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Sample records for hydrogen sulfide h2s

  1. 30 CFR 250.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must... Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.215 What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the...

  2. The dipole moment surface for hydrogen sulfide H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Ala`a. A. A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Yurchenko, Sergey N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    In this work we perform a systematic ab initio study of the dipole moment surface (DMS) of H2S at various levels of theory and of its effect on the intensities of vibration-rotation transitions; H2S intensities are known from the experiment to display anomalies which have so far been difficult to reproduce by theoretical calculations. We use the transition intensities from the HITRAN database of 14 vibrational bands for our comparisons. The intensities of all fundamental bands show strong sensitivity to the ab initio method used for constructing the DMS while hot, overtone and combination bands up to 4000 cm-1 do not. The core-correlation and relativistic effects are found to be important for computed line intensities, for instance affecting the most intense fundamental band (ν2) by about 20%. Our recommended DMS, called ALYT2, is based on the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(6+d)Z level of theory supplemented by a core-correlation/relativistic corrective surface obtained at the CCSD[T]/aug-cc-pCV5Z-DK level. The corresponding computed intensities agree significantly better (to within 10%) with experimental data taken directly from original papers. Worse agreement (differences of about 25%) is found for those HITRAN intensities obtained from fitted effective dipole models, suggesting the presence of underlying problems in those fits.

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Releasing Agents: Chemistry and Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Biggs, Tyler D.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a newly recognized signaling molecule with very potent cytoprotective actions. The fields of H2S physiology and pharmacology have been rapidly growing in recent years, but a number of fundamental issues must be addressed to advance our understanding of the biology and clinical potential of H2S in the future. Hydrogen sulfide releasing agents (also known as H2S donors) have been widely used in the field. These compounds are not only useful research tools, but also potential therapeutic agents. It is therefore important to study the chemistry and pharmacology of exogenous H2S and to be aware of the limitations associated with the choice of donors used to generate H2S in vitro and in vivo. In this review we summarized the developments and limitations of current available donors including H2S gas, sulfide salts, garlic-derived sulfur compounds, Lawesson’s reagent/analogs, 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones, thiol-activated donors, photo-caged donors, and thioamino acids. Some biological applications of these donors were also discussed. PMID:25019301

  4. 30 CFR 250.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must... CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.215 What hydrogen...

  5. Phosphorylation of BK channels modulates the sensitivity to hydrogen sulfide (H2S)

    PubMed Central

    Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Fuchs, Roman; Kainz, Verena; Weiger, Thomas M.; Hermann, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gases, such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), or hydrogen sulfide (H2S), termed gasotransmitters, play an increasingly important role in understanding of how electrical signaling of cells is modulated. H2S is well-known to act on various ion channels and receptors. In a previous study we reported that H2S increased calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel activity. Aims: The goal of the present study is to investigate the modulatory effect of BK channel phosphorylation on the action of H2S on the channel as well as to recalculate and determine the H2S concentrations in aqueous sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS) solutions. Methods: Single channel recordings of GH3, GH4, and GH4 STREX cells were used to analyze channel open probability, amplitude, and open dwell times. H2S was measured with an anion selective electrode. Results: The concentration of H2S produced from NaHS was recalculated taking pH, temperature salinity of the perfusate, and evaporation of H2S into account. The results indicate that from a concentration of 300 μM NaHS, only 11–13%, i.e., 34–41 μM is effective as H2S in solution. GH3, GH4, and GH4 STREX cells respond differently to phosphorylation. BK channel open probability (Po) of all cells lines used was increased by H2S in ATP-containing solutions. PKA prevented the action of H2S on channel Po in GH4 and GH4 STREX, but not in GH3 cells. H2S, high significantly increased Po of all PKG pretreated cells. In the presence of PKC, which lowers channel activity, H2S increased channel Po of GH4 and GH4 STREX, but not those of GH3 cells. H2S increased open dwell times of GH3 cells in the absence of ATP significantly. A significant increase of dwell times with H2S was also observed in the presence of okadaic acid. Conclusions: Our results suggest that phosphorylation by PKG primes the channels for H2S activation and indicate that channel phosphorylation plays an important role in the response to H2S. PMID:25429270

  6. 30 CFR 250.245 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... analysis must be consistent with the EPA's risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must... Development Operations Coordination Documents (docd) § 250.245 What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information...

  7. 30 CFR 250.245 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... analysis must be consistent with the EPA's risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must... Documents (docd) § 250.245 What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?...

