.042 mol/L, while for batch-type reactor the highest peroxide concentration was 0.563 mol/L. The two-step method accomplishes the regeneration of BHP by a conventional chlor-alkali cell combined with a fuel cell reactor which could convert hydrogen and oxygen to peroxide in alkaline potassium hydroxide solution. A peroxide concentration of 2.450 mol/L was obtained for the two-step method.

  19. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  1. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  4. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  6. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. Hydrogen peroxide as a soil amendment for greenhouse nasturtium production (Tropaeolum majus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, is a highly reactive oxidizing agent naturally occurring in plants and animals. Plants produce hydrogen peroxide to destroy either infected plant cells or the pathogens within a plant. Hydrogen peroxide also acts as a stress signal to plants. It is approved for the contro...

  8. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  10. Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities

    DOEpatents

    Nyman, May D.; Hobbs, David T.

    2009-02-24

    The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

  11. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (p<0.01). The GC group presented a significantly lower peroxide passage than did GD and GE (p<0.01). It can be concluded that the hydrogen peroxide placed into the pulp chamber passed through the

  12. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  13. Ozonation of deciduous wood in the presence of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Fionov, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The kinetic curves of the dependence of ozone specific absorption ( Q r, sp ) upon aspen wood ozonation in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide are obtained. It is established that the rate of ozone and Q r, sp absorption increase in the O3/H2O2 system. It is demonstrated by ESR, IR, and UV spectroscopy of diffuse reflection that wood ozonation in the O3/H2O2 system results in the destruction of lignin aromatic and quinoid structures. The ozonation process in the presence of H2O2 is accompanied by destruction of the carbohydrate component of the lignocarbohydrate complex. We conclude that O3/H2O2 can be used in the deep delignification of wood. It is shown that the presence of hydrogen peroxide upon ozonation increases the efficiency of the process, allowing its duration and total ozone consumption to be reduced.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  15. 14 CFR 420.66 - Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored... Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.66 Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored within an intraline...

  16. 14 CFR 420.66 - Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored... Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.66 Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored within an intraline...

  17. Novel aqueous dual-channel aluminum-hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart

    1994-06-01

    A dual-channel aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery is introduced with an open-circuit voltage of 1.9 volts, polarization losses of 0.9 mV cm(exp 2) mA(exp -1), and power densities of 1 W/cm(exp 2). Catholyte and anolyte cell compartments are separated by an Ir/Pd modified porous nickel cathode. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode. The battery is expressed by aluminum oxidation and aqueous solution phase hydrogen peroxide reduction for an overall battery discharge consisting of 2Al + 3H2O2 + 2OH(-) yields 2AlO2(-) + 4H2O E = 2.3 V. The search for electrical propulsion sources which fit the requirements for electrically powered vehicles has blurred the standard characteristics associated with electrochemical storage systems. Presently, electrochemical systems comprised of mechanically rechargeable primary batteries, secondary batteries, and fuel cells are candidates for electrochemical propulsion sources. While important advances in energy and power density continue for nonaqueous and molten electrolytes, aqueous electrolyte batteries often have an advantage in simplicity, conductivity, cost effectiveness, and environmental impact. Systems coupling aluminum anodes and aqueous electrolytes have been investigated. These systems include: aluminum/silver oxide, aluminum/manganese dioxide, aluminum air, aluminum/hydrogen peroxide aqueous batteries, and the recently introduced aluminum/ferricyanide and aluminum sulfur aqueous batteries. Conventional aqueous systems such as the nickel cadmium and lead-acid batteries are characterized by their relatively low energy densities and adverse environmental impact. Other systems have substantially higher theoretical energy capacities. While aluminum-silver oxide has demonstrated the highest steady-state power density, its high cost is an impediment for widespread utilization for electric propulsion.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    1998-07-13

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable benchtop propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  19. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of hydrogen peroxide vapor. [for atmospheric abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Schinke, S. D.; Molina, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined over the wavelength range 210 to 350 nm at 296 K. At the longer wavelengths, the gas phase absorptivities are significantly larger than the corresponding values in condensed phase. The atmospheric H2O2 photodissociation rate for overhead sun at the earth's surface is estimated to be about 1.3 x 10 to the -5th/sec.

  20. SONEX-Hydrogen Peroxide, Methylhydroperoxide and Formaldehyde Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikes, Brian

    1999-01-01

    We measured gas phase H2O2, CH3OOH, and CH2O on board the NASA DC-8 during the SONEX field mission, presented preliminary results at three scientific meetings, participated in two data workshops and contributed to joint publications of final results. The observations of peroxides and formaldehyde were instrumental in assessing odd-hydrogen radical chemistry, ozone chemistry, and in tracing meteorological transport paths.

  1. Microsolvation of methyl hydrogen peroxide: Ab initio quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Anant D.; Rai, Dhurba; Bartolotti, Libero J.; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2009-08-01

    Methyl hydrogen peroxide (MHP), one of the simplest organic hydroperoxides, is a strong oxidant, with enhanced activity in aqueous ambience. The present study investigates, at the molecular level, the role of hydrogen bonding that is conducive to cluster formation of MHP with water molecules from its peroxide end, with the methyl group remaining hydrophobic for up to five water molecules. Ab initio quantum chemical computations on MHP⋯(H2O)n, [n =1-5] are performed at second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory employing the basis sets 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) to study the cluster formation of MHP with water molecules from its peroxide end and hydrophobic hydration due to the methyl group. Successive addition of water molecules alters the hydrogen bonding pattern, which leads to changes in overall cluster geometry and in turn to IR vibrational frequency shifts. Molecular co-operativity in these clusters is gauged directly through a detailed many-body interaction energy analysis. Molecular electrostatic potential maps are shown to have a bearing on predicting further growth of these clusters, which is duly corroborated through sample calculations for MHP⋯(H2O)8. Further, a continuum solvation model calculation for energetically stable clusters suggests that this study should serve as a precursor for pathways to aqueous solvation of MHP.

