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Sample records for hydrogen peroxide induced

  1. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  2. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  3. UV-induced synthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.M.; Huerta, A.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Suspension-cultured rose cells irradiated with UV (254 mm, 558 J m{sup {minus}2}) showed a transient efflux of K{sup +}, and a production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measured by chemiluminescence of luminol in the presence of peroxidase. The peak concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, attained at about 60-90 min after irradiation, was 2-5 uM. The addition of superoxide dismutase to irradiated cells stimulated luminscence, suggesting that the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} came at least in part from superoxide that was present in the extracellular medium. Treatments that inhibited the UV-induced efflux of K{sup +} also inhibited the appearance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, though the converse was not always true, suggesting that K{sup +} efflux was necessary for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} synthesis, but not vice-versa. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the extracellular space is required for lignin synthesis in many plant tissues. Phenolic compounds, the other substrates for lignin, are induced by UV. We suggest that the UV-stimulated production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is part of a coordinated induction of lignin synthesis.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... peroxide is used in these products: Hydrogen peroxide Hair bleach Some contact lens cleaners Note: Household hydrogen peroxide ... it contains 97% water and 3% hydrogen peroxide. Hair bleaches are stronger. They usually have a concentration of ...

  5. Effect of ethanol on hydrogen peroxide-induced AMPK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Wou, Sung-Eun; Zeng, Yan; Ross, Ruth A.; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Crabb, David W.

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to oxidative stress. Previous work has shown that ethanol treatment of cultured hepatoma cells and of mice inhibited the activity of AMPK and reduced the amount of AMPK protein. Ethanol generates oxidative stress in the liver. Since AMPK is activated by reactive oxygen species, it seems paradoxical that ethanol would inhibit AMPK in the hepatoma cells. In an attempt to understand the mechanism whereby ethanol inhibits AMPK, we studied the effect of ethanol on AMPK activation by exogenous hydrogen peroxide. The effects of ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, and inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) [either okadaic acid or PP2A small interference RNA (siRNA)] on AMPK phosphorylation and activity were examined in rat hepatoma cells (H4IIEC3) and HeLa cells. In H4IIEC3 cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) transiently increased the level of phospho-AMPK to 1.5-fold over control (P < 0.05). Similar findings were observed in HeLa cells, which do not express the upstream AMPK kinase, LKB1. H2O2 markedly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 in H4IIEC3 cells. Ethanol significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC-ζ, LKB1, and AMPK caused by exposure to H2O2. This inhibitory effect of ethanol required its metabolism. More importantly, the inhibitory effects of ethanol on H2O2-induced AMPK phosphorylation were attenuated by the presence of the PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, or PP2A siRNA. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on AMPK phosphorylation is exerted through the inhibition of PKC-ζ and LKB1 phosphorylation and the activation of PP2A. PMID:18832448

  6. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Akt Phosphorylation Regulates Bax Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sadidi, Mahdieh; Lentz, Stephen I.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are involved in many cellular processes that positively and negatively regulate cell fate. H2O2, acting as an intracellular messenger, activates phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream target Akt, and promotes cell survival. The aim of the current study was to understand the mechanism by which PI3K/Akt signaling promotes survival in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrate that PI3K/Akt mediates phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bax. This phosphorylation suppresses apoptosis and promotes cell survival. Increased survival in the presence of H2O2 was blocked by LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K activation. LY294002 prevented Bax phosphorylation and resulted in Bax translocation to the mitochondria, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and cell death. Collectively, these findings reveal a mechanism by which H2O2-induced activation of PI3K/Akt influences posttranslational modification of Bax and inactivate a key component of the cell death machinery. PMID:19278624

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Oral Streptococci Induces Macrophage Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 human macrophage cell line at multiplicities of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited the cytotoxic effect of S. oralis. S. oralis deletion mutants lacking the spxB gene, which encodes pyruvate oxidase, and are therefore deficient in H2O2 production, showed reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, H2O2 alone was capable of inducing cell death. The cytotoxic effect seemed to be independent of inflammatory responses, because H2O2 was not a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages. These results indicate that streptococcal H2O2 plays a role as a cytotoxin, and is implicated in the cell death of infected human macrophages. PMID:23658745

  9. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide induced responses of cat tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, V; Oike, M; Tanaka, H; Inoue, R; Ito, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (10−6 and 10−3 M) on membrane potential, membrane currents, intracellular calcium concentration, resting muscle tone and contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol were examined in cat tracheal strips and isolated smooth muscle cells. H2O2 (10−4 and 10−5 M) enhanced the amplitude of contractions and excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.) evoked by EFS without changing muscle tone and resting membrane potential of the tracheal smooth muscle, and enhanced the contraction induced by carbachol (10−8 M). At an increased concentration (10−3 M), H2O2 elevated resting muscle tone and marginally hyperpolarized the membrane in the majority of the cells. In 51 out of 56 cells examined, H2O2 (10−6–10−3 M) elicited an outward current at a holding potential of −40 mV and enhanced the frequency of the spontaneous transient outward current (STOC). In 20 cells the outward current was preceded by a small inward current. In the other cells, H2O2 elicited only an inward current or did not affect the background current. In Ca2+ free solution the action of H2O2 on the resting muscle tone, STOCs, background current and on the current induced by ramp depolarization was significantly reduced. H2O2 (10−4 M) increased the intracellular ionized calcium concentration both in the absence and presence of external Ca2+. However, the effect developed faster and was of a higher amplitude in the presence of external Ca2+. These results suggest that H2O2 increases intracellular Ca2+, with a subsequent augmentation of stimulation-evoked contractions, and enhances Ca2+ and voltage-sensitive potassium conductance. PMID:9222542

  11. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage by Carica papaya leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Okoko, Tebekeme; Ere, Diepreye

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro antioxidant potential of Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract and its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage assessed by haemolysis and lipid peroxidation. Methods Hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, hydrogen ion scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and the ferrous ion reducing ability were assessed as antioxidant indices. In the other experiment, human erythrocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide to induce erythrocyte damage. The extract (at various concentrations) was subsequently incubated with the erythrocytes and later analysed for haemolysis and lipid peroxidation as indices for erythrocyte damage. Results Preliminary investigation of the extract showed that the leaf possessed significant antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities using in vitro models in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). The extract also reduced hydrogen peroxide induced erythrocyte haemolysis and lipid peroxidation significantly when compared with ascorbic acid (P<0.05). The IC50 values were 7.33 mg/mL and 1.58 mg/mL for inhibition of haemolysis and lipid peroxidation, respectively. In all cases, ascorbic acid (the reference antioxidant) possessed higher activity than the extract. Conclusions The findings show that C. papaya leaves possess significant bioactive potential which is attributed to the phytochemicals which act in synergy. Thus, the leaves can be exploited for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes. PMID:23569948

  12. Tolerance of pentose utilising yeast to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol fermentations follow traditional beverage fermentations where the yeast is exposed to adverse conditions such as oxidative stress. Lignocellulosic bioethanol fermentations involve the conversion of pentose and hexose sugars into ethanol. Environmental stress conditions such as osmotic stress and ethanol stress may affect the fermentation performance; however, oxidative stress as a consequence of metabolic output can also occur. However, the effect of oxidative stress on yeast with pentose utilising capabilities has yet to be investigated. Results Assaying for the effect of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress on Candida, Pichia and Scheffersomyces spp. has demonstrated that these yeast tolerate hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in a manner consistent with that demonstrated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia guillermondii appears to be more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress when compared to Candida shehatae, Candida succiphila or Scheffersomyces stipitis. Conclusions Sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress increased in the presence of minimal media; however, addition of amino acids and nucleobases was observed to increase tolerance. In particular adenine increased tolerance and methionine reduced tolerance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24636079

  13. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  14. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  15. Mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in hepatic and neuronal human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guizani, Nejib; Waly, Mostafa I

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative stress agent that is associated with depletion of intracellular glutathione and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes in different cell lines. Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods reduces cellular oxidative stress and its related health problems. This study aimed to assess the antioxidant properties of mushroom, Agaricus bisporous cultivar extract, against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in cultured human hepatic (HepG2) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. In this study, hydrogen peroxide caused significant oxidative stress in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by glutathione depletion, impairment of total antioxidant capacity and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase). Agaricusbisporous extract ameliorated the observed hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular insult as indicated by restoring the activity of glutathione and the assayed antioxidant enzymes to control levels. The results suggest that mushroom extract as antioxidant properties and protects against the oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide-in cultured human hepatic and neuronal cells. PMID:24261122

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  17. Prompt repair of hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA lesions prevents catastrophic chromosomal fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahaseth, Tulip; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative DNA damage in vivo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, HP) induces copious single-strand(ss)-breaks and base modifications. HP also causes infrequent double-strand DNA breaks, whose relationship to the cell killing is unclear. Since hydrogen peroxide only fragments chromosomes in growing cells, these double-strand breaks were thought to represent replication forks collapsed at direct or excision ss-breaks and to be fully reparable. We have recently reported that hydrogen peroxide kills Escherichia coli by inducing catastrophic chromosome fragmentation, while cyanide (CN) potentiates both the killing and fragmentation. Remarkably, the extreme density of CN+HP-induced chromosomal double-strand breaks makes involvement of replication forks unlikely. Here we show that this massive fragmentation is further amplified by inactivation of ss-break repair or base-excision repair, suggesting that unrepaired primary DNA lesions are directly converted into double-strand breaks. Indeed, blocking DNA replication lowers CN+HP-induced fragmentation only ∼2-fold, without affecting the survival. Once cyanide is removed, recombinational repair in E. coli can mend several double-strand breaks, but cannot mend ∼100 breaks spread over the entire chromosome. Therefore, double-strand breaks induced by oxidative damage happen at the sites of unrepaired primary one-strand DNA lesions, are independent of replication and are highly lethal, supporting the model of clustered ss-breaks at the sites of stable DNA-iron complexes. PMID:27078578

  18. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Vale, J Allister

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidising agent that is used in a number of household products, including general-purpose disinfectants, chlorine-free bleaches, fabric stain removers, contact lens disinfectants and hair dyes, and it is a component of some tooth whitening products. In industry, the principal use of hydrogen peroxide is as a bleaching agent in the manufacture of paper and pulp. Hydrogen peroxide has been employed medicinally for wound irrigation and for the sterilisation of ophthalmic and endoscopic instruments. Hydrogen peroxide causes toxicity via three main mechanisms: corrosive damage, oxygen gas formation and lipid peroxidation. Concentrated hydrogen peroxide is caustic and exposure may result in local tissue damage. Ingestion of concentrated (>35%) hydrogen peroxide can also result in the generation of substantial volumes of oxygen. Where the amount of oxygen evolved exceeds its maximum solubility in blood, venous or arterial gas embolism may occur. The mechanism of CNS damage is thought to be arterial gas embolisation with subsequent brain infarction. Rapid generation of oxygen in closed body cavities can also cause mechanical distension and there is potential for the rupture of the hollow viscus secondary to oxygen liberation. In addition, intravascular foaming following absorption can seriously impede right ventricular output and produce complete loss of cardiac output. Hydrogen peroxide can also exert a direct cytotoxic effect via lipid peroxidation. Ingestion of hydrogen peroxide may cause irritation of the gastrointestinal tract with nausea, vomiting, haematemesis and foaming at the mouth; the foam may obstruct the respiratory tract or result in pulmonary aspiration. Painful gastric distension and belching may be caused by the liberation of large volumes of oxygen in the stomach. Blistering of the mucosae and oropharyngeal burns are common following ingestion of concentrated solutions, and laryngospasm and haemorrhagic gastritis have been

  19. Proline dehydrogenase is essential for proline protection against hydrogen peroxide induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhu, Weidong; Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Demers, Andrew J.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Simpson, Melanie A.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism has an underlying role in apoptotic signaling that impacts tumorigenesis. Proline is oxidized to glutamate in the mitochondria with the rate limiting step catalyzed by proline dehydrogenase (PRODH). PRODH expression is inducible by p53 leading to increased proline oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and induction of apoptosis. Paradoxical to its role in apoptosis, proline also protects cells against oxidative stress. Here we explore the mechanism of proline protection against hydrogen peroxide stress in melanoma WM35 cells. Treatment of WM35 cells with proline significantly increased cell viability, diminished oxidative damage of cellular lipids and proteins, and retained ATP and NADPH levels after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRODH abolished proline protection against oxidative stress whereas knockdown of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis, had no impact on proline protection. Potential linkages between proline metabolism and signaling pathways were explored. The combined inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 eliminated proline protection. A significant increase in Akt activation was observed in proline treated cells after hydrogen peroxide stress along with a corresponding increase in the phosphorylation of the fork head transcription factor class O3a (FoxO3a). The role of PRODH in proline mediated protection was validated in the prostate carcinoma cell line, PC3. Knockdown of PRODH in PC3 cells attenuated phosphorylated levels of Akt and FoxO3a and decreased cell survival during hydrogen peroxide stress. The results provide evidence that PRODH is essential in proline protection against hydrogen peroxide mediated cell death and that proline/PRODH helps activate Akt in cancer cells. PMID:22796327

  20. Iron prochelator BSIH protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L; Franz, Katherine J

    2008-12-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide) prochelators that are converted by hydrogen peroxide into SIH (salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone) chelating agents that inhibit iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical generation. Here, we show that BSIH protects a cultured cell model for retinal pigment epithelium against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. BSIH is more stable than SIH in cell culture medium and is more protective during long-term experiments. Repetitive exposure of cells to BSIH is nontoxic, whereas SIH and desferrioxamine induce cell death after repeated exposure. Combined, our results indicate that cell protection by BSIH involves iron sequestration that occurs only when the cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that prochelators discriminate toxic iron from healthy iron and are promising candidates for neuro- and retinal protection. PMID:18835041

  1. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide induces lysosomal protease alterations in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Mason, Ceceile W; Goodman, Carl B; Holder, Maurice S; Kirksey, Otis W; Womble, Tracy A; Severs, Walter B; Palm, Donald E

    2007-09-01

    Alterations in lysosomal proteases have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. The current study demonstrates a concentration-dependent decrease in PC12 cell viability and transient changes in cystatin C (CYSC), cathepsin B (CATB), cathepsin D (CATD) and caspase-3 following exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, activation of CATD occurred following exposure to H2O2 and cysteine protease suppression, while inhibition of CATD with pepstatin A significantly improved cell viability. Additionally, significant PARP cleavage, suggestive of caspase-3-like activity, was observed following H2O2 exposure, while inhibition of caspase-3 significantly increased cell viability compared to H2O2 administration alone. Collectively, our data suggest that H2O2 induced cell death is regulated at least in part by caspase-3 and CATD. Furthermore, cysteine protease suppression increases CATD expression and activity. These studies provide insight for alternate pathways and potential therapeutic targets of cell death associated with oxidative stress and lysosomal protease alterations. PMID:17440810

  3. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  4. Inhibition of hydrogen peroxide induced injuring on human skin fibroblast by Ulva prolifera polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuner; Guo, Ziye; Yang, Yayun; Geng, Zhonglei; Tang, Langlang; Zhao, Minglin; Qiu, Yuyan; Chen, Yifan; He, Peimin

    2016-10-01

    Ulva prolifera can protect human skin fibroblast from being injured by hydrogen peroxide. This work studied the composition of Ulva prolifera polysaccharide and identified its physicochemical properties. The results showed that the cell proliferation of 0.5mg/mL crude polysaccharide was 154.4% of that in negative control group. Moreover, ROS detection indices, including DCFH-DA, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT, indicated that crude polysaccharide could improve cellular ability to scavenge free radical and decrease the injury on human skin fibroblast by hydrogen peroxide. In purified polysaccharide, the activity of fraction P1-1 was the highest, with 174.6% of that in negative control group. The average molecular weight of P1-1 was 137kD with 18.0% of sulfate content. This work showed the inhibition of hydrogen peroxide induced injuries on human skin fibroblast by Ulva prolifera polysaccharide, which may further evaluate the application of U. prolifera on cosmetics. PMID:27211299

  5. Benzene-Induced Uncoupling of Naphthalene Dioxygenase Activity and Enzyme Inactivation by Production of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung

    1999-01-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) is a multicomponent enzyme system that oxidizes naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene with consumption of O2 and two electrons from NAD(P)H. In the presence of benzene, NADH oxidation and O2 utilization were partially uncoupled from substrate oxidation. Approximately 40 to 50% of the consumed O2 was detected as hydrogen peroxide. The rate of benzene-dependent O2 consumption decreased with time, but it was partially increased by the addition of catalase in the course of the O2 consumption by NDO. Detailed experiments showed that the total amount of O2 consumed and the rate of benzene-induced O2 consumption increased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging agents, and further addition of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPNAP) of NDO. Kinetic studies showed that ISPNAP was irreversibly inactivated in the reaction that contained benzene, but the inactivation was relieved to a high degree in the presence of catalase and partially relieved in the presence of 0.1 mM ferrous ion. Benzene- and naphthalene-reacted ISPNAP gave almost identical visible absorption spectra. In addition, hydrogen peroxide added at a range of 0.1 to 0.6 mM to the reaction mixtures inactivated the reduced ISPNAP containing mononuclear iron. These results show that hydrogen peroxide released during the uncoupling reaction acts both as an inhibitor of benzene-dependent O2 consumption and as an inactivator of ISPNAP. It is proposed that the irreversible inactivation of ISPNAP occurs by a Fenton-type reaction which forms a strong oxidizing agent, hydroxyl radicals (·OH), from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrous mononuclear iron at the active site. Furthermore, when [14C]benzene was used as the substrate, cis-benzene 1,2-dihydrodiol formed by NDO was detected. This result shows that NDO also couples a trace amount of benzene to both O2 consumption and NADH oxidation. PMID:10217759

  6. Layer-by-layer immobilized catalase on electrospun nanofibrous mats protects against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Deng, Hongbing; Cai, Tongjian; Zhan, Yingfei; Wang, Xiankai; Chen, Xuanxuan; Ji, Ailing; Lil, Xueyong

    2014-07-01

    Catalase, a kind of redox enzyme and generally recognized as an efficient agent for protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity. The immobilization of catalase was accomplished by depositing the positively charged chitosan and the negatively charged catalase on electrospun cellulose nanofibrous mats through electrospining and layer-by-layer (LBL) techniques. The morphology obtained from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that more orderly arranged three-dimension (3D) structure and roughness formed with increasing the number of coating bilayers. Besides, the enzyme-immobilized nanofibrous mats were found with high enzyme loading and activity, moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further demonstrated the successful immobilization of chitosan and catalase on cellulose nanofibers support. Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells with or without pretreatment of nanofibrous mats by MTT assay, LDH activity and Flow cytometric evaluation, and confirmed the pronounced hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity, but pretreatment of immobilized catalase reduced the cytotoxicity and protected cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxic effects which were further demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images. The data pointed toward a role of catalase-immobilized nanofibrous mats in protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular damage and their potential application in biomedical field. PMID:24804555

  7. Resveratrol attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced myocardial apoptosis by autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Ting, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chih-Yang; Yang, Jing-Yi; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Background Resveratrol is a Sirt-1-specific activator, which also exerts cardioprotective effects that regulate redox signalling during oxidative stress and autophagy during cardiovascular disease (CVD). Objective This study investigated the protective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage in cardiomyocytes. Design In this article, hydrogen peroxide-induced autophagy and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were studied at an increasing concentration from 0 to 100 µM. Results Resveratrol pretreatment with concentrations of 10, 20, and 50 µM inhibits autophagic apoptosis by increasing p-Akt and Bcl-2 protein levels in H9c2 cells. Interestingly, resveratrol treatment activates the Beclin-1, LC3, p62, and the lysosome-associated protein LAMP2a within 24 h of administration. Conclusions These results suggest that resveratrol-regulated autophagy may play a role in degrading damaged organelles in H9c2 cells rather than causing apoptosis, and this may be a possible mechanism by which resveratrol protects the heart during CVD. PMID:27211317

  8. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Md. Sanaullah; Mano, Jun’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  9. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2015-07-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  10. A comprehensive analysis of hydrogen peroxide-induced gene expression in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, Steven; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dat, James; Gadjev, Ilya; Boonefaes, Tom; Morsa, Stijn; Rottiers, Pieter; Slooten, Luit; Van Montagu, Marc; Zabeau, Marc; Inzé, Dirk; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide plays a central role in launching the defense response during stress in plants. To establish a molecular profile provoked by a sustained increase in hydrogen peroxide levels, catalase-deficient tobacco plants (CAT1AS) were exposed to high light (HL) intensities over a detailed time course. The expression kinetics of >14,000 genes were monitored by using transcript profiling technology based on cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Clustering and sequence analysis of 713 differentially expressed transcript fragments revealed a transcriptional response that mimicked that reported during both biotic and abiotic stresses, including the up-regulation of genes involved in the hypersensitive response, vesicular transport, posttranscriptional processes, biosynthesis of ethylene and jasmonic acid, proteolysis, mitochondrial metabolism, and cell death, and was accompanied by a very rapid up-regulation of several signal transduction components. Expression profiling corroborated by functional experiments showed that HL induced photoinhibition in CAT1AS plants and that a short-term HL exposure of CAT1AS plants triggered an increased tolerance against a subsequent severe oxidative stress. PMID:14671332

  11. Hydrogen peroxide derived from marine peroxy sesquiterpenoids induces apoptosis in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Haruna; Taira, Junsei; Ueda, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the isolates of the peroxy sesquiterpenoids (1-3) from the Okinawan soft coral, Sinularia sp., indicated cytotoxicity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. The apoptotic cells with a nuclear condensation were detected in the presence of these compounds, then the caspase 3/7 activity was induced, indicating that the compounds have a potential antitumor activity by apoptosis-induction. The cells treated with these compounds were generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), indicating that the ROS is related to the induction of apoptosis. The ROS production reduced in the presence of catalase or trolox, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is generated through a certain free radical reaction derived from the compound. In fact, the accumulation of intracellular H2O2 was also confirmed in the presence of these compounds. Based on all the results, this study proposed the apoptosis-inducing mechanism due to the compounds that the H2O2 produced involving free radical reactions derived from cleavage of the end or hydro-peroxide in the molecule induced cell death. PMID:27575468

  12. Peroxide-inducible catalase in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida protects against exogenous hydrogen peroxide and killing by activated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss L., macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barnes, A C; Bowden, T J; Horne, M T; Ellis, A E

    1999-03-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida expresses a single cytoplasmically located catalase which was found to be inducible by exposure to 20 microM hydrogen peroxide in mid-exponential phase resulting in a 4 fold increase in activity. Subsequent exposure to 2 mM peroxide in late-exponential/early-stationary phase resulted in further induction of catalase activity which increased to 20 fold higher levels than those found in uninduced cultures. Exponentially induced cultures were protected against subsequent exposure to 10 mM peroxide which was lethal to non-induced cultures. Bacteria subjected to induction in mid-exponential and early-stationary phase were resistant to 100 mM peroxide, although viability was greatly reduced. Growth of the bacterium under iron-restricted conditions had no effect on the peroxide induction of catalase. As current evidence indicates, the latter is an iron-co-factored heme catalase, this result suggests that catalase induction has a high priority in the metabolism of iron. Furthermore, exposure to peroxide also induces expression of periplasmic MnSOD. A. salmonicida MT423 was resistant to normal rainbow trout macrophages, but was susceptible to killing by activated macrophages. However, if catalase was induced by prior exposure to 20 microM peroxide during mid-exponential phase, A. salmonicida was resistant to killing by activated macrophages. The ability of A. salmonicida to upregulate periplasmic MnSOD and cytoplasmic catalase production under iron restricted conditions and low level peroxide (conditions expected to exist during the early stages of an infection) may be vital for its ability to withstand attack by phagocytic cells in vivo. PMID:10089155

