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Sample records for hydrogen peroxide induced

  1. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  2. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  3. UV-induced synthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.M.; Huerta, A.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Suspension-cultured rose cells irradiated with UV (254 mm, 558 J m{sup {minus}2}) showed a transient efflux of K{sup +}, and a production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measured by chemiluminescence of luminol in the presence of peroxidase. The peak concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, attained at about 60-90 min after irradiation, was 2-5 uM. The addition of superoxide dismutase to irradiated cells stimulated luminscence, suggesting that the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} came at least in part from superoxide that was present in the extracellular medium. Treatments that inhibited the UV-induced efflux of K{sup +} also inhibited the appearance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, though the converse was not always true, suggesting that K{sup +} efflux was necessary for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} synthesis, but not vice-versa. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the extracellular space is required for lignin synthesis in many plant tissues. Phenolic compounds, the other substrates for lignin, are induced by UV. We suggest that the UV-stimulated production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is part of a coordinated induction of lignin synthesis.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... peroxide is used in these products: Hydrogen peroxide Hair bleach Some contact lens cleaners Note: Household hydrogen peroxide ... it contains 97% water and 3% hydrogen peroxide. Hair bleaches are stronger. They usually have a concentration of ...

  5. Effect of ethanol on hydrogen peroxide-induced AMPK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Wou, Sung-Eun; Zeng, Yan; Ross, Ruth A.; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Crabb, David W.

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to oxidative stress. Previous work has shown that ethanol treatment of cultured hepatoma cells and of mice inhibited the activity of AMPK and reduced the amount of AMPK protein. Ethanol generates oxidative stress in the liver. Since AMPK is activated by reactive oxygen species, it seems paradoxical that ethanol would inhibit AMPK in the hepatoma cells. In an attempt to understand the mechanism whereby ethanol inhibits AMPK, we studied the effect of ethanol on AMPK activation by exogenous hydrogen peroxide. The effects of ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, and inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) [either okadaic acid or PP2A small interference RNA (siRNA)] on AMPK phosphorylation and activity were examined in rat hepatoma cells (H4IIEC3) and HeLa cells. In H4IIEC3 cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) transiently increased the level of phospho-AMPK to 1.5-fold over control (P < 0.05). Similar findings were observed in HeLa cells, which do not express the upstream AMPK kinase, LKB1. H2O2 markedly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 in H4IIEC3 cells. Ethanol significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC-ζ, LKB1, and AMPK caused by exposure to H2O2. This inhibitory effect of ethanol required its metabolism. More importantly, the inhibitory effects of ethanol on H2O2-induced AMPK phosphorylation were attenuated by the presence of the PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, or PP2A siRNA. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on AMPK phosphorylation is exerted through the inhibition of PKC-ζ and LKB1 phosphorylation and the activation of PP2A. PMID:18832448

  6. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Akt Phosphorylation Regulates Bax Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sadidi, Mahdieh; Lentz, Stephen I.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are involved in many cellular processes that positively and negatively regulate cell fate. H2O2, acting as an intracellular messenger, activates phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream target Akt, and promotes cell survival. The aim of the current study was to understand the mechanism by which PI3K/Akt signaling promotes survival in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrate that PI3K/Akt mediates phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bax. This phosphorylation suppresses apoptosis and promotes cell survival. Increased survival in the presence of H2O2 was blocked by LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K activation. LY294002 prevented Bax phosphorylation and resulted in Bax translocation to the mitochondria, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and cell death. Collectively, these findings reveal a mechanism by which H2O2-induced activation of PI3K/Akt influences posttranslational modification of Bax and inactivate a key component of the cell death machinery. PMID:19278624

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Oral Streptococci Induces Macrophage Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 human macrophage cell line at multiplicities of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited the cytotoxic effect of S. oralis. S. oralis deletion mutants lacking the spxB gene, which encodes pyruvate oxidase, and are therefore deficient in H2O2 production, showed reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, H2O2 alone was capable of inducing cell death. The cytotoxic effect seemed to be independent of inflammatory responses, because H2O2 was not a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages. These results indicate that streptococcal H2O2 plays a role as a cytotoxin, and is implicated in the cell death of infected human macrophages. PMID:23658745

  9. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide induced responses of cat tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, V; Oike, M; Tanaka, H; Inoue, R; Ito, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (10−6 and 10−3 M) on membrane potential, membrane currents, intracellular calcium concentration, resting muscle tone and contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol were examined in cat tracheal strips and isolated smooth muscle cells. H2O2 (10−4 and 10−5 M) enhanced the amplitude of contractions and excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.) evoked by EFS without changing muscle tone and resting membrane potential of the tracheal smooth muscle, and enhanced the contraction induced by carbachol (10−8 M). At an increased concentration (10−3 M), H2O2 elevated resting muscle tone and marginally hyperpolarized the membrane in the majority of the cells. In 51 out of 56 cells examined, H2O2 (10−6–10−3 M) elicited an outward current at a holding potential of −40 mV and enhanced the frequency of the spontaneous transient outward current (STOC). In 20 cells the outward current was preceded by a small inward current. In the other cells, H2O2 elicited only an inward current or did not affect the background current. In Ca2+ free solution the action of H2O2 on the resting muscle tone, STOCs, background current and on the current induced by ramp depolarization was significantly reduced. H2O2 (10−4 M) increased the intracellular ionized calcium concentration both in the absence and presence of external Ca2+. However, the effect developed faster and was of a higher amplitude in the presence of external Ca2+. These results suggest that H2O2 increases intracellular Ca2+, with a subsequent augmentation of stimulation-evoked contractions, and enhances Ca2+ and voltage-sensitive potassium conductance. PMID:9222542

  11. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage by Carica papaya leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Okoko, Tebekeme; Ere, Diepreye

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro antioxidant potential of Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract and its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage assessed by haemolysis and lipid peroxidation. Methods Hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, hydrogen ion scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and the ferrous ion reducing ability were assessed as antioxidant indices. In the other experiment, human erythrocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide to induce erythrocyte damage. The extract (at various concentrations) was subsequently incubated with the erythrocytes and later analysed for haemolysis and lipid peroxidation as indices for erythrocyte damage. Results Preliminary investigation of the extract showed that the leaf possessed significant antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities using in vitro models in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). The extract also reduced hydrogen peroxide induced erythrocyte haemolysis and lipid peroxidation significantly when compared with ascorbic acid (P<0.05). The IC50 values were 7.33 mg/mL and 1.58 mg/mL for inhibition of haemolysis and lipid peroxidation, respectively. In all cases, ascorbic acid (the reference antioxidant) possessed higher activity than the extract. Conclusions The findings show that C. papaya leaves possess significant bioactive potential which is attributed to the phytochemicals which act in synergy. Thus, the leaves can be exploited for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes. PMID:23569948

  12. Tolerance of pentose utilising yeast to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol fermentations follow traditional beverage fermentations where the yeast is exposed to adverse conditions such as oxidative stress. Lignocellulosic bioethanol fermentations involve the conversion of pentose and hexose sugars into ethanol. Environmental stress conditions such as osmotic stress and ethanol stress may affect the fermentation performance; however, oxidative stress as a consequence of metabolic output can also occur. However, the effect of oxidative stress on yeast with pentose utilising capabilities has yet to be investigated. Results Assaying for the effect of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress on Candida, Pichia and Scheffersomyces spp. has demonstrated that these yeast tolerate hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in a manner consistent with that demonstrated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia guillermondii appears to be more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress when compared to Candida shehatae, Candida succiphila or Scheffersomyces stipitis. Conclusions Sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress increased in the presence of minimal media; however, addition of amino acids and nucleobases was observed to increase tolerance. In particular adenine increased tolerance and methionine reduced tolerance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24636079

  13. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  14. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  15. Mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in hepatic and neuronal human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guizani, Nejib; Waly, Mostafa I

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative stress agent that is associated with depletion of intracellular glutathione and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes in different cell lines. Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods reduces cellular oxidative stress and its related health problems. This study aimed to assess the antioxidant properties of mushroom, Agaricus bisporous cultivar extract, against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in cultured human hepatic (HepG2) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. In this study, hydrogen peroxide caused significant oxidative stress in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by glutathione depletion, impairment of total antioxidant capacity and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase). Agaricusbisporous extract ameliorated the observed hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular insult as indicated by restoring the activity of glutathione and the assayed antioxidant enzymes to control levels. The results suggest that mushroom extract as antioxidant properties and protects against the oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide-in cultured human hepatic and neuronal cells. PMID:24261122

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  17. Prompt repair of hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA lesions prevents catastrophic chromosomal fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahaseth, Tulip; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative DNA damage in vivo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, HP) induces copious single-strand(ss)-breaks and base modifications. HP also causes infrequent double-strand DNA breaks, whose relationship to the cell killing is unclear. Since hydrogen peroxide only fragments chromosomes in growing cells, these double-strand breaks were thought to represent replication forks collapsed at direct or excision ss-breaks and to be fully reparable. We have recently reported that hydrogen peroxide kills Escherichia coli by inducing catastrophic chromosome fragmentation, while cyanide (CN) potentiates both the killing and fragmentation. Remarkably, the extreme density of CN+HP-induced chromosomal double-strand breaks makes involvement of replication forks unlikely. Here we show that this massive fragmentation is further amplified by inactivation of ss-break repair or base-excision repair, suggesting that unrepaired primary DNA lesions are directly converted into double-strand breaks. Indeed, blocking DNA replication lowers CN+HP-induced fragmentation only ∼2-fold, without affecting the survival. Once cyanide is removed, recombinational repair in E. coli can mend several double-strand breaks, but cannot mend ∼100 breaks spread over the entire chromosome. Therefore, double-strand breaks induced by oxidative damage happen at the sites of unrepaired primary one-strand DNA lesions, are independent of replication and are highly lethal, supporting the model of clustered ss-breaks at the sites of stable DNA-iron complexes. PMID:27078578

  18. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Vale, J Allister

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidising agent that is used in a number of household products, including general-purpose disinfectants, chlorine-free bleaches, fabric stain removers, contact lens disinfectants and hair dyes, and it is a component of some tooth whitening products. In industry, the principal use of hydrogen peroxide is as a bleaching agent in the manufacture of paper and pulp. Hydrogen peroxide has been employed medicinally for wound irrigation and for the sterilisation of ophthalmic and endoscopic instruments. Hydrogen peroxide causes toxicity via three main mechanisms: corrosive damage, oxygen gas formation and lipid peroxidation. Concentrated hydrogen peroxide is caustic and exposure may result in local tissue damage. Ingestion of concentrated (>35%) hydrogen peroxide can also result in the generation of substantial volumes of oxygen. Where the amount of oxygen evolved exceeds its maximum solubility in blood, venous or arterial gas embolism may occur. The mechanism of CNS damage is thought to be arterial gas embolisation with subsequent brain infarction. Rapid generation of oxygen in closed body cavities can also cause mechanical distension and there is potential for the rupture of the hollow viscus secondary to oxygen liberation. In addition, intravascular foaming following absorption can seriously impede right ventricular output and produce complete loss of cardiac output. Hydrogen peroxide can also exert a direct cytotoxic effect via lipid peroxidation. Ingestion of hydrogen peroxide may cause irritation of the gastrointestinal tract with nausea, vomiting, haematemesis and foaming at the mouth; the foam may obstruct the respiratory tract or result in pulmonary aspiration. Painful gastric distension and belching may be caused by the liberation of large volumes of oxygen in the stomach. Blistering of the mucosae and oropharyngeal burns are common following ingestion of concentrated solutions, and laryngospasm and haemorrhagic gastritis have been

  19. Proline dehydrogenase is essential for proline protection against hydrogen peroxide induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhu, Weidong; Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Demers, Andrew J.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Simpson, Melanie A.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism has an underlying role in apoptotic signaling that impacts tumorigenesis. Proline is oxidized to glutamate in the mitochondria with the rate limiting step catalyzed by proline dehydrogenase (PRODH). PRODH expression is inducible by p53 leading to increased proline oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and induction of apoptosis. Paradoxical to its role in apoptosis, proline also protects cells against oxidative stress. Here we explore the mechanism of proline protection against hydrogen peroxide stress in melanoma WM35 cells. Treatment of WM35 cells with proline significantly increased cell viability, diminished oxidative damage of cellular lipids and proteins, and retained ATP and NADPH levels after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRODH abolished proline protection against oxidative stress whereas knockdown of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis, had no impact on proline protection. Potential linkages between proline metabolism and signaling pathways were explored. The combined inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 eliminated proline protection. A significant increase in Akt activation was observed in proline treated cells after hydrogen peroxide stress along with a corresponding increase in the phosphorylation of the fork head transcription factor class O3a (FoxO3a). The role of PRODH in proline mediated protection was validated in the prostate carcinoma cell line, PC3. Knockdown of PRODH in PC3 cells attenuated phosphorylated levels of Akt and FoxO3a and decreased cell survival during hydrogen peroxide stress. The results provide evidence that PRODH is essential in proline protection against hydrogen peroxide mediated cell death and that proline/PRODH helps activate Akt in cancer cells. PMID:22796327

  20. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  1. Iron prochelator BSIH protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L; Franz, Katherine J

    2008-12-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide) prochelators that are converted by hydrogen peroxide into SIH (salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone) chelating agents that inhibit iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical generation. Here, we show that BSIH protects a cultured cell model for retinal pigment epithelium against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. BSIH is more stable than SIH in cell culture medium and is more protective during long-term experiments. Repetitive exposure of cells to BSIH is nontoxic, whereas SIH and desferrioxamine induce cell death after repeated exposure. Combined, our results indicate that cell protection by BSIH involves iron sequestration that occurs only when the cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that prochelators discriminate toxic iron from healthy iron and are promising candidates for neuro- and retinal protection. PMID:18835041

  2. Hydrogen peroxide induces lysosomal protease alterations in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Mason, Ceceile W; Goodman, Carl B; Holder, Maurice S; Kirksey, Otis W; Womble, Tracy A; Severs, Walter B; Palm, Donald E

    2007-09-01

    Alterations in lysosomal proteases have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. The current study demonstrates a concentration-dependent decrease in PC12 cell viability and transient changes in cystatin C (CYSC), cathepsin B (CATB), cathepsin D (CATD) and caspase-3 following exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, activation of CATD occurred following exposure to H2O2 and cysteine protease suppression, while inhibition of CATD with pepstatin A significantly improved cell viability. Additionally, significant PARP cleavage, suggestive of caspase-3-like activity, was observed following H2O2 exposure, while inhibition of caspase-3 significantly increased cell viability compared to H2O2 administration alone. Collectively, our data suggest that H2O2 induced cell death is regulated at least in part by caspase-3 and CATD. Furthermore, cysteine protease suppression increases CATD expression and activity. These studies provide insight for alternate pathways and potential therapeutic targets of cell death associated with oxidative stress and lysosomal protease alterations. PMID:17440810

  3. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  4. Inhibition of hydrogen peroxide induced injuring on human skin fibroblast by Ulva prolifera polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuner; Guo, Ziye; Yang, Yayun; Geng, Zhonglei; Tang, Langlang; Zhao, Minglin; Qiu, Yuyan; Chen, Yifan; He, Peimin

    2016-10-01

    Ulva prolifera can protect human skin fibroblast from being injured by hydrogen peroxide. This work studied the composition of Ulva prolifera polysaccharide and identified its physicochemical properties. The results showed that the cell proliferation of 0.5mg/mL crude polysaccharide was 154.4% of that in negative control group. Moreover, ROS detection indices, including DCFH-DA, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT, indicated that crude polysaccharide could improve cellular ability to scavenge free radical and decrease the injury on human skin fibroblast by hydrogen peroxide. In purified polysaccharide, the activity of fraction P1-1 was the highest, with 174.6% of that in negative control group. The average molecular weight of P1-1 was 137kD with 18.0% of sulfate content. This work showed the inhibition of hydrogen peroxide induced injuries on human skin fibroblast by Ulva prolifera polysaccharide, which may further evaluate the application of U. prolifera on cosmetics. PMID:27211299

  5. Benzene-Induced Uncoupling of Naphthalene Dioxygenase Activity and Enzyme Inactivation by Production of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung

    1999-01-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) is a multicomponent enzyme system that oxidizes naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene with consumption of O2 and two electrons from NAD(P)H. In the presence of benzene, NADH oxidation and O2 utilization were partially uncoupled from substrate oxidation. Approximately 40 to 50% of the consumed O2 was detected as hydrogen peroxide. The rate of benzene-dependent O2 consumption decreased with time, but it was partially increased by the addition of catalase in the course of the O2 consumption by NDO. Detailed experiments showed that the total amount of O2 consumed and the rate of benzene-induced O2 consumption increased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging agents, and further addition of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPNAP) of NDO. Kinetic studies showed that ISPNAP was irreversibly inactivated in the reaction that contained benzene, but the inactivation was relieved to a high degree in the presence of catalase and partially relieved in the presence of 0.1 mM ferrous ion. Benzene- and naphthalene-reacted ISPNAP gave almost identical visible absorption spectra. In addition, hydrogen peroxide added at a range of 0.1 to 0.6 mM to the reaction mixtures inactivated the reduced ISPNAP containing mononuclear iron. These results show that hydrogen peroxide released during the uncoupling reaction acts both as an inhibitor of benzene-dependent O2 consumption and as an inactivator of ISPNAP. It is proposed that the irreversible inactivation of ISPNAP occurs by a Fenton-type reaction which forms a strong oxidizing agent, hydroxyl radicals (·OH), from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrous mononuclear iron at the active site. Furthermore, when [14C]benzene was used as the substrate, cis-benzene 1,2-dihydrodiol formed by NDO was detected. This result shows that NDO also couples a trace amount of benzene to both O2 consumption and NADH oxidation. PMID:10217759

  6. Layer-by-layer immobilized catalase on electrospun nanofibrous mats protects against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Deng, Hongbing; Cai, Tongjian; Zhan, Yingfei; Wang, Xiankai; Chen, Xuanxuan; Ji, Ailing; Lil, Xueyong

    2014-07-01

    Catalase, a kind of redox enzyme and generally recognized as an efficient agent for protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity. The immobilization of catalase was accomplished by depositing the positively charged chitosan and the negatively charged catalase on electrospun cellulose nanofibrous mats through electrospining and layer-by-layer (LBL) techniques. The morphology obtained from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that more orderly arranged three-dimension (3D) structure and roughness formed with increasing the number of coating bilayers. Besides, the enzyme-immobilized nanofibrous mats were found with high enzyme loading and activity, moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further demonstrated the successful immobilization of chitosan and catalase on cellulose nanofibers support. Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells with or without pretreatment of nanofibrous mats by MTT assay, LDH activity and Flow cytometric evaluation, and confirmed the pronounced hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity, but pretreatment of immobilized catalase reduced the cytotoxicity and protected cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxic effects which were further demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images. The data pointed toward a role of catalase-immobilized nanofibrous mats in protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular damage and their potential application in biomedical field. PMID:24804555

  7. Resveratrol attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced myocardial apoptosis by autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Ting, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chih-Yang; Yang, Jing-Yi; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Background Resveratrol is a Sirt-1-specific activator, which also exerts cardioprotective effects that regulate redox signalling during oxidative stress and autophagy during cardiovascular disease (CVD). Objective This study investigated the protective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage in cardiomyocytes. Design In this article, hydrogen peroxide-induced autophagy and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were studied at an increasing concentration from 0 to 100 µM. Results Resveratrol pretreatment with concentrations of 10, 20, and 50 µM inhibits autophagic apoptosis by increasing p-Akt and Bcl-2 protein levels in H9c2 cells. Interestingly, resveratrol treatment activates the Beclin-1, LC3, p62, and the lysosome-associated protein LAMP2a within 24 h of administration. Conclusions These results suggest that resveratrol-regulated autophagy may play a role in degrading damaged organelles in H9c2 cells rather than causing apoptosis, and this may be a possible mechanism by which resveratrol protects the heart during CVD. PMID:27211317

  8. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2015-07-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  9. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Md. Sanaullah; Mano, Jun’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  10. A comprehensive analysis of hydrogen peroxide-induced gene expression in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, Steven; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dat, James; Gadjev, Ilya; Boonefaes, Tom; Morsa, Stijn; Rottiers, Pieter; Slooten, Luit; Van Montagu, Marc; Zabeau, Marc; Inzé, Dirk; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide plays a central role in launching the defense response during stress in plants. To establish a molecular profile provoked by a sustained increase in hydrogen peroxide levels, catalase-deficient tobacco plants (CAT1AS) were exposed to high light (HL) intensities over a detailed time course. The expression kinetics of >14,000 genes were monitored by using transcript profiling technology based on cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Clustering and sequence analysis of 713 differentially expressed transcript fragments revealed a transcriptional response that mimicked that reported during both biotic and abiotic stresses, including the up-regulation of genes involved in the hypersensitive response, vesicular transport, posttranscriptional processes, biosynthesis of ethylene and jasmonic acid, proteolysis, mitochondrial metabolism, and cell death, and was accompanied by a very rapid up-regulation of several signal transduction components. Expression profiling corroborated by functional experiments showed that HL induced photoinhibition in CAT1AS plants and that a short-term HL exposure of CAT1AS plants triggered an increased tolerance against a subsequent severe oxidative stress. PMID:14671332

  11. Hydrogen peroxide derived from marine peroxy sesquiterpenoids induces apoptosis in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Haruna; Taira, Junsei; Ueda, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the isolates of the peroxy sesquiterpenoids (1-3) from the Okinawan soft coral, Sinularia sp., indicated cytotoxicity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. The apoptotic cells with a nuclear condensation were detected in the presence of these compounds, then the caspase 3/7 activity was induced, indicating that the compounds have a potential antitumor activity by apoptosis-induction. The cells treated with these compounds were generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), indicating that the ROS is related to the induction of apoptosis. The ROS production reduced in the presence of catalase or trolox, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is generated through a certain free radical reaction derived from the compound. In fact, the accumulation of intracellular H2O2 was also confirmed in the presence of these compounds. Based on all the results, this study proposed the apoptosis-inducing mechanism due to the compounds that the H2O2 produced involving free radical reactions derived from cleavage of the end or hydro-peroxide in the molecule induced cell death. PMID:27575468

  12. Peroxide-inducible catalase in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida protects against exogenous hydrogen peroxide and killing by activated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss L., macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barnes, A C; Bowden, T J; Horne, M T; Ellis, A E

    1999-03-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida expresses a single cytoplasmically located catalase which was found to be inducible by exposure to 20 microM hydrogen peroxide in mid-exponential phase resulting in a 4 fold increase in activity. Subsequent exposure to 2 mM peroxide in late-exponential/early-stationary phase resulted in further induction of catalase activity which increased to 20 fold higher levels than those found in uninduced cultures. Exponentially induced cultures were protected against subsequent exposure to 10 mM peroxide which was lethal to non-induced cultures. Bacteria subjected to induction in mid-exponential and early-stationary phase were resistant to 100 mM peroxide, although viability was greatly reduced. Growth of the bacterium under iron-restricted conditions had no effect on the peroxide induction of catalase. As current evidence indicates, the latter is an iron-co-factored heme catalase, this result suggests that catalase induction has a high priority in the metabolism of iron. Furthermore, exposure to peroxide also induces expression of periplasmic MnSOD. A. salmonicida MT423 was resistant to normal rainbow trout macrophages, but was susceptible to killing by activated macrophages. However, if catalase was induced by prior exposure to 20 microM peroxide during mid-exponential phase, A. salmonicida was resistant to killing by activated macrophages. The ability of A. salmonicida to upregulate periplasmic MnSOD and cytoplasmic catalase production under iron restricted conditions and low level peroxide (conditions expected to exist during the early stages of an infection) may be vital for its ability to withstand attack by phagocytic cells in vivo. PMID:10089155

  13. Guard cell hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediate elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Li, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Guanqun; Liu, Yaru; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-10-01

    Climate change as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 influences plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Although the involvement of stomata in plant responses to elevated CO2 has been well established, the underlying mechanism of elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement remains largely unknown. We used diverse techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, biochemical methodologies and gene silencing to investigate the signaling pathway for elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Elevated CO2 -induced stomatal closure was dependent on the production of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and NITRATE REDUCTASE (NR)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells in an abscisic acid (ABA)-independent manner. Silencing of OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) compromised the elevated CO2 -induced accumulation of H2 O2 and NO, upregulation of SLOW ANION CHANNEL ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1) gene expression and reduction of stomatal aperture, whereas silencing of RBOH1 or NR had no effects on the expression of OST1. Our results demonstrate that as critical signaling molecules, RBOH1-dependent H2 O2 and NR-dependent NO act downstream of OST1 that regulate SLAC1 expression and elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement. This information is crucial to deepen the understanding of CO2 signaling pathway in guard cells. PMID:26308648

  14. d-Amino acid oxidase-mediated increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide is mainly responsible for formalin-induced tonic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Miao; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Spinal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in chronic pain. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) oxidizes d-amino acids such as d-serine to form the byproduct hydrogen peroxide without producing other ROS. DAAO inhibitors are specifically analgesic in tonic pain, neuropathic pain and cancer pain. This study examined the role of spinal hydrogen peroxide in pain and the mechanism of the analgesic effects of DAAO inhibitors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Formalin-induced pain behaviours and spinal hydrogen peroxide levels were measured in rodents. KEY RESULTS Formalin injected into the paw increased spinal hydrogen peroxide synchronously with enhanced tonic pain; both were effectively prevented by i.t. fluorocitrate, a selective astrocyte metabolic inhibitor. Given systemically, the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) blocked spinal DAAO enzymatic activity and specifically prevented formalin-induced tonic pain in a dose-dependent manner. Although CBIO maximally inhibited tonic pain by 62%, it completely prevented the increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. I.t. catalase, an enzyme specific for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, completely depleted spinal hydrogen peroxide and prevented formalin-induced tonic pain by 65%. Given systemically, the ROS scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) also inhibited formalin-induced tonic pain and increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. Formalin-induced tonic pain was potentiated by i.t. exogenous hydrogen peroxide. CBIO did not increase spinal d-serine level, and i.t. d-serine did not alter either formalin-induced tonic pain or CBIO's analgesic effect. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Spinal hydrogen peroxide is specifically and largely responsible for formalin-induced pain, and DAAO inhibitors produce analgesia by blocking spinal hydrogen peroxide production rather than interacting with spinal d-serine. PMID:21950354

  15. Hydrogen peroxide induces spawning in mollusks, with activation of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Morse, D E; Duncan, H; Hooker, N; Morse, A

    1977-04-15

    Addition of hydrogen peroxide to seawater causes synchronous spawning in gravid male and female abalones, and certain other mollusks as well. This effect is blocked by exposure of the animals to aspirin, an inhibitor of the enzyme catalyzing oxidative synthesis of prostaglandin endoperoxide. Hydrogen peroxide activates this enzymatic reaction in cell-free extracts prepared from abalone eggs (a very rich source of the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase); this effect appears to reveal a fundamental property of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthesis. Applicability of these findings to both mariculture and medical purposes is suggested. PMID:403609

  16. Role of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide induced by intermittent hypoxia in airway epithelial wound repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Sato, Atsuyasu; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Satooka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Koichi; Tanimura, Kazuya; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Muro, Shigeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-05-15

    The airway epithelium acts as a frontline barrier against various environmental insults and its repair process after airway injury is critical for the lung homeostasis restoration. Recently, the role of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as transcription-independent damage signaling has been highlighted in the wound repair process. Both conditions of continuous hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia (IH) induce ROS. Although IH is important in clinical settings, the roles of IH-induced ROS in the airway repair process have not been investigated. In this study, we firstly showed that IH induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and significantly decreased bronchial epithelial cell migration, prevented by catalase treatment in a wound scratch assay. RhoA activity was higher during repair process in the IH condition compared to in the normoxic condition, resulting in the cellular morphological changes shown by immunofluorescence staining: round cells, reduced central stress fiber numbers, pronounced cortical actin filament distributions, and punctate focal adhesions. These phenotypes were replicated by exogenous H2O2 treatment under the normoxic condition. Our findings confirmed the transcription-independent role of IH-induced intracellular ROS in the bronchial epithelial cell repair process and might have significant implications for impaired bronchial epithelial cell regeneration. PMID:27093911

  17. Calpain-1 is required for hydrogen peroxide-induced myotube atrophy.

    PubMed

    McClung, J M; Judge, A R; Talbert, E E; Powers, S K

    2009-02-01

    Recent reports suggest numerous roles for cysteine proteases in the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy due to disuse or disease. Nonetheless, a specific requirement for these proteases in the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy has not been demonstrated. Therefore, this investigation determined whether calpains or caspase-3 is required for oxidant-induced C2C12 myotube atrophy. We demonstrate that exposure to hydrogen peroxide (25 microM H2O2) induces myotube oxidative damage and atrophy, with no evidence of cell death. Twenty-four hours of exposure to H2O2 significantly reduced both myotube diameter and the abundance of numerous proteins, including myosin (-81%), alpha-actinin (-40%), desmin (-79%), talin (-37%), and troponin I (-80%). Myotube atrophy was also characterized by increased cleavage of the cysteine protease substrate alphaII-spectrin following 4 h and 24 h of H2O2 treatment. This degradation was blocked by administration of the protease inhibitor leupeptin (10 microM). Using small interfering RNA transfection of mature myotubes against the specific proteases calpain-1, calpain-2, and caspase-3, we demonstrated that calpain-1 is required for H2O2-induced myotube atrophy. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence for an absolute requirement for calpain-1 in the development of skeletal muscle myotube atrophy in response to oxidant-induced cellular stress. PMID:19109522

  18. Protection of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage by Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaolu; Wang, Kai; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Fuliang; Zhao, Fengqi; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of high-producing dairy cows are likely to be subject to oxidative stress (OS) due to the intensive cell metabolism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the cytoprotective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced OS in cultured bovine MECs (MAC-T). Pretreatment of MAC-T cells with resveratrol could rescue the decrease in cell viability and resulted in lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after H2O2 exposure. Resveratrol helped MAC-T cells to prevent H2O2-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-related cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol induced mRNA expression of multiple antioxidant defense genes in MAC-T cells under normal/oxidative conditions. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was required for the cytoprotective effects on MAC-T cells by resveratrol, as knockdown of Nrf2 significantly abolished resveratrol-induced cytoprotective effects against OS. In addition, by using selective inhibitors, we further confirmed that the induction of Nrf2 by resveratrol was mediated through the prolonged activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways but negatively regulated by p38/MAPK pathway. Overall, resveratrol has beneficial effects on bovine MECs redox balance and may be potentially used as a therapeutic medicine against oxidative insult in lactating animals. PMID:26962394

  19. Deacetylation of the tumor suppressor protein PML regulates hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guan, D; Lim, J H; Peng, L; Liu, Y; Lam, M; Seto, E; Kao, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor that is expressed at a low level in various cancers. Although post-translational modifications including SUMOylation, phosphorylation, and ubiquitination have been found to regulate the stability or activity of PML, little is known about the role of its acetylation in the control of cell survival. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of lysine 487 (K487) and SUMO1 conjugation of K490 at PML protein are mutually exclusive. We found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) promotes PML deacetylation and identified SIRT1 and SIRT5 as PML deacetylases. Both SIRT1 and SIRT5 are required for H2O2-mediated deacetylation of PML and accumulation of nuclear PML protein in HeLa cells. Knockdown of SIRT1 reduces the number of H2O2-induced PML-nuclear bodies (NBs) and increases the survival of HeLa cells. Ectopic expression of wild-type PML but not the K487R mutant rescues H2O2-induced cell death in SIRT1 knockdown cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type SIRT5 but not a catalytic defective mutant can also restore H2O2-induced cell death in SIRT1 knockdown cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism in which SIRT1/SIRT5-mediated PML deacetylation plays a role in the regulation of cancer cell survival. PMID:25032863

  20. White tea (Camellia sinensis Kuntze) exerts neuroprotection against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Calvo, Maria Isabel

    2011-03-01

    Tea is a popular beverage whose consumption is associated with prevention of certain disorders. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of white tea extract (WTE) on hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in PC12 cells. Cells were treated with various doses of WTE (10-250 μg/ml) before exposition to 250 μM hydrogen peroxide and cell survival was determined through the MTT and LDH assays. Oxidative stress was quantified in the cells after treatments as intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed in a cell free system in terms of free radical scavenging capacity. Results showed that WTE has a significant protective effect in the PC12 cell line against hydrogen peroxide as cell survival was significantly superior in WTE-treated cells compared to hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. A reduction on intracellular oxidative stress as well as radical scavenging properties were produced by WTE. Results suggest that WTE protects PC12 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity, and that an antioxidant mechanism through ROS scavenging may be in part responsible for cells neuroprotection. PMID:21271291

  1. Mechanical wounding-induced laticifer differentiation in rubber tree: An indicative role of dehydration, hydrogen peroxide, and jasmonates.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Min; Yang, Shu-Guang; Shi, Min-Jing; Zhang, Shi-Xin; Wu, Ji-Lin

    2015-06-15

    The secondary laticifer in the secondary phloem of rubber tree are a specific tissue differentiating from vascular cambia. The number of the secondary laticifers is closely related to the rubber productivity of Hevea. Factors involved in the mechanical wounding-induced laticifer differentiation were analyzed by using paraffin section, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Northern-blot techniques. Dehydration of the wounded bark tissues triggered a burst of hydrogen peroxide, abscisic acid, and jasmonates and up-regulated the expression of HbAOSa, which was associated with the secondary laticifer differentiation strictly limited to the wounded area. Application of exogenous hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000) could induce the secondary laticifer differentiation, respectively. Moreover, 6-Benzylaminopurine, a synthetic cytokinin, enhanced the methyl jasmonate-induced secondary laticifer differentiation. However, the dehydration-induced secondary laticifer differentiation was inhibited by exogenous abscisic acid. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, was effective in inhibiting the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide as well as of jasmonates upon dehydration. It blocked the dehydration-induced but not the methyl jasmonate-induced secondary laticifer differentiation. The results suggested a stress signal pathway mediating the wound-induced secondary laticifer differentiation in rubber tree. PMID:26070085

  2. Effect of vitamin C administration on hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenlei; Yang, Nanfei; Feng, Xiujing; Sun, Tingzhe; Shen, Pingping; Sun, Weibin

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease, which is associated with chronic inflammation and leads to significant destruction of periodontal tissues. Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) constitute the largest cell population in PDL tissues and a considerable body of evidence has demonstrated an association between oxidative stress and the progression of periodontitis. However, the effects on PDLCs exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the molecular mechanisms by which H2O2 affects periodontitis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the potential cytotoxic effect of H2O2 and the antioxidative function of vitamin C (Vc) in PDLCs were investigated. The results demonstrated that H2O2 treatment decreased the viability of PDLCs. The decreased PDLC viability was primarily induced by apoptosis, which was evidenced by cleaved caspases-3, caspases-9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Following optimal Vc addition, the proapoptotic effects of H2O2 were partially antagonized. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that H2O2 primarily induced the apoptosis of PDLCs and that these adverse effects were partially rescued following treatment with Vc. These results revealed how H2O2 promotes the progression of periodontitis and provide an improved understanding of the reversal effect of antioxidant treatment. Therefore, optimal Vc administration may provide a potentially effective technique in periodontal therapy. PMID:25333298

  3. Is Hydrogen Peroxide a Suitable Apoptosis Inducer for All Cell Types?

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinmei; Wan, Chunyun; Guo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is currently the most widely used apoptosis inducer due to its broad cytotoxic efficacy against nearly all cell types. However, equivalent cytotoxicity is achieved over a wide range of doses, although the reasons for this differential sensitivity are not always clear. In this study, three kinds of cells, the 293T cell line, primary fibroblasts, and terminally differentiated myocardial cells, were treated with a wide range of H2O2 doses. Times to apoptosis initiation and end were measured cytochemically and the changes in expression of caspase-9, P53, NF-κB, and RIP were determined by RT-PCR. The 293T cell line was the most sensitive to H2O2, undergoing necroptosis and/or apoptosis at all concentrations from 0.1 to 1.6 mM. At > 0.4 mM, H2O2 also caused necroptosis in primary cells. At < 0.4 mM, however, primary cells exhibited classic signs of apoptosis, although they tended to survive for 36 hours in < 0.2 mM H2O2. Thus, H2O2 is a broadly effective apoptosis inducer, but the dose range differs by cell type. For cell lines, a low dose is required and the exposure time must be reduced compared to primary cells to avoid cell death primarily by necroptosis or necrosis. PMID:27595106

  4. Degradation of bisphenol A and formation of hydrogen peroxide induced by glow discharge plasma in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jiang, Xuanzhen; Liu, Yongjun

    2008-06-15

    Degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) and simultaneous formation of hydrogen peroxide induced by glow discharge plasma in contact with aqueous solution were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the BPA degradation rate was higher in sodium chloride solution than that in sodium sulfate or phosphate solutions. However, the formation rates of hydrogen peroxide were on the opposite case. Both the BPA removal and the hydrogen peroxide production rates decreased in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, indicating that hydroxyl radicals are the most probable oxidants responsible for BPA degradation and the precursors of hydrogen peroxide. Ferric ion showed better catalytic effect than that of ferrous ion, suggesting that the ferric ion was reduced by the intermediates formed during BPA degradation, which was confirmed by following the production of ferrous ion in the system. TOC of the solution gradually reduced with discharge time; however, without catalysts, the solution COD increased with discharge time and sharply decreased in the presence of iron salts. The major intermediate products were identified by LC/MS and the possible degradation mechanism was discussed. PMID:18082947

  5. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-02-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H(2)O(2) in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H(2)O(2), but application oat peptides with H(2)O(2) at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H(2)O(2)-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  6. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-10-20

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(-), HCC353Hic-5(-), HCC372Hic-5(-), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(-) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  7. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1 301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2, but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  8. Stabilized aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, M.J.; Sciafani, L.D.

    1988-05-17

    This patent describes a stabilized aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution having a pH below 7 and an amount of Ferric ion up to about 2 ppm comprising hydrogen peroxide, acetanilide having a concentration which ranges between 0.74 M Mol/L and 2.22 mMol/L, and o-benzene disulfonic acid or salt thereof at a concentration between about 0.86 mMol/L to about 1.62 mMol/L.

  9. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5)

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Michael; Thielmann, Ina; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stegner, David

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice. PMID:26172113

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Contributes to the Epithelial Cell Death Induced by the Oral Mitis Group of Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Sakurai, Atsuo; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Members of the mitis group of streptococci are normal inhabitants of the commensal flora of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract of humans. Some mitis group species, such as Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus sanguinis, are primary colonizers of the human oral cavity. Recently, we found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is cytotoxic to human macrophages, suggesting that streptococcus-derived H2O2 may act as a cytotoxin. Since epithelial cells provide a physical barrier against pathogenic microbes, we investigated their susceptibility to infection by H2O2-producing streptococci in this study. Infection by S. oralis and S. sanguinis was found to stimulate cell death of Detroit 562, Calu-3 and HeLa epithelial cell lines at a multiplicity of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited S. oralis cytotoxicity, and H2O2 alone was capable of eliciting epithelial cell death. Moreover, S. oralis mutants lacking the spxB gene encoding pyruvate oxidase, which are deficient in H2O2 production, exhibited reduced cytotoxicity toward Detroit 562 epithelial cells. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that both S. oralis and H2O2 induced interleukin-6 production in Detroit 562 epithelial cells. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 is cytotoxic to epithelial cells, and promotes bacterial evasion of the host defense systems in the oral cavity and upper respiratory tracts. PMID:24498253

  11. Rutin protects rat articular chondrocytes against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide through SIRT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-05-13

    The progressive degeneration and ossification of articular chondrocytes are main symptoms in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Several flavonoids may provide an adjunctive alternative for the management of moderate OA in humans. Rutin, a natural flavone derivative (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside), is well known for its potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties against oxidative stress. However, the protective function of rutin related to OA, which is characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage, remains unclear. The present study investigated the protective effects of rutin, an activator of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), involved in the inhibition of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in rat chondrocytes. SIRT1 activation by rutin attenuated levels of inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB/MAPK signaling, whereas the inhibition of SIRT1 by sirtinol counteracted the beneficial effects of rutin in H2O2-treated chondrocytes. The findings of these studies suggested the potential involvement of SIRT1 in the pathogenesis of OA, and indicated that rutin is a possible therapeutic option for OA. PMID:27086847

  12. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2•−). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2•− in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA. PMID:26633563

  13. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Chong-Un; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Lee, Ying-Ray; Lin, Mei-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yi; Lee, Chien-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases' progression. Costunolide (CS) is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H₂O₂ exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H₂O₂ through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged. PMID:27409597

  14. Streptococcus oralis Induces Lysosomal Impairment of Macrophages via Bacterial Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus oralis, an oral commensal, belongs to the mitis group of streptococci and occasionally causes opportunistic infections, such as bacterial endocarditis and bacteremia. Recently, we found that the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is sufficient to kill human monocytes and epithelial cells, implying that streptococcal H2O2 is a cytotoxin. In the present study, we investigated whether streptococcal H2O2 impacts lysosomes, organelles of the intracellular digestive system, in relation to cell death. S. oralis infection induced the death of RAW 264 macrophages in an H2O2-dependent manner, which was exemplified by the fact that exogenous H2O2 also induced cell death. Infection with either a mutant lacking spxB, which encodes pyruvate oxidase responsible for H2O2 production, or Streptococcus mutans, which does not produce H2O2, showed less cytotoxicity. Visualization of lysosomes with LysoTracker revealed lysosome deacidification after infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2, which was corroborated by acridine orange staining. Similarly, fluorescent labeling of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 gradually disappeared during infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2 The deacidification and the following induction of cell death were inhibited by chelating iron in lysosomes. Moreover, fluorescent staining of cathepsin B indicated lysosomal destruction. However, treatment of infected cells with a specific inhibitor of cathepsin B had negligible effects on cell death; instead, it suppressed the detachment of dead cells from the culture plates. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 induces cell death with lysosomal destruction and then the released lysosomal cathepsins contribute to the detachment of the dead cells. PMID:27113357

  15. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage. PMID:25326781

  16. [Hydrogen peroxide-induced lesions in the digestive tract. Apropos 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Asanza, G; Menchén, P L; Castellote, J I; Salcedo, M; Jaime, B; Senent, C; Castellanos, D; Cos, E

    1995-06-01

    Gastrointestinal injury caused by caustic products a are relatively infrequent, occurring mainly in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Accidental ingestion accounts for most of the cases, and the severity and extent of damage produced, depends on the composition and volume of the caustic agent ingested; endoscopy is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure. We report four unusual cases of caustic injury of the gastrointestinal tract due to hydrogen peroxide, two cases due to oral ingestion and another two due to the accidental administration of enemas, there was a good clinic and endoscopic recovery with conservative treatment. PMID:7612371

  17. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  18. Differential Gene Expression Patterns in Chicken Cardiomyocytes during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youwen; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is both an exogenous and endogenous cytotoxic agent that can reliably induce apoptosis in numerous cell types for studies on apoptosis signaling pathways. However, little is known of these apoptotic processes in myocardial cells of chicken, a species prone to progressive heart failure. Sequencing of mRNA transcripts (RNA-Seq) allows for the identification of differentially expressed genes under various physiological and pathological conditions to elucidate the molecular pathways involved, including cellular responses to exogenous and endogenous toxins. We used RNA-seq to examine genes differentially expressed during H2O2-induced apoptosis in primary cultures of embryonic chicken cardiomyocytes. Following control or H2O2 treatment, RNA was extracted and sequencing performed to identify novel transcripts up- or downregulated in the H2O2 treatment group and construct protein−protein interaction networks. Of the 19,268 known and 2,160 novel transcripts identified in both control and H2O2 treatment groups, 4,650 showed significant differential expression. Among them, 55.63% were upregulated and 44.37% downregulated. Initiation of apoptosis by H2O2 was associated with upregulation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and downregulation of anti-apoptotic genes API5 and TRIA1. Many other differentially expressed genes were associated with metabolic pathways (including ‘Fatty acid metabolism’, ‘Alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism’, and ‘Biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids’) and cell signaling pathways (including ‘PPAR signaling pathway’, ‘Adipocytokine signaling pathway’, ‘TGF-beta signaling pathway’, ‘MAPK signaling pathway’, and ‘p53 signaling pathway’). In chicken cardiomyocytes, H2O2 alters the expression of numerous genes linked to cell signaling and metabolism as well as genes directly associated with apoptosis. In particular, H2O2 also affects the biosynthesis and processing of proteins and

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of "maximal internal H2 O2 concentration" and "cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration" (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of “maximal internal H2 O2 concentration” and “cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration” (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  1. Ocimum sanctum extracts attenuate hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxic ultrastructural changes in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Halder, Nabanita; Joshi, Sujata; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Tandon, Radhika; Gupta, Suresh Kumar

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the major oxidant involved in cataract formation. The present study investigated the effect of an aqueous leaf extract of Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) against H2O2 induced cytotoxic changes in human lens epithelial cells (HLEC). Donor eyes of the age range 20-40 years were procured within 5-8 h of death. After several washings with gentamicin (50 mL/L) and betadine (10 mL/L), clear transparent lenses (n=6 in each group) were incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) alone (normal) or in DMEM containing 100 microm of H2O2 (control) or in DMEM containing both H2O2 (100 microm) and 150 microg/mL of Ocimum sanctum extract (treated) for 30 min at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 and 95% air. Following incubation, the semi-hardened epithelium of each lens was carefully removed, fixed and processed for electron microscopic studies. Thin sections (60-70 mm) were contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate and viewed under a transmission electron microscope. Normal epithelial cells showed intact, euchromatic nucleus with few small vacuoles (diameter 0.58+/-0.6 microm) in well-demarcated cytoplasm. After treatment with H2O2, they showed pyknotic nuclei with clumping of chromatin and ill-defined edges. The cytoplasm was full of vacuoles (diameter 1.61+/-0.7 microm). The overall cellular morphology was typical of dying cells. Treatment of cells with Ocimum sanctum extract protected the epithelial cells from H2O2 insult and maintained their normal architecture. The mean diameter of the vacuoles was 0.66+/-0.2 microm. The results indicate that extracts of O. sanctum have an important protective role against H2O2 injury in HLEC by maintaining the normal cellular architecture. The protection could be due to its ability to reduce H2O2 through its antioxidant property and thus reinforcing the concept that the extracts can penetrate the HLEC membrane. PMID:19441070

  2. Exogenous low-dose hydrogen peroxide enhances drought tolerance of soybean (Glycine max L.) through inducing antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Guler, Neslihan Saruhan; Pehlivan, Necla

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) functions as a signal molecule in plants under abiotic and biotic stress. In this study, the role of exogenous H(2)O(2) in improving drought tolerance in two soybean cultivars (Glycine max L. Merrill) differing in their tolerance to drought was evaluated. Plants were grown in plastic pots with normal irrigation in a phytotron. Four weeks after radicle emergence, either 1 mM H(2)O(2) or distilled water was sprayed as foliar onto the leaves of each plant, after drought stress was applied. Leaf samples were harvested on the 4(th) and 7(th) days of the drought. Antioxidant-related enzyme activity, such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content was measured during the drought period. Drought stress decreased leaf water potential, relative water content and photosynthetic pigment content but enhanced lipid peroxidation and endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration. By contrast, exogenous low dose H(2)O(2) improved water status, pigment content and lipid peroxidation under drought stress. Endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration was reduced by exogenous H(2)O(2) as compared to drought treatment alone. H(2)O(2) pre-treatment induced all the antioxidant enzyme activities, to a greater extent than the control leaves, during drought. H(2)O(2) pretreatment further enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the tolerant cultivar compared to the sensitive cultivar. Results suggested that low dose H(2)O(2) pre-treatment alleviated water loss and H(2)O(2) content and increased drought stress tolerance by inducing the antioxidant system. PMID:27165528

  3. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart L.; Matthews, Donna

    1993-11-01

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  4. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  10. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  12. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  13. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  14. Protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells by scutellarin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Liu, Guo-Qing

    2004-04-30

    The present study investigated the protective actions of the antioxidant scutellarin against the cytotoxicity produced by exposure to H2O2 in PC12 cells. This was done by assaying for MTT (3,(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ in cells were evaluated by fluorescent microplate reader using DCFH and Fura 2-AM, respectively, as probes. Lipid peroxidation was quantified using thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was assessed by the retention of rhodamine123 (Rh123), a specific fluorescent cationic dye that is readily sequestered by active mitochondria, depending on their transmembrane potential. The DNA content and percentage of apoptosis were monitored with flow cytometry. Vitamin E, a potent antioxidant, was employed as a comparative agent. Preincubation of PC12 cells with scutellarin prevented cytotoxicity induced by H2O2. Intracellular accumulation of ROS, Ca2+ and products of lipid peroxidation, resulting from H2O2 were significantly reduced by scutellarin. Incubation of cells with H2O2 caused a marked decrease in MMP, which was significantly inhibited by scutellarin. PC12 cells treated with H2O2 underwent apoptotic death as determined by flow cytometric assay. The percentage of this H2O2-induced apoptosis in the cells was decreased in the presence of different concentrations of scutellarin. Scutellarin exhibited significantly higher potency compared to the antioxidant vitamin E. The present findings showed that scutellarin attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, intracellular accumulation of ROS and Ca2+, lipid peroxidation, and loss of MMP and DNA, which may represent the cellular mechanisms for its neuroprotective action. PMID:15051420

  15. Hydrogen peroxide induced cell death: One or two modes of action?

    PubMed

    Uhl, Lionel; Gerstel, Audrey; Chabalier, Maialène; Dukan, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Imlay and Linn show that exposure of logarithmically growing Escherichia coli to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) leads to two kinetically distinguishable modes of cell killing. Mode one killing is pronounced near 1 mM concentration of H2O2 and is caused by DNA damage, whereas mode-two killing requires higher concentration ([Formula: see text]). The second mode seems to be essentially due to damage to all macromolecules. This phenomenon has also been observed in Fenton in vitro systems with DNA nicking caused by hydroxyl radical ([Formula: see text]). To our knowledge, there is currently no mathematical model for predicting mode one killing in vitro or in vivo after H2O2 exposure. We propose a simple model, using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. Using this model, we show that available iron and cell density, two factors potentially involved in ROS dynamics, play a major role in the prediction of the experimental results obtained by our team and in previous studies. Indeed the presence of the mode one killing is strongly related to those two parameters. To our knowledge, mode-one death has not previously been explained. Imlay and Linn (Imlay and Linn, 1986) suggested that perhaps the amount of the toxic species was reduced at high concentrations of H2O2 because hydroxyl (or other) radicals might be quenched directly by hydrogen peroxide with the concomitant formation of superoxide anion (a less toxic species). We demonstrate (mathematically and numerically) that free available iron decrease is necessary to explain mode one killing which cannot appear without it and that H2O2 quenching or consumption is not responsible for mode-one death. We are able to follow ROS concentration (particularly responsible for mode one killing) after exposure to H2O2. This model therefore allows us to understand two major parameters involved in the presence or not of the first killing mode. PMID:27441232

  16. Skeletal Muscle Contractions Induce Acute Changes in Cytosolic Superoxide, but Slower Responses in Mitochondrial Superoxide and Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Timothy; Kabayo, Tabitha; Ng, Rainer; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased following contractile activity and these species interact with multiple signaling pathways to mediate adaptations to contractions. The sources and time course of the increase in ROS during contractions remain undefined. Confocal microscopy with specific fluorescent probes was used to compare the activities of superoxide in mitochondria and cytosol and the hydrogen peroxide content of the cytosol in isolated single mature skeletal muscle (flexor digitorum brevis) fibers prior to, during, and after electrically stimulated contractions. Superoxide in mitochondria and cytoplasm were assessed using MitoSox red and dihydroethidium (DHE) respectively. The product of superoxide with DHE, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) was acutely increased in the fiber cytosol by contractions, whereas hydroxy-MitoSox showed a slow cumulative increase. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthases increased the contraction-induced formation of hydroxy-MitoSox only with no effect on 2-HE formation. These data indicate that the acute increases in cytosolic superoxide induced by contractions are not derived from mitochondria. Data also indicate that, in muscle mitochondria, nitric oxide (NO) reduces the availability of superoxide, but no effect of NO on cytosolic superoxide availability was detected. To determine the relationship of changes in superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, an alternative specific approach was used where fibers were transduced using an adeno-associated viral vector to express the hydrogen peroxide probe, HyPer within the cytoplasmic compartment. HyPer fluorescence was significantly increased in fibers following contractions, but surprisingly followed a relatively slow time course that did not appear directly related to cytosolic superoxide. These data demonstrate for the first time temporal and site specific differences in specific ROS that occur in skeletal muscle fibers during and after contractile activity. PMID

  17. Effects of mulberry ethanol extracts on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Rae; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ki Rim; Kim, Young Eon; Baek, Nam In; Hong, Eock Kee

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of mammalian cellular damage and are associated with diseases such as aging, arteriosclerosis, inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops upon the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which is partly due to ROS activity. In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective and anti-oxidative effects of fractionated mulberry extracts in mouse insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells (MIN6N cells). Treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced significant cell death and increased intracellular ROS levels, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation in the MIN6N cells. Fractionated mulberry extracts significantly reduced the H2O2-dependent production of intracellular ROS, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and lipid peroxidation. In addition, mulberry extracts inhibited DNA fragmentation induced by H2O2. Thus, the antioxidant properties of mulberry extracts in pancreatic β-cells may be exploited for the prevention or treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:24154764

  18. Improved Electrolytic Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Patrick I.

    2005-01-01

    An improved apparatus for the electrolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide dissolved in water has been developed. The apparatus is a prototype of H2O2 generators for the safe and effective sterilization of water, sterilization of equipment in contact with water, and other applications in which there is need for hydrogen peroxide at low concentration as an oxidant. Potential applications for electrolytic H2O2 generators include purification of water for drinking and for use in industrial processes, sanitation for hospitals and biotechnological industries, inhibition and removal of biofouling in heat exchangers, cooling towers, filtration units, and the treatment of wastewater by use of advanced oxidation processes that are promoted by H2O2.