  8. Hydrogen sulfide-based therapies: focus on H2S releasing NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Santucci, Luca

    2011-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pain medications, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are effective treatment for pain, fever and inflammation. However their use associates with a 4-6 fold increase in the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. The basic mode of action of NSAIDs lies in the inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COXs), a family of enzymes involved in the generation of prostaglandins (PGs). The COX exists at least in two isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2, with PGs mediating inflammation at site of injury generated by the COX-2, while COX-1 produces PGs that are essential in maintaining integrity in the gastrointestinal tract. Selective inhibitors of COX-2, the coxibs, spare the gastrointestinal tract while exerting anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, their use has been linked to an increased risk of thrombo-embolic events. Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), are potent vasodilatory agents that maintain mucosal integrity in the gastrointestinal tract. In the last decade hybrid molecules that release NO or H(2)S have been coupled with non-selective NSAIDs to generate new classes of anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents with the potential to spare the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system. These agents, the NO-releasing NSAIDs, or CINOD, and the H(2)S-releasing NSAIDs are currently investigated as a potential alternative to NSAIDs and coxibs. Naproxcinod has been the first, and so far the only, CINOD extensively investigated in clinical trials. Despite its promising profile, the approval of this drug was recently rejected by the Food and Drug Administration because the lack of long-term controlled studies. NSAIDs that release H(2)S as a mechanism to support an enhanced gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety are being investigated in preclinical studies. Either naproxen or diclofenac coupled to an H(2)S releasing moiety has been reported to cause less gastrointestinal and cardiovascular injury than parent NSAIDs in preclinical models. PMID

  9. Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas sensors from viral-templated nanocrystalline gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chung Hee; Zhang, Miluo; Myung, Nosang V.; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-01

    A facile, site-specific viral-templated assembly method was used to fabricate sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors at room temperature. A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage served to organize gold nanoparticles into linear arrays which were used as seeds for subsequent nanowire formation through electroless deposition. Nanowire widths and densities within the sensors were modified by electroless deposition time and phage concentration, respectively, to tune device resistance. Chemiresistive H2S gas sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensitivity of 654%/ppmv, theoretical lowest detection limit of 2 ppbv, and 70% recovery within 9 min for 0.025 ppmv. The role of the viral template and associated gold-binding peptide was elucidated by removing organics using a short O2 plasma treatment followed by an ethanol dip. The template and gold-binding peptide were crucial to electrical and sensor performance. Without surface organics, the resistance fell by several orders of magnitude, the sensitivity dropped by more than a factor of 100 to 6%/ppmv, the lower limit of detection increased, and no recovery was detected with dry air flow. Viral templates provide a novel, alternative fabrication route for highly sensitive, nanostructured H2S gas sensors.

  10. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  11. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  12. Fluorescent probes for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfane sulfur and their applications to biological studies.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Kazuhito; Hanaoka, Kenjiro

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a toxic gas with the smell of rotten eggs, plays key roles in many physiological processes, including relaxation of vascular smooth muscles, mediation of neurotransmission, inhibition of insulin signaling, and regulation of inflammation. The most commonly used methods or detecting H2S are the methylene blue method and the electrode method, but these methods require destructive sampling, e.g., homogenization of biological samples. On the other hand, the fluorescence detection method has been widely used in biological studies to study the physiological roles of H2S, because this technology provides real-time, easy-to-use, nondestructive detection in live cells or tissues. Many selective fluorescent probes for H2S have been reported. Sulfane sulfur compounds contain divalent sulfur atoms bonded to other sulfur atom(s), as in persulfides (R-S-SH) and polysulfides (R-S-Sn-S-R). They are currently attracting increasing interest because one of the mechanisms of activity regulation of proteins by H2S is sulfhydration of cysteine residues (RSH → RSSH). Since H2S and sulfane sulfur are redox partners, they are very likely to coexist in biological systems, and from a reactivity point-of-view, sulfane sulfur seems likely to be much more effective than H2S in S-sulfhydration. Therefore, sulfane sulfur may be involved in mediating at least some of the biological activities of H2S. In this review, we summarize recent work on fluorescent probes selective for H2S and/or sulfane sulfur, and we briefly review their applications to biological studies. PMID:25461270