  13. Guard cell hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediate elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Li, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Guanqun; Liu, Yaru; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-10-01

    Climate change as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 influences plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Although the involvement of stomata in plant responses to elevated CO2 has been well established, the underlying mechanism of elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement remains largely unknown. We used diverse techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, biochemical methodologies and gene silencing to investigate the signaling pathway for elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Elevated CO2 -induced stomatal closure was dependent on the production of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and NITRATE REDUCTASE (NR)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells in an abscisic acid (ABA)-independent manner. Silencing of OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) compromised the elevated CO2 -induced accumulation of H2 O2 and NO, upregulation of SLOW ANION CHANNEL ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1) gene expression and reduction of stomatal aperture, whereas silencing of RBOH1 or NR had no effects on the expression of OST1. Our results demonstrate that as critical signaling molecules, RBOH1-dependent H2 O2 and NR-dependent NO act downstream of OST1 that regulate SLAC1 expression and elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement. This information is crucial to deepen the understanding of CO2 signaling pathway in guard cells. PMID:26308648

  14. d-Amino acid oxidase-mediated increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide is mainly responsible for formalin-induced tonic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Miao; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Spinal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in chronic pain. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) oxidizes d-amino acids such as d-serine to form the byproduct hydrogen peroxide without producing other ROS. DAAO inhibitors are specifically analgesic in tonic pain, neuropathic pain and cancer pain. This study examined the role of spinal hydrogen peroxide in pain and the mechanism of the analgesic effects of DAAO inhibitors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Formalin-induced pain behaviours and spinal hydrogen peroxide levels were measured in rodents. KEY RESULTS Formalin injected into the paw increased spinal hydrogen peroxide synchronously with enhanced tonic pain; both were effectively prevented by i.t. fluorocitrate, a selective astrocyte metabolic inhibitor. Given systemically, the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) blocked spinal DAAO enzymatic activity and specifically prevented formalin-induced tonic pain in a dose-dependent manner. Although CBIO maximally inhibited tonic pain by 62%, it completely prevented the increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. I.t. catalase, an enzyme specific for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, completely depleted spinal hydrogen peroxide and prevented formalin-induced tonic pain by 65%. Given systemically, the ROS scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) also inhibited formalin-induced tonic pain and increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. Formalin-induced tonic pain was potentiated by i.t. exogenous hydrogen peroxide. CBIO did not increase spinal d-serine level, and i.t. d-serine did not alter either formalin-induced tonic pain or CBIO's analgesic effect. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Spinal hydrogen peroxide is specifically and largely responsible for formalin-induced pain, and DAAO inhibitors produce analgesia by blocking spinal hydrogen peroxide production rather than interacting with spinal d-serine. PMID:21950354

  15. Hydrogen peroxide induces spawning in mollusks, with activation of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Morse, D E; Duncan, H; Hooker, N; Morse, A

    1977-04-15

    Addition of hydrogen peroxide to seawater causes synchronous spawning in gravid male and female abalones, and certain other mollusks as well. This effect is blocked by exposure of the animals to aspirin, an inhibitor of the enzyme catalyzing oxidative synthesis of prostaglandin endoperoxide. Hydrogen peroxide activates this enzymatic reaction in cell-free extracts prepared from abalone eggs (a very rich source of the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase); this effect appears to reveal a fundamental property of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthesis. Applicability of these findings to both mariculture and medical purposes is suggested. PMID:403609

  16. Role of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide induced by intermittent hypoxia in airway epithelial wound repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Sato, Atsuyasu; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Satooka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Koichi; Tanimura, Kazuya; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Muro, Shigeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-05-15

    The airway epithelium acts as a frontline barrier against various environmental insults and its repair process after airway injury is critical for the lung homeostasis restoration. Recently, the role of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as transcription-independent damage signaling has been highlighted in the wound repair process. Both conditions of continuous hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia (IH) induce ROS. Although IH is important in clinical settings, the roles of IH-induced ROS in the airway repair process have not been investigated. In this study, we firstly showed that IH induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and significantly decreased bronchial epithelial cell migration, prevented by catalase treatment in a wound scratch assay. RhoA activity was higher during repair process in the IH condition compared to in the normoxic condition, resulting in the cellular morphological changes shown by immunofluorescence staining: round cells, reduced central stress fiber numbers, pronounced cortical actin filament distributions, and punctate focal adhesions. These phenotypes were replicated by exogenous H2O2 treatment under the normoxic condition. Our findings confirmed the transcription-independent role of IH-induced intracellular ROS in the bronchial epithelial cell repair process and might have significant implications for impaired bronchial epithelial cell regeneration. PMID:27093911

  17. Protection of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage by Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaolu; Wang, Kai; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Fuliang; Zhao, Fengqi; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of high-producing dairy cows are likely to be subject to oxidative stress (OS) due to the intensive cell metabolism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the cytoprotective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced OS in cultured bovine MECs (MAC-T). Pretreatment of MAC-T cells with resveratrol could rescue the decrease in cell viability and resulted in lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after H2O2 exposure. Resveratrol helped MAC-T cells to prevent H2O2-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-related cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol induced mRNA expression of multiple antioxidant defense genes in MAC-T cells under normal/oxidative conditions. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was required for the cytoprotective effects on MAC-T cells by resveratrol, as knockdown of Nrf2 significantly abolished resveratrol-induced cytoprotective effects against OS. In addition, by using selective inhibitors, we further confirmed that the induction of Nrf2 by resveratrol was mediated through the prolonged activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways but negatively regulated by p38/MAPK pathway. Overall, resveratrol has beneficial effects on bovine MECs redox balance and may be potentially used as a therapeutic medicine against oxidative insult in lactating animals. PMID:26962394

  18. Calpain-1 is required for hydrogen peroxide-induced myotube atrophy.

    PubMed

    McClung, J M; Judge, A R; Talbert, E E; Powers, S K

    2009-02-01

    Recent reports suggest numerous roles for cysteine proteases in the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy due to disuse or disease. Nonetheless, a specific requirement for these proteases in the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy has not been demonstrated. Therefore, this investigation determined whether calpains or caspase-3 is required for oxidant-induced C2C12 myotube atrophy. We demonstrate that exposure to hydrogen peroxide (25 microM H2O2) induces myotube oxidative damage and atrophy, with no evidence of cell death. Twenty-four hours of exposure to H2O2 significantly reduced both myotube diameter and the abundance of numerous proteins, including myosin (-81%), alpha-actinin (-40%), desmin (-79%), talin (-37%), and troponin I (-80%). Myotube atrophy was also characterized by increased cleavage of the cysteine protease substrate alphaII-spectrin following 4 h and 24 h of H2O2 treatment. This degradation was blocked by administration of the protease inhibitor leupeptin (10 microM). Using small interfering RNA transfection of mature myotubes against the specific proteases calpain-1, calpain-2, and caspase-3, we demonstrated that calpain-1 is required for H2O2-induced myotube atrophy. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence for an absolute requirement for calpain-1 in the development of skeletal muscle myotube atrophy in response to oxidant-induced cellular stress. PMID:19109522

  19. Deacetylation of the tumor suppressor protein PML regulates hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guan, D; Lim, J H; Peng, L; Liu, Y; Lam, M; Seto, E; Kao, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor that is expressed at a low level in various cancers. Although post-translational modifications including SUMOylation, phosphorylation, and ubiquitination have been found to regulate the stability or activity of PML, little is known about the role of its acetylation in the control of cell survival. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of lysine 487 (K487) and SUMO1 conjugation of K490 at PML protein are mutually exclusive. We found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) promotes PML deacetylation and identified SIRT1 and SIRT5 as PML deacetylases. Both SIRT1 and SIRT5 are required for H2O2-mediated deacetylation of PML and accumulation of nuclear PML protein in HeLa cells. Knockdown of SIRT1 reduces the number of H2O2-induced PML-nuclear bodies (NBs) and increases the survival of HeLa cells. Ectopic expression of wild-type PML but not the K487R mutant rescues H2O2-induced cell death in SIRT1 knockdown cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type SIRT5 but not a catalytic defective mutant can also restore H2O2-induced cell death in SIRT1 knockdown cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism in which SIRT1/SIRT5-mediated PML deacetylation plays a role in the regulation of cancer cell survival. PMID:25032863

  20. White tea (Camellia sinensis Kuntze) exerts neuroprotection against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Calvo, Maria Isabel

    2011-03-01

    Tea is a popular beverage whose consumption is associated with prevention of certain disorders. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of white tea extract (WTE) on hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in PC12 cells. Cells were treated with various doses of WTE (10-250 μg/ml) before exposition to 250 μM hydrogen peroxide and cell survival was determined through the MTT and LDH assays. Oxidative stress was quantified in the cells after treatments as intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed in a cell free system in terms of free radical scavenging capacity. Results showed that WTE has a significant protective effect in the PC12 cell line against hydrogen peroxide as cell survival was significantly superior in WTE-treated cells compared to hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. A reduction on intracellular oxidative stress as well as radical scavenging properties were produced by WTE. Results suggest that WTE protects PC12 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity, and that an antioxidant mechanism through ROS scavenging may be in part responsible for cells neuroprotection. PMID:21271291

  1. Mechanical wounding-induced laticifer differentiation in rubber tree: An indicative role of dehydration, hydrogen peroxide, and jasmonates.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Min; Yang, Shu-Guang; Shi, Min-Jing; Zhang, Shi-Xin; Wu, Ji-Lin

    2015-06-15

    The secondary laticifer in the secondary phloem of rubber tree are a specific tissue differentiating from vascular cambia. The number of the secondary laticifers is closely related to the rubber productivity of Hevea. Factors involved in the mechanical wounding-induced laticifer differentiation were analyzed by using paraffin section, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Northern-blot techniques. Dehydration of the wounded bark tissues triggered a burst of hydrogen peroxide, abscisic acid, and jasmonates and up-regulated the expression of HbAOSa, which was associated with the secondary laticifer differentiation strictly limited to the wounded area. Application of exogenous hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000) could induce the secondary laticifer differentiation, respectively. Moreover, 6-Benzylaminopurine, a synthetic cytokinin, enhanced the methyl jasmonate-induced secondary laticifer differentiation. However, the dehydration-induced secondary laticifer differentiation was inhibited by exogenous abscisic acid. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, was effective in inhibiting the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide as well as of jasmonates upon dehydration. It blocked the dehydration-induced but not the methyl jasmonate-induced secondary laticifer differentiation. The results suggested a stress signal pathway mediating the wound-induced secondary laticifer differentiation in rubber tree. PMID:26070085

  2. Effect of vitamin C administration on hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenlei; Yang, Nanfei; Feng, Xiujing; Sun, Tingzhe; Shen, Pingping; Sun, Weibin

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease, which is associated with chronic inflammation and leads to significant destruction of periodontal tissues. Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) constitute the largest cell population in PDL tissues and a considerable body of evidence has demonstrated an association between oxidative stress and the progression of periodontitis. However, the effects on PDLCs exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the molecular mechanisms by which H2O2 affects periodontitis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the potential cytotoxic effect of H2O2 and the antioxidative function of vitamin C (Vc) in PDLCs were investigated. The results demonstrated that H2O2 treatment decreased the viability of PDLCs. The decreased PDLC viability was primarily induced by apoptosis, which was evidenced by cleaved caspases-3, caspases-9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Following optimal Vc addition, the proapoptotic effects of H2O2 were partially antagonized. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that H2O2 primarily induced the apoptosis of PDLCs and that these adverse effects were partially rescued following treatment with Vc. These results revealed how H2O2 promotes the progression of periodontitis and provide an improved understanding of the reversal effect of antioxidant treatment. Therefore, optimal Vc administration may provide a potentially effective technique in periodontal therapy. PMID:25333298

  3. Is Hydrogen Peroxide a Suitable Apoptosis Inducer for All Cell Types?

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinmei; Wan, Chunyun; Guo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is currently the most widely used apoptosis inducer due to its broad cytotoxic efficacy against nearly all cell types. However, equivalent cytotoxicity is achieved over a wide range of doses, although the reasons for this differential sensitivity are not always clear. In this study, three kinds of cells, the 293T cell line, primary fibroblasts, and terminally differentiated myocardial cells, were treated with a wide range of H2O2 doses. Times to apoptosis initiation and end were measured cytochemically and the changes in expression of caspase-9, P53, NF-κB, and RIP were determined by RT-PCR. The 293T cell line was the most sensitive to H2O2, undergoing necroptosis and/or apoptosis at all concentrations from 0.1 to 1.6 mM. At > 0.4 mM, H2O2 also caused necroptosis in primary cells. At < 0.4 mM, however, primary cells exhibited classic signs of apoptosis, although they tended to survive for 36 hours in < 0.2 mM H2O2. Thus, H2O2 is a broadly effective apoptosis inducer, but the dose range differs by cell type. For cell lines, a low dose is required and the exposure time must be reduced compared to primary cells to avoid cell death primarily by necroptosis or necrosis. PMID:27595106

  4. Degradation of bisphenol A and formation of hydrogen peroxide induced by glow discharge plasma in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jiang, Xuanzhen; Liu, Yongjun

    2008-06-15

    Degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) and simultaneous formation of hydrogen peroxide induced by glow discharge plasma in contact with aqueous solution were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the BPA degradation rate was higher in sodium chloride solution than that in sodium sulfate or phosphate solutions. However, the formation rates of hydrogen peroxide were on the opposite case. Both the BPA removal and the hydrogen peroxide production rates decreased in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, indicating that hydroxyl radicals are the most probable oxidants responsible for BPA degradation and the precursors of hydrogen peroxide. Ferric ion showed better catalytic effect than that of ferrous ion, suggesting that the ferric ion was reduced by the intermediates formed during BPA degradation, which was confirmed by following the production of ferrous ion in the system. TOC of the solution gradually reduced with discharge time; however, without catalysts, the solution COD increased with discharge time and sharply decreased in the presence of iron salts. The major intermediate products were identified by LC/MS and the possible degradation mechanism was discussed. PMID:18082947

  5. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-10-20

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(-), HCC353Hic-5(-), HCC372Hic-5(-), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(-) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  6. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-02-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H(2)O(2) in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H(2)O(2), but application oat peptides with H(2)O(2) at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H(2)O(2)-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  7. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1 301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2, but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  8. Stabilized aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, M.J.; Sciafani, L.D.

    1988-05-17

    This patent describes a stabilized aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution having a pH below 7 and an amount of Ferric ion up to about 2 ppm comprising hydrogen peroxide, acetanilide having a concentration which ranges between 0.74 M Mol/L and 2.22 mMol/L, and o-benzene disulfonic acid or salt thereof at a concentration between about 0.86 mMol/L to about 1.62 mMol/L.

  9. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5)

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Michael; Thielmann, Ina; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stegner, David

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice. PMID:26172113

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Contributes to the Epithelial Cell Death Induced by the Oral Mitis Group of Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Sakurai, Atsuo; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Members of the mitis group of streptococci are normal inhabitants of the commensal flora of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract of humans. Some mitis group species, such as Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus sanguinis, are primary colonizers of the human oral cavity. Recently, we found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is cytotoxic to human macrophages, suggesting that streptococcus-derived H2O2 may act as a cytotoxin. Since epithelial cells provide a physical barrier against pathogenic microbes, we investigated their susceptibility to infection by H2O2-producing streptococci in this study. Infection by S. oralis and S. sanguinis was found to stimulate cell death of Detroit 562, Calu-3 and HeLa epithelial cell lines at a multiplicity of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited S. oralis cytotoxicity, and H2O2 alone was capable of eliciting epithelial cell death. Moreover, S. oralis mutants lacking the spxB gene encoding pyruvate oxidase, which are deficient in H2O2 production, exhibited reduced cytotoxicity toward Detroit 562 epithelial cells. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that both S. oralis and H2O2 induced interleukin-6 production in Detroit 562 epithelial cells. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 is cytotoxic to epithelial cells, and promotes bacterial evasion of the host defense systems in the oral cavity and upper respiratory tracts. PMID:24498253

  11. Rutin protects rat articular chondrocytes against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide through SIRT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-05-13

    The progressive degeneration and ossification of articular chondrocytes are main symptoms in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Several flavonoids may provide an adjunctive alternative for the management of moderate OA in humans. Rutin, a natural flavone derivative (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside), is well known for its potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties against oxidative stress. However, the protective function of rutin related to OA, which is characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage, remains unclear. The present study investigated the protective effects of rutin, an activator of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), involved in the inhibition of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in rat chondrocytes. SIRT1 activation by rutin attenuated levels of inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB/MAPK signaling, whereas the inhibition of SIRT1 by sirtinol counteracted the beneficial effects of rutin in H2O2-treated chondrocytes. The findings of these studies suggested the potential involvement of SIRT1 in the pathogenesis of OA, and indicated that rutin is a possible therapeutic option for OA. PMID:27086847

  12. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Chong-Un; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Lee, Ying-Ray; Lin, Mei-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yi; Lee, Chien-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases' progression. Costunolide (CS) is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H₂O₂ exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H₂O₂ through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged. PMID:27409597

  13. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2•−). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2•− in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA. PMID:26633563

  14. Streptococcus oralis Induces Lysosomal Impairment of Macrophages via Bacterial Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus oralis, an oral commensal, belongs to the mitis group of streptococci and occasionally causes opportunistic infections, such as bacterial endocarditis and bacteremia. Recently, we found that the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is sufficient to kill human monocytes and epithelial cells, implying that streptococcal H2O2 is a cytotoxin. In the present study, we investigated whether streptococcal H2O2 impacts lysosomes, organelles of the intracellular digestive system, in relation to cell death. S. oralis infection induced the death of RAW 264 macrophages in an H2O2-dependent manner, which was exemplified by the fact that exogenous H2O2 also induced cell death. Infection with either a mutant lacking spxB, which encodes pyruvate oxidase responsible for H2O2 production, or Streptococcus mutans, which does not produce H2O2, showed less cytotoxicity. Visualization of lysosomes with LysoTracker revealed lysosome deacidification after infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2, which was corroborated by acridine orange staining. Similarly, fluorescent labeling of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 gradually disappeared during infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2 The deacidification and the following induction of cell death were inhibited by chelating iron in lysosomes. Moreover, fluorescent staining of cathepsin B indicated lysosomal destruction. However, treatment of infected cells with a specific inhibitor of cathepsin B had negligible effects on cell death; instead, it suppressed the detachment of dead cells from the culture plates. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 induces cell death with lysosomal destruction and then the released lysosomal cathepsins contribute to the detachment of the dead cells. PMID:27113357

  15. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage. PMID:25326781

  16. [Hydrogen peroxide-induced lesions in the digestive tract. Apropos 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Asanza, G; Menchén, P L; Castellote, J I; Salcedo, M; Jaime, B; Senent, C; Castellanos, D; Cos, E

    1995-06-01

    Gastrointestinal injury caused by caustic products a are relatively infrequent, occurring mainly in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Accidental ingestion accounts for most of the cases, and the severity and extent of damage produced, depends on the composition and volume of the caustic agent ingested; endoscopy is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure. We report four unusual cases of caustic injury of the gastrointestinal tract due to hydrogen peroxide, two cases due to oral ingestion and another two due to the accidental administration of enemas, there was a good clinic and endoscopic recovery with conservative treatment. PMID:7612371

  17. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  18. Differential Gene Expression Patterns in Chicken Cardiomyocytes during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youwen; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is both an exogenous and endogenous cytotoxic agent that can reliably induce apoptosis in numerous cell types for studies on apoptosis signaling pathways. However, little is known of these apoptotic processes in myocardial cells of chicken, a species prone to progressive heart failure. Sequencing of mRNA transcripts (RNA-Seq) allows for the identification of differentially expressed genes under various physiological and pathological conditions to elucidate the molecular pathways involved, including cellular responses to exogenous and endogenous toxins. We used RNA-seq to examine genes differentially expressed during H2O2-induced apoptosis in primary cultures of embryonic chicken cardiomyocytes. Following control or H2O2 treatment, RNA was extracted and sequencing performed to identify novel transcripts up- or downregulated in the H2O2 treatment group and construct protein−protein interaction networks. Of the 19,268 known and 2,160 novel transcripts identified in both control and H2O2 treatment groups, 4,650 showed significant differential expression. Among them, 55.63% were upregulated and 44.37% downregulated. Initiation of apoptosis by H2O2 was associated with upregulation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and downregulation of anti-apoptotic genes API5 and TRIA1. Many other differentially expressed genes were associated with metabolic pathways (including ‘Fatty acid metabolism’, ‘Alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism’, and ‘Biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids’) and cell signaling pathways (including ‘PPAR signaling pathway’, ‘Adipocytokine signaling pathway’, ‘TGF-beta signaling pathway’, ‘MAPK signaling pathway’, and ‘p53 signaling pathway’). In chicken cardiomyocytes, H2O2 alters the expression of numerous genes linked to cell signaling and metabolism as well as genes directly associated with apoptosis. In particular, H2O2 also affects the biosynthesis and processing of proteins and

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of “maximal internal H2 O2 concentration” and “cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration” (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of "maximal internal H2 O2 concentration" and "cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration" (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  1. Ocimum sanctum extracts attenuate hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxic ultrastructural changes in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Halder, Nabanita; Joshi, Sujata; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Tandon, Radhika; Gupta, Suresh Kumar

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the major oxidant involved in cataract formation. The present study investigated the effect of an aqueous leaf extract of Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) against H2O2 induced cytotoxic changes in human lens epithelial cells (HLEC). Donor eyes of the age range 20-40 years were procured within 5-8 h of death. After several washings with gentamicin (50 mL/L) and betadine (10 mL/L), clear transparent lenses (n=6 in each group) were incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) alone (normal) or in DMEM containing 100 microm of H2O2 (control) or in DMEM containing both H2O2 (100 microm) and 150 microg/mL of Ocimum sanctum extract (treated) for 30 min at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 and 95% air. Following incubation, the semi-hardened epithelium of each lens was carefully removed, fixed and processed for electron microscopic studies. Thin sections (60-70 mm) were contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate and viewed under a transmission electron microscope. Normal epithelial cells showed intact, euchromatic nucleus with few small vacuoles (diameter 0.58+/-0.6 microm) in well-demarcated cytoplasm. After treatment with H2O2, they showed pyknotic nuclei with clumping of chromatin and ill-defined edges. The cytoplasm was full of vacuoles (diameter 1.61+/-0.7 microm). The overall cellular morphology was typical of dying cells. Treatment of cells with Ocimum sanctum extract protected the epithelial cells from H2O2 insult and maintained their normal architecture. The mean diameter of the vacuoles was 0.66+/-0.2 microm. The results indicate that extracts of O. sanctum have an important protective role against H2O2 injury in HLEC by maintaining the normal cellular architecture. The protection could be due to its ability to reduce H2O2 through its antioxidant property and thus reinforcing the concept that the extracts can penetrate the HLEC membrane. PMID:19441070

  2. Exogenous low-dose hydrogen peroxide enhances drought tolerance of soybean (Glycine max L.) through inducing antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Guler, Neslihan Saruhan; Pehlivan, Necla

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) functions as a signal molecule in plants under abiotic and biotic stress. In this study, the role of exogenous H(2)O(2) in improving drought tolerance in two soybean cultivars (Glycine max L. Merrill) differing in their tolerance to drought was evaluated. Plants were grown in plastic pots with normal irrigation in a phytotron. Four weeks after radicle emergence, either 1 mM H(2)O(2) or distilled water was sprayed as foliar onto the leaves of each plant, after drought stress was applied. Leaf samples were harvested on the 4(th) and 7(th) days of the drought. Antioxidant-related enzyme activity, such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content was measured during the drought period. Drought stress decreased leaf water potential, relative water content and photosynthetic pigment content but enhanced lipid peroxidation and endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration. By contrast, exogenous low dose H(2)O(2) improved water status, pigment content and lipid peroxidation under drought stress. Endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration was reduced by exogenous H(2)O(2) as compared to drought treatment alone. H(2)O(2) pre-treatment induced all the antioxidant enzyme activities, to a greater extent than the control leaves, during drought. H(2)O(2) pretreatment further enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the tolerant cultivar compared to the sensitive cultivar. Results suggested that low dose H(2)O(2) pre-treatment alleviated water loss and H(2)O(2) content and increased drought stress tolerance by inducing the antioxidant system. PMID:27165528

  3. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  4. Protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells by scutellarin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Liu, Guo-Qing

    2004-04-30

    The present study investigated the protective actions of the antioxidant scutellarin against the cytotoxicity produced by exposure to H2O2 in PC12 cells. This was done by assaying for MTT (3,(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ in cells were evaluated by fluorescent microplate reader using DCFH and Fura 2-AM, respectively, as probes. Lipid peroxidation was quantified using thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was assessed by the retention of rhodamine123 (Rh123), a specific fluorescent cationic dye that is readily sequestered by active mitochondria, depending on their transmembrane potential. The DNA content and percentage of apoptosis were monitored with flow cytometry. Vitamin E, a potent antioxidant, was employed as a comparative agent. Preincubation of PC12 cells with scutellarin prevented cytotoxicity induced by H2O2. Intracellular accumulation of ROS, Ca2+ and products of lipid peroxidation, resulting from H2O2 were significantly reduced by scutellarin. Incubation of cells with H2O2 caused a marked decrease in MMP, which was significantly inhibited by scutellarin. PC12 cells treated with H2O2 underwent apoptotic death as determined by flow cytometric assay. The percentage of this H2O2-induced apoptosis in the cells was decreased in the presence of different concentrations of scutellarin. Scutellarin exhibited significantly higher potency compared to the antioxidant vitamin E. The present findings showed that scutellarin attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, intracellular accumulation of ROS and Ca2+, lipid peroxidation, and loss of MMP and DNA, which may represent the cellular mechanisms for its neuroprotective action. PMID:15051420

  5. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  9. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  11. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... Specific Usage Additives § 173.356 Hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (CAS Reg. No. 7722-84-1) may...