  19. NASA Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, Ronald; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation is to provide the current status of NASA's efforts in the development of hydrogen peroxide in both mono-propellant and bi-propellant applications, consistent with the Space Launch Initiative goals of pursuing low toxicity and operationally simpler propellants for application in the architectures being considered for the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle, also known as the Space Launch Initiative, or SLI.

  20. Carvedilol protects bone marrow stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death via PI3K-AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meihui; Chen, Shudong; Lin, Dingkun

    2016-03-01

    Carvedilol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, has been reported to exert potent anti-oxidative activities. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of carvedilol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death, which imitate the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. Carvedilol significantly reduced H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis and subsequent cell death. LY294002, the PI3K inhibitor, blocked the protective effects and up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation of carvedilol. Together, our results showed that carvedilol protects H2O2-induced BMSCs cell death partly through PI3K-Akt pathway, suggesting carvedilol could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments. PMID:26898450

  1. Effects of rutaecarpine on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in murine hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  2. Effects of Rutaecarpine on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Murine Hepa-1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  3. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Protein Oxidation During Storage and Lyophilization Process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiqiang; Zheng, Xiaoyang; Yang, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Although the impact of hydrogen peroxide (HP) on proteins in liquid solutions has been studied extensively, the impact during lyophilization has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of HP on lyophilized proteins and HP removal by lyophilization. A protein formulation at 5 mg/mL and its placebo were spiked with HP up to 5.0 ppm and then lyophilized. HP concentration, protein oxidation, and aggregation were monitored before and after lyophilization, as well as during storage at 25°C. The lyophilization process removed on average 94.1% of HP from protein formulation, but only 72.5% from the placebo. There were also significant increases in protein oxidization and aggregation. The oxidation increment correlated with the decrease of HP concentration in both the protein formulation and placebo at all temperatures. Protein oxidation at different freezing temperatures was also studied in follow-up studies. Data from these studies suggest that (1) HP has a significant impact on oxidation and aggregation of protein during lyophilization; (2) significant oxidation can occur even when the protein formulation is frozen; (3) the oxidized protein is more prone to aggregation during lyophilization process. PMID:27238482

  5. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cláudia S L; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  6. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  7. Astaxanthin protects steroidogenesis from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Lee, Yue-Jia; Chou, Mei-Chia; Chang, Renin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Liang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Leang-Shin

    2015-03-01

    Androgens, especially testosterone produced in Leydig cells, play an essential role in development of the male reproductive phenotype and fertility. However, testicular oxidative stress may cause a decline in testosterone production. Many antioxidants have been used as reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers to eliminate oxidative stress to protect steroidogenesis. Astaxanthin (AST), a natural extract from algae and plants ubiquitous in the marine environment, has been shown to have antioxidant activity in many previous studies. In this study, we treated primary mouse Leydig cells or MA-10 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to cause oxidative stress. Testosterone and progesterone production was suppressed and the expression of the mature (30 kDa) form of StAR protein was down-regulated in MA-10 cells by H2O2 and cAMP co-treatment. However, progesterone production and expression of mature StAR protein were restored in MA-10 cells by a one-hour pretreatment with AST. AST also reduced ROS levels in cells so that they were lower than the levels in untreated controls. These results provide additional evidence of the potential health benefits of AST as a potential food additive to ease oxidative stress. PMID:25786065

  8. Astaxanthin Protects Steroidogenesis from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mouse Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Lee, Yue-Jia; Chou, Mei-Chia; Chang, Renin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Liang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Leang-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Androgens, especially testosterone produced in Leydig cells, play an essential role in development of the male reproductive phenotype and fertility. However, testicular oxidative stress may cause a decline in testosterone production. Many antioxidants have been used as reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers to eliminate oxidative stress to protect steroidogenesis. Astaxanthin (AST), a natural extract from algae and plants ubiquitous in the marine environment, has been shown to have antioxidant activity in many previous studies. In this study, we treated primary mouse Leydig cells or MA-10 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to cause oxidative stress. Testosterone and progesterone production was suppressed and the expression of the mature (30 kDa) form of StAR protein was down-regulated in MA-10 cells by H2O2 and cAMP co-treatment. However, progesterone production and expression of mature StAR protein were restored in MA-10 cells by a one-hour pretreatment with AST. AST also reduced ROS levels in cells so that they were lower than the levels in untreated controls. These results provide additional evidence of the potential health benefits of AST as a potential food additive to ease oxidative stress. PMID:25786065

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induced relaxation in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro is mediated by EDRF and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zellers, T.; McCormick, J. )

    1991-03-15

    Xanthine and xanthine oxidase induced relaxations in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro are augmented in the presence of the endothelium and abolished by catalase, implicating hydrogen peroxide as an endothelium-dependent effector. To determine the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}O{sub 2} causes relaxations, isolated rings of fifth order porcine pulmonary artery, with (E{sup +}) and without (E{sup {minus}}) endothelium, were suspended in organ baths filled with buffer, and isometric tension was recorded. Hydrogen peroxide caused concentration-dependent, endothelium-augmented relaxations which were abolished by catalase and hydroquinone and reversed by L-nitroarginine and methylene blue. Prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}) levels, measured after a two minute exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in rings with endothelium were comparable to controls. This concentration of PGI{sub 2} does not cause relaxations in these rings. These data suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulates the release of an EDRF, causing relaxations mediated by cyclic GMP, which is independent of prostacyclin.

  10. Nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide in tomato resistance. Nitric oxide modulates hydrogen peroxide level in o-hydroxyethylorutin-induced resistance to Botrytis cinerea in tomato.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula; Rózalska, Sylwia

    2005-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been postulated to be required, together with reactive oxygen species (ROS), for activation of disease resistance reactions of plants to infection with a pathogen or elicitor treatment. However, biochemical mechanisms by which ROS and NO participate in these reactions are still under intensive study and controversial debate. We previously demonstrated that o-hydroxyethylorutin when applied on tomato leaves (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. "Perkoz") restricted Botrytis cinerea infection development. In this research we investigated ROS and NO generation in tomato plants treated with o-hydroxyethylorutin, non-treated and infected ones. The NO content was enhanced or decreased in the studied plants by supplying them with NO generator-SNP or scavenger-cPTIO. NO detection was carried out using diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-DA) in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The influence of elevated and decreased levels of NO on B. cinerea infection development and ROS generation was studied. The elevated NO concentration in tomato leaves strongly decreased hydrogen peroxide concentration without affecting other studied ROS (superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical) levels. H2O2 concentrations in NO-supplied leaves were low regardless of further treatment of tomato leaves with o-hydroxyethylorutin or inoculation with B. cinerea. The low H2O2 concentration coincided with quick and severe infection development in NO-supplied leaves. As activities of enzymes generating (SOD EC 1.15.1.1)) and removing (APX EC 1.11.1.11, CAT EC 1.11.1.6) H2O2 were unchanged in the studied plants, the decrease in H2O2 concentration was probably due to a direct NO-H2O2 interaction. PMID:15922611

  11. Combination Treatment of Hydrogen Peroxide and X-Rays Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shinji Sawada, Ken; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Karashima, Takashi; Shuin, Taro; Nishioka, Akihito; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods and Materials: At 4h before the irradiation, PC-3 cells were exposed to 10mM ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) concentrations. Subsequently, cells were exposed to 0.1mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} just before the irradiations, which were administered with 10-MV X-rays at doses of 10Gy. Results: The percentage of apoptotic cells at 48h after X-irradiation alone, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone, and combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 1.85%, 4.85%, and 28.4%, respectively. With use of combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred 4h after the irradiation. This resulted in lysosomal rupturing, mitochondrial fragmentation, and the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm from the mitochondria. In contrast, when cells were exposed to NH{sub 4}Cl before the X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} administration, apoptosis was almost completely suppressed, ROS production did not occur, lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial fragmentation were blocked, and cytochrome c was not released. Conclusions: Hydrogen peroxide strongly enhanced lysosome-dependent radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. A combined use of X-rays and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can also injure the mitochondrial cytoplasmic organelles and lead to the production of ROS that in and of itself might possibly induce apoptosis.

  12. NADPH oxidase-generated hydrogen peroxide induces DNA damage in mutant FLT3-expressing leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Stanicka, Joanna; Russell, Eileen G; Woolley, John F; Cotter, Thomas G

    2015-04-10

    Internal tandem duplication of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3-ITD) receptor is present in 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and it has been associated with an aggressive AML phenotype. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines have been shown to generate increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the molecular basis of how FLT3-ITD-driven ROS leads to the aggressive form of AML is not clearly understood. Our group has previously reported that inhibition of FLT3-ITD signaling results in post-translational down-regulation of p22(phox), a small membrane-bound subunit of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex. Here we demonstrated that 32D cells, a myeloblast-like cell line transfected with FLT3-ITD, have a higher protein level of p22(phox) and p22(phox)-interacting NOX isoforms than 32D cells transfected with the wild type FLT3 receptor (FLT3-WT). The inhibition of NOX proteins, p22(phox), and NOX protein knockdowns caused a reduction in ROS, as measured with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific dye, peroxy orange 1 (PO1), and nuclear H2O2, as measured with nuclear peroxy emerald 1 (NucPE1). These reductions in the level of H2O2 following the NOX knockdowns were accompanied by a decrease in the number of DNA DSBs. We showed that 32D cells that express FLT3-ITD have a higher level of both oxidized DNA and DNA DSBs than their wild type counterparts. We also observed that NOX4 and p22(phox) localize to the nuclear membrane in MV4-11 cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Taken together these data indicate that NOX and p22(phox) mediate the ROS production from FLT3-ITD that signal to the nucleus causing genomic instability. PMID:25697362

  13. NADPH Oxidase-generated Hydrogen Peroxide Induces DNA Damage in Mutant FLT3-expressing Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Stanicka, Joanna; Russell, Eileen G.; Woolley, John F.; Cotter, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3-ITD) receptor is present in 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and it has been associated with an aggressive AML phenotype. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines have been shown to generate increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the molecular basis of how FLT3-ITD-driven ROS leads to the aggressive form of AML is not clearly understood. Our group has previously reported that inhibition of FLT3-ITD signaling results in post-translational down-regulation of p22phox, a small membrane-bound subunit of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex. Here we demonstrated that 32D cells, a myeloblast-like cell line transfected with FLT3-ITD, have a higher protein level of p22phox and p22phox-interacting NOX isoforms than 32D cells transfected with the wild type FLT3 receptor (FLT3-WT). The inhibition of NOX proteins, p22phox, and NOX protein knockdowns caused a reduction in ROS, as measured with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific dye, peroxy orange 1 (PO1), and nuclear H2O2, as measured with nuclear peroxy emerald 1 (NucPE1). These reductions in the level of H2O2 following the NOX knockdowns were accompanied by a decrease in the number of DNA DSBs. We showed that 32D cells that express FLT3-ITD have a higher level of both oxidized DNA and DNA DSBs than their wild type counterparts. We also observed that NOX4 and p22phox localize to the nuclear membrane in MV4–11 cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Taken together these data indicate that NOX and p22phox mediate the ROS production from FLT3-ITD that signal to the nucleus causing genomic instability. PMID:25697362

  14. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  15. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  16. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  17. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  18. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  19. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide, from Wieland to Sies.

    PubMed

    Koppenol, Willem H

    2016-04-01

    A history of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in vivo is presented, starting with the discovery of catalase. The first hypothesis was formulated by Heinrich Wieland, who assumed that dioxygen reacted directly with organic molecules. This view was strongly criticised by Otto Warburg, Helmut Sies' academic grandfather. The involvement of hydrogen peroxide in physiological processes was investigated by Theodor Bücher, the "Doktorvater" of Helmut. Helmut's research made it possible to quantitate hydrogen peroxide in tissues. PMID:27095207

  1. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Anderson, M.S.; Johnson, R.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Hendrix, A.R.; Barth, C.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Dalton, J.B.; Clark, R.N.; Shirley, J.H.; Ocampo, A.C.; Matson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  2. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  3. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Anderson, M S; Johnson, R E; Smythe, W D; Hendrix, A R; Barth, C A; Soderblom, L A; Hansen, G B; McCord, T B; Dalton, J B; Clark, R N; Shirley, J H; Ocampo, A C; Matson, D L

    1999-03-26

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis. PMID:10092224

  5. Huperzine B, a novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates hydrogen peroxide induced injury in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Y; Tang, X C

    2000-09-29

    A number of studies indicate that free radicals are involved in the neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was mainly conducted to examine the effect of Huperzine B on H(2)O(2) induced toxicity in rat pheochromocytoma line PC12 by measuring cell lesion, level of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities. Following a 30 min exposure of the cells to H(2)O(2) (150 microM), a marked decrease in cell survival, activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase as well as increased production of malondialdehyde (MDA) were found. Pretreatment of the cells with huperzine B (10-100 microM) prior to H(2)O(2) exposure significantly elevated the cell survival, antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased the level of MDA. The above-mentioned neuroprotective effects are also observed with tacrine (1 microM), donepezil (10 microM) and galanthamine (10 microM), suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of cholinesterase inhibitor might partly contribute to the clinical efficacy in AD treatment. PMID:10996445

  6. Oxidative cleavage of cycloalkanones by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Starostin, E.K.; Aleksandrov, A.V.; Nikishin, G.I.

    1986-07-10

    The authors have studied the reaction of cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, cycloheptanone, and cyclododecanone with aqueous hydrogen peroxide over the temperature range 110-150/sup 0/C. The effects of temperature, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the molar proportions of the reagents on the composition and yields of the products have been examined in the case of cyclohexanone. Oxidation of cyclohexanone by aqueous hydrogen peroxide at 110-150/sup 0/C gives 1,10-decanedicarboxylic acid and hexanoic acid as the principal products. Cyclopentanone and cycloheptanone react with hydrogen peroxide similarly to cyclohexanone, giving sebacic and pentanoic acids, and 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acids, respectively.

  7. N-Acetyl-Serotonin Protects HepG2 Cells from Oxidative Stress Injury Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiying; Yu, Shuna; Jiang, Zhengchen; Liang, Cuihong; Yu, Wenbo; Li, Jin; Du, Xiaodong; Wang, Hailiang; Gao, Xianghong; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver diseases. N-Acetyl-serotonin (NAS) has been reported to protect against oxidative damage, though the mechanisms by which NAS protects hepatocytes from oxidative stress remain unknown. To determine whether pretreatment with NAS could reduce hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, we investigated the H2O2-induced oxidative damage to HepG2 cells with or without NAS using MTT, Hoechst 33342, rhodamine 123, Terminal dUTP Nick End Labeling Assay (TUNEL), dihydrodichlorofluorescein (H2DCF), Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) double staining, immunocytochemistry, and western blot. H2O2 produced dramatic injuries in HepG2 cells, represented by classical morphological changes of apoptosis, increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, release of cytochrome c (Cyt-C) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, and loss of membrane potential (ΔΨm). NAS significantly inhibited H2O2-induced changes, indicating that it protected against H2O2-induced oxidative damage by reducing MDA levels and increasing SOD activity and that it protected the HepG2 cells from apoptosis through regulating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, involving inhibition of mitochondrial hyperpolarization, release of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors, and caspase activity. PMID:25013541

  8. Protective effect of reduced glutathione C60 derivative against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Zhou, Chi; He, Jun; Hu, Zheng; Guan, Wen-Chao; Liu, Sheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and free radicals cause oxidative stress, which induces cellular injuries, metabolic dysfunction, and even cell death in various clinical abnormalities. Fullerene (C60) is critical for scavenging oxygen free radicals originated from cell metabolism, and reduced glutathione (GSH) is another important endogenous antioxidant. In this study, a novel water-soluble reduced glutathione fullerene derivative (C60-GSH) was successfully synthesized, and its beneficial roles in protecting against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cultured HEK 293T cells were investigated. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to confirm the chemical structure of C60-GSH. Our results demonstrated that C60-GSH prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell damage. Additionally, C60-GSH pretreatment significantly attenuated H2O2-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD) consumption and malondialdehyde (MDA) elevation. Furthermore, C60-GSH inhibited intracellular calcium mobilization, and subsequent cell apoptosis via bcl-2/bax-caspase-3 signaling pathway induced by H2O2 stimulation in HEK 293T cells. Importantly, these protective effects of C60-GSH were superior to those of GSH. In conclusion, these results suggested that C60-GSH has potential to protect against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis by scavenging free radicals and maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis without evident toxicity. PMID:27376803

  9. Hydrogen peroxide treatment in Atlantic salmon induces stress and detoxification response in a daily manner.

    PubMed

    Vera, L M; Migaud, H

    2016-01-01

    Daily variation in the absorption, metabolism and excretion of toxic substances will ultimately determine the actual concentration to which the cells and tissues are exposed. In aquaculture, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) can be frequently exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to treat topical skin and gill infections, particularly in relation to parasitic infections (e.g. sea lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis and amoebic gill disease caused by Neoparamoeba perurans). It is well accepted that the time of administration influences pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs which in turn affects their efficacy and toxicity. Consequently, a better understanding of drug side effects as a function of time of day exposure would help to improve treatment efficacy and fish welfare. To this end, salmon were exposed to H2O2 (1500 mg/L) for 20 min at six different times of the day during a 24-h cycle and we investigated the time-dependent effects of exposure on physiological stress (glucose, lactate and cortisol) and antioxidant enzyme expression (gpx1, cat, Mn-sod and hsp70) in liver and gills. In addition, at each sampling point, 8 control fish were also sampled. Our results revealed that the time of administration of H2O2 caused significant differences in the induction of both physiological and oxidative stress responses. Glucose and lactate were higher in the treated fish during daytime whereas cortisol levels appeared to be systematically increased (>1000 ng/mL) after H2O2 treatment irrespective of exposure time, although differences with control levels were higher during the day. In liver, gene expression of antioxidant enzymes displayed daily rhythmicity in both treated and control groups and showed higher mRNA expression levels in salmon treated with H2O2 at ZT6 (6 h after lights onset). In gills, rhythmic expression was only found for gpx1 in the control fish and for hsp70 and Mn-sod in the treated groups. However, in the treated salmon, higher gene expression levels of

  10. The antioxidant properties of oligo sodium alginates prepared by radiation-induced degradation in aqueous and hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şen, Murat; Atik, Hanife

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the radiation-induced degradation of sodium alginates (NaAlg), having different guluronic acids (G) and mannuronic acid (M) ratios, (G/M), in aqueous and hydrogen peroxide solutions were investigated first; after that, the antioxidative properties of the oligo sodium alginates prepared were identified. Radiation degradation yield values, G(S), were determined for each irradiation condition and compared with those of the dry-state-irradiated NaAlg. The results showed that the oligo sodium alginates with M from 1000 to 3750 Da could be easily prepared by γ-irradiation of NaAlg solution in the presence of small amount of hydrogen peroxide at low doses (below 5.0 kGy) and by controlling the G/M. The antioxidant properties of the fractions with various molecular weight and G/M were evaluated by determining the scavenging ability of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPHrad ), and 50% inhibition concentrations of LF120 NaAlg, which was irradiated in aqueous solution and H2O2 solution at a dose of 2.5 kGy and having number average molecular weights of 10.2 and 3.75 kDa were found to be 10.0 and 2.5 mg/ml, respectively. The results demonstrated that its molecular weight was an important factor in controlling the antioxidant properties of NaAlg, and due to the sharp decrease in molecular weight in the case of aqueous media irradiation the effect of G/M of initial polymer became unimportant whereas the dry-state-irradiated NaAlgs behaved conversely.

  11. Inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase 1 affects ceramide accumulation and hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Neuro-2a cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ranran; Yang, Wei; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in brain injury after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, which contributes toward excessive apoptosis of nerve cells. Therefore, it would be beneficial to identify a therapy that could interfere with the progression of apoptosis and protect the brain from ischemia-reperfusion injury. As ceramide, a well-known second messenger of apoptosis, can be metabolized by sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1), recent research has focused on the link between SMS1 and apoptosis in different cells. To investigate whether SMS1 is involved in the process of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in neurons and to explore the possible underlying mechanism, we treated mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2A (N2a) cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation with H2O2 significantly upregulated the expression of SMS1, increased the intracellular levels of ceramide and sphingomyelin synthase activity, and induced apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment of N2a cells with D609, an sphingomyelin synthase inhibitor, or SMS1-silencing RNA (siRNA) further increased ceramide and potentiated H2O2-induced apoptosis which could be reversed by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Thus, our study has shown that SMS1 regulates ceramide levels in N2a cells and plays a potent protective role in this oxidative stress-induced apoptosis partly through the p38 pathway. PMID:27391427

  12. Neuroprotective effect of Citrus unshiu immature peel and nobiletin inhibiting hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Jung, Su Young; Lee, Gyeong Hwan; Cho, Jung Hee; Choi, In Young

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress-induced cell damage is common in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In a case study, nobiletin-rich Citrus reticulata peels could prevent the progression of cognitive impairment in donepezil-preadministered Alzheimer's disease patients. Objective: In this study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanism of nobiletin and Citrus unshiu immature peel (CUIP) water extract, which contains nobiletin as a major compound, on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal neuronal model. Materials and Methods: HT22 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide in the presence or absence of various concentrations of CUIP and nobiletin. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic protein levels were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Western blotting. Results: Pretreatment with CUIP and nobiletin inhibited cell death due to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide-induced the expression of phospho-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) and p-p38 proteins in HT22 cells; however CUIP and nobiletin suppressed p-JNK and p-p38 without changing JNK or p38. Regarding apoptosis, caspase 3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and Bax protein expression was determined. CUIP and nobiletin suppressed caspase 3 and Bax expression, but they induced Bcl-2 expression in HT22 cells. Conclusion: These results show that CUIP and nobiletin can protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in HT22 neurons via mitogen-activated protein kinases and apoptotic pathways. PMID:26664016

  13. Hydrogen peroxide as a greenhouse soil amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are anecdotal reports that hydrogen peroxide provides growth benefits beyond controlling plant infection and plant stress. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of soil applications of hydrogen peroxide solutions on plant growth and flowering. Nasturtium (Tropaeolum maju...

  14. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen peroxide is a common oxidant that has been applied extensively with in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Because of its widespread use in this and other fields, it has been extensively researched. This research has revealed that hydrogen peroxide has very complex chemistry...

  15. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  16. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  17. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  18. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  19. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  20. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  1. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  2. Homocysteine thiolactone induces apoptotic DNA damage mediated by increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide and caspase 3 activation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, R F; Huang, S M; Lin, B S; Wei, J S; Liu, T Z

    2001-05-11

    The cytotoxicity of homocysteine derivatives on chromosomal damage in somatic cells is not well established. The present study used reactive homocysteine derivative of homocysteine thiolactone (Hcy) to investigate its causal effect on apoptotic DNA injury in human promyeloid HL-60 cells. Our results demonstrated that Hcy induced cell death and features of apoptosis including increased phosphotidylserine exposure on the membrane surface, increased apoptotic cells with hypoploid DNA contents, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, all of which occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hcy treatment also significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species H2O2, which coincided with the elimination of caspase 3 proenzyme levels and increased caspase 3 activity at the time of the appearance of apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Preincubation of Hcy-treated HL-60 cells with catalase completely scavenged intracellular H2O2, thus inhibiting caspase 3 activity and protecting cells from apoptotic DNA damage. In contrast, superoxide dismutase failed to inhibit Hcy-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Hcy exerted its genotoxic effects on HL-60 cells through an apoptotic pathway, which is mediated by the activation of caspase 3 activity induced by an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide. PMID:11432446

  3. Naringin protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ge; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Ma, Long-Fei; Zhang, Yuan-Min

    2015-12-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of osteoporosis. We show that naringin, a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, effectively protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Naringin increased viability of hAMDSCs and attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Naringin also reversed H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative stress induced by H2O2 inhibits osteogenic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium content and mRNA expression levels of osteogenesis marker genes RUNX2 and OSX in hADMSCs. However, addition of naringin leads to a significant recovery, suggesting the protective effects of naringin against H2O2-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, the H2O2-induced decrease of protein expressions of β-catenin and clyclin D1, two important transcriptional regulators of Wnt-signaling, was successfully rescued by naringin treatment. Also, in the presence of Wnt inhibitor DKK-1, naringin is no longer effective in stimulating ALP activity, increasing calcium content and mRNA expression levels of RUNX2 and OSX in H2O2-exposed hADMSCs. These data clearly demonstrates that naringin protects hADMSCs against oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation, which may involve Wnt signaling pathway. Our work suggests that naringin may be a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for osteoporosis and activation of Wnt signaling may represent attractive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of degenerative disease of bone tissue. PMID:26482937

  4. ALGAL-INDUCED DECAY AND FORMATION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN WATER: ITS POSSIBLE ROLE IN OXIDATION OF ANILINES BY ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of the rates of decomposition and photoproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by several green and blue-green algae in water are reported. Results suggest that algae have an important influence on the environmental concentration of H2O2, a widely distributed oxidant in na...

  5. Hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase is involved in high blue-light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng; Xing, Da; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-08-01

    One of the most important functions of blue light is to induce chloroplast movements by reducing the damage to photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by various environmental stimuli, can act as a signaling molecule that regulates a number of developmental processes and environmental responses. To investigate whether H2O2 is involved in high blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we use luminescence spectrometer to observe H2O2 generation with the assistance of the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (H2DCF-DA). After treatment with high blue light, a large quantity of H2O2 indicated by the fluorescence intensity of DCF is produced in a dose-dependent manner in leaf strip of Arabidopsis. Enzymatic assay shows that the activity of NADPH oxidase, which is a major site for H2O2 generation, also rapidly increases in treated strips. Exogenously applied H2O2 can promote the high blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Moreover, high blue light-induced H2O2 generation can be abolished completely by addition of exogenous catalase (CAT), and partly by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (DCMU), which are an NADPH oxidase inhibitor and a blocker of electron transport chain. And subsequent chloroplast movements can be abolished by CAT and DPI, but not by DCMU. These results presented here suggested that high blue light can induce oxidative burst, and NADPH oxidase as a major producer for H2O2 is involved in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements.

  6. Effect of standardized fruit extract of Luffa cylindrica on oxidative stress markers in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Suchita; Saha, Sudipta; Kaithwas, Gaurav; Saraf, Shubhini A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The ability of Luffa cylindrica Roem fruit extract (LCE) to modulate biochemical parameters was investigated by in vitro studies for its role in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract on isolated goat lenses which were incubated for 72 h at 37°C. Materials and Methods: Test groups contained 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 µg/ml of LCE along with 1 ml of H2O2 (0.5 mM) as cataract inducer. Lenses were examined for morphological variation and transparency periodically during the incubation. Biochemical parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), total protein content (TPC), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were estimated. Results: SOD, GSH, and TPC levels were found to increase proportionally with the concentration of LCE. However, MDA levels were found to be inversely proportional to the concentration of LCE. Opacity was graded as per “lens opacities classification system III.” Morphological examination suggested that LCE (25 µg/ml) maintained a vision for 44 h. No lens in LCE dose groups developed dense nuclear opacity after 24 h as opposed to 80% in negative control. Conclusion: The results suggest that LCE can delay the onset and/or prevent the progression of cataract which can be attributed to the presence of adequate phenolics, flavonoids, and Vitamin A and its high nutritional value. This preliminary study can be further synergized by testing LCE against other in vivo and in vitro models of cataract. PMID:26729957

  7. Protective effects of rice dreg protein hydrolysates against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HepG-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxia; Wang, Li; Wang, Ren; Luo, Xiaohu; Li, Yanan; Chen, Zhengxing

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of rice dreg protein hydrolysates (RDPHs) obtained by various proteases on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HepG-2 cells were investigated. Cell cytotoxicity was evaluated through the aspects of cell viability, ROS level, antioxidant enzyme activity, and production of malondialdehyde (MDA). Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Molecular weight distribution was analyzed by gel permeation chromatography, and amino acid composition was measured using an automatic amino acid analyzer. The survival of cells and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were significantly increased through the pre-incubation of HepG-2 cells with RDPHs before H2O2 exposure. Additionally, these pretreatments also resulted in a reduction in ROS and MDA levels. As a result, apoptosis and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential of the HepG-2 cells were alleviated. Furthermore, the protective effects of protein hydrolysates obtained by various proteases were noticeably distinct, in which RDPHs prepared by alkaline protease showed higher antioxidant activities. The difference in the protective effects might be attributed to the specific peptide or amino acid composition. Therefore, enzymatic hydrolysis with different enzymes studied here could attenuate H2O2-induced cell damage, and the type of protease greatly influenced the anti-oxidative activity. Particularly, optimum use of Alcalase could produce peptides with higher antioxidant activity. PMID:26843356

  8. Evaluating the effects of galbanic acid on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kobra; Behravan, Javad; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mehmankhah, Babak; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Ferula szowitsiana has been widely used for medicinal purposes around the world. The anti-oxidant effect of F. szowitsiana had been proved. The current study aims to determine the protective effects of galbanic acid, a sesquiterpene coumarin from F. szowitsiana, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Human lymphocytes were incubated with H2O2 (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µM), galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and a combination of galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and H2O2 (25 µM) at 4 C for 30 minutes. Solvents of galbanic acid without H2O2 were used as negative controls. Results: The findings of this study demonstrated that H2O2 exposure leads to a significant concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage. Galbanic acid did not cause DNA damage compared with the control cells. Data showed that galbanic acid does not have a protective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Conclusion: According to the results, it is concluded that the capability of F. szowitsiana in reducing reactive oxygen species and the anti-inflammatory property of its methanolic extract may be due to its other ingredients. PMID:25386396

  9. Thiamine-induced priming against root-knot nematode infection in rice involves lignification and hydrogen peroxide generation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kun; Ji, Hong-Li; Gheysen, Godelieve; Kyndt, Tina

    2016-05-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1, VB1) can act as a plant defence trigger, or priming agent, leading to a rapid counterattack on pathogen invasion. In this study, the priming effect of thiamine on rice (Oryza sativa cv. Nipponbare) and its activity against root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) infection were evaluated. Thiamine treatment and subsequent nematode inoculation activated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and lignin deposition in plant roots, and this correlated with enhanced transcription of OsPAL1 and OsC4H, two genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The number of nematodes in rice roots was slightly but significantly reduced, and the development of the nematodes was delayed, whereas no direct toxic effects of VB1 on nematode viability and infectivity were observed. The combined application of thiamine with l-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), significantly hampered the VB1-priming capacity. These findings indicate that thiamine-induced priming in rice involves H2 O2 and phenylpropanoid-mediated lignin production, which hampers nematode infection. Further cellular and molecular studies on the mechanism of thiamine-induced defence will be useful for the development of novel nematode control strategies. PMID:27103216

  10. The sigma-1 receptor-zinc finger protein 179 pathway protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Tzu-Chieh; Lin, Shu-Hui; Lee, Pin-Tse; Yeh, Shiu-Hwa; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chou, Szu-Yi; Su, Tsung-Ping; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Chuang, Jian-Ying

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, hence protecting neurons against ROS is very important. In this study, we focused on sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), a chaperone at endoplasmic reticulum, and investigated its protective functions. Using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced ROS accumulation model, we verified that apoptosis-signaling pathways were elicited by H2O2 treatment. However, the Sig-1R agonists, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), reduced the activation of apoptotic pathways significantly. By performing protein-protein interaction assays and shRNA knockdown of Sig-1R, we identified the brain Zinc finger protein 179 (Znf179) as a downstream target of Sig-1R regulation. The neuroprotective effect of Znf179 overexpression was similar to that of DHEAS treatment, and likely mediated by affecting the levels of antioxidant enzymes. We also quantified the levels of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the hippocampi of wild-type and Znf179 knockout mice, and found both enzymes to be reduced in the knockout versus the wild-type mice. In summary, these results reveal that Znf179 plays a novel role in neuroprotection, and Sig-1R agonists may be therapeutic candidates to prevent ROS-induced damage in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. PMID:26792191

  11. Heat shock protein 70 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced nucleolar fragmentation via suppressing cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkai; Deng, Gonghua; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yi, Yuxin; Yang, Tubao; McMillan, Daniel R; Xiao, Xiangzhong

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that nucleolar fragmentation is a part of the overall apoptotic morphology, however, it is currently obscure whether and how nucleolar fragmentation can be induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) can prevent nucleolar fragmentation. To dissect these two questions, C(2)C(12) myogenic cells and immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with heat shock transcriptional factor 1 (HSF1) null mutation were treated with heat shock response (HS) (42.5 ± 0.5°C for 1 h and recovery at 37°C for 24 h) and then were insulted with 0.5 mmol/L H(2)O(2). Morphological changes of nucleoli were observed under contrast microscope or electronic microscope. It was found that (1) stimulation with H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation by mediating cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolar protein, nucleolin in C(2)C(12) myocytes and MEFs; (2) HS suppressed nucleolar fragmentation by inducing the expression of Hsp70 in an HSF1-dependent manner as indicated by assays of transfection with Hsp70 antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ONs) or recombinant plasmids of full-length Hsp70 cDNA; (3) protection of Hsp70 against nucleolar fragmentation was related to its accumulation in nucleolus mediated by nuclear localization sequence and its inhibition against cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolin. These results suggested that H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation and HS or Hsp70 inhibit H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation through the translocation of Hsp70 into nucleolar and its protection against impairment of nucleolin. PMID:21960124

  12. Piper sarmentosum as an antioxidant on oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by hydrogen peroxide*

    PubMed Central

    Hafizah, Abdul Hamid; Zaiton, Zakaria; Zulkhairi, Amom; Mohd Ilham, Adenan; Nor Anita, Megat Mohd Nordin; Zaleha, Abdullah Mahdy

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cell death due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) may contribute to the initial endothelial injury, which promotes atherosclerotic lesion formation. Piper sarmentosum (PS), a natural product, has been shown to have an antioxidant property, which is hypothesized to inhibit production of ROS and prevent cell injury. Thus, the present study was designed to determine the effects of PS on the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative cell damage in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In this experiment, HUVECs were obtained by collagenase perfusion of the large vein in the umbilical cord and cultured in medium M200 supplemented with low serum growth supplementation (LSGS). HUVECs were treated with various concentrations of H2O2 (0–1000 µmol/L) and it was observed that 180 µmol/L H2O2 reduced cell viability by 50% as denoted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Using the above concentration as the positive control, the H2O2-induced HUVECs were concomitantly treated with various concentrations (100, 150, 250 and 300 µg/ml) of three different extracts (aqueous, methanol and hexane) of PS. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) levels showed a significant increase (P<0.05) in HUVECs compared to the negative control. However, PS extracts showed a protective effect on HUVECs from H2O2-induced cell apoptosis with a significant reduction in MDA, SOD, CAT and GPX levels (P<0.05). Furthermore, PS had exhibited ferric reducing antioxidant power with its high phenolic content. Hence, it was concluded that PS plays a beneficial role in reducing oxidative stress in H2O2-induced HUVECs. PMID:20443214

  13. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  14. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  15. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells. PMID:17451824

  17. Study of fibroblast gene expression in response to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide or UVA with skin aging.

    PubMed

    Hazane-Puch, Florence; Bonnet, Mathilde; Valenti, Kita; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Kurfurst, Robin; Favier, Alain; Sauvaigo, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The skin aging process, implying oxidative stress, is associated with specific gene expression. Ultraviolet A (UVA) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) making them relevant in the study of skin cell responses to oxidative stresses. To investigate transcript expression associated with chronological skin aging and its modulation by two oxidative stresses, cDNA micro-arrays, composed of a set of 81 expressed sequence tag (EST) clones, were used to probe the patterns of transcript expression in human fibroblasts of five young (< 21 years-old) and five older (> 50 years-old) healthy females at basal levels and 24 h after exposure to UVA (7 J/cm2) and H(2)O(2) (20 mM). At the basal state, 22% of total genes were up-regulated in the older group. Although both stresses led to the same cell mortality, H(2)O(2) induced a stronger modulation of gene expression than UVA, with 19.5% of transcripts up-regulated versus 4%. The aging process affected the response to H(2)O(2) and even though cells from old donors presented higher basal levels of transcripts they were not able to regulate them in response to the stress. Interestingly, UVA had a specific strong inhibitory effect on the expression of chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2) transcript, suggesting a possible mechanism for its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory roles. PMID:20299309

  18. Zinc suppresses apoptosis of U937 cells induced by hydrogen peroxide through an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Y; Karasaki, Y; Sugiura, T; Itoh, H; Abe, T; Yamamura, K; Higashi, K

    1998-05-19

    Treatment of human premonocytic U937 cells with 500 microM H2O2 for 1h followed by 4h incubation in fresh medium to allow the cells to execute apoptotic processes caused DNA fragmentation. However, in the presence of 1mM ZnSO4 throughout the incubation, DNA ladder formation was markedly inhibited. Hydrogen peroxide treatment for 1h with or without zinc increased both Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. However, only Bax protein decreased to basal levels in the presence of zinc during the following 4h incubation, resulting in an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and prevention of apoptosis. Treatment of U937 cells with 1mM ZnSO4 alone also decreased the levels of Bax protein. Furthermore, we observed that zinc completely inhibited the activation of CPP32 by H2O2, while no significant changes of ICE activities occurred with either H2O2 and/or zinc. These results indicate that the suppression of H2O2-induced apoptosis by zinc is mediated through an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which occurs upstream from the activation of CPP32. PMID:9610364

  19. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Hossein-Nezhad, Arash; Ansari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1) control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h); (2) melatonin (1 mM) for 12 h; (3) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h; (4) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM). The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression. PMID:26881079

  20. The Octadecaneuropeptide ODN Protects Astrocytes against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis via a PKA/MAPK-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Yosra; Kaddour, Hadhemi; Vaudry, David; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Douiri, Salma; Leprince, Jérôme; Castel, Helene; Vaudry, Hubert; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes synthesize and release endozepines, a family of regulatory peptides, including the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) an endogenous ligand of both central-type benzodiazepine (CBR) and metabotropic receptors. We have recently shown that ODN exerts a protective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in astrocytes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the type of receptor and the transduction pathways involved in the protective effect of ODN in cultured rat astrocytes. We have first observed a protective activity of ODN at very low concentrations that was abrogated by the metabotropic ODN receptor antagonist cyclo1–8[DLeu5]OP, but not by the CBR antagonist flumazenil. We have also found that the metabotropic ODN receptor is positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in astrocytes and that the glioprotective action of ODN upon H2O2-induced astrocyte death is PKA- and MEK-dependent, but PLC/PKC-independent. Downstream of PKA, ODN induced ERK phosphorylation, which in turn activated the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 and blocked the stimulation by H2O2 of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax. The effect of ODN on the Bax/Bcl-2 balance contributed to abolish the deleterious action of H2O2 on mitochondrial membrane integrity and caspase-3 activation. Finally, the inhibitory effect of ODN on caspase-3 activity was shown to be PKA and MEK-dependent. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that the potent glioprotective action of ODN against oxidative stress involves the metabotropic ODN receptor coupled to the PKA/ERK-kinase pathway to inhibit caspase-3 activation. PMID:22927932

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  2. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vinegar Amount sufficient for the purpose Remove sulfur dioxide from wine prior to fermentation to produce vinegar. Emulsifiers containing fatty acid esters 1.25 Bleaching agent. (d) Residual hydrogen peroxide...

  4. NASA Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant Hazards Technical Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David L.; Greene, Ben; Frazier, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The Fire, Explosion, Compatibility and Safety Hazards of Hydrogen Peroxide NASA technical manual was developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility. NASA Technical Memorandum TM-2004-213151 covers topics concerning high concentration hydrogen peroxide including fire and explosion hazards, material and fluid reactivity, materials selection information, personnel and environmental hazards, physical and chemical properties, analytical spectroscopy, specifications, analytical methods, and material compatibility data. A summary of hydrogen peroxide-related accidents, incidents, dose calls, mishaps and lessons learned is included. The manual draws from art extensive literature base and includes recent applicable regulatory compliance documentation. The manual may be obtained by United States government agencies from NASA Johnson Space Center and used as a reference source for hazards and safe handling of hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal JB6 P+ cells via hydrogen peroxide-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Ding, M; Leonard, S S; Robinson, V A; Millecchia, L; Zhang, X; Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V; Shi, X

    1999-12-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological mechanism for the control of DNA integrity in mammalian cells. Vanadium induces both DNA damage and apoptosis. It is suggested that vanadium-induced apoptosis serves to eliminate DNA-damaged cells. This study is designed to clarify a role of reactive oxygen species in the mechanism of apoptosis induced by vanadium. We established apoptosis model with murine epidermal JB6 P+ cells in the response to vanadium stimulation. Apoptosis was detected by a cell death ELISA assay and morphological analysis. The result shows that apoptosis induced by vanadate is dose-dependent, reaching its saturation level at a concentration of 100 microM vanadate. Vanadyl (IV) can also induce apoptosis albeit with lesser potency. A role of reactive oxygen species was analyzed by multiple reagents including specific scavengers of different reactive oxygen species. The result shows that vanadate-induced apoptosis is enhanced by NADPH, superoxide dismutase and sodium formate, but was inhibited by catalase and deferoxamine. Cells exposed to vanadium consume more molecular oxygen and at the same time, produce more H2O2 as measured by the change in fluorescence of scopoletin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase. This change in oxygen consumption and H2O2 production is enhanced by NADPH. Taken together, these results show that vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal cells and H2O2 induced by vanadate plays a major role in this process. PMID:10705990

  6. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  7. Protective effect of Cymbopogon citratus on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in the reproductive system of male rats.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Saleh M; Taha, Ekhlass M; Mubark, Zaid M; Aziz, Salam S; Simon, K D; Mazlan, A G

    2013-12-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (C. citratus) has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemoprotective properties. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of C. citratus aqueous extract against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and injury in the reproductive system of male rats. The twenty-five rats used in this study were divided into five groups, comprised of five rats each. The control group received standard food and drink. The H2O2 group received standard food and water with 0.5% H2O2. The rats in the H2O2 + C. citratus group and H2O2 + vitamin E group received standard food, H2O2, and C. citratus [100 mg·kg(-1) body weight (bw)], or vitamin E as an antioxidant reference (500 mg·kg(-1) bw), respectively. The C. citratus group was given C. citratus (100 mg·kg(-1) bw) in addition to the standard food and drink. The treatments were administered for 30 days. The H2O2 treatment significantly (P < 0.05) decreased body, testicular, and epididymal weight, as well as glutathione (GSH) level, but markedly increased malonaldehyde (MDA) in serum and testes homogenates. The rats treated with H2O2 exhibited testicular degeneration and significant reduction in sperm viability, motility, count, and rate of normal sperm. The C. citratus, vitamin E, and H2O2 treatment significantly (P < 0.05) increased the body, testicular, and epididymal weight, testosterone level, the values of the various sperm characteristics, and GSH. However, this treatment markedly reduced MDA in serum and testes homogenates, as well as testicular histopathological alterations in the H2O2-treated rats. The C. citratus aqueous extract reduced oxidative stress and protected male rats against H2O2-induced reproductive system injury. PMID:23957393

  8. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Redding-Johanson, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Bender, K.S.; Keasling, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.; Fields, M.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Luo, F.; Deng, Y.; He, Q.

    2010-07-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses.

  9. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENICALS SENSITIZE HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lungs are a target organ for arsenic carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that inorganic arsenic (iAs) can potentiate DNA damage induced by other agents. Once inside the human body iAs generally undergoes two ...