  13. Chemical tools for the study of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfane sulfur and their applications to biological studies.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoko; Shimamoto, Kazuhito; Hanaoka, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) functions in many physiological processes, including relaxation of vascular smooth muscles, mediation of neurotransmission, inhibition of insulin signaling, and regulation of inflammation. On the other hand, sulfane sulfur, which is a sulfur atom with six valence electrons but no charge, has the unique ability to bind reversibly to other sulfur atoms to form hydropersulfides (R-S-SH) and polysulfides (-S-Sn-S-). H2S and sulfane sulfur always coexist, and recent work suggests that sulfane sulfur species may be the actual signaling molecules in at least some biological phenomena. For example, one of the mechanisms of activity regulation of proteins by H2S is the S-sulfhydration of cysteine residues (protein Cys-SSH). In this review, we summarize recent progress on chemical tools for the study of H2S and sulfane sulfur, covering fluorescence probes utilizing various design strategies, H2S caged compounds, inhibitors of physiological H2S-producing enzymes (cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase), and labeling reagents. Fluorescence probes offer particular advantages as chemical tools to study physiological functions of biomolecules, including ease of use and real-time, nondestructive visualization of biological processes in live cells and tissues. PMID:26798192

  14. Chemical tools for the study of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfane sulfur and their applications to biological studies

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yoko; Shimamoto, Kazuhito; Hanaoka, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) functions in many physiological processes, including relaxation of vascular smooth muscles, mediation of neurotransmission, inhibition of insulin signaling, and regulation of inflammation. On the other hand, sulfane sulfur, which is a sulfur atom with six valence electrons but no charge, has the unique ability to bind reversibly to other sulfur atoms to form hydropersulfides (R-S-SH) and polysulfides (-S-Sn-S-). H2S and sulfane sulfur always coexist, and recent work suggests that sulfane sulfur species may be the actual signaling molecules in at least some biological phenomena. For example, one of the mechanisms of activity regulation of proteins by H2S is the S-sulfhydration of cysteine residues (protein Cys-SSH). In this review, we summarize recent progress on chemical tools for the study of H2S and sulfane sulfur, covering fluorescence probes utilizing various design strategies, H2S caged compounds, inhibitors of physiological H2S-producing enzymes (cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase), and labeling reagents. Fluorescence probes offer particular advantages as chemical tools to study physiological functions of biomolecules, including ease of use and real-time, nondestructive visualization of biological processes in live cells and tissues. PMID:26798192

  15. Exogenous Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Protects Alveolar Growth in Experimental O2-Induced Neonatal Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vadivel, Arul; Alphonse, Rajesh S.; Ionescu, Lavinia; Machado, Desiree S.; O’Reilly, Megan; Eaton, Farah; Haromy, Al; Michelakis, Evangelos D.; Thébaud, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the chronic lung disease of prematurity, remains a major health problem. BPD is characterized by impaired alveolar development and complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PHT). Currently there is no specific treatment for BPD. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon monoxide and nitric oxide (NO), belong to a class of endogenously synthesized gaseous molecules referred to as gasotransmitters. While inhaled NO is already used for the treatment of neonatal PHT and currently tested for the prevention of BPD, H2S has until recently been regarded exclusively as a toxic gas. Recent evidence suggests that endogenous H2S exerts beneficial biological effects, including cytoprotection and vasodilatation. We hypothesized that H2S preserves normal alveolar development and prevents PHT in experimental BPD. Methods We took advantage of a recently described slow-releasing H2S donor, GYY4137 (morpholin-4-ium-4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate) to study its lung protective potential in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, GYY4137 promoted capillary-like network formation, viability and reduced reactive oxygen species in hyperoxia-exposed human pulmonary artery endothelial cells. GYY4137 also protected mitochondrial function in alveolar epithelial cells. In vivo, GYY4137 preserved and restored normal alveolar growth in rat pups exposed from birth for 2 weeks to hyperoxia. GYY4137 also attenuated PHT as determined by improved pulmonary arterial acceleration time on echo-Doppler, pulmonary artery remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. GYY4137 also prevented pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. Conclusions H2S protects from impaired alveolar growth and PHT in experimental O2-induced lung injury. H2S warrants further investigation as a new therapeutic target for alveolar damage and PHT. PMID:24603989

  16. 30 CFR 550.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activities. (b) Classification. Under 30 CFR 250.490(c), a request that the BSEE Regional Supervisor classify... H2S unknown, an H2S Contingency Plan prepared under 30 CFR 250.490(f), or a reference to an approved... Protection Agency's (EPA) risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68....

  17. 30 CFR 550.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activities. (b) Classification. Under 30 CFR 250.490(c), a request that the BSEE Regional Supervisor classify... H2S unknown, an H2S Contingency Plan prepared under 30 CFR 250.490(f), or a reference to an approved... Protection Agency's (EPA) risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68....

  18. 30 CFR 550.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activities. (b) Classification. Under 30 CFR 250.490(c), a request that the BSEE