  12. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart L.; Matthews, Donna

    1993-11-01

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  13. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  14. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  15. Hydrogen peroxide induced cell death: One or two modes of action?

    PubMed

    Uhl, Lionel; Gerstel, Audrey; Chabalier, Maialène; Dukan, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Imlay and Linn show that exposure of logarithmically growing Escherichia coli to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) leads to two kinetically distinguishable modes of cell killing. Mode one killing is pronounced near 1 mM concentration of H2O2 and is caused by DNA damage, whereas mode-two killing requires higher concentration ([Formula: see text]). The second mode seems to be essentially due to damage to all macromolecules. This phenomenon has also been observed in Fenton in vitro systems with DNA nicking caused by hydroxyl radical ([Formula: see text]). To our knowledge, there is currently no mathematical model for predicting mode one killing in vitro or in vivo after H2O2 exposure. We propose a simple model, using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. Using this model, we show that available iron and cell density, two factors potentially involved in ROS dynamics, play a major role in the prediction of the experimental results obtained by our team and in previous studies. Indeed the presence of the mode one killing is strongly related to those two parameters. To our knowledge, mode-one death has not previously been explained. Imlay and Linn (Imlay and Linn, 1986) suggested that perhaps the amount of the toxic species was reduced at high concentrations of H2O2 because hydroxyl (or other) radicals might be quenched directly by hydrogen peroxide with the concomitant formation of superoxide anion (a less toxic species). We demonstrate (mathematically and numerically) that free available iron decrease is necessary to explain mode one killing which cannot appear without it and that H2O2 quenching or consumption is not responsible for mode-one death. We are able to follow ROS concentration (particularly responsible for mode one killing) after exposure to H2O2. This model therefore allows us to understand two major parameters involved in the presence or not of the first killing mode. PMID:27441232

  16. Skeletal Muscle Contractions Induce Acute Changes in Cytosolic Superoxide, but Slower Responses in Mitochondrial Superoxide and Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Timothy; Kabayo, Tabitha; Ng, Rainer; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased following contractile activity and these species interact with multiple signaling pathways to mediate adaptations to contractions. The sources and time course of the increase in ROS during contractions remain undefined. Confocal microscopy with specific fluorescent probes was used to compare the activities of superoxide in mitochondria and cytosol and the hydrogen peroxide content of the cytosol in isolated single mature skeletal muscle (flexor digitorum brevis) fibers prior to, during, and after electrically stimulated contractions. Superoxide in mitochondria and cytoplasm were assessed using MitoSox red and dihydroethidium (DHE) respectively. The product of superoxide with DHE, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) was acutely increased in the fiber cytosol by contractions, whereas hydroxy-MitoSox showed a slow cumulative increase. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthases increased the contraction-induced formation of hydroxy-MitoSox only with no effect on 2-HE formation. These data indicate that the acute increases in cytosolic superoxide induced by contractions are not derived from mitochondria. Data also indicate that, in muscle mitochondria, nitric oxide (NO) reduces the availability of superoxide, but no effect of NO on cytosolic superoxide availability was detected. To determine the relationship of changes in superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, an alternative specific approach was used where fibers were transduced using an adeno-associated viral vector to express the hydrogen peroxide probe, HyPer within the cytoplasmic compartment. HyPer fluorescence was significantly increased in fibers following contractions, but surprisingly followed a relatively slow time course that did not appear directly related to cytosolic superoxide. These data demonstrate for the first time temporal and site specific differences in specific ROS that occur in skeletal muscle fibers during and after contractile activity. PMID

  17. Effects of mulberry ethanol extracts on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Rae; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ki Rim; Kim, Young Eon; Baek, Nam In; Hong, Eock Kee

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of mammalian cellular damage and are associated with diseases such as aging, arteriosclerosis, inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops upon the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which is partly due to ROS activity. In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective and anti-oxidative effects of fractionated mulberry extracts in mouse insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells (MIN6N cells). Treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced significant cell death and increased intracellular ROS levels, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation in the MIN6N cells. Fractionated mulberry extracts significantly reduced the H2O2-dependent production of intracellular ROS, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and lipid peroxidation. In addition, mulberry extracts inhibited DNA fragmentation induced by H2O2. Thus, the antioxidant properties of mulberry extracts in pancreatic β-cells may be exploited for the prevention or treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:24154764

  18. Improved Electrolytic Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Patrick I.

    2005-01-01

    An improved apparatus for the electrolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide dissolved in water has been developed. The apparatus is a prototype of H2O2 generators for the safe and effective sterilization of water, sterilization of equipment in contact with water, and other applications in which there is need for hydrogen peroxide at low concentration as an oxidant. Potential applications for electrolytic H2O2 generators include purification of water for drinking and for use in industrial processes, sanitation for hospitals and biotechnological industries, inhibition and removal of biofouling in heat exchangers, cooling towers, filtration units, and the treatment of wastewater by use of advanced oxidation processes that are promoted by H2O2.

  19. NASA Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, Ronald; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation is to provide the current status of NASA's efforts in the development of hydrogen peroxide in both mono-propellant and bi-propellant applications, consistent with the Space Launch Initiative goals of pursuing low toxicity and operationally simpler propellants for application in the architectures being considered for the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle, also known as the Space Launch Initiative, or SLI.

  20. Carvedilol protects bone marrow stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death via PI3K-AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meihui; Chen, Shudong; Lin, Dingkun

    2016-03-01

    Carvedilol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, has been reported to exert potent anti-oxidative activities. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of carvedilol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death, which imitate the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. Carvedilol significantly reduced H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis and subsequent cell death. LY294002, the PI3K inhibitor, blocked the protective effects and up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation of carvedilol. Together, our results showed that carvedilol protects H2O2-induced BMSCs cell death partly through PI3K-Akt pathway, suggesting carvedilol could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments. PMID:26898450

  1. Effects of rutaecarpine on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in murine hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  2. Effects of Rutaecarpine on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Murine Hepa-1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  3. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  4. Astaxanthin protects steroidogenesis from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Lee, Yue-Jia; Chou, Mei-Chia; Chang, Renin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Liang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Leang-Shin

    2015-03-01

    Androgens, especially testosterone produced in Leydig cells, play an essential role in development of the male reproductive phenotype and fertility. However, testicular oxidative stress may cause a decline in testosterone production. Many antioxidants have been used as reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers to eliminate oxidative stress to protect steroidogenesis. Astaxanthin (AST), a natural extract from algae and plants ubiquitous in the marine environment, has been shown to have antioxidant activity in many previous studies. In this study, we treated primary mouse Leydig cells or MA-10 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to cause oxidative stress. Testosterone and progesterone production was suppressed and the expression of the mature (30 kDa) form of StAR protein was down-regulated in MA-10 cells by H2O2 and cAMP co-treatment. However, progesterone production and expression of mature StAR protein were restored in MA-10 cells by a one-hour pretreatment with AST. AST also reduced ROS levels in cells so that they were lower than the levels in untreated controls. These results provide additional evidence of the potential health benefits of AST as a potential food additive to ease oxidative stress. PMID:25786065

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Protein Oxidation During Storage and Lyophilization Process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiqiang; Zheng, Xiaoyang; Yang, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Although the impact of hydrogen peroxide (HP) on proteins in liquid solutions has been studied extensively, the impact during lyophilization has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of HP on lyophilized proteins and HP removal by lyophilization. A protein formulation at 5 mg/mL and its placebo were spiked with HP up to 5.0 ppm and then lyophilized. HP concentration, protein oxidation, and aggregation were monitored before and after lyophilization, as well as during storage at 25°C. The lyophilization process removed on average 94.1% of HP from protein formulation, but only 72.5% from the placebo. There were also significant increases in protein oxidization and aggregation. The oxidation increment correlated with the decrease of HP concentration in both the protein formulation and placebo at all temperatures. Protein oxidation at different freezing temperatures was also studied in follow-up studies. Data from these studies suggest that (1) HP has a significant impact on oxidation and aggregation of protein during lyophilization; (2) significant oxidation can occur even when the protein formulation is frozen; (3) the oxidized protein is more prone to aggregation during lyophilization process. PMID:27238482

  6. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cláudia S L; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  7. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  8. Astaxanthin Protects Steroidogenesis from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mouse Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Lee, Yue-Jia; Chou, Mei-Chia; Chang, Renin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Liang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Leang-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Androgens, especially testosterone produced in Leydig cells, play an essential role in development of the male reproductive phenotype and fertility. However, testicular oxidative stress may cause a decline in testosterone production. Many antioxidants have been used as reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers to eliminate oxidative stress to protect steroidogenesis. Astaxanthin (AST), a natural extract from algae and plants ubiquitous in the marine environment, has been shown to have antioxidant activity in many previous studies. In this study, we treated primary mouse Leydig cells or MA-10 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to cause oxidative stress. Testosterone and progesterone production was suppressed and the expression of the mature (30 kDa) form of StAR protein was down-regulated in MA-10 cells by H2O2 and cAMP co-treatment. However, progesterone production and expression of mature StAR protein were restored in MA-10 cells by a one-hour pretreatment with AST. AST also reduced ROS levels in cells so that they were lower than the levels in untreated controls. These results provide additional evidence of the potential health benefits of AST as a potential food additive to ease oxidative stress. PMID:25786065

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induced relaxation in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro is mediated by EDRF and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zellers, T.; McCormick, J. )

    1991-03-15

    Xanthine and xanthine oxidase induced relaxations in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro are augmented in the presence of the endothelium and abolished by catalase, implicating hydrogen peroxide as an endothelium-dependent effector. To determine the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}O{sub 2} causes relaxations, isolated rings of fifth order porcine pulmonary artery, with (E{sup +}) and without (E{sup {minus}}) endothelium, were suspended in organ baths filled with buffer, and isometric tension was recorded. Hydrogen peroxide caused concentration-dependent, endothelium-augmented relaxations which were abolished by catalase and hydroquinone and reversed by L-nitroarginine and methylene blue. Prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}) levels, measured after a two minute exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in rings with endothelium were comparable to controls. This concentration of PGI{sub 2} does not cause relaxations in these rings. These data suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulates the release of an EDRF, causing relaxations mediated by cyclic GMP, which is independent of prostacyclin.

  10. Nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide in tomato resistance. Nitric oxide modulates hydrogen peroxide level in o-hydroxyethylorutin-induced resistance to Botrytis cinerea in tomato.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula; Rózalska, Sylwia

    2005-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been postulated to be required, together with reactive oxygen species (ROS), for activation of disease resistance reactions of plants to infection with a pathogen or elicitor treatment. However, biochemical mechanisms by which ROS and NO participate in these reactions are still under intensive study and controversial debate. We previously demonstrated that o-hydroxyethylorutin when applied on tomato leaves (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. "Perkoz") restricted Botrytis cinerea infection development. In this research we investigated ROS and NO generation in tomato plants treated with o-hydroxyethylorutin, non-treated and infected ones. The NO content was enhanced or decreased in the studied plants by supplying them with NO generator-SNP or scavenger-cPTIO. NO detection was carried out using diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-DA) in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The influence of elevated and decreased levels of NO on B. cinerea infection development and ROS generation was studied. The elevated NO concentration in tomato leaves strongly decreased hydrogen peroxide concentration without affecting other studied ROS (superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical) levels. H2O2 concentrations in NO-supplied leaves were low regardless of further treatment of tomato leaves with o-hydroxyethylorutin or inoculation with B. cinerea. The low H2O2 concentration coincided with quick and severe infection development in NO-supplied leaves. As activities of enzymes generating (SOD EC 1.15.1.1)) and removing (APX EC 1.11.1.11, CAT EC 1.11.1.6) H2O2 were unchanged in the studied plants, the decrease in H2O2 concentration was probably due to a direct NO-H2O2 interaction. PMID:15922611

  11. Combination Treatment of Hydrogen Peroxide and X-Rays Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shinji Sawada, Ken; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Karashima, Takashi; Shuin, Taro; Nishioka, Akihito; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods and Materials: At 4h before the irradiation, PC-3 cells were exposed to 10mM ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) concentrations. Subsequently, cells were exposed to 0.1mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} just before the irradiations, which were administered with 10-MV X-rays at doses of 10Gy. Results: The percentage of apoptotic cells at 48h after X-irradiation alone, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone, and combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 1.85%, 4.85%, and 28.4%, respectively. With use of combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred 4h after the irradiation. This resulted in lysosomal rupturing, mitochondrial fragmentation, and the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm from the mitochondria. In contrast, when cells were exposed to NH{sub 4}Cl before the X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} administration, apoptosis was almost completely suppressed, ROS production did not occur, lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial fragmentation were blocked, and cytochrome c was not released. Conclusions: Hydrogen peroxide strongly enhanced lysosome-dependent radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. A combined use of X-rays and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can also injure the mitochondrial cytoplasmic organelles and lead to the production of ROS that in and of itself might possibly induce apoptosis.

  12. NADPH oxidase-generated hydrogen peroxide induces DNA damage in mutant FLT3-expressing leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Stanicka, Joanna; Russell, Eileen G; Woolley, John F; Cotter, Thomas G

    2015-04-10

    Internal tandem duplication of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3-ITD) receptor is present in 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and it has been associated with an aggressive AML phenotype. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines have been shown to generate increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the molecular basis of how FLT3-ITD-driven ROS leads to the aggressive form of AML is not clearly understood. Our group has previously reported that inhibition of FLT3-ITD signaling results in post-translational down-regulation of p22(phox), a small membrane-bound subunit of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex. Here we demonstrated that 32D cells, a myeloblast-like cell line transfected with FLT3-ITD, have a higher protein level of p22(phox) and p22(phox)-interacting NOX isoforms than 32D cells transfected with the wild type FLT3 receptor (FLT3-WT). The inhibition of NOX proteins, p22(phox), and NOX protein knockdowns caused a reduction in ROS, as measured with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific dye, peroxy orange 1 (PO1), and nuclear H2O2, as measured with nuclear peroxy emerald 1 (NucPE1). These reductions in the level of H2O2 following the NOX knockdowns were accompanied by a decrease in the number of DNA DSBs. We showed that 32D cells that express FLT3-ITD have a higher level of both oxidized DNA and DNA DSBs than their wild type counterparts. We also observed that NOX4 and p22(phox) localize to the nuclear membrane in MV4-11 cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Taken together these data indicate that NOX and p22(phox) mediate the ROS production from FLT3-ITD that signal to the nucleus causing genomic instability. PMID:25697362

  13. NADPH Oxidase-generated Hydrogen Peroxide Induces DNA Damage in Mutant FLT3-expressing Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Stanicka, Joanna; Russell, Eileen G.; Woolley, John F.; Cotter, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3-ITD) receptor is present in 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and it has been associated with an aggressive AML phenotype. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines have been shown to generate increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the molecular basis of how FLT3-ITD-driven ROS leads to the aggressive form of AML is not clearly understood. Our group has previously reported that inhibition of FLT3-ITD signaling results in post-translational down-regulation of p22phox, a small membrane-bound subunit of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex. Here we demonstrated that 32D cells, a myeloblast-like cell line transfected with FLT3-ITD, have a higher protein level of p22phox and p22phox-interacting NOX isoforms than 32D cells transfected with the wild type FLT3 receptor (FLT3-WT). The inhibition of NOX proteins, p22phox, and NOX protein knockdowns caused a reduction in ROS, as measured with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific dye, peroxy orange 1 (PO1), and nuclear H2O2, as measured with nuclear peroxy emerald 1 (NucPE1). These reductions in the level of H2O2 following the NOX knockdowns were accompanied by a decrease in the number of DNA DSBs. We showed that 32D cells that express FLT3-ITD have a higher level of both oxidized DNA and DNA DSBs than their wild type counterparts. We also observed that NOX4 and p22phox localize to the nuclear membrane in MV4–11 cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Taken together these data indicate that NOX and p22phox mediate the ROS production from FLT3-ITD that signal to the nucleus causing genomic instability. PMID:25697362

  14. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  15. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  16. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  17. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  18. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  19. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen...

  20. Huperzine B, a novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates hydrogen peroxide induced injury in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Y; Tang, X C

    2000-09-29

    A number of studies indicate that free radicals are involved in the neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was mainly conducted to examine the effect of Huperzine B on H(2)O(2) induced toxicity in rat pheochromocytoma line PC12 by measuring cell lesion, level of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities. Following a 30 min exposure of the cells to H(2)O(2) (150 microM), a marked decrease in cell survival, activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase as well as increased production of malondialdehyde (MDA) were found. Pretreatment of the cells with huperzine B (10-100 microM) prior to H(2)O(2) exposure significantly elevated the cell survival, antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased the level of MDA. The above-mentioned neuroprotective effects are also observed with tacrine (1 microM), donepezil (10 microM) and galanthamine (10 microM), suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of cholinesterase inhibitor might partly contribute to the clinical efficacy in AD treatment. PMID:10996445

  1. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Anderson, M.S.; Johnson, R.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Hendrix, A.R.; Barth, C.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Dalton, J.B.; Clark, R.N.; Shirley, J.H.; Ocampo, A.C.; Matson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  2. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  3. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Anderson, M S; Johnson, R E; Smythe, W D; Hendrix, A R; Barth, C A; Soderblom, L A; Hansen, G B; McCord, T B; Dalton, J B; Clark, R N; Shirley, J H; Ocampo, A C; Matson, D L

    1999-03-26

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis. PMID:10092224

  5. Hydrogen peroxide, from Wieland to Sies.

    PubMed

    Koppenol, Willem H

    2016-04-01

    A history of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in vivo is presented, starting with the discovery of catalase. The first hypothesis was formulated by Heinrich Wieland, who assumed that dioxygen reacted directly with organic molecules. This view was strongly criticised by Otto Warburg, Helmut Sies' academic grandfather. The involvement of hydrogen peroxide in physiological processes was investigated by Theodor Bücher, the "Doktorvater" of Helmut. Helmut's research made it possible to quantitate hydrogen peroxide in tissues. PMID:27095207

  6. Oxidative cleavage of cycloalkanones by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Starostin, E.K.; Aleksandrov, A.V.; Nikishin, G.I.

    1986-07-10

    The authors have studied the reaction of cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, cycloheptanone, and cyclododecanone with aqueous hydrogen peroxide over the temperature range 110-150/sup 0/C. The effects of temperature, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the molar proportions of the reagents on the composition and yields of the products have been examined in the case of cyclohexanone. Oxidation of cyclohexanone by aqueous hydrogen peroxide at 110-150/sup 0/C gives 1,10-decanedicarboxylic acid and hexanoic acid as the principal products. Cyclopentanone and cycloheptanone react with hydrogen peroxide similarly to cyclohexanone, giving sebacic and pentanoic acids, and 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acids, respectively.