  2. Photochemical formation of hydrogen peroxide in surface and ground waters exposed to sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.J.; Zika, R.G.

    1983-05-13

    A rapid increase in the concentration of hydrogen peroxide was observed when samples of natural surface and ground water from various locations in the United States were exposed to sunlight. The hydrogen peroxide is photochemically generated from organic constitutents present in the water; humic materials are believed to be the primary agent producing the peroxide. Studies with superoxide dismutase suggest that the superoxide anion is the precursor of the peroxide.

  3. Modifications of boronic ester pro-chelators triggered by hydrogen peroxide tune reactivity to inhibit metal-promoted oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Pham, David M; Kwon, Ashley M; Vangeloff, Abbey D; Franz, Katherine J

    2007-11-21

    Several new analogs of salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH) and salicylaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone (SBH) that contain an aryl boronic ester (BSIH, BSBH) or acid (BASIH) in place of an aryl hydroxide have been synthesized and characterized as masked metal ion chelators. These pro-chelators show negligible interaction with iron(III), although the boronic acid versions exhibit some interaction with copper(II), zinc(II) and nickel(II). Hydrogen peroxide oxidizes the aryl boronate to phenol, thus converting the pro-chelators to tridentate ligands with high affinity metal binding properties. An X-ray crystal structure of a bis-ligated iron(III) complex, [Fe(SBH(m-OMe)(3))(2)]NO(3), confirms the meridonal binding mode of these ligands. Modifications of the aroyl ring of the chelators tune their iron affinity, whereas modifications on the boron-containing ring of the pro-chelators attenuate their reaction rates with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, the methoxy derivative pro-chelator (p-OMe)BASIH reacts with hydrogen peroxide nearly 5 times faster than the chloro derivative (m-Cl)BASIH. Both the rate of pro-chelator to chelator conversion as well as the metal binding affinity of the chelator influence the overall ability of these molecules to inhibit hydroxyl radical formation catalyzed by iron or copper in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid. This pro-chelator strategy has the potential to improve the efficacy of medicinal chelators for inhibiting metal-promoted oxidative stress. PMID:17992288

  4. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of 2-alkenals generates genotoxic 4-oxo-2-alkenals during lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Nuka, Erika; Tomono, Susumu; Ishisaka, Akari; Kato, Yoji; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Yoshichika

    2016-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation products react with cellular molecules, such as DNA bases, to form covalent adducts, which are associated with aging and disease processes. Since lipid peroxidation is a complex process and occurs in multiple stages, there might be yet unknown reaction pathways. Here, we analyzed comprehensively 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) adducts with oxidized arachidonic acid using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and found the formation of 7-(2-oxo-hexyl)-etheno-dG as one of the major unidentified adducts. The formation of this adduct was reproduced in the reaction of dG with 2-octenal and predominantly with 4-oxo-2-octenal (OOE). We also found that other 2-alkenals (with five or more carbons) generate corresponding 4-oxo-2-alkenal-type adducts. Importantly, it was found that transition metals enhanced the oxidation of C4-position of 2-octenal, leading to the formation of OOE-dG adduct. These findings demonstrated a new pathway for the formation of 4-oxo-2-alkenals during lipid peroxidation and might provide a mechanism for metal-catalyzed genotoxicity. PMID:27281652

  5. At-home vital bleaching: a comparison of hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide treatments.

    PubMed

    Berga-Caballero, Amparo; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Amengual-Lorenzo, José

    2006-01-01

    Tray bleaching of vital teeth performed at home by the patient under the dentist s supervision, whether alone or in combination with any of the in-office techniques, provides an interesting alternative to other methods employed in this type of dental treatment. This bleaching procedure applies low-concentration peroxides to the enamel by means of a custom-made mouth tray specifically designed for this purpose. The aim of this study is to examine and compare two commercially-available bleaching products, at equivalent concentrations, for use in this technique: VivaStyle (Vivadent) and FKD (Kin); the former is a 10% carbamide peroxide and the latter a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide formulation. It examines the parameters that must be monitored during the application of this type of procedure and presents 6 cases (3 treated with one of the above-mentioned products and the other 3 with the other), establishing the bleaching power of the products and the appearance and intensity of post-operatory hypersensitivity. The results obtained show that both products are effective for the purpose for which they were designed. In general, dental hypersensitivity was minimal. PMID:16388304

  6. Optimization of two methods for the analysis of hydrogen peroxide: high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection in direct current mode.