  10. Centella asiatica extracts modulate hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Joo; Cha, Hwa Jun; Nam, Ki Ho; Yoon, Yeongmin; Lee, Hyunjin; An, Sungkwan

    2011-12-01

    Centella asiatica (C. asiatica) is a pharmacological plant in South Asia. It has been demonstrated that C. asiatica extracts containing various pentacyclic triterpenes exert healing effects, especially wound healing and collagen synthesis in skin. However, there are few studies on the effect of C. asiatica extracts on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). To determine whether H(2) O(2) -induced senescence is affected by C. asiatica extracts, we performed senescence analysis on cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). We also analysed whole gene expression level using microarrays and showed that 39 mRNAs are differentially expressed in H(2) O(2) -induced HDFs with and without treatment with C. asiatica extracts. These genes regulate apoptosis, gene silencing, cell growth, transcription, senescence, DNA replication and the spindle checkpoint. Differential expression of FOXM1, E2F2, MCM2, GDF15 and BHLHB2 was confirmed using semi-quantitative PCR. In addition, C. asiatica extracts rescued the H(2) O(2) -induced repression of replication in HDFs. Therefore, the findings presented here suggest that C. asiatica extracts might regulate SIPS by preventing repression of DNA replication and mitosis-related gene expression. PMID:22092576

  11. Steady-state hydrogen peroxide induces glycolysis in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Ulanovskaya, Olesya A; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhou, Tianhong; Sun, Fei; Lu, Zhike; Hutchison, Alan L; Lan, Lefu; Wu, Min; Cravatt, Benjamin F; He, Chuan

    2014-07-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be readily inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated direct oxidation of their catalytic active cysteines. Because of the rapid degradation of H2O2 by bacterial catalase, only steady-state but not one-dose treatment with H2O2 rapidly induces glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We conducted transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses to globally profile the bacterial transcriptomes in response to a steady level of H2O2, which revealed profound transcriptional changes, including the induced expression of glycolytic genes in both bacteria. Our results revealed that the inactivation of GAPDH by H2O2 induces metabolic levels of glycolysis and the PPP; the elevated levels of fructose 1,6-biphosphate (FBP) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) lead to dissociation of their corresponding glycolytic repressors (GapR and HexR, respectively) from their cognate promoters, thus resulting in derepression of the glycolytic genes to overcome H2O2-stalled glycolysis in S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Both GapR and HexR may directly sense oxidative stresses, such as menadione. PMID:24769698

  12. Steady-State Hydrogen Peroxide Induces Glycolysis in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Ulanovskaya, Olesya A.; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhou, Tianhong; Sun, Fei; Lu, Zhike; Hutchison, Alan L.; Lan, Lefu; Wu, Min; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be readily inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated direct oxidation of their catalytic active cysteines. Because of the rapid degradation of H2O2 by bacterial catalase, only steady-state but not one-dose treatment with H2O2 rapidly induces glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We conducted transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses to globally profile the bacterial transcriptomes in response to a steady level of H2O2, which revealed profound transcriptional changes, including the induced expression of glycolytic genes in both bacteria. Our results revealed that the inactivation of GAPDH by H2O2 induces metabolic levels of glycolysis and the PPP; the elevated levels of fructose 1,6-biphosphate (FBP) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) lead to dissociation of their corresponding glycolytic repressors (GapR and HexR, respectively) from their cognate promoters, thus resulting in derepression of the glycolytic genes to overcome H2O2-stalled glycolysis in S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Both GapR and HexR may directly sense oxidative stresses, such as menadione. PMID:24769698

  13. Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Chong, Y L; Mahmood, A A; Indran, M; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Vikineswary, S

    2009-04-01

    Lentinula edodes (Berk) Pegler, commonly known as Shiitake mushroom has been used as medicinal food in Asian countries, especially in China and Japan and is believed to possess strong immunomodulatory property. In the present study, the methanolic extract of the fruit bodies of L. edodes was investigated for cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by measuring the activities of xanthine oxidase (XO) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) . H2O2 at a concentration of 5 microM caused 50% inhibition of PBMCs viability. The extract improved the PBMC viability and exerted a dose-dependent protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. At 100 microg/ml of extract concentration, the cell viability increased by 60% compared with the PBMCs incubated with H2O2 alone. The extract also inhibited XO activity in PBMC, while showing moderate stimulatory effect on GPx. However, in the presence of H2O2 alone, both the enzyme activities were increased significantly. The GPx activity increased, possibly in response to the increased availability of H2O2 in the cell. When the cells were pretreated with the extract and washed (to remove the extract) prior to the addition of H2O2, the GPx and XO activities as well as the cell viability were comparable to those when incubated with the extract alone. Thus, it is suggested that one of the possible mechanisms via which L. edodes methanolic extract confers protection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in PBMC is by inhibiting the superoxide-producing XO and increasing GPx activity which could rapidly inactivate H2O2. PMID:19517993

  14. Inhibition of miR-134 Protects Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Cheng; Yang, Lu; Pei, Chong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play an important role in neurological diseases. Particularly, miR-134 is reportedly involved in regulating neuron survival. However, the association between miR-134 and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival under adverse stimulus has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we aimed to explore the role and underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating RGC apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. Results showed that the expression of miR-134 dose- and time-dependently increased in RGC after H2O2 treatment. H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of miR-134 expression by antagomiR-134 and was enhanced by miR-134 overexpression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed a direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region of cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), a critical transcription factor for neuronal protection. In H2O2-treated RGCs, the inhibition of miR-134 significantly elevated the expression of CREB and its downstream genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR-134 also increased the expression of miR-132, a rapid response gene downstream of CREB. In addition, the target gene of miR-132, acetylcholinesterase was expectedly decreased by miR-134 inhibition. However, the overexpression of miR-134 exerted an opposite effect. The knockdown of CREB apparently abolished the protective effect of miR-134 inhibition against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis. The increased expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 induced by miR-134 inhibition was also abrogated by CREB knockdown. Overall, our results suggested that the downregulation of miR-134 can effectively protect against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis by negatively modulating CREB expression. PMID:25744098

  15. In Vitro Neuroprotective Effect of Shikimic Acid Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Caregnato, Fernanda Freitas; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Gasparotto, Juciano; Serafini, Mairim Russo; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo José; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2015-08-01

    Shikimic acid (SA), originally extracted from Illicium verum Hook. fil., is an indispensable starting material for the synthesis of the antiviral drug Oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)) with very limited number of studies regarding its biological effects in vitro. Therefore, we here evaluated the thermoanalytical profile, redox properties, and in vitro effects of SA on human neuronal-like cells (SH-SY5Y). The thermoanalytical profile of SA was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) characterization. Both antioxidant potential and in vitro lipoperoxidation levels were analyzed. Cell viability and intracellular reactive species (RS) production was determined by DCF and SRB assays, respectively. Our results show in vitro antioxidant activity of SA without exerting cytotoxic effects on SH-SY5Y cells at tested concentrations of 10 nM, 10 μM, and 10 mM. In addition, SA protected the cells against H2O2-induced toxicity; effect that could be related, at least in part, with decreased intracellular RS production and its antioxidant potential. The present study shows evidence for neuroprotective actions of SA against oxidative stress-induced toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells, inviting for further investigation about its potential use in the context of oxidative stress-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25862258

  16. Aging modifies brain region-specific vulnerability to experimental oxidative stress induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Bielinski, Donna; Dallal, Gerard E.; Joseph, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated a significant decline in brain function and behavior in Fischer 344 (F344) rats with age. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysregulation in calcium homeostasis (as assessed through 45Ca flux) may contribute to the increase in age-related vulnerability to oxidative stress in brain regions, and result in a deficit in behavior-mediated signaling. Crude membrane (P-2) and more purified synaptosomal fractions were isolated from the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of young (6 months) and old (22 months) F344 rats and were assessed for calcium flux and extracellular-regulated kinase activity 1 (ERK) under control and oxidative stress conditions induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide (final concentration 5 μM). The level of oxidative stress responses was monitored by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). The results showed a significant difference in oxidative stress responses between young and old rats in evaluated brain regions. Old rats showed higher sensitivity to oxidative stress than young rats. The present findings show the differential effects of oxidative stress on calcium flux in brain regions with age that are dependent upon the brain areas examined and the fraction assessed. The accumulation of ROS and the decrease in GSH in the frontal cortex were sufficient to decrease ERK activity in old rats. This is the first study, to our knowledge, that demonstrates age-related differential sensitivity to oxidative stress expressed as a function of behavior-mediated signaling and stress levels among different fractions isolated from brain regions controlling behavior. PMID:19424838

  17. High light-induced hydrogen peroxide production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is increased by high CO2 availability.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Na, Chae Sun; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2015-03-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an unavoidable part of photosynthesis. Stress that accompanies high light levels and low CO2 availability putatively includes enhanced ROS production in the so-called Mehler reaction. Such conditions are thought to encourage O2 to become an electron acceptor at photosystem I, producing the ROS superoxide anion radical (O2·-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). In contrast, here it is shown in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that CO2 depletion under high light levels lowered cellular H2 O2 production, and that elevated CO2 levels increased H2 O2 production. Using various photosynthetic and mitochondrial mutants of C. reinhardtii, the chloroplast was identified as the main source of elevated H2 O2 production under high CO2 availability. High light levels under low CO2 availability induced photoprotective mechanisms called non-photochemical quenching, or NPQ, including state transitions (qT) and high energy state quenching (qE). The qE-deficient mutant npq4 produced more H2 O2 than wild-type cells under high light levels, although less so under high CO2 availability, whereas it demonstrated equal or greater enzymatic H2 O2 -degrading capacity. The qT-deficient mutant stt7-9 produced the same H2 O2 as wild-type cells under high CO2 availability. Physiological levels of H2 O2 were able to hinder qT and the induction of state 2, providing an explanation for why under high light levels and high CO2 availability wild-type cells behaved like stt7-9 cells stuck in state 1. PMID:25619314

  18. [Hydrogen peroxide in artificial photosynthesizing systems].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, A V; Komissarov, G G

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of the concepts of hydrogen peroxide as a source of photosynthetic oxygen (hydrogen) coordination and photochemical properties of chlorophyll and its aggregates towards hydrogen peroxide were considered. The binding energy of H2O and H2O2 with chlorophyll and chlorophyllide depending on their form (monomers, dimers and trimers) was estimated by quantum chemical calculations. It is shown that at an increase of the degree of the pigment aggregation binding energy of H2O2 was more than the energy of H2O. Analysis of experimental results of the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using chlorophyll was carried out. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (deltaG degrees and deltaH degrees) of the formation of organic compounds from CO2 with water and hydrogen peroxide were compared. The interaction of CO2 with H2O2 requires much less energy consumption than with water for all considered cases. The formation of organic products (formaldehyde, alcohols, carboxylic and carbonylic compounds) and simultaneous production of O2 under the influence of visible light in the systems of inorganic carbon--hydrogen peroxide--chlorophyll (phthalocyanine) is detected by GC/MS method, FTIR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. PMID:25702472

  19. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Induces Tumoricidal Effects on Lymphoma Cells Through Hydrogen Peroxide Mediation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao Daniel; Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2016-09-01

    Several groups have reported that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) possess unique tumoricidal properties against many cancers. However, the exact mechanisms as to how hWJSCs inhibit tumor growth are not known. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of cancer cells to high hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels from H2 O2 -releasing drugs causes their death. We therefore explored whether the tumoricidal effect of hWJSCs on lymphoma cells was mediated via H2 O2 . We first exposed lymphoma cells to six different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) concentrates of hWJSC-conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) (3, 5, 10, 30, 50, 100 kDa) for 48 h. Since, the 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate showed the greatest cell inhibition we then investigated whether the tumoricidal effect of the specific 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate on two different lymphoma cell lines (Ramos and Toledo) was mediated via accumulation of H2 O2 . We used a battery of assays (MTT, propidium iodide, mitochondria membrane potential, apoptosis, cell cycle, oxidative stress enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation) to test this mechanism. The hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate significantly decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cell death and apoptosis in both lymphoma cell lines. There were significant increases in superoxide dismutase with concomitant decreases in glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and thioredoxin peroxidase activities. H2 O2 levels, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation were also significantly increased in both lymphoma cell lines. The results suggested that the hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate regulates cellular H2 O2 leading to a tumoricidal effect and may thus be a promising anti-lymphoma agent. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2045-2055, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27392313

  20. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  1. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  2. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates—RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  3. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates.

    PubMed

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates-RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  4. Differential role of ethylene and hydrogen peroxide in dark-induced stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Kar, R K; Parvin, N; Laha, D

    2013-12-15

    Regulation of stomatal aperture is crucial in terrestrial plants for controlling water loss and gaseous exchange with environment. While much is known of signaling for stomatal opening induced by blue light and the role of hormones, little is known about the regulation of stomatal closing in darkness. The present study was aimed to verify their role in stomatal regulation in darkness. Epidermal peelings from the leaves of Commelina benghalensis were incubated in a defined medium in darkness for 1 h followed by a 1 h incubation in different test solutions [H2O2, propyl gallate, ethrel (ethylene), AgNO3, sodium orthovanadate, tetraethyl ammonium chloride, CaCl2, LaCl3, separately and in combination] before stomatal apertures were measured under the microscope. In the dark stomata remained closed under treatments with ethylene and propyl gallate but opened widely in the presence of H2O2 and AgNO3. The opening effect was largely unaffected by supplementing the treatment with Na-vanadate (PM H+ ATPase inhibitor) and tetraethyl ammonium chloride (K(+)-channel inhibitor) except that opening was significantly inhibited by the latter in presence of H2O2. On the other hand, H2O2 could not override the closing effect of ethylene at any concentrations while a marginal opening of stomata was found when Ag NO3 treatment was given together with propyl gallate. CaCl2 treatment opened stomata in the darkness while LaCl3 maintained stomata closed. A combination of LaCl3 and propyl gallate strongly promoted stomatal opening. A probable action of ethylene in closing stomata of Commelina benghalensis in dark has been proposed. PMID:24517017

  5. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  6. Catalyst Development for Hydrogen Peroxide Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morlan, P. W.; Wu, P.-K.; Ruttle, D. W.; Fuller, R. P.; Nejad, A. S.; Anderson, W. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of various catalysts of hydrogen peroxide was conducted for the applications of liquid rocket engines. The catalyst development includes silver screen technology, solid catalyst technology, and homogeneous catalyst technology. The silver screen technology development was performed with 85% (by weight) hydrogen peroxide. The results of this investigation were used as the basis for the catalyst design of a pressure-fed liquid-fueled upper stage engine. Both silver-plated nickel 200 screens and pure silver screens were used as the active metal catalyst during the investigation, The data indicate that a high decomposition efficiency (greater than 90%) of 85% hydrogen peroxide can be achieved at a bed loading of 0.5 lbm/sq in/sec with both pure silver and silver plated screens. Samarium oxide coating, however, was found to retard the decomposition process and the catalyst bed was flooded at lower bed loading. A throughput of 200 lbm of hydrogen peroxide (1000 second run time) was tested to evaluate the catalyst aging issue and performance degradation was observed starting at approximately 400 seconds. Catalyst beds of 3.5 inch in diameter was fabricated using the same configuration for a 1,000-lbf rocket engine. High decomposition efficiency was obtained with a low pressure drop across the bed. Solid catalyst using precious metal was also developed for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide from 85% to 98% by weight. Preliminary results show that the catalyst has a strong reactivity even after 15 minutes of peroxide decomposition. The development effort also includes the homogeneous catalyst technology. Various non-toxic catalysts were evaluated with 98% peroxide and hydrocarbon fuels. The results of open cup drop tests indicate an ignition delay around 11 ms.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide - Material Compatibility Studied by Microcalorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homung, Steven D.; Davis, Dennis D.; Baker, David; Popp, Christopher G.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental and toxicity concerns with current hypergolic propellants have led to a renewed interest in propellant grade hydrogen peroxide (HP) for propellant applications. Storability and stability has always been an issue with HP. Contamination or contact of HP with metallic surfaces may cause decomposition, which can result in the evolution of heat and gas leading to increased pressure or thermal hazards. The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility has developed a technique to monitor the decompositions of hydrogen peroxide at temperatures ranging from 25 to 60 C. Using isothermal microcalorimetry we have measured decomposition rates at the picomole/s/g level showing the catalytic effects of materials of construction. In this paper we will present the results of testing with Class 1 and 2 materials in 90 percent hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    PubMed

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  9. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  10. Improvement of adventitious root formation in flax using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takáč, Tomáš; Obert, Bohuš; Rolčík, Jakub; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-09-25

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important crop for the production of oil and fiber. In vitro manipulations of flax are used for genetic improvement and breeding while improvements in adventitious root formation are important for biotechnological programs focused on regeneration and vegetative propagation of genetically valuable plant material. Additionally, flax hypocotyl segments possess outstanding morphogenetic capacity, thus providing a useful model for the investigation of flax developmental processes. Here, we investigated the crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and auxin with respect to reprogramming flax hypocotyl cells for root morphogenetic development. Exogenous auxin induced the robust formation of adventitious roots from flax hypocotyl segments while the addition of hydrogen peroxide further enhanced this process. The levels of endogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) were positively correlated with increased root formation in response to exogenous auxin (1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; NAA). Histochemical staining of the hypocotyl segments revealed that hydrogen peroxide and peroxidase, but not superoxide, were positively correlated with root formation. Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that endogenous levels of hydrogen peroxide were controlled by peroxidases during root formation from hypocotyl segments. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide positively affected flax adventitious root formation by regulating the endogenous auxin levels. Consequently, this agent can be applied to increase flax regeneration capacity for biotechnological purposes such as improved plant rooting. PMID:26921706

  11. PED/PEA-15 Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Ins-1E Pancreatic Beta-Cells via PLD-1

    PubMed Central

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Zatterale, Federica; Nigro, Cecilia; Mirra, Paola; Falco, Roberta; Ulianich, Luca; Di Jeso, Bruno; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The small scaffold protein PED/PEA-15 is involved in several different physiologic and pathologic processes, such as cell proliferation and survival, diabetes and cancer. PED/PEA-15 exerts an anti-apoptotic function due to its ability to interfere with both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in different cell types. Recent evidence shows that mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 present larger pancreatic islets and increased beta-cells mass. In the present work we investigated PED/PEA-15 role in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E beta-cells. In pancreatic islets isolated from TgPED/PEA-15 mice hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA fragmentation was lower compared to WT islets. TUNEL analysis showed that PED/PEA-15 overexpression increases the viability of Ins-1E beta-cells and enhances their resistance to apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide exposure. The activity of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP-1 were markedly reduced in Ins-1E cells overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Ins-1EPED/PEA-15). In parallel, we observed a decrease of the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-xS and Bad. In contrast, the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xL was enhanced. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation was higher in control cells compared to Ins-1EPED/PEA-15 cells. Interestingly, the preincubation with propranolol, an inhibitor of the pathway of PLD-1, a known interactor of PED/PEA-15, responsible for its deleterious effects on glucose tolerance, abolishes the antiapoptotic effects of PED/PEA-15 overexpression in Ins-1E beta-cells. The same results have been obtained by inhibiting PED/PEA-15 interaction with PLD-1 in Ins-1EPED/PEA-15. These results show that PED/PEA-15 overexpression is sufficient to block hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E cells through a PLD-1 mediated mechanism. PMID:25489735

  12. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.356...

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Changes in Energy Status and Respiration Metabolism of Harvested Longan Fruit in Relation to Pericarp Browning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Xiong; Lin, Yi-Fen; Chen, Yi-Hui; Wang, Hui; Shi, John; Lin, He-Tong

    2016-06-01

    Energy status and respiration metabolism of "Fuyan" longan fruit treated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and their relationship to pericarp browning were studied. The results displayed that H2O2 significantly increased the respiration rate, increased activities of respiratory terminal oxidases like cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO), decreased NAD kinase activity, maintained lower contents of NADP and NADPH as well as higher amounts of NAD and NADH, and accelerated the decrease of energy charge. These results gave convincing evidence that the treatment of H2O2 for accelerating longan pericarp browning was due to an increase of energy deficiency, an increase of respiratory metabolic pathways of Embden-Meyerhof pathway (EMP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a decrease of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) of respiratory pathway, and an increase of activities of respiratory terminal oxidases like CCO and AAO. PMID:27213701

  14. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    DOEpatents

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has distinct adaptive responses to both hydrogen peroxide and menadione.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, D J

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with low concentrations of either hydrogen peroxide or menadione (a superoxide-generating agent) induces adaptive responses which protect cells from the lethal effects of subsequent challenge with higher concentrations of these oxidants. Pretreatment with menadione is protective against cell killing by hydrogen peroxide; however, pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide is unable to protect cells from subsequent challenge with menadione. This suggests that the adaptive responses to these two different oxidants may be distinct. PMID:1400218

  16. Advanced age protects microvascular endothelium from aberrant Ca2+ influx and cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Matthew J; Boerman, Erika M; Behringer, Erik J; Shaw, Rebecca L; Domeier, Timothy L; Segal, Steven S

    2015-01-01

    Young (∼4 months) and Old (∼24 months) male C57BL/6 mice. Under resting conditions, with no difference in intracellular calcium levels, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) availability was ∼1/3 greater in endothelium of Old mice while vascular catalase activity was reduced by nearly half. Compared to Old, imposing oxidative stress (200 μm H2O2) for 20 min increased intracellular calcium to 4-fold greater levels in endothelium of Young in conjunction with twice the calcium influx. Prolonged (60 min) exposure to H2O2 induced 7-fold greater cell death in endothelium of Young. Microvascular adaptation to advanced age may protect endothelial cells during elevated oxidative stress to preserve functional viability of the intima. PMID:25689097

  17. An upper limit for stratospheric hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Traub, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    It has been postulated that hydrogen peroxide is important in stratospheric chemistry as a reservoir and sink for odd hydrogen species, and for its ability to interconvert them. The present investigation is concerned with an altitude dependent upper limit curve for stratospheric hydrogen peroxide, taking into account an altitude range from 21.5 to 38.0 km for January 23, 1983. The data employed are from balloon flight No. 1316-P, launched from the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) in Palestine, Texas. The obtained upper limit curve lies substantially below the data reported by Waters et al. (1981), even though the results are from the same latitude and are both wintertime measurements.

  18. Impact of hydrogen peroxide as a soil amendment on nasturtiums

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, is a highly reactive oxidizing agent naturally occurring in plants and animals. Plants produce hydrogen peroxide to destroy either their infected plant cells or the pathogens within their cells. Hydrogen peroxide also acts as a stress signal to plants. It is approved for c...

  19. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  20. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  1. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  2. Protective effects of Arctium lappa L. roots against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury and potential mechanisms in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xing; Guo, Li-Ping; Hu, Xiao-Long; Huang, Jin; Fan, Yan-Hua; Ren, Tian-Shu; Zhao, Qing-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Accumulated evidence has shown that excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in neuronal cell death related with various chronic neurodegenerative disorders. This study was designed to explore neuroprotective effects of ethyl acetate extract of Arctium lappa L. roots (EAL) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell injury in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability was significantly decreased after exposure to 200 μM H2O2, whereas pretreatment with different concentrations of EAL attenuated the H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Hoechst 33342 staining indicated that EAL reversed nuclear condensation in H2O2-treated cells. Meanwhile, TUNEL assay with DAPI staining showed that EAL attenuated apoptosis was induced by H2O2. Pretreatment with EAL also markedly elevated activities of antioxidant enzyme (GSH-Px and SOD), reduced lipid peroxidation (MDA) production, prevented ROS formation, and the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, EAL showed strong radical scavenging ability in 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assays. Furthermore, EAL inhibited H2O2-induced apoptosis by increases in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, decreases in cytochrome c release, and attenuation of caspase-3, caspase-9 activities, and expressions. These findings suggest that EAL may be regarded as a potential antioxidant agent and possess potent neuroprotective activity against H2O2-induced injury. PMID:25352420

  3. How do porosity-inducing techniques affect antibiotic elution from bone cement? An in vitro comparison between hydrogen peroxide and a mechanical mixer

    PubMed Central

    Lovric, V.; Leung, A.; Walsh, W. R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Increasing the porosity of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer increases the antibiotic elution, but the correlation between porosity and antibiotic elution is not well documented. The purposes of this study was to attempt new porosity-increasing methods and to investigate the correlation between antibiotic elution and both total and surface porosity. Materials and methods Five types of antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) using 2 g cefazolin and 40 g cement were prepared. Other than manual mixing, hydrogen peroxide was used as a foaming agent and a mixing drill piece was used as a mechanical device to try to induce porosity when mixing the cement. Elution of antibiotic into phosphate-buffered saline was measured from 1 h to 1 week. Surface porosity was calculated from density values which were measured with a density kit and an electronic balance, while total porosity was quantified using micro-computed tomography. Results When a mixing drill piece was used to induce porosity, we observed a significant increasin antibiotic elution compared to a manually mixed ALBC. On the other hand, hydrogen peroxide reduced the elution significantly. Mild correlation between the total amount of cluted in 1 week antibiotic elution and total porosity was observed. Conclusions In terms of improving elution, the mixing drill piece seemed to be efficient. A relationship between surface porosity and elution efficacy was not observed. PMID:19384476

  4. Calyxin Y induces hydrogen peroxide-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xiao-bing; Wang, Jun-song; Geng, Ya-di; Yang, Chang-shui; Kong, Ling-yi

    2013-10-28

    Calyxin Y has been recently isolated from Alpinia katsumadai which has a folk use as an anti-tumor medicine. Calyxin Y induced caspase-dependent cell death in NCI-H460 cells, and concomitantly, provoked cytoprotective autophagy with the upregulation of critical Atg proteins. The cleavage of Atg proteins by caspases acted as a switch between autophagy and apoptosis induced by calyxin Y. Intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was triggered upon exposure to calyxin Y via the induction of autophagy and apoptosis. We provided evidence that activated JNK was upstream effectors controlling both autophagy and apoptosis in response to elevated H2O2. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that calyxin Y serves multiple roles as a promising chemotherapeutic agent that induces H2O2-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation. PMID:23811287

  5. Experimental investigation of hydrogen peroxide RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Decina, A.; Zanini, S.; D'Orazio, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a detailed experimental study of the plasma properties in low pressure RF discharges in hydrogen peroxide and a comparison with argon under the same operating conditions. H2O2 plasmas have been proposed for sterilization purposes. Electrical properties of the discharge were shown to be similar, as for the RF and DC voltages of the driving electrode. Bulk plasma volume remains stable, concentrated in an almost cylindrical region between the two facing electrodes. It was found that the electron temperature is almost uniform across the plasma and independent of the power level. This is higher than in argon discharges: T e  =  4.6  ±  0.9 eV versus T e  =  3.3  ±  1.1 eV. The plasma density increases almost linearly with the power level and a substantial negative ion component has been ruled out in hydrogen peroxide. Dissociation in the plasma gas phase was revealed by atomic hydrogen and hydroxyl radical emission in the discharge spectra. Emission from hydroxyl and atomic oxygen demonstrates that oxidizing radicals are produced by hydrogen peroxide discharges, revealing its usefulness for plasma processing other than sterilization, for instance to increase polymer film surface energy. On the other hand, argon could be considered as a candidate for the sterilization purposes due to the intense production of UV radiation.

  6. Vibrationally mediated photodissociation of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ticich, T.M.; Likar, M.D.; Duebal, H.; Butler, L.J.; Crim, F.F.

    1987-11-15

    Vibrationally mediated photodissociation is a means of studying the spectroscopy of bound vibrational overtone states and of probing the electronic photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In these experiments, a highly vibrationally excited hydrogen peroxide molecule prepared by initial excitation in the region of the third (4..nu../sub OH/) or fourth (5..nu../sub OH/) overtone of the OH stretching vibration absorbs an additional photon to dissociate to OH fragments whose individual quantum state populations are measured by laser induced fluorescence. This technique is a means of obtaining excitation spectra for bound highly vibrationally excited states and confirms the accuracy of a model that incorporates the role of the torsional vibration in the vibrational overtone spectroscopy. The photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules are substantially different from those observed for dissociation by single photons of comparable or greater energy. Approximately 11% of the OH fragments formed in the vibrationally mediated photodissociation through 4..nu../sub OH/ are vibrationally excited as compared to an unobservable amount (less than or equal to2%) in the single photon ultraviolet dissociation.

  7. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ∼24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  8. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  9. Synthesis and Protective Effects of Kaempferol-3'-sulfonate on Hydrogen Peroxide-induced injury in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinbin; Wang, Qin; Wang, Chunmei; Qin, Xiaolin; Huang, Yu; Zeng, Renquan

    2016-06-01

    A novel water-soluble sulfated derivative, kaempferol-3'-sulfonate acid sodium (KS) with the composition of [C15 H9 O9 SNa]·2.5H2 O, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, and HRMS. Its protective effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells injured by hydrogen peroxide were evaluated by CCK-8 method, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. The experimental results indicated that the KS can significantly increase cell viability and reduce apoptosis on H2 O2 -injured VSMCs, as well as reverse the effects of H2 O2 on Bcl-2, Bad, and caspase-3 expressions. In addition, LDH leakage, MDA levels, and SOD and GSH activities were also measured with spectrophotometry. The results indicated that the KS acted as antioxidant preventing LDH leakage and MDA production, while increasing intracellular SOD and GSH activities. These findings revealed that KS might potentially serve as an effective antioxidant agent for prevention and treatment of vascular disease caused by H2 O2 -injured VSMCs. PMID:26706847

  10. Nelumbo nucifera leaves protect hydrogen peroxide-induced hepatic damage via antioxidant enzymes and HO-1/Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Lee, Da-Bin

    2015-06-01

    Naturally occurring phenolic compounds are widely found in plants. Here, the phenolic composition and hepatoprotective effect of the butanolic extract (BE) from Nelumbo nucifera leaves against H2O2-induced hepatic damage in cultured hepatocytes were investigated. BE showed high total phenol and flavonoid contents, and major phenolic compounds are quercetin, catechin, ferulic acid, rutin, and protocatechuic acid by HPLC analysis. BE effectively scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) cation radicals (IC50 values of 5.21 μg mL(-1) for DPPH and 6.22 μg mL(-1) for ABTS(+)) and showed strong reducing power. Pretreatment of BE prior to 650 μM H2O2 exposure markedly increased cell viability and suppressed H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and AAPH-induced cell membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, BE up-regulated intracellular glutathione levels under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Notably, the hepatoprotective effect of BE was directly correlated with the increased expression of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) by 0.62-fold, catalase (CAT) by 0.42-fold, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by 2.4-fold. Pretreatment of BE also increased the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8.1-fold indicating that increased SOD-1, CAT, and HO-1 expressions are Nrf2-mediated. PMID:25962859

  11. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization of freeze dryers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J W; Arnold, J F; Nail, S L; Renzi, E

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to steam sterilization has been examined using a pilot plant freeze dryer equipped with a prototype vapor generator. Specific objectives of the study discussed in this presentation were to: 1. Identify critical process variables affecting the lethality of VHP to Bacillus stearothermophilus spores, particularly within dead legs in the system. 2. Measure the efficacy of system degassing after sterilization. 3. Determine the effect of repeated sterilization cycles on the integrity of elastomeric components of the freeze dryer. Penetration of adequate concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor into small diameter piping, such as tubing connected to pressure gauges, is the most challenging aspect of VHP sterilization of freeze dryers. Prior to equipment modifications, spore strips placed within such dead legs remained positive irrespective of the number of gas/degas pulses and system pressure. Equipment modifications necessary to effect complete kill of biological indicators placed in system dead legs is discussed. Results of this study support the conclusion that vaporized hydrogen peroxide shows promise as an alternative sterilization method for freeze dryers. PMID:1474433

  12. Zingerone protects against stannous chloride-induced and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Iyappan; Narayanan, Nithya; Rabindran, Remitha; Jayasree, P R; Manish Kumar, P R

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the dose-dependent antioxidant activity and DNA protective effects of zingerone. At 500 μg/mL, the DPPH radical scavenging activity of zingerone and ascorbic acid as a standard was found to be 86.7 and 94.2 % respectively. At the same concentration, zingerone also showed significant reducing power (absorbance 0.471) compared to that of ascorbic acid (absorbance 0.394). The in vitro toxicity of stannous chloride (SnCl2) was evaluated using genomic and plasmid DNA. SnCl2-induced degradation of genomic DNA was found to occur at a concentration of 0.8 mM onwards with complete degradation at 1.02 mM and above. In the case of plasmid DNA, conversion of supercoiled DNA into the open circular form indicative of DNA nicking activity was observed at a concentration of 0.2 mM onwards; complete conversion was observed at a concentration of 1.02 mM and above. Zingerone was found to confer protection against SnCl2-induced oxidative damage to genomic and plasmid DNA at concentrations of 500 and 750 μg/mL onwards, respectively. This protective effect was further confirmed in the presence of UV/H2O2-a known reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system-wherein protection by zingerone against ROS-mediated DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 250 μg/mL onwards in a dose-dependent manner. This study clearly indicated the in vitro DNA protective property of zingerone against SnCl2-induced, ROS-mediated DNA damage. PMID:24006104

  13. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders. PMID:26221182

  14. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders. PMID:26221182

  15. Protective effect of the extracts from Cnidium officinale against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide via antioxidant effect.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Park, Jae Ho; Lee, Hee Kyeong; Ju, So Yeong; Hong, Se Chul; Lee, Jeong Rak; Chung, Gyu Young; Lim, Jae Hwan; Jeong, Hyung Jin

    2009-03-01

    The dried rhizomes of Cnidium officinale are used as herbal drugs in the treatment of pain, inflammation, menstrual disturbance and antivitamin deficiency disease, and also act as a blood pressure depressant. In addition, there are several reports suggesting that they have pharmacological properties to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, and that they act as an inhibitor of high glucose-induced proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells. However, little has been known about the functional role of the extracts from C. officinale on oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis caused by ROS. In this work, we have investigated the DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and intracellular ROS scavenging capacity, and Fe(2+) chelating activity of the extracts from C. officinale. In addition, we evaluated whether the extracts are capable of reducing H(2)O(2)-induced DNA and cell damage in the human skin fibroblast cell. These extracts showed a dose-dependent free-radical scavenging capacity and a protective effect on DNA damage and the lipid peroxidation causing the cell damage by ROS. These antioxidant activities and inhibitory effects of the extracts on DNA and cell damage may further explain that C. officinale is useful as a herbal medicine for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:19101603

  16. Antioxidant phenolic profile from ethyl acetate fraction of Fructus Ligustri Lucidi with protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Heng-Yin; Chen, Shiu Ching; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Kuo, Hui-Chun; Hseu, You-Cheng; Ching, Hui; Wu, Chi-Rei

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the antioxidant and protective properties of crude extract and fractions from Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in SH-SY5Y cells. The contents of their phytochemical profiles were determined by spectrophotometric methods and high performance liquid chromatography using a photodiode array detector. FLL crude extract possessed appreciable scavenging capacity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and H2O2. The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction was the most active fraction in scavenging free radicals and H2O2. Following exposure of cells to H2O2, there was a marked decrease in cell survival and intracellular antioxidant enzymes, and then intracellular oxidative stress, the level of lipid peroxidation, and caspase-3 activity were increased. Simultaneous treatment with the EtOAc fraction blocked these H2O2-induced cellular events. Hydroxytyrosol and salidroside are major components of the EtOAc fraction. These results show that the phenolic-enriched EtOAc fraction of FLL contains tyrosol-related derivatives and exerts the protective effects against H2O2 toxicity via its free radical scavenging activity and ability to elevate the levels of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22142696

  17. Hydrogen peroxide-induced antioxidant activities and cardiotonic glycoside accumulation in callus cultures of endemic Digitalis species.

    PubMed

    Cingoz, Gunce Sahin; Verma, Sandeep Kumar; Gurel, Ekrem

    2014-09-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on callus cultures of four Digitalis species (Digitalis lamarckii, Digitalis trojana, Digitalis davisiana and Digitalis cariensis) increased catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total phenolic, proline activity and cardiotonic glycoside production. Callus derived from hypocotyl explants was cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 0.25 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) thidiazuron (TDZ). After a month of culture, callus was transferred to MS medium containing 10 mM H2O2 and then incubated for 6 h. The amount of five cardenolides (Lanatoside C, Digitoxin, Digoxigenin, Gitoxigenin and Digoxin) as well as CAT, SOD, total phenolic, proline activity from Digitalis species were compared. No digoxin was detected in all treatments and control groups. The total cardenolides estimated were in the order of D. lamarckii (586.65  μg g(-1) dw), D. davisiana (506.79 μg g(-1) dw), D. cariensis (376.60 μg g(-1) dw) and D. trojana (282.39 μg g(-1) dw). It was clear that H2O2 pre-treatment resulted in an increase in enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. However, a significant negative relationship between cardenolides production and overall activities of CAT, SOD, total phenolic and proline was evident. The described protocol here will be useful for the development of new strategies for a large-scale production of cardenolides. PMID:24915111

  18. Metabolic responses of Beauveria bassiana to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress using an LC-MS-based metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Wang, Wei; Lu, Ruili; Jin, Song; Chen, Yihui; Fan, Meizhen; Huang, Bo; Li, Zengzhi; Hu, Fenglin

    2016-06-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, is commonly used as a biological agent for pest control. Environmental and biological factors expose the fungus to oxidative stress; as a result, B. bassiana has adopted a number of anti-oxidant mechanisms. In this study, we investigated metabolites of B. bassiana that are formed in response to oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) revealed differences between the control and the H2O2-treated groups. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) showed 18 up-regulated metabolites and 25 down-regulated metabolites in the H2O2-treated fungus. Pathway analysis indicated that B. bassiana may be able to alleviate oxidative stress by enhancing lipid catabolism and glycometabolism, thus decreasing membrane polarity and preventing polar H2O2 or ROS from permeating into fungal cells and protecting cells against oxidative injury. Meanwhile, most of the unsaturated fatty acids that are derived from glycerophospholipids hydrolysis can convert into oxylipins through autoxidation, which can prevent the reactive oxygen of H2O2 from attacking important macromolecules of the fungus. Results showed also that H2O2 treatment can enhance mycotoxins production which implies that oxidative stress may be able to increase the virulence of the fungus. In comparison to the control group, citric acid and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine were down-regulated, which suggested that metabolic flux was occurring to the TCA cycle and enhancing carbohydrate metabolism. The findings from this study will contribute to the understanding of how the molecular mechanisms of fungus respond to environmental and biological stress factors as well as how the manipulation of such metabolisms may lead to selection of more effective fungal strains for pest control. PMID:27116916

  19. Plumbagin exerts protective effects in nucleus pulposus cells by attenuating hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis through NF-κB and Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hui; Yu, Hang; Ren, Ding; Zhu, Kejun; Huang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Plumbagin, one of the constituents responsible for the various biological activities of Plumbago zeylanica has been demonstrated to possess antioxidant activity, which may inhibit lipid peroxidation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the present study, we aimed to examine the protective effects of plumbagin as well as the underlying mechansim through which plumbagin attenuates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). For this purpose, the NPCs were incubated with fresh medium containing H2O2 (200 µM) at 37˚C in a humidified 5% CO2 atmosphere for 6 h, and cultured with various concentrations of plumbagin (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 µM). Treatment with plumbagin significantly increased the viability of the H2O2-exposed NPCs in a dose‑dependent manner. Moreover, plumbagin significantly reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, as well as the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the H2O2‑exposed NPCs. Glutathione (GSH) content, as well as the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxdiase (GSH-Px) were increased. We found that the administration of plumbagin significantly inhibited the activity of caspase-9 and -3, and downregulated NF-κB expression and upregulated Nrf-2 expression in the H2O2-exposed NPCs. Taken together, these findings suggest that plumbagin exerts neuroprotective effects in NPCs by attenuating H2O2‑induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis through mediating the expression of NF-κB and Nrf-2. PMID:27082014

  20. Hydrogen peroxide excretion by oral streptococci and effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, J; Iwami, Y; Yamada, T

    1983-01-01

    Approved type strains of Streptococcus sanguis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. salivarius were grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rate of hydrogen peroxide excretion, oxygen uptake, and acid production from glucose by washed-cell suspensions of these strains were studied, and the levels of enzymes in cell-free extracts which reduced oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, or hypothiocyanite (OSCN-) in the presence of NADH or NADPH were assayed. The effects of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide on the rate of acid production and oxygen uptake by intact cells, the activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts, and the levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates were also studied. All strains consumed oxygen in the presence of glucose. S. sanguis, S. mitis, and anaerobically grown S. mutans excreted hydrogen peroxide. There was higher NADH oxidase and NADH peroxidase activity in aerobically grown cells than in anaerobically grown cells. NADPH oxidase activity was low in all species. Acid production, oxygen uptake, and, consequently, hydrogen peroxide excretion were inhibited in all the strains by lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide. S. sanguis and S. mitis had a higher capacity than S. mutans and S. salivarius to recover from this inhibition. Higher activity in the former strains of an NADH-OSCN oxidoreductase, which converted OSCN- into thiocyanate, explained this difference. The change in levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates after inhibition of glycolysis by OSCN- and the actual activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts in the presence of OSCN- indicated that the primary target of OSCN- in the glycolytic pathway was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. PMID:6832837

  1. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  2. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-{kappa}B in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (G{alpha}i1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of G{alpha}i1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of G{alpha}i1QL. G{alpha}i1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-{kappa}B, which resulted from an increase in NF-{kappa}B p50 protein. We conclude that G{alpha}i1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation.

  3. Complex I and complex III inhibition specifically increase cytosolic hydrogen peroxide levels without inducing oxidative stress in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Forkink, Marleen; Basit, Farhan; Teixeira, José; Swarts, Herman G.; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor studies with isolated mitochondria demonstrated that complex I (CI) and III (CIII) of the electron transport chain (ETC) can act as relevant sources of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we studied ROS generation and oxidative stress induction during chronic (24 h) inhibition of CI and CIII using rotenone (ROT) and antimycin A (AA), respectively, in intact HEK293 cells. Both inhibitors stimulated oxidation of the ROS sensor hydroethidine (HEt) and increased mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels without major effects on cell viability. Integrated analysis of cells stably expressing cytosolic- or mitochondria-targeted variants of the reporter molecules HyPer (H2O2-sensitive and pH-sensitive) and SypHer (H2O2-insensitive and pH-sensitive), revealed that CI- and CIII inhibition increased cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels. Total and mitochondria-specific lipid peroxidation was not increased in the inhibited cells as reported by the C11-BODIPY581/591 and MitoPerOx biosensors. Also expression of the superoxide-detoxifying enzymes CuZnSOD (cytosolic) and MnSOD (mitochondrial) was not affected. Oxyblot analysis revealed that protein carbonylation was not stimulated by CI and CIII inhibition. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of CI and CIII: (i) increases the levels of HEt-oxidizing ROS and (ii) specifically elevates cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels, (iii) does not induce oxidative stress or substantial cell death. We conclude that the increased ROS levels are below the stress-inducing level and might play a role in redox signaling. PMID:26516986

  4. Hazard Assessment of Personal Protective Clothing for Hydrogen Peroxide Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Ben; McClure, Mark B.; Johnson, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Selection of personal protective equipment (PPE) for hydrogen peroxide service is an important part of the hazard assessment process. But because drip testing of chemical protective clothing for hydrogen peroxide service has not been reported for about 40 years, it is of great interest to test new protective clothing materials with new, high-concentration hydrogen peroxide following similar procedures. The suitability of PPE for hydrogen peroxide service is in part determined by observations made when hydrogen peroxide is dripped onto swatches of protective clothing material. Protective clothing material was tested as received, in soiled condition, and in grossly soiled condition. Materials were soiled by pretreating the material with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solution then drying to promote a reaction. Materials were grossly soiled with solid KMnO4 to greatly promote reaction. Observations of results including visual changes to the hydrogen peroxide and materials, times to ignition, and self-extinguishing characteristics of the materials are reported.

  5. Allicin protects rat cardiomyoblasts (H9c2 cells) from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative injury through inhibiting the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jackie Yan-Yan; Tsui, Hei-Tung; Chung, Ivan Ying-Ming; Chan, Robbie Yat-Kan; Kwan, Yiu-Wa; Chan, Shun-Wan

    2014-11-01

    Oxidative stress is considered an important factor that promotes cell death in response to a variety of pathophysiological conditions. This study investigated the antioxidant properties of allicin, the principle ingredient of garlic, on preventing oxidative stress-induced injury. The antioxidant capacities of allicin were measured by using 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced cell damage on H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Allicin (0.3-10 μM) pre-incubation could concentration-dependently attenuate the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase induced by H(2)O(2) on H9c2 cells. It could also protect H9c2 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage. However, the DPPH free radical scavenging activity of allicin was shown to be low. Therefore, it is believed that the protective effect of allicin on H9c2 cells could inhibit intracellular ROS production instead of scavenging extracellular H(2)O(2) or free radicals. For the observed protective effect on H9c2 cells, allicin might also be effective in reducing free radical-induced myocardial cell death in ischemic condition. PMID:24945597

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide Accumulation in the Choroid During Intermittent Hypoxia Increases Risk of Severe Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beharry, Kay D.; Cai, Charles L.; Sharma, Poonam; Bronshtein, Vadim; Valencia, Gloria B.; Lazzaro, Douglas R.; Aranda, Jacob V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Extremely low gestational age neonates (ELGANs) requiring oxygen therapy often experience frequent episodes of intermittent hypoxia (IH) and are at high risk for severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Using an established model for oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), we examined the hypothesis that there is a critical number of daily brief IH episodes which will result in irreversible retinal oxidative damage. Methods. Newborn rats were exposed to increasing daily clustered IH episodes (12% O2 with 50% O2) from postnatal day (P) 0 to P7 or P0 to P14, or placed in room air (RA) until P21 following 7- or 14-day IH. RA littermates at P7, P14, and P21 served as controls. A group exposed to constant 50% O2 (CH) served as a second control. Blood gases, eye opening at P14, retinal, and choroidal oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation (8-isoPGF2α), oxidants (H2O2) and antioxidants (catalase and SOD), retinal pathology (adenosine diphosphatase (ADPase)-stained retinal flatmounts), and mitochondria-related genes were assessed. Results. pO2 levels were higher with increasing IH episodes and remained elevated during the reoxygenation period. High SO2 levels were associated with most severe OIR. Levels of all measured biomarkers peaked with six IH episodes and decreased with 8 to 12 episodes. H2O2 accumulated in the choroid during the reoxygenation period with irreversible retinal damage. Conclusions. Our data suggest that six is the maximum number of IH episodes that the retina can sustain. Accumulation of H2O2 in the choroid may result in high levels being delivered to the entire retina, ultimately resulting in irreversible retinal oxidative damage. PMID:24168990

  7. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  8. Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide by DAB Staining in Arabidopsis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Daudi, Arsalan; O’Brien, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    In this protocol, the in situ detection of hydrogen peroxide (one of several reactive oxygen species) is described in mature Arabidopsis rosette leaves by staining with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using an adaptation of previous methods (Thordal-Christensen et al., 1997; Bindschedler et al., 2006; Daudi et al., 2012). DAB is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of some haem-containing proteins, such as peroxidases, to generate a dark brown precipitate. This precipitate is exploited as a stain to detect the presence and distribution of hydrogen peroxide in plant cells. The protocol can be modified slightly to detect hydrogen peroxide in different types of plant tissue.

  9. Overexpression of X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis by inhibiting microRNA-24 protects periodontal ligament cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Chen, Z; Wang, J; Hu, H

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a common oral clinical drug for the tooth bleaching, induces severe cell apoptosis of periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). The excessive cell apoptosis of PDLCs impairs periodontal tissue damage and repair. However, the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. Here, we showed that microRNA-24 (miR-24) played an important role in regulating H2O2-induced cell apoptosis of PDLCs. We found that miR-24 expression was increased in PDLCs in response to H2O2 treatment. Down-regulation of miR-24 obviously rescued H2O2-induced cell apoptosis in PDLCs. By bioinformatic analysis, X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) was identified as a candidate target gene of miR-24, which was further verified by the dual-luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, the protein expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten was significantly decreased by miR-24 silencing, whereas the phosphorylation of Akt was remarkably increased by miR-24 silencing. In addition, the gene silencing of XIAP significantly reduced Akt activity and blocked the protective effect of the miR-24 inhibitor against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis. Overall, our findings suggest that miR-24 plays an important role in regulating the cell survival of PDLCs through targeting XIAP. PMID:27188727

  10. Lycopene protects human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced death via inhibition of oxidative stress and mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    FENG, CHUNSHENG; LUO, TIANFEI; ZHANG, SHUYAN; LIU, KAI; ZHANG, YANHONG; LUO, YINAN; GE, PENGFEI

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is characterized by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a common pathway that results in neuronal injury or death due to various types of pathological stress. Although lycopene has been identified as a potent antioxidant, its effect on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage remains unclear. In the present study, pretreatment with lycopene was observed to protect SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against H2O2-induced death via inhibition of apoptosis resulting from activation of caspase-3 and translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus. Furthermore, the over-produced ROS, as well as the reduced activities of anti-oxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, were demonstrated to be alleviated by lycopene. Additionally, lycopene counteracted H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, which was evidenced by suppression of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, attenuation of the decline of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of the increase of Bax and decrease of Bcl-2 levels within the mitochondria. The release of cytochrome c and AIF from the mitochondria was also reduced. These results indicate that lycopene is a potent neuroprotectant against apoptosis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and could be administered to prevent neuronal injury or death. PMID:27035331

  11. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  12. Monolithic Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyst Bed Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponzo, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    With recent increased industry and government interest in rocket grade hydrogen peroxide as a viable propellant, significant effort has been expended to improve on earlier developments. This effort has been predominately centered in improving heterogeneous. typically catalyst beds; and homogeneous catalysts, which are typically solutions of catalytic substances. Heterogeneous catalyst beds have traditionally consisted of compressed wire screens plated with a catalytic substance, usually silver, and were used m many RCS applications (X-1, Mercury, and Centaur for example). Aerojet has devised a heterogeneous catalyst design that is monolithic (single piece), extremely compact, and has pressure drops equal to or less than traditional screen beds. The design consists of a bonded stack of very thin, photoetched metal plates, silver coated. This design leads to a high surface area per unit volume and precise flow area, resulting in high, stable, and repeatable performance. Very high throughputs have been demonstrated with 90% hydrogen peroxide. (0.60 lbm/s/sq in at 1775-175 psia) with no flooding of the catalyst bed. Bed life of over 900 seconds has also been demonstrated at throughputs of 0.60 lbm/s/sq in across varying chamber pressures. The monolithic design also exhibits good starting performance, short break-in periods, and will easily scale to various sizes.