  7. Protective effect of reduced glutathione C60 derivative against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Zhou, Chi; He, Jun; Hu, Zheng; Guan, Wen-Chao; Liu, Sheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and free radicals cause oxidative stress, which induces cellular injuries, metabolic dysfunction, and even cell death in various clinical abnormalities. Fullerene (C60) is critical for scavenging oxygen free radicals originated from cell metabolism, and reduced glutathione (GSH) is another important endogenous antioxidant. In this study, a novel water-soluble reduced glutathione fullerene derivative (C60-GSH) was successfully synthesized, and its beneficial roles in protecting against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cultured HEK 293T cells were investigated. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to confirm the chemical structure of C60-GSH. Our results demonstrated that C60-GSH prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell damage. Additionally, C60-GSH pretreatment significantly attenuated H2O2-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD) consumption and malondialdehyde (MDA) elevation. Furthermore, C60-GSH inhibited intracellular calcium mobilization, and subsequent cell apoptosis via bcl-2/bax-caspase-3 signaling pathway induced by H2O2 stimulation in HEK 293T cells. Importantly, these protective effects of C60-GSH were superior to those of GSH. In conclusion, these results suggested that C60-GSH has potential to protect against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis by scavenging free radicals and maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis without evident toxicity. PMID:27376803

  8. N-Acetyl-Serotonin Protects HepG2 Cells from Oxidative Stress Injury Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiying; Yu, Shuna; Jiang, Zhengchen; Liang, Cuihong; Yu, Wenbo; Li, Jin; Du, Xiaodong; Wang, Hailiang; Gao, Xianghong; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver diseases. N-Acetyl-serotonin (NAS) has been reported to protect against oxidative damage, though the mechanisms by which NAS protects hepatocytes from oxidative stress remain unknown. To determine whether pretreatment with NAS could reduce hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, we investigated the H2O2-induced oxidative damage to HepG2 cells with or without NAS using MTT, Hoechst 33342, rhodamine 123, Terminal dUTP Nick End Labeling Assay (TUNEL), dihydrodichlorofluorescein (H2DCF), Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) double staining, immunocytochemistry, and western blot. H2O2 produced dramatic injuries in HepG2 cells, represented by classical morphological changes of apoptosis, increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, release of cytochrome c (Cyt-C) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, and loss of membrane potential (ΔΨm). NAS significantly inhibited H2O2-induced changes, indicating that it protected against H2O2-induced oxidative damage by reducing MDA levels and increasing SOD activity and that it protected the HepG2 cells from apoptosis through regulating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, involving inhibition of mitochondrial hyperpolarization, release of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors, and caspase activity. PMID:25013541

  9. Hydrogen peroxide treatment in Atlantic salmon induces stress and detoxification response in a daily manner.

    PubMed

    Vera, L M; Migaud, H

    2016-01-01

    Daily variation in the absorption, metabolism and excretion of toxic substances will ultimately determine the actual concentration to which the cells and tissues are exposed. In aquaculture, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) can be frequently exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to treat topical skin and gill infections, particularly in relation to parasitic infections (e.g. sea lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis and amoebic gill disease caused by Neoparamoeba perurans). It is well accepted that the time of administration influences pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs which in turn affects their efficacy and toxicity. Consequently, a better understanding of drug side effects as a function of time of day exposure would help to improve treatment efficacy and fish welfare. To this end, salmon were exposed to H2O2 (1500 mg/L) for 20 min at six different times of the day during a 24-h cycle and we investigated the time-dependent effects of exposure on physiological stress (glucose, lactate and cortisol) and antioxidant enzyme expression (gpx1, cat, Mn-sod and hsp70) in liver and gills. In addition, at each sampling point, 8 control fish were also sampled. Our results revealed that the time of administration of H2O2 caused significant differences in the induction of both physiological and oxidative stress responses. Glucose and lactate were higher in the treated fish during daytime whereas cortisol levels appeared to be systematically increased (>1000 ng/mL) after H2O2 treatment irrespective of exposure time, although differences with control levels were higher during the day. In liver, gene expression of antioxidant enzymes displayed daily rhythmicity in both treated and control groups and showed higher mRNA expression levels in salmon treated with H2O2 at ZT6 (6 h after lights onset). In gills, rhythmic expression was only found for gpx1 in the control fish and for hsp70 and Mn-sod in the treated groups. However, in the treated salmon, higher gene expression levels of

  10. The antioxidant properties of oligo sodium alginates prepared by radiation-induced degradation in aqueous and hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şen, Murat; Atik, Hanife

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the radiation-induced degradation of sodium alginates (NaAlg), having different guluronic acids (G) and mannuronic acid (M) ratios, (G/M), in aqueous and hydrogen peroxide solutions were investigated first; after that, the antioxidative properties of the oligo sodium alginates prepared were identified. Radiation degradation yield values, G(S), were determined for each irradiation condition and compared with those of the dry-state-irradiated NaAlg. The results showed that the oligo sodium alginates with M from 1000 to 3750 Da could be easily prepared by γ-irradiation of NaAlg solution in the presence of small amount of hydrogen peroxide at low doses (below 5.0 kGy) and by controlling the G/M. The antioxidant properties of the fractions with various molecular weight and G/M were evaluated by determining the scavenging ability of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPHrad ), and 50% inhibition concentrations of LF120 NaAlg, which was irradiated in aqueous solution and H2O2 solution at a dose of 2.5 kGy and having number average molecular weights of 10.2 and 3.75 kDa were found to be 10.0 and 2.5 mg/ml, respectively. The results demonstrated that its molecular weight was an important factor in controlling the antioxidant properties of NaAlg, and due to the sharp decrease in molecular weight in the case of aqueous media irradiation the effect of G/M of initial polymer became unimportant whereas the dry-state-irradiated NaAlgs behaved conversely.

  11. Inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase 1 affects ceramide accumulation and hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Neuro-2a cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ranran; Yang, Wei; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in brain injury after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, which contributes toward excessive apoptosis of nerve cells. Therefore, it would be beneficial to identify a therapy that could interfere with the progression of apoptosis and protect the brain from ischemia-reperfusion injury. As ceramide, a well-known second messenger of apoptosis, can be metabolized by sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1), recent research has focused on the link between SMS1 and apoptosis in different cells. To investigate whether SMS1 is involved in the process of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in neurons and to explore the possible underlying mechanism, we treated mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2A (N2a) cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation with H2O2 significantly upregulated the expression of SMS1, increased the intracellular levels of ceramide and sphingomyelin synthase activity, and induced apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment of N2a cells with D609, an sphingomyelin synthase inhibitor, or SMS1-silencing RNA (siRNA) further increased ceramide and potentiated H2O2-induced apoptosis which could be reversed by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Thus, our study has shown that SMS1 regulates ceramide levels in N2a cells and plays a potent protective role in this oxidative stress-induced apoptosis partly through the p38 pathway. PMID:27391427

  12. Neuroprotective effect of Citrus unshiu immature peel and nobiletin inhibiting hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Jung, Su Young; Lee, Gyeong Hwan; Cho, Jung Hee; Choi, In Young

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress-induced cell damage is common in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In a case study, nobiletin-rich Citrus reticulata peels could prevent the progression of cognitive impairment in donepezil-preadministered Alzheimer's disease patients. Objective: In this study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanism of nobiletin and Citrus unshiu immature peel (CUIP) water extract, which contains nobiletin as a major compound, on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal neuronal model. Materials and Methods: HT22 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide in the presence or absence of various concentrations of CUIP and nobiletin. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic protein levels were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Western blotting. Results: Pretreatment with CUIP and nobiletin inhibited cell death due to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide-induced the expression of phospho-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) and p-p38 proteins in HT22 cells; however CUIP and nobiletin suppressed p-JNK and p-p38 without changing JNK or p38. Regarding apoptosis, caspase 3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and Bax protein expression was determined. CUIP and nobiletin suppressed caspase 3 and Bax expression, but they induced Bcl-2 expression in HT22 cells. Conclusion: These results show that CUIP and nobiletin can protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in HT22 neurons via mitogen-activated protein kinases and apoptotic pathways. PMID:26664016

  13. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  14. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  15. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  16. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  17. Hydrogen peroxide as a greenhouse soil amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are anecdotal reports that hydrogen peroxide provides growth benefits beyond controlling plant infection and plant stress. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of soil applications of hydrogen peroxide solutions on plant growth and flowering. Nasturtium (Tropaeolum maju...

  18. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen peroxide is a common oxidant that has been applied extensively with in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Because of its widespread use in this and other fields, it has been extensively researched. This research has revealed that hydrogen peroxide has very complex chemistry...

  19. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  20. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  1. Homocysteine thiolactone induces apoptotic DNA damage mediated by increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide and caspase 3 activation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, R F; Huang, S M; Lin, B S; Wei, J S; Liu, T Z

    2001-05-11

    The cytotoxicity of homocysteine derivatives on chromosomal damage in somatic cells is not well established. The present study used reactive homocysteine derivative of homocysteine thiolactone (Hcy) to investigate its causal effect on apoptotic DNA injury in human promyeloid HL-60 cells. Our results demonstrated that Hcy induced cell death and features of apoptosis including increased phosphotidylserine exposure on the membrane surface, increased apoptotic cells with hypoploid DNA contents, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, all of which occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hcy treatment also significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species H2O2, which coincided with the elimination of caspase 3 proenzyme levels and increased caspase 3 activity at the time of the appearance of apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Preincubation of Hcy-treated HL-60 cells with catalase completely scavenged intracellular H2O2, thus inhibiting caspase 3 activity and protecting cells from apoptotic DNA damage. In contrast, superoxide dismutase failed to inhibit Hcy-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Hcy exerted its genotoxic effects on HL-60 cells through an apoptotic pathway, which is mediated by the activation of caspase 3 activity induced by an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide. PMID:11432446

  2. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  3. Naringin protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ge; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Ma, Long-Fei; Zhang, Yuan-Min

    2015-12-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of osteoporosis. We show that naringin, a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, effectively protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Naringin increased viability of hAMDSCs and attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Naringin also reversed H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative stress induced by H2O2 inhibits osteogenic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium content and mRNA expression levels of osteogenesis marker genes RUNX2 and OSX in hADMSCs. However, addition of naringin leads to a significant recovery, suggesting the protective effects of naringin against H2O2-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, the H2O2-induced decrease of protein expressions of β-catenin and clyclin D1, two important transcriptional regulators of Wnt-signaling, was successfully rescued by naringin treatment. Also, in the presence of Wnt inhibitor DKK-1, naringin is no longer effective in stimulating ALP activity, increasing calcium content and mRNA expression levels of RUNX2 and OSX in H2O2-exposed hADMSCs. These data clearly demonstrates that naringin protects hADMSCs against oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation, which may involve Wnt signaling pathway. Our work suggests that naringin may be a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for osteoporosis and activation of Wnt signaling may represent attractive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of degenerative disease of bone tissue. PMID:26482937

  4. ALGAL-INDUCED DECAY AND FORMATION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN WATER: ITS POSSIBLE ROLE IN OXIDATION OF ANILINES BY ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of the rates of decomposition and photoproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by several green and blue-green algae in water are reported. Results suggest that algae have an important influence on the environmental concentration of H2O2, a widely distributed oxidant in na...

  5. Hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase is involved in high blue-light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng; Xing, Da; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-08-01

    One of the most important functions of blue light is to induce chloroplast movements by reducing the damage to photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by various environmental stimuli, can act as a signaling molecule that regulates a number of developmental processes and environmental responses. To investigate whether H2O2 is involved in high blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we use luminescence spectrometer to observe H2O2 generation with the assistance of the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (H2DCF-DA). After treatment with high blue light, a large quantity of H2O2 indicated by the fluorescence intensity of DCF is produced in a dose-dependent manner in leaf strip of Arabidopsis. Enzymatic assay shows that the activity of NADPH oxidase, which is a major site for H2O2 generation, also rapidly increases in treated strips. Exogenously applied H2O2 can promote the high blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Moreover, high blue light-induced H2O2 generation can be abolished completely by addition of exogenous catalase (CAT), and partly by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (DCMU), which are an NADPH oxidase inhibitor and a blocker of electron transport chain. And subsequent chloroplast movements can be abolished by CAT and DPI, but not by DCMU. These results presented here suggested that high blue light can induce oxidative burst, and NADPH oxidase as a major producer for H2O2 is involved in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements.

  6. Evaluating the effects of galbanic acid on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kobra; Behravan, Javad; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mehmankhah, Babak; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Ferula szowitsiana has been widely used for medicinal purposes around the world. The anti-oxidant effect of F. szowitsiana had been proved. The current study aims to determine the protective effects of galbanic acid, a sesquiterpene coumarin from F. szowitsiana, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Human lymphocytes were incubated with H2O2 (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µM), galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and a combination of galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and H2O2 (25 µM) at 4 C for 30 minutes. Solvents of galbanic acid without H2O2 were used as negative controls. Results: The findings of this study demonstrated that H2O2 exposure leads to a significant concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage. Galbanic acid did not cause DNA damage compared with the control cells. Data showed that galbanic acid does not have a protective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Conclusion: According to the results, it is concluded that the capability of F. szowitsiana in reducing reactive oxygen species and the anti-inflammatory property of its methanolic extract may be due to its other ingredients. PMID:25386396

  7. Effect of standardized fruit extract of Luffa cylindrica on oxidative stress markers in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Suchita; Saha, Sudipta; Kaithwas, Gaurav; Saraf, Shubhini A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The ability of Luffa cylindrica Roem fruit extract (LCE) to modulate biochemical parameters was investigated by in vitro studies for its role in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract on isolated goat lenses which were incubated for 72 h at 37°C. Materials and Methods: Test groups contained 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 µg/ml of LCE along with 1 ml of H2O2 (0.5 mM) as cataract inducer. Lenses were examined for morphological variation and transparency periodically during the incubation. Biochemical parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), total protein content (TPC), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were estimated. Results: SOD, GSH, and TPC levels were found to increase proportionally with the concentration of LCE. However, MDA levels were found to be inversely proportional to the concentration of LCE. Opacity was graded as per “lens opacities classification system III.” Morphological examination suggested that LCE (25 µg/ml) maintained a vision for 44 h. No lens in LCE dose groups developed dense nuclear opacity after 24 h as opposed to 80% in negative control. Conclusion: The results suggest that LCE can delay the onset and/or prevent the progression of cataract which can be attributed to the presence of adequate phenolics, flavonoids, and Vitamin A and its high nutritional value. This preliminary study can be further synergized by testing LCE against other in vivo and in vitro models of cataract. PMID:26729957

  8. Protective effects of rice dreg protein hydrolysates against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HepG-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxia; Wang, Li; Wang, Ren; Luo, Xiaohu; Li, Yanan; Chen, Zhengxing

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of rice dreg protein hydrolysates (RDPHs) obtained by various proteases on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HepG-2 cells were investigated. Cell cytotoxicity was evaluated through the aspects of cell viability, ROS level, antioxidant enzyme activity, and production of malondialdehyde (MDA). Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Molecular weight distribution was analyzed by gel permeation chromatography, and amino acid composition was measured using an automatic amino acid analyzer. The survival of cells and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were significantly increased through the pre-incubation of HepG-2 cells with RDPHs before H2O2 exposure. Additionally, these pretreatments also resulted in a reduction in ROS and MDA levels. As a result, apoptosis and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential of the HepG-2 cells were alleviated. Furthermore, the protective effects of protein hydrolysates obtained by various proteases were noticeably distinct, in which RDPHs prepared by alkaline protease showed higher antioxidant activities. The difference in the protective effects might be attributed to the specific peptide or amino acid composition. Therefore, enzymatic hydrolysis with different enzymes studied here could attenuate H2O2-induced cell damage, and the type of protease greatly influenced the anti-oxidative activity. Particularly, optimum use of Alcalase could produce peptides with higher antioxidant activity. PMID:26843356

  9. Thiamine-induced priming against root-knot nematode infection in rice involves lignification and hydrogen peroxide generation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kun; Ji, Hong-Li; Gheysen, Godelieve; Kyndt, Tina

    2016-05-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1, VB1) can act as a plant defence trigger, or priming agent, leading to a rapid counterattack on pathogen invasion. In this study, the priming effect of thiamine on rice (Oryza sativa cv. Nipponbare) and its activity against root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) infection were evaluated. Thiamine treatment and subsequent nematode inoculation activated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and lignin deposition in plant roots, and this correlated with enhanced transcription of OsPAL1 and OsC4H, two genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The number of nematodes in rice roots was slightly but significantly reduced, and the development of the nematodes was delayed, whereas no direct toxic effects of VB1 on nematode viability and infectivity were observed. The combined application of thiamine with l-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), significantly hampered the VB1-priming capacity. These findings indicate that thiamine-induced priming in rice involves H2 O2 and phenylpropanoid-mediated lignin production, which hampers nematode infection. Further cellular and molecular studies on the mechanism of thiamine-induced defence will be useful for the development of novel nematode control strategies. PMID:27103216

  10. The sigma-1 receptor-zinc finger protein 179 pathway protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Tzu-Chieh; Lin, Shu-Hui; Lee, Pin-Tse; Yeh, Shiu-Hwa; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chou, Szu-Yi; Su, Tsung-Ping; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Chuang, Jian-Ying

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, hence protecting neurons against ROS is very important. In this study, we focused on sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), a chaperone at endoplasmic reticulum, and investigated its protective functions. Using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced ROS accumulation model, we verified that apoptosis-signaling pathways were elicited by H2O2 treatment. However, the Sig-1R agonists, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), reduced the activation of apoptotic pathways significantly. By performing protein-protein interaction assays and shRNA knockdown of Sig-1R, we identified the brain Zinc finger protein 179 (Znf179) as a downstream target of Sig-1R regulation. The neuroprotective effect of Znf179 overexpression was similar to that of DHEAS treatment, and likely mediated by affecting the levels of antioxidant enzymes. We also quantified the levels of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the hippocampi of wild-type and Znf179 knockout mice, and found both enzymes to be reduced in the knockout versus the wild-type mice. In summary, these results reveal that Znf179 plays a novel role in neuroprotection, and Sig-1R agonists may be therapeutic candidates to prevent ROS-induced damage in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. PMID:26792191

  11. Heat shock protein 70 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced nucleolar fragmentation via suppressing cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkai; Deng, Gonghua; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yi, Yuxin; Yang, Tubao; McMillan, Daniel R; Xiao, Xiangzhong

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that nucleolar fragmentation is a part of the overall apoptotic morphology, however, it is currently obscure whether and how nucleolar fragmentation can be induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) can prevent nucleolar fragmentation. To dissect these two questions, C(2)C(12) myogenic cells and immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with heat shock transcriptional factor 1 (HSF1) null mutation were treated with heat shock response (HS) (42.5 ± 0.5°C for 1 h and recovery at 37°C for 24 h) and then were insulted with 0.5 mmol/L H(2)O(2). Morphological changes of nucleoli were observed under contrast microscope or electronic microscope. It was found that (1) stimulation with H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation by mediating cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolar protein, nucleolin in C(2)C(12) myocytes and MEFs; (2) HS suppressed nucleolar fragmentation by inducing the expression of Hsp70 in an HSF1-dependent manner as indicated by assays of transfection with Hsp70 antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ONs) or recombinant plasmids of full-length Hsp70 cDNA; (3) protection of Hsp70 against nucleolar fragmentation was related to its accumulation in nucleolus mediated by nuclear localization sequence and its inhibition against cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolin. These results suggested that H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation and HS or Hsp70 inhibit H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation through the translocation of Hsp70 into nucleolar and its protection against impairment of nucleolin. PMID:21960124

  12. Piper sarmentosum as an antioxidant on oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by hydrogen peroxide*

    PubMed Central

    Hafizah, Abdul Hamid; Zaiton, Zakaria; Zulkhairi, Amom; Mohd Ilham, Adenan; Nor Anita, Megat Mohd Nordin; Zaleha, Abdullah Mahdy

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cell death due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) may contribute to the initial endothelial injury, which promotes atherosclerotic lesion formation. Piper sarmentosum (PS), a natural product, has been shown to have an antioxidant property, which is hypothesized to inhibit production of ROS and prevent cell injury. Thus, the present study was designed to determine the effects of PS on the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative cell damage in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In this experiment, HUVECs were obtained by collagenase perfusion of the large vein in the umbilical cord and cultured in medium M200 supplemented with low serum growth supplementation (LSGS). HUVECs were treated with various concentrations of H2O2 (0–1000 µmol/L) and it was observed that 180 µmol/L H2O2 reduced cell viability by 50% as denoted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Using the above concentration as the positive control, the H2O2-induced HUVECs were concomitantly treated with various concentrations (100, 150, 250 and 300 µg/ml) of three different extracts (aqueous, methanol and hexane) of PS. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) levels showed a significant increase (P<0.05) in HUVECs compared to the negative control. However, PS extracts showed a protective effect on HUVECs from H2O2-induced cell apoptosis with a significant reduction in MDA, SOD, CAT and GPX levels (P<0.05). Furthermore, PS had exhibited ferric reducing antioxidant power with its high phenolic content. Hence, it was concluded that PS plays a beneficial role in reducing oxidative stress in H2O2-induced HUVECs. PMID:20443214

  13. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  14. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  15. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Study of fibroblast gene expression in response to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide or UVA with skin aging.

    PubMed

    Hazane-Puch, Florence; Bonnet, Mathilde; Valenti, Kita; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Kurfurst, Robin; Favier, Alain; Sauvaigo, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The skin aging process, implying oxidative stress, is associated with specific gene expression. Ultraviolet A (UVA) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) making them relevant in the study of skin cell responses to oxidative stresses. To investigate transcript expression associated with chronological skin aging and its modulation by two oxidative stresses, cDNA micro-arrays, composed of a set of 81 expressed sequence tag (EST) clones, were used to probe the patterns of transcript expression in human fibroblasts of five young (< 21 years-old) and five older (> 50 years-old) healthy females at basal levels and 24 h after exposure to UVA (7 J/cm2) and H(2)O(2) (20 mM). At the basal state, 22% of total genes were up-regulated in the older group. Although both stresses led to the same cell mortality, H(2)O(2) induced a stronger modulation of gene expression than UVA, with 19.5% of transcripts up-regulated versus 4%. The aging process affected the response to H(2)O(2) and even though cells from old donors presented higher basal levels of transcripts they were not able to regulate them in response to the stress. Interestingly, UVA had a specific strong inhibitory effect on the expression of chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2) transcript, suggesting a possible mechanism for its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory roles. PMID:20299309

  17. Zinc suppresses apoptosis of U937 cells induced by hydrogen peroxide through an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Y; Karasaki, Y; Sugiura, T; Itoh, H; Abe, T; Yamamura, K; Higashi, K

    1998-05-19

    Treatment of human premonocytic U937 cells with 500 microM H2O2 for 1h followed by 4h incubation in fresh medium to allow the cells to execute apoptotic processes caused DNA fragmentation. However, in the presence of 1mM ZnSO4 throughout the incubation, DNA ladder formation was markedly inhibited. Hydrogen peroxide treatment for 1h with or without zinc increased both Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. However, only Bax protein decreased to basal levels in the presence of zinc during the following 4h incubation, resulting in an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and prevention of apoptosis. Treatment of U937 cells with 1mM ZnSO4 alone also decreased the levels of Bax protein. Furthermore, we observed that zinc completely inhibited the activation of CPP32 by H2O2, while no significant changes of ICE activities occurred with either H2O2 and/or zinc. These results indicate that the suppression of H2O2-induced apoptosis by zinc is mediated through an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which occurs upstream from the activation of CPP32. PMID:9610364

  18. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells. PMID:17451824

  19. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Hossein-Nezhad, Arash; Ansari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1) control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h); (2) melatonin (1 mM) for 12 h; (3) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h; (4) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM). The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression. PMID:26881079

  20. The Octadecaneuropeptide ODN Protects Astrocytes against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis via a PKA/MAPK-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Yosra; Kaddour, Hadhemi; Vaudry, David; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Douiri, Salma; Leprince, Jérôme; Castel, Helene; Vaudry, Hubert; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes synthesize and release endozepines, a family of regulatory peptides, including the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) an endogenous ligand of both central-type benzodiazepine (CBR) and metabotropic receptors. We have recently shown that ODN exerts a protective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in astrocytes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the type of receptor and the transduction pathways involved in the protective effect of ODN in cultured rat astrocytes. We have first observed a protective activity of ODN at very low concentrations that was abrogated by the metabotropic ODN receptor antagonist cyclo1–8[DLeu5]OP, but not by the CBR antagonist flumazenil. We have also found that the metabotropic ODN receptor is positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in astrocytes and that the glioprotective action of ODN upon H2O2-induced astrocyte death is PKA- and MEK-dependent, but PLC/PKC-independent. Downstream of PKA, ODN induced ERK phosphorylation, which in turn activated the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 and blocked the stimulation by H2O2 of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax. The effect of ODN on the Bax/Bcl-2 balance contributed to abolish the deleterious action of H2O2 on mitochondrial membrane integrity and caspase-3 activation. Finally, the inhibitory effect of ODN on caspase-3 activity was shown to be PKA and MEK-dependent. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that the potent glioprotective action of ODN against oxidative stress involves the metabotropic ODN receptor coupled to the PKA/ERK-kinase pathway to inhibit caspase-3 activation. PMID:22927932

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  2. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  3. NASA Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant Hazards Technical Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David L.; Greene, Ben; Frazier, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The Fire, Explosion, Compatibility and Safety Hazards of Hydrogen Peroxide NASA technical manual was developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility. NASA Technical Memorandum TM-2004-213151 covers topics concerning high concentration hydrogen peroxide including fire and explosion hazards, material and fluid reactivity, materials selection information, personnel and environmental hazards, physical and chemical properties, analytical spectroscopy, specifications, analytical methods, and material compatibility data. A summary of hydrogen peroxide-related accidents, incidents, dose calls, mishaps and lessons learned is included. The manual draws from art extensive literature base and includes recent applicable regulatory compliance documentation. The manual may be obtained by United States government agencies from NASA Johnson Space Center and used as a reference source for hazards and safe handling of hydrogen peroxide.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vinegar Amount sufficient for the purpose Remove sulfur dioxide from wine prior to fermentation to produce vinegar. Emulsifiers containing fatty acid esters 1.25 Bleaching agent. (d) Residual hydrogen peroxide...