    PubMed

    Tarvin, Megan; McCord, Bruce; Mount, Kelly; Sherlach, Katy; Miller, Mark L

    2010-11-26

    Two complementary methods were optimized for the separation and detection of trace levels of hydrogen peroxide. The first method utilized reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD). With this approach, hydrogen peroxide was detected based upon its participation in the hemin-catalyzed oxidation of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid to yield the fluorescent dimer. The second method utilized high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED). With this approach, hydrogen peroxide was detected based upon its oxidation at a gold working electrode at an applied potential of 400 mV vs. hydrogen reference electrode (Pd/H(2)). Both methods were linear across the range of 15-300 μM, and the electrochemical method was linear across a wider range of 7.4-15,000 μM. The limit of detection for hydrogen peroxide was 6 μM by HPLC/FD, and 0.6 μM by HPLC/ED. A series of organic peroxides and inorganic ions were evaluated for their potential to interfere with the detection of hydrogen peroxide. Studies investigating the recovery of hydrogen peroxide with three different extraction protocols were also performed. Post-blast debris from the detonation of a mixture of concentrated hydrogen peroxide with nitromethane was analyzed on both systems. Hydrogen peroxide residues were successfully detected on this post-blast debris. PMID:21030031

  7. Vapor hydrogen peroxide as alternative to dry heat microbial reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S.; Kern, R.; Koukol, R.; Barengoltz, J.; Cash, H.

    2008-09-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VHP) sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal was to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NASA Procedural Requirements 8020.12 as a low-temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process. The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions for planetary protection acceptable microbial reduction levels. Experiments were conducted by the STERIS Corporation, under contract to JPL, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor hydrogen peroxide for the inactivation of the standard spore challenge, Geobacillus stearothermophilus. VHP process parameters were determined that provide significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters of interest: hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of injection cycles, and exposure duration, the investigation also considered the possible effect on lethality of environmental parameters: temperature, absolute humidity, and material substrate. This study delineated a range of test sterilizer process conditions: VHP concentration, process duration, a process temperature range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, a process humidity range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, and the dependence on selected spacecraft material substrates. The derivation of D-values from the lethality data permitted conservative planetary protection recommendations.

  8. Effect of ethanol on hydrogen peroxide-induced AMPK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Wou, Sung-Eun; Zeng, Yan; Ross, Ruth A.; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Crabb, David W.

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to oxidative stress. Previous work has shown that ethanol treatment of cultured hepatoma cells and of mice inhibited the activity of AMPK and reduced the amount of AMPK protein. Ethanol generates oxidative stress in the liver. Since AMPK is activated by reactive oxygen species, it seems paradoxical that ethanol would inhibit AMPK in the hepatoma cells. In an attempt to understand the mechanism whereby ethanol inhibits AMPK, we studied the effect of ethanol on AMPK activation by exogenous hydrogen peroxide. The effects of ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, and inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) [either okadaic acid or PP2A small interference RNA (siRNA)] on AMPK phosphorylation and activity were examined in rat hepatoma cells (H4IIEC3) and HeLa cells. In H4IIEC3 cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) transiently increased the level of phospho-AMPK to 1.5-fold over control (P < 0.05). Similar findings were observed in HeLa cells, which do not express the upstream AMPK kinase, LKB1. H2O2 markedly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 in H4IIEC3 cells. Ethanol significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC-ζ, LKB1, and AMPK caused by exposure to H2O2. This inhibitory effect of ethanol required its metabolism. More importantly, the inhibitory effects of ethanol on H2O2-induced AMPK phosphorylation were attenuated by the presence of the PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, or PP2A siRNA. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on AMPK phosphorylation is exerted through the inhibition of PKC-ζ and LKB1 phosphorylation and the activation of PP2A. PMID:18832448

  9. Efficacy of hydrogen peroxide for treating saprolegniasis in channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Gingerich, W.H.; Dawson, V.K.; Olson, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery-reared fish and their eggs are commonly afflicted with saprolegniasis, a fungal disease that can cause significant losses in production. Fish culturists need safe and effective fungicides to minimize losses and meet production demands. The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide was evaluated for preventing or controlling mortality associated with saprolegniasis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Saprolegniasis was systematically induced in channel catfish so various therapies could be evaluated in a controlled laboratory environment. Both prophylactic and therapeutic hydrogen peroxide bath treatments of 50, 100, and 150 ??L/L for 1 h were administered every other day for seven total treatments. All untreated positive control fish died of saprolegniasis during the prophylactic and therapeutic tests. Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 150 ??L/L were harmful (relative to lower concentrations) to test fish and resulted in 73-95% mortality. Mortality was attributed to a combination of abrasion, temperature, chemical treatment, and disease stressors. Treatments of 100 ??L/L were less harmful (relatively) but also appeared to contribute to mortality (60-79%). These treatments, however, significantly reduced the incidence of mortality and infection compared with those observed for fish of the positive control or 150-??L/L treatment groups. Overall, treatments of 50 ??L/L were found to be the most safe and effective of those tested. Mortality with this concentration ranged from 16% in therapeutic tests to 41% in prophylactic tests. The statistical model employed estimated that the optimum treatment concentration for preventing or controlling mortality, reducing the incidence of infections, and enhancing the recovery of infected fish was 75 ??L H2O2/L.