  13. PROPULSE 980: A Hydrogen Peroxide Enrichment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, Robert; Bromley, G.; Wanger, Robert; Pauls, Dan; Maynard, Bryon; McNeal, Curtis; Dumbacher, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The PROPULSE 980 unit is a transportable processing plant that enriches aerospace grade hydrogen peroxide from 90% to 98% final concentration. The unit was developed by Degussa-H Is, in cooperation with Orbital, NASA Marshall Space Center, and NASA Stennis Space Center. The system is a self-contained unit that houses all of the process equipment, instrumentation and controls to perform the concentration operation nearly autonomously. It is designed to produce non-bulk quantities of 98% hydrogen peroxide. The enrichment unit design also maintains system, personnel and environmental safety during all aspects of the enrichment process and final product storage. As part of the Propulse 980 checkout and final buyoff, it will be disassembled at the Degussa-H Is Corporation plant in Theodore, AL, transported to the Stennis Space Center, reassembled and subjected to a series of checkout tests to verify design objectives have been met. This paper will summarize the basic project elements and provide an update on the present status of the project.

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide Probes Directed to Different Cellular Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Zhou, You; Belousov, Vsevolod V.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular compartments, HyPer occurred in the reduced state in the nucleus, cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondrial intermembrane space and mitochondrial matrix, but low levels of the oxidized form of the biosensor were also observed in each of these compartments, consistent with a low peroxide tone in mammalian cells. In contrast, HyPer was mostly oxidized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using this system, we characterized control of hydrogen peroxide in various cell systems, such as cells deficient in thioredoxin reductase, sulfhydryl oxidases or subjected to selenium deficiency. Generation of hydrogen peroxide could also be monitored in various compartments following signaling events. Conclusions We found that HyPer can be used as a valuable tool to monitor hydrogen peroxide generated in different cellular compartments. The data also show that hydrogen peroxide generated in one compartment could translocate to other compartments. Our data provide information on compartmentalization, dynamics and homeostatic control of hydrogen peroxide in mammalian cells. PMID:21283738

  15. Protective effect of polypeptides from larva of housefly (Musca domestica) on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Wang, Pan; Qin, Qi-Lian; Zhang, Huan; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Housefly (Musca domestica) is an important medical insect and its larva is an ideal high protein food source. We isolated from housefly larvae the polypeptides hydrolyzed by neutral protease (PHNP), and investigated the protective effect of PHNP on hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. Cells exposed to H₂O₂ showed a marked decrease in proliferation and intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. H₂O₂ also caused apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction including mitochondrial fragmentation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment with PHNP at concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10 μg/mL blocked these H₂O₂-induced cellular events in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of PHNP at 10 μg/mL is equal to that of ascorbic acid at 10 μM. In summary, PHNP has a protective effect against H₂O₂-induced oxidative injury in cells due to its ability to decrease intracellular ROS and elevate antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:23933357

  16. Cocktail of Four Active Components Derived from Sheng Mai San Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced PC12 Cell Apoptosis Linked with the Caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Huana; Song, Yunfei; Cao, Zhengyu; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2015-12-01

    SMXZF, a combination of four active components including ginsenoside Rb1, ginsenoside Rg1, schizandrin, and DT-13 (6:9:5:4) that is derived from Sheng Mai San, has previously been shown to exhibit a neuroprotective effect against focal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Due to the key role of oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis in the pathogenesis of stroke, we examined the effect of SMXZF in oxidative stress responses and related signaling pathways in differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our results showed that incubation with 100 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 12 hr could reduce cell viability and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity with an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In contrast, SMXZF alleviated oxidative stress by reducing the over-production of ROS and MDA in parallel to concentration dependently increasing SOD activity. In addition, SMXZF significantly attenuated H2O2-induced caspase-3 cleavage, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase-1 (ROCK1) activation, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation. Inhibiting either caspase-3 or ROCK1 mimicked the effect. Consequently, our results suggest that SMXZF inhibits H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis linked with the caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC pathway, which has also been confirmed to be a positive feedback loop in oxidative stress-injured PC12 cells. These findings support the pharmacological potential of SMXZF for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. PMID:26058543

  17. Literature review of the role of hydroxyl radicals in chemically-induced mutagenicity and carcinogenicity for the risk assessment of a disinfection system utilizing photolysis of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kikuchi, Katsushi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new disinfection system for oral hygiene, proving that hydroxyl radicals generated by the photolysis of 1 M hydrogen peroxide could effectively kill oral pathogenic microorganisms. Prior to any clinical testing, the safety of the system especially in terms of the risk of carcinogenicity is examined by reviewing the literature. Previous studies have investigated indirectly the kinds of reactive oxygen species involved in some sort of chemically-induced mutagenicity in vitro by using reactive oxygen species scavengers, suggesting the possible involvement of hydroxyl radicals. Similarly, possible involvement of hydroxyl radicals in some sort of chemically-induced carcinogenicity has been proposed. Notably, it is suggested that the hydroxyl radical can play a role in heavy metal-induced carcinogenicity that requires chronic exposure to the carcinogen. In these cases, hydroxyl radicals produced by Fenton-like reactions may be involved in the carcinogenicity. Meanwhile, potential advantages have been reported on the use of the hydroxyl radical, being included in host immune defense by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and medical applications such as for cancer treatment and antibiotics. From these, we conclude that there would seem to be little to no risk in using the hydroxyl radical as a disinfectant for short-term treatment of the oral cavity. PMID:22798706

  18. Akt attenuates apoptotic death through phosphorylation of H2A under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells and hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Cho, Sung-Woo; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Although the essential role of protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt in cell survival signaling has been clearly established, the mechanism by which Akt mediates the cellular response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. We demonstrated that Akt attenuated neuronal apoptosis through direct association with histone 2A (H2A) and phosphorylation of H2A at threonine 17. At early time points during H2O2 exposure of PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons, when the cells can tolerate the level of DNA damage, Akt was activated and phosphorylated H2A, leading to inhibition of apoptotic death. At later time points, Akt delivered the NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase Sirtuin 2 (Sirt 2) to the vicinity of phosphorylated H2A in response to irreversible DNA damage, thereby inducing H2A deacetylation and subsequently leading to apoptotic death. Ectopically expressed T17A-substituted H2A minimally interacted with Akt and failed to prevent apoptosis under oxidative stress. Thus Akt-mediated H2A phosphorylation has an anti-apoptotic function in conditions of H2O2-induced oxidative stress in neurons and PC12 cells. PMID:26899247

  19. Baicalein protects C6 glial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis through regulation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Ok; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Cheol; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye-Jin; Cho, Eun-Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Baicalein, a flavonoid originally obtained from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to possess various biological properties. Although several studies have demonstrated the anti-oxidative activity of baicalein, its neuroprotective mechanisms have not been clearly established. The present study aimed to detect the effects of baicalein against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage in C6 glial cells and to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. The results demonstrated that baicalein effectively inhibited H2O2-induced growth and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. We noted that Baicalein also attenuated the H2O2‑induced formation of comet tail, phosphorylation of p-γH2A.X, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP or ΔΨm), and changes to apoptosis‑related protein expression, which suggests that it can prevent H2O2‑induced cellular DNA damage and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, treatment with baicalein effectively induced the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Moreover, the protective effects of baicalein against H2O2‑induced DNA damage and apoptosis were abolished by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, and auranofin, a TrxR inhibitor. In addition, we noted that the cytoprotective effects of baicalein were attenuated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The findings of our present study suggest that baicalein enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity through the inhibition of ROS generation and the activation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway, thus protecting C6 cells from H2O2-induced neuronal damage. PMID:26796879

  20. Demonstration of the Catalytic Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Alfred R. Jr.; Kessinger, Angela

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration known as Elephant's Toothpaste in which the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by iodide. Oxygen is released and soap bubbles are produced. The foam produced is measured, and results show a good relationship between the amount of foam and the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide. (DDR)

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Heng, Lee Yook; Hashim, Uda

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a biosensor utilizing modified titania, TiO2 particles using aminopropyl-triethoxy-silane, (APTS) for developing hydrogen peroxide biosensor is presented. The surface of Ti-APTS particles is used as a support for hemoglobin immobilization via covalent bonding. The performance of the biosensor is determined by differential pulse voltammetry. The linear response was observed at the reduction current of redox mediator probe [FeCN6]3-/4- at potential between 0.22 V to 0.24 V. The preliminary result for electrochemistry study on this modified electrode is reported. The preliminary linear range is obtained from 1×10-2 M to 1×10-8 M.

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) Potential for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafwallner, F.

    2004-10-01

    Low toxicity or "green" propellants are now under study by organizations around the world. Especially ultra high concentrated hydrogen peroxide (HP) may be a significant step toward less toxic, storable und safer operation of upper stages and spacecrafts. HP can be used as a monopropellant, when catalytically decomposed or as a bipropellant constituting the propellant combination`s oxidizer. Serving as a monopropellant, catalytic decomposition will result in exhaust of superheated steam and oxygen which can be used to drive gas turbines and feed life support systems or provide thrust as a monopropellant, provide the oxidizer, or function as an igniter for bipropellant engines. HP can be used in fuel cells to produce electrical power, heat and water.

  4. Impairment of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in CD95(APO-1)-induced human T-cell leukemia cell apoptosis mediated by glutathione depletion and generation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yin, W; Cheng, W; Shen, W; Shu, L; Zhao, J; Zhang, J; Hua, Z-C

    2007-08-01

    Human T-cell leukemia is a malignant disease that needs various regimens of cytotoxic chemotherapy to overcome drug resistance. Recently, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase has emerged as a potential target for cancer therapy. However, its exact signaling pathway in human T-cell leukemia cell death has not been well defined. In the current study, we found CD95(APO-1) was able to trigger the internalization of plasma membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in Jurkat cells or primary T cells as a mechanism to suppress its activity. This internalization was closely relevant to intracellular glutathione (GSH) depletion in Jurkat cells downstream of Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) and caspase 8. GSH depletion in Fas L-treated Jurkat cells induced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which subsequently increased the serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit. Exogenous H(2)O(2) even mimicked the effect of Fas L to upregulate the serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit and suppress Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. Overall, our results indicate that CD95(APO-1) induces the FADD- and caspase 8-dependent internalization of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase through intracellular GSH loss, and the subsequent generation of H(2)O(2)-mediated serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit. Taken together, this study presents a novel regulatory mechanism of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in CD95(APO-1)-mediated human T-leukemia cell apoptosis. PMID:17554377

  5. Lactoferrin and ovotransferrin contribute toward antioxidative effects of Edible Bird's Nest against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhiping; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Ismail, Norsharina; Ideris, Aini; Mahmud, Rozi

    2015-01-01

    There are reports of improved redox outcomes due to consumption of Edible Bird's Nest (EBN). Many of the functional effects of EBN can be linked to its high amounts of antioxidants. Interestingly, dietary components with high antioxidants have shown promise in the prevention of aging and its related diseases like Alzheimer's disease. In this study, the antioxidative potentials of EBN and its constituents, lactoferrin (LF) and ovotransferrin (OVF), were determined and protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)- induced toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and acridine orange and propidium iodide (AO/PI) staining with microscopy were examined. Results showed that EBN and its constituents attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, and decreased radical oxygen species (ROS) through increased scavenging activity. Furthermore, LF, OVF, and EBN produced transcriptional changes in antioxidant related genes that tended towards neuroprotection as compared to H2O2-treated group. Overall, the results suggest that LF and OVF may produce synergistic or all-or-none antioxidative effects in EBN. PMID:26057702

  6. Bactericidal effect of hydrogen peroxide on spacecraft isolates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, M. D.; Renninger, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on both sporeforming and nonsporeforming spacecraft isolates as an initial step in determining its suitability for microbiological decontamination of certain United States spacecraft. Survivor data were obtained for eight bacterial isolates (six sporeformers and two nonsporeformers) recovered before launch Mariner 9 and exposed to concentrations of 3, 10, and 15% hydrogen peroxide. The effects of various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide on the spores are presented in tabular form, along with the percentage of survival of nonsporeformers exposed to hydrogen peroxide. No viable vegetative cells were recovered after a 10-min exposure time to any of the three concentration of hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Protective Effect of 2,4',5'-Trihydroxyl-5,2'-dibromo diphenylmethanone, a New Halophenol, against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced EA.hy926 Cells Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianguo; Feng, Xiue; Ge, Rui; Li, Jiankuan; Li, Qingshan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the process of energy metabolism in aerobic respiration. A growing body of evidence indicates that excessive ROS is implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. The newly synthesized halophenol, 2,4',5'-trihydroxyl-5,2'-dibromo diphenylmethanone (TDD), exhibits antioxidative and cytoprotective activities in vitro. In this study, the protective effect of TDD against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative injury of EA.hy926 cells was investigated. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-dephenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while the effect of TDD on the transcription profile of EA.hy926 cells subjected to H2O2-induced oxidative injury was evaluated by microarray analysis. Several signaling pathways, including apoptosis, were significantly associated with TDD. Flow cytometric analysis was used to evaluate anti-apoptotic effect of TDD. Subsequently, RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the expressions of the apoptosis-associated protein, Bcl-2 and Bax. Meanwhile the expression of cleaved caspase-3, an executioner of apoptosis, was also detected by Western blot. The results showed that pretreatment of EA.hy926 cells with TDD prevented the decrease of cell viability induced by H2O2, and attenuated H2O2-induced elevation of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 while increased Bcl-2 expressions. In summary, TDD inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative injury of EA.hy926 cells through negative regulation of apoptosis. These findings suggest that TDD is a potential candidate for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26251890

  8. Hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 interact to mediate UV-B-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in radish sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cui, Jin; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk among hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in the hypocotyls of radish sprouts was investigated. The results showed that UV-B irradiation significantly increased the anthocyanin accumulation and the expression of UVR8, and a similar trend appeared in radish sprouts subjected to cadmium, chilling and salt stresses regardless of light source. However, these responses disappeared under dark exposure. These results suggest that abiotic stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were light-dependent. Moreover, abiotic stresses all enhanced the production of H2O2 and exogenous H2O2 addition significantly increased the anthocyanin concentration and UVR8 transcription, while these increases were severely inhibited by addition of dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a chemical trap for H2O2). It seems to suggest that H2O2 played an important role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, addition of 0.5 mM sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO-releasing compound) substantially induced the anthocyanin accumulation, and H2O2-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were significantly suppressed by co-treatment with 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (PTIO, a NO scavenger), which was parallel with the expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related transcription factors and structural genes. All these results demonstrate that both H2O2 and NO are involved in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation, and there is a crosstalk between them as well as a classical UVR8 pathway. PMID:27404993

  9. Hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 interact to mediate UV-B-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in radish sprouts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cui, Jin; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk among hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in the hypocotyls of radish sprouts was investigated. The results showed that UV-B irradiation significantly increased the anthocyanin accumulation and the expression of UVR8, and a similar trend appeared in radish sprouts subjected to cadmium, chilling and salt stresses regardless of light source. However, these responses disappeared under dark exposure. These results suggest that abiotic stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were light-dependent. Moreover, abiotic stresses all enhanced the production of H2O2 and exogenous H2O2 addition significantly increased the anthocyanin concentration and UVR8 transcription, while these increases were severely inhibited by addition of dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a chemical trap for H2O2). It seems to suggest that H2O2 played an important role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, addition of 0.5 mM sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO-releasing compound) substantially induced the anthocyanin accumulation, and H2O2-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were significantly suppressed by co-treatment with 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (PTIO, a NO scavenger), which was parallel with the expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related transcription factors and structural genes. All these results demonstrate that both H2O2 and NO are involved in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation, and there is a crosstalk between them as well as a classical UVR8 pathway. PMID:27404993

  10. Esculetin-induced protection of human hepatoma HepG2 cells against hydrogen peroxide is associated with the Nrf2-dependent induction of the NAD(P)H: Quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, Sudhakar R.; Ellis, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-15

    Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxy coumarin), is a potent antioxidant that is present in several plant species. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of protection of esculetin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability, cell integrity, intracellular glutathione levels, generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of antioxidant enzymes were used as markers to measure cellular oxidative stress and response to ROS. The protective effect of esculetin was compared to a well-characterized chemoprotective compound quercetin. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with sub-lethal (10-25 {mu}M) esculetin for 8 h prevented cell death and maintained cell integrity following exposure to 0.9 mM hydrogen peroxide. An increase in the generation of ROS following hydrogen peroxide treatment was significantly attenuated by 8 h pre-treatment with esculetin. In addition, esculetin ameliorated the decrease in intracellular glutathione caused by hydrogen peroxide exposure. Moreover, treatment with 25 {mu}M esculetin for 8 h increased the expression of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) at both protein and mRNA levels significantly, by 12-fold and 15-fold, respectively. Esculetin treatment also increased nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8-fold indicating that increased NQO1 expression is Nrf2-mediated. These results indicate that esculetin protects human hepatoma HepG2 cells from hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative injury and that this protection is provided through the induction of protective enzymes as part of an adaptive response mediated by Nrf2 nuclear accumulation.

  11. Neuroprotection of (+)-2-(1-Hydroxyl-4-Oxocyclohexyl) Ethyl Caffeate Against Hydrogen Peroxide and Lipopolysaccharide Induced Injury via Modulating Arachidonic Acid Network and p38-MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiao-Ning; Xu, Liu-Xin; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong-Lin; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are highly relevant to the pathological processes of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). (+)-2-(1-hydroxyl-4-oxocyclohexyl) ethyl caffeate (HOEC), a novel 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, was isolated from the whole plant of Incarvillea mairei var granditlora (Wehrhahn) Grierson. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of HOEC on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced cytotoxicity and neuroinflammation in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay, LDH release assay, morphological observation and Hoechst 33342/PI dual staining followed by EIA, immunofluorescence staining and Western Blotting analysis were performed to elucidate the neuroprotective effect of HOEC. Treatment with HOEC at various concentrations prior to H2O2 exposure significantly enhanced cell viability, decreased LDH release, prevented cell morphologic changes and apoptosis. Instead of PGE2 reduction, HOEC markedly inhibited the production of LTB4 and suppressed the macrophage-mediated neurotoxicity. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining showed that HOEC inhibited H2O2-induced p38 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Neuroprotective effect of HOEC was abolished by a p38 inhibitor. Further in vivo studies of LPS-induced neuroinflammation confirmed the anti-inflammatory effects of HOEC. These findings that HOEC protects SH-SY5Y cells from H2O2 and LPS-induced injury via arachidonic acid network modulation followed by p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling, might make HOEC be considered as a therapeutic candidate for prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases involving oxidative stress or/and inflammation. PMID:26510982

  12. Protective efficacy of carnosic acid against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative injury in HepG2 cells through the SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Fan, Qing; Lin, Musen; Zhang, Ce; Fan, Guangjun; Zhai, Xiaohan; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Zhao; Yao, Jihong

    2015-08-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), found in rosemary, has been reported to have antioxidant and antiadipogenic properties. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanism by which CA inhibits hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in HepG2 cells. Cells were pretreated with 2.5-10 μmol/L CA for 2 h and then exposed to 3 mmol/L H2O2 for an additional 4 h. CA dose-dependently increased cell viability and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activities. Pretreatment with CA completely attenuated the inhibited expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and the B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL), and reduced glutathione activity caused by H2O2, whereas it reversed reactive oxygen species accumulation and the increase in cleaved caspase-3. Importantly, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, was significantly increased by CA. Considering the above results, we hypothesized that SIRT1 may play important roles in the protective effects of CA in injury induced by H2O2. As expected, SIRT1 suppression by Ex527 (6-chloro-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazole-1-carboxamide) and siRNA-mediated SIRT1 silencing (si-SIRT1) significantly aggravated the H2O2-induced increased level of cleaved caspase-3 but greatly reduced the decreased expression of MnSOD and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, the positive regulatory effect of CA was inhibited by si-SIRT1. Collectively, the present study indicated that CA can alleviate H2O2-induced hepatocyte damage through the SIRT1 pathway. PMID:26059423

  13. Proteomics of the oxidative stress response induced by hydrogen peroxide and paraquat reveals a novel AhpC-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hare, Nathan J; Scott, Nichollas E; Shin, Eun Hye H; Connolly, Angela M; Larsen, Martin R; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2011-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen most typically associated with wound infections, but also the main cause of mortality in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). The ability to adapt to oxidative stress associated with host immune defense may be one mechanism by which P. aeruginosa establishes infection in the cystic fibrosis lung and eventually out-competes other pathogenic bacteria to persist into chronic infection. We utilized a proteomics approach to identify the proteins associated with the oxidative stress response of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide-inducing paraquat. 2-DE and MS allowed for the identification of 59 and 58 protein spots that were statistically significantly altered following H(2) O(2) and paraquat treatment, respectively. We observed a unique mass and pI pattern for alkylhydroperoxide reductase C (AhpC) that was replicated by hypothetical protein PA3529 following treatment with 10 mM H(2) O(2) . AhpC belongs to the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family and is a redox enzyme responsible for removing peroxides in bacterial cells. MS analysis showed that PA3529 was altered by the formation of a dimer via a disulfide bond in a manner analogous to that known for AhpC, and by cysteine overoxidation to Cys-sulfonic acid (SO(3) H) postoxidative stress. PA3529 is therefore a functional AhpC paralog expressed under H(2) O(2) stress. Following paraquat-induced oxidative stress, we also observed the overabundance and likely oxidative modification of a second hypothetical antioxidant protein (PA3450) that shares sequence similarity with 1-Cys peroxiredoxins. Other induced proteins included known oxidative stress proteins (superoxide dismutase and catalase), as well as those involved in iron acquisition (siderophore biosynthesis and receptor proteins FpvA and FptA) and hypothetical proteins, including others predicted to be antioxidants (PA0848). These data suggest that P. aeruginosa contains a plethora of novel

  14. Modulation of Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Neuronal Cells by Thymoquinone-Rich Fraction and Thymoquinone via Transcriptomic Regulation of Antioxidant and Apoptotic Signaling Genes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Norsharina; Ismail, Maznah; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Abu Bakar, Muhammad Firdaus; Basri, Hamidon; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa Linn. (N. sativa) and its bioactive constituent Thymoquinone (TQ) have demonstrated numerous pharmacological attributes. In the present study, the neuroprotective properties of Thymoquinone-rich fraction (TQRF) and TQ against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced neurotoxicity in differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. TQRF was extracted using supercritical fluid extraction while TQ was acquired commercially, and their effects on H2O2 were evaluated using cell viability assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay, morphological observation, and multiplex gene expression. Both TQRF and TQ protected the cells against H2O2 by preserving the mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, reducing intracellular ROS levels, preserving morphological architecture, and modulating the expression of genes related to antioxidants (SOD1, SOD2, and catalase) and signaling genes (p53, AKT1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK, and NF-κβ). In conclusion, the enhanced efficacy of TQRF over TQ was likely due to the synergism of multiple constituents in TQRF. The efficacy of TQRF was better than that of TQ alone when equal concentrations of TQ in TQRF were compared. In addition, TQRF also showed comparable effects to TQ when the same concentrations were tested. These findings provide further support for the use of TQRF as an alternative to combat oxidative stress insults in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26823946

  15. Modulation of Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Neuronal Cells by Thymoquinone-Rich Fraction and Thymoquinone via Transcriptomic Regulation of Antioxidant and Apoptotic Signaling Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Norsharina; Ismail, Maznah; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Abu Bakar, Muhammad Firdaus; Basri, Hamidon; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa Linn. (N. sativa) and its bioactive constituent Thymoquinone (TQ) have demonstrated numerous pharmacological attributes. In the present study, the neuroprotective properties of Thymoquinone-rich fraction (TQRF) and TQ against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced neurotoxicity in differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. TQRF was extracted using supercritical fluid extraction while TQ was acquired commercially, and their effects on H2O2 were evaluated using cell viability assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay, morphological observation, and multiplex gene expression. Both TQRF and TQ protected the cells against H2O2 by preserving the mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, reducing intracellular ROS levels, preserving morphological architecture, and modulating the expression of genes related to antioxidants (SOD1, SOD2, and catalase) and signaling genes (p53, AKT1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK, and NF-κβ). In conclusion, the enhanced efficacy of TQRF over TQ was likely due to the synergism of multiple constituents in TQRF. The efficacy of TQRF was better than that of TQ alone when equal concentrations of TQ in TQRF were compared. In addition, TQRF also showed comparable effects to TQ when the same concentrations were tested. These findings provide further support for the use of TQRF as an alternative to combat oxidative stress insults in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26823946

  16. Copper-induced hydrogen peroxide upregulation of a metallothionein gene, OsMT2c, from Oryza sativa L. confers copper tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shi, Xiaoting; Qian, Meng; Zheng, Luqing; Lian, Chunlan; Xia, Yan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2015-08-30

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich metal-binding proteins found in numerous genera and species, but their functions in abiotic stress tolerance remain unclear. Here, a MT gene from Oryza sativa, OsMT2c, was isolated and characterized, encoding a type 2 MT, and observed expression in the roots, leaf sheathes, and leaves, but only weak expression in seeds. OsMT2c was upregulated by copper (Cu) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. Excessive Cu elicited a rapid and sustained production and release of H2O2 in rice, and exogenous H2O2 scavengers N,N'-dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and ascorbic acid (Asc) decreased H2O2 production and OsMT2c expression. Furthermore, the expression of OsMT2c increased in the osapx2 mutant in which the H2O2 levels were higher than in wild-type (WT) plants. These results showed that Cu increased MT2c expression through the production and accumulation of Cu-induced H2O2 in O. sativa. In addition, the transgenic OsMT2c-overexpressing Arabidopsis displayed improved tolerance to Cu stress and exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability compared to WT and empty-vector (Ev) seedlings. PMID:25867584

  17. Enzyme-Treated Asparagus Extract Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Murine Skin Fibroblast L929 Cells.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Ken; Takanari, Jun; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Sakurai, Takuya; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hideki; Kizaki, Takako

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) exerts a wide variety of beneficial biological actions including facilitating anti-cortisol stress and neurological anti-aging responses. However, the anti-skin aging effects of ETAS remain to be elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play pivotal roles in skin aging. Increased ROS levels in fibroblasts in response to ultraviolet irradiation activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its downstream transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), and the resultant gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) isoforms accelerates collagen breakdown in the dermis. Therefore, we explored whether ETAS has anti-skin aging effects by attenuating the oxidative stress responses in fibroblasts. Simultaneous treatment of murine skin L929 fibroblasts with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and either ETAS or dextrin showed that ETAS significantly suppressed H2O2-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA as measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. ETAS also clearly suppressed H2O2-stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun (AP-1 subunit) and JNK as determined by Western blot. However, ETAS did not affect the increased amounts of carbonyl proteins in response to H2O2, also as determined by Western blotting. These results suggest that ETAS diminishes cellular responsiveness to ROS but does not scavenge ROS. Thus, ETAS has the potential to prevent skin aging through attenuating the oxidative stress responses in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:27319149

  18. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  20. Protective effects of Semiaquilegia adoxoides n-butanol extract against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bing; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jianta; Zhang, Mingming; Xu, Ran; Wu, Fei; Xiao, Haitao; Tang, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Context Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced damage in the lens epithelium leads to cell death and cataract. Semiaquilegia adoxoides (DC.) Makino (Ranunculaceae), a folk medicine of Hmong (an ethnic group of China), has been traditionally used to treat cataract; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is yet to be uncovered. Objective This study aimed to investigate whether the n-butanol extract of S. adoxoides (nSA) is effective against the H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lens epithelial (HLE) cells. Materials and methods Human lens epithelial (SRA 01/04) cells were stimulated by H2O2 (250 μM) in the presence or absence of nSA. The antioxidant effects of nSA were determined in terms of cell viability (MTT assay), apoptosis (AnnexinV/PI staining), radical scavenging capability (various enzymatic assays), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123 staining), expression of apoptotic markers including caspase-3 and caspase-9 and the change of Bcl-2/Bax ratio (western blot) in the HLE cells. Results The results showed that pretreatment of nSA (250, 500 and 1000 μg/mL) markedly reduced H2O2-induced cellular apoptosis and malondialdehyde accumulation, but elevated the activities of total superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase. Thus, the total antioxidative capability was enhanced upon the nSA treatment meanwhile the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was prevented. Moreover, nSA at concentrations of 250, 500 and 1000 μg/mL also significantly suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and -9, and increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in the HLE cells. Discussion and conclusion Our findings suggested that nSA is a potential prophylactic agent in the prevention of cataractogeneis. PMID:26974044

  1. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael F; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission. PMID:26217368

  2. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission. PMID:26217368

  3. 1,4-Benzenediboronic-Acid-Induced Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles: Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Detection and Biotin-Avidin-Mediated Immunoassay with Naked-Eye Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth of small-sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is often implemented for H2O2 sensing and plasmonic immunoassay. In contrast, there is little-to-no information in the literature regarding the application of H2O2-inhibited aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. This study discloses that benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BDBA) was effective in driving the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs through an interaction between α-hydroxycarboxylate of citrate and boronic acids of BDBA. The H2O2-mediated oxidation of BDBA resulted in the conversion of boronic acid groups to phenol groups. The oxidized BDBA was incapable of triggering the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. Thus, the presence of H2O2 prohibited BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. The BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs can be paired with the glucose oxidase (GOx)-glucose system to design a colorimetric probe for glucose. Moreover, a H2O2·BDBA·AuNP probe was integrated with sandwich immunoassay, biotinylated antibody, and avidin-conjugated GOx for the selective naked-eye detection of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human-prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The lowest detectable concentrations of rabbit IgG and human PSA by the naked eye were down to 0.1 and 4 ng/mL, respectively. More importantly, the proposed plasmonic immunoassay allowed the naked-eye quantification of 0-10 ng/mL PSA at an interval of 2 ng/mL in plasma samples. PMID:27091002

  4. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-07-09

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated inmore » medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. Lastly, we hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.« less

  5. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-07-09

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. Lastly, we hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide activates NFkappaB and the interleukin-6 promoter through NFkappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Johnston, G; Stebler, B; Keller, E T

    2001-06-01

    Aging is associated not only with oxidant stress, but also with increased interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. To determine if oxidative stress could contribute to the age-associated increase IL-6 expression, we exposed LNCaP prostate carcinoma cells and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells to H2O2 as an oxidant challenge. We found that H2O2 induced IL-6 expression through activation of the IL-6 promoter. Furthermore, H2O2-induced activation of the promoter was mediated through nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB) secondary to H2O2-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha. NFkappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) is upstream of the IkappaB kinase complex that induces IkappaBalpha degradation. Accordingly, we explored if H2O2 induces IL-6 expression through NIK. In addition to H2O2 inducing NIK autophosphorylation, transfection of LNCaP cells with a dominant negative NIK diminished H2O2-mediated NFkappaB and IL-6 promoter activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that H2O2 induces the IL-6 promoter by activating NFkappaB through NIK. These data provide a candidate mechanism through which oxidant challenge induces IL-6 gene expression with age. PMID:11491660

  7. Intraoral chemical burn from use of 3% hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Arash M; Brooks, John K

    2011-01-01

    Injudicious use of over-the-counter 3% hydrogen peroxide, a relatively potent oxidative agent, can result in a chemical burn to the oral mucosa. This article describes a patient who rinsed with 3% hydrogen peroxide for periods of more than two minutes as a self-prescribed remedy for oral discomfort following seafood ingestion. Subsequently, the patient experienced pain and extensive chemical burns of the sublingual and buccal mucosa and gingiva. In addition, the buccal mucosa underwent necrosis. Prolonged oral mucosal contact with 3% hydrogen peroxide is ill-advised. PMID:22313923

  8. Nitroxide antioxidant as a potential strategy to attenuate the oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide plus nitric oxide in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Tien; Yu, Liang-En; Wang, Jiz-Yuh

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative/nitrosative stress contributes to the etiology of the neurological disorders, including ischemic stroke and chronic neurodegeneration. Neurotoxic modifications mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are closely associated with the destruction of key macromolecules and inactivation of antioxidant enzymes, which compromises antioxidant defenses. Approaches to expel ROS/RNS and alleviate toxic oxidative/nitrosative stress in neurons have not completely been defined. Here, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of various antioxidants that serve as the neuroprotectors under a toxic stress created by ROS plus nitric oxide (NO). Sublytic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, l-penicillamine (SNAP) enabled to induce a toxic oxidative/nitrosative stress through activating both p38 MAPK and p53 cascades, and cause DNA damage and protein tyrosine nitration in primary neuronal cultures. After comparing six antioxidants, including superoxide dimutase (SOD), catalase, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl (TEMPO), N-acetylcysteine, dimethylthiourea, and uric acid, TEMPO was the superior antioxidant that comprehensively and efficaciously decreased H2O2 plus SNAP-evoked activation of stress cascades of p38 MAPK and p53, production of NO, ROS, and peroxynitrite, double-strand breaks of DNA, and nitration of protein tyrosine residues. SOD increased the peroxynitrite formation and was unable to reduce the level of protein nitration. All antioxidants tested, except SOD, effectively reduced neuronal damage and DNA breakage caused by the toxic H2O2/SNAP combination. In conclusion, these results suggest that TEMPO ensures excellent ROS/RNS clearance and stress-signaling inhibition, thus effectively rescuing neurons from ROS/H2O2 plus NO/SNAP-induced insult. This study reveals a potential strategy for nitroxide antioxidants as a therapeutic agent against oxidative/nitrosative neurotoxicity. PMID:26891889

  9. Methanol extracts from Cystoseira tamariscifolia and Cystoseira nodicaulis are able to inhibit cholinesterases and protect a human dopaminergic cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Luísa; Silvestre, Laura; Rocha, Maria Isabel; Rodrigues, Maria João; Vizetto-Duarte, Catarina; Pereira, Hugo; Barreira, Luísa; Varela, João

    2016-09-01

    Context Marine macroalgae contain several bioactive molecules that may be developed as functional foods, but information about their neuroprotective potential is scarce. Objective The objective of this study is to determine the in vitro antioxidant and neuroprotective features of marine algae from the southern coast of Portugal and to assess the total content of different types of bioactives. Materials and methods Methanol extracts from 21 macroalgal species from the southern Portugal were evaluated for in vitro antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Active extracts were further evaluated for inhibitory activity against butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and tyrosinase (TYRO), and for their ability to attenuate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The total contents of different phenolic groups were determined for the most active extracts. Results Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss (Sargassaceae) had the highest antiradical activity (92%, 1 mg/mL). Cystoseira nodicaulis (Withering) M. Roberts (Sargassaceae) (75%) and Cystoseira humilis Schousboe ex Kützing (Sargassaceae) (70%) had the highest iron-chelating activity at 10 mg/mL. Cystoseira baccata (S.G. Gmelin) P.C. Silva (Sargassaceae) was more active towards copper (66%, 10 mg/mL). Cystoseira tamariscifolia had the highest AChE inhibitory capacity (85%, 10 mg/mL). Cystoseira tamariscifolia and C. nodicaulis were also active against BuChE and TYRO, and were able to protect SH-SY5Y cells against oxidative stress induced by H2O2. Cystoseira tamariscifolia had the highest content of all the groups of phenolics, and was particularly enriched in hydroxycinnamic acids (106 mg CAE/g DW). Discussion and conclusion Results indicate that C. tamariscifolia and C. nodicaulis are important sources of nutraceutical compounds and may be considered functional foods that could improve cognitive functions. PMID:26731087

  10. Genome-wide analysis of hydrogen peroxide-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis reveals a high light-induced transcriptional cluster involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Vanderauwera, Sandy; Zimmermann, Philip; Rombauts, Stéphane; Vandenabeele, Steven; Langebartels, Christian; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Inzé, Dirk; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2005-10-01

    In plants, reactive oxygen species and, more particularly, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) play a dual role as toxic by-products of normal cell metabolism and as regulatory molecules in stress perception and signal transduction. Peroxisomal catalases are an important sink for photorespiratory H(2)O(2). Using ATH1 Affymetrix microarrays, expression profiles were compared between control and catalase-deficient Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Reduced catalase levels already provoked differences in nuclear gene expression under ambient growth conditions, and these effects were amplified by high light exposure in a sun simulator for 3 and 8 h. This genome-wide expression analysis allowed us to reveal the expression characteristics of complete pathways and functional categories during H(2)O(2) stress. In total, 349 transcripts were significantly up-regulated by high light in catalase-deficient plants and 88 were down-regulated. From this data set, H(2)O(2) was inferred to play a key role in the transcriptional up-regulation of small heat shock proteins during high light stress. In addition, several transcription factors and candidate regulatory genes involved in H(2)O(2) transcriptional gene networks were identified. Comparisons with other publicly available transcriptome data sets of abiotically stressed Arabidopsis revealed an important intersection with H(2)O(2)-deregulated genes, positioning elevated H(2)O(2) levels as an important signal within abiotic stress-induced gene expression. Finally, analysis of transcriptional changes in a combination of a genetic (catalase deficiency) and an environmental (high light) perturbation identified a transcriptional cluster that was strongly and rapidly induced by high light in control plants, but impaired in catalase-deficient plants. This cluster comprises the complete known anthocyanin regulatory and biosynthetic pathway, together with genes encoding unknown proteins. PMID:16183842

  11. Inactivation of rabies virus by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elghaffar, Asmaa A; Ali, Amal E; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-02-01

    Development of safe and protective vaccines against infectious pathogens remains a challenge. Inactivation of rabies virus is a critical step in the production of vaccines and other research reagents. Beta-propiolactone (βPL); the currently used inactivating agent for rabies virus is expensive and proved to be carcinogenic in animals. This study aimed to investigate the ability of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to irreversibly inactivate rabies virus without affecting its antigenicity and immunogenicity in pursuit of finding safe, effective and inexpensive alternative inactivating agents. H2O2 3% rapidly inactivated a Vero cell adapted fixed rabies virus strain designated as FRV/K within 2h of exposure without affecting its antigenicity or immunogenicity. No residual infectious virus was detected and the H2O2-inactivated vaccine proved to be safe and effective when compared with the same virus harvest inactivated with the classical inactivating agent βPL. Mice immunized with H2O2-inactivated rabies virus produced sufficient level of antibodies and were protected when challenged with lethal CVS virus. These findings reinforce the idea that H2O2 can replace βPL as inactivating agent for rabies virus to reduce time and cost of inactivation process. PMID:26731189

  12. Materials Compatibility Testing in Concentrated Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, R.; Bromley, G.; Mason, D.; Crockett, D.; Martinez, L.; McNeal, C.; Lyles, G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Materials test methods from the 1960's have been used as a starting point in evaluating materials for today's space launch vehicles. These established test methods have been modified to incorporate today's analytical laboratory equipment. The Orbital test objective was to test a wide range of materials to incorporate the revolution in polymer and composite materials that has occurred since the 1960's. Testing is accomplished in 3 stages from rough screening to detailed analytical tests. Several interesting test observations have been made during this testing and are included in the paper. A summary of the set-up, test and evaluation of long-term storage sub-scale tanks is also included. This sub-scale tank test lasted for a 7-month duration prior to being stopped due to a polar boss material breakdown. Chemical evaluations of the hydrogen peroxide and residue left on the polar boss surface identify the material breakdown quite clearly. The paper concludes with recommendations for future testing and a specific effort underway within the industry to standardize the test methods used in evaluating materials.

  13. Locating bomb factories by detecting hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Connell, Samantha; Ferrari, Carlotta; Suarez, Guillaume; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-11-01

    The analytical capability to detect hydrogen peroxide vapour can play a key role in localizing a site where a H2O2 based Improvised Explosive (IE) is manufactured. In security activities it is very important to obtain information in a short time. For this reason, an analytical method to be used in security activity needs portable devices. The authors have developed the first analytical method based on a portable luminometer, specifically designed and validated to locate IE manufacturing sites using quantitative on-site vapour analysis for H2O2. The method was tested both indoor and outdoor. The results demonstrate that the detection of H2O2 vapours could allow police forces to locate the site, while terrorists are preparing an attack. The collected data are also very important in developing new sensors, able to give an early alarm if located at a proper distance from a site where an H2O2 based IE is prepared. PMID:27591582

  14. Molecular evolution of hydrogen peroxide degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2012-09-15

    For efficient removal of intra- and/or extracellular hydrogen peroxide by dismutation to harmless dioxygen and water (2H(2)O(2) → O(2) + 2H(2)O), nature designed three metalloenzyme families that differ in oligomeric organization, monomer architecture as well as active site geometry and catalytic residues. Here we report on the updated reconstruction of the molecular phylogeny of these three gene families. Ubiquitous typical (monofunctional) heme catalases are found in all domains of life showing a high structural conservation. Their evolution was directed from large subunit towards small subunit proteins and further to fused proteins where the catalase fold was retained but lost its original functionality. Bifunctional catalase-peroxidases were at the origin of one of the two main heme peroxidase superfamilies (i.e. peroxidase-catalase superfamily) and constitute a protein family predominantly present among eubacteria and archaea, but two evolutionary branches are also found in the eukaryotic world. Non-heme manganese catalases are a relatively small protein family with very old roots only present among bacteria and archaea. Phylogenetic analyses of the three protein families reveal features typical (i) for the evolution of whole genomes as well as (ii) for specific evolutionary events including horizontal gene transfer, paralog formation and gene fusion. As catalases have reached a striking diversity among prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, understanding their phylogenetic and molecular relationship and function will contribute to drug design for prevention of diseases of humans, animals and plants. PMID:22330759

  15. Tempol inhibits neutrophil and hydrogen peroxide-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hahn, S M; Mitchell, J B; Shacter, E

    1997-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by neutrophil activation are associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Reactive oxygen species are produced by activated neutrophils and produce DNA damage which may lead to tissue damage. Previous studies have shown that activated murine neutrophils induce DNA strand breaks in a target plasmacytoma cell, RIMPC 2394. We studied the effect of a water soluble nitroxide anti-oxidant, Tempol, on murine neutrophil induction of DNA strand breaks in this system. Murine neutrophils were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of BALB/cAn mice after an i.p. injection of pristane oil. Neutrophils were activated by the phorbol ester PMA and co-incubated with RIMPC 2394 cells. Control alkaline elution studies revealed progressive DNA strand breaks in RIMPC cells with time. The addition of Tempol to the incubation mixture prevented DNA damage in a dose dependent fashion. Five mM Tempol provided complete protection. Tempol protection against DNA strand breaks was similar for both stimulated neutrophils and exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide produced by stimulated neutrophils demonstrated that Tempol did not decrease hydrogen peroxide concentration. Oxidation of reduced metals, thereby interfering with the production of hydroxyl radical, is the most likely mechanism of nitroxide protection, although superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity and scavenging of carbon-based free radicals may also account for a portion of the observed protection. The anti-oxidant activity of Tempol inhibited DNA damage by activated neutrophils. The nitroxides as a class of compounds may have a role in the investigation and modification of inflammatory conditions. PMID:9378367

  16. Efficacy of hydrogen peroxide for treating saprolegniasis in channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Gingerich, W.H.; Dawson, V.K.; Olson, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery-reared fish and their eggs are commonly afflicted with saprolegniasis, a fungal disease that can cause significant losses in production. Fish culturists need safe and effective fungicides to minimize losses and meet production demands. The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide was evaluated for preventing or controlling mortality associated with saprolegniasis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Saprolegniasis was systematically induced in channel catfish so various therapies could be evaluated in a controlled laboratory environment. Both prophylactic and therapeutic hydrogen peroxide bath treatments of 50, 100, and 150 ??L/L for 1 h were administered every other day for seven total treatments. All untreated positive control fish died of saprolegniasis during the prophylactic and therapeutic tests. Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 150 ??L/L were harmful (relative to lower concentrations) to test fish and resulted in 73-95% mortality. Mortality was attributed to a combination of abrasion, temperature, chemical treatment, and disease stressors. Treatments of 100 ??L/L were less harmful (relatively) but also appeared to contribute to mortality (60-79%). These treatments, however, significantly reduced the incidence of mortality and infection compared with those observed for fish of the positive control or 150-??L/L treatment groups. Overall, treatments of 50 ??L/L were found to be the most safe and effective of those tested. Mortality with this concentration ranged from 16% in therapeutic tests to 41% in prophylactic tests. The statistical model employed estimated that the optimum treatment concentration for preventing or controlling mortality, reducing the incidence of infections, and enhancing the recovery of infected fish was 75 ??L H2O2/L.

  17. Catalytic hydroxylation of benzoic acid by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pulippurasseril, C.R.; Filippova, T.Yu.; Dedov, A.G.

    1992-12-31

    An effective catalytic system based on Fe(III) and surfactants is proposed for the hydroxylation of benozic acid by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium at a temperature of 30-80{degrees}C. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide formation and actin filament reorganization by Cdc42 are essential for ethanol-induced in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Luo, Jia; Leonard, Stephen S; Harris, Gabriel K; Millecchia, Lyndell; Flynn, Daniel C; Shi, Xianglin

    2003-05-01

    This report focuses on the identification of the molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced in vitro angiogenesis. The manipulation of angiogenesis is an important therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic inflammation. Our results showed that ethanol stimulation altered the integrity of actin filaments and increased the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia in SVEC4-10 cells. Further experiments demonstrated that ethanol stimulation increased cell migration and invasion and induced in vitro angiogenesis in SVEC4-10 cells. Mechanistically, ethanol stimulation activated Cdc42 and produced H(2)O(2) a reactive oxygen species intermediate in SVEC4-10 cells. Measuring the time course of Cdc42 activation and H(2)O(2) production upon ethanol stimulation revealed that the Cdc42 activation and the increase of H(2)O(2) lasted more than 3 h, which indicates the mechanisms of the long duration effects of ethanol on the cells. Furthermore, either overexpression of a constitutive dominant negative Cdc42 or inhibition of H(2)O(2) production abrogated the effects of ethanol on SVEC4-10 cells, indicating that both the activation of Cdc42 and the production of H(2)O(2) are essential for the actions of ethanol. Interestingly, we also found that overexpression of a constitutive dominant positive Cdc42 itself was sufficient to produce H(2)O(2) and to induce in vitro angiogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that ethanol stimulation can induce H(2)O(2) production through the activation of Cdc42, which results in reorganizing actin filaments and increasing cell motility and in vitro angiogenesis. PMID:12598535

  19. THE ROLE OF TRPM2 IN HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED EXPRESSION OF INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE AND CHEMOKINE IN RAT TRIGEMINAL GANGLIA

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, M.-K.; ASGAR, J.; LEE, J.; SHIM, M. S.; DUMLER, C.; RO, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal ganglia (TG) contain neuronal cell bodies surrounded by satellite glial cells. Although peripheral injury is well known to induce changes in gene expression within sensory ganglia, detailed mechanisms whereby peripheral injury leads to gene expression within sensory ganglia are not completely understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important modulator of hyperalgesia, but the role of ROS generated within sensory ganglia is unclear. Since ROS are known to affect transcription processes, ROS generated within sensory ganglia could directly influence gene expression and induce cellular changes at the soma level. In this study, we hypothesized that peripheral inflammation leads to cytokine and chemokine production and ROS generation within TG and that transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM2), a well known oxidative sensor, contributes to ROS-induced gene regulation within TG. The masseter injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) resulted in a significantly elevated level of ROS within TG of the inflamed side with a concurrent increase in cytokine expression in TG. Treatment of TG cultures with H2O2 significantly up-regulated mRNA and protein levels of cytokine/chemokine such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2). TRPM2 was expressed in both neurons and nonneuronal cells in TG, and pretreatment of TG cultures with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an inhibitor of TRPM2, or siRNA against TRPM2 attenuated H2O2-induced up-regulation of IL-6 and CXCL2. These results suggested that activation of TRPM2 could play an important role in the modulation of cytokine/chemokine expression within TG under oxidative stress and that such changes may contribute to amplification of nociceptive signals leading to pathological pain conditions. PMID:25849615

  20. Protective effect of quercitrin against hydrogen peroxide-induced dysfunction in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Mi

    2012-03-01

    The protective effect of quercitrin on the response of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells to oxidative stress was evaluated. Osteoblasts were incubated with H(2)O(2) and/or quercitrin, and markers of osteoblast function and oxidative damage were examined. Quercitrin treatment reversed the cytotoxic effect of H(2)O(2) significantly (P<0.05). This effect was blocked by ICI182780 and LY294002, suggesting that quercitrin's effect might be involved in estrogen action and results from PI3K mediated signaling pathway. Pretreatment of quercitrin increased collagen content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium deposition of osteoblasts compared with H(2)O(2) treated cells and these effects were blocked by ERKs and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) inhibitors such as PD98059 and SB203580, respectively. These suggest that quercitrin-induced protective effect against osteoblast dysfunction by oxidative stress is associated with increased activation of ERKs and p38 MAPK. Pretreatment with quercitrin also reduced the increase in bone-resorbing factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and oxidative damage markers (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and nitrotyrosine) induced by H(2)O(2). These results suggest that quercitrin may be protective against H(2)O(2)-induced dysfunction in osteoblasts. PMID:20822887

  1. Nanomolar concentrations of zinc pyrithione increase cell susceptibility to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide in rat thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tomohiro M; Saito, Minoru; Yonezawa, Takayasu; Okano, Yoshiro; Oyama, Yasuo

    2012-06-01

    Zinc pyrithione is used as an antifouling agent. However, the environmental impacts of zinc pyrithione have recently been of concern. Zinc induces diverse actions during oxidative stress; therefore, we examined the effect of zinc pyrithione on rat thymocytes suffering from oxidative stress using appropriate fluorescent probes. The cytotoxicity of zinc pyrithione was not observed when the cells were incubated with 3 μM zinc pyrithione for 3 h. However, zinc pyrithione at nanomolar concentrations (10 nM or more) significantly increased the lethality of cells suffering from oxidative stress induced by 3 mM H(2)O(2). The application of zinc pyrithione alone at nanomolar concentrations increased intracellular Zn(2+) level and the cellular content of superoxide anions, and decreased the cellular content of nonprotein thiols. The simultaneous application of nanomolar zinc pyrithione and micromolar H(2)O(2) synergistically increased the intracellular Zn(2+) level. Therefore, zinc pyrithione at nanomolar concentrations may exert severe cytotoxic action on cells simultaneously exposed to chemicals that induce oxidative stress. If so, zinc pyrithione leaked from antifouling materials into surrounding environments would be a risk factor for aquatic ecosystems. Alternatively, zinc pyrithione under conditions of oxidative stress may become more potent antifouling ingredient. PMID:22356860

  2. Protective activity of butyrate on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in isolated human colonocytes and HT29 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, P; Fabiani, R; De Bartolomeo, A; Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Pelli, M A; Morozzi, G

    2001-10-01

    Epidemiological studies support the involvement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in colon physiology and the protective role of butyrate on colon carcinogenesis. Among the possible mechanisms by which butyrate may exert its anti-carcinogenicity an antioxidant activity has been recently suggested. We investigated the effects of butyrate and mixtures of SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate) on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated human colonocytes and in two human colon tumour cell lines (HT29 and HT29 19A). Human colonocytes were isolated from endoscopically obtained samples and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage in normal colonocytes in a dose-dependent manner which was statistically significant at concentrations over 10 microM. At 15 microM H(2)O(2) DNA damage in HT29 and HT29 19A cells was significantly lower than that observed in normal colonocytes (P < 0.01). Pre-incubation of the cells with physiological concentrations of butyrate (6.25 and 12.5 mM) reduced H(2)O(2) (15 microM) induced damage by 33 and 51% in human colonocytes, 45 and 75% in HT29 and 30 and 80% in HT29 19A, respectively. Treatment of cells with a mixture of 25 mM acetate + 10.4 mM propionate + 6.25 mM butyrate did not induce DNA damage, while a mixture of 50 mM acetate + 20.8 mM propionate + 12.5 mM butyrate was weakly genotoxic only towards normal colonocytes. However, both mixtures were able to reduce the H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by about 50% in all cell types. The reported protective effect of butyrate might be important in pathogenetic mechanisms mediated by reactive oxygen species, and aids understanding of the apparent protection toward colorectal cancer exerted by dietary fibres, which enhance the butyrate bioavailability in the colonic mucosa. PMID:11577008

  3. Prediction and assignment of the FIR spectrum of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helminger, P.; Messer, J. K.; De Lucia, F. C.; Bowman, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Millimeter and submillimeter microwave studies are used to predict and assign the FIR rotational-torsional spectrum of hydrogen peroxide. Special attention is given to the strong Q-branch features that have recently been used by Traub and Chance to place an upper limit on the atmospheric abundance of hydrogen peroxide. In addition, 67 new transitions are reported in the 400-1000 GHz region.