  5. Vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal JB6 P+ cells via hydrogen peroxide-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Ding, M; Leonard, S S; Robinson, V A; Millecchia, L; Zhang, X; Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V; Shi, X

    1999-12-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological mechanism for the control of DNA integrity in mammalian cells. Vanadium induces both DNA damage and apoptosis. It is suggested that vanadium-induced apoptosis serves to eliminate DNA-damaged cells. This study is designed to clarify a role of reactive oxygen species in the mechanism of apoptosis induced by vanadium. We established apoptosis model with murine epidermal JB6 P+ cells in the response to vanadium stimulation. Apoptosis was detected by a cell death ELISA assay and morphological analysis. The result shows that apoptosis induced by vanadate is dose-dependent, reaching its saturation level at a concentration of 100 microM vanadate. Vanadyl (IV) can also induce apoptosis albeit with lesser potency. A role of reactive oxygen species was analyzed by multiple reagents including specific scavengers of different reactive oxygen species. The result shows that vanadate-induced apoptosis is enhanced by NADPH, superoxide dismutase and sodium formate, but was inhibited by catalase and deferoxamine. Cells exposed to vanadium consume more molecular oxygen and at the same time, produce more H2O2 as measured by the change in fluorescence of scopoletin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase. This change in oxygen consumption and H2O2 production is enhanced by NADPH. Taken together, these results show that vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal cells and H2O2 induced by vanadate plays a major role in this process. PMID:10705990

  6. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  7. Protective effect of Cymbopogon citratus on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in the reproductive system of male rats.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Saleh M; Taha, Ekhlass M; Mubark, Zaid M; Aziz, Salam S; Simon, K D; Mazlan, A G

    2013-12-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (C. citratus) has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemoprotective properties. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of C. citratus aqueous extract against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and injury in the reproductive system of male rats. The twenty-five rats used in this study were divided into five groups, comprised of five rats each. The control group received standard food and drink. The H2O2 group received standard food and water with 0.5% H2O2. The rats in the H2O2 + C. citratus group and H2O2 + vitamin E group received standard food, H2O2, and C. citratus [100 mg·kg(-1) body weight (bw)], or vitamin E as an antioxidant reference (500 mg·kg(-1) bw), respectively. The C. citratus group was given C. citratus (100 mg·kg(-1) bw) in addition to the standard food and drink. The treatments were administered for 30 days. The H2O2 treatment significantly (P < 0.05) decreased body, testicular, and epididymal weight, as well as glutathione (GSH) level, but markedly increased malonaldehyde (MDA) in serum and testes homogenates. The rats treated with H2O2 exhibited testicular degeneration and significant reduction in sperm viability, motility, count, and rate of normal sperm. The C. citratus, vitamin E, and H2O2 treatment significantly (P < 0.05) increased the body, testicular, and epididymal weight, testosterone level, the values of the various sperm characteristics, and GSH. However, this treatment markedly reduced MDA in serum and testes homogenates, as well as testicular histopathological alterations in the H2O2-treated rats. The C. citratus aqueous extract reduced oxidative stress and protected male rats against H2O2-induced reproductive system injury. PMID:23957393

  8. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Redding-Johanson, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Bender, K.S.; Keasling, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.; Fields, M.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Luo, F.; Deng, Y.; He, Q.

    2010-07-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses.

  9. Centella asiatica extracts modulate hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Joo; Cha, Hwa Jun; Nam, Ki Ho; Yoon, Yeongmin; Lee, Hyunjin; An, Sungkwan

    2011-12-01

    Centella asiatica (C. asiatica) is a pharmacological plant in South Asia. It has been demonstrated that C. asiatica extracts containing various pentacyclic triterpenes exert healing effects, especially wound healing and collagen synthesis in skin. However, there are few studies on the effect of C. asiatica extracts on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). To determine whether H(2) O(2) -induced senescence is affected by C. asiatica extracts, we performed senescence analysis on cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). We also analysed whole gene expression level using microarrays and showed that 39 mRNAs are differentially expressed in H(2) O(2) -induced HDFs with and without treatment with C. asiatica extracts. These genes regulate apoptosis, gene silencing, cell growth, transcription, senescence, DNA replication and the spindle checkpoint. Differential expression of FOXM1, E2F2, MCM2, GDF15 and BHLHB2 was confirmed using semi-quantitative PCR. In addition, C. asiatica extracts rescued the H(2) O(2) -induced repression of replication in HDFs. Therefore, the findings presented here suggest that C. asiatica extracts might regulate SIPS by preventing repression of DNA replication and mitosis-related gene expression. PMID:22092576

  10. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENICALS SENSITIZE HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lungs are a target organ for arsenic carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that inorganic arsenic (iAs) can potentiate DNA damage induced by other agents. Once inside the human body iAs generally undergoes two ...

  11. Steady-state hydrogen peroxide induces glycolysis in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Ulanovskaya, Olesya A; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhou, Tianhong; Sun, Fei; Lu, Zhike; Hutchison, Alan L; Lan, Lefu; Wu, Min; Cravatt, Benjamin F; He, Chuan

    2014-07-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be readily inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated direct oxidation of their catalytic active cysteines. Because of the rapid degradation of H2O2 by bacterial catalase, only steady-state but not one-dose treatment with H2O2 rapidly induces glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We conducted transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses to globally profile the bacterial transcriptomes in response to a steady level of H2O2, which revealed profound transcriptional changes, including the induced expression of glycolytic genes in both bacteria. Our results revealed that the inactivation of GAPDH by H2O2 induces metabolic levels of glycolysis and the PPP; the elevated levels of fructose 1,6-biphosphate (FBP) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) lead to dissociation of their corresponding glycolytic repressors (GapR and HexR, respectively) from their cognate promoters, thus resulting in derepression of the glycolytic genes to overcome H2O2-stalled glycolysis in S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Both GapR and HexR may directly sense oxidative stresses, such as menadione. PMID:24769698

  12. Steady-State Hydrogen Peroxide Induces Glycolysis in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Ulanovskaya, Olesya A.; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhou, Tianhong; Sun, Fei; Lu, Zhike; Hutchison, Alan L.; Lan, Lefu; Wu, Min; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be readily inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated direct oxidation of their catalytic active cysteines. Because of the rapid degradation of H2O2 by bacterial catalase, only steady-state but not one-dose treatment with H2O2 rapidly induces glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We conducted transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses to globally profile the bacterial transcriptomes in response to a steady level of H2O2, which revealed profound transcriptional changes, including the induced expression of glycolytic genes in both bacteria. Our results revealed that the inactivation of GAPDH by H2O2 induces metabolic levels of glycolysis and the PPP; the elevated levels of fructose 1,6-biphosphate (FBP) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) lead to dissociation of their corresponding glycolytic repressors (GapR and HexR, respectively) from their cognate promoters, thus resulting in derepression of the glycolytic genes to overcome H2O2-stalled glycolysis in S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Both GapR and HexR may directly sense oxidative stresses, such as menadione. PMID:24769698

  13. Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Chong, Y L; Mahmood, A A; Indran, M; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Vikineswary, S

    2009-04-01

    Lentinula edodes (Berk) Pegler, commonly known as Shiitake mushroom has been used as medicinal food in Asian countries, especially in China and Japan and is believed to possess strong immunomodulatory property. In the present study, the methanolic extract of the fruit bodies of L. edodes was investigated for cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by measuring the activities of xanthine oxidase (XO) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) . H2O2 at a concentration of 5 microM caused 50% inhibition of PBMCs viability. The extract improved the PBMC viability and exerted a dose-dependent protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. At 100 microg/ml of extract concentration, the cell viability increased by 60% compared with the PBMCs incubated with H2O2 alone. The extract also inhibited XO activity in PBMC, while showing moderate stimulatory effect on GPx. However, in the presence of H2O2 alone, both the enzyme activities were increased significantly. The GPx activity increased, possibly in response to the increased availability of H2O2 in the cell. When the cells were pretreated with the extract and washed (to remove the extract) prior to the addition of H2O2, the GPx and XO activities as well as the cell viability were comparable to those when incubated with the extract alone. Thus, it is suggested that one of the possible mechanisms via which L. edodes methanolic extract confers protection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in PBMC is by inhibiting the superoxide-producing XO and increasing GPx activity which could rapidly inactivate H2O2. PMID:19517993

  14. Inhibition of miR-134 Protects Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Cheng; Yang, Lu; Pei, Chong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play an important role in neurological diseases. Particularly, miR-134 is reportedly involved in regulating neuron survival. However, the association between miR-134 and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival under adverse stimulus has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we aimed to explore the role and underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating RGC apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. Results showed that the expression of miR-134 dose- and time-dependently increased in RGC after H2O2 treatment. H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of miR-134 expression by antagomiR-134 and was enhanced by miR-134 overexpression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed a direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region of cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), a critical transcription factor for neuronal protection. In H2O2-treated RGCs, the inhibition of miR-134 significantly elevated the expression of CREB and its downstream genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR-134 also increased the expression of miR-132, a rapid response gene downstream of CREB. In addition, the target gene of miR-132, acetylcholinesterase was expectedly decreased by miR-134 inhibition. However, the overexpression of miR-134 exerted an opposite effect. The knockdown of CREB apparently abolished the protective effect of miR-134 inhibition against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis. The increased expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 induced by miR-134 inhibition was also abrogated by CREB knockdown. Overall, our results suggested that the downregulation of miR-134 can effectively protect against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis by negatively modulating CREB expression. PMID:25744098

  15. In Vitro Neuroprotective Effect of Shikimic Acid Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Caregnato, Fernanda Freitas; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Gasparotto, Juciano; Serafini, Mairim Russo; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo José; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2015-08-01

    Shikimic acid (SA), originally extracted from Illicium verum Hook. fil., is an indispensable starting material for the synthesis of the antiviral drug Oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)) with very limited number of studies regarding its biological effects in vitro. Therefore, we here evaluated the thermoanalytical profile, redox properties, and in vitro effects of SA on human neuronal-like cells (SH-SY5Y). The thermoanalytical profile of SA was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) characterization. Both antioxidant potential and in vitro lipoperoxidation levels were analyzed. Cell viability and intracellular reactive species (RS) production was determined by DCF and SRB assays, respectively. Our results show in vitro antioxidant activity of SA without exerting cytotoxic effects on SH-SY5Y cells at tested concentrations of 10 nM, 10 μM, and 10 mM. In addition, SA protected the cells against H2O2-induced toxicity; effect that could be related, at least in part, with decreased intracellular RS production and its antioxidant potential. The present study shows evidence for neuroprotective actions of SA against oxidative stress-induced toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells, inviting for further investigation about its potential use in the context of oxidative stress-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25862258

  16. Aging modifies brain region-specific vulnerability to experimental oxidative stress induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Bielinski, Donna; Dallal, Gerard E.; Joseph, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated a significant decline in brain function and behavior in Fischer 344 (F344) rats with age. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysregulation in calcium homeostasis (as assessed through 45Ca flux) may contribute to the increase in age-related vulnerability to oxidative stress in brain regions, and result in a deficit in behavior-mediated signaling. Crude membrane (P-2) and more purified synaptosomal fractions were isolated from the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of young (6 months) and old (22 months) F344 rats and were assessed for calcium flux and extracellular-regulated kinase activity 1 (ERK) under control and oxidative stress conditions induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide (final concentration 5 μM). The level of oxidative stress responses was monitored by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). The results showed a significant difference in oxidative stress responses between young and old rats in evaluated brain regions. Old rats showed higher sensitivity to oxidative stress than young rats. The present findings show the differential effects of oxidative stress on calcium flux in brain regions with age that are dependent upon the brain areas examined and the fraction assessed. The accumulation of ROS and the decrease in GSH in the frontal cortex were sufficient to decrease ERK activity in old rats. This is the first study, to our knowledge, that demonstrates age-related differential sensitivity to oxidative stress expressed as a function of behavior-mediated signaling and stress levels among different fractions isolated from brain regions controlling behavior. PMID:19424838

  17. High light-induced hydrogen peroxide production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is increased by high CO2 availability.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Na, Chae Sun; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2015-03-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an unavoidable part of photosynthesis. Stress that accompanies high light levels and low CO2 availability putatively includes enhanced ROS production in the so-called Mehler reaction. Such conditions are thought to encourage O2 to become an electron acceptor at photosystem I, producing the ROS superoxide anion radical (O2·-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). In contrast, here it is shown in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that CO2 depletion under high light levels lowered cellular H2 O2 production, and that elevated CO2 levels increased H2 O2 production. Using various photosynthetic and mitochondrial mutants of C. reinhardtii, the chloroplast was identified as the main source of elevated H2 O2 production under high CO2 availability. High light levels under low CO2 availability induced photoprotective mechanisms called non-photochemical quenching, or NPQ, including state transitions (qT) and high energy state quenching (qE). The qE-deficient mutant npq4 produced more H2 O2 than wild-type cells under high light levels, although less so under high CO2 availability, whereas it demonstrated equal or greater enzymatic H2 O2 -degrading capacity. The qT-deficient mutant stt7-9 produced the same H2 O2 as wild-type cells under high CO2 availability. Physiological levels of H2 O2 were able to hinder qT and the induction of state 2, providing an explanation for why under high light levels and high CO2 availability wild-type cells behaved like stt7-9 cells stuck in state 1. PMID:25619314

  18. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Induces Tumoricidal Effects on Lymphoma Cells Through Hydrogen Peroxide Mediation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao Daniel; Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2016-09-01

    Several groups have reported that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) possess unique tumoricidal properties against many cancers. However, the exact mechanisms as to how hWJSCs inhibit tumor growth are not known. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of cancer cells to high hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels from H2 O2 -releasing drugs causes their death. We therefore explored whether the tumoricidal effect of hWJSCs on lymphoma cells was mediated via H2 O2 . We first exposed lymphoma cells to six different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) concentrates of hWJSC-conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) (3, 5, 10, 30, 50, 100 kDa) for 48 h. Since, the 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate showed the greatest cell inhibition we then investigated whether the tumoricidal effect of the specific 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate on two different lymphoma cell lines (Ramos and Toledo) was mediated via accumulation of H2 O2 . We used a battery of assays (MTT, propidium iodide, mitochondria membrane potential, apoptosis, cell cycle, oxidative stress enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation) to test this mechanism. The hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate significantly decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cell death and apoptosis in both lymphoma cell lines. There were significant increases in superoxide dismutase with concomitant decreases in glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and thioredoxin peroxidase activities. H2 O2 levels, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation were also significantly increased in both lymphoma cell lines. The results suggested that the hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate regulates cellular H2 O2 leading to a tumoricidal effect and may thus be a promising anti-lymphoma agent. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2045-2055, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27392313

  19. [Hydrogen peroxide in artificial photosynthesizing systems].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, A V; Komissarov, G G

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of the concepts of hydrogen peroxide as a source of photosynthetic oxygen (hydrogen) coordination and photochemical properties of chlorophyll and its aggregates towards hydrogen peroxide were considered. The binding energy of H2O and H2O2 with chlorophyll and chlorophyllide depending on their form (monomers, dimers and trimers) was estimated by quantum chemical calculations. It is shown that at an increase of the degree of the pigment aggregation binding energy of H2O2 was more than the energy of H2O. Analysis of experimental results of the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using chlorophyll was carried out. Estimates of the thermodynamic parameters (deltaG degrees and deltaH degrees) of the formation of organic compounds from CO2 with water and hydrogen peroxide were compared. The interaction of CO2 with H2O2 requires much less energy consumption than with water for all considered cases. The formation of organic products (formaldehyde, alcohols, carboxylic and carbonylic compounds) and simultaneous production of O2 under the influence of visible light in the systems of inorganic carbon--hydrogen peroxide--chlorophyll (phthalocyanine) is detected by GC/MS method, FTIR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. PMID:25702472

  20. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  1. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  2. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates.

    PubMed

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates-RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  3. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates—RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  4. Differential role of ethylene and hydrogen peroxide in dark-induced stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Kar, R K; Parvin, N; Laha, D

    2013-12-15

    Regulation of stomatal aperture is crucial in terrestrial plants for controlling water loss and gaseous exchange with environment. While much is known of signaling for stomatal opening induced by blue light and the role of hormones, little is known about the regulation of stomatal closing in darkness. The present study was aimed to verify their role in stomatal regulation in darkness. Epidermal peelings from the leaves of Commelina benghalensis were incubated in a defined medium in darkness for 1 h followed by a 1 h incubation in different test solutions [H2O2, propyl gallate, ethrel (ethylene), AgNO3, sodium orthovanadate, tetraethyl ammonium chloride, CaCl2, LaCl3, separately and in combination] before stomatal apertures were measured under the microscope. In the dark stomata remained closed under treatments with ethylene and propyl gallate but opened widely in the presence of H2O2 and AgNO3. The opening effect was largely unaffected by supplementing the treatment with Na-vanadate (PM H+ ATPase inhibitor) and tetraethyl ammonium chloride (K(+)-channel inhibitor) except that opening was significantly inhibited by the latter in presence of H2O2. On the other hand, H2O2 could not override the closing effect of ethylene at any concentrations while a marginal opening of stomata was found when Ag NO3 treatment was given together with propyl gallate. CaCl2 treatment opened stomata in the darkness while LaCl3 maintained stomata closed. A combination of LaCl3 and propyl gallate strongly promoted stomatal opening. A probable action of ethylene in closing stomata of Commelina benghalensis in dark has been proposed. PMID:24517017

  5. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  6. Catalyst Development for Hydrogen Peroxide Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morlan, P. W.; Wu, P.-K.; Ruttle, D. W.; Fuller, R. P.; Nejad, A. S.; Anderson, W. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of various catalysts of hydrogen peroxide was conducted for the applications of liquid rocket engines. The catalyst development includes silver screen technology, solid catalyst technology, and homogeneous catalyst technology. The silver screen technology development was performed with 85% (by weight) hydrogen peroxide. The results of this investigation were used as the basis for the catalyst design of a pressure-fed liquid-fueled upper stage engine. Both silver-plated nickel 200 screens and pure silver screens were used as the active metal catalyst during the investigation, The data indicate that a high decomposition efficiency (greater than 90%) of 85% hydrogen peroxide can be achieved at a bed loading of 0.5 lbm/sq in/sec with both pure silver and silver plated screens. Samarium oxide coating, however, was found to retard the decomposition process and the catalyst bed was flooded at lower bed loading. A throughput of 200 lbm of hydrogen peroxide (1000 second run time) was tested to evaluate the catalyst aging issue and performance degradation was observed starting at approximately 400 seconds. Catalyst beds of 3.5 inch in diameter was fabricated using the same configuration for a 1,000-lbf rocket engine. High decomposition efficiency was obtained with a low pressure drop across the bed. Solid catalyst using precious metal was also developed for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide from 85% to 98% by weight. Preliminary results show that the catalyst has a strong reactivity even after 15 minutes of peroxide decomposition. The development effort also includes the homogeneous catalyst technology. Various non-toxic catalysts were evaluated with 98% peroxide and hydrocarbon fuels. The results of open cup drop tests indicate an ignition delay around 11 ms.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide - Material Compatibility Studied by Microcalorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homung, Steven D.; Davis, Dennis D.; Baker, David; Popp, Christopher G.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental and toxicity concerns with current hypergolic propellants have led to a renewed interest in propellant grade hydrogen peroxide (HP) for propellant applications. Storability and stability has always been an issue with HP. Contamination or contact of HP with metallic surfaces may cause decomposition, which can result in the evolution of heat and gas leading to increased pressure or thermal hazards. The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility has developed a technique to monitor the decompositions of hydrogen peroxide at temperatures ranging from 25 to 60 C. Using isothermal microcalorimetry we have measured decomposition rates at the picomole/s/g level showing the catalytic effects of materials of construction. In this paper we will present the results of testing with Class 1 and 2 materials in 90 percent hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    PubMed

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  9. Improvement of adventitious root formation in flax using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takáč, Tomáš; Obert, Bohuš; Rolčík, Jakub; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-09-25

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important crop for the production of oil and fiber. In vitro manipulations of flax are used for genetic improvement and breeding while improvements in adventitious root formation are important for biotechnological programs focused on regeneration and vegetative propagation of genetically valuable plant material. Additionally, flax hypocotyl segments possess outstanding morphogenetic capacity, thus providing a useful model for the investigation of flax developmental processes. Here, we investigated the crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and auxin with respect to reprogramming flax hypocotyl cells for root morphogenetic development. Exogenous auxin induced the robust formation of adventitious roots from flax hypocotyl segments while the addition of hydrogen peroxide further enhanced this process. The levels of endogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) were positively correlated with increased root formation in response to exogenous auxin (1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; NAA). Histochemical staining of the hypocotyl segments revealed that hydrogen peroxide and peroxidase, but not superoxide, were positively correlated with root formation. Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that endogenous levels of hydrogen peroxide were controlled by peroxidases during root formation from hypocotyl segments. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide positively affected flax adventitious root formation by regulating the endogenous auxin levels. Consequently, this agent can be applied to increase flax regeneration capacity for biotechnological purposes such as improved plant rooting. PMID:26921706

  10. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  11. PED/PEA-15 Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Ins-1E Pancreatic Beta-Cells via PLD-1

    PubMed Central

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Zatterale, Federica; Nigro, Cecilia; Mirra, Paola; Falco, Roberta; Ulianich, Luca; Di Jeso, Bruno; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The small scaffold protein PED/PEA-15 is involved in several different physiologic and pathologic processes, such as cell proliferation and survival, diabetes and cancer. PED/PEA-15 exerts an anti-apoptotic function due to its ability to interfere with both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in different cell types. Recent evidence shows that mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 present larger pancreatic islets and increased beta-cells mass. In the present work we investigated PED/PEA-15 role in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E beta-cells. In pancreatic islets isolated from TgPED/PEA-15 mice hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA fragmentation was lower compared to WT islets. TUNEL analysis showed that PED/PEA-15 overexpression increases the viability of Ins-1E beta-cells and enhances their resistance to apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide exposure. The activity of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP-1 were markedly reduced in Ins-1E cells overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Ins-1EPED/PEA-15). In parallel, we observed a decrease of the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-xS and Bad. In contrast, the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xL was enhanced. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation was higher in control cells compared to Ins-1EPED/PEA-15 cells. Interestingly, the preincubation with propranolol, an inhibitor of the pathway of PLD-1, a known interactor of PED/PEA-15, responsible for its deleterious effects on glucose tolerance, abolishes the antiapoptotic effects of PED/PEA-15 overexpression in Ins-1E beta-cells. The same results have been obtained by inhibiting PED/PEA-15 interaction with PLD-1 in Ins-1EPED/PEA-15. These results show that PED/PEA-15 overexpression is sufficient to block hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E cells through a PLD-1 mediated mechanism. PMID:25489735

  12. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Changes in Energy Status and Respiration Metabolism of Harvested Longan Fruit in Relation to Pericarp Browning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Xiong; Lin, Yi-Fen; Chen, Yi-Hui; Wang, Hui; Shi, John; Lin, He-Tong

    2016-06-01

    Energy status and respiration metabolism of "Fuyan" longan fruit treated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and their relationship to pericarp browning were studied. The results displayed that H2O2 significantly increased the respiration rate, increased activities of respiratory terminal oxidases like cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO), decreased NAD kinase activity, maintained lower contents of NADP and NADPH as well as higher amounts of NAD and NADH, and accelerated the decrease of energy charge. These results gave convincing evidence that the treatment of H2O2 for accelerating longan pericarp browning was due to an increase of energy deficiency, an increase of respiratory metabolic pathways of Embden-Meyerhof pathway (EMP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a decrease of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) of respiratory pathway, and an increase of activities of respiratory terminal oxidases like CCO and AAO. PMID:27213701

  13. 21 CFR 173.356 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 173.356 Section 173.356 Food... DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.356...