  10. Tempol inhibits neutrophil and hydrogen peroxide-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hahn, S M; Mitchell, J B; Shacter, E

    1997-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by neutrophil activation are associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Reactive oxygen species are produced by activated neutrophils and produce DNA damage which may lead to tissue damage. Previous studies have shown that activated murine neutrophils induce DNA strand breaks in a target plasmacytoma cell, RIMPC 2394. We studied the effect of a water soluble nitroxide anti-oxidant, Tempol, on murine neutrophil induction of DNA strand breaks in this system. Murine neutrophils were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of BALB/cAn mice after an i.p. injection of pristane oil. Neutrophils were activated by the phorbol ester PMA and co-incubated with RIMPC 2394 cells. Control alkaline elution studies revealed progressive DNA strand breaks in RIMPC cells with time. The addition of Tempol to the incubation mixture prevented DNA damage in a dose dependent fashion. Five mM Tempol provided complete protection. Tempol protection against DNA strand breaks was similar for both stimulated neutrophils and exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide produced by stimulated neutrophils demonstrated that Tempol did not decrease hydrogen peroxide concentration. Oxidation of reduced metals, thereby interfering with the production of hydroxyl radical, is the most likely mechanism of nitroxide protection, although superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity and scavenging of carbon-based free radicals may also account for a portion of the observed protection. The anti-oxidant activity of Tempol inhibited DNA damage by activated neutrophils. The nitroxides as a class of compounds may have a role in the investigation and modification of inflammatory conditions. PMID:9378367

  11. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  12. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR TREATING POLLUTANTS IN A GAS USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND UV LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clauseu, christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending there between. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  13. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on polishing removal rate in CMP with various abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, R.; Ramanathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide in chemical mechanical planarization slurries for shallow trench isolation was investigated. The various abrasives used in this study were ceria, silica, alumina, zirconia, titania, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride. Hydrogen peroxide suppresses the polishing of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces by ceria abrasives. The polishing performances of other abrasives were either unaffected or enhanced slightly with the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The ceria abrasives were treated with hydrogen peroxide, and the polishing of the work surfaces with the treated abrasive shows that the inhibiting action of hydrogen peroxide is reversible. It was found that the effect of hydrogen peroxide as an additive is a strong function of the nature of the abrasive particle.

  14. Catalysis with Cu(II) (bpy) improves alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenglun; Chen, Charles H; Liu, Tongjun; Mathrubootham, Vaidyanathan; Hegg, Eric L; Hodge, David B

    2013-04-01

    Copper(II) 2,2'-bipyridine (Cu(II) (bpy))-catalyzed alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment was performed on three biomass feedstocks including alkali pre-extracted switchgrass, silver birch, and a hybrid poplar cultivar. This catalytic approach was found to improve the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of plant cell wall polysaccharides to monosaccharides for all biomass types at alkaline pH relative to uncatalyzed pretreatment. The hybrid poplar exhibited the most significant improvement in enzymatic hydrolysis with monomeric sugar release and conversions more than doubling from 30% to 61% glucan conversion, while lignin solubilization was increased from 36.6% to 50.2% and hemicellulose solubilization was increased from 14.9% to 32.7%. It was found that Cu(II) (bpy)-catalyzed AHP pretreatment of cellulose resulted in significantly more depolymerization than uncatalyzed AHP pretreatment (78.4% vs. 49.4% decrease in estimated degree of polymerization) and that carboxyl content the cellulose was significantly increased as well (fivefold increase vs. twofold increase). Together, these results indicate that Cu(II) (bpy)-catalyzed AHP pretreatment represents a promising route to biomass deconstruction for bioenergy applications. PMID:23192283

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide as an Effective Disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida. PMID:24954350

  16. Hydrogen peroxide-based propulsion and power systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Melof, Brian Matthew; Keese, David L.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Ruffner, Judith Alison; Escapule, William Rusty

    2004-04-01

    Less toxic, storable, hypergolic propellants are desired to replace nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and hydrazine in certain applications. Hydrogen peroxide is a very attractive replacement oxidizer, but finding acceptable replacement fuels is more challenging. The focus of this investigation is to find fuels that have short hypergolic ignition delays, high specific impulse, and desirable storage properties. The resulting hypergolic fuel/oxidizer combination would be highly desirable for virtually any high energy-density applications such as small but powerful gas generating systems, attitude control motors, or main propulsion. These systems would be implemented on platforms ranging from guided bombs to replacement of environmentally unfriendly existing systems to manned space vehicles.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide in inflammation: messenger, guide, and assassin.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, C; Chockley, P; Singh, S K; Pase, L; Lieschke, G J; Grabher, C

    2012-01-01

    Starting as a model for developmental genetics, embryology, and organogenesis, the zebrafish has become increasingly popular as a model organism for numerous areas of biology and biomedicine over the last decades. Within haematology, this includes studies on blood cell development and function and the intricate regulatory mechanisms within vertebrate immunity. Here, we review recent studies on the immediate mechanisms mounting an inflammatory response by in vivo analyses using the zebrafish. These recently revealed novel roles of the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide that have changed our view on the initiation of a granulocytic inflammatory response. PMID:22737171

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has distinct adaptive responses to both hydrogen peroxide and menadione.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, D J

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with low concentrations of either hydrogen peroxide or menadione (a superoxide-generating agent) induces adaptive responses which protect cells from the lethal effects of subsequent challenge with higher concentrations of these oxidants. Pretreatment with menadione is protective against cell killing by hydrogen peroxide; however, pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide is unable to protect cells from subsequent challenge with menadione. This suggests that the adaptive responses to these two different oxidants may be distinct. PMID:1400218

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Accidents and Incidents: What We Can Learn From History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Ben; Baker, David L.; Frazier, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Historical accidents and incidents involving hydrogen peroxide are reviewed and presented. These hydrogen peroxide events are associated with storage, transportation, handling, and disposal and they include exposures, fires, and explosions. Understanding the causes and effects of these accident and incident examples may aid personnel currently working with hydrogen peroxide to mitigate and perhaps avoid similar situations. Lessons learned, best practices, and regulatory compliance information related to the cited accidents and incidents are also discussed.