  4. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  5. Effects of aqueous extracts of Halimeda incrassata (Ellis) Lamouroux and Bryothamnion triquetrum (S.G.Gmelim) Howe on hydrogen peroxide and methyl mercury-induced oxidative stress in GT1-7 mouse hypothalamic immortalized cells.

    PubMed

    Fallarero, A; Loikkanen, J J; Männistö, P T; Castañeda, O; Vidal, A

    2003-01-01

    The current investigation focuses attention on the neuroprotective and antioxidant properties of aqueous extracts from Halimeda incrassata (Hi) and Bryothamniom triquetrum (Bt) in the mouse immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line. Under basal oxidative conditions, Hi extract reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species production, as assessed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, while Bt extract does not contribute to basal ROS generation. Both extracts, at concentrations higher than 0.20 mg/ml, exert protection against hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death, although only Hi extract can additionally prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS production. The two seaweed aqueous extracts, at concentrations higher than 0.05 mg/ml, also display protection against neuronal death induced by methyl mercury chloride, as well as against methyl mercury chloride-mediated ROS generation. None of the extracts increase GSH intracellular pools, in basal conditions, after depleting its levels with either hydrogen peroxide or methyl mercury chloride. Some comments on the probable targets of the neuroprotection exerted by these two extracts are included in this paper. PMID:12622462

  6. pCramoll and rCramoll as New Preventive Agents against the Oxidative Dysfunction Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luís Cláudio Nascimento; Alves, Neyla Maria Pereira; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; Higino, Taciana Mirely Maciel; da Cunha, Cássia Regina Albuquerque; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; da Paz, Nathalia Varejão Nogueira; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the induction of cell death and is associated with various pathologic disorders; therefore, the search for natural products that attenuate the effects produced by oxidant agents is greatly increased. Here, the protective effects of native lectin from Cratylia mollis seeds (pCramoll) and recombinant Cramoll 1 (rCramoll) against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in Vero cells were evaluated. Both lectins significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent way. The maximum protective effects were 96.85 ± 15.59% (rCramoll) and 59.48 ± 23.44% (pCramoll). The Live/Dead analysis showed a reduction in the percentage of dead cells from 65.04 ± 3.29% (H2O2) to 39.77 ± 2.93% (pCramoll) and 13.90 ± 9.01% (rCramoll). The deleterious effects of H2O2 on cell proliferation were reduced to 10.83% (pCramoll) and 24.17% (rCramoll). Lectins treatment attenuated the excessive superoxide production, the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the lysosomal and DNA damage in H2O2-treated cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that pCramoll and rCramoll blocked H2O2-induced cytotoxicity through decreasing reactive oxygen species, restoring the mitochondrial potential, preventing the lysosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, and thus promoting cell survival and proliferation. PMID:26576224

  7. pCramoll and rCramoll as New Preventive Agents against the Oxidative Dysfunction Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento da Silva, Luís Cláudio; Alves, Neyla Maria Pereira; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; Higino, Taciana Mirely Maciel; da Cunha, Cássia Regina Albuquerque; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; da Paz, Nathalia Varejão Nogueira; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the induction of cell death and is associated with various pathologic disorders; therefore, the search for natural products that attenuate the effects produced by oxidant agents is greatly increased. Here, the protective effects of native lectin from Cratylia mollis seeds (pCramoll) and recombinant Cramoll 1 (rCramoll) against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in Vero cells were evaluated. Both lectins significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent way. The maximum protective effects were 96.85 ± 15.59% (rCramoll) and 59.48 ± 23.44% (pCramoll). The Live/Dead analysis showed a reduction in the percentage of dead cells from 65.04 ± 3.29% (H2O2) to 39.77 ± 2.93% (pCramoll) and 13.90 ± 9.01% (rCramoll). The deleterious effects of H2O2 on cell proliferation were reduced to 10.83% (pCramoll) and 24.17% (rCramoll). Lectins treatment attenuated the excessive superoxide production, the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the lysosomal and DNA damage in H2O2-treated cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that pCramoll and rCramoll blocked H2O2-induced cytotoxicity through decreasing reactive oxygen species, restoring the mitochondrial potential, preventing the lysosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, and thus promoting cell survival and proliferation. PMID:26576224

  8. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and Eoarchean iron formations.

    PubMed

    Pecoits, E; Smith, M L; Catling, D C; Philippot, P; Kappler, A; Konhauser, K O

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that photosynthetic bacteria played a crucial role in Fe(II) oxidation and the precipitation of iron formations (IF) during the Late Archean-Early Paleoproterozoic (2.7-2.4 Ga). It is less clear whether microbes similarly caused the deposition of the oldest IF at ca. 3.8 Ga, which would imply photosynthesis having already evolved by that time. Abiological alternatives, such as the direct oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) by ultraviolet radiation may have occurred, but its importance has been discounted in environments where the injection of high concentrations of dissolved iron directly into the photic zone led to chemical precipitation reactions that overwhelmed photooxidation rates. However, an outstanding possibility remains with respect to photochemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere that might generate hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), a recognized strong oxidant for ferrous iron. Here, we modeled the amount of H2 O2 that could be produced in an Eoarchean atmosphere using updated solar fluxes and plausible CO2 , O2 , and CH4 mixing ratios. Irrespective of the atmospheric simulations, the upper limit of H2 O2 rainout was calculated to be <10(6) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) . Using conservative Fe(III) sedimentation rates predicted for submarine hydrothermal settings in the Eoarchean, we demonstrate that the flux of H2 O2 was insufficient by several orders of magnitude to account for IF deposition (requiring ~10(11) H2 O2 molecules cm(-2) s(-1) ). This finding further constrains the plausible Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms in Eoarchean seawater, leaving, in our opinion, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms the most likely mechanism responsible for Earth's oldest IF. PMID:25324177

  9. Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

    2004-03-22

    This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide in Groundwater at Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Nico, P. S.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Davis, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as a reactive transient presenting ubiquitously in natural surface waters, can react with a large suite of biologically important and redox-sensitive trace elements. The dominant source of H2O2 in natural waters has long been thought to be photo-oxidation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by molecular oxygen to produce superoxide radical, which then proceeds via dismutation to generate H2O2. However, recent studies have indicated that dark production of H2O2 in deep seawater, principally by biological production, is potentially on par with photochemical generation. Here, we present evidence for abiotic dark generation of H2O2 in groundwater in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO. Background H2O2 concentrations were determined in situ using a sensitive chemiluminescence-based method. Our results suggest H2O2 concentrations ranged from lower than the detection limit (1 nM) to 54 nM in different monitoring wells at the site, and the concentrations exhibited close correlations with profiles of dissolved oxygen and iron concentrations in the wells, indicating a possible metal redox cycling mechanism. In addition, dissolved natural organic matter, which could potentially coordinate the interconversion of ferric and ferrous species, might also play an important role in H2O2 formation. While biologically mediated activities have been recognized as the major sink of H2O2, the detected H2O2 pattern in groundwater suggests the existence of a balance between H2O2 source and decay, which potentially involves a cascade of biogeochemically significant processes, including the interconversion of ferrous/ferric species, the generation of more reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radical, the depletion of dissolved oxygen and further transformation of natural organic matter and other chemical pollutants.

  11. Localised hydrogen peroxide sensing for reproductive health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Schartner, Erik P.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2015-05-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to affect the developmental competence of embryos. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) an important reactive oxygen species, is also known to causes DNA damage and defective sperm function. Current techniques require incubating a developing embryo with an organic fluorophore which is potentially hazardous for the embryo. What we need is a localised ROS sensor which does not require fluorophores in solution and hence will allow continuous monitoring of H2O2 production without adversely affect the development of the embryo. Here we report studies on such a fibre-based sensor for the detection of H2O2 that uses a surface-bound aryl boronate fluorophore carboxyperoxyfluor-1(CPF1). Optical fibres present a unique platform due to desirable characteristics as dip sensors in biological solutions. Attempts to functionalise the fibre tips using polyelectrolyte layers and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) coatings resulted in a limited signal and poor fluorescent response to H2O2 due to a low tip surface density of the fluorophore. To increase the surface density, CPF1 was integrated into a polymer matrix formed on the fibre tip by a UV-catalysed polymerisation process of acrylamide onto a methacrylate silane layer. The polyacrylamide containing CPF1 gave a much higher surface density than previous surface attachment methods and the sensor was found to effectively detect H2O2. Using this method, biologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 were detected, enabling remote sensing studies into ROS releases from embryos throughout early development.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) vs eosinophil count in induced sputum (IS) in parenchymal vs airways lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Fireman, Elizabeth; Shtark, Moshe; Priel, Israel E; Shiner, Robert; Mor, Ram; Kivity, Shmuel; Fireman, Zvi

    2007-04-01

    We compared exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and induced sputum (IS) for assessing inflammation in pulmonary diseases in patients with obstructive lung disease (n = 20), persistent cough >6 months (n = 20), interstitial lung disease (n = 25) and controls (n = 10). EBC was collected by suspending a Teflon perfluoroalkoxy tube installed in an ice-filled container and connected to a polypropylene test tube. IS was recovered after 20' inhalation of 3% saline with an ultrasonic nebulizer, and 300 cells were differentially counted in cytospin Giemsa-stained slides. H(2)0(2) was measured by a method based on oxidation of phenolsulfonphthalein (phenol red) mediated by horseradish peroxidases and H(2)0(2). Pulmonary function tests were performed by conventional methods. H(2)0(2) levels in EBC and % eosinophils in IS were significantly different between groups. A positive and significant correlation was found between % eosinophils in IS and the levels of H(2)0(2) in EBC for each group and for all patients combined. PMID:17372840

  13. Proteomic analysis of ginsenoside Re attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gui-Dong; Zhong, Xian-Feng; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Zeng, Rong

    2016-05-18

    Ginsenoside Re is an active component in ginseng that has attracted much attention because of its evident therapeutic effects on the cardiovascular system. However, little basic information is available on the mechanisms and pharmacological effects of ginsenoside Re. The potential mechanisms and protective effects of Re on H2O2-induced oxidative injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. An oxidative injury model was established using H2O2. The anti-oxidative effects of Re were determined using a series of experiments, such as MTT and anti-oxidative indicator assays. The potential protective mechanisms of Re were explored at the proteomic level, and differentially expressed proteins were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Results indicated that Re could be a potential anti-oxidant to protect HUVECs against oxidative stress damage. Proteomic analysis showed that the expression of 23 protein spots was upregulated in Re and H2O2 groups to resist oxidative stress, 15 of which were identified by their mass spectrum. These upregulated proteins were involved in stress response, anti-oxidative systems, protein synthesis, regulation of transcription and post-translational modifications, and repair of mitochondrial functions. This study may provide new insights into the mechanisms of ginsenoside Re in protecting the cardiovascular system. PMID:27161858

  14. Involvement of endogenous antioxidant systems in the protective activity of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damages in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Douiri, Salma; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Hamdi, Yosra; Cubì, Roger; Basille, Magali; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Vaudry, David; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2016-06-01

    Astroglial cells possess an array of cellular defense mechanisms, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase antioxidant enzymes, to prevent damages caused by oxidative stress. Nevertheless, astroglial cell viability and functionality can be affected by significant oxidative stress. We have previously shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent glioprotective agent that prevents hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced apoptosis in cultured astrocytes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential protective effect of PACAP against oxidative-generated alteration of astrocytic antioxidant systems. Incubation of cells with subnanomolar concentrations of PACAP inhibited H2 O2 -evoked reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial respiratory burst, and caspase-3 mRNA level increase. PACAP also stimulated SOD and catalase activities in a concentration-dependent manner, and counteracted the inhibitory effect of H2 O2 on the activity of these two antioxidant enzymes. The protective action of PACAP against H2 O2 -evoked inhibition of antioxidant systems in astrocytes was protein kinase A, PKC, and MAP-kinase dependent. In the presence of H2 O2 , the SOD blocker NaCN and the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole, both suppressed the protective effects of PACAP on SOD and catalase activities, mitochondrial function, and cell survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-apoptotic effect of PACAP on astroglial cells can account for the activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and reduction in respiration rate, thus preserving mitochondrial integrity and preventing caspase-3 expression provoked by oxidative stress. Considering its powerful anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties, the PACAPergic signaling system should thus be considered for the development of new therapeutical approaches to cure various pathologies involving oxidative neurodegeneration. We propose the following cascade for the

  15. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and methyl hydroperoxide in Yanbian, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Ji, B.; Lee, M.; Kim, K.; Lee, G.

    2003-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides are photochemical byproducts. They are referred as the indicator of oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Further, they are related with the production and removal of ozone in photochemistry. To better understand the photochemical processes in the troposphere, it is essential to know the correct concentration of hydroperoxides. Hydrogen peroxide and methyl Hydroperoxide were measured from 24 Aug to 3 Sep in Yanbian, China. Measurements were made for continuously during the whole course of the experiments. After collected in aqueous solution using continuous scrubbing coil, hydroperoxides were separated by HPLC, and then quantified by fluorescence produced using postcolumn enzyme derivatization. Collection and analysis were done automatically Average concentration of hydrogen peroxide and methyl hydroperoxide were 0.9ppbc and 1.6 ppb, respectively. In general, hydroperoxides showed typical diurnal variations with the maximum concentration during day. It was the first study of air pollution conducted in Yanbian, China. Detailed results will be presented in the meeting.

  16. Microbiologic evaluation of a hydrogen peroxide sterilization system.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, D L; Chung, P Y; Tsuchiya, P Y; Wessels, I F; Zuccarelli, A J

    1994-01-01

    The reliability of chemical sterilizers (acetone and/or 30-percent hydrogen peroxide at 25 degrees C and at 60 degrees C) was tested against Bacillus subtilis inoculated onto glass slides, commercial biological indicator discs (Bacillus stearothermophilus and B. subtilis), and B. subtilis spore survival. Acetone alone was not sporicidal. Hydrogen-peroxide-sterilized glass slides were sterile after 5 minutes. The indicator discs required 25 minutes at 25 degrees C, and less than 3 minutes at 60 degrees C (P < .0001). The D value of B. subtilis in 27-percent hydrogen peroxide at 25 degrees C is 2 minutes, with z values of 22 degrees C and 26 degrees C at 25 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. For delicate instruments, a 30-percent peroxide solution followed by an acetone rinse provides an effective alternative to classic heat sterilization. PMID:7898862

  17. Different Modes of Hydrogen Peroxide Action During Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyla, Łukasz; Lechowska, Katarzyna; Kubala, Szymon; Garnczarska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was initially recognized as a toxic molecule that causes damage at different levels of cell organization and thus losses in cell viability. From the 1990s, the role of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule in plants has also been discussed. The beneficial role of H2O2 as a central hub integrating signaling network in response to biotic and abiotic stress and during developmental processes is now well established. Seed germination is the most pivotal phase of the plant life cycle, affecting plant growth and productivity. The function of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and seed aging has been illustrated in numerous studies; however, the exact role of this molecule remains unknown. This review evaluates evidence that shows that H2O2 functions as a signaling molecule in seed physiology in accordance with the known biology and biochemistry of H2O2. The importance of crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and a number of signaling molecules, including plant phytohormones such as abscisic acid, gibberellins, and ethylene, and reactive molecules such as nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide acting on cell communication and signaling during seed germination, is highlighted. The current study also focuses on the detrimental effects of H2O2 on seed biology, i.e., seed aging that leads to a loss of germination efficiency. The dual nature of hydrogen peroxide as a toxic molecule on one hand and as a signal molecule on the other is made possible through the precise spatial and temporal control of its production and degradation. Levels of hydrogen peroxide in germinating seeds and young seedlings can be modulated via pre-sowing seed priming/conditioning. This rather simple method is shown to be a valuable tool for improving seed quality and for enhancing seed stress tolerance during post-priming germination. In this review, we outline how seed priming/conditioning affects the integrative role of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and aging. PMID:26870076

  18. [Accelerated senescence of fresh-cut Chinese water chestnut tissues in relation to hydrogen peroxide accumulation].

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Tao; Jiang, Yue-Ming; Yang, Shu-Zhen; Pan, Si-Yi

    2005-10-01

    Accelerated senescence of fresh-cut Chinese water chestnut (CWC) tissues in relation to active oxygen species (AOS) metabolism was investigated. Fresh-cut CWC (2 mm thick) and intact CWC were stored at 4 degrees C in trays wrapped with plastic films. Changes in superoxide anion production rate, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were monitored, while contents of hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid, MDA as well as electrolyte leakage were measured. Fresh-cutting of CWC induced activities of SOD, CAT and APX to a certain extent (Fig. 2B and Fig. 3), but simultaneously stimulated superoxide anion production markedly (Fig. 2A), enhanced hydrogen peroxide accumulation and accelerated loss in ascorbic acid (Figs. 4 and 5), which resulted in increased lipid peroxidation indicated by malondialdehyde (MDA) content and electrolyte leakage (Fig. 1). Statistics analysis indicated that there was a significantly positive correlation among hydrogen peroxide accumulation, MDA content and electrolyte leakage (Table 1). Histochemical detection with 3, 3'-diaminobenzidine further demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide accumulation increased in fresh-cut CWC during storage (Fig. 5). AOS production rate and activities of SOD, CAT and APX changed little while no obvious hydrogen peroxide accumulation was observed, in intact CWC during storage. PMID:16222096

  19. Changes in tetrahydrobiopterin levels in endothelial cells and adult cardiomyocytes induced by LPS and hydrogen peroxide--a role for GFRP?

    PubMed

    Kalivendi, Shasi; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Whitsett, Jennifer; Konorev, Eugene; Kalyanaraman, B; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2005-02-15

    Alterations in tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) levels have significant consequences in vascular pathophysiology. However, the mechanisms regulating BH4 remain poorly understood. The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH-I), the first enzyme in BH4 biosynthesis, is controlled by protein levels, posttranslational modifications and interaction with GTPCH-I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). This work examined the correlation between GTPCH-I protein levels and activity and changes in BH4 in human endothelial cells (HAECs) and adult rat cardiomyocytes (ARCM). Changes in BH4 were stimulated with LPS in HAECs and ARCM, and with hydrogen peroxide in HAECs only. Biopterin production by HAECs and ARCM were attained with concentrations of LPS >1 microg/ml and responses were nonlinear with respect to LPS concentrations. Western blot analysis demonstrated that induction of biopterin synthesis in HAECs and ARCM by LPS does not entail augmentation of constitutive GTPCH-I protein levels. However, LPS diminished GFRP mRNA, suggesting that disruption of GTPCH-I:GFRP complex enhances de novo biopterin synthesis. Conversely, treatment with hydrogen peroxide increased GTPCH-I and GFRP mRNA levels in HAECs while depleting BH4 and GSH, which was counteracted by catalase. This indicates that GFRP may override increases in GTPCH-I protein inhibiting enzyme activity. This conclusion is further supported by depletion of biopterin in cells transiently transfected with GFRP. Thus, allosteric regulation of GTPCH-I activity in the cardiovascular system maybe an important mechanism regulating BH4 levels through GFRP signaling. PMID:15649650

  20. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide as signalling molecules in plants.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven J; Desikan, Radhika; Clarke, Andrew; Hurst, Roger D; Hancock, John T

    2002-05-01

    It is now clear that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) function as signalling molecules in plants. A wide range of abiotic and biotic stresses results in H(2)O(2) generation, from a variety of sources. H(2)O(2) is removed from cells via a number of antioxidant mechanisms, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic. Both biotic and abiotic stresses can induce NO synthesis, but the biosynthetic origins of NO in plants have not yet been resolved. Cellular responses to H(2)O(2) and NO are complex, with considerable cross-talk between responses to several stimuli. In this review the potential roles of H(2)O(2) and NO during various stresses and the signalling pathways they activate are discussed. Key signalling components that might provide targets for enhancing crop production are also identified. PMID:11997372

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide, Signaling in Disguise during Metal Phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Ann; Hendrix, Sophie; Amaral dos Reis, Rafaela; De Smet, Stefanie; Deckers, Jana; Gielen, Heidi; Jozefczak, Marijke; Loix, Christophe; Vercampt, Hanne; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Keunen, Els

    2016-01-01

    Plants exposed to excess metals are challenged by an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide (O2•-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the hydroxyl radical (•OH). The mechanisms underlying this oxidative challenge are often dependent on metal-specific properties and might play a role in stress perception, signaling and acclimation. Although ROS were initially considered as toxic compounds causing damage to various cellular structures, their role as signaling molecules became a topic of intense research over the last decade. Hydrogen peroxide in particular is important in signaling because of its relatively low toxicity, long lifespan and its ability to cross cellular membranes. The delicate balance between its production and scavenging by a plethora of enzymatic and metabolic antioxidants is crucial in the onset of diverse signaling cascades that finally lead to plant acclimation to metal stress. In this review, our current knowledge on the dual role of ROS in metal-exposed plants is presented. Evidence for a relationship between H2O2 and plant metal tolerance is provided. Furthermore, emphasis is put on recent advances in understanding cellular damage and downstream signaling responses as a result of metal-induced H2O2 production. Finally, special attention is paid to the interaction between H2O2 and other signaling components such as transcription factors, mitogen-activated protein kinases, phytohormones and regulating systems (e.g. microRNAs). These responses potentially underlie metal-induced senescence in plants. Elucidating the signaling network activated during metal stress is a pivotal step to make progress in applied technologies like phytoremediation of polluted soils. PMID:27199999

  2. The hydrogen peroxide impact on larval settlement and metamorphosis of abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangjing; Yang, Zhihui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2008-08-01

    Abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta is an important economic mollusk. The settlement and metamorphosis are two critical stages during its development period, which has direct influence on abalone survival and production. The influence of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) on abalone embryo and juvenile development were examined in this study. Larvae of Haliotis diversicolor supertexta were induced to settlement and metamorphose by exposure to seawater supplemented with hydrogen peroxide. They had the best performance at 800 μmol/L. The concentration of 1 000 μmol/L or higher was toxic to the larvae, as the larvae could settle down only at benthic diatom plates without complete metamorphosis. In addition, H2O2 adding time was critical to the larval performance. 24h after two-day post-fertilization was proved to be the optimal adding time. In this paper, two action mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide are discussed: (1) hydrogen peroxide has direct toxicity to ciliated cells, thus cause apoptosis; (2) hydrogen peroxide, as a product from catecholamines’ autoxidation process in vivo, can reverse this process to produce neuro-transmitters to induce abalone metamorphosis.

  3. Fisetin inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammatory action and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT/Nrf-2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hee; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative skin damage and skin inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis of skin-related diseases. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid abundantly found in several vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been shown to exert various positive biological effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, neuroprotective and anti-oxidative effects. In this study, we investigate the skin protective effects and anti-inflammatory properties of fisetin in hydrogen peroxide- and TNF-α-challenged human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. When HaCaT cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of fisetin (1-20μM), heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, fisetin dose-dependently increased cell viability and reduced ROS production in hydrogen peroxide-treated HaCaT cells. Fisetin also inhibited the production of NO, PGE2 IL-1β, IL-6, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells treated with TNF-α. Fisetin induced Nrf2 translocation to the nuclei. HO-1 siRNA transient transfection reversed the effects of fisetin on cytoprotection, ROS reduction, NO, PGE2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α production, and NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Moreover, fisetin increased Akt phosphorylation and a PI3K pathway inhibitor (LY294002) abolished fisetin-induced cytoprotection and NO inhibition. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a beneficial role of fisetin in skin therapy. PMID:26590114

  4. Simulated afterburner performance with hydrogen peroxide injection for thrust augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, Allen J; Grobman, Jack S

    1956-01-01

    Combustion performance of three afterburner configurations was evaluated at simulated altitude flight conditions with liquid augmentation to the primary combustor. Afterburner combustion efficiency and stability were better with injection of high-strength hydrogen peroxide than with no injection or with water injection. Improvements were observed in afterburner configurations with and without flameholders and in a short-length afterburner. At a peroxide-air ratio of 0.3, combustion was stable and 85 to 90 percent efficient in all configurations tested. Calculated augmented net-thrust ratios for peroxide injection with afterburning were approximately 60 percent greater than those for water injection.

  5. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  6. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, wemore » show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.« less

  7. Reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide generation in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Rudzka, Dominika A; Cameron, Jenifer M; Olson, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell migration is a complex process that requires spatially and temporally co-ordinated regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In response to external cues, signals are transduced to elicit cytoskeletal responses. It has emerged that reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide, are important second messengers in pathways that influence the actin cytoskeleton, although the identities of key proteins regulated by hydrogen peroxide are largely unknown. We recently showed that oxidation of cofilin1 is elevated in migrating cells relative to stationary cells, and that the effect of this post-translational modification is to reduce cofilin1-actin binding and to inhibit filamentous-actin severing by cofilin1. These studies revealed that cofilin1 regulation by hydrogen peroxide contributes to directional cell migration, and established a template for discovering additional proteins that are regulated in an analogous manner. PMID:27066166

  8. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  9. Oxidative desulfurization of Tufanbeyli coal by hydrogen peroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guru, M.; Sarioz, B.V.; Cakanyildirim, C.

    2008-07-01

    It is becoming popular to use fossil fuels efficiently since the necessary energy is mostly supplied from fossil fuels. Altough there are high lignite reserves, high sulfur content limits the efficient use of them. In this article, we aimed to convert combustible sulfur in coal to non-combustible sulfate form in the ash by oxidizing it with a hydrogen peroxide solution. The parameters affecting the sulfur conversion were determined to be: hydrogen peroxide concentration, reaction time, mean particle size at constant room temperature and shaking rate. The maximum desulfurization efficiency reached was 74% of the original combustible sulfur with 15% (w/w) hydrogen peroxide solution, 12 hours of reaction time, and 0.25 mm mean particle size.

  10. Modeling the oxidation of phenolic compounds by hydrogen peroxide photolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi; Cheng, Long; Ma, Lin; Meng, Fanchao; Arnold, Robert G; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide UV photolysis is among the most widely used advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for the destruction of trace organics in waters destined for reuse. Previous kinetic models of hydrogen peroxide photolysis focus on the dynamics of hydroxyl radical production and consumption, as well as the reaction of the target organic with hydroxyl radicals. However, the rate of target destruction may also be affected by radical scavenging by reaction products. In this work, we build a predictive kinetic model for the destruction of p-cresol by hydrogen peroxide photolysis based on a complete reaction mechanism that includes reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. The results show that development of a predictive kinetic model to evaluate process performance requires consideration of the complete reaction mechanism, including reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. PMID:27448315

  11. Formation of hydrogen peroxide in electron irradiated secondary effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.J.; Sosa, D.; Cadavid, E.M. ); Waite, T.D.; Kurucz, C.N. )

    1989-01-01

    The results of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in a chlorinated secondary wastewater are presented in this paper. This research project utilizes a large scale 1.5 MeV, 50 mA, electron accelerator located at the Virginia Key Wastewater Treatment Plant in Miami, Florida. Secondary chlorinated wastewater is connected to the influent of the electron beam facility and can be treated at 120 gpm. The formation of the oxidant hydrogen peroxide has been related to electron dose. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  12. Distillation Kinetics of Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Peroxide and Water and the Isolation of Pure Hydrogen Peroxide in Ultrahigh Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the growth of thin films of crystalline H2O2 and H2O2.2H2O (dihydrate) in ultrahigh vacuum by distilling an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. We traced the process using infrared reflectance spectroscopy, mass loss on a quartz crystal microbalance, and in a few cases ultraviolet-visible reflectance. We find that the different crystalline phases-water, dihydrate, and hydrogen peroxide-have very different sublimation rates, making distillation efficient to isolate the less volatile component, crystalline H2O2.

  13. Oxygen Mass Flow Rate Generated for Monitoring Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with non-toxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because peroxide is sensitive to contaminants, material interactions, stability and storage issues, monitoring decomposition rates is important. Stennis Space Center (SSC) uses thermocouples to monitor bulk fluid temperature (heat evolution) to determine reaction rates. Unfortunately, large temperature rises are required to offset the heat lost into the surrounding fluid. Also, tank penetration to accomodate a thermocouple can entail modification of a tank or line and act as a source of contamination. The paper evaluates a method for monitoring oxygen evolution as a means to determine peroxide stability. Oxygen generation is not only directly related to peroxide decomposition, but occurs immediately. Measuring peroxide temperature to monitor peroxide stability has significant limitations. The bulk decomposition of 1% / week in a large volume tank can produce in excess of 30 cc / min. This oxygen flow rate corresponds to an equivalent temperature rise of approximately 14 millidegrees C, which is difficult to measure reliably. Thus, if heat transfer were included, there would be no temperature rise. Temperature changes from the surrounding environment and heat lost to the peroxide will also mask potential problems. The use of oxygen flow measurements provides an ultra sensitive technique for monitoring reaction events and will provide an earlier indication of an abnormal decomposition when compared to measuring temperature rise.

  14. Protective effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line

    PubMed Central

    Senevirathne, Mahinda; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Blueberry was enzymatically hydrolyzed using selected commercial food grade carbohydrases (AMG, Celluclast, Termamyl, Ultraflo and Viscozyme) and proteases (Alcalase, Flavourzyme, Kojizyme, Neutrase and Protamex) to obtain water soluble compounds, and their protective effect was investigated against H2O2-induced damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line (V79-4) via various published methods. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates showed higher total phenolic content as well as higher cell viability and ROS scavenging activities, and hence, selected for further antioxidant assays. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates also showed higher protective effects against lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptotic body formation in a dose-dependent fashion. Thus, the results indicated that water soluble compounds obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of blueberry possess good antioxidant activity against H2O2-induced cell damage in vitro. PMID:20607062

  15. Anti-oxidant effects of the extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata on human dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes against hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage.

    PubMed

    Thang, P T; Patrick, S; Teik, L S; Yung, C S

    2001-06-01

    In cutaneous tissue repair, oxidants and antioxidants play very important roles. In local acute and chronic wounds, oxidants are known to have the ability to cause as cell damage and may function as inhibitory factors to wound healing. The administration of anti-oxidants or free radical scavengers is reportedly helpful, notably in order to limit the delayed sequelae of thermal trauma and to enhance the healing process. Extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata have been shown to be beneficial for treatment of wounds. Studies in vitro of these extracts demonstrated enhanced proliferation of fibroblasts, endothelial cells and keratinocytes, stimulation of keratinocyte migration in an in vitro wound assay, up-regulation of production by keratinocytes of extracellular matrix proteins and basement membrane components, and inhibition of collagen lattice contraction by fibroblasts. In this study, the anti-oxidant effects of both total ethanol and polyphenolic extracts from the plant leaves on hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage to human fibroblasts and keratinocytes were investigated. Cell viability was monitored by a colorimetric assay. The results showed that for fibroblasts, toxicity of hydrogen peroxide or hypoxanthine xanthine oxidase on cells was dose-dependent. Total ethanol extract (TEE) at 400 and 800 microg/ml showed maximum and consistent protective cellular effect on oxidant toxicity at low or high doses of oxidants. The 50 microg/ml concentration of TEE also had significant and slightly protective effects on fibroblasts against hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage, respectively. For keratinocytes, a dose-dependent relationship of oxidant toxicity was only seen with hydrogen peroxide but the protective action of the extract correlated with oxidant dosage. TEE at 400 and 800 microg/ml showed dose-dependent effects with both low and high concentration of oxidants. TEE at 50 microg/ml had no

  16. A PORTABLE MICROREACTOR SYSTEM TO SYNTHESIZE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the event that vehicles of buildings become contaminated by hazardous chemical or biological materials, a well-studied and effective decontaminant is hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV).  Unfortunately, the current technology for generating HPV requires 35 weight percent hydro...

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide Producing Lactobacilli in Women with Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Min; Kim, Chol Hong; Kim, Seok Mo; Oh, Jong Seok

    2006-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical neoplasia, and hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli are the most important microorganisms for maintaining the balance of the vaginal ecosystem. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship of hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli, cervical neoplasia and high-risk HPV. Materials and Methods We enrolled 1138 women with abnormal cervical smears or cervicograms who were referred to the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Chonnam National University Medical School. In all of them, 1,138 vaginal swabs were collected for the qualitative assay of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli and 150 cervical swabs were used for the HPV hybrid capture II test without regard to the subjects' pregnancy status. In the non-pregnant women, 880 cervical biopsies and/or loop electrosurgical excision procedures were performed for making the histological diagnosis. Results There was no significant difference not only between the distribution of H2O2 producing lactobacilli and the cervical histology, but also between the distribution of H2O2 producing lactobacilli and the positivity for high-risk HPV. Conclusions Both cervical neoplasia and high-risk HPV may not be influenced by the existence of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli in the vagina. PMID:19771268

  18. RESPONSE OF PLANT-COLONIZING PSEUDOMONADS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colonization of plant root surfaces by Pseudomonas putida may require mechanisms that protect this bacterium against superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide produced by the root. atalase and superoxide dismutase may be important in this bacterial defense system. tationary-phase ce...

  19. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the...

  20. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030 or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section...

  1. Hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Antifungal agents are needed to maintain healthy stocks of fish in the intensive culture systems currently employed in fish hatcheries. Malachite green has been the most widely used antifungal agent; however, its potential for producing teratology in animals and fish precludes further use in fish culture. Preliminary studies at the National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI, USA (La Crosse Center) indicate that hydrogen peroxide is effective for control of Saprolegnia sp. fungus on incubating eggs of rainbow trout. It is also effective against a wide variety of other organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, viruses, and spores, and has been proposed as a treatment for sea lice on salmon. Hydrogen peroxide and its primary decomposition products, oxygen and water, are not systemic poisons and are considered environmentally compatible. In response to a petition from the La Crosse Center, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently classified hydrogen peroxide as a 'low regulatory priority' when used for control of fungus on fish and fish eggs. Preliminary tests conducted at the La Crosse Center suggest that prophylactic treatments of 250 to 500 ppm (based on 100% active ingredient) for 15 minutes every other day will inhibit fungal infections on healthy rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs. This treatment regime also seems to inhibit fungal development and increase hatching success among infected eggs. Efficacy and safety of hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish are currently being evaluated.

  2. Toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to rainbow trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Rach, J.J.; Olson, J.J.; Ramsay, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 0, 500, 1,000, and 3,000 I?L/L, concentrations that were multiples of the Low Regulatory Priority limit of 500 I?L/L, were administered for 15 min every weekday (Mondaya??Friday) to eggs of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and steelhead (anadromous rainbow trout) to determine the margin of safety existing for standard egg treatments. All untreated and treated eggs remained free of fungal infection throughout incubation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs by 1.4a??5.9% among those treated at 500 I?L/L, 6.8a??15.4% among those treated at 1,000 I?L/L, and 13.2a??25.3% among those treated at 3,000 I?L/L. Mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated at 1,000 I?L H2O2/L was 7% lower than that for eggs treated at 500 I?L H2O2/L. Mean percent hatch of Skamania strain steelhead was significantly reduced by hydrogen peroxide treatment, whereas the mean percent hatch of Ganaraska strain steelhead was similar to the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs. Daily percent mortality of rainbow trout eggs increased significantly from day 6 to day 10 (78a??135 daily temperature units, DTUsA?C) of incubation. Discontinuing hydrogen peroxide treatments to Skamania strain steelhead eggs from day 7 to day 11 (78a??105 DTUsA?C) of incubation significantly increased the probability of eggs reaching the eyed egg stage. The mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated with hydrogen peroxide at concentrations up to 1,000 I?L/L may be increased if no treatments are administered between 70 and 140 DTUsA?C. Mortality of sac fry was not observed at hydrogen peroxide concentrations of 1,000 I?L/L or lower. Fish culturists should be aware that other species or strains may be more sensitive than rainbow trout. Other species and strains should be initially treated with hydrogen peroxide at 500 I?L/L until monitoring of egg mortality identifies the presence or absence of a sensitive period.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide oxidant fuel cell systems for ultra-portable applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will address the issues of using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant fuel in a miniature DMFC system. Cell performance for DMFC based fuel cells operating on hydrogen peroxide will be presented and discussed.

  4. 78 FR 73697 - New Animal Drugs; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ...; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of Sponsor AGENCY: Food and Drug... interest in, NADA 141-255 for PEROX-AID (hydrogen peroxide) 35% Solution to Western Chemical, Inc.,...

  5. Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, Follow All Instructions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, ... warning label and red tip remind you that contact lens solutions with hydrogen peroxide require special handling. ( ...

  6. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  7. Application of a newly developed hydrogen peroxide vapor phase sensor to HPV sterilizer.

    PubMed

    Taizo, I; Sinichi, A; Kawamura, K

    1998-01-01

    A new type of concentration sensor for hydrogen peroxide vapor has been developed by making use of a semiconductor. Output from the vapor sensor has been shown to have a good linear relationship with the logarithm of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor. Concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor introduced into the sterilization chamber could be kept constant by monitoring the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide vapor continuously and controlling the vapor supply. Temperature and humidity have also been kept constant. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined by using the combination system of the hydrogen peroxide vapor sensor, the hydrogen peroxide vapor supplier, thermosensor and humidity sensor. D-values at the temperature of 30 degrees C and the absolute humidity of 0.7 mg H2O/L thus obtained, were 0.2 minutes at hydrogen peroxide concentration of 600 ppm and 1.2 minutes at 200 ppm at the temperature of 30 degrees C and 0.7 mg/L absolute humidity. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various temperatures, humidity and levels of hydrogen peroxide concentration have also been determined. These fundamental data indicate that the sterilization by hydrogen peroxide vapor can be validated as precisely as steam sterilization by measuring and controlling the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor using a combination of the hydrogen peroxide concentration sensor and the vapor generator. Influence of temperature and humidity have also been studied. The hydrogen peroxide sensor has been calibrated and standardized by using the standard hydrogen peroxide vapor whose concentration has been determined by calculating partial pressure of hydrogen peroxide over the water-hydrogen peroxide solution. PMID:9542409

  8. Investigation on regeneration of basic hydrogen peroxide by electrochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Changchun; Chen, Wenwu; Xu, Xiaobo; Wang, Jinglong; Liu, Yushi; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Two electrochemical methods for regeneration of Basic Hydrogen Peroxide (BHP) were investigated in this paper, which could be called one-step method and two-step method, respectively, distinguished by the number of steps during the regeneration process. The one-step method converts potassium chloride solution and oxygen directly to chlorine and BHP by a modified chlor-alkali cell with an oxygen cathode. For the one-step method, two reactors of different structure and corresponding regenerating process were designed. The experimental results showed that, for the continuous-type reactor, the highest peroxide concentration was 0.042 mol/L, while for batch-type reactor the highest peroxide concentration was 0.563 mol/L. The two-step method accomplishes the regeneration of BHP by a conventional chlor-alkali cell combined with a fuel cell reactor which could convert hydrogen and oxygen to peroxide in alkaline potassium hydroxide solution. A peroxide concentration of 2.450 mol/L was obtained for the two-step method.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide as a soil amendment for greenhouse nasturtium production (Tropaeolum majus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, is a highly reactive oxidizing agent naturally occurring in plants and animals. Plants produce hydrogen peroxide to destroy either infected plant cells or the pathogens within a plant. Hydrogen peroxide also acts as a stress signal to plants. It is approved for the contro...

  10. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  12. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  15. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  17. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  18. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  20. Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities

    DOEpatents

    Nyman, May D.; Hobbs, David T.

    2009-02-24

    The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

  1. The Role of Aquaporins and Membrane Damage in Chilling and Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Changes in the Hydraulic Conductance of Maize Roots12

    PubMed Central

    Aroca, Ricardo; Amodeo, Gabriela; Fernández-Illescas, Silvia; Herman, Eliot M.; Chaumont, François; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    2005-01-01

    When chilling-sensitive plants are chilled, root hydraulic conductance (Lo) declines precipitously; Lo also declines in chilling-tolerant plants, but it subsequently recovers, whereas in chilling-sensitive plants it does not. As a result, the chilling-sensitive plants dry out and may die. Using a chilling-sensitive and a chilling-tolerant maize genotype we investigated the effect of chilling on Lo, and its relationship to osmotic water permeability of isolated root cortex protoplasts, aquaporin gene expression, aquaporin abundance, and aquaporin phosphorylation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation in the roots and electrolyte leakage from the roots. Because chilling can cause H2O2 accumulation we also determined the effects of a short H2O2 treatment of the roots and examined the same parameters. We conclude from these studies that the recovery of Lo during chilling in the chilling-tolerant genotype is made possible by avoiding or repairing membrane damage and by a greater abundance and/or activity of aquaporins. The same changes in aquaporins take place in the chilling-sensitive genotype, but we postulate that membrane damage prevents the Lo recovery. It appears that the aquaporin response is necessary but not sufficient to respond to chilling injury. The plant must also be able to avoid the oxidative damage that accompanies chilling. PMID:15591439

  2. Minimal Peroxide Exposure of Neuronal Cells Induces Multifaceted Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Zhou, Yu; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Mitchell, Nicholas; Stone, Matthew D.; Becker, Kevin G.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative exposure of cells occurs naturally and may be associated with cellular damage and dysfunction. Protracted low level oxidative exposure can induce accumulated cell disruption, affecting multiple cellular functions. Accumulated oxidative exposure has also been proposed as one of the potential hallmarks of the physiological/pathophysiological aging process. We investigated the multifactorial effects of long-term minimal peroxide exposure upon SH-SY5Y neural cells to understand how they respond to the continued presence of oxidative stressors. We show that minimal protracted oxidative stresses induce complex molecular and physiological alterations in cell functionality. Upon chronic exposure to minimal doses of hydrogen peroxide, SH-SY5Y cells displayed a multifactorial response to the stressor. To fully appreciate the peroxide-mediated cellular effects, we assessed these adaptive effects at the genomic, proteomic and cellular signal processing level. Combined analyses of these multiple levels of investigation revealed a complex cellular adaptive response to the protracted peroxide exposure. This adaptive response involved changes in cytoskeletal structure, energy metabolic shifts towards glycolysis and selective alterations in transmembrane receptor activity. Our analyses of the global responses to chronic stressor exposure, at multiple biological levels, revealed a viable neural phenotype in-part reminiscent of aged or damaged neural tissue. Our paradigm indicates how cellular physiology can subtly change in different contexts and potentially aid the appreciation of stress response adaptations. PMID:21179406

  3. Mononuclear Iron Enzymes Are Primary Targets of Hydrogen Peroxide Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Anjem, Adil; Imlay, James A.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested whether nonredox metalloenzymes are commonly charged with iron in vivo and are primary targets of oxidative stress because of it. Indeed, three sample mononuclear enzymes, peptide deformylase, threonine dehydrogenase, and cytosine deaminase, were rapidly damaged by micromolar hydrogen peroxide in vitro and in live Escherichia coli. The first two enzymes use a cysteine residue to coordinate the catalytic metal atom; it was quantitatively oxidized by the radical generated by the Fenton reaction. Because oxidized cysteine can be repaired by cellular reductants, the effect was to avoid irreversible damage to other active-site residues. Nevertheless, protracted H2O2 exposure gradually inactivated these enzymes, consistent with the overoxidation of the cysteine residue to sulfinic or sulfonic forms. During H2O2 stress, E. coli defended all three proteins by inducing MntH, a manganese importer, and Dps, an iron-sequestration protein. These proteins appeared to collaborate in replacing the iron atom with nonoxidizable manganese. The implication is that mononuclear metalloproteins are common targets of H2O2 and that both structural and metabolic arrangements exist to protect them. PMID:22411989

  4. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (p<0.01). The GC group presented a significantly lower peroxide passage than did GD and GE (p<0.01). It can be concluded that the hydrogen peroxide placed into the pulp chamber passed through the

  5. Ozonation of deciduous wood in the presence of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Fionov, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The kinetic curves of the dependence of ozone specific absorption ( Q r, sp ) upon aspen wood ozonation in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide are obtained. It is established that the rate of ozone and Q r, sp absorption increase in the O3/H2O2 system. It is demonstrated by ESR, IR, and UV spectroscopy of diffuse reflection that wood ozonation in the O3/H2O2 system results in the destruction of lignin aromatic and quinoid structures. The ozonation process in the presence of H2O2 is accompanied by destruction of the carbohydrate component of the lignocarbohydrate complex. We conclude that O3/H2O2 can be used in the deep delignification of wood. It is shown that the presence of hydrogen peroxide upon ozonation increases the efficiency of the process, allowing its duration and total ozone consumption to be reduced.

  6. 14 CFR 420.66 - Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored... Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.66 Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored within an intraline...

  7. 14 CFR 420.66 - Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored... Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.66 Separation distance requirements for storage of hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine, and liquid hydrogen and any incompatible energetic liquids stored within an intraline...

  8. Novel aqueous dual-channel aluminum-hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart

    1994-06-01

    A dual-channel aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery is introduced with an open-circuit voltage of 1.9 volts, polarization losses of 0.9 mV cm(exp 2) mA(exp -1), and power densities of 1 W/cm(exp 2). Catholyte and anolyte cell compartments are separated by an Ir/Pd modified porous nickel cathode. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode. The battery is expressed by aluminum oxidation and aqueous solution phase hydrogen peroxide reduction for an overall battery discharge consisting of 2Al + 3H2O2 + 2OH(-) yields 2AlO2(-) + 4H2O E = 2.3 V. The search for electrical propulsion sources which fit the requirements for electrically powered vehicles has blurred the standard characteristics associated with electrochemical storage systems. Presently, electrochemical systems comprised of mechanically rechargeable primary batteries, secondary batteries, and fuel cells are candidates for electrochemical propulsion sources. While important advances in energy and power density continue for nonaqueous and molten electrolytes, aqueous electrolyte batteries often have an advantage in simplicity, conductivity, cost effectiveness, and environmental impact. Systems coupling aluminum anodes and aqueous electrolytes have been investigated. These systems include: aluminum/silver oxide, aluminum/manganese dioxide, aluminum air, aluminum/hydrogen peroxide aqueous batteries, and the recently introduced aluminum/ferricyanide and aluminum sulfur aqueous batteries. Conventional aqueous systems such as the nickel cadmium and lead-acid batteries are characterized by their relatively low energy densities and adverse environmental impact. Other systems have substantially higher theoretical energy capacities. While aluminum-silver oxide has demonstrated the highest steady-state power density, its high cost is an impediment for widespread utilization for electric propulsion.