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has distinct adaptive responses to both hydrogen peroxide and menadione.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, D J

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with low concentrations of either hydrogen peroxide or menadione (a superoxide-generating agent) induces adaptive responses which protect cells from the lethal effects of subsequent challenge with higher concentrations of these oxidants. Pretreatment with menadione is protective against cell killing by hydrogen peroxide; however, pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide is unable to protect cells from subsequent challenge with menadione. This suggests that the adaptive responses to these two different oxidants may be distinct. PMID:1400218

  15. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    DOEpatents

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  16. Advanced age protects microvascular endothelium from aberrant Ca2+ influx and cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Matthew J; Boerman, Erika M; Behringer, Erik J; Shaw, Rebecca L; Domeier, Timothy L; Segal, Steven S

    2015-01-01

    Young (∼4 months) and Old (∼24 months) male C57BL/6 mice. Under resting conditions, with no difference in intracellular calcium levels, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) availability was ∼1/3 greater in endothelium of Old mice while vascular catalase activity was reduced by nearly half. Compared to Old, imposing oxidative stress (200 μm H2O2) for 20 min increased intracellular calcium to 4-fold greater levels in endothelium of Young in conjunction with twice the calcium influx. Prolonged (60 min) exposure to H2O2 induced 7-fold greater cell death in endothelium of Young. Microvascular adaptation to advanced age may protect endothelial cells during elevated oxidative stress to preserve functional viability of the intima. PMID:25689097

  17. An upper limit for stratospheric hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Traub, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    It has been postulated that hydrogen peroxide is important in stratospheric chemistry as a reservoir and sink for odd hydrogen species, and for its ability to interconvert them. The present investigation is concerned with an altitude dependent upper limit curve for stratospheric hydrogen peroxide, taking into account an altitude range from 21.5 to 38.0 km for January 23, 1983. The data employed are from balloon flight No. 1316-P, launched from the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) in Palestine, Texas. The obtained upper limit curve lies substantially below the data reported by Waters et al. (1981), even though the results are from the same latitude and are both wintertime measurements.

  18. Impact of hydrogen peroxide as a soil amendment on nasturtiums

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, is a highly reactive oxidizing agent naturally occurring in plants and animals. Plants produce hydrogen peroxide to destroy either their infected plant cells or the pathogens within their cells. Hydrogen peroxide also acts as a stress signal to plants. It is approved for c...

  19. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  20. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  1. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  2. Protective effects of Arctium lappa L. roots against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury and potential mechanisms in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xing; Guo, Li-Ping; Hu, Xiao-Long; Huang, Jin; Fan, Yan-Hua; Ren, Tian-Shu; Zhao, Qing-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Accumulated evidence has shown that excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in neuronal cell death related with various chronic neurodegenerative disorders. This study was designed to explore neuroprotective effects of ethyl acetate extract of Arctium lappa L. roots (EAL) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell injury in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability was significantly decreased after exposure to 200 μM H2O2, whereas pretreatment with different concentrations of EAL attenuated the H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Hoechst 33342 staining indicated that EAL reversed nuclear condensation in H2O2-treated cells. Meanwhile, TUNEL assay with DAPI staining showed that EAL attenuated apoptosis was induced by H2O2. Pretreatment with EAL also markedly elevated activities of antioxidant enzyme (GSH-Px and SOD), reduced lipid peroxidation (MDA) production, prevented ROS formation, and the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, EAL showed strong radical scavenging ability in 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assays. Furthermore, EAL inhibited H2O2-induced apoptosis by increases in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, decreases in cytochrome c release, and attenuation of caspase-3, caspase-9 activities, and expressions. These findings suggest that EAL may be regarded as a potential antioxidant agent and possess potent neuroprotective activity against H2O2-induced injury. PMID:25352420

  3. How do porosity-inducing techniques affect antibiotic elution from bone cement? An in vitro comparison between hydrogen peroxide and a mechanical mixer

    PubMed Central

    Lovric, V.; Leung, A.; Walsh, W. R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Increasing the porosity of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer increases the antibiotic elution, but the correlation between porosity and antibiotic elution is not well documented. The purposes of this study was to attempt new porosity-increasing methods and to investigate the correlation between antibiotic elution and both total and surface porosity. Materials and methods Five types of antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) using 2 g cefazolin and 40 g cement were prepared. Other than manual mixing, hydrogen peroxide was used as a foaming agent and a mixing drill piece was used as a mechanical device to try to induce porosity when mixing the cement. Elution of antibiotic into phosphate-buffered saline was measured from 1 h to 1 week. Surface porosity was calculated from density values which were measured with a density kit and an electronic balance, while total porosity was quantified using micro-computed tomography. Results When a mixing drill piece was used to induce porosity, we observed a significant increasin antibiotic elution compared to a manually mixed ALBC. On the other hand, hydrogen peroxide reduced the elution significantly. Mild correlation between the total amount of cluted in 1 week antibiotic elution and total porosity was observed. Conclusions In terms of improving elution, the mixing drill piece seemed to be efficient. A relationship between surface porosity and elution efficacy was not observed. PMID:19384476

  4. Calyxin Y induces hydrogen peroxide-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xiao-bing; Wang, Jun-song; Geng, Ya-di; Yang, Chang-shui; Kong, Ling-yi

    2013-10-28

    Calyxin Y has been recently isolated from Alpinia katsumadai which has a folk use as an anti-tumor medicine. Calyxin Y induced caspase-dependent cell death in NCI-H460 cells, and concomitantly, provoked cytoprotective autophagy with the upregulation of critical Atg proteins. The cleavage of Atg proteins by caspases acted as a switch between autophagy and apoptosis induced by calyxin Y. Intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was triggered upon exposure to calyxin Y via the induction of autophagy and apoptosis. We provided evidence that activated JNK was upstream effectors controlling both autophagy and apoptosis in response to elevated H2O2. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that calyxin Y serves multiple roles as a promising chemotherapeutic agent that induces H2O2-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation. PMID:23811287

  5. Experimental investigation of hydrogen peroxide RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Decina, A.; Zanini, S.; D'Orazio, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a detailed experimental study of the plasma properties in low pressure RF discharges in hydrogen peroxide and a comparison with argon under the same operating conditions. H2O2 plasmas have been proposed for sterilization purposes. Electrical properties of the discharge were shown to be similar, as for the RF and DC voltages of the driving electrode. Bulk plasma volume remains stable, concentrated in an almost cylindrical region between the two facing electrodes. It was found that the electron temperature is almost uniform across the plasma and independent of the power level. This is higher than in argon discharges: T e  =  4.6  ±  0.9 eV versus T e  =  3.3  ±  1.1 eV. The plasma density increases almost linearly with the power level and a substantial negative ion component has been ruled out in hydrogen peroxide. Dissociation in the plasma gas phase was revealed by atomic hydrogen and hydroxyl radical emission in the discharge spectra. Emission from hydroxyl and atomic oxygen demonstrates that oxidizing radicals are produced by hydrogen peroxide discharges, revealing its usefulness for plasma processing other than sterilization, for instance to increase polymer film surface energy. On the other hand, argon could be considered as a candidate for the sterilization purposes due to the intense production of UV radiation.

  6. Vibrationally mediated photodissociation of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ticich, T.M.; Likar, M.D.; Duebal, H.; Butler, L.J.; Crim, F.F.

    1987-11-15

    Vibrationally mediated photodissociation is a means of studying the spectroscopy of bound vibrational overtone states and of probing the electronic photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In these experiments, a highly vibrationally excited hydrogen peroxide molecule prepared by initial excitation in the region of the third (4..nu../sub OH/) or fourth (5..nu../sub OH/) overtone of the OH stretching vibration absorbs an additional photon to dissociate to OH fragments whose individual quantum state populations are measured by laser induced fluorescence. This technique is a means of obtaining excitation spectra for bound highly vibrationally excited states and confirms the accuracy of a model that incorporates the role of the torsional vibration in the vibrational overtone spectroscopy. The photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules are substantially different from those observed for dissociation by single photons of comparable or greater energy. Approximately 11% of the OH fragments formed in the vibrationally mediated photodissociation through 4..nu../sub OH/ are vibrationally excited as compared to an unobservable amount (less than or equal to2%) in the single photon ultraviolet dissociation.

  7. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ∼24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  8. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  9. Synthesis and Protective Effects of Kaempferol-3'-sulfonate on Hydrogen Peroxide-induced injury in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinbin; Wang, Qin; Wang, Chunmei; Qin, Xiaolin; Huang, Yu; Zeng, Renquan

    2016-06-01

    A novel water-soluble sulfated derivative, kaempferol-3'-sulfonate acid sodium (KS) with the composition of [C15 H9 O9 SNa]·2.5H2 O, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, and HRMS. Its protective effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells injured by hydrogen peroxide were evaluated by CCK-8 method, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. The experimental results indicated that the KS can significantly increase cell viability and reduce apoptosis on H2 O2 -injured VSMCs, as well as reverse the effects of H2 O2 on Bcl-2, Bad, and caspase-3 expressions. In addition, LDH leakage, MDA levels, and SOD and GSH activities were also measured with spectrophotometry. The results indicated that the KS acted as antioxidant preventing LDH leakage and MDA production, while increasing intracellular SOD and GSH activities. These findings revealed that KS might potentially serve as an effective antioxidant agent for prevention and treatment of vascular disease caused by H2 O2 -injured VSMCs. PMID:26706847

  10. Nelumbo nucifera leaves protect hydrogen peroxide-induced hepatic damage via antioxidant enzymes and HO-1/Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Lee, Da-Bin

    2015-06-01

    Naturally occurring phenolic compounds are widely found in plants. Here, the phenolic composition and hepatoprotective effect of the butanolic extract (BE) from Nelumbo nucifera leaves against H2O2-induced hepatic damage in cultured hepatocytes were investigated. BE showed high total phenol and flavonoid contents, and major phenolic compounds are quercetin, catechin, ferulic acid, rutin, and protocatechuic acid by HPLC analysis. BE effectively scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) cation radicals (IC50 values of 5.21 μg mL(-1) for DPPH and 6.22 μg mL(-1) for ABTS(+)) and showed strong reducing power. Pretreatment of BE prior to 650 μM H2O2 exposure markedly increased cell viability and suppressed H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and AAPH-induced cell membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, BE up-regulated intracellular glutathione levels under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Notably, the hepatoprotective effect of BE was directly correlated with the increased expression of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) by 0.62-fold, catalase (CAT) by 0.42-fold, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by 2.4-fold. Pretreatment of BE also increased the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8.1-fold indicating that increased SOD-1, CAT, and HO-1 expressions are Nrf2-mediated. PMID:25962859

  11. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization of freeze dryers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J W; Arnold, J F; Nail, S L; Renzi, E

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to steam sterilization has been examined using a pilot plant freeze dryer equipped with a prototype vapor generator. Specific objectives of the study discussed in this presentation were to: 1. Identify critical process variables affecting the lethality of VHP to Bacillus stearothermophilus spores, particularly within dead legs in the system. 2. Measure the efficacy of system degassing after sterilization. 3. Determine the effect of repeated sterilization cycles on the integrity of elastomeric components of the freeze dryer. Penetration of adequate concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor into small diameter piping, such as tubing connected to pressure gauges, is the most challenging aspect of VHP sterilization of freeze dryers. Prior to equipment modifications, spore strips placed within such dead legs remained positive irrespective of the number of gas/degas pulses and system pressure. Equipment modifications necessary to effect complete kill of biological indicators placed in system dead legs is discussed. Results of this study support the conclusion that vaporized hydrogen peroxide shows promise as an alternative sterilization method for freeze dryers. PMID:1474433

  12. Zingerone protects against stannous chloride-induced and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Iyappan; Narayanan, Nithya; Rabindran, Remitha; Jayasree, P R; Manish Kumar, P R

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the dose-dependent antioxidant activity and DNA protective effects of zingerone. At 500 μg/mL, the DPPH radical scavenging activity of zingerone and ascorbic acid as a standard was found to be 86.7 and 94.2 % respectively. At the same concentration, zingerone also showed significant reducing power (absorbance 0.471) compared to that of ascorbic acid (absorbance 0.394). The in vitro toxicity of stannous chloride (SnCl2) was evaluated using genomic and plasmid DNA. SnCl2-induced degradation of genomic DNA was found to occur at a concentration of 0.8 mM onwards with complete degradation at 1.02 mM and above. In the case of plasmid DNA, conversion of supercoiled DNA into the open circular form indicative of DNA nicking activity was observed at a concentration of 0.2 mM onwards; complete conversion was observed at a concentration of 1.02 mM and above. Zingerone was found to confer protection against SnCl2-induced oxidative damage to genomic and plasmid DNA at concentrations of 500 and 750 μg/mL onwards, respectively. This protective effect was further confirmed in the presence of UV/H2O2-a known reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system-wherein protection by zingerone against ROS-mediated DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 250 μg/mL onwards in a dose-dependent manner. This study clearly indicated the in vitro DNA protective property of zingerone against SnCl2-induced, ROS-mediated DNA damage. PMID:24006104

  13. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders. PMID:26221182

  14. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders. PMID:26221182

  15. Protective effect of the extracts from Cnidium officinale against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide via antioxidant effect.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Park, Jae Ho; Lee, Hee Kyeong; Ju, So Yeong; Hong, Se Chul; Lee, Jeong Rak; Chung, Gyu Young; Lim, Jae Hwan; Jeong, Hyung Jin

    2009-03-01

    The dried rhizomes of Cnidium officinale are used as herbal drugs in the treatment of pain, inflammation, menstrual disturbance and antivitamin deficiency disease, and also act as a blood pressure depressant. In addition, there are several reports suggesting that they have pharmacological properties to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, and that they act as an inhibitor of high glucose-induced proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells. However, little has been known about the functional role of the extracts from C. officinale on oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis caused by ROS. In this work, we have investigated the DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and intracellular ROS scavenging capacity, and Fe(2+) chelating activity of the extracts from C. officinale. In addition, we evaluated whether the extracts are capable of reducing H(2)O(2)-induced DNA and cell damage in the human skin fibroblast cell. These extracts showed a dose-dependent free-radical scavenging capacity and a protective effect on DNA damage and the lipid peroxidation causing the cell damage by ROS. These antioxidant activities and inhibitory effects of the extracts on DNA and cell damage may further explain that C. officinale is useful as a herbal medicine for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:19101603

  16. Antioxidant phenolic profile from ethyl acetate fraction of Fructus Ligustri Lucidi with protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Heng-Yin; Chen, Shiu Ching; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Kuo, Hui-Chun; Hseu, You-Cheng; Ching, Hui; Wu, Chi-Rei

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the antioxidant and protective properties of crude extract and fractions from Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in SH-SY5Y cells. The contents of their phytochemical profiles were determined by spectrophotometric methods and high performance liquid chromatography using a photodiode array detector. FLL crude extract possessed appreciable scavenging capacity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and H2O2. The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction was the most active fraction in scavenging free radicals and H2O2. Following exposure of cells to H2O2, there was a marked decrease in cell survival and intracellular antioxidant enzymes, and then intracellular oxidative stress, the level of lipid peroxidation, and caspase-3 activity were increased. Simultaneous treatment with the EtOAc fraction blocked these H2O2-induced cellular events. Hydroxytyrosol and salidroside are major components of the EtOAc fraction. These results show that the phenolic-enriched EtOAc fraction of FLL contains tyrosol-related derivatives and exerts the protective effects against H2O2 toxicity via its free radical scavenging activity and ability to elevate the levels of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22142696

  17. Hydrogen peroxide-induced antioxidant activities and cardiotonic glycoside accumulation in callus cultures of endemic Digitalis species.

    PubMed

    Cingoz, Gunce Sahin; Verma, Sandeep Kumar; Gurel, Ekrem

    2014-09-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on callus cultures of four Digitalis species (Digitalis lamarckii, Digitalis trojana, Digitalis davisiana and Digitalis cariensis) increased catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total phenolic, proline activity and cardiotonic glycoside production. Callus derived from hypocotyl explants was cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 0.25 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) thidiazuron (TDZ). After a month of culture, callus was transferred to MS medium containing 10 mM H2O2 and then incubated for 6 h. The amount of five cardenolides (Lanatoside C, Digitoxin, Digoxigenin, Gitoxigenin and Digoxin) as well as CAT, SOD, total phenolic, proline activity from Digitalis species were compared. No digoxin was detected in all treatments and control groups. The total cardenolides estimated were in the order of D. lamarckii (586.65  μg g(-1) dw), D. davisiana (506.79 μg g(-1) dw), D. cariensis (376.60 μg g(-1) dw) and D. trojana (282.39 μg g(-1) dw). It was clear that H2O2 pre-treatment resulted in an increase in enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. However, a significant negative relationship between cardenolides production and overall activities of CAT, SOD, total phenolic and proline was evident. The described protocol here will be useful for the development of new strategies for a large-scale production of cardenolides. PMID:24915111

  18. Metabolic responses of Beauveria bassiana to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress using an LC-MS-based metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Wang, Wei; Lu, Ruili; Jin, Song; Chen, Yihui; Fan, Meizhen; Huang, Bo; Li, Zengzhi; Hu, Fenglin

    2016-06-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, is commonly used as a biological agent for pest control. Environmental and biological factors expose the fungus to oxidative stress; as a result, B. bassiana has adopted a number of anti-oxidant mechanisms. In this study, we investigated metabolites of B. bassiana that are formed in response to oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) revealed differences between the control and the H2O2-treated groups. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) showed 18 up-regulated metabolites and 25 down-regulated metabolites in the H2O2-treated fungus. Pathway analysis indicated that B. bassiana may be able to alleviate oxidative stress by enhancing lipid catabolism and glycometabolism, thus decreasing membrane polarity and preventing polar H2O2 or ROS from permeating into fungal cells and protecting cells against oxidative injury. Meanwhile, most of the unsaturated fatty acids that are derived from glycerophospholipids hydrolysis can convert into oxylipins through autoxidation, which can prevent the reactive oxygen of H2O2 from attacking important macromolecules of the fungus. Results showed also that H2O2 treatment can enhance mycotoxins production which implies that oxidative stress may be able to increase the virulence of the fungus. In comparison to the control group, citric acid and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine were down-regulated, which suggested that metabolic flux was occurring to the TCA cycle and enhancing carbohydrate metabolism. The findings from this study will contribute to the understanding of how the molecular mechanisms of fungus respond to environmental and biological stress factors as well as how the manipulation of such metabolisms may lead to selection of more effective fungal strains for pest control. PMID:27116916

  19. Plumbagin exerts protective effects in nucleus pulposus cells by attenuating hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis through NF-κB and Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hui; Yu, Hang; Ren, Ding; Zhu, Kejun; Huang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Plumbagin, one of the constituents responsible for the various biological activities of Plumbago zeylanica has been demonstrated to possess antioxidant activity, which may inhibit lipid peroxidation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the present study, we aimed to examine the protective effects of plumbagin as well as the underlying mechansim through which plumbagin attenuates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). For this purpose, the NPCs were incubated with fresh medium containing H2O2 (200 µM) at 37˚C in a humidified 5% CO2 atmosphere for 6 h, and cultured with various concentrations of plumbagin (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 µM). Treatment with plumbagin significantly increased the viability of the H2O2-exposed NPCs in a dose‑dependent manner. Moreover, plumbagin significantly reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, as well as the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the H2O2‑exposed NPCs. Glutathione (GSH) content, as well as the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxdiase (GSH-Px) were increased. We found that the administration of plumbagin significantly inhibited the activity of caspase-9 and -3, and downregulated NF-κB expression and upregulated Nrf-2 expression in the H2O2-exposed NPCs. Taken together, these findings suggest that plumbagin exerts neuroprotective effects in NPCs by attenuating H2O2‑induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis through mediating the expression of NF-κB and Nrf-2. PMID:27082014

  20. Hydrogen peroxide excretion by oral streptococci and effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, J; Iwami, Y; Yamada, T

    1983-01-01

    Approved type strains of Streptococcus sanguis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. salivarius were grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rate of hydrogen peroxide excretion, oxygen uptake, and acid production from glucose by washed-cell suspensions of these strains were studied, and the levels of enzymes in cell-free extracts which reduced oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, or hypothiocyanite (OSCN-) in the presence of NADH or NADPH were assayed. The effects of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide on the rate of acid production and oxygen uptake by intact cells, the activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts, and the levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates were also studied. All strains consumed oxygen in the presence of glucose. S. sanguis, S. mitis, and anaerobically grown S. mutans excreted hydrogen peroxide. There was higher NADH oxidase and NADH peroxidase activity in aerobically grown cells than in anaerobically grown cells. NADPH oxidase activity was low in all species. Acid production, oxygen uptake, and, consequently, hydrogen peroxide excretion were inhibited in all the strains by lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide. S. sanguis and S. mitis had a higher capacity than S. mutans and S. salivarius to recover from this inhibition. Higher activity in the former strains of an NADH-OSCN oxidoreductase, which converted OSCN- into thiocyanate, explained this difference. The change in levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates after inhibition of glycolysis by OSCN- and the actual activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts in the presence of OSCN- indicated that the primary target of OSCN- in the glycolytic pathway was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. PMID:6832837

  1. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-{kappa}B in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (G{alpha}i1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of G{alpha}i1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of G{alpha}i1QL. G{alpha}i1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-{kappa}B, which resulted from an increase in NF-{kappa}B p50 protein. We conclude that G{alpha}i1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation.