  20. Three-dimensional electrode microbial fuel cell for hydrogen peroxide synthesis coupled to wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia-yi; Li, Nan; Zhao, Lin

    2014-05-01

    A three-dimensional electrode bioelectrochemical system for the cathodic production of hydrogen peroxide and the simultaneous treatment of wastewater is investigated. Three types of three-dimensional electrodes - activated carbon particle electrodes (ACPE), carbon black particle electrodes (CBPE) and graphite particle electrodes (GPE) - are made of activated carbon (AC), carbon black (CB) and graphite powders respectively with polytetrafluoroethene (PTFE) as the binder. The MFC using the GPE is shown to perform best for catalyzing H2O2 production, while the MFCs equipped with the CBPE and the ACPE achieve a 17-18% higher power output but a 2.5-4.4% lower H2O2 yield, due to the further cathodic reduction of H2O2. Furthermore, a relatively high current in the system is demonstrated to have a positive impact on both cathodic H2O2 generation and anodic organic degradation for each MFC. At an external resistance of 20 Ω, the MFC using the GPE achieves the H2O2 generation of 196.50 mg L-1 and 84% COD removal in 24 h, with Coulombic efficiency, Faradic efficiency and COD conversion efficiency of 29%, 70%, and 20%, respectively. This study shows that MFC with carbon three-dimensional electrode is a cost-effective energy-saving bioelectrochemical system for the simultaneous production of hydrogen peroxide and removal of COD.

  1. Glucose oxidase prevents programmed cell death of the silkworm anterior silk gland through hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroto; Kakei, Motonori; Iwami, Masafumi; Sakurai, Sho

    2011-03-01

    During pupal metamorphosis, the anterior silk glands (ASGs) of the silkworm Bombyx mori degenerate through programmed cell death (PCD), which is triggered by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). 20E triggers the PCD of the ASGs of day 7 fifth instar (V7) larvae but not that of V5 larvae. When V7 ASGs were cocultured with V5 ASGs in the presence of 20E, neither culture of ASGs underwent PCD. The 20E-induced PCD of V7 ASGs was also inhibited when they were incubated in conditioned medium that was prepared by incubating V5 ASGs for 48 h, an indication that V5 ASGs released an inhibitor of 20E-induced PCD during incubation. The inhibitor was purified from conditioned medium and identified as glucose oxidase (GOD). GOD catalyzes the oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone, and generates hydrogen peroxide as a byproduct. We found that hydrogen peroxide is the molecule that directly inhibits the action of 20E and may act to protect the ASGs from early execution of PCD during the feeding stage. GOD was localized in the inner cavity of the gland, and was discharged to the outside of the ASGs with the silk thread at the onset of spinning. Thus, the spinning behavior, occurring at the beginning of the prepupal period, plays an important role in controlling the time at which ASGs undergo PCD in response to 20E. PMID:21205208

  2. Identification of hydrogen peroxide-secreting cells by cytocompatible coating with a hydrogel membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sakai, Shinji; Kawa, Shogo; Taya, Masahito

    2014-12-01

    A method for identifying each cell secreting reactive oxygen species (ROS) is highly desirable to advance the understanding of the physiological and pathological processes attributed to extracellular ROS. Here, we first report a method for realizing this. The individual cells secreting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a common ROS, could be coated by a hydrogel membrane through a horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed reaction consuming H2O2 secreted from the cells themselves. This hydrogel membrane coating was proved to be cytocompatible. In addition, the hydrogel membrane made from an alginate derivative could be removed on demand without causing damage to the enclosed cells. These results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method to be an effective tool in cellular ROS studies. PMID:25359398

  3. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  4. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-01

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 105 and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA).

  5. Experimental study of combustion in hydrogen peroxide hybrid rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernimont, Eric John

    Combustion behavior in a hydrogen peroxide oxidized hybrid rocket motor is investigated with a series of experiments. Hybrid chemical rocket propulsion is presently of interest due to reduced system complexity compared to classical chemical propulsion systems. Reduced system complexity, by use of a storable oxidizer and a hybrid configuration, is expected to reduce propulsive costs. The fuel in this study is polyethylene which has the potential of continuous manufacture leading to further reduced system costs. The study investigated parameters of interest for nominal design of a full scale hydrogen peroxide oxidized hybrid rocket. Amongst these parameters is the influence of chamber pressure, mass flux, fuel molecular weight and fuel density on fuel regression rate. Effects of chamber pressure and aft combustion length on combustion efficiency and non-acoustic combustion oscillations are also examined. The fuel regression behavior is found to be strongly influenced by both chamber pressure and mass flux. Combustion efficiencies in the upper 90% range are attained by simple changes to the aft combustion chamber length as well as increased combustion pressure. Fuel burning surface is found to be influenced by the density of the polyethylene polymer as well as molecular weight. The combustion is observed to be exceptionally smooth (oscillations less than 5% zero-to-peak of mean) in all motors tested in this program. Tests using both a single port fuel gain and a novel radial flow hybrid are also performed.

  6. A low-volume microstructured optical fiber hydrogen peroxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartner, E. P.; Murphy, D. F.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.; Monro, T. M.