  9. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of hydrogen peroxide vapor. [for atmospheric abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Schinke, S. D.; Molina, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined over the wavelength range 210 to 350 nm at 296 K. At the longer wavelengths, the gas phase absorptivities are significantly larger than the corresponding values in condensed phase. The atmospheric H2O2 photodissociation rate for overhead sun at the earth's surface is estimated to be about 1.3 x 10 to the -5th/sec.

  10. SONEX-Hydrogen Peroxide, Methylhydroperoxide and Formaldehyde Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikes, Brian

    1999-01-01

    We measured gas phase H2O2, CH3OOH, and CH2O on board the NASA DC-8 during the SONEX field mission, presented preliminary results at three scientific meetings, participated in two data workshops and contributed to joint publications of final results. The observations of peroxides and formaldehyde were instrumental in assessing odd-hydrogen radical chemistry, ozone chemistry, and in tracing meteorological transport paths.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    1998-07-13

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable benchtop propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  12. Oxidative damage due to copper ion and hydrogen peroxide induces GlcNAc-specific cleavage of an Asn-linked oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Hironobu; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Koyota, Souichi; Honke, Koichi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gutteridge, John M C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2002-03-01

    Cleavage of an asparagine-linked sugar chain by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a copper salt was investigated. Incubation of a 2-aminopyridine (PA)-labeled biantennary sugar chain, GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1-6(GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1-3)Manbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc-PA, with H2O2 and Cu2+ led to formation of four major degradation products. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic analysis coupled with glycosidase digestion indicated that the sugar chain is not randomly degraded but specifically degraded at a GlcNAc residue. Treatment with either of H2O2 or copper alone did not cleave nor degrade the sugar chain to any extent. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra obtained using a spin trap reagent were consistent with the generation of OH* or an OH*-like radical by the H2O2/copper salt mixture. The addition of ascorbic acid enhanced this radical generation as well as the degradation of the sugar chain. It was also found that H2O2/Cu2+ destroys the N-acetyl group of the monosaccharide GlcNAc, as judged by a decrease in the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of this group. On the other hand, replacement of copper by Fe2+ caused no cleavage of the sugar chain, although comparable levels of the same radical species were generated. Furthermore, spectrophotometric analysis showed that a GlcNAc-containing sugar chain coordinates to copper but not to iron, and, thus, the coordination appears to play an essential role in the degradation of the sugar chain. These findings suggest that coordination of copper ions to GlcNAc residues localizes the generation of a radical, which cleaves the glycosidic linkage, possibly involving alteration of the N-acetyl group, thereby allowing the GlcNAc-specific cleavage. PMID:11872178

  13. Microsolvation of methyl hydrogen peroxide: Ab initio quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Anant D.; Rai, Dhurba; Bartolotti, Libero J.; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2009-08-01

    Methyl hydrogen peroxide (MHP), one of the simplest organic hydroperoxides, is a strong oxidant, with enhanced activity in aqueous ambience. The present study investigates, at the molecular level, the role of hydrogen bonding that is conducive to cluster formation of MHP with water molecules from its peroxide end, with the methyl group remaining hydrophobic for up to five water molecules. Ab initio quantum chemical computations on MHP⋯(H2O)n, [n =1-5] are performed at second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory employing the basis sets 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) to study the cluster formation of MHP with water molecules from its peroxide end and hydrophobic hydration due to the methyl group. Successive addition of water molecules alters the hydrogen bonding pattern, which leads to changes in overall cluster geometry and in turn to IR vibrational frequency shifts. Molecular co-operativity in these clusters is gauged directly through a detailed many-body interaction energy analysis. Molecular electrostatic potential maps are shown to have a bearing on predicting further growth of these clusters, which is duly corroborated through sample calculations for MHP⋯(H2O)8. Further, a continuum solvation model calculation for energetically stable clusters suggests that this study should serve as a precursor for pathways to aqueous solvation of MHP.

  14. Improving the hydrogen peroxide bleaching efficiency of aspen chemithermomechanical pulp by using chitosan.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongquan; Dou, Hongyan; Fu, Yingjuan; Qin, Menghua

    2015-11-01

    The presence of transition metals during the hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp results in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which decreases the bleaching efficiency. In this study, chitosans were used as peroxide stabilizer in the alkaline hydrogen peroxide bleaching of aspen chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP). The results showed that the brightness of the bleached CTMP increased 1.5% ISO by addition of 0.1% chitosan with 95% degree of deacetylation during peroxide bleaching. Transition metals in the form of ions or metal colloid particles, such as iron, copper and manganese, could be adsorbed by chitosans. Chitosans could inhibit the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by different transition metals under alkaline conditions. The ability of chitosans to inhibit peroxide decomposition depended on the type of transition metals, chitosan concentration and degree of deacetylation applied. The addition of chitosan slightly reduced the concentration of the hydroxyl radical formed during the hydrogen peroxide bleaching of aspen CTMP. PMID:26256367

  15. Electric Response of Hydrogen Peroxide-doped Water Ices: an Analog Study for Positive Hole Currents in Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockburger, C. C.; Keller, C. T.; Gray, A.; Sornette, J.; Udom, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Freund, F.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide-doped water ices can be viewed an analog system to igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks, which invariably contain peroxy defects, typically Si-OO-Si, and generate positive hole charge carriers when subjected to stress. By preparing pure water ice and hydrogen peroxide-doped water ices, freezing them to -80°C, allows us to control the concentration of peroxy defects (here hydrogen peroxide molecules) and study the electrical response, when the ices are subjected to stress. Blocks of pure water ice and hydrogen peroxide-doped water ices, -80°C, were prepared. Two methods to activate peroxy bonds were used: (i) stressing one end of rectangular blocks in a hydraulic press, (ii) subjecting one part of a 2-chamber plastic tray to intense ultrasound to create a gradient of activated charge carriers. In the hydraulic press experiments the pure water ice samples produced vanishingly small currents except for occasional transients, mostly negative, during fracturing of the ice. By contrast, hydrogen peroxide-doped water ices led to significant currents, consistently positive, flowing down the stress gradients. Using ultrasound as an activation method avoids fracturing. Therefore the results are much 'cleaner', not contaminated by hard-to-control fracture-induced currents. The positive sign of the currents suggests defect electrons, generated by the break-up of peroxy bonds of hydrogen peroxide molecules embedded in the ice structure, analogous to positive hole charge carriers that are stress-activated in rocks.

  16. Improved sensing response of photo activated ZnO thin film for hydrogen peroxide detection.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, S; Nandhini, V; Jeyaprakash, B G

    2016-11-15

    The nanostructured ZnO thin films were deposited using spray pyrolysis technique. Formation of polycrystalinity with hexagonal wurtzite structure was observed from the structural study. Highly dense spherical shaped nanoparticles with fine crystallites were observed from the surface morphological studies. The light induced hydrogen peroxide vapour sensing was done using chemi-resistive method and its effect on the sensing response was studied and reported. PMID:27491004

  17. Photochemical formation of hydrogen peroxide in surface and ground waters exposed to sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.J.; Zika, R.G.

    1983-05-13

    A rapid increase in the concentration of hydrogen peroxide was observed when samples of natural surface and ground water from various locations in the United States were exposed to sunlight. The hydrogen peroxide is photochemically generated from organic constitutents present in the water; humic materials are believed to be the primary agent producing the peroxide. Studies with superoxide dismutase suggest that the superoxide anion is the precursor of the peroxide.

  18. At-home vital bleaching: a comparison of hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide treatments.

    PubMed

    Berga-Caballero, Amparo; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Amengual-Lorenzo, José

    2006-01-01

    Tray bleaching of vital teeth performed at home by the patient under the dentist s supervision, whether alone or in combination with any of the in-office techniques, provides an interesting alternative to other methods employed in this type of dental treatment. This bleaching procedure applies low-concentration peroxides to the enamel by means of a custom-made mouth tray specifically designed for this purpose. The aim of this study is to examine and compare two commercially-available bleaching products, at equivalent concentrations, for use in this technique: VivaStyle (Vivadent) and FKD (Kin); the former is a 10% carbamide peroxide and the latter a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide formulation. It examines the parameters that must be monitored during the application of this type of procedure and presents 6 cases (3 treated with one of the above-mentioned products and the other 3 with the other), establishing the bleaching power of the products and the appearance and intensity of post-operatory hypersensitivity. The results obtained show that both products are effective for the purpose for which they were designed. In general, dental hypersensitivity was minimal. PMID:16388304

  19. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatnytskyi, Dmytro V.; Zdorevskyi, Oleksiy O.; Perepelytsya, Sergiy M.; Volkov, Sergey N.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long-lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counterion, were considered. The counterions have been taken into consideration insofar as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counterions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2-Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene

  20. Vapor hydrogen peroxide as alternative to dry heat microbial reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S.; Kern, R.; Koukol, R.; Barengoltz, J.; Cash, H.

    2008-09-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VHP) sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal was to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NASA Procedural Requirements 8020.12 as a low-temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process. The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions for planetary protection acceptable microbial reduction levels. Experiments were conducted by the STERIS Corporation, under contract to JPL, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor hydrogen peroxide for the inactivation of the standard spore challenge, Geobacillus stearothermophilus. VHP process parameters were determined that provide significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters of interest: hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of injection cycles, and exposure duration, the investigation also considered the possible effect on lethality of environmental parameters: temperature, absolute humidity, and material substrate. This study delineated a range of test sterilizer process conditions: VHP concentration, process duration, a process temperature range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, a process humidity range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, and the dependence on selected spacecraft material substrates. The derivation of D-values from the lethality data permitted conservative planetary protection recommendations.

  1. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  2. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR TREATING POLLUTANTS IN A GAS USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND UV LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clauseu, christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending there between. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  3. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on polishing removal rate in CMP with various abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, R.; Ramanathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide in chemical mechanical planarization slurries for shallow trench isolation was investigated. The various abrasives used in this study were ceria, silica, alumina, zirconia, titania, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride. Hydrogen peroxide suppresses the polishing of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces by ceria abrasives. The polishing performances of other abrasives were either unaffected or enhanced slightly with the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The ceria abrasives were treated with hydrogen peroxide, and the polishing of the work surfaces with the treated abrasive shows that the inhibiting action of hydrogen peroxide is reversible. It was found that the effect of hydrogen peroxide as an additive is a strong function of the nature of the abrasive particle.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide-based propulsion and power systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Melof, Brian Matthew; Keese, David L.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Ruffner, Judith Alison; Escapule, William Rusty

    2004-04-01

    Less toxic, storable, hypergolic propellants are desired to replace nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and hydrazine in certain applications. Hydrogen peroxide is a very attractive replacement oxidizer, but finding acceptable replacement fuels is more challenging. The focus of this investigation is to find fuels that have short hypergolic ignition delays, high specific impulse, and desirable storage properties. The resulting hypergolic fuel/oxidizer combination would be highly desirable for virtually any high energy-density applications such as small but powerful gas generating systems, attitude control motors, or main propulsion. These systems would be implemented on platforms ranging from guided bombs to replacement of environmentally unfriendly existing systems to manned space vehicles.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide in inflammation: messenger, guide, and assassin.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, C; Chockley, P; Singh, S K; Pase, L; Lieschke, G J; Grabher, C

    2012-01-01

    Starting as a model for developmental genetics, embryology, and organogenesis, the zebrafish has become increasingly popular as a model organism for numerous areas of biology and biomedicine over the last decades. Within haematology, this includes studies on blood cell development and function and the intricate regulatory mechanisms within vertebrate immunity. Here, we review recent studies on the immediate mechanisms mounting an inflammatory response by in vivo analyses using the zebrafish. These recently revealed novel roles of the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide that have changed our view on the initiation of a granulocytic inflammatory response. PMID:22737171

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide as an Effective Disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida. PMID:24954350

  7. Differential regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor by hydrogen peroxide and flagellin in cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Noriko; Izumi, Shunsuke; Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Toku, Seikichi; Kakinohana, Manabu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-02-01

    In previous studies, we found that stimulation of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) by flagellin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAPK-2) through activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in cultured alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Our studies strongly suggested that MAPKAPK-2 phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Ser1047. It has been reported that phosphorylation of Ser1047 after treatment with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced the internalization of EGFR. In the present study, we first found that treatment of A549 cells with hydrogen peroxide induced the activation of MAPKAPK-2 and phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 within 30 min. This was different from flagellin treatment because hydrogen peroxide treatment induced the phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1173 as well as Ser1047, indicating the activation of EGFR. We also found that KN93, an inhibitor of CaM kinase II, inhibited the hydrogen peroxide-induced phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 through inhibition of the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Furthermore, we examined the internalization of EGFR by three different methods. Flow cytometry with an antibody against the extracellular domain of EGFR and biotinylation of cell surface proteins revealed that flagellin, but not hydrogen peroxide, decreased the amount of cell-surface EGFR. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by EGF treatment was reduced by flagellin pre-treatment. These results strongly suggested that hydrogen peroxide activated the p38 MAPK pathway via activation of CaM kinase II and that flagellin and hydrogen peroxide regulate the functions of EGFR by different mechanisms. PMID:25542757

  8. Effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on biophoton emission from radish root cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospísil, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Biophotons spontaneously emitted from radish root cells were detected using highly sensitive photomultiplier tube. Freshly isolated radish root cells exhibited spontaneous photon emission of about 4 counts s(-1). Addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cells caused significant enhancement in biophoton emission to about 500 counts s(-1). Removal of molecular oxygen using glucose/glucose oxidase system and scavengering of reactive oxygen species by reducing agents such are sodium ascorbate and cysteine completely diminished biophoton emission. Spectral analysis of the hydrogen peroxide-induced biophoton emission indicates that biophotons are emitted mainly in green-red region of the spectra. The data provided by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping technique showed that formation of singlet oxygen observed after addition of H2O2 correlates with enhancement in biophoton emission. These observations provide direct evidence that singlet oxygen is involved in biophoton emission from radish root cells. PMID:20106674

  9. Hydrogen Peroxide Accidents and Incidents: What We Can Learn From History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Ben; Baker, David L.; Frazier, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Historical accidents and incidents involving hydrogen peroxide are reviewed and presented. These hydrogen peroxide events are associated with storage, transportation, handling, and disposal and they include exposures, fires, and explosions. Understanding the causes and effects of these accident and incident examples may aid personnel currently working with hydrogen peroxide to mitigate and perhaps avoid similar situations. Lessons learned, best practices, and regulatory compliance information related to the cited accidents and incidents are also discussed.

  10. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-01

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 105 and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA).

  11. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  12. Time-course diffusion of hydrogen peroxide using modern technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, F. L. E.; Vollet-Filho, J. D.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2009-02-01

    The concern with the hydrogen penetration towards the pulp can be observed on the literature by the great number of papers published on this topic; Those measurements often uses chemical agents to quantify the concentration of the bleaching agent that cross the enamel and dentin. The objective of this work was the quantification of oxygen free radicals by fluorescence that are located in the interface between enamel and dentin. It was used to accomplish our objectives a Ruthenium probe (FOXY R - Ocean Optics) a 405nm LED, a bovine tooth and a portable diagnostic system (Science and support LAB - LAT - IFSC/USP). The fluorescence of the probe is suppressed in presence of oxygen free radicals in function of time. The obtained results clearly shows that the hydrogen peroxide when not catalyzed should be kept in contact with the tooth for longer periods of time.

  13. MEMS-Based Satellite Micropropulsion Via Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Thomas, Michael A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques offer great potential in satisfying the mission requirements for the next generation of "micro-scale" satellites being designed by NASA and Department of Defense agencies. More commonly referred to as "nanosats", these miniature satellites feature masses in the range of 10-100 kg and therefore have unique propulsion requirements. The propulsion systems must be capable of providing extremely low levels of thrust and impulse while also satisfying stringent demands on size, mass, power consumption and cost. We begin with an overview of micropropulsion requirements and some current MEMS-based strategies being developed to meet these needs. The remainder of the article focuses the progress being made at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center towards the development of a prototype monopropellant MEMS thruster which uses the catalyzed chemical decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide as a propulsion mechanism. The products of decomposition are delivered to a micro-scale converging/diverging supersonic nozzle which produces the thrust vector; the targeted thrust level approximately 500 N with a specific impulse of 140-180 seconds. Macro-scale hydrogen peroxide thrusters have been used for satellite propulsion for decades; however, the implementation of traditional thruster designs on a MEMS scale has uncovered new challenges in fabrication, materials compatibility, and combustion and hydrodynamic modeling. A summary of the achievements of the project to date is given, as is a discussion of remaining challenges and future prospects.

  14. Experimental study of combustion in hydrogen peroxide hybrid rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernimont, Eric John

    Combustion behavior in a hydrogen peroxide oxidized hybrid rocket motor is investigated with a series of experiments. Hybrid chemical rocket propulsion is presently of interest due to reduced system complexity compared to classical chemical propulsion systems. Reduced system complexity, by use of a storable oxidizer and a hybrid configuration, is expected to reduce propulsive costs. The fuel in this study is polyethylene which has the potential of continuous manufacture leading to further reduced system costs. The study investigated parameters of interest for nominal design of a full scale hydrogen peroxide oxidized hybrid rocket. Amongst these parameters is the influence of chamber pressure, mass flux, fuel molecular weight and fuel density on fuel regression rate. Effects of chamber pressure and aft combustion length on combustion efficiency and non-acoustic combustion oscillations are also examined. The fuel regression behavior is found to be strongly influenced by both chamber pressure and mass flux. Combustion efficiencies in the upper 90% range are attained by simple changes to the aft combustion chamber length as well as increased combustion pressure. Fuel burning surface is found to be influenced by the density of the polyethylene polymer as well as molecular weight. The combustion is observed to be exceptionally smooth (oscillations less than 5% zero-to-peak of mean) in all motors tested in this program. Tests using both a single port fuel gain and a novel radial flow hybrid are also performed.

  15. A low-volume microstructured optical fiber hydrogen peroxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartner, E. P.; Murphy, D. F.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.; Monro, T. M.

    2011-05-01

    The ability to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in solution is critical for quality assessment and control in many disparate applications, including wine, aviation fuels and IVF. The objective of this research is to develop a rapid test for the hydrogen peroxide content that can be performed on very low volume samples (i.e. sub-μL) that is relatively independent of other products within the sample. For H2O2 detection we use suspended core optical fibers to achieve a high evanescent field interaction with the fluid of interest, without the constraint of limited interaction length that is generally inherent with nanowire structures. By filling the holes of the fiber with an analyte/fluorophore solution we seek to create a quick and effective sensor that should enable detection of desired species within liquid media. By choosing a fluorophore that reacts with our target species to produce an increase in fluorescence, we can correlate observed fluorescence intensity with the concentration of the target molecule.

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Transport in the Lung and Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Shlyonsky, V.; Boom, A.; Mies, F.

    2016-01-01

    Renal and lung epithelial cells are exposed to some significant concentrations of H2O2. In urine it may reach 100 μM, while in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung it is estimated to be in micromolar to tens-micromolar range. Hydrogen peroxide has a stimulatory action on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) single-channel activity. It also increases stability of the channel at the membrane and slows down the transcription of the ENaC subunits. The expression and the activity of the channel may be inhibited in some other, likely higher, oxidative states of the cell. This review discusses the role and the origin of H2O2 in the lung and kidney. Concentration-dependent effects of hydrogen peroxide on ENaC and the mechanisms of its action have been summarized. This review also describes outlooks for future investigations linking oxidative stress, epithelial sodium transport, and lung and kidney function. PMID:27073804

  17. Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C) Stapf) polyphenols protect human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) from oxidative damage induced by high glucose, hydrogen peroxide and oxidised low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Campos, J; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Leiva, E; Guzmán, L; Orrego, R; Fernández, P; González, M; Radojkovic, C; Zuñiga, F A; Lamperti, L; Pastene, E; Aguayo, C

    2014-05-15

    The aromatic herb Cymbopogon citratus Stapf is widely used in tropical and subtropical countries in cooking, as a herbal tea, and in traditional medicine for hypertension and diabetes. Some of its properties have been associated with the in vitro antioxidant effect of polyphenols isolated from their aerial parts. However, little is known about C. citratus effects on endothelial cells oxidative injury. Using chromatographic procedures, a polyphenol-rich fraction was obtained from C. citratus (CCF) and their antioxidant properties were assessed by cooper-induced LDL oxidation assay. The main constituents of the active CCF, identified by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS), were chlorogenic acid, isoorientin and swertiajaponin. CCF 10 and 100 μg/ml diminishes reactive oxidative species (ROS) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs), challenged with high D-glucose (60% inhibition), hydrogen peroxide (80% inhibition) or oxidised low-density lipoprotein (55% inhibition). CCF 10 or 100 μg/ml did not change nitric oxide (NO) production. However, CCF was able to inhibit vasoconstriction induced by the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619, which suggest a NO-independent vasodilatador effect on blood vessels. Our results suggest that lemon grass antioxidant properties might prevent endothelial dysfunction associated to an oxidative imbalance promoted by different oxidative stimuli. PMID:24423518

  18. Functional activation of the egr-1 (early growth response-1) gene by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Nose, K; Ohba, M

    1996-06-01

    The redox-based regulation of gene expression is one of the fundamental mechanisms of cellular functions, and hydrogen peroxide seems to act as an intracellular second messenger of signal transduction of cytokines. Hydrogen peroxide at non-toxic doses induced the accumulation of mRNA for the early growth response-1 (egr-1) gene in mouse osteoblastic cells. The Egr-1 protein is a transcription factor that binds the GCGGGGGCG sequence and contains a zinc-finger structure that is essential for DNA binding. Egr-1 protein is sensitive to oxidative stress and loses specific DNA-binding activity when exposed to high levels of oxidative stress. Incubating cells with hydrogen peroxide at about 50 microM, however, increased the accumulation of Egr-1 protein, and the Egr-1 product seemed to be functional, judging by its binding activity to the GCGGGGGCG sequence and its ability to activate the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene under the control of the human thymidine kinase enhancer containing the Egr-1 binding sequence. It was reported that the activity of Egr-1 protein as a transcription factor was negatively regulated by active oxygens. However, with appropriate concentrations of active oxygen, its capacity to bind a specific DNA sequence and to enhance the transcriptional activity of target genes is thought to be elevated. PMID:8687376

  19. Roles of RPS41 in Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Hydrogen Peroxide Sensitivity in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Xiong, Juan; Shang, Qinghua; Jiang, Yuanying; Cao, Yingying

    2016-06-01

    In eukaryotes, loss of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RPs) results in a reduced growth rate and other phenotypic defects. The ability to transition from a unicellular budding yeast to a filamentous form is very important for biofilm formation and virulence in Candida albicans. Our recent study found that loss of the RPS41 (C2_10620W_A) gene but not its paralog RPS42 (C1_01640W_A) resulted in altered growth and filamentation changes in C. albicans, so we hypothesized that the RPS41 gene should play important roles in virulence and biofilm formation in this pathogen. We found that both virulence and the ability to form biofilms were defective due to deletion of the RPS41 gene. We also found that loss of the RPS41 gene increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, and that hydrogen peroxide induced the expression of the RPS41 gene in a wild-type strain. These results suggested that the RPS41 gene plays important roles in C. albicans biofilm formation, virulence, and susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26952720

  20. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  1. Bacterial Fucose-Rich Polysaccharide Stabilizes MAPK-Mediated Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling by Directly Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and 1H/13C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  2. Bacterial fucose-rich polysaccharide stabilizes MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling by directly scavenging reactive oxygen species during hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼ 42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H/(13)C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  3. Peroxide test strips detect added hydrogen peroxide in raw milk at levels affecting bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicole H; Friedlander, Adam; Mok, Allen; Kent, David; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has a long-established history of use as a preservative in milk worldwide. The use of H2O2 to activate the inherent lactoperoxidase enzyme system has dramatically improved the quality of raw dairy products in areas in which cooling is not widely available. In the United States, however, where refrigeration is widely available, the addition of H2O2 to milk is not permitted, with the exception of certain applications prior to cheesemaking and during the preparation of modified whey. Due to the relatively quick deterioration of H2O2 in fluid milk, the detection of raw milk adulterated with the compound can be challenging. In this study we evaluated (i) total aerobic bacterial counts and (ii) ability of peroxide test strips to detect H2O2 in raw milk with various concentrations (0, 100, 300, 500, 700, and 900 ppm) of added H2O2, incubated at both 6 and 21°C for 0, 24, and 48 h. Results showed that at both 6 and 21°C the H2O2 concentration and time had a significant effect on bacterial loads in raw milk. Additionally, commercially available test strips were able to detect H2O2 in raw milk, with predicted probability of >90%, immediately after addition and after 24 and 48 h for the higher concentrations used, offering a viable method for detecting raw milk adulteration with H2O2. PMID:25285503

  4. Melatonin protects skin keratinocyte from hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death via the SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin MD.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), which is primarily synthesized in and secreted from the pineal gland, plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation as well as in the regulation of cell metastasis and cell survival in a diverse range of cells. The aim of this study is to investigate protection effect of melatonin on H2O2-induced cell damage and the mechanisms of melatonin in human keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced cell damages in human keratinocytes and co-treatment of melatonin protected the keratinocytes against H2O2-induced cell damage. Melatonin treatment activated the autophagy flux signals, which were identified by the decreased levels of p62 protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux via an autophagy inhibitor and ATG5 siRNA technique blocked the protective effects of melatonin against H2O2-induced cell death in human keratinocytes. And we found the inhibition of sirt1 using sirtinol and sirt1 siRNA reversed the protective effects of melatonin and induces the autophagy process in H2O2-treated cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy flux activated by melatonin protects human keratinocytes through sirt1 pathway against hydrogen peroxide-induced damages. And this study also suggest that melatonin could potentially be utilized as a therapeutic agent in skin disease. PMID:26918354

  5. Melatonin protects skin keratinocyte from hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death via the SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin Md; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-03-15

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), which is primarily synthesized in and secreted from the pineal gland, plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation as well as in the regulation of cell metastasis and cell survival in a diverse range of cells. The aim of this study is to investigate protection effect of melatonin on H2O2-induced cell damage and the mechanisms of melatonin in human keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced cell damages in human keratinocytes and co-treatment of melatonin protected the keratinocytes against H2O2-induced cell damage. Melatonin treatment activated the autophagy flux signals, which were identified by the decreased levels of p62 protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux via an autophagy inhibitor and ATG5 siRNA technique blocked the protective effects of melatonin against H2O2-induced cell death in human keratinocytes. And we found the inhibition of sirt1 using sirtinol and sirt1 siRNA reversed the protective effects of melatonin and induces the autophagy process in H2O2-treated cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy flux activated by melatonin protects human keratinocytes through sirt1 pathway against hydrogen peroxide-induced damages. And this study also suggest that melatonin could potentially be utilized as a therapeutic agent in skin disease. PMID:26918354

  6. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria exhibiting high scavenging activity for environmental hydrogen peroxide from fermented foods and its two scavenging enzymes for hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akio; Kaneko, Chiaki; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Takeda, Kouji; Kimata, Shinya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Abe, Akira; Tanaka, Naoto; Okada, Sanae; Uchino, Masataka; Satoh, Junichi; Nakagawa, Junichi; Niimura, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    To obtain lactic acid bacteria that scavenge environmental hydrogen peroxide, we developed a specialized enrichment medium and successfully isolated Pediococcus pentosaceus Be1 strain from a fermented food. This strain showed vigorous environmental hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity over a wide range of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. High Mn-catalase and NADH peroxidase activities were found in the cell-free extract of the P. pentosaceus Be1 strain, and these two hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes were purified from the cell-free extract of the strain. Mn-catalase has been purified from several microorganisms by several researchers, and the NADH peroxidase was first purified from the original strain in this report. After cloning the genes of the Mn-catalase and the NADH peroxidase, the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with those of known related enzymes. PMID:27118075

  7. The electrochemistry of SIMFUEL in dilute alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldik, Jon

    The work described in this thesis is a study of the electrochemistry of SIMFUEL (SIMulated nuclear FUEL) in dilute, alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions. In the first set of experiments, the reaction of H2O 2 on SIMFUEL electrodes was studied electrochemically and under open circuit conditions in 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl solutions at pH 9.8. The composition of the oxidized UO2 surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hydrogen peroxide reduction was found to be catalyzed by the formation of a mixed UIV/UV (UO 2+x) surface layer, but to be blocked by the accumulation of UVI species (UO3· yH2O or adsorbed (UO2)2+) on the electrode surface. The formation of this UVI layer blocks both H2O2 reduction and oxidation, thereby inhibiting the potentially rapid H2O2 decomposition reaction to H2O and O2. Decomposition is found to proceed at a rate controlled by the desorption of the adsorbed (UO2)2+ or reduction of adsorbed O2 species. Reduction of (O2) ads is coupled to the slow oxidative dissolution of UO2 and formation of a corrosion product deposit of UO3· yH2O. In the second series of experiments, the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on SIMFUEL was studied using the steady-state polarization technique. Kinetic parameters for the reaction, such as Tafel slopes and reaction orders, were determined. The results were interpreted in terms of a chemical-electrochemical mechanism involving UIV/UV donor-acceptor reduction sites. The large values of the Tafel slopes and the fractional reaction orders with respect to H2O2 can be understood in terms of the potential-dependent surface coverage of active sites, similar to that observed in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide on oxidized copper surfaces. The effects of pH over the range 10-13 were also investigated. The H2O 2 reduction currents were nearly independent of pH in the range 10-11, but were slowed at more alkaline values. The change in pH dependence appears to be related to the acid-base properties

  8. A combination of four effective components derived from Sheng-mai san attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in PC12 cells through inhibiting Akt and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guo-Sheng; Li, Shao-Xia; Wang, Yan; Xu, Ying-Qiong; Lv, Yan-Ni; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether a combination of four effective components derived from Sheng-mai san (SMXZF; ginsenoside Rb1: ginsenoside Rg1: DT-13: Schizandrol A as 6 : 9 : 4 : 5) could attenuate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in PC12 cells, focusing on the Akt and MAPK pathways . The PC12 cells were exposed to H2O2 (400 μmol·L(-1)) for 1 h in the presence or absence of SMXZF pre-treatment for 24 h. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. The efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the intracellular content of malondialdehyde (MDA), the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and caspase-3 were also determined. Cell apoptosis was measured by Hoechst 33342 staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining method. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, Akt, and MAPKs were detected by Western blotting analyses. SMXZF pretreatment significantly increased the cell viability and SOD activity and improved the cell morphological changes, while reduced the levels of LDH and MDA at the concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 μg·mL(-1). SMXZF also inhibited H2O2-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Moreover, SMXZF reduced the activity of caspase-3, up-regulated the protein ratio of Bcl-2 and Bax and inhibited the expression of cleaved caspase-3, p-Akt, p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 in H2O2-induced PC12 cells. Co-incubation of Akt inhibitor or p38 inhibitor partly attenuated the protection of SMXZF against H2O2-injured PC12 cells. In conclusion, our findings suggested that SMXZF attenuated H2O2-induced injury in PC12 cells by inhibiting Akt and MAPKs signaling pathways, which might shed insights on its neuroprotective mechanism. PMID:27507201

  9. Development of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Knight, J.; Quigley, M.; Forsberg, G.; Ganapathi, G.; Yarbrough, C.; Koukol, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will present test data and discussion on the work we are conducting at JPL to address the following issues: 1) efficacy of sterilization process; 2) diffusion of hydrogen peroxide under sterilization process conditions into hard to reach places; 3) materials and components compatibility with the sterilization process and 4) development of methodology to protect sensitive components from hydrogen peroxide vapor.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide and povidone-lodine solution--a dangerous combination.

    PubMed

    2011-02-01

    When mixed with povidone-iodine solution, hydrogen peroxide can release enough oxygen to cause sealed waste containers to burst open. Such risks can also result from using a sealed container to collect hydrogen peroxide that has mixed with body fluids (for instance, in a debridement procedure). Staff should be instructed to avoid both practices. PMID:23444560

  11. An Experimental Investigation of Hypergolic Ignition Delay of Hydrogen Peroxide with Fuel Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John A.; Gostowski, Rudy; Chianese, Silvio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of decomposition and ignition delay of hydrogen peroxide at concentrations of 80% to 98% with combinations of hydrocarbon fuels, tertiary amines and transition metal chelates will be presented in the proposed paper. The results will be compared to hydrazine ignition delays with hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid mixtures using the same test apparatus.

  12. Evaluation of silica-coated tubing for the measurement of hydrogen peroxide in hot water.

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, T. W.; Bartels, D. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Chemistry

    2004-04-14

    A commercial silica coating for stainless steel tubing was investigated for its ability to inhibit the decomposition of aqueous hydrogen peroxide on the tubing surface. Although the coating proves effective at preventing decomposition up to 200 {sup o}C, above this temperature, the coating degrades, as evidenced by enhanced decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Oxygen from Hydrogen Peroxide. A Safe Molar Volume-Molar Mass Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenbaugh, John H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a molar volume-molar mass experiment for use in general chemistry laboratories. Gives background technical information, procedures for the titration of aqueous hydrogen peroxide with standard potassium permanganate and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen, and a discussion of the results obtained in three…

  14. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

    PubMed Central

    Karadas, Muhammet; Hatipoglu, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n = 10): AS: no whitening (negative control), with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwash; SC: Scope White mouthwash; and OP group: 10% CP Opalescence PF (positive control). Color measurements were carried out with a spectrophotometer before staining, after staining, and on the 7th, 28th, and 56th day of the whitening period. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance followed by a Tukey post hoc test. The color change (ΔE) was significantly greater in all the groups compared to that of the AS group. After 56 days, no significant differences were found among the mouthwash products with respect to color change (P > 0.05). The whiteness of the teeth treated with the mouthwashes increased significantly over time. Nevertheless, the color change achieved with the mouthwashes was significantly lower than that achieved with the 10% CP at-home bleaching gel. PMID:26295061

  15. Protective Effects of Minor Components of Curcuminoids on Hydrogen Peroxide-Treated Human HaCaT Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuh-Hwa; Lin, Yin-Shiou; Huang, Yu-Wei; Fang, Sheng-Uei; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2016-05-11

    Hydrogen peroxide, one of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), can cause intracellular oxidative stress associated with skin aging and/or photoaging. Curcumin, a polyphenol in turmeric, has been reported to exhibit biological activity. In this study, five naturally occurring curcuminoids [curcumin, demethoxycurcumin (DMC), bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), monohydroxy-DMC, and monohydroxy-BDMC] were used to investigate their protective roles against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in the immortalized human keratinocyte cell lines (HaCaT cells). These five curcuminoids at 10 μM, but not at 5 μM, were shown to exhibit cytotoxicities toward HaCaT keratinocytes. Therefore, a 5 μM concentration of the five curcuminoids was selected for further investigations. Cells were pretreated with or without curcuminoids for 2.5 h before 24-h hydrogen peroxide (150 μM) treatments. Pretreatments with the minor components monohydroxy-DMC or monohydroxy-BDMC, but not curcumin, DMC, and BDMC, showed protective activity, elevating cell viability compared to cells with direct hydrogen peroxide treatments. Pretreatments with monohydroxy-DMC and monohydroxy-BDMC showed the best protective effects, reducing apoptotic cell populations and intracellular ROS, as demonstrated by flow cytometry, as well as reducing the changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential compared to cells with direct hydrogen peroxide treatments. The pretreatments with monohydroxy-DMC and monohydroxy-BDMC reduced c-jun and c-fos mRNA expression and p53 tumor suppressor protein expression and increased HO-1 protein expression and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, respectively, compared to cells with direct hydrogen peroxide treatments. The five curcuminoids exhibited similar hydrogen peroxide-scavenging activity in vitro. It was proposed that monohydroxy-DMC and monohydroxy-BDMC could induce antioxidant defense systems better than curcumin, DMC, or BDMC could against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative

  16. Hydrogen peroxide treatment of eggshell membrane to control porosity.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shuchen; Chou, Hsuan-Hung; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2013-12-01

    The eggshell membrane (ESM) is a naturally occurring biological polymer, which can be extracted from eggshells, and has been used for adsorption of dyes or heavy metals, as a semipermeable membrane to control particle transport, and as a natural biocompatible material for tissue replacement. In this study, we used hydrogen peroxide to control the pore size and fibre crossing density of the ESM. Structural and chemical properties were investigated using AFM, optical microscopy, contact angle, and FTIR. We show that the structure and permeability of the ESM can be controlled by timed exposure to H2O2 and we demonstrate this effect using red blood cells. This process provides a simple method for preparing biocompatible membranes, with controlled selectivity for biofiltration applications. PMID:23870936

  17. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression. PMID:22565543

  18. Red fluorescent genetically encoded indicator for intracellular hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Yulia G.; Bilan, Dmitry S.; Matlashov, Mikhail E.; Mishina, Natalia M.; Markvicheva, Ksenia N.; Subach, Oksana M.; Subach, Fedor V.; Bogeski, Ivan; Hoth, Markus; Enikolopov, Grigori; Belousov, Vsevolod V.

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are conserved regulators of numerous cellular functions, and overproduction of ROS is a hallmark of various pathological processes. Genetically encoded fluorescent probes are unique tools to study ROS production in living systems of different scale and complexity. However, the currently available recombinant redox sensors have green emission, which overlaps with the spectra of many other probes. Expanding the spectral range of recombinant in vivo ROS probes would enable multiparametric in vivo ROS detection. Here we present the first genetically encoded red fluorescent sensor for hydrogen peroxide detection, HyPerRed. The performance of this sensor is similar to its green analogues. We demonstrate the utility of the sensor by tracing low concentrations of H2O2 produced in the cytoplasm of cultured cells upon growth factor stimulation. Moreover, using HyPerRed we detect local and transient H2O2 production in the mitochondrial matrix upon inhibition of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake.

  19. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of softwood: hemicellulose degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated softwood hemicelluloses degradation pathways during alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment of Douglas fir. It was found that glucomannan is much more susceptible to alkaline pretreatment than xylan. Organic acids, including lactic, succinic, glycolic and formic acid are the predominant products from glucomannan degradation. At low treatment temperature (90°C), a small amount of formic acid is produced from glucomannan, whereas glucomannan degradation to lactic acid and succinic acid becomes the main reactions at 140°C and 180°C. The addition of H2O2 during alkaline pretreatment of D. fir led to a significant removal of lignin, which subsequently facilitated glucomannan solubilization. However, H2O2 has little direct effect on the glucomannan degradation reaction. The main degradation pathways involved in glucomannan conversion to organics acids are elucidated. The results from this study demonstrate the potential to optimize pretreatment conditions to maximize the value of biomass hemicellulose. PMID:24185034

  20. Plasma Depolymerization of Chitosan in the Presence of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fengming; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Haitian; Tian, Shuangqi

    2012-01-01

    The depolymerization of chitosan by plasma in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. The efficiency of the depolymerization was demonstrated by means of determination of viscosity-average molecular weight and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The structure of the depolymerized chitosan was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), ultraviolet spectra (UV) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that chitosan can be effectively degradated by plasma in the presence of H2O2. The chemical structure of the depolymerized chitosan was not obviously modified. The combined plasma/H2O2 method is significantly efficient for scale-up manufacturing of low molecular weight chitosan. PMID:22837727

  1. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide as Alternative to Dry Heat Microbial Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Howard A.; Kern, Roger G.; Chung, Shirley Y.; Koukol, Robert C.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VHP) sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal is to include this technique, with appropriate specification, in NPG8020.12C as a low temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process. A series of experiments were conducted in vacuum to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. With this knowledge of D values, sensible margins can be applied in a planetary protection specification. The outcome of this study provided an optimization of test sterilizer process conditions: VHP concentration, process duration, a process temperature range for which the worst case D value may be imposed, a process humidity range for which the worst case D value may be imposed, and robustness to selected spacecraft material substrates.

  2. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  3. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  4. Spatially-resolved intracellular sensing of hydrogen peroxide in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Emilie A. K.; Netterfield, Tatiana S.; Sarkar, Saheli; Kemp, Melissa L.; Payne, Christine K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding intracellular redox chemistry requires new tools for the site-specific visualization of intracellular oxidation. We have developed a spatially-resolved intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide, HyPer-Tau, for time-resolved imaging in live cells. This sensor consists of a hydrogen peroxide-sensing protein tethered to microtubules. We demonstrate the use of the HyPer-Tau sensor for three applications; dose-dependent response of human cells to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, a model immune response of mouse macrophages to stimulation by bacterial toxin, and a spatially-resolved response to localized delivery of hydrogen peroxide. These results demonstrate that HyPer-Tau can be used as an effective tool for tracking changes in spatially localized intracellular hydrogen peroxide and for future applications in redox signaling. PMID:26585385

  5. Chemiluminescent Nanomicelles for Imaging Hydrogen Peroxide and Self-Therapy in Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Zhang, Luzhong; Gao, Jian; Wu, Wei; Hu, Yong; Jiang, Xiqun

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a signal molecule of the tumor, and its overproduction makes a higher concentration in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue. Based on the fact that peroxalates can make chemiluminescence with a high efficiency in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we developed nanomicelles composed of peroxalate ester oligomers and fluorescent dyes, called peroxalate nanomicelles (POMs), which could image hydrogen peroxide with high sensitivity and stability. The potential application of the POMs in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer was also investigated. It was found that the PDT-drug-loaded POMs were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide, and the PDT drug could be stimulated by the chemiluminescence from the reaction between POMs and hydrogen peroxide, which carried on a self-therapy of the tumor without the additional laser light resource. PMID:21765637

  6. Oxidation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in water. 4: Ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Rivas, J.; Ovejero, G.

    1996-03-01

    Three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene, have been treated in water with ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration, pH, and bicarbonate ions has been investigated. The process goes through direct and radical reactions in the case of fluorene and phenanthrene oxidation, while acenaphthene is removed exclusively by direct ozonation. At concentrations of hydrogen peroxide higher than 10{sup {minus}5} M, ozone mass transfer controls the process rate, regardless of pH. In any case, however, the presence of hydrogen peroxide does not improve the oxidation rate compared to ozonation alone due to the importance of the direct reactions. Intermediate compounds identified during oxidation with ozone alone and combined with UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide are similar and justify the high consumption of ozone in these processes.

  7. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-09-15

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  8. Development of hydrogen peroxide technique for bioburden reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schwartz, L.; Stabekis, P.; Barengoltz, J.

    In order to meet the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Planetary Protection microbial reduction requirements for Mars in-situ life detection and sample return missions, entire planetary spacecraft (including planetary entry probes and planetary landing capsules) may have to be exposed to a qualified sterilization process. Presently, dry heat is the only NASA approved sterilization technique available for spacecraft application. However, with the increasing use of various man-made materials, highly sophisticated electronic circuit boards, and sensors in a modern spacecraft, compatibility issues may render this process unacceptable to design engineers and thus impractical to achieve terminal sterilization of the entire spacecraft. An alternative vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process, which is currently used in various industries, has been selected for further development. Strategic Technology Enterprises, Incorporated (STE), a subsidiary of STERIS Corporation, under a contract from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing systems and methodologies to decontaminate spacecraft using vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) technology. The VHP technology provides an effective, rapid and low temperature means for inactivation of spores, mycobacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms. The VHP application is a dry process affording excellent material compatibility with many of the components found in spacecraft such as polymers, paints and electronic systems. Furthermore, the VHP process has innocuous residuals as it decomposes to water vapor and oxygen. This paper will discuss the approach that is being used to develop this technique and will present lethality data that have been collected to establish deep vacuum VHP sterilization cycles. In addition, the application of this technique to meet planetary protection requirements will be addressed.

  9. Effect of acetone extract from stem bark of Acacia species (A. dealbata, A. ferruginea and A. leucophloea) on antioxidant enzymes status in hydrogen peroxide-induced HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sowndhararajan, Kandhasamy; Hong, Sunghyun; Jhoo, Jin-Woo; Kim, Songmun; Chin, Nyuk Ling

    2015-01-01

    Acacia species are multipurpose trees, widely used in the traditional systems of medicine to treat various ailments. The major objective of the present study was to determine the gene expression of enzymatic antioxidants by acetone extract from the stem bark of three Acacia species (Acacia dealbata, Acacia ferruginea and Acacia leucophloea) in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. The expression of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase containing copper–zinc (CuZnSOD)/manganese (MnSOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in HepG2 cells was evaluated by real-time PCR. The results of antioxidant enzyme expression in real-time PCR study revealed that the H2O2 (200 μM) challenged HepG2 cells reduced the expression of enzymes such as SOD, GPx and CAT. However, the cells pre-treated with acetone extracts of all the three Acacia species significantly (P > 0.05) up-regulated the expression of antioxidant enzymes in a concentration dependent manner (25, 50 and 75 μg/mL). In conclusion, the findings of our study demonstrated that the acetone extract of Acacia species effectively inhibited H2O2 mediated oxidative stress and may be useful as a therapeutic agent in preventing oxidative stress mediated diseases. PMID:26586994

  10. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M.; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A.; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M.; Cejudo, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide. PMID:23967002

  11. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A C S; Coutinho, D de Sá; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91(phox-/-) mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  12. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A CS; de Sá Coutinho, D; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91phox−/− mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  13. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and diamine oxidase activity in pea root nodules under aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Sujkowska-Rybkowska, Marzena; Borucki, Wojciech

    2014-02-01

    Aluminum (Al) is one of the environmental stressors that induces formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and H2O2-generated apoplast diamine oxidase (DAO) activity were detected cytochemically via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules exposed to high (50 μM AlCl3, for 2 and 24h) Al stress. The nodules were shown to respond to Al stress by disturbances in infection thread (IT) growth, bacteria endocytosis, premature degeneration of bacteroidal tissue and generation of H2O2 in nodule apoplast. Large amounts of peroxide were found at the same sites as high DAO activity under Al stress, suggesting that DAO is a major source of Al-induced peroxide accumulation in the nodules. Peroxide distribution and DAO activity in the nodules of both control plants and Al-treated ones were typically found in the plant cell walls, intercellular spaces and infection threads. However, 2 h Al treatment increased DAO activity and peroxide accumulation in the nodule apoplast and bacteria within threads. A prolonged Al treatment (24 h) increased the H2O2 content and DAO activity in the nodule apoplast, especially in the thread walls, matrix and bacteria within infection threads. In addition to ITs, prematurely degenerated bacteroids, which occurred in response to Al, were associated with intense staining for H2O2 and DAO activity. These results suggest the involvement of DAO in the production of a large amount of H2O2 in the nodule apoplast under Al stress. The role of reactive oxygen species in pea-Rhizobium symbiosis under Al stress is discussed. PMID:24246127

  14. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rokaya, Mohammad E.; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26257782

  15. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji; Lee, Hui-Young; Hong, Suntaek; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2013-06-14

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H2O2 are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H2O2 on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H2O2 (0.05-0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15(INK4B) expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H2O2 selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H2O2 increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H2O2 on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15(INK4B)-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H2O2 as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing a potential mechanism whereby H2O2 antagonizes the cytostatic function of TGF-β1. PMID:23685151

  16. Protective effects of a 21-aminosteroid against copper-induced erythrocyte and plasma lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Filipe, P M; Manso, C F

    1992-09-22

    The 21-aminosteroids, or lazaroids, are a novel class of antioxidant drugs designed to inhibit iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in biological lipid environments. They have been shown to be of therapeutic value in several animal models of traumatic, ischemic and hemorrhagic injury of the central nervous system. Our purpose was to evaluate the ability of 21-aminosteroids to protect human erythrocytes and plasma against oxidative damage in vitro. We found that the 21-aminosteroid U74500A inhibited erythrocyte and plasma lipid peroxidation. U74500A at 1 microM significantly reduced copper-induced and hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte lipid peroxidation by 76.5 and 27.6%, respectively. The inhibition of erythrocyte lipid peroxidation was accompanied by an inhibition of hemolysis. Copper-induced plasma lipid peroxidation was also significantly reduced by as little as 1 microM U74500A. These results suggest that 21-aminosteroids may prove useful in preventive or therapeutic interventions in situations where erythrocyte or plasma components are subjected to oxidative stress and in situations related to copper-induced oxidative damage. PMID:1425992

  17. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Protects against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Inhibition of Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dawei; Wang, Yonghui; Xu, Shihong; Wang, Fu; Wang, Bomin; Han, Ke; Sun, Daqing; Li, Lianxin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress induces bone loss and osteoporosis, and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) may be used to combat these diseases due to its antioxidative property. Herein, oxidative stress in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) was induced by H2O2, resulting in an adverse effect on their osteogenic differentiation. However, this H2O2-induced adverse effect was nullified when the cells were treated with EGCG. In addition, treatment of BM-MSCs with EGCG alone also resulted in the enhancement of osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs. After EGCG treatment, expressions of β-catenin and cyclin D1 were upregulated, suggesting that the Wnt pathway was involved in the effects of EGCG on the osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs. This was also confirmed by the fact that the Wnt pathway inhibitor, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), can nullify the EGCG-induced enhancement effect on BM-MSC's osteogenic differentiation. Hence, our results suggested that EGCG can reduce the effects of oxidative stress on Wnt pathway in osteogenic cells, which supported a potentially promising therapy of bone disorders induced by oxidative stress. Considering its positive effects on BM-MSCs, EGCG may also be beneficial for stem cell-based bone repair. PMID:26977159

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing and Signaling by Protein Kinases in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Oka, Shin-ichi; Ale-Agha, Niloofar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidants were once principally considered perpetrators of injury and disease. However, this has become an antiquated view, with cumulative evidence showing that the oxidant hydrogen peroxide serves as a signaling molecule. Hydrogen peroxide carries vital information about the redox state of the cell and is crucial for homeostatic regulation during health and adaptation to stress. Recent Advances: In this review, we examine the contemporary concepts for how hydrogen peroxide is sensed and transduced into a biological response by introducing post-translational oxidative modifications on select proteins. Oxidant sensing and signaling by kinases are of particular importance as they integrate oxidant signals into phospho-regulated pathways. We focus on CAMKII, PKA, and PKG, kinases whose redox regulation has notable impact on cardiovascular function. Critical Issues: In addition, we examine the mechanism for regulating intracellular hydrogen peroxide, considering the net concentrations that may accumulate. The effects of endogenously generated oxidants are often modeled by applying exogenous hydrogen peroxide to cells or tissues. Here we consider whether model systems exposed to exogenous hydrogen peroxide have relevance to systems where the oxidant is generated endogenously, and if so, what concentration can be justified in terms of relevance to health and disease. Future Directions: Improving our understanding of hydrogen peroxide signaling and the sensor proteins that it can modify will help us develop new strategies to regulate intracellular signaling to prevent disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1042–1052. PMID:22867279

  19. α-Tocopherol at Nanomolar Concentration Protects PC12 Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Death and Modulates Protein Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Irina O.; Sokolova, Tatyana V.; Bayunova, Liubov V.; Vlasova, Yulia A.; Rychkova, Maria P.; Avrova, Natalia F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare protective and anti-apoptotic effects of α-tocopherol at nanomolar and micromolar concentrations against 0.2 mM H2O2-induced toxicity in the PC12 neuronal cell line and to reveal protein kinases that contribute to α-tocopherol protective action. The protection by 100 nM α-tocopherol against H2O2-induced PC12 cell death was pronounced if the time of pre-incubation with α-tocopherol was 3–18 h. For the first time, the protective effect of α-tocopherol was shown to depend on its concentration in the nanomolar range (1 nM < 10 nM < 100 nM), if the pre-incubation time was 18 h. Nanomolar and micromolar α-tocopherol decreased the number of PC12 cells in late apoptosis induced by H2O2 to the same extent if pre-incubation time was 18 h. Immunoblotting data showed that α-tocopherol markedly diminished the time of maximal activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt)-induced in PC12 cells by H2O2. Inhibitors of MEK 1/2, PI 3-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) diminished the protective effect of α-tocopherol against H2O2-initiated toxicity if the pre-incubation time was long. The modulation of ERK 1/2, Akt and PKC activities appears to participate in the protection by α-tocopherol against H2O2-induced death of PC12 cells. The data obtained suggest that inhibition by α-tocopherol in late stage ERK 1/2 and Akt activation induced by H2O2 in PC12 cells makes contribution to its protective effect, while total inhibition of these enzymes is not protective. PMID:23109870

  20. Impact of the auxin signaling inhibitor p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid on short-term Cd-induced hydrogen peroxide production and growth response in barley root tip.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Ladislav; Bočová, Beáta; Huttová, Jana; Liptáková, Ľubica; Mistrík, Igor; Valentovičová, Katarína; Zelinová, Veronika

    2012-09-15

    Short-term treatment (30 min) of barley roots with a low 10 μM Cd concentration induced significant H(2)O(2) production in the elongation and differentiation zone of the root tip 3h after treatment. This elevated H(2)O(2) production was accompanied by root growth inhibition and probably invoked root swelling in the elongation zone of the root tip. By contrast, a high 60 μM Cd concentration induced robust H(2)O(2) production in the elongation zone of the root tip already 1h after short-term treatment. This robust H(2)O(2) generation caused extensive cell death 6 h after short-term treatment. Similarly to low Cd concentration, exogenously applied H(2)O(2) caused marked root growth inhibition, which at lower H(2)O(2) concentration was accompanied by root swelling. The auxin signaling inhibitor p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid effectively inhibited 10 μM Cd-induced root growth inhibition, H(2)O(2) production and root swelling, but was ineffective in the alleviation of 60 μM Cd-induced root growth inhibition and H(2)O(2) production. Our results demonstrated that Cd-induced mild oxidative stress caused root growth inhibition, likely trough the rapid reorientation of cell growth in which a crucial role was played by IAA signaling in the root tip. Strong oxidative stress induced by high Cd concentration caused extensive cell death in the elongation zone of the root tip, resulting in the cessation of root growth or even in root death. PMID:22795748

  1. Differential Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide in Adaptive and Inflammatory Gene Expression Induced by Exposure of Human Airway Epithelial Cells to Zn2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidant stress is believed to play an important role in particulate matter (PM)–mediated toxicity in the respiratory tract. Zinc (Zn2+) is a ubiquitous component of PM that has been shown to induce adverse responses such as inflammatory and adaptive gene expression in airway epit...