  2. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  3. Complex I and complex III inhibition specifically increase cytosolic hydrogen peroxide levels without inducing oxidative stress in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Forkink, Marleen; Basit, Farhan; Teixeira, José; Swarts, Herman G.; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor studies with isolated mitochondria demonstrated that complex I (CI) and III (CIII) of the electron transport chain (ETC) can act as relevant sources of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we studied ROS generation and oxidative stress induction during chronic (24 h) inhibition of CI and CIII using rotenone (ROT) and antimycin A (AA), respectively, in intact HEK293 cells. Both inhibitors stimulated oxidation of the ROS sensor hydroethidine (HEt) and increased mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels without major effects on cell viability. Integrated analysis of cells stably expressing cytosolic- or mitochondria-targeted variants of the reporter molecules HyPer (H2O2-sensitive and pH-sensitive) and SypHer (H2O2-insensitive and pH-sensitive), revealed that CI- and CIII inhibition increased cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels. Total and mitochondria-specific lipid peroxidation was not increased in the inhibited cells as reported by the C11-BODIPY581/591 and MitoPerOx biosensors. Also expression of the superoxide-detoxifying enzymes CuZnSOD (cytosolic) and MnSOD (mitochondrial) was not affected. Oxyblot analysis revealed that protein carbonylation was not stimulated by CI and CIII inhibition. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of CI and CIII: (i) increases the levels of HEt-oxidizing ROS and (ii) specifically elevates cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels, (iii) does not induce oxidative stress or substantial cell death. We conclude that the increased ROS levels are below the stress-inducing level and might play a role in redox signaling. PMID:26516986

  4. Allicin protects rat cardiomyoblasts (H9c2 cells) from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative injury through inhibiting the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jackie Yan-Yan; Tsui, Hei-Tung; Chung, Ivan Ying-Ming; Chan, Robbie Yat-Kan; Kwan, Yiu-Wa; Chan, Shun-Wan

    2014-11-01

    Oxidative stress is considered an important factor that promotes cell death in response to a variety of pathophysiological conditions. This study investigated the antioxidant properties of allicin, the principle ingredient of garlic, on preventing oxidative stress-induced injury. The antioxidant capacities of allicin were measured by using 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced cell damage on H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Allicin (0.3-10 μM) pre-incubation could concentration-dependently attenuate the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase induced by H(2)O(2) on H9c2 cells. It could also protect H9c2 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage. However, the DPPH free radical scavenging activity of allicin was shown to be low. Therefore, it is believed that the protective effect of allicin on H9c2 cells could inhibit intracellular ROS production instead of scavenging extracellular H(2)O(2) or free radicals. For the observed protective effect on H9c2 cells, allicin might also be effective in reducing free radical-induced myocardial cell death in ischemic condition. PMID:24945597

  5. Hazard Assessment of Personal Protective Clothing for Hydrogen Peroxide Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Ben; McClure, Mark B.; Johnson, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Selection of personal protective equipment (PPE) for hydrogen peroxide service is an important part of the hazard assessment process. But because drip testing of chemical protective clothing for hydrogen peroxide service has not been reported for about 40 years, it is of great interest to test new protective clothing materials with new, high-concentration hydrogen peroxide following similar procedures. The suitability of PPE for hydrogen peroxide service is in part determined by observations made when hydrogen peroxide is dripped onto swatches of protective clothing material. Protective clothing material was tested as received, in soiled condition, and in grossly soiled condition. Materials were soiled by pretreating the material with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solution then drying to promote a reaction. Materials were grossly soiled with solid KMnO4 to greatly promote reaction. Observations of results including visual changes to the hydrogen peroxide and materials, times to ignition, and self-extinguishing characteristics of the materials are reported.

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide Accumulation in the Choroid During Intermittent Hypoxia Increases Risk of Severe Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beharry, Kay D.; Cai, Charles L.; Sharma, Poonam; Bronshtein, Vadim; Valencia, Gloria B.; Lazzaro, Douglas R.; Aranda, Jacob V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Extremely low gestational age neonates (ELGANs) requiring oxygen therapy often experience frequent episodes of intermittent hypoxia (IH) and are at high risk for severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Using an established model for oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), we examined the hypothesis that there is a critical number of daily brief IH episodes which will result in irreversible retinal oxidative damage. Methods. Newborn rats were exposed to increasing daily clustered IH episodes (12% O2 with 50% O2) from postnatal day (P) 0 to P7 or P0 to P14, or placed in room air (RA) until P21 following 7- or 14-day IH. RA littermates at P7, P14, and P21 served as controls. A group exposed to constant 50% O2 (CH) served as a second control. Blood gases, eye opening at P14, retinal, and choroidal oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation (8-isoPGF2α), oxidants (H2O2) and antioxidants (catalase and SOD), retinal pathology (adenosine diphosphatase (ADPase)-stained retinal flatmounts), and mitochondria-related genes were assessed. Results. pO2 levels were higher with increasing IH episodes and remained elevated during the reoxygenation period. High SO2 levels were associated with most severe OIR. Levels of all measured biomarkers peaked with six IH episodes and decreased with 8 to 12 episodes. H2O2 accumulated in the choroid during the reoxygenation period with irreversible retinal damage. Conclusions. Our data suggest that six is the maximum number of IH episodes that the retina can sustain. Accumulation of H2O2 in the choroid may result in high levels being delivered to the entire retina, ultimately resulting in irreversible retinal oxidative damage. PMID:24168990

  7. Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide by DAB Staining in Arabidopsis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Daudi, Arsalan; O’Brien, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    In this protocol, the in situ detection of hydrogen peroxide (one of several reactive oxygen species) is described in mature Arabidopsis rosette leaves by staining with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using an adaptation of previous methods (Thordal-Christensen et al., 1997; Bindschedler et al., 2006; Daudi et al., 2012). DAB is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of some haem-containing proteins, such as peroxidases, to generate a dark brown precipitate. This precipitate is exploited as a stain to detect the presence and distribution of hydrogen peroxide in plant cells. The protocol can be modified slightly to detect hydrogen peroxide in different types of plant tissue.

  8. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  9. Overexpression of X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis by inhibiting microRNA-24 protects periodontal ligament cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Chen, Z; Wang, J; Hu, H

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a common oral clinical drug for the tooth bleaching, induces severe cell apoptosis of periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). The excessive cell apoptosis of PDLCs impairs periodontal tissue damage and repair. However, the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. Here, we showed that microRNA-24 (miR-24) played an important role in regulating H2O2-induced cell apoptosis of PDLCs. We found that miR-24 expression was increased in PDLCs in response to H2O2 treatment. Down-regulation of miR-24 obviously rescued H2O2-induced cell apoptosis in PDLCs. By bioinformatic analysis, X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) was identified as a candidate target gene of miR-24, which was further verified by the dual-luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, the protein expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten was significantly decreased by miR-24 silencing, whereas the phosphorylation of Akt was remarkably increased by miR-24 silencing. In addition, the gene silencing of XIAP significantly reduced Akt activity and blocked the protective effect of the miR-24 inhibitor against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis. Overall, our findings suggest that miR-24 plays an important role in regulating the cell survival of PDLCs through targeting XIAP. PMID:27188727

  10. Lycopene protects human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced death via inhibition of oxidative stress and mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    FENG, CHUNSHENG; LUO, TIANFEI; ZHANG, SHUYAN; LIU, KAI; ZHANG, YANHONG; LUO, YINAN; GE, PENGFEI

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is characterized by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a common pathway that results in neuronal injury or death due to various types of pathological stress. Although lycopene has been identified as a potent antioxidant, its effect on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage remains unclear. In the present study, pretreatment with lycopene was observed to protect SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against H2O2-induced death via inhibition of apoptosis resulting from activation of caspase-3 and translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus. Furthermore, the over-produced ROS, as well as the reduced activities of anti-oxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, were demonstrated to be alleviated by lycopene. Additionally, lycopene counteracted H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, which was evidenced by suppression of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, attenuation of the decline of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of the increase of Bax and decrease of Bcl-2 levels within the mitochondria. The release of cytochrome c and AIF from the mitochondria was also reduced. These results indicate that lycopene is a potent neuroprotectant against apoptosis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and could be administered to prevent neuronal injury or death. PMID:27035331

  11. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  12. PROPULSE 980: A Hydrogen Peroxide Enrichment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, Robert; Bromley, G.; Wanger, Robert; Pauls, Dan; Maynard, Bryon; McNeal, Curtis; Dumbacher, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The PROPULSE 980 unit is a transportable processing plant that enriches aerospace grade hydrogen peroxide from 90% to 98% final concentration. The unit was developed by Degussa-H Is, in cooperation with Orbital, NASA Marshall Space Center, and NASA Stennis Space Center. The system is a self-contained unit that houses all of the process equipment, instrumentation and controls to perform the concentration operation nearly autonomously. It is designed to produce non-bulk quantities of 98% hydrogen peroxide. The enrichment unit design also maintains system, personnel and environmental safety during all aspects of the enrichment process and final product storage. As part of the Propulse 980 checkout and final buyoff, it will be disassembled at the Degussa-H Is Corporation plant in Theodore, AL, transported to the Stennis Space Center, reassembled and subjected to a series of checkout tests to verify design objectives have been met. This paper will summarize the basic project elements and provide an update on the present status of the project.

  13. Monolithic Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyst Bed Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponzo, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    With recent increased industry and government interest in rocket grade hydrogen peroxide as a viable propellant, significant effort has been expended to improve on earlier developments. This effort has been predominately centered in improving heterogeneous. typically catalyst beds; and homogeneous catalysts, which are typically solutions of catalytic substances. Heterogeneous catalyst beds have traditionally consisted of compressed wire screens plated with a catalytic substance, usually silver, and were used m many RCS applications (X-1, Mercury, and Centaur for example). Aerojet has devised a heterogeneous catalyst design that is monolithic (single piece), extremely compact, and has pressure drops equal to or less than traditional screen beds. The design consists of a bonded stack of very thin, photoetched metal plates, silver coated. This design leads to a high surface area per unit volume and precise flow area, resulting in high, stable, and repeatable performance. Very high throughputs have been demonstrated with 90% hydrogen peroxide. (0.60 lbm/s/sq in at 1775-175 psia) with no flooding of the catalyst bed. Bed life of over 900 seconds has also been demonstrated at throughputs of 0.60 lbm/s/sq in across varying chamber pressures. The monolithic design also exhibits good starting performance, short break-in periods, and will easily scale to various sizes.

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide Probes Directed to Different Cellular Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Zhou, You; Belousov, Vsevolod V.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular compartments, HyPer occurred in the reduced state in the nucleus, cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondrial intermembrane space and mitochondrial matrix, but low levels of the oxidized form of the biosensor were also observed in each of these compartments, consistent with a low peroxide tone in mammalian cells. In contrast, HyPer was mostly oxidized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using this system, we characterized control of hydrogen peroxide in various cell systems, such as cells deficient in thioredoxin reductase, sulfhydryl oxidases or subjected to selenium deficiency. Generation of hydrogen peroxide could also be monitored in various compartments following signaling events. Conclusions We found that HyPer can be used as a valuable tool to monitor hydrogen peroxide generated in different cellular compartments. The data also show that hydrogen peroxide generated in one compartment could translocate to other compartments. Our data provide information on compartmentalization, dynamics and homeostatic control of hydrogen peroxide in mammalian cells. PMID:21283738

  15. Akt attenuates apoptotic death through phosphorylation of H2A under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells and hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Cho, Sung-Woo; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Although the essential role of protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt in cell survival signaling has been clearly established, the mechanism by which Akt mediates the cellular response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. We demonstrated that Akt attenuated neuronal apoptosis through direct association with histone 2A (H2A) and phosphorylation of H2A at threonine 17. At early time points during H2O2 exposure of PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons, when the cells can tolerate the level of DNA damage, Akt was activated and phosphorylated H2A, leading to inhibition of apoptotic death. At later time points, Akt delivered the NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase Sirtuin 2 (Sirt 2) to the vicinity of phosphorylated H2A in response to irreversible DNA damage, thereby inducing H2A deacetylation and subsequently leading to apoptotic death. Ectopically expressed T17A-substituted H2A minimally interacted with Akt and failed to prevent apoptosis under oxidative stress. Thus Akt-mediated H2A phosphorylation has an anti-apoptotic function in conditions of H2O2-induced oxidative stress in neurons and PC12 cells. PMID:26899247

  16. Protective effect of polypeptides from larva of housefly (Musca domestica) on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Wang, Pan; Qin, Qi-Lian; Zhang, Huan; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Housefly (Musca domestica) is an important medical insect and its larva is an ideal high protein food source. We isolated from housefly larvae the polypeptides hydrolyzed by neutral protease (PHNP), and investigated the protective effect of PHNP on hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. Cells exposed to H₂O₂ showed a marked decrease in proliferation and intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. H₂O₂ also caused apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction including mitochondrial fragmentation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment with PHNP at concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10 μg/mL blocked these H₂O₂-induced cellular events in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of PHNP at 10 μg/mL is equal to that of ascorbic acid at 10 μM. In summary, PHNP has a protective effect against H₂O₂-induced oxidative injury in cells due to its ability to decrease intracellular ROS and elevate antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:23933357

  17. Literature review of the role of hydroxyl radicals in chemically-induced mutagenicity and carcinogenicity for the risk assessment of a disinfection system utilizing photolysis of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kikuchi, Katsushi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new disinfection system for oral hygiene, proving that hydroxyl radicals generated by the photolysis of 1 M hydrogen peroxide could effectively kill oral pathogenic microorganisms. Prior to any clinical testing, the safety of the system especially in terms of the risk of carcinogenicity is examined by reviewing the literature. Previous studies have investigated indirectly the kinds of reactive oxygen species involved in some sort of chemically-induced mutagenicity in vitro by using reactive oxygen species scavengers, suggesting the possible involvement of hydroxyl radicals. Similarly, possible involvement of hydroxyl radicals in some sort of chemically-induced carcinogenicity has been proposed. Notably, it is suggested that the hydroxyl radical can play a role in heavy metal-induced carcinogenicity that requires chronic exposure to the carcinogen. In these cases, hydroxyl radicals produced by Fenton-like reactions may be involved in the carcinogenicity. Meanwhile, potential advantages have been reported on the use of the hydroxyl radical, being included in host immune defense by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and medical applications such as for cancer treatment and antibiotics. From these, we conclude that there would seem to be little to no risk in using the hydroxyl radical as a disinfectant for short-term treatment of the oral cavity. PMID:22798706

  18. Cocktail of Four Active Components Derived from Sheng Mai San Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced PC12 Cell Apoptosis Linked with the Caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Huana; Song, Yunfei; Cao, Zhengyu; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2015-12-01

    SMXZF, a combination of four active components including ginsenoside Rb1, ginsenoside Rg1, schizandrin, and DT-13 (6:9:5:4) that is derived from Sheng Mai San, has previously been shown to exhibit a neuroprotective effect against focal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Due to the key role of oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis in the pathogenesis of stroke, we examined the effect of SMXZF in oxidative stress responses and related signaling pathways in differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our results showed that incubation with 100 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 12 hr could reduce cell viability and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity with an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In contrast, SMXZF alleviated oxidative stress by reducing the over-production of ROS and MDA in parallel to concentration dependently increasing SOD activity. In addition, SMXZF significantly attenuated H2O2-induced caspase-3 cleavage, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase-1 (ROCK1) activation, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation. Inhibiting either caspase-3 or ROCK1 mimicked the effect. Consequently, our results suggest that SMXZF inhibits H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis linked with the caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC pathway, which has also been confirmed to be a positive feedback loop in oxidative stress-injured PC12 cells. These findings support the pharmacological potential of SMXZF for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. PMID:26058543

  19. Baicalein protects C6 glial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis through regulation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Ok; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Cheol; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye-Jin; Cho, Eun-Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Baicalein, a flavonoid originally obtained from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to possess various biological properties. Although several studies have demonstrated the anti-oxidative activity of baicalein, its neuroprotective mechanisms have not been clearly established. The present study aimed to detect the effects of baicalein against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage in C6 glial cells and to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. The results demonstrated that baicalein effectively inhibited H2O2-induced growth and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. We noted that Baicalein also attenuated the H2O2‑induced formation of comet tail, phosphorylation of p-γH2A.X, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP or ΔΨm), and changes to apoptosis‑related protein expression, which suggests that it can prevent H2O2‑induced cellular DNA damage and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, treatment with baicalein effectively induced the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Moreover, the protective effects of baicalein against H2O2‑induced DNA damage and apoptosis were abolished by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, and auranofin, a TrxR inhibitor. In addition, we noted that the cytoprotective effects of baicalein were attenuated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The findings of our present study suggest that baicalein enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity through the inhibition of ROS generation and the activation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway, thus protecting C6 cells from H2O2-induced neuronal damage. PMID:26796879

  20. Demonstration of the Catalytic Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Alfred R. Jr.; Kessinger, Angela

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration known as Elephant's Toothpaste in which the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by iodide. Oxygen is released and soap bubbles are produced. The foam produced is measured, and results show a good relationship between the amount of foam and the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide. (DDR)

  1. Impairment of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in CD95(APO-1)-induced human T-cell leukemia cell apoptosis mediated by glutathione depletion and generation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yin, W; Cheng, W; Shen, W; Shu, L; Zhao, J; Zhang, J; Hua, Z-C

    2007-08-01

    Human T-cell leukemia is a malignant disease that needs various regimens of cytotoxic chemotherapy to overcome drug resistance. Recently, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase has emerged as a potential target for cancer therapy. However, its exact signaling pathway in human T-cell leukemia cell death has not been well defined. In the current study, we found CD95(APO-1) was able to trigger the internalization of plasma membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in Jurkat cells or primary T cells as a mechanism to suppress its activity. This internalization was closely relevant to intracellular glutathione (GSH) depletion in Jurkat cells downstream of Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) and caspase 8. GSH depletion in Fas L-treated Jurkat cells induced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which subsequently increased the serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit. Exogenous H(2)O(2) even mimicked the effect of Fas L to upregulate the serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit and suppress Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. Overall, our results indicate that CD95(APO-1) induces the FADD- and caspase 8-dependent internalization of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase through intracellular GSH loss, and the subsequent generation of H(2)O(2)-mediated serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit. Taken together, this study presents a novel regulatory mechanism of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in CD95(APO-1)-mediated human T-leukemia cell apoptosis. PMID:17554377

  2. Lactoferrin and ovotransferrin contribute toward antioxidative effects of Edible Bird's Nest against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhiping; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Ismail, Norsharina; Ideris, Aini; Mahmud, Rozi

    2015-01-01

    There are reports of improved redox outcomes due to consumption of Edible Bird's Nest (EBN). Many of the functional effects of EBN can be linked to its high amounts of antioxidants. Interestingly, dietary components with high antioxidants have shown promise in the prevention of aging and its related diseases like Alzheimer's disease. In this study, the antioxidative potentials of EBN and its constituents, lactoferrin (LF) and ovotransferrin (OVF), were determined and protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)- induced toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and acridine orange and propidium iodide (AO/PI) staining with microscopy were examined. Results showed that EBN and its constituents attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, and decreased radical oxygen species (ROS) through increased scavenging activity. Furthermore, LF, OVF, and EBN produced transcriptional changes in antioxidant related genes that tended towards neuroprotection as compared to H2O2-treated group. Overall, the results suggest that LF and OVF may produce synergistic or all-or-none antioxidative effects in EBN. PMID:26057702

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) Potential for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafwallner, F.

    2004-10-01

    Low toxicity or "green" propellants are now under study by organizations around the world. Especially ultra high concentrated hydrogen peroxide (HP) may be a significant step toward less toxic, storable und safer operation of upper stages and spacecrafts. HP can be used as a monopropellant, when catalytically decomposed or as a bipropellant constituting the propellant combination`s oxidizer. Serving as a monopropellant, catalytic decomposition will result in exhaust of superheated steam and oxygen which can be used to drive gas turbines and feed life support systems or provide thrust as a monopropellant, provide the oxidizer, or function as an igniter for bipropellant engines. HP can be used in fuel cells to produce electrical power, heat and water.

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Heng, Lee Yook; Hashim, Uda

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a biosensor utilizing modified titania, TiO2 particles using aminopropyl-triethoxy-silane, (APTS) for developing hydrogen peroxide biosensor is presented. The surface of Ti-APTS particles is used as a support for hemoglobin immobilization via covalent bonding. The performance of the biosensor is determined by differential pulse voltammetry. The linear response was observed at the reduction current of redox mediator probe [FeCN6]3-/4- at potential between 0.22 V to 0.24 V. The preliminary result for electrochemistry study on this modified electrode is reported. The preliminary linear range is obtained from 1×10-2 M to 1×10-8 M.