    2011-05-01

    The ability to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in solution is critical for quality assessment and control in many disparate applications, including wine, aviation fuels and IVF. The objective of this research is to develop a rapid test for the hydrogen peroxide content that can be performed on very low volume samples (i.e. sub-μL) that is relatively independent of other products within the sample. For H2O2 detection we use suspended core optical fibers to achieve a high evanescent field interaction with the fluid of interest, without the constraint of limited interaction length that is generally inherent with nanowire structures. By filling the holes of the fiber with an analyte/fluorophore solution we seek to create a quick and effective sensor that should enable detection of desired species within liquid media. By choosing a fluorophore that reacts with our target species to produce an increase in fluorescence, we can correlate observed fluorescence intensity with the concentration of the target molecule.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Transport in the Lung and Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Shlyonsky, V.; Boom, A.; Mies, F.

    2016-01-01

    Renal and lung epithelial cells are exposed to some significant concentrations of H2O2. In urine it may reach 100 μM, while in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung it is estimated to be in micromolar to tens-micromolar range. Hydrogen peroxide has a stimulatory action on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) single-channel activity. It also increases stability of the channel at the membrane and slows down the transcription of the ENaC subunits. The expression and the activity of the channel may be inhibited in some other, likely higher, oxidative states of the cell. This review discusses the role and the origin of H2O2 in the lung and kidney. Concentration-dependent effects of hydrogen peroxide on ENaC and the mechanisms of its action have been summarized. This review also describes outlooks for future investigations linking oxidative stress, epithelial sodium transport, and lung and kidney function. PMID:27073804

  8. Peroxide-Free Pd(II)-Catalyzed Ortho Aroylation and Ortho Halogenation of Directing Arenes.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sourav Kumar; Banerjee, Arghya; Mohanta, Prakash Ranjan; Patel, Bhisma K

    2016-07-15

    A Pd(II)-catalyzed peroxide-free ortho aroylation of directing arenes has been developed via cross dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) in the presence of the terminal oxidant Cu(OAc)2·H2O. Ortho aroylation of directing arenes proceeds via decarbonylation of the in situ generated phenyl glyoxal, which is obtained from 2-acetoxyacetophenone in the presence of the oxidant Cu(OAc)2·H2O. However, changing the oxidant to CuX2 (X = Cl, Br) provided exclusive di-ortho-halogenated 2-arylbenzothiazoles. During the halogenation, CuX2 served the dual role of a halogen source as well as a co-oxidant. PMID:27314648

  9. A highly efficient fluorescent sensor of explosive peroxide vapor via ZnO nanorod array catalyzed deboronation of pyrenyl borate.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; Zhu, Defeng; He, Qingguo; Shi, Liqi; Fu, Yanyan; Wen, Dan; Cao, Huimin; Cheng, Jiangong

    2012-06-11

    A new strategy capable of detecting explosive peroxide vapor via deboronation reaction induced fluorescence quenching has been developed. Using ordered assembly arrays of ZnO nanorods as catalyzing substrates, the deboronation reaction was 42 times faster than that on quartz substrates, which resulted in a very fast response and high sensitivity. PMID:22552712

  10. Results Of Copper Catalyzed Peroxide Oxidation (CCPO) Of Tank 48H Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Pareizs, J. M.; Newell, J. D.; Fondeur, F. F.; Nash, C. A.; White, T. L.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed a series of laboratory-scale experiments that examined copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) aided destruction of organic components, most notably tetraphenylborate (TPB), in Tank 48H simulant slurries. The experiments were designed with an expectation of conducting the process within existing vessels of Building 241-96H with minimal modifications to the existing equipment. Results of the experiments indicate that TPB destruction levels exceeding 99.9% are achievable, dependent on the reaction conditions. A lower reaction pH provides faster reaction rates (pH 7 > pH 9 > pH 11); however, pH 9 reactions provide the least quantity of organic residual compounds within the limits of species analyzed. Higher temperatures lead to faster reaction rates and smaller quantities of organic residual compounds. A processing temperature of 50°C as part of an overall set of conditions appears to provide a viable TPB destruction time on the order of 4 days. Higher concentrations of the copper catalyst provide faster reaction rates, but the highest copper concentration (500 mg/L) also resulted in the second highest quantity of organic residual compounds. The data in this report suggests 100-250 mg/L as a minimum. Faster rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition lead to faster reaction rates and lower quantities of organic residual compounds. An addition rate of 0.4 mL/hour, scaled to the full vessel, is suggested for the process. SRNL recommends that for pH adjustment, an acid addition rate 42 mL/hour, scaled to the full vessel, is used. This is the same addition rate used in the testing. Even though the TPB and phenylborates can be destroyed in a relative short time period, the residual organics will take longer to degrade to <10 mg/L. Low level leaching on titanium occurred, however, the typical concentrations of released titanium are very low (~40 mg/L or less). A small amount of leaching under these conditions is not

  11. Regiospecific base-catalyzed hydrogen exchange of triarylsulfonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.K.; Sasamoto, K.