  2. Protective Effects of Chlorogenic Acid and its Metabolites on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Alterations in Rat Brain Slices: A Comparative Study with Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Gul, Zulfiye; Demircan, Celaleddin; Bagdas, Deniz; Buyukuysal, Rifat Levent

    2016-08-01

    The effectiveness of chlorogenic acid and its main metabolites, caffeic and quinic acids, against oxidative stress was investigated. Resveratrol, another natural phenolic compound, was also tested for comparison. Rat cortical slices were incubated with 200 μM H2O2 for 1 h, and alterations in oxidative stress parameters, such as 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and the production of both malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), were assayed in the absence or presence of phenolic compounds. Additionally, the effectiveness of chlorogenic acid and other compounds on H2O2-induced increases in fluorescence intensities were also compared in slice-free incubation medium. Although quinic acid failed, chlorogenic and caffeic acids significantly ameliorated the H2O2-induced decline in TTC staining intensities. Although resveratrol also caused an increase in staining intensity, its effect was not dose-dependent; the high concentrations of resveratrol tested in the present study (10 and 100 μM) further lessened the staining of the slices. Additionally, all phenolic compounds significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced increases in MDA and ROS levels in cortical slices. When the IC50 values were compared to H2O2-induced alterations, chlorogenic acid was more potent than either its metabolites or resveratrol for all parameters studied under these experimental conditions. In slice-free experimental conditions, on the other hand, chlorogenic and caffeic acids significantly attenuated the fluorescence emission enhanced by H2O2 with a similar order of potency to that obtained in slice-containing physiological medium. These results indicate that chlorogenic acid is a more potent phenolic compound than resveratrol and its main metabolites caffeic and quinic acids against H2O2-induced alterations in oxidative stress parameters in rat cortical slices. PMID:27161374

  3. Development of biological and nonbiological explanations for the Viking label release data. [hydrogen peroxide theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The plausibility that hydrogen peroxide, widely distributed within the Mars surface material, was responsible for the evocative response obtained by the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment on Mars was investigated. Although a mixture of gamma Fe2O3 and silica sand stimulated the LR nutrient reaction with hydrogen peroxide and reduced the rate of hydrogen decomposition under various storage conditions, the Mars analog soil prepared by the Viking Inorganic Analysis Team to match the Mars analytical data does not cause such effects. Nor is adequate resistance to UV irradiation shown. On the basis of the results and consideration presented while the hydrogen peroxide theory remains the most, if not only, attractive chemical explanation of the LR data, it remains unconvincing on critical points. Until problems concerning the formation and stabilization of hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Mars can be overcome, adhere to the scientific evidence requires serious consideration of the biological theory.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide and the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Hartman, H.

    1991-01-01

    Possible pathways for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis in the early reducing atmosphere of the earth are discussed. It is suggested that the abiotic production of atmospheric oxidants could have provided a mechanism by which locally oxidizing conditions were sustained within spatially confined habitats thus removing the available reductants and forcing photosynthetic organisms to utilize water (rather than ferrous or sulfide ions) as the electron donor. It is argued that atmospheric H2O2 played the key role in inducing oxygenic photosynthesis, because, as peroxide concentrations local environments increased, primitive organisms would not only be faced with a loss of a reductant, but would be also forced to develop a biochemical apparatus (such as catalase) that would protect them against the products of oxygenic photosynthesis. This scenario allows for the early evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis at the time when global conditions were still anaerobic.

  5. [Use of hydrogen peroxide in the treatment of sewage in antibiotic production].

    PubMed

    Polunina, E E; Zav'ialova, E V; Shchipanov, N P; Savina, N N

    1996-03-01

    The possible use of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant in the local treatment of the sewage in antibiotic production was investigated. The data on oxidation of SASs and other pollutants in antibiotic production by hydrogen peroxide alone or in the presence of ferrous sulfate as a homogenous catalyst are presented. The influence of the sewage preliminary treatment by hydrogen peroxide on the foaming was studied. It was shown advisable to use the described process for the local treatment as the first stage followed by the sewage electrochemical treatment. PMID:8967796

  6. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial oxidant generation: role of transferrin-receptor-dependent iron and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kalivendi, Shasi V; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Cunningham, Sonya; Shang, Tiesong; Hillard, Cecilia J; Kalyanaraman, B

    2003-01-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) is a neurotoxin used in cellular models of Parkinson's Disease. Although intracellular iron plays a crucial role in MPP(+)-induced apoptosis, the molecular signalling mechanisms linking iron, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis are still unknown. We investigated these aspects using cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. MPP(+) enhanced caspase 3 activity after 24 h with significant increases as early as 12 h after treatment of cells. Pre-treatment of CGNs and neuroblastoma cells with the metalloporphyrin antioxidant enzyme mimic, Fe(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin (FeTBAP), completely prevented the MPP(+)-induced caspase 3 activity as did overexpression of glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and pre-treatment with a lipophilic, cell-permeable iron chelator [N, N '-bis-(2-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N, N '-diacetic acid, HBED]. MPP(+) treatment increased the number of TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labelling)-positive cells which was completely blocked by pre-treatment with FeTBAP. MPP(+) treatment significantly decreased the aconitase and mitochondrial complex I activities; pre-treatment with FeTBAP, HBED and GPx1 overexpression reversed this effect. MPP(+) treatment increased the intracellular oxidative stress by 2-3-fold, as determined by oxidation of dichlorodihydrofluorescein and dihydroethidium (hydroethidine). These effects were reversed by pre-treatment of cells with FeTBAP and HBED and by GPx1 overexpression. MPP(+)-treatment enhanced the cell-surface transferrin receptor (TfR) expression, suggesting a role for TfR-induced iron uptake in MPP(+) toxicity. Treatment of cells with anti-TfR antibody (IgA class) inhibited MPP(+)-induced caspase activation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity did not affect caspase 3 activity, apoptotic cell death or ROS generation by MPP(+). Overall, these results suggest that MPP(+)-induced cell death

  7. NDRG2 promotes myoblast proliferation and caspase 3/7 activities during differentiation, and attenuates hydrogen peroxide – But not palmitate-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kimberley J.; Russell, Aaron P.; Foletta, Victoria C.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the stress-responsive N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) in the control of myoblast growth, and the amino acids contributing to its function, are not well characterized. Here, we investigated the effect of increased NDRG2 levels on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in skeletal muscle cells under basal and stress conditions. NDRG2 overexpression increased C2C12 myoblast proliferation and the expression of positive cell cycle regulators, cdk2, cyclin B and cyclin D, and phosphorylation of Rb, while the serine/threonine-deficient NDRG2, 3A-NDRG2, had less effect. The onset of differentiation was enhanced by NDRG2 as determined through the myogenic regulatory factor expression profiles and myocyte fusion index. However, the overall level of differentiation in myotubes was not different. While NDRG2 up-regulated caspase 3/7 activities during differentiation, no increase in apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay or through cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP proteins. During H2O2 treatment to induce oxidative stress, NDRG2 helped protect against the loss of proliferation and ER stress as measured by GRP78 expression with 3A-NDRG2 displaying less protection. NDRG2 also attenuated apoptosis by reducing cleavage of PARP and caspase 3 and expression of pro-apoptotic Bax while enhancing the pro-survival Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL levels. In contrast, Mcl-1 was not altered, and NDRG2 did not protect against palmitate-induced lipotoxicity. Our findings show that NDRG2 overexpression increases myoblast proliferation and caspase 3/7 activities without increasing overall differentiation. Furthermore, NDRG2 attenuates H2O2-induced oxidative stress and specific serine and threonine amino acid residues appear to contribute to its function in muscle cells. PMID:26380811

  8. Activation of AP-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB transcription factors is involved in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Vollgraf, U; Wegner, M; Richter-Landsberg, C

    1999-12-01

    H2O2-induced onset and execution of programmed cell death in mature rat brain oligodendrocytes in culture is accompanied by the induction and nuclear translocation of the transcription factors AP-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), both of which have been discussed as regulators of cell death and survival. Supershift analysis of nuclear extracts indicated that the AP-1 complex consists of c-Jun, c-Fos, JunD, and possibly JunB proteins, and that the NF-kappaB complex contains p50, p65, and c-Rel proteins. The first signs of DNA fragmentation were seen already during the first hour after the treatment. DNA fragmentation could be prevented by the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and vitamin E, by the nuclease inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid, and by preincubation with the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Additionally, DFO protected oligodendrocytes from H2O2-induced cytotoxic effects as assessed by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, and suppressed the formation of free radicals. DFO alone led to a slight increase and in combination with H2O2 synergistically induced DNA-binding activities of AP-1 and NF-kappaB in oligodendrocytes. Our data suggest that although low levels of H2O2 directly activate AP-1 and NF-kappaB and might contribute to signal transduction pathways promoting cell survival, the formation and action of hydroxyl radicals promote cell death mechanisms that can be attenuated by the iron chelator DFO. PMID:10582611

  9. Protective effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative neuronal cell damage in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sang Bum; Ban, Ju Yeon; Lee, Bo Young; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2003-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the neuroprotective effects of fangchinoline (FAN) and tetrandrine (TET), bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, which exhibit the characteristics of Ca 2+ channel blockers, on H2O2 -induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. H2O2 produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by (5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), an N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, and NG-nitro- L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Pretreatment with FAN and TET over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death as assessed by a trypan blue exclusion test, a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the number of apoptotic nuclei. In addition, FAN and TET inhibited the H2O2 -induced elevation of glutamate release into the medium, elevation of the cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+] c ), and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that FAN and TET may mitigate the harmful effects of H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death by interfering with the increase of [Ca 2+] c, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and generation of ROS. Abbreviations. AP5:D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid DMSO:dimethyl sulfoxide FAN:fangchinoline H 2 DCF-DA:2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate MK-801:(5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,20-imine MTT:3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide L-NAME: NG-Nitro- L-arginine methyl ester NMDA: N-methyl- D-aspartate TET:tetrandrine PMID:12865967

  10. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji; Lee, Hui-Young; Hong, Suntaek; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces Smad3 linker phosphorylation through Akt-ERK1/2 pathway. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated suppression of TGF-β signal requires Smad3 linker phosphorylation. •This is a first report about interplay between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and growth inhibition pathway. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.05–0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15{sup INK4B} expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15{sup INK4B}-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing

  11. Prevention of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells by 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone isolated from Chaga (Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yutaka; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2009-10-15

    Chaga (Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat) is a mushroom traditionally used as a folk medicine for tumors and stomach ulcers in Russia. Previously, we reported the antioxidant potential of Chaga extracts and seven isolated phenolic ingredients. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of Chaga extracts and other isolated phenolic ingredients against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress and subsequent damage of cellular and nuclear components. Chaga extracts and the phenolic ingredients, 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone (DBL) and caffeic acid (CA), effectively suppressed intracellular ROS level in H(2)O(2)-treated cells. The H(2)O(2)-induced cell death was more pronounced, effectively prevented in the cells treated with DBL than in cells treated with CA. In addition, ROS activate various signal transduction pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Therefore, we examined the potentially beneficial effects of DBL on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38-MAPK signaling activated by H(2)O(2) stimulation. DBL selectively inhibited the phosphorylation of p38-MAPK, without affecting JNK and ERK. PMID:19647072

  12. Red paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) and its main carotenoids, capsanthin and β-carotene, prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of gap-junction intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Moon; Rhee, Han Cheol; Kim, Suna

    2016-07-25

    This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of red paprika extract (RPE) and its main carotenoids, namely, capsanthin (CST) and β-carotene (BCT), on the H2O2-induced inhibition of gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells (WB cells). We found that pre-treatment with RPE, CST and BCT protected WB cells from H2O2-induced inhibition of GJIC. RPE, CST and BCT not only recovered connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA expression but also prevented phosphorylation of Cx43 protein by H2O2 treatment. RPE attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK, whereas pre-treatment with CST and BCT only attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 and did not affect JNK in H2O2-treated WB cells. RPE, CST and BCT significantly suppressed the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H2O2-treated cells compared to untreated WB cells. These results suggest that dietary intake of red paprika might be helpful for lowering the risk of diseases caused by oxidative stress. PMID:27154496

  13. Quantitative proteomics study of the neuroprotective effects of B12 on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lijun; Zhou, Juntuo; Chen, Xi; Lou, Yaxin; Liu, Dan; Zou, Xiajuan; Yang, Bin; Yin, Yuxin; Pan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    B12 belongs to the coumarin class of compounds that have been shown to have various physiological and pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antioxidant. In the present study, we characterised the neuroprotective effects of B12 against H2O2-induced neuronal cell damage in SH-SY5Y cells. Protein expression profiling in combination with pathway analysis was deployed to investigate the molecular events associated with the neuroprotective effects in human neuronal cells using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. A total of 22 proteins were significantly differentially expressed in H2O2-damaged cells with or without B12 treatment. Bioinformatics analysis using the Cytoscape platform indicated that poly pyrimidine tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1) was highly associated with the protective effect, and western blotting verified that PTBP1 was up-regulated in H2O2 + B12 treatment group, compared with the H2O2 treated group. PTBP RNAi experiments knocked down PTBP expression, which cancelled out the protective effect of B12 on cell viability. Thus, we infer that B12 neuroprotective activity involves up-regulation of PTBP1 and its associated signalling networks following H2O2-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. B12 or related compounds may prove to be useful therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. PMID:26951766

  14. In vitro protective effects of Withania somnifera (L.) dunal root extract against hydrogen peroxide and β-amyloid(1-42)-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Seal, C J; Howes, M J R; Kite, G C; Okello, E J

    2010-10-01

    Withania somnifera L. Dunal (Solanaceae), also known as 'ashwagandha' in Sanskrit and as 'Indian ginseng', is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer, with antiaging, antistress, immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. There is a paucity of data on the potential neuroprotective effects of W. somnifera root, as traditionally used, against H(2)O(2)- and Aβ((1-42))-induced cytotoxicity which are current targets for novel approaches to treat dementia, especially dementia of the Alzheimer's type (AD). In this study, an aqueous extract prepared from the dried roots of W. somnifera was assessed for potential protective effects against H(2)O(2)- and Aβ((1-42))-aggregated fibril cytotoxicity by an MTT assay using a differentiated rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line. The results suggest that pretreatments of differentiated PC12 cells with aqueous extracts of W. somnifera root significantly protect differentiated PC12 cells against both H(2)O(2)- and Aβ((1-42))-induced cytotoxicity, in a concentration dependent manner. To investigate the compounds that could explain the observed effects, the W. somnifera extract was analysed by liquid chromatography-serial mass spectrometry and numerous withanolide derivatives, including withaferin A, were detected. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective properties of an aqueous extract of W. somnifera root and may provide some explanation for the putative ethnopharmacological uses of W. somnifera for cognitive and other neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with oxidative stress. PMID:20680931

  15. Glucose oxidase prevents programmed cell death of the silkworm anterior silk gland through hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroto; Kakei, Motonori; Iwami, Masafumi; Sakurai, Sho

    2011-03-01

    During pupal metamorphosis, the anterior silk glands (ASGs) of the silkworm Bombyx mori degenerate through programmed cell death (PCD), which is triggered by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). 20E triggers the PCD of the ASGs of day 7 fifth instar (V7) larvae but not that of V5 larvae. When V7 ASGs were cocultured with V5 ASGs in the presence of 20E, neither culture of ASGs underwent PCD. The 20E-induced PCD of V7 ASGs was also inhibited when they were incubated in conditioned medium that was prepared by incubating V5 ASGs for 48 h, an indication that V5 ASGs released an inhibitor of 20E-induced PCD during incubation. The inhibitor was purified from conditioned medium and identified as glucose oxidase (GOD). GOD catalyzes the oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone, and generates hydrogen peroxide as a byproduct. We found that hydrogen peroxide is the molecule that directly inhibits the action of 20E and may act to protect the ASGs from early execution of PCD during the feeding stage. GOD was localized in the inner cavity of the gland, and was discharged to the outside of the ASGs with the silk thread at the onset of spinning. Thus, the spinning behavior, occurring at the beginning of the prepupal period, plays an important role in controlling the time at which ASGs undergo PCD in response to 20E. PMID:21205208

  16. Optimization of Hydrogen Peroxide Detection for a Methyl Mercaptan Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhan-Hong; Guedri, Houssemeddine; Viguier, Bruno; Sun, Shi-Gang; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Several kinds of modified carbon screen printed electrodes (CSPEs) for amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are presented in order to propose a methyl mercaptan (MM) biosensor. Unmodified, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPC), Prussian blue (PB), and Os-wired HRP modified CSPE sensors were fabricated and tested to detect H2O2, applying a potential of +0.6 V, +0.6 V, +0.4 V, −0.2 V and −0.1 V (versus Ag/AgCl), respectively. The limits of detection of these electrodes for H2O2 were 3.1 μM, 1.3 μM, 71 nM, 1.3 μM, 13.7 nM, respectively. The results demonstrated that the Os-wired HRP modified CSPEs gives the lowest limit of detection (LOD) for H2O2 at a working potential as low as −0.1 V. Os-wired HRP is the optimum choice for establishment of a MM biosensor and gives a detection limit of 0.5 μM. PMID:23591963

  17. Graphene Oxide Based Fluorometric Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide in Milk.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly rapid, visual, precise, selective and sensitive analytical method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in milk using Graphene oxide (GO) with 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). A 1000 µL aliquots of 10-fold diluted samples (high and low-fat milk) directly onto the 100 µL of GO and 100 µL of 100 µM DCFH-DA produced green colour under Ultraviolet light at 365 nm. The analytical feature of our proposed method includes low detection limit (10 mmol mL⁻¹) and satisfactory recovery values for samples. The presence of H202 in milk is a major concern because it constitutes a public health hazard. Many milk indursties are using H₂O₂ as a preservative, but if the concentration increases then it causes so many health problems such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancer and diabetes. Present methods show an easy way for detecting H₂O₂ generally require considerable time and laboratory facilities. The chemical tests have sufficient sensitivity to detect wide linear range of H₂O₂ concentration. PMID:27398583

  18. Glutathione and γ-glutamylcysteine in hydrogen peroxide detoxification.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Bolaños, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important regulator of cell redox status and signaling pathways. However, if produced in excess, it can trigger oxidative damage, which can be counteracted by the antioxidant systems. Amongst these, the glutathione (GSH) precursor, γ-glutamylcysteine (γGC), has recently been shown to detoxify H2O2 in a glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1)-dependent fashion. To analyze how both γGC and GSH reduce H2O2, we have taken advantage of a colorimetric assay that allows simple and reliable quantification of H2O2 in the micromolar range. Whereas most assays rely on coupled enzymatic reactions, this method determines the formation of a ferric thiocyanate derivative after direct Fe(2+) oxidation by H2O2. Here, we detail the procedure and considerations to determine H2O2 reduction by both γGC and GSH, either from cell samples or in vitro reactions with purified enzymes from GSH metabolism. PMID:23830629

  19. Preliminary flight test of hydrogen peroxide retro-propulsion module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sungyong; Jo, Sungkwon; Wee, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Hosung; Kwon, Sejin

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a retro-thruster, the design of a retro-propulsion module, and a preliminary flight of the module in a landing demonstration. First, a retro-monopropellant thruster with the maximum thrust of 350 N that employs hydrogen peroxide as a monopropellant was developed. It's thrust force, efficiency of characteristic velocity, and specific impulse were evaluated during the course of it's development. To control the thrust force, two solenoid valves and a pulse width modulation (PWM) flow control valve were incorporated into the thruster design. Second, a retro-propulsion module with a wet mass of 23 kg was designed and fabricated. All the required components including tanks, propellant tubes, a pressure regulator, valves, a retro-thruster, and support structure were integrated into the module. Finally, a preliminary flight test with thrust and altitude control was carried out successfully. In this test, the throttling of the thrust force and altitude control was performed manually for safety purposes.

  20. Ab initio calculation of infrared intensities for hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an ab initio SCF quantum mechanical study are used to derive estimates for the infrared intensities of the fundamental vibrations of hydrogen peroxide. Atomic polar tensors (APTs) were calculated on the basis of a 4-31G basis set, and used to derive absolute intensities for the vibrational transitions. Comparison of the APTs calculated for H2O2 with those previously obtained for H2O and CH3OH, and of the absolute intensities derived from the H2O2 APTs with those derived from APTs transferred from H2O and CH3OH, reveals the sets of values to differ by no more than a factor of two, supporting the validity of the theoretical calculation. Values of the infrared intensities obtained correspond to A1 = 14.5 km/mol, A2 = 0.91 km/mol, A3 = 0.058 km/mol, A4 = 123 km/mol, A5 = 46.2 km/mol, and A6 = 101 km/mol. Charge, charge flux and overlap contributions to the dipole moment derivatives are also computed.

  1. Red fluorescent genetically encoded indicator for intracellular hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Yulia G.; Bilan, Dmitry S.; Matlashov, Mikhail E.; Mishina, Natalia M.; Markvicheva, Ksenia N.; Subach, Oksana M.; Subach, Fedor V.; Bogeski, Ivan; Hoth, Markus; Enikolopov, Grigori; Belousov, Vsevolod V.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are conserved regulators of numerous cellular functions, and overproduction of ROS is a hallmark of various pathological processes. Genetically encoded fluorescent probes are unique tools to study ROS production in living systems of different scale and complexity. However, the currently available recombinant redox sensors have green emission, which overlaps with the spectra of many other probes. Expanding the spectral range of recombinant in vivo ROS probes would enable multiparametric in vivo ROS detection. Here we present the first genetically encoded red fluorescent sensor for hydrogen peroxide detection, HyPerRed. The performance of this sensor is similar to its green analogues. We demonstrate the utility of the sensor by tracing low concentrations of H2O2 produced in the cytoplasm of cultured cells upon growth factor stimulation. Moreover, using HyPerRed we detect local and transient H2O2 production in the mitochondrial matrix upon inhibition of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake. PMID:25330925

  2. Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents and tests a previously unrecognized mechanism for driving a replicating molecular system on the prebiotic earth. It is proposed that cell-free RNA replication in the primordial soup may have been driven by self-sustained oscillatory thermochemical reactions. To test this hypothesis, a well-characterized hydrogen peroxide oscillator was chosen as the driver and complementary RNA strands with known association and melting kinetics were used as the substrate. An open flow system model for the self-consistent, coupled evolution of the temperature and concentrations in a simple autocatalytic scheme is solved numerically, and it is shown that thermochemical cycling drives replication of the RNA strands. For the (justifiably realistic) values of parameters chosen for the simulated example system, the mean amount of replicant produced at steady state is 6.56 times the input amount, given a constant supply of substrate species. The spontaneous onset of sustained thermochemical oscillations via slowly drifting parameters is demonstrated, and a scheme is given for prebiotic production of complementary RNA strands on rock surfaces. PMID:24647902

  3. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment. PMID:26603095

  4. Hydrogen peroxide photocycling in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yeala; Harris, Raviv; Klein-Kedem, Nir

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was investigated from December 2007 to October 2008 in the Gulf of Aqaba, which in the absence of H(2)O(2) contribution from biological production, rain and runoff, turned out to be a unique natural photochemical laboratory. A distinct seasonal pattern emerged, with highest midday surface H(2)O(2) concentrations in spring-summer (30-90 nM) as compared to winter (10-30 nM). Similarly, irradiation normalized net H(2)O(2) formation rates obtained in concurrent ship-board experiments were faster in spring-summer than in winter. These seasonal patterns were attributed to changes in water characteristics, namely elevated spring-summer chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The role of trace elements in H(2)O(2) photoformation was studied by simultaneously measuring superoxide (O(2)(-)), Fe(II), and H(2)O(2) formation and loss in ambient seawater and in the presence of superoxide dismutase, iron and copper. O(2)(-) was found to decay fast in the Gulf water, with a half-life of 15-28 s, primarily due to catalytic reactions with trace metals (predominantly copper). Hence, H(2)O(2) formation in the Gulf involves metal-catalyzed O(2)(-) disproptionation. Added iron moderately lowered net H(2)O(2) photoformation, probably due to its participation in Fe(II) oxidation, a process that may also modify H(2)O(2) formation in situ. PMID:20377174

  5. DNA single-strand breaks and cytotoxicity induced by chromate(VI), cadmium(II), and mercury(II) in hydrogen peroxide-resistant cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, K; Sugiyama, M; Haramaki, N

    1994-01-01

    The induction of cytotoxicity and DNA single-strand breaks by chromium(VI), cadmium(II), and mercury(II) were compared in H2O2-resistant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO(R)) cells and parental (CHO(P)) cells. Using a colony-forming assay, CHO(R) cells were found to be significantly more resistant than CHO(P) cells to the cytotoxicity caused by CdCl2 and HgCl2, but not to that caused by Na2CrO4. However, the DNA single-strand breaks produced by each of these metals were significantly lower in the CHO(R) cells. With respect to chromium reduction, the level of chromium(V) in CHO(R) cells was decreased. The role of intracellular active oxygen in the heavy metal-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity is discussed. PMID:7843132

  6. Hyperoside attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced L02 cell damage via MAPK-dependent Keap{sub 1}-Nrf{sub 2}-ARE signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Hai-Yan; Liu, Yao; Chen, Jian-Hong; Sun, Feng-Jun; Shi, Hui-Qing; Xia, Pei-Yuan

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Hyperoside attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced L02 cell damage. {yields} Hyperoside up-regulated HO-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. {yields} Hyperoside activated both Nrf{sub 2} nuclear translocation and gene expression. {yields} Hyperoside may inhibit Keap{sub 1} mRNA translation or protein degradation. {yields} Phosphorylation of ERK and p38 is involved in hyperoside-mediated Nrf{sub 2} activation. -- Abstract: The flavonoid hyperoside has been reported to elicit cytoprotection against oxidative stress partly by increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. Here, hepatic L02 cells exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) were used to demonstrate that hyperoside protected cells by significantly inhibiting overproduction of intracellular ROS, depletion of the mitochondrial membrane potential and leakage of lactate dehydrogenase. Hyperoside further enhanced the cellular antioxidant defense system through increasing the activity of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and by up-regulating HO-1 expression. Meanwhile, real time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence studies revealed that hyperoside stimulated nuclear translocation of the Nrf{sub 2} transcription factor in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was significantly suppressed by pharmacological inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) p38 and ERK. Collectively, our data provide the first description of the mechanism underlying hyperoside's ability to attenuate H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell damage, namely this compound interacts with the MAPK-dependent Keap{sub 1}-Nrf{sub 2}-ARE signaling pathway to up-regulate HO-1 expression and enhance intracellular antioxidant activity.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide-induced production of a 40 kDa immunoreactive thyroglobulin fragment in human thyroid cells: the onset of thyroid autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Duthoit, C; Estienne, V; Giraud, A; Durand-Gorde, J M; Rasmussen, A K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Carayon, P; Ruf, J

    2001-01-01

    We recently reported that, during in vitro thyroid-hormone synthesis, H(2)O(2) stress cleaved thyroglobulin (Tg) into C-terminal peptides. These peptides were found to contain the immunodominant region of Tg recognized by Tg autoantibodies from patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. To test the hypothesis that Tg fragmentation is an early upstream initiating event involved in Tg autoimmune response and the consequence of oxidative injuries, we studied the effect of H(2)O(2) stress on human thyroid cells. In culture conditions allowing Tg synthesis and iodine organification by the cells, we found that bolus addition of increasing millimolar doses of H(2)O(2) induced a dose-response appearance of floating cells in the culture medium. These cells apparently resulted from a necrotic process, and they bore iodinated Tg fragments. These fragments were found to be similar to those previously obtained in vitro from purified Tg. In both cases, Tg peptides were recognized by a well-defined monoclonal antibody directed to the immunodominant region of Tg. The smallest immunoreactive Tg peptide had a molecular mass of 40 kDa and entered human thyrocytes more efficiently than the entire Tg. These data suggest that thyrocytes exposed to locally increased H(2)O(2) doses accumulate fragmented Tg for further delivery into surrounding living thyrocytes in the course of an autoimmune response. PMID:11736644

  8. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus): immune responses and role of recombinant Prx3 in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Godahewa, G I; Kim, Yucheol; Dananjaya, S H S; Jayasooriya, R G P T; Noh, Jae Koo; Lee, Jehee; De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic infections and environmental factors cause a variety of stresses in fish including oxidative stress by rapid elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Transcriptional activation and expression of antioxidant enzymes are essential for reducing the oxidative stress. In this study, we present the molecular characterization, immune responses and ROS scavenging activity of mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 from Oplegnathus fasciatus (RbPrx3). Coding sequence (CDS) of RbPrx3 contains 248 amino acids polypeptide which consists of highly conserved peroxiredoxin super family domain and two cysteine residues. Pairwise sequence comparison revealed that RbPrx3 has the greatest identity (94.8%) to Sparus aurata Prx3. Transcriptional analysis of RbPrx3 indicated the ubiquitously expressed mRNA in wide array of organs showing the highest expression in the liver of rock bream. Upon immune challenge of Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), RbPrx3 mRNA level was up-regulated in immunocompetent liver tissues compared to unchallenged fish. Purified recombinant RbPrx3 treated THP-1 cells showed higher survival rate against H(2)O(2) induced oxidative stress and significantly reduced the level of intracellular ROS. Overall results from our study suggest that RbPrx3 may be involved in broader functions such as regulating oxidative stresses by scavenging ROS and activating immune responses in rock bream. PMID:25542382

  9. Hyperoxic gassing with Tiron enhances bradykinin-induced endothelium-dependent and EDH-type relaxation through generation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pui San; Roberts, Richard E; Randall, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenation with 95%O2 is routinely used in organ bath studies. However, hyperoxia may affect tissue responses, particularly in studies which involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, the effects of the antioxidant, Tiron, were investigated under different gassing conditions in the porcine isolated coronary artery (PCA). Distal PCAs from male and female pigs were mounted in a wire myograph gassed with either 95%O2/5%CO2 or 95% air/5%CO2 and pre-contracted with U46619. Concentration-response curves to bradykinin were constructed in the presence of Tiron (1mM), a cell permeable superoxide scavenger and catalase (1000Uml(-1)) to breakdown H2O2. The H2O2 level in Krebs'-Henseleit solution was detected using Amplex Red. Bradykinin produced concentration-dependent vasorelaxations in male and female PCAs when gassed with either 95%O2 or air, with no differences in the Rmax or EC50. Tiron increased the potency of bradykinin only when gassed with 95%O2 in PCAs from both sexes. At 95%O2, catalase prevented the leftward shift caused by Tiron in both sexes indicating that catalase prevented the formation of H2O2 by Tiron. In female PCAs, addition of catalase to Tiron significantly reduced the Rmax. In the EDH-type response (using L-NAME and indomethacin), Tiron enhanced the potency of the bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation when gassed with 95%O2 in PCAs from both sexes. Biochemical analysis using Amplex Red demonstrated that H2O2 was generated in Krebs'-Henseleit solution when gassed with 95%O2, but not with air. Therefore, hyperoxic gassing conditions could alter the environment generating superoxide within the Krebs'-Henseleit buffer, which may, in turn, influence the in vitro pharmacological responses. PMID:25450247

  10. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes from rats chronically treated with corticosterone: The protective effect of oxytocin treatment.

    PubMed

    Stanić, Dušanka; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Petrović, Jelena; Bogavac-Stanojević, Nataša; Sopić, Miron; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena; Ignjatović, Svetlana; Pešić, Vesna

    2016-08-25

    Contemporary lifestyle is commonly associated with chronic stress, an environmental factor contributing to development of various psychological and somatic disorders. Increased levels of glucocorticoids, observed in the chronic stress, induce the production of reactive oxygen species leading to genotoxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic administration of oxytocin (OXY) 10 IU/400 μL/day, s.c., for 14 days, a hormone presumed to exert antioxidant effect, may prevent DNA damage in the comet assay of peripheral blood lymphocytes of Wistar rats treated chronically with corticosterone (CORT) 100 mg/L ad libitum, per os, for 21 days, as well as, to influence some plasma oxidative stress parameters, i.e. levels of total lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), and malondialdehyde (MDA), and the activity of antioxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Even though there was no reduction in overall number of damaged cells after oxytocin treatment only, the marked increase in total comet score (TCS) after incubation with H2O2 in CORT group compared to controls, was absent in the CORT + OXY experimental group. Furthermore, significant decrease of highly damaged cells compared to corticosterone group was noted. Chronic oxytocin administration thus protected lymphocytes from high intensity damage that leads to cellular death. In addition, treatment with OXY along with CORT, significantly decreased concentration of LOOH in plasma, and increased SOD compared to CORT treatment only. This finding corresponds well with current reports on beneficial effects of OXY in conditions of HPA axis hyperactivity, and supports the hypothesis of OXY-mediated antioxidant action. PMID:27402529

  11. Reusable sensor based on high magnetization carboxyl-modified graphene oxide with intrinsic hydrogen peroxide catalytic activity for hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Shi-Lian; Tsai, Rung-Ywan

    2013-03-15

    We propose a new strategy to improve the enzyme stability, construction and sensitivity of a multifunctional sensor. An exfoliated graphene oxide sheet with carboxyl-long-chains (GO-CLC) was prepared in one step from primitive graphite via Friedel-Crafts acylation. Magnetic nanoparticles, glucose oxidase (GOD) and poly[aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline] (SPAnH) were then incorporated to form an electrochemical film (SPAnH-HMGO-CLC-GOD) for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and glucose. The GO and Fe(3)O(4) have intrinsic hydrogen peroxide catalytic activity and the activity will be enhanced by the combination of SPAnH coating and induces an amplification of electrochemical reduction current. This response can be used as a glucose sensor by tracing the released H(2)O(2) after enzymatic reaction of bound GOD. Our sensor was linear within the range from 0.01 mM to 1mM H(2)O(2) and 0.1mM to 1.4mM glucose, with high sensitivities of 4340.6 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 1074.6 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD) were 5.4% for H(2)O(2) detection and 5.8% for glucose detection. The true detecting range was 0.4-40 mM for H(2)O(2) and 4-56 mM for glucose, which multiplied by 40-fold of dilution. This sensor based on the catalysis of organic SPAnH and the enzymatic activity of GOD can be used for both H(2)O(2) and glucose sensing in potential clinical, environmental and industrial applications. PMID:22959012

  12. Nanoceria based electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide detection.

    PubMed

    Ujjain, Sanjeev Kumar; Das, Anubhav; Srivastava, Gaurav; Ahuja, Preety; Roy, Manas; Arya, Aditya; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Sharma, Raj Kishore; Das, Mainak

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress is a condition when the concentration of free radicals and reactive molecular species rise above certain level in living systems. This condition not only perturbs the normal physiology of the system but also has been implicated in many diseases in humans and other animals. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is known to be involved in induction of oxidative stress and has also been linked to a variety of ailments such as inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and cancer in humans. It is one of the more stable reactive molecular species present in living systems. Because of its stability and links with various diseases, sensing the level of H2O2 can be of great help in diagnosing these diseases, thereby easing disease management and amelioration. Nanoceria is a potent candidate in free radical scavenging as well as sensing because of its unique redox properties. These properties have been exploited, in the reported work, to sense and quantify peroxide levels. Nanoceria has been synthesized using different capping agents: Hexamethylene-tetra-amine (HMTA) and fructose. CeO2-HMTA show rhombohedral and cubic 6.4 nm particles whereas CeO2-fructose are found to be spherical with average particle diameter size 5.8 nm. CeO2-HMTA, due to the better exposure of the active (200) and (220) planes relative to (111) plane, exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity toward H2O2 reduction. Amperometric responses were measured by increasing H2O2 concentration. The authors observed a sensitivity of 21.13 and 9.6 μA cm(-2) mM(-1) for CeO2-HMTA and CeO2-fructose, respectively. The response time of 4.8 and 6.5 s was observed for CeO2-HMTA and CeO2-fructose, respectively. The limit of detection is as low as 0.6 and 2.0 μM at S/N ratio 3 for CeO2-HMTA and CeO2-fructose, respectively. Ceria-HMTA was further tested for its antioxidant activity in an animal cell line in vitro and the results confirmed its activity. PMID:25280852

  13. ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION UTILIZING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AS A SUPPLEMENTAL SOURCE OF OXYGEN: A LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field scale studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using hydrogen peroxide as a supplemental source of oxygen for bioremediation of an aviation gasoline fuel spill. Field samples of aviation gasoline contaminated aquifer material were artificially...

  14. [The Clinical Application Status and Development Trends of Hydrogen Peroxide Low Temperature Plasma Sterilizers].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Min; Zheng, Yunxin; Chen, Ying; Hou, Bin; Xu, Zitian

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilization technology solved the problems of thermo-sensitive materials' disinfection and sterilization based on its development and unique characteristics. This paper introduced the researches of clinical application quality control, and showed the hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers were being widely used in hospitals and highly recognized. According to the clinical data and the literatures of the domestic equipment in preliminary application, it could be concluded that the technology maturity of domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers was in a high level. The advantages of using domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers to do disinfection and sterilization included lower cost, safer, faster and non-toxic, etc. Also the management system should be improved and the clinical staff should master the technical essentials, obey the procedures strictly, verify periodically and offer full monitoring to upgrade the quality of sterilization. PMID:27197500

  15. An automated system for the measurement of hydrogen peroxide in industrial applications

    PubMed Central

    Westbroek, Philippe; Temmerman, Edward; Kiekens, Paul; Govaert, Filip

    1998-01-01

    An automated sensor system for the continuous and in-line measurement of hydrogen peroxide in industrial applications is described. The hydrogen peroxide concentration can be measured over the entire pH range, over a wide concentration range of hydrogen peroxide (10-3 70 g/l), from 0 to 70°C, and with high precision and accuracy (errors less than 1% ). The system consists of a bypass in which the necessary electrodes are positioned and electronically controlled. The sensor is very selective for hydrogen peroxide, easy to instal, and it is stable for at least two months after calibration. The calibration can be done in the process solution during a running process. PMID:18924833

  16. Certification of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Koukol, R.; Foster, T. L.; Stabekis, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process and research activities JPL is planning to conduct for certification of hydrogen peroxide as a NASA approved technique for sterilization of various spacecraft parts/components and entire modern spacecraft.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BIOQUELL, INC. CLARIS C HYDROGEN PEROXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Clarus C Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator, a biological decontamination device manufactured by BIOQUELL, Inc. The unit was tested by evaluating its ability to decontaminate seven types...

  18. FLOW INJECTION ANALYSIS OF TRACE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE USING AN IMMOBILIZED ENZYME REACTOR (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sub-parts per billion (ppb) levels of aqueous hydrogen peroxide have been determined with a flow injection analysis system employing a single bead string reactor composed of horseradish peroxidase covalently bound to an aminated macroporous polymeric absorbent with glutaraldehyde...

  19. SnFe2 O4 Nanocrystals as Highly Efficient Catalysts for Hydrogen-Peroxide Sensing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan-Ting; Liu, Dai-Ming; Lu, Shih-Yuan

    2016-07-25

    SnFe2 O4 nanocrystals (NC), prepared with a simple one-step carrier-solvent-assisted interfacial reaction process, were developed as highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen peroxide sensing. These NCs, with a size of around 7 nm, served as the sensing catalyst and were decorated onto the pore surfaces of a porous fluorine-doped tin oxide (PFTO) host electrode, prepared from commercial FTO glass with a simple anodic treatment, to form the sensing electrode for hydrogen peroxide. The SnFe2 O4 NCs-loaded PFTO electrode exhibited an ultra-high sensitivity of 1027 mA m(-1)  cm(-2) toward hydrogen peroxide, outperforming Pt NCs-loaded PFTO electrodes. The SnFe2 O4 NCs-loaded PFTO electrode proved a promising relatively low cost, high performance sensing electrode for hydrogen peroxide. PMID:27346720

  20. HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR THE PARTIAL-OXYGENATION OF SATURATED HYDROCARBONS WITH HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of catalysts with the capacity to activate green oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, can offer an environmentally sound pathway for hydrocarbon oxidation. Furthermore, by including the concepts of green chemistry and pollution prevention one ...

  1. The in vivo infusion of hydrogen peroxide induces oxidative stress and differentially affects the activities of small intestinal carbohydrate digestive enzymes in the neonatal pig.

    PubMed

    Lackeyram, D; Mine, Y; Widowski, T; Archbold, T; Fan, M Z

    2012-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by persistent and relapsing fatigue that involves oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that a decrease in key carbohydrate-digesting enzyme activity in the gut is one of the major biological mechanisms of developing CFS in liquid formula-fed neonatal pigs with in vivo infusion of H(2)O(2). Piglets at 7 to 10 d of age were fitted with an intraperitoneal catheter, allowed a 3-d post surgical recovery, and infused with either H(2)O(2) at 5 mmol/kg BW (PER; n = 8) or the same volume of saline (CON; n = 8) in six 20-ml doses daily for a period of 10 d. During this period, animal behavior was monitored, blood samples collected, and jejunal enzyme activity kinetic experiments for lactase, sucrase, maltase, and maltase-glucoamylase were conducted. Plasma concentration of reduced glutathione remained similar (P > 0.05) to the pre-infusion level over the study duration in the CON group whereas this was 65% lower (P < 0.05) than the pre-infusion level in the PER group. Piglets experiencing oxidative stress had an overall lower (P < 0.05) physical mobility and the maximal jejunal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] for lactase (PER, 6.54 ± 0.68 vs. CON, 12.65 ± 0.69) and maltase (PER, 57.39 ± 1.02 vs. CON, 75.60 ± 1.04), respectively. However, differences were not observed (P > 0.05) in the maximal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] of sucrase (PER, 10.50 ± 1.37 vs. CON, 12.40 ± 1.55) and maltase-glucoamylase (PER, 0.71 ± 0.08 vs. CON, 0.70 ± 0.07) between the 2 groups. In conclusion, infusion of a suitable dose of H(2)O(2) induced CFS in the neonatal pigs. Oxidative stress in vivo differentially affected the maximal activities of important small intestinal carbohydrate-digesting enzymes in neonatal pigs fed a dairy milk-based liquid formula. PMID:23365398

  2. Developing Planetary Protection Technology: Recurrence of Hydrogen Peroxide Resistant Microbes from Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, M. J.; Chen, F.; Quigley, M. S.; Pillai, S.; Kern, R.; Venkateswaran, K.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide vapor is currently the sterilant-of-choice for flight hardware because it is a low-heat sterilization process suitable for use with various spacecraft components. Hydrogen peroxide is a strong oxidizing agent that produces hydroxyl free radicals ( .OH) which attack essential cell components, including lipids, proteins, and DNA. Planetary protection research efforts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are focused on developing cleaning and sterilization technologies for spacecraft preparation prior to launch. These efforts include research to assess the microbial diversity of spacecraft assembly areas and any extreme characteristics these microbes might possess. Previous studies have shown that some heat-tolerant Bacillus species isolated from the JPL Spacecraft Assembly Facility (SAF) are resistant to recommended hydrogen peroxide vapor sterilization exposures. A Bacillus species, which was related to a hydrogen peroxide resistant strain, was repeatedly isolated from various locations in the JPL-SAF. This species was found in both unclassified (entrance floors, ante-room, and air-lock) and classified (class 100K) (floors, cabinet tops, and air) areas. The phylogenetic affiliation of these strains was carried out using biochemical tests and 16S rDNA sequencing. The 16S rDNA analysis showed >99% sequence similarity to Bacillus pumilus. In order to understand the epidemiology of these strains, a more highly evolved gene (topoisomerase II β -subunit, gyrB) was also sequenced. Among 4 clades, one cluster, comprised of 3 strains isolated from the air-lock area, tightly aligned with the B. pumilus ATCC 7061 type strain (97%). The gyrB sequence similarity of this clade was only 91% with the 3 other clades. The genetic relatedness of these strains, as per pulse field gel electrophoresis patterns, will be presented. The vegetative cells and spores of a number of isolates were tested for their hydrogen peroxide resistance. Cells and spores were

  3. Electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide: selective oxidation reactions in perfluorinated alcohol solvents.

    PubMed

    Neimann, K; Neumann, R

    2000-09-01

    [reaction; see text] The catalytic electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide with transition metal compounds toward reaction with nucleophiles is a matter of very significant research and practical interest. We have now found that use of perfluorinated alcoholic solvents such as 1,1, 1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol in the absence of catalysts allowed electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide toward epoxidation of alkenes and the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of ketones. PMID:10964384

  4. Safety issues of high-concentrated hydrogen peroxide production used as rocket propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romantsova, O. V.; Ulybin, V. B.

    2015-04-01

    The article dwells on the possibility of production of high-concentrated hydrogen peroxide with the Russian technology of isopropyl alcohol autoxidation. Analysis of fire/explosion hazards and reasons of insufficient quality is conducted for the technology. Modified technology is shown. Non-standard fire/explosion characteristics required for integrated fire/explosion hazards rating for modified hydrogen peroxide production based on the autoxidation of isopropyl alcohol are defined.