  6. Bactericidal effect of hydrogen peroxide on spacecraft isolates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, M. D.; Renninger, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on both sporeforming and nonsporeforming spacecraft isolates as an initial step in determining its suitability for microbiological decontamination of certain United States spacecraft. Survivor data were obtained for eight bacterial isolates (six sporeformers and two nonsporeformers) recovered before launch Mariner 9 and exposed to concentrations of 3, 10, and 15% hydrogen peroxide. The effects of various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide on the spores are presented in tabular form, along with the percentage of survival of nonsporeformers exposed to hydrogen peroxide. No viable vegetative cells were recovered after a 10-min exposure time to any of the three concentration of hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 interact to mediate UV-B-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in radish sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cui, Jin; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk among hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in the hypocotyls of radish sprouts was investigated. The results showed that UV-B irradiation significantly increased the anthocyanin accumulation and the expression of UVR8, and a similar trend appeared in radish sprouts subjected to cadmium, chilling and salt stresses regardless of light source. However, these responses disappeared under dark exposure. These results suggest that abiotic stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were light-dependent. Moreover, abiotic stresses all enhanced the production of H2O2 and exogenous H2O2 addition significantly increased the anthocyanin concentration and UVR8 transcription, while these increases were severely inhibited by addition of dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a chemical trap for H2O2). It seems to suggest that H2O2 played an important role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, addition of 0.5 mM sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO-releasing compound) substantially induced the anthocyanin accumulation, and H2O2-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were significantly suppressed by co-treatment with 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (PTIO, a NO scavenger), which was parallel with the expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related transcription factors and structural genes. All these results demonstrate that both H2O2 and NO are involved in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation, and there is a crosstalk between them as well as a classical UVR8 pathway. PMID:27404993

  8. Protective Effect of 2,4',5'-Trihydroxyl-5,2'-dibromo diphenylmethanone, a New Halophenol, against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced EA.hy926 Cells Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianguo; Feng, Xiue; Ge, Rui; Li, Jiankuan; Li, Qingshan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the process of energy metabolism in aerobic respiration. A growing body of evidence indicates that excessive ROS is implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. The newly synthesized halophenol, 2,4',5'-trihydroxyl-5,2'-dibromo diphenylmethanone (TDD), exhibits antioxidative and cytoprotective activities in vitro. In this study, the protective effect of TDD against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative injury of EA.hy926 cells was investigated. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-dephenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while the effect of TDD on the transcription profile of EA.hy926 cells subjected to H2O2-induced oxidative injury was evaluated by microarray analysis. Several signaling pathways, including apoptosis, were significantly associated with TDD. Flow cytometric analysis was used to evaluate anti-apoptotic effect of TDD. Subsequently, RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the expressions of the apoptosis-associated protein, Bcl-2 and Bax. Meanwhile the expression of cleaved caspase-3, an executioner of apoptosis, was also detected by Western blot. The results showed that pretreatment of EA.hy926 cells with TDD prevented the decrease of cell viability induced by H2O2, and attenuated H2O2-induced elevation of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 while increased Bcl-2 expressions. In summary, TDD inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative injury of EA.hy926 cells through negative regulation of apoptosis. These findings suggest that TDD is a potential candidate for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26251890

  9. Hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 interact to mediate UV-B-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in radish sprouts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cui, Jin; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk among hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in the hypocotyls of radish sprouts was investigated. The results showed that UV-B irradiation significantly increased the anthocyanin accumulation and the expression of UVR8, and a similar trend appeared in radish sprouts subjected to cadmium, chilling and salt stresses regardless of light source. However, these responses disappeared under dark exposure. These results suggest that abiotic stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were light-dependent. Moreover, abiotic stresses all enhanced the production of H2O2 and exogenous H2O2 addition significantly increased the anthocyanin concentration and UVR8 transcription, while these increases were severely inhibited by addition of dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a chemical trap for H2O2). It seems to suggest that H2O2 played an important role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, addition of 0.5 mM sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO-releasing compound) substantially induced the anthocyanin accumulation, and H2O2-induced anthocyanin accumulation and UVR8 expression were significantly suppressed by co-treatment with 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (PTIO, a NO scavenger), which was parallel with the expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related transcription factors and structural genes. All these results demonstrate that both H2O2 and NO are involved in UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation, and there is a crosstalk between them as well as a classical UVR8 pathway. PMID:27404993

  10. Esculetin-induced protection of human hepatoma HepG2 cells against hydrogen peroxide is associated with the Nrf2-dependent induction of the NAD(P)H: Quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, Sudhakar R.; Ellis, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-15

    Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxy coumarin), is a potent antioxidant that is present in several plant species. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of protection of esculetin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability, cell integrity, intracellular glutathione levels, generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of antioxidant enzymes were used as markers to measure cellular oxidative stress and response to ROS. The protective effect of esculetin was compared to a well-characterized chemoprotective compound quercetin. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with sub-lethal (10-25 {mu}M) esculetin for 8 h prevented cell death and maintained cell integrity following exposure to 0.9 mM hydrogen peroxide. An increase in the generation of ROS following hydrogen peroxide treatment was significantly attenuated by 8 h pre-treatment with esculetin. In addition, esculetin ameliorated the decrease in intracellular glutathione caused by hydrogen peroxide exposure. Moreover, treatment with 25 {mu}M esculetin for 8 h increased the expression of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) at both protein and mRNA levels significantly, by 12-fold and 15-fold, respectively. Esculetin treatment also increased nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8-fold indicating that increased NQO1 expression is Nrf2-mediated. These results indicate that esculetin protects human hepatoma HepG2 cells from hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative injury and that this protection is provided through the induction of protective enzymes as part of an adaptive response mediated by Nrf2 nuclear accumulation.

  11. Neuroprotection of (+)-2-(1-Hydroxyl-4-Oxocyclohexyl) Ethyl Caffeate Against Hydrogen Peroxide and Lipopolysaccharide Induced Injury via Modulating Arachidonic Acid Network and p38-MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiao-Ning; Xu, Liu-Xin; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong-Lin; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are highly relevant to the pathological processes of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). (+)-2-(1-hydroxyl-4-oxocyclohexyl) ethyl caffeate (HOEC), a novel 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, was isolated from the whole plant of Incarvillea mairei var granditlora (Wehrhahn) Grierson. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of HOEC on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced cytotoxicity and neuroinflammation in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay, LDH release assay, morphological observation and Hoechst 33342/PI dual staining followed by EIA, immunofluorescence staining and Western Blotting analysis were performed to elucidate the neuroprotective effect of HOEC. Treatment with HOEC at various concentrations prior to H2O2 exposure significantly enhanced cell viability, decreased LDH release, prevented cell morphologic changes and apoptosis. Instead of PGE2 reduction, HOEC markedly inhibited the production of LTB4 and suppressed the macrophage-mediated neurotoxicity. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining showed that HOEC inhibited H2O2-induced p38 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Neuroprotective effect of HOEC was abolished by a p38 inhibitor. Further in vivo studies of LPS-induced neuroinflammation confirmed the anti-inflammatory effects of HOEC. These findings that HOEC protects SH-SY5Y cells from H2O2 and LPS-induced injury via arachidonic acid network modulation followed by p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling, might make HOEC be considered as a therapeutic candidate for prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases involving oxidative stress or/and inflammation. PMID:26510982

  12. Protective efficacy of carnosic acid against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative injury in HepG2 cells through the SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Fan, Qing; Lin, Musen; Zhang, Ce; Fan, Guangjun; Zhai, Xiaohan; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Zhao; Yao, Jihong

    2015-08-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), found in rosemary, has been reported to have antioxidant and antiadipogenic properties. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanism by which CA inhibits hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in HepG2 cells. Cells were pretreated with 2.5-10 μmol/L CA for 2 h and then exposed to 3 mmol/L H2O2 for an additional 4 h. CA dose-dependently increased cell viability and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activities. Pretreatment with CA completely attenuated the inhibited expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and the B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL), and reduced glutathione activity caused by H2O2, whereas it reversed reactive oxygen species accumulation and the increase in cleaved caspase-3. Importantly, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, was significantly increased by CA. Considering the above results, we hypothesized that SIRT1 may play important roles in the protective effects of CA in injury induced by H2O2. As expected, SIRT1 suppression by Ex527 (6-chloro-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazole-1-carboxamide) and siRNA-mediated SIRT1 silencing (si-SIRT1) significantly aggravated the H2O2-induced increased level of cleaved caspase-3 but greatly reduced the decreased expression of MnSOD and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, the positive regulatory effect of CA was inhibited by si-SIRT1. Collectively, the present study indicated that CA can alleviate H2O2-induced hepatocyte damage through the SIRT1 pathway. PMID:26059423

  13. Proteomics of the oxidative stress response induced by hydrogen peroxide and paraquat reveals a novel AhpC-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hare, Nathan J; Scott, Nichollas E; Shin, Eun Hye H; Connolly, Angela M; Larsen, Martin R; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2011-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen most typically associated with wound infections, but also the main cause of mortality in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). The ability to adapt to oxidative stress associated with host immune defense may be one mechanism by which P. aeruginosa establishes infection in the cystic fibrosis lung and eventually out-competes other pathogenic bacteria to persist into chronic infection. We utilized a proteomics approach to identify the proteins associated with the oxidative stress response of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide-inducing paraquat. 2-DE and MS allowed for the identification of 59 and 58 protein spots that were statistically significantly altered following H(2) O(2) and paraquat treatment, respectively. We observed a unique mass and pI pattern for alkylhydroperoxide reductase C (AhpC) that was replicated by hypothetical protein PA3529 following treatment with 10 mM H(2) O(2) . AhpC belongs to the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family and is a redox enzyme responsible for removing peroxides in bacterial cells. MS analysis showed that PA3529 was altered by the formation of a dimer via a disulfide bond in a manner analogous to that known for AhpC, and by cysteine overoxidation to Cys-sulfonic acid (SO(3) H) postoxidative stress. PA3529 is therefore a functional AhpC paralog expressed under H(2) O(2) stress. Following paraquat-induced oxidative stress, we also observed the overabundance and likely oxidative modification of a second hypothetical antioxidant protein (PA3450) that shares sequence similarity with 1-Cys peroxiredoxins. Other induced proteins included known oxidative stress proteins (superoxide dismutase and catalase), as well as those involved in iron acquisition (siderophore biosynthesis and receptor proteins FpvA and FptA) and hypothetical proteins, including others predicted to be antioxidants (PA0848). These data suggest that P. aeruginosa contains a plethora of novel

  14. Modulation of Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Neuronal Cells by Thymoquinone-Rich Fraction and Thymoquinone via Transcriptomic Regulation of Antioxidant and Apoptotic Signaling Genes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Norsharina; Ismail, Maznah; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Abu Bakar, Muhammad Firdaus; Basri, Hamidon; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa Linn. (N. sativa) and its bioactive constituent Thymoquinone (TQ) have demonstrated numerous pharmacological attributes. In the present study, the neuroprotective properties of Thymoquinone-rich fraction (TQRF) and TQ against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced neurotoxicity in differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. TQRF was extracted using supercritical fluid extraction while TQ was acquired commercially, and their effects on H2O2 were evaluated using cell viability assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay, morphological observation, and multiplex gene expression. Both TQRF and TQ protected the cells against H2O2 by preserving the mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, reducing intracellular ROS levels, preserving morphological architecture, and modulating the expression of genes related to antioxidants (SOD1, SOD2, and catalase) and signaling genes (p53, AKT1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK, and NF-κβ). In conclusion, the enhanced efficacy of TQRF over TQ was likely due to the synergism of multiple constituents in TQRF. The efficacy of TQRF was better than that of TQ alone when equal concentrations of TQ in TQRF were compared. In addition, TQRF also showed comparable effects to TQ when the same concentrations were tested. These findings provide further support for the use of TQRF as an alternative to combat oxidative stress insults in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26823946

  15. Modulation of Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Neuronal Cells by Thymoquinone-Rich Fraction and Thymoquinone via Transcriptomic Regulation of Antioxidant and Apoptotic Signaling Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Norsharina; Ismail, Maznah; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Abu Bakar, Muhammad Firdaus; Basri, Hamidon; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa Linn. (N. sativa) and its bioactive constituent Thymoquinone (TQ) have demonstrated numerous pharmacological attributes. In the present study, the neuroprotective properties of Thymoquinone-rich fraction (TQRF) and TQ against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced neurotoxicity in differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. TQRF was extracted using supercritical fluid extraction while TQ was acquired commercially, and their effects on H2O2 were evaluated using cell viability assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay, morphological observation, and multiplex gene expression. Both TQRF and TQ protected the cells against H2O2 by preserving the mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, reducing intracellular ROS levels, preserving morphological architecture, and modulating the expression of genes related to antioxidants (SOD1, SOD2, and catalase) and signaling genes (p53, AKT1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK, and NF-κβ). In conclusion, the enhanced efficacy of TQRF over TQ was likely due to the synergism of multiple constituents in TQRF. The efficacy of TQRF was better than that of TQ alone when equal concentrations of TQ in TQRF were compared. In addition, TQRF also showed comparable effects to TQ when the same concentrations were tested. These findings provide further support for the use of TQRF as an alternative to combat oxidative stress insults in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26823946

  16. Copper-induced hydrogen peroxide upregulation of a metallothionein gene, OsMT2c, from Oryza sativa L. confers copper tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shi, Xiaoting; Qian, Meng; Zheng, Luqing; Lian, Chunlan; Xia, Yan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2015-08-30

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich metal-binding proteins found in numerous genera and species, but their functions in abiotic stress tolerance remain unclear. Here, a MT gene from Oryza sativa, OsMT2c, was isolated and characterized, encoding a type 2 MT, and observed expression in the roots, leaf sheathes, and leaves, but only weak expression in seeds. OsMT2c was upregulated by copper (Cu) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. Excessive Cu elicited a rapid and sustained production and release of H2O2 in rice, and exogenous H2O2 scavengers N,N'-dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and ascorbic acid (Asc) decreased H2O2 production and OsMT2c expression. Furthermore, the expression of OsMT2c increased in the osapx2 mutant in which the H2O2 levels were higher than in wild-type (WT) plants. These results showed that Cu increased MT2c expression through the production and accumulation of Cu-induced H2O2 in O. sativa. In addition, the transgenic OsMT2c-overexpressing Arabidopsis displayed improved tolerance to Cu stress and exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability compared to WT and empty-vector (Ev) seedlings. PMID:25867584

  17. Enzyme-Treated Asparagus Extract Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Murine Skin Fibroblast L929 Cells.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Ken; Takanari, Jun; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Sakurai, Takuya; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hideki; Kizaki, Takako

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) exerts a wide variety of beneficial biological actions including facilitating anti-cortisol stress and neurological anti-aging responses. However, the anti-skin aging effects of ETAS remain to be elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play pivotal roles in skin aging. Increased ROS levels in fibroblasts in response to ultraviolet irradiation activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its downstream transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), and the resultant gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) isoforms accelerates collagen breakdown in the dermis. Therefore, we explored whether ETAS has anti-skin aging effects by attenuating the oxidative stress responses in fibroblasts. Simultaneous treatment of murine skin L929 fibroblasts with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and either ETAS or dextrin showed that ETAS significantly suppressed H2O2-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA as measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. ETAS also clearly suppressed H2O2-stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun (AP-1 subunit) and JNK as determined by Western blot. However, ETAS did not affect the increased amounts of carbonyl proteins in response to H2O2, also as determined by Western blotting. These results suggest that ETAS diminishes cellular responsiveness to ROS but does not scavenge ROS. Thus, ETAS has the potential to prevent skin aging through attenuating the oxidative stress responses in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:27319149

  18. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Protective effects of Semiaquilegia adoxoides n-butanol extract against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bing; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jianta; Zhang, Mingming; Xu, Ran; Wu, Fei; Xiao, Haitao; Tang, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Context Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced damage in the lens epithelium leads to cell death and cataract. Semiaquilegia adoxoides (DC.) Makino (Ranunculaceae), a folk medicine of Hmong (an ethnic group of China), has been traditionally used to treat cataract; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is yet to be uncovered. Objective This study aimed to investigate whether the n-butanol extract of S. adoxoides (nSA) is effective against the H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lens epithelial (HLE) cells. Materials and methods Human lens epithelial (SRA 01/04) cells were stimulated by H2O2 (250 μM) in the presence or absence of nSA. The antioxidant effects of nSA were determined in terms of cell viability (MTT assay), apoptosis (AnnexinV/PI staining), radical scavenging capability (various enzymatic assays), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123 staining), expression of apoptotic markers including caspase-3 and caspase-9 and the change of Bcl-2/Bax ratio (western blot) in the HLE cells. Results The results showed that pretreatment of nSA (250, 500 and 1000 μg/mL) markedly reduced H2O2-induced cellular apoptosis and malondialdehyde accumulation, but elevated the activities of total superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase. Thus, the total antioxidative capability was enhanced upon the nSA treatment meanwhile the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was prevented. Moreover, nSA at concentrations of 250, 500 and 1000 μg/mL also significantly suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and -9, and increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in the HLE cells. Discussion and conclusion Our findings suggested that nSA is a potential prophylactic agent in the prevention of cataractogeneis. PMID:26974044

  20. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael F; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission. PMID:26217368

  1. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission. PMID:26217368

  2. 1,4-Benzenediboronic-Acid-Induced Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles: Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Detection and Biotin-Avidin-Mediated Immunoassay with Naked-Eye Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth of small-sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is often implemented for H2O2 sensing and plasmonic immunoassay. In contrast, there is little-to-no information in the literature regarding the application of H2O2-inhibited aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. This study discloses that benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BDBA) was effective in driving the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs through an interaction between α-hydroxycarboxylate of citrate and boronic acids of BDBA. The H2O2-mediated oxidation of BDBA resulted in the conversion of boronic acid groups to phenol groups. The oxidized BDBA was incapable of triggering the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. Thus, the presence of H2O2 prohibited BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. The BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs can be paired with the glucose oxidase (GOx)-glucose system to design a colorimetric probe for glucose. Moreover, a H2O2·BDBA·AuNP probe was integrated with sandwich immunoassay, biotinylated antibody, and avidin-conjugated GOx for the selective naked-eye detection of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human-prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The lowest detectable concentrations of rabbit IgG and human PSA by the naked eye were down to 0.1 and 4 ng/mL, respectively. More importantly, the proposed plasmonic immunoassay allowed the naked-eye quantification of 0-10 ng/mL PSA at an interval of 2 ng/mL in plasma samples. PMID:27091002

  3. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-07-09

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated inmore » medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. Lastly, we hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.« less

  4. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-07-09

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. Lastly, we hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.

  5. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide activates NFkappaB and the interleukin-6 promoter through NFkappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Johnston, G; Stebler, B; Keller, E T

    2001-06-01

    Aging is associated not only with oxidant stress, but also with increased interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. To determine if oxidative stress could contribute to the age-associated increase IL-6 expression, we exposed LNCaP prostate carcinoma cells and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells to H2O2 as an oxidant challenge. We found that H2O2 induced IL-6 expression through activation of the IL-6 promoter. Furthermore, H2O2-induced activation of the promoter was mediated through nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB) secondary to H2O2-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha. NFkappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) is upstream of the IkappaB kinase complex that induces IkappaBalpha degradation. Accordingly, we explored if H2O2 induces IL-6 expression through NIK. In addition to H2O2 inducing NIK autophosphorylation, transfection of LNCaP cells with a dominant negative NIK diminished H2O2-mediated NFkappaB and IL-6 promoter activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that H2O2 induces the IL-6 promoter by activating NFkappaB through NIK. These data provide a candidate mechanism through which oxidant challenge induces IL-6 gene expression with age. PMID:11491660

  7. Intraoral chemical burn from use of 3% hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Arash M; Brooks, John K

    2011-01-01

    Injudicious use of over-the-counter 3% hydrogen peroxide, a relatively potent oxidative agent, can result in a chemical burn to the oral mucosa. This article describes a patient who rinsed with 3% hydrogen peroxide for periods of more than two minutes as a self-prescribed remedy for oral discomfort following seafood ingestion. Subsequently, the patient experienced pain and extensive chemical burns of the sublingual and buccal mucosa and gingiva. In addition, the buccal mucosa underwent necrosis. Prolonged oral mucosal contact with 3% hydrogen peroxide is ill-advised. PMID:22313923

  8. Methanol extracts from Cystoseira tamariscifolia and Cystoseira nodicaulis are able to inhibit cholinesterases and protect a human dopaminergic cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Luísa; Silvestre, Laura; Rocha, Maria Isabel; Rodrigues, Maria João; Vizetto-Duarte, Catarina; Pereira, Hugo; Barreira, Luísa; Varela, João

    2016-09-01

    Context Marine macroalgae contain several bioactive molecules that may be developed as functional foods, but information about their neuroprotective potential is scarce. Objective The objective of this study is to determine the in vitro antioxidant and neuroprotective features of marine algae from the southern coast of Portugal and to assess the total content of different types of bioactives. Materials and methods Methanol extracts from 21 macroalgal species from the southern Portugal were evaluated for in vitro antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Active extracts were further evaluated for inhibitory activity against butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and tyrosinase (TYRO), and for their ability to attenuate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The total contents of different phenolic groups were determined for the most active extracts. Results Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss (Sargassaceae) had the highest antiradical activity (92%, 1 mg/mL). Cystoseira nodicaulis (Withering) M. Roberts (Sargassaceae) (75%) and Cystoseira humilis Schousboe ex Kützing (Sargassaceae) (70%) had the highest iron-chelating activity at 10 mg/mL. Cystoseira baccata (S.G. Gmelin) P.C. Silva (Sargassaceae) was more active towards copper (66%, 10 mg/mL). Cystoseira tamariscifolia had the highest AChE inhibitory capacity (85%, 10 mg/mL). Cystoseira tamariscifolia and C. nodicaulis were also active against BuChE and TYRO, and were able to protect SH-SY5Y cells against oxidative stress induced by H2O2. Cystoseira tamariscifolia had the highest content of all the groups of phenolics, and was particularly enriched in hydroxycinnamic acids (106 mg CAE/g DW). Discussion and conclusion Results indicate that C. tamariscifolia and C. nodicaulis are important sources of nutraceutical compounds and may be considered functional foods that could improve cognitive functions. PMID:26731087

  9. Nitroxide antioxidant as a potential strategy to attenuate the oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide plus nitric oxide in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Tien; Yu, Liang-En; Wang, Jiz-Yuh

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative/nitrosative stress contributes to the etiology of the neurological disorders, including ischemic stroke and chronic neurodegeneration. Neurotoxic modifications mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are closely associated with the destruction of key macromolecules and inactivation of antioxidant enzymes, which compromises antioxidant defenses. Approaches to expel ROS/RNS and alleviate toxic oxidative/nitrosative stress in neurons have not completely been defined. Here, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of various antioxidants that serve as the neuroprotectors under a toxic stress created by ROS plus nitric oxide (NO). Sublytic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, l-penicillamine (SNAP) enabled to induce a toxic oxidative/nitrosative stress through activating both p38 MAPK and p53 cascades, and cause DNA damage and protein tyrosine nitration in primary neuronal cultures. After comparing six antioxidants, including superoxide dimutase (SOD), catalase, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl (TEMPO), N-acetylcysteine, dimethylthiourea, and uric acid, TEMPO was the superior antioxidant that comprehensively and efficaciously decreased H2O2 plus SNAP-evoked activation of stress cascades of p38 MAPK and p53, production of NO, ROS, and peroxynitrite, double-strand breaks of DNA, and nitration of protein tyrosine residues. SOD increased the peroxynitrite formation and was unable to reduce the level of protein nitration. All antioxidants tested, except SOD, effectively reduced neuronal damage and DNA breakage caused by the toxic H2O2/SNAP combination. In conclusion, these results suggest that TEMPO ensures excellent ROS/RNS clearance and stress-signaling inhibition, thus effectively rescuing neurons from ROS/H2O2 plus NO/SNAP-induced insult. This study reveals a potential strategy for nitroxide antioxidants as a therapeutic agent against oxidative/nitrosative neurotoxicity. PMID:26891889

  10. Genome-wide analysis of hydrogen peroxide-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis reveals a high light-induced transcriptional cluster involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Vanderauwera, Sandy; Zimmermann, Philip; Rombauts, Stéphane; Vandenabeele, Steven; Langebartels, Christian; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Inzé, Dirk; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2005-10-01

    In plants, reactive oxygen species and, more particularly, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) play a dual role as toxic by-products of normal cell metabolism and as regulatory molecules in stress perception and signal transduction. Peroxisomal catalases are an important sink for photorespiratory H(2)O(2). Using ATH1 Affymetrix microarrays, expression profiles were compared between control and catalase-deficient Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Reduced catalase levels already provoked differences in nuclear gene expression under ambient growth conditions, and these effects were amplified by high light exposure in a sun simulator for 3 and 8 h. This genome-wide expression analysis allowed us to reveal the expression characteristics of complete pathways and functional categories during H(2)O(2) stress. In total, 349 transcripts were significantly up-regulated by high light in catalase-deficient plants and 88 were down-regulated. From this data set, H(2)O(2) was inferred to play a key role in the transcriptional up-regulation of small heat shock proteins during high light stress. In addition, several transcription factors and candidate regulatory genes involved in H(2)O(2) transcriptional gene networks were identified. Comparisons with other publicly available transcriptome data sets of abiotically stressed Arabidopsis revealed an important intersection with H(2)O(2)-deregulated genes, positioning elevated H(2)O(2) levels as an important signal within abiotic stress-induced gene expression. Finally, analysis of transcriptional changes in a combination of a genetic (catalase deficiency) and an environmental (high light) perturbation identified a transcriptional cluster that was strongly and rapidly induced by high light in control plants, but impaired in catalase-deficient plants. This cluster comprises the complete known anthocyanin regulatory and biosynthetic pathway, together with genes encoding unknown proteins. PMID:16183842