    1981-10-23

    Solvent isotope labelling method has been used to show that the hydrocarbon products commonly observed in the reaction of triarylsulfonium salts with a number of alkoxide nucleophiles are derived via the radical intermediate rather than the corresponding anions. The results of the determination of the extent and scope of the base-catalyzed hydrogen exchange of the triarylsulfonium salts with the protic solvent medium are reported. No clear explanation for the observed regiospecificity of the hydrogen exchange in the salts is readily available. The enhanced thermodynamic acidity of the ortho hydrogen due to the inductive effect of the electron-withdrawing sulfonium and the dipole stabilization of the corresponding carbanionic species are suggested as explanations for the regiospecific deprotonation of the ortho hydrogen in the triarylsulfonium salts. (BLM)

  12. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  13. Peroxide test strips detect added hydrogen peroxide in raw milk at levels affecting bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicole H; Friedlander, Adam; Mok, Allen; Kent, David; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has a long-established history of use as a preservative in milk worldwide. The use of H2O2 to activate the inherent lactoperoxidase enzyme system has dramatically improved the quality of raw dairy products in areas in which cooling is not widely available. In the United States, however, where refrigeration is widely available, the addition of H2O2 to milk is not permitted, with the exception of certain applications prior to cheesemaking and during the preparation of modified whey. Due to the relatively quick deterioration of H2O2 in fluid milk, the detection of raw milk adulterated with the compound can be challenging. In this study we evaluated (i) total aerobic bacterial counts and (ii) ability of peroxide test strips to detect H2O2 in raw milk with various concentrations (0, 100, 300, 500, 700, and 900 ppm) of added H2O2, incubated at both 6 and 21°C for 0, 24, and 48 h. Results showed that at both 6 and 21°C the H2O2 concentration and time had a significant effect on bacterial loads in raw milk. Additionally, commercially available test strips were able to detect H2O2 in raw milk, with predicted probability of >90%, immediately after addition and after 24 and 48 h for the higher concentrations used, offering a viable method for detecting raw milk adulteration with H2O2. PMID:25285503

  14. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria exhibiting high scavenging activity for environmental hydrogen peroxide from fermented foods and its two scavenging enzymes for hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akio; Kaneko, Chiaki; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Takeda, Kouji; Kimata, Shinya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Abe, Akira; Tanaka, Naoto; Okada, Sanae; Uchino, Masataka; Satoh, Junichi; Nakagawa, Junichi; Niimura, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    To obtain lactic acid bacteria that scavenge environmental hydrogen peroxide, we developed a specialized enrichment medium and successfully isolated Pediococcus pentosaceus Be1 strain from a fermented food. This strain showed vigorous environmental hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity over a wide range of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. High Mn-catalase and NADH peroxidase activities were found in the cell-free extract of the P. pentosaceus Be1 strain, and these two hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes were purified from the cell-free extract of the strain. Mn-catalase has been purified from several microorganisms by several researchers, and the NADH peroxidase was first purified from the original strain in this report. After cloning the genes of the Mn-catalase and the NADH peroxidase, the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with those of known related enzymes. PMID:27118075

  15. Development of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Knight, J.; Quigley, M.; Forsberg, G.; Ganapathi, G.; Yarbrough, C.; Koukol, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will present test data and discussion on the work we are conducting at JPL to address the following issues: 1) efficacy of sterilization process; 2) diffusion of hydrogen peroxide under sterilization process conditions into hard to reach places; 3) materials and components compatibility with the sterilization process and 4) development of methodology to protect sensitive components from hydrogen peroxide vapor.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide and povidone-lodine solution--a dangerous combination.

    PubMed

    2011-02-01

    When mixed with povidone-iodine solution, hydrogen peroxide can release enough oxygen to cause sealed waste containers to burst open. Such risks can also result from using a sealed container to collect hydrogen peroxide that has mixed with body fluids (for instance, in a debridement procedure). Staff should be instructed to avoid both practices. PMID:23444560

  17. Evaluation of silica-coated tubing for the measurement of hydrogen peroxide in hot water.

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, T. W.; Bartels, D. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Chemistry

    2004-04-14

    A commercial silica coating for stainless steel tubing was investigated for its ability to inhibit the decomposition of aqueous hydrogen peroxide on the tubing surface. Although the coating proves effective at preventing decomposition up to 200 {sup o}C, above this temperature, the coating degrades, as evidenced by enhanced decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Oxygen from Hydrogen Peroxide. A Safe Molar Volume-Molar Mass Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenbaugh, John H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a molar volume-molar mass experiment for use in general chemistry laboratories. Gives background technical information, procedures for the titration of aqueous hydrogen peroxide with standard potassium permanganate and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen, and a discussion of the results obtained in three…

  19. An Experimental Investigation of Hypergolic Ignition Delay of Hydrogen Peroxide with Fuel Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John A.; Gostowski, Rudy; Chianese, Silvio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of decomposition and ignition delay of hydrogen peroxide at concentrations of 80% to 98% with combinations of hydrocarbon fuels, tertiary amines and transition metal chelates will be presented in the proposed paper. The results will be compared to hydrazine ignition delays with hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid mixtures using the same test apparatus.

  20. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

    PubMed Central

    Karadas, Muhammet; Hatipoglu, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n = 10): AS: no whitening (negative control), with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwash; SC: Scope White mouthwash; and OP group: 10% CP Opalescence PF (positive control). Color measurements were carried out with a spectrophotometer before staining, after staining, and on the 7th, 28th, and 56th day of the whitening period. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance followed by a Tukey post hoc test. The color change (ΔE) was significantly greater in all the groups compared to that of the AS group. After 56 days, no significant differences were found among the mouthwash products with respect to color change (P > 0.05). The whiteness of the teeth treated with the mouthwashes increased significantly over time. Nevertheless, the color change achieved with the mouthwashes was significantly lower than that achieved with the 10% CP at-home bleaching gel. PMID:26295061

  1. Plasma Depolymerization of Chitosan in the Presence of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fengming; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Haitian; Tian, Shuangqi