  5. Efficacy of hydrogen peroxide to control saprolegniasis on channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Valentine, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Crawford, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide to control mortality associated with saprolegniasis in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) eggs was evaluated at the Lost Valley State Fish Hatchery (Warsaw, MO). Two efficacy trials were conducted. In Trial 1, channel catfish eggs in their natural gelatinous matrix were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0, 500, and 750 mg l(-1). Channel catfish eggs in Trial 2 had the gelatinous matrix removed before treatment with hydrogen peroxide at 0 and 500 mg l(-1). Each treatment regimen was tested in triplicate and each egg jar contained similar to 17,400 eggs. Hydrogen peroxide was administered as a 15-min flow-through treatment applied once daily for a total of six applications. Control jars were similarly treated with culture water. Samples of exposure water were collected during each treatment and analyzed to verify actual treatment concentrations. Hydrogen peroxide treatment efficacy was assessed by comparing the percent egg hatch in the treatment group to the untreated control group in each trial. Mean percent hatch in Trial I was 44% (control), 54% (500 mg l(-1)), and 69% (750 mg l(-1)). Hydrogen peroxide treatment at either 500 or 750 mg l(-1) significantly (P<0.01) increased the percent hatch compared to the untreated control group. In Trial 2, hydrogen peroxide treatment at 500 mg l(-1) significantly (P<0.01) increased the percent egg hatch (67%) relative to the untreated controls (57%). Hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced egg mortality and increased the percent hatch of channel catfish eggs regardless of whether eggs were incubated in the gelatinous matrix or without the matrix in comparison to the untreated control. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cerebral arterial gas embolism after pre-flight ingestion of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Ben L; Gault, Alan; Gawthrope, Ian C

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is a feared complication of ambient depressurisation and can also be a complication of hydrogen peroxide ingestion. We present an unusual case of CAGE in a 57-year-old woman exposed to both of these risk factors. We describe her subsequent successful treatment with hyperbaric oxygen, despite a 72-hour delay in initial presentation and diagnosis, and discuss the safety of aero-medical transfer following hydrogen peroxide ingestions. PMID:27335000

  7. Strategies for designing supported gold-palladium bimetallic catalysts for the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer K; Freakley, Simon J; Carley, Albert F; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-03-18

    Hydrogen peroxide is a widely used chemical but is not very efficient to make in smaller than industrial scale. It is an important commodity chemical used for bleaching, disinfection, and chemical manufacture. At present, manufacturers use an indirect process in which anthraquinones are sequentially hydrogenated and oxidized in a manner that hydrogen and oxygen are never mixed. However, this process is only economic at a very large scale producing a concentrated product. For many years, the identification of a direct process has been a research goal because it could operate at the point of need, producing hydrogen peroxide at the required concentration for its applications. Research on this topic has been ongoing for about 100 years. Until the last 10 years, catalyst design was solely directed at using supported palladium nanoparticles. These catalysts require the use of bromide and acid to arrest peroxide decomposition, since palladium is a very active catalyst for hydrogen peroxide hydrogenation. Recently, chemists have shown that supported gold nanoparticles are active when gold is alloyed with palladium because this leads to a significant synergistic enhancement in activity and importantly selectivity. Crucially, bimetallic gold-based catalysts do not require the addition of bromide and acids, but with carbon dioxide as a diluent its solubility in the reaction media acts as an in situ acid promoter, which represents a greener approach for peroxide synthesis. The gold catalysts can operate under intrinsically safe conditions using dilute hydrogen and oxygen, yet these catalysts are so active that they can generate peroxide at commercially significant rates. The major problem associated with the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide concerns the selectivity of hydrogen usage, since in the indirect process this factor has been finely tuned over decades of operation. In this Account, we discuss how the gold-palladium bimetallic catalysts have active sites for the

  8. Water disinfection with the hydrogen peroxide-ascorbic acid-copper (II) system.

    PubMed Central

    Ragab-Depre, N J

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of secondary effluents with hydrogen peroxide (10 mg/liter)-ascorbic acid (10 mg/liter)-Cu2+ (0.5 mg/liter) for 60 min resulted in around 99% reduction of the initial plate count. Hydrogen peroxide could be replaced by other peroxygen compounds; ascorbic acid could be replaced by other reducing agents, of which sodium sulfite and ethanol were the most effective. Cu2+, however, could not be replaced by other metal ions without loss of bactericidal efficiency of the ternary combination. Enterobacteriaceae, total and fecal coliforms, staphylococci, and micrococci were reduced by 99.0 to 99.9%. Group D streptococci aerobic spores were reduced by 80 and 15%, respectively. Clostridium perfringens, yeasts, and molds were not killed by the disinfectant combinations. The effect of pH was only minor in the range from 6 to 7.5. At a higher pH value the bactericidal effects tended to decrease. The hydrogen peroxide-ascorbic acid-Cu2+ combination made it possible to obtain 99% reduction within 30 min. When using the hydrogen peroxide-sodium sulfite-Cu2+ or the hydrogen peroxide-ethanol-Cu2+ combinations, 60 min of contact time was necessary to obtain 99% reduction of the initial plate count. Cu2+ combined to an intermediate product of the ascorbic acid autoxidation is the toxic agent, and its penetration into the cell is promoted by hydrogen peroxide. PMID:7138000

  9. Sensitive hydrogen peroxide content measurement technology using refractive-index-based optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bao-jin; Ying, Chao-Fu; Ye, Hui-qun; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Yun-Tao

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring of water quality is essential to modern life. Not only is it a major factor in safeguarding public health, high quality freshwater is also a key input in agriculture and many industrial process. A preliminary prototype for hydrogen peroxide content in water is setup and introduced. Based on the detection of beam deviation due to the refractive index changes of the aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution, hydrogen peroxide content can be measured by a position-sensitive detector. Measurement principle is theoretically described. Experimental results indicate the feasibility of the developed system. Not like intensity-modulated refractive index sensor which necessitates a stable light source, this sensor exploits the beam deviation due to optical refraction at the receiving end face of the measurement cell, which is caused by changes in refractive index with different hydrogen peroxide content in water. Hydrogen peroxide content measurement resolution can reach about 0.01% within the measurement range from distilled water to hydrogen peroxide content of 30%.

  10. In situ oxidation remediation technologies: kinetic of hydrogen peroxide decomposition on soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Romero, Arturo; Santos, Aurora; Vicente, Fernando; Rodriguez, Sergio; Lafuente, A Lopez

    2009-10-30

    Rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition were investigated in soils slurries. The interaction soil-hydrogen peroxide was studied using a slurry system at 20 degrees C and pH 7. To determine the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, several experiments were carried out with two soils with different SOM content (S1=15.1%, S2=10%). The influence of the oxidant dosage ([H2O2](o) from 10 to 30 g L(-1) and soil weight to liquid phase volume ratio=500 g L(-1)) was investigated using the two calcareous loamy sand soil samples. The results showed a rate dependency on both SOM and hydrogen peroxide concentration being the H2O2 decomposition rate over soil surface described by a second-order kinetic expression r(H2O2) = -dn(H2O2) / W(SOM) dt = kC(H2O2) C(SOM). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to evaluate the effect caused by the application of this oxidant on the SOM content. It was found a slightly increase of SOM content after treatment with hydrogen peroxide, probably due to the incorporation of oxygen from the oxidant (hydrogen peroxide). PMID:19520509

  11. Acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to selected lifestages of cold-, cool-, and warmwater fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Rach, J.J.; Ramsay, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery personnel depend on therapeutant treatments to control diseases. Currently, hatchery managers in the United States are limited to one approved therapeutant (formalin) and three compounds of Low Regulatory Priority (sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid) to control external diseases of cultured fish. Hydrogen peroxide has been used to effectively control external columnaris and bacterial gill disease in rainbow trout, however, definitive safe treatment concentrations for hydrogen peroxide are lacking for a variety of species. We report the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to 11 species of fry and 13 species of fingerling freshwater fish. Most mortality occurred within the first 30 h after the first exposure to hydrogen peroxide with little change in the overall shape of survival curves over time. Our data predict that in an actual therapeutic application of hydrogen peroxide, most treatment-related mortalities would be observed shortly after the initial exposure. Coolwater species were more sensitive than coldwater species but were generally similar to warmwater species tested. Based on our mortality data, coldwater species and largemouth bass may be treated for 60 min at concentrations of ??? 150 ??l/l without harmful effects; all muskellunge, walleye, bluegill, channel catfish, yellow perch, pallid sturgeon fingerlings, fathead minnow fingerlings, white sucker fingerlings, and northern pike fry may be treated for 60 min at ??? 100 ??l/l; and northern pike fingerlings and white sucker, yellow perch and fathead minnow fry may be treated for 60 min at ??? 50 ??l/l.

  12. Acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to selected lifestages of cold-, cool-, and warmwater fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Rach, Jeffery J.; Ramsay, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery personnel depend on therapeutant treatments to control diseases. Currently, hatchery managers in the United States are limited to one approved therapeutant (formalin) and three compounds of Low Regulatory Priority (sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid) to control external diseases of cultured fish. Hydrogen peroxide has been used to effectively control external columnaris and bacterial gill disease in rainbow trout, however, definitive safe treatment concentrations for hydrogen peroxide are lacking for a variety of species. We report the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to 11 species of fry and 13 species of fingerling freshwater fish. Most mortality occurred within the first 30 h after the first exposure to hydrogen peroxide with little change in the overall shape of survival curves over time. Our data predict that in an actual therapeutic application of hydrogen peroxide, most treatment-related mortalities would be observed shortly after the initial exposure. Coolwater species were more sensitive than coldwater species but were generally similar to warmwater species tested. Based on our mortality data, coldwater species and largemouth bass may be treated for 60 min at concentrations of ≤ 150 (μl/1 without harmful effects; all muskellunge, walleye, bluegill, channel catfish, yellow perch, pallid sturgeon fingerlings, fathead minnow fingerlings, white sucker fingerlings, and northern pike fry may be treated for 60 min at ≤ 100 μl/l; and northern pike fingerlings and white sucker, yellow perch and fathead minnow fry may be treated for 60 min at ≤ 50μl/l.

  13. Can an LED-laser hybrid light help to decrease hydrogen peroxide concentration while maintaining effectiveness in teeth bleaching?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, J.; Ovies, N.; Cisternas, P.; Fernández, E.; Oliveira Junior, O. B.; de Andrade, M. F.; Moncada, G.; Vildósola, P.

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bleaching efficacy of 35% hydrogen peroxide and 15% hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide catalysed by an LED-laser hybrid light. We studied 70 patients randomized to two groups. Tooth shade and pulpal sensitivity were registered. Group 1: 15% hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide. Group 2: 35% hydrogen peroxide. Both groups were activated by an LED-laser light. No significant differences were seen in shade change immediately, one week or one month after treatment (p > 0.05). Differences were seen in pulpal sensitivity (p < 0.05). The use of an LED-laser hybrid light to activate 15% hydrogen peroxide gel with N_TiO2 permits decreasing the peroxide concentration with similar aesthetic results and less pulpal sensitivity than using 35% hydrogen peroxide for bleaching teeth.

  14. Molecular and Cellular Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Human Lung Cancer Cells: Potential Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a very high mortality-to-incidence ratio, representing one of the main causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Therefore, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Several diseases including lung cancer have been associated with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most studied. Despite the fact that H2O2 may have opposite effects on cell proliferation depending on the concentration and cell type, it triggers several antiproliferative responses. H2O2 produces both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions, increases the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and increases p53 activity and other transcription factors orchestrating cancer cell death. In addition, H2O2 facilitates the endocytosis of oligonucleotides, affects membrane proteins, induces calcium release, and decreases cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the MAPK pathway and the expression of genes related to inflammation including interleukins, TNF-α, and NF-κB are also affected by H2O2. Herein, we will summarize the main effects of hydrogen peroxide on human lung cancer leading to suggesting it as a potential therapeutic tool to fight this disease. Because of the multimechanistic nature of this molecule, novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer based on the use of H2O2 may help to decrease the mortality from this malignancy. PMID:27375834

  15. Molecular and Cellular Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Human Lung Cancer Cells: Potential Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Vilema-Enríquez, Gabriela; Arroyo, Aurora; Grijalva, Marcelo; Amador-Zafra, Ricardo Israel; Camacho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a very high mortality-to-incidence ratio, representing one of the main causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Therefore, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Several diseases including lung cancer have been associated with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most studied. Despite the fact that H2O2 may have opposite effects on cell proliferation depending on the concentration and cell type, it triggers several antiproliferative responses. H2O2 produces both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions, increases the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and increases p53 activity and other transcription factors orchestrating cancer cell death. In addition, H2O2 facilitates the endocytosis of oligonucleotides, affects membrane proteins, induces calcium release, and decreases cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the MAPK pathway and the expression of genes related to inflammation including interleukins, TNF-α, and NF-κB are also affected by H2O2. Herein, we will summarize the main effects of hydrogen peroxide on human lung cancer leading to suggesting it as a potential therapeutic tool to fight this disease. Because of the multimechanistic nature of this molecule, novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer based on the use of H2O2 may help to decrease the mortality from this malignancy. PMID:27375834

  16. Low-Toxicity Reactive Hypergolic Fuels for Use with Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. K.; Rusek, J. J.

    2004-10-01

    The need for low toxicity hypergolic fuels has brought rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) to the forefront as the oxidizer of choice for future hypergolic systems. The search for a hypergolic mate for RGHP has been primarily focused on using transition metal salts dissolved in energetic liquids to create hypergolic fuels. These dissolved salts catalytically decompose RGHP on contact, producing heated oxygen and steam which ignite the remainder of the fuel. The use of transition metal salts in these fuels is therefore necessary to induce hypergolicity, but these compounds reduce the specific impulse of these fuels due to the presence of high molecular weight transition metal oxides in the exhaust. Reactive hypergolic fuels can eliminate this problem by using light metal hydrides dissolved in energetic liquids for fuels. These metal hydrides combust directly with RGHP upon contact and ignite the remainder of the fuel. Due to the low atomic weights of the metals used, these metal hydrides can enhance the specific impulse of such fuels instead of degrading the performance as transitional metal salts do. Tests of such reactive fuels are promising and indicate that fuels of this type can be successful hypergolic fuels for use with hydrogen peroxide.

  17. Identification of hydrogen peroxide as a major cytotoxic component in Maillard reaction mixtures and coffee.

    PubMed

    Hegele, Jörg; Münch, Gerald; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2009-06-01

    The cytotoxic activity of Maillard reaction products and coffee was studied using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the neutral red uptake (NRU) assay. Equimolar mixtures of sugars and lysine were heated at 120 degrees C and used to stimulate bovine aorta endothelial cells for 24 h. The cytotoxic activity increased with increase in educt concentration and heating time. Mixtures containing ribose were most active, followed by lactose and glucose. Hydrogen peroxide, which was present in the Maillard mixtures in concentrations between 7 and 87 microM, was identified as one of their major cytotoxic components. H2O2-concentrations increased further up to 130 microM under cell culture conditions. Filter coffee, espresso, and green coffee extract reduced cell viability significantly to 10, 19, and 83% of PBS-treated control. The effect was largely attenuated by the addition of catalase. Nil, 33, and 41 microM H2O2 was measured in green coffee extract, filter coffee, and espresso, respectively, increasing to 13, 369, and 333 microM during cell culture conditions. No additional H2O2 formation was detected when coffee was incubated for up to 5 h without further treatment. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide is a major product in Maillard mixtures and coffee inducing cell death in vitro. PMID:19199286

  18. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  19. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Stephen A; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B; Gibson, L. Lee; Bartram, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  20. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  1. Photochemistry of hydrogen peroxide in Kr and Xe matrixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Pettersson, Mika; Jolkkonen, Santtu; Pehkonen, Susanna; Räsänen, Markku

    2000-02-01

    UV photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in various rare-gas matrixes is comparatively studied. The photorecovery of H2O2 from the tight H2O⋯O complex is observed in Kr and Xe matrixes, in addition to this reaction in an Ar matrix found previously. The similarity of spectral position and efficiency of the photorecovery reaction in various rare-gas solids indicates its fundamental character, supports charge-transfer excitation of H2O⋯O as its origin, and preserves promises to find this photoreaction in media of environmental importance. In UV photolysis of H2O2, the relatively small concentration of isolated OH radicals is found in a Kr matrix, and no OH radicals appear in a Xe matrix, and this trend is discussed in terms of delayed cage exit. Moreover, additional species photogenerated from H2O2 in a Xe matrix as well as the absence of OH radicals might be connected with participation of some hidden intermediates (HOXeOH, HXeOOH, etc.) in the dynamics, thus, catalyzing new photodissociation channels. Among the photolysis products, the loose H2O//O complex is suggested to be stabilized in Kr and Xe matrixes. This loosely bound complex is quasistable and decomposes at relatively low temperatures (below 20 K) quantitatively forming the known tight H2O⋯O structure. This low-temperature process offers one additional example of short-range atomic mobility introduced recently in the literature.

  2. Necessity of OxyR for the hydrogen peroxide stress response and full virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cruz, Zomary; Allen, Caitilyn

    2011-09-01

    The plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt disease, is exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during tomato infection and expresses diverse oxidative stress response (OSR) genes during midstage disease on tomato. The R. solanacearum genome predicts that the bacterium produces multiple and redundant ROS-scavenging enzymes but only one known oxidative stress response regulator, OxyR. An R. solanacearum oxyR mutant had no detectable catalase activity, did not grow in the presence of 250 μM hydrogen peroxide, and grew poorly in the oxidative environment of solid rich media. This phenotype was rescued by the addition of exogenous catalase, suggesting that oxyR is essential for the hydrogen peroxide stress response. Unexpectedly, the oxyR mutant strain grew better than the wild type in the presence of the superoxide generator paraquat. Gene expression studies indicated that katE, kaG, ahpC1, grxC, and oxyR itself were each differentially expressed in the oxyR mutant background and in response to hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that oxyR is necessary for hydrogen peroxide-inducible gene expression. Additional OSR genes were differentially regulated in response to hydrogen peroxide alone. The virulence of the oxyR mutant strain was significantly reduced in both tomato and tobacco host plants, demonstrating that R. solanacearum is exposed to inhibitory concentrations of ROS in planta and that OxyR-mediated responses to ROS during plant pathogenesis are important for R. solanacearum host adaptation and virulence. PMID:21803891

  3. Considerations for Storage of High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Utilizing Non-Metal Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Robin E.; Scott, Joseph P.; Wise, Harry

    2005-01-01

    When working with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, it is critical that the storage container be constructed of the proper materials, those which will not degrade to the extent that container breakdown or dangerous decomposition occurs. It has been suggested that the only materials that will safely contain the peroxide for a significant period of time are metals of stainless steel construction or aluminum use as High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Containers. The stability and decomposition of HTP will be also discussed as well as various means suggested in the literature to minimize these problems. The dangers of excess oxygen generation are also touched upon.

  4. Replacement of hydrogen peroxide cleaning with oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. E.

    1992-03-01

    Comparison between the standard peroxide cleaning method and an oxygen plasma modified version was run on thin film bond monitors. The plasma modified version substituted oxygen plasma for the peroxide cleaning step in the process and reduced the DI rinse water temperature from 75 C to 25 C. A direct surface cleanliness comparison was made between the two cleaning methods using Auger spectroscopy. A beam lead and ribbon bonding experiment was also run on plasma-cleaned networks. Results of both experiments indicate that plasma cleaning is superior to peroxide cleaning and that reliable bonding can be done on plasma-cleaned thin film networks.

  5. Mechanism of the formation of hydrogen tetroxide and peroxide via low-temperature interaction between hydrogen atoms and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanov, A. V.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Antipenko, E. E.; Lunin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    A mechanism and kinetic model for the synthesis of peroxide radical condensate via the low-temperature interaction of hydrogen atoms with O2 molecules is proposed. The main components of the reaction, hydrogen tetroxide H2O4 and hydrogen peroxide H2O2, are formed in a low-temperature liquid layer formed near the cold surface during synthesis. Molecules of H2O4 and H2O2 are stabilized by transitioning to the solid phase. The dependences of the ratio on the ratio of concentrations of H and O2 in the gas phase, calculated on the basis of the model, are consistent with the experimental data.

  6. Prediction of Severe Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia Using Cord Blood Hydrogen Peroxide: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hung-Chieh; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Chen, Chien-Yi; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2014-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that cord blood hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) could be utilized to predict the severity of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Methods We prospectively enrolled term or near-term healthy neonates. Cord blood and capillary blood at three days of age were measured for hydrogen peroxide and bilirubin concentrations. For newborns with hyperbilirubinemia, further blood samples were obtained at five and seven days of age. Newborns were divided into severe or less severe hyperbilirubinemic groups (peak bilirubin ≥17 mg/dL or not). The sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values were determined. Results There were 158 neonates enrolled. The incidence of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia was 30.5% for a concentration ≥15 mg/dl. The rising patterns were similar among bilirubin concentrations and hydrogen peroxide levels during the first few days of life. There was a strong positive correlation between bilirubin concentrations and hydrogen peroxide levels after correlation analysis. The rate of severe hyperbilirubinemia was 13.3%. It revealed that a cord blood hydrogen peroxide signal level of 2500 counts/10 seconds was an appropriate cut-off for predicting severe hyperbilirubinemia. Sensitivity and the negative predictive value were 76.2% and 93.3%, respectively. Conclusions Our findings confirm that hydrogen peroxide levels and bilirubin concentrations in cord and neonatal blood are closely related. A cord blood hydrogen peroxide level above 2500 counts/10 seconds associated with a high predictive value for severe hyperbilirubinemia. This method provides information about which neonate should be closely followed after discharge from the nursery. PMID:24466244

  7. Trends in Selective Hydrogen Peroxide Production on Transition Metal Surfaces from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Rees B.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.

    2012-10-19

    We present a comprehensive, Density Functional Theory-based analysis of the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, on twelve transition metal surfaces. We determine the full thermodynamics and selected kinetics of the reaction network on these metals, and we analyze these energetics with simple, microkinetically motivated rate theories to assess the activity and selectivity of hydrogen peroxide production on the surfaces of interest. By further exploiting Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationships and scaling relationships between the binding energies of different adsorbates, we express the results in the form of a two dimensional contour volcano plot, with the activity and selectivity being determined as functions of two independent descriptors, the atomic hydrogen and oxygen adsorption free energies. We identify both a region of maximum predicted catalytic activity, which is near Pt and Pd in descriptor space, and a region of selective hydrogen peroxide production, which includes Au. The optimal catalysts represent a compromise between activity and selectivity and are predicted to fall approximately between Au and Pd in descriptor space, providing a compact explanation for the experimentally known performance of Au-Pd alloys for hydrogen peroxide synthesis, and suggesting a target for future computational screening efforts to identify improved direct hydrogen peroxide synthesis catalysts. Related methods of combining activity and selectivity analysis into a single volcano plot may be applicable to, and useful for, other aqueous phase heterogeneous catalytic reactions where selectivity is a key catalytic criterion.

  8. Products of binary complex compounds thermolysis: Catalysts for hydrogen peroxide decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domonov, D. P.; Pechenyuk, S. I.; Gosteva, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    Samples are obtained via the thermolysis of binary complex compounds in a hydrogen atmosphere. Their catalytic activity in hydrogen peroxide decomposition is studied. The values of the rate constants and activation energies for the catalytic reaction are estimated. The correlation between catalytic activity, composition, specific surface area ( S sp), and particle size of the samples is analyzed.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  10. Chemokine-dependent T cell migration requires aquaporin-3–mediated hydrogen peroxide uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chikuma, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Kabashima, Kenji; Verkman, Alan S.; Inoue, Shintaro; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine-dependent trafficking is indispensable for the effector function of antigen-experienced T cells during immune responses. In this study, we report that the water/glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is expressed on T cells and regulates their trafficking in cutaneous immune reactions. T cell migration toward chemokines is dependent on AQP3-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) uptake but not the canonical water/glycerol transport. AQP3-mediated H2O2 transport is essential for the activation of the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 and the subsequent actin dynamics. Coincidentally, AQP3-deficient mice are defective in the development of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity, which is attributed to the impaired trafficking of antigen-primed T cells to the hapten-challenged skin. We therefore suggest that AQP3-mediated H2O2 uptake is required for chemokine-dependent T cell migration in sufficient immune response. PMID:22927550

  11. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Bruce R.; Shih, Kai-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 × 10-2 to 80 g kWh-1. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  12. Light and hydrogen peroxide inhibit C. elegans Feeding through gustatory receptor orthologs and pharyngeal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bhatla, Nikhil; Horvitz, H Robert

    2015-02-18

    While gustatory sensing of the five primary flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and savory) has been extensively studied, pathways that detect non-canonical taste stimuli remain relatively unexplored. In particular, while reactive oxygen species cause generalized damage to biological systems, no gustatory mechanism to prevent ingestion of such material has been identified in any organism. We observed that light inhibits C. elegans feeding and used light as a tool to uncover molecular and neural mechanisms for gustation. Light can generate hydrogen peroxide, and we discovered that hydrogen peroxide similarly inhibits feeding. The gustatory receptor family members LITE-1 and GUR-3 are required for the inhibition of feeding by light and hydrogen peroxide. The I2 pharyngeal neurons increase calcium in response to light and hydrogen peroxide, and these responses require GUR-3 and a conserved antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin PRDX-2. Our results demonstrate a gustatory mechanism that mediates the detection and blocks ingestion of a non-canonical taste stimulus, hydrogen peroxide. PMID:25640076

  13. Hydrogen peroxide is the most toxic oxygen species for Onchocerca cervicalis microfilariae.

    PubMed

    Callahan, H L; Crouch, R K; James, E R

    1990-06-01

    The toxicity of the active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen to microfilariae (mf) has been studied in vitro, using active oxygen-generating systems and scavengers/inhibitors. Mf viability was monitored by uptake of the radiolabel, [3H]2-deoxy-D-glucose. Hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen, but not superoxide radical or hydroxyl radical, are toxic for mf. Hydrogen peroxide was toxic for mf within 2 h at concentrations as low as 5 microM, an amount eosinophils have been shown to release in vitro (Weiss et al. 1986). Catalase and thiourea, but not inactivated catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), singlet oxygen scavengers, or hydroxyl radical scavengers, protected mf. Mf have relatively high levels of endogenous SOD but no measurable glutathione peroxidase and low levels of catalase when compared with other parasites (Callahan, Crouch & James, 1988). The low levels of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzymes correlate well with mf sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and the protective effect of exogenous catalase. PMID:2163503

  14. Light and hydrogen peroxide inhibit C. elegans feeding through gustatory receptor orthologs and pharyngeal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bhatla, Nikhil; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While gustatory sensing of the five primary flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and savory) has been extensively studied, pathways that detect non-canonical taste stimuli remain relatively unexplored. In particular, while reactive oxygen species cause generalized damage to biological systems, no gustatory mechanism to prevent ingestion of such material has been identified in any organism. We observed that light inhibits C. elegans feeding and used light as a tool to uncover molecular and neural mechanisms for gustation. Light can generate hydrogen peroxide, and we discovered that hydrogen peroxide similarly inhibits feeding. The gustatory receptor family members LITE-1 and GUR-3 are required for the inhibition of feeding by light and hydrogen peroxide. The I2 pharyngeal neurons increase calcium in response to light and hydrogen peroxide, and these responses require GUR-3 and a conserved antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin PRDX-2. Our results demonstrate a gustatory mechanism that mediates the detection and blocks ingestion of a non-canonical taste stimulus, hydrogen peroxide. PMID:25640076

  15. Converting Chemical Energy to Electricity through a Three-Jaw Mini-Generator Driven by the Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Wang, Lei; Ji, Fanqin; Shi, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity is one of the most important research advancements to come from the horizontal locomotion of small objects. Until now, the Marangoni effect has been the only propulsion method to produce the horizontal locomotion to induce an electromotive force, which is limited to a short duration because of the specific property of surfactants. To solve this issue, in this article we utilized the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide the propulsion for a sustainable energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity. We fabricated a mini-generator consisting of three parts: a superhydrophobic rotator with three jaws, three motors to produce a jet of oxygen bubbles to propel the rotation of the rotator, and three magnets integrated into the upper surface of the rotator to produce the magnet flux. Once the mini-generator was placed on the solution surface, the motor catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. This generated a large amount of oxygen bubbles that caused the generator and integrated magnets to rotate at the air/water interface. Thus, the magnets passed under the coil area and induced a change in the magnet flux, thus generating electromotive forces. We also investigated experimental factors, that is, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the turns of the solenoid coil, and found that the mini-generator gave the highest output in a hydrogen peroxide solution with a concentration of 10 wt % and under a coil with 9000 turns. Through combining the stable superhydrophobicity and catalyst, we realized electricity generation for a long duration, which could last for 26 000 s after adding H2O2 only once. We believe this work provides a simple process for the development of horizontal motion and provides a new path for energy reutilization. PMID:27093949

  16. Rapid determination of hydrogen peroxide in pulp bleaching effluents by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Chao; Jin, Hui-Jun; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2012-04-27

    A headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) method has been developed for the determination of residual hydrogen peroxide in pulp bleaching effluents. The method is based on the reaction of hydrogen peroxide and permanganate in an acidic medium (0.1 mol/L), in which hydrogen peroxide is quantitatively converted to oxygen within 10 min at 60°C in a sealed headspace sample vial. The released oxygen is then determined by GC equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. The method is robust, sensitive, and accurate, with reproducibility characterized by a relative standard deviation of <0.5%, a sensitivity whose limit of quantification (LOQ) is 0.96 μmol, and a demonstrated recovery ranging from 98 to 103%. Further, the method is simple, rapid, and automated. PMID:22444430

  17. [Continuous Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Water Containing Very Low Concentrations of Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine].

    PubMed

    Bruskov, V I; Yaguzhinsky, L S; Masalimov, Z K; Chernikov, A V; Emelyanenko, V I; Gudkov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Continuous generation of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by low concentrations of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (heptyl)--a rocket fuel component--in air saturated water was shown by the method of enhanced chemiluminescence in the system of luminol-p-iodophenol-peroxidase. The concentration dependence and the influence of heat and light on the formation of hydrogen peroxide in the water under the influence of dimethylhydrazine at concentrations considerably lower than maximum allowable concentrations were studied, and the physical-chemical mechanism of this process was considered. It is supposed that dimethylhydrazine at ultra-low concentrations is associated with air nanobubbles and represents a long-lived complex performing catalysis of hydrogen peroxide formation under the influence of heat and light. We put forward the new concept of.toxicity of dimethylhydrazine at very low concentrations due to violation of homeostasis of reactive oxygen species formation in aqueous solutions entering the body of humans and animals. PMID:26394466

  18. A novel aqueous dual-channel aluminum-hydrogen peroxide battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C. . Electric Propulsion); Licht, S. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    A dual-channel aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery is introduced with an open-circuit voltage of 1.9 volts, polarized losses of 0.9 mV cm[sup 2]/mA, and power densities of 1 W/cm[sup 2]. Catholyte and anolyte cell compartments are separated by an Ir/Pd modified porous nickel cathode. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode. The battery is expressed by aluminum oxidation and aqueous solution phase hydrogen peroxide reduction for an overall battery discharge consisting of 2Al + 3H[sub 2]O[sub 2] + 2 OH[sup [minus

  19. The study of hydrogen peroxide level under cisplatin action using genetically encoded sensor hyper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, A. S.; Orlova, A. G.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Brilkina, A. A.; Balalaeva, I. V.; Antonova, N. O.; Mishina, N. M.; Shakhova, N. M.; Belousov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the work was to study the participation of hydrogen peroxide in reaction of cervical cancer cell line HeLa Kyoto on cisplatin action. Determination of hydrogen peroxide level was performed using genetically encoded fluorescent sensor HyPer2. The dependence of cell viability on cisplatin concentration was determined using MTT assay. Mechanisms of cell death as well as HyPer2 reaction was revealed by flow cytometry after 6-hours of incubation with cisplatin in different concentrations. Cisplatin used in low concentrations had no effect on hydrogen peroxide level in HeLa Kyoto cells. Increase of HyPer2 fluorescence was detected only after exposure with cisplatin in high concentration. The reaction was not the consequence of cell death.

  20. Photopatternable and Photoactive Hydrogel for On-demand Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Shaun P.; Wang, Royal Y.; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Lam, Kit S.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Russell, Paul; Sun, Gang; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, largely mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a nearly ubiquitous component in complex biological processes such as aging and disease. Optimal in vitro methods used in elucidating disease mechanisms would deliver of low levels of hydrogen peroxide, emulating the in vivo pathological state, but current methods are limited by kinetic stability or accurate measurement of the dose administered. Here we present an in vitro platform that exploits anthraquinone catalysts for the photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide. This system can be dynamically tuned to provide constant generation of hydrogen peroxide at a desired physiologic rate over at least 14 days and is described using a kinetic model. Material characterization and stability is discussed along with a proof-of-concept in vitro study that assessed the viability of cells as they were oxidatively challenged over 24 h at different ROS generation rates. PMID:24290809

  1. Pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, A.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Pretreatment of the agrocellulosic waste, cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide greatly enhances its susceptibility to enzymatic cellulolysis and thus the ethanol production from it. Various process conditions have been studied to optimize the enzymate effectiveness. These conditions include the contact time, the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the pretreatment temperature. Results obtained show, that about 50% of lignin and most of hemicellulose content of can bagasse was solubilized, by 2% alkaline hydrogen peroxide at 30{sup 0}C within 8 h. The cellulose content was consequently increased from 42% in the original cane bagasse to 75% in the oxidized pulp. Saccharification of this pulp residue with cellulase from Trichorderma viride at 45{sup 0}C for 24 h, yielded glucose with 95% efficiency. The efficiency of ethanol production from the insoluble fraction with S. cervisiae was 90% compared to about 50% for untreated cane bagasse.

  2. Surface Passivation of CdZnTe Detector by Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, M.; Chen, H.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    The spectral resolution of room temperature nuclear radiation detectors such as CdZnTe is usually limited by the presence of conducting surface species that increase the surface leakage current. Studies have shown that the leakage current can be reduced by proper surface preparation. In this study, we try to optimize the performance of CdZnTe detector by etching the detector with hydrogen peroxide solution as function of concentration and etching time. The passivation effect that hydrogen peroxide introduces have been investigated by current-voltage (I-V) measurement on both parallel strips and metal-semiconductor-metal configurations. The improvements on the spectral response of Fe-55 and 241Am due to hydrogen peroxide treatment are presented and discussed.

  3. Ultrafast Shock Interrogation of Hydrogen Peroxide/Water Mixtures: Thermochemical Predictions of Shock Condition Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Michael; Bastea, Sorin; Carter, Jeffrey; Kuo, I.-F. William; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Grant, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a powerful oxidizer and its concentrated aqueous solutions exhibit very high reactivity, even sustaining detonation under strong enough confinement. Due to its simple composition and basic expected decomposition kinetics hydrogen peroxide is very suitable for studying the interplay of high pressures, temperatures and reactivity and their effect on the equation of state, particularly at the boundary between detonating and non-detonating behavior. To this end we performed speed of sound and picosecond time resolved shock measurements on solutions of hydrogen peroxide of concentrations from 30 to 90 percent, and analyzed the results in terms of common assumptions of chemical equilibrium in reactive fluid mixtures. Experimental shock states were achieved up to a maximum pressure of 20 GPa with corresponding shock velocities of 6-7 km/sec.

  4. Design of a hydrogen peroxide-activatable agent that specifically targets cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vadukoot, Anish K.; AbdulSalam, Safnas F.; Wunderlich, Mark; Pullen, Eboni D.; Landero-Figueroa, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Some cancers, like acute myeloid leukemia (AML), use reactive oxygen species to endogenously activate cell proliferation and angiogenic signaling cascades. Thus many cancers display increases in reactive oxygen like hydrogen peroxide concentrations. To translate this finding into a therapeutic strategy we designed new hydrogen peroxide-activated agents with two key molecular pharmacophores. The first pharmacophore is a peroxide-acceptor and the second is a pendant amine. The acceptor is an N-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)acetamide susceptible to hydrogen peroxide oxidation. We hypothesized that selectivity between AML and normal cells could be achieved by tuning the pendant amine. Synthesis and testing of fourteen compounds that differed at the pendent amine led to the identification of an agent (14) with 2 μM activity against AML cancer cells and an eleven fold-lower activity in healthy CD34+ blood stem cells. Interestingly, analysis shows that upon oxidation the pendant amine cyclizes, ejecting water, with the acceptor to give a bicyclic compound capable of reacting with nucleophiles. Preliminary mechanistic investigations show that AML cells made from addition of two oncogenes (NrasG12D and MLL-AF9) increase the ROS-status, is initially an anti-oxidant as hydrogen peroxide is consumed to activate the pro-drug, and cells respond by upregulating electrophilic defense as visualized by western blotting of KEAP1. Thus, using this chemical approach we have obtained a simple, potent, and selective ROS-activated anti-AML agent. PMID:25464887

  5. Sphingosine induces the aggregation of imine-containing peroxidized vesicles.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Viguera, Ana R; Collado, M Isabel; Sims, Kacee H; Constance, Chad; Hill, Kasey; Shaw, Walt A; Goñi, Félix M; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-08-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of many diseases like atherosclerosis and multiple sclerosis. We have analyzed the interaction of sphingosine with peroxidized bilayers in model membranes. Cu(2+) induced peroxidation was checked following UV absorbance at 245nm, and also using the novel Avanti snoopers®. Mass spectrometry confirms the oxidation of phospholipid unsaturated chains. Our results show that sphingosine causes aggregation of Cu(2+)-peroxidized vesicles. We observed that aggregation is facilitated by the presence of negatively-charged phospholipids in the membrane, and inhibited by anti-oxidants e.g. BHT. Interestingly, long-chain alkylamines (C18, C16) but not their short-chain analogues (C10, C6, C1) can substitute sphingosine as promoters of vesicle aggregation. Furthermore, sphinganine but not sphingosine-1-phosphate can mimic this effect. Formation of imines in the membrane upon peroxidation was detected by (1)H-NMR and it appeared to be necessary for the aggregation effect. (31)P-NMR spectroscopy reveals that sphingosine facilitates formation of non-lamellar phase in parallel with vesicle aggregation. The data might suggest a role for sphingosine in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:24802275

  6. Hydrogen peroxide-dependent 4-t-butylphenol hydroxylation by tyrosinase--a new catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M; García-Carmona, F

    1996-09-13

    The aim of this work was to study the hydroxylation by tyrosinase of 4-t-butylphenol to 4-t-butylcatechol, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. This hydroxylation reaction does not take place without the addition of hydrogen peroxide. Some properties of this new hydroxylating activity have been analysed. The kinetic parameters of mushroom tyrosinase for hydrogen peroxide (K(m) = 4.9 mM, V(m) = 48.1 microM/min) and 4-t-butylphenol (K(m) = 16 microM/min, V(m) = 6.7 microM/min) were evaluated. A lag period appeared, which was similar to the characteristic lag of monophenolase activity at the expense of molecular oxygen. The length of the lag phase decreased with increasing hydrogen peroxide concentrations but was longer with higher 4-t-butylphenol concentrations. The pH optimum for this hydroxylating activity was close to 5.5. The lag also varied with pH, reaching its highest value at pH 4.8. The lag was shortened by the addition of increasing amounts of 4-t-butylcatechol, and was abolished at 24.5 microM of 4-t-butylcatechol. 4-t-Butylphenol was oxidized by mushroom tyrosinase in the presence of 24.5 microM 4-t-butylcatechol and in the absence of hydrogen peroxide although the enzymatic activity tailed off. The presence of hydrogen peroxide is necessary to maintain a constant steady-state rate of 4-t-butylphenol oxidation by tyrosinase. PMID:8841378

  7. Electrochemically produced hydrogen peroxide affects Joliot-type oxygen-evolution measurements of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Pham, Long Vo; Messinger, Johannes

    2014-09-01

    The main technique employed to characterize the efficiency of water-splitting in photosynthetic preparations in terms of miss and double hit parameters and for the determination of Si (i=2,3,0) state lifetimes is the measurement of flash-induced oxygen oscillation pattern on bare platinum (Joliot-type) electrodes. We demonstrate here that this technique is not innocent. Polarization of the electrode against an Ag/AgCl electrode leads to a time-dependent formation of hydrogen peroxide by two-electron reduction of dissolved oxygen continuously supplied by the flow buffer. While the miss and double hit parameters are almost unaffected by H₂O₂, a time dependent reduction of S1 to S₋₁ occurs over a time period of 20 min. The S1 reduction can be largely prevented by adding catalase or by removing O₂ from the flow buffer with N₂. Importantly, we demonstrate that even at the shortest possible polarization times (40s in our set up) the S₂ and S₀ decays are significantly accelerated by the side reaction with H₂O₂. The removal of hydrogen peroxide leads to unperturbed S₂ state data that reveal three instead of the traditionally reported two phases of decay. In addition, even under the best conditions (catalase+N₂; 40s polarization) about 4% of S₋₁ state is observed in well dark-adapted samples, likely indicating limitations of the equal fit approach. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. PMID:24486444

  8. Caged mitochondrial uncouplers that are released in response to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Quin, Caroline; Robertson, Linsey; McQuaker, Stephen J; Price, Nicholas C; Brand, Martin D; Hartley, Richard C

    2010-03-27

    Caged versions of the most common mitochondrial uncouplers (proton translocators) have been prepared that sense the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide to release the uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) from caged states with second order rate constants of 10 (+/-0.8) M(-1) s(-1) and 64.8 (+/-0.6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The trigger mechanism involves conversion of an arylboronate into a phenol followed by fragmentation. Hydrogen peroxide-activated uncouplers may be useful for studying the biological process of ageing. PMID:20418941

  9. Caged mitochondrial uncouplers that are released in response to hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Quin, Caroline; Robertson, Linsey; McQuaker, Stephen J.; Price, Nicholas C.; Brand, Martin D.; Hartley, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Caged versions of the most common mitochondrial uncouplers (proton translocators) have been prepared that sense the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide to release the uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) from caged states with second order rate constants of 10 (±0.8) M−1 s−1 and 64.8 (±0.6) M−1 s−1, respectively. The trigger mechanism involves conversion of an arylboronate into a phenol followed by fragmentation. Hydrogen peroxide-activated uncouplers may be useful for studying the biological process of ageing. PMID:20418941

  10. Transformation of wood during ozonization in the presence of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Abrosimova, G. E.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Lunin, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Samples of ozonized aspen wood pretreated with hydrogen peroxide solutions of various concentrations are investigated by UV diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray structural analysis. The general course of wood transformation under the action of the O3/H2O2 system is associated with the destruction of lignin and oxidation of carbohydrates, raising the fraction of the crystalline phase in a lignocarbohydrate material. The possibility of varying the depth of the chemical and structural transformation of the substrate upon changing the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the O3/H2O2 system is demonstrated.

  11. Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 by using the synergistic effect of hydrogen peroxide and gamma radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, U D; Govindarajan, P; Dave, P J

    1989-01-01

    Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 was studied by using gamma radiation and hydrogen peroxide. A 100-krad dose of gamma radiation was sufficient to inactivate 50 micrograms of aflatoxin B1 in the presence of 5% hydrogen peroxide, and 400 krad was required for total degradation of 100 micrograms of aflatoxin in the same system. Degradation of aflatoxin B1 was confirmed by high-pressure liquid chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic analysis. Ames microsomal mutagenicity test showed loss of aflatoxin activity. This method of detoxification also reduces the toxin levels effectively in artificially contaminated groundnuts. Images PMID:2497710

  12. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  13. Artificial photosynthesis for production of hydrogen peroxide and its fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-01

    The reducing power released from photosystem I (PSI) via ferredoxin enables the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, which is essential in the Calvin-Benson cycle to make sugars in photosynthesis. Alternatively, PSI can reduce O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide as a fuel. This article describes the artificial version of the photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from water and O2 using solar energy. Hydrogen peroxide is used as a fuel in hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to make electricity. The combination of the photocatalytic H2O2 production from water and O2 using solar energy with one-compartment H2O2 fuel cells provides on-site production and usage of H2O2 as a more useful and promising solar fuel than hydrogen. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26365231

  14. [The effect of cadmium chloride and hydrogen peroxide on the lipid peroxidation and fractional composition of lipids in hepatocytes of rats].

    PubMed

    Borikov, O Iu; Kaliman, P A

    2004-01-01

    The isolated hepatocytes were incubated in the medium, containing cadmium chloride or hydrogen peroxide. Influence of the latter on the intensity of lipid peroxidation and contents of some lipids fractions, as well as viability of hepatocytes in these conditions has been studied. It is shown that under such cultivation conditions the activation of lipid peroxidation in the hepatocytes takes place. Its activation in presence of cadmium chloride was one of the factors of the membranes damage. The changes in the content of some fractions of lipids were similar both under the incubations of the cells with cadmium chloride and hydrogen peroxide. This allows one to suppose that cadmium chloride causes changes in the lipid composition of membranes as a result of intensification of lipid peroxidation. PMID:15915720

  15. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  16. Study of use of different types of hydrogen peroxides (2006-2008).

    PubMed

    Vissers, Marc; Van Parys, Pieter; Audenaert, Joachim; Kerger, Pierrot; De Windt, Wim; Dick, Jan; Gobin, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxides are commonly used in greenhouses for cleaning purposes and disinfection of irrigation water systems, i.e., to prevent clogging by duckweed (Lemna minor), algae and other (micro)organisms. This use contains a potential risk of involuntary contact to the plants, e.g., to roots through irrigation or to the plant leaves through accidental droplets (spraying mist). To help growers to maximize disinfection with minimal risks, the efficacy and plant safety of a variety of commercial available peroxide formulations were compared, i.e., pure peroxide products, peroxide products with additives: Ag, performic acid, peracetic acid and sorbitol. Starting from pure (clean and without fertilizers) irrigation water the peroxides with Ag-stabilisers were most stable and most effective for algae prevention. In screenings for the curative effect on algae, duckweed and bacteria the best results were obtained with peroxide formulations with performic acid. In plant safety tests on potted Ficus benjamina, sprays and irrigations above the plants gave no toxicity till 500 ppm a.i.; irrigations below the plants didn't show toxicity but the plant growth was reduced with weekly applications of 2000 ppm a.i. On the contrary several applications were risky on herbaceous plants, sometimes even with very low dosages (12.5 ppm peroxide). PMID:20222582

  17. Coupling of Solar Energy to Hydrogen Peroxide Production in the Cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Roncel, Mercedes; Navarro, José A.; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide production by blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) under photoautotrophic conditions is of great interest as a model system for the bioconversion of solar energy. Our experimental system was based on the photosynthetic reduction of molecular oxygen with electrons from water by Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 as the biophotocatalyst and methyl viologen as a redox intermediate. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic conditions of the algae in their different growth stages strongly influence the capacity for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction, and so the initial formation rate and net peroxide yield became maximum in the mid-log phase of growth. The overall process can be optimized in the presence of certain metabolic inhibitors such as iodoacetamide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, as well as by permeabilization of the cellular membrane after drastic temperature changes and by immobilization of the cells in inert supports such as agar and alginate. PMID:16347855

  18. Use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet agar plates for selective recovery of bacteriophages from natural environments

    SciTech Connect

    Asghari, A.; Farrah, S.R.; Bitton, G. )

    1992-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide inactivated bacteriophages and bacteria at different rates. A concentration of 0.1% hydrogen peroxide reduced the numbers of several bacteria by an average of 94% but caused an average of 25% inactivation in the numbers of bacteriophages tested. Treating natural samples with hydrogen peroxide selectively reduced the indigenous bacterial flora and permitted better visualization of plaques of lawns of Escherichia coli C-3000. In some cases indigenous gram-positive bacteria were relatively resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but their growth could be limited by incorporation of crystal violet into the bottom agar used for plaque assays. The use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet-containing plates permitted recovery of more phages from natural samples than did other procedures, such as chloroform pretreatment or the use of selective plating agar such as EC medium.

  19. Antitumor effect of synergistic contribution of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Mizuno, Masaaki; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPP) have been attracted attention in the noble application of cancer therapy. Although good effects of the Plasma-Activated-Medium (PAM) such as the selective antitumor effect and killing effect for the anticancer agent resistant cells were reported, a mechanism of this effect has not been still clarified yet. In this study, we have investigated a contribution of the reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) generated in PAM such as hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. Those species generated in the PAM quantitatively measured by light absorbance of commercial regent. Moreover, viable cell count after cell culture with those RNOS intentionally added medium or PAM were also measured by MTS assay. Our NEAPP source generated hydrogen peroxide and nitrite with the generation ratio of 0.35 μM/s and 9.8 μM/s. In those RNOS, hydrogen peroxide has respective antitumor effect. On the other hands, nitrite has no antitumor effect singly. But, synergistically enhance the antitumor effect of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, this effect of those RNOS also contribute for the selectively cancer killing effect of PAM.

  20. Evaluation of a sporicidal peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide-based daily disinfectant cleaner.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Mana, Thriveen S C; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Jencson, Annette C; Sitzlar, Brett; Fertelli, Dennis; Hurless, Kelly; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-11-01

    OxyCide Daily Disinfectant Cleaner, a novel peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide-based sporicidal disinfectant, was as effective as sodium hypochlorite for in vitro killing of Clostridium difficile spores, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomcyin-resistant enterococci. OxyCide was minimally affected by organic load and was effective in reducing pathogen contamination in isolation rooms. PMID:25333438