    2012-01-01

    The depolymerization of chitosan by plasma in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. The efficiency of the depolymerization was demonstrated by means of determination of viscosity-average molecular weight and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The structure of the depolymerized chitosan was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), ultraviolet spectra (UV) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that chitosan can be effectively degradated by plasma in the presence of H2O2. The chemical structure of the depolymerized chitosan was not obviously modified. The combined plasma/H2O2 method is significantly efficient for scale-up manufacturing of low molecular weight chitosan. PMID:22837727

  2. Hydrogen peroxide treatment of eggshell membrane to control porosity.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shuchen; Chou, Hsuan-Hung; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2013-12-01

    The eggshell membrane (ESM) is a naturally occurring biological polymer, which can be extracted from eggshells, and has been used for adsorption of dyes or heavy metals, as a semipermeable membrane to control particle transport, and as a natural biocompatible material for tissue replacement. In this study, we used hydrogen peroxide to control the pore size and fibre crossing density of the ESM. Structural and chemical properties were investigated using AFM, optical microscopy, contact angle, and FTIR. We show that the structure and permeability of the ESM can be controlled by timed exposure to H2O2 and we demonstrate this effect using red blood cells. This process provides a simple method for preparing biocompatible membranes, with controlled selectivity for biofiltration applications. PMID:23870936

  3. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression. PMID:22565543

  4. Red fluorescent genetically encoded indicator for intracellular hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Yulia G.; Bilan, Dmitry S.; Matlashov, Mikhail E.; Mishina, Natalia M.; Markvicheva, Ksenia N.; Subach, Oksana M.; Subach, Fedor V.; Bogeski, Ivan; Hoth, Markus; Enikolopov, Grigori; Belousov, Vsevolod V.

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are conserved regulators of numerous cellular functions, and overproduction of ROS is a hallmark of various pathological processes. Genetically encoded fluorescent probes are unique tools to study ROS production in living systems of different scale and complexity. However, the currently available recombinant redox sensors have green emission, which overlaps with the spectra of many other probes. Expanding the spectral range of recombinant in vivo ROS probes would enable multiparametric in vivo ROS detection. Here we present the first genetically encoded red fluorescent sensor for hydrogen peroxide detection, HyPerRed. The performance of this sensor is similar to its green analogues. We demonstrate the utility of the sensor by tracing low concentrations of H2O2 produced in the cytoplasm of cultured cells upon growth factor stimulation. Moreover, using HyPerRed we detect local and transient H2O2 production in the mitochondrial matrix upon inhibition of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide as signalling molecules in plants.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven J; Desikan, Radhika; Clarke, Andrew; Hurst, Roger D; Hancock, John T

    2002-05-01

    It is now clear that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) function as signalling molecules in plants. A wide range of abiotic and biotic stresses results in H(2)O(2) generation, from a variety of sources. H(2)O(2) is removed from cells via a number of antioxidant mechanisms, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic. Both biotic and abiotic stresses can induce NO synthesis, but the biosynthetic origins of NO in plants have not yet been resolved. Cellular responses to H(2)O(2) and NO are complex, with considerable cross-talk between responses to several stimuli. In this review the potential roles of H(2)O(2) and NO during various stresses and the signalling pathways they activate are discussed. Key signalling components that might provide targets for enhancing crop production are also identified. PMID:11997372

  6. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of softwood: hemicellulose degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated softwood hemicelluloses degradation pathways during alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment of Douglas fir. It was found that glucomannan is much more susceptible to alkaline pretreatment than xylan. Organic acids, including lactic, succinic, glycolic and formic acid are the predominant products from glucomannan degradation. At low treatment temperature (90°C), a small amount of formic acid is produced from glucomannan, whereas glucomannan degradation to lactic acid and succinic acid becomes the main reactions at 140°C and 180°C. The addition of H2O2 during alkaline pretreatment of D. fir led to a significant removal of lignin, which subsequently facilitated glucomannan solubilization. However, H2O2 has little direct effect on the glucomannan degradation reaction. The main degradation pathways involved in glucomannan conversion to organics acids are elucidated. The results from this study demonstrate the potential to optimize pretreatment conditions to maximize the value of biomass hemicellulose. PMID:24185034

  7. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide as Alternative to Dry Heat Microbial Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Howard A.; Kern, Roger G.; Chung, Shirley Y.; Koukol, Robert C.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VHP) sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal is to include this technique, with appropriate specification, in NPG8020.12C as a low temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process. A series of experiments were conducted in vacuum to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. With this knowledge of D values, sensible margins can be applied in a planetary protection specification. The outcome of this study provided an optimization of test sterilizer process conditions: VHP concentration, process duration, a process temperature range for which the worst case D value may be imposed, a process humidity range for which the worst case D value may be imposed, and robustness to selected spacecraft material substrates.

  8. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  9. Oxidation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in water. 4: Ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Rivas, J.; Ovejero, G.

    1996-03-01

    Three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene, have been treated in water with ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration, pH, and bicarbonate ions has been investigated. The process goes through direct and radical reactions in the case of fluorene and phenanthrene oxidation, while acenaphthene is removed exclusively by direct ozonation. At concentrations of hydrogen peroxide higher than 10{sup {minus}5} M, ozone mass transfer controls the process rate, regardless of pH. In any case, however, the presence of hydrogen peroxide does not improve the oxidation rate compared to ozonation alone due to the importance of the direct reactions. Intermediate compounds identified during oxidation with ozone alone and combined with UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide are similar and justify the high consumption of ozone in these processes.

  10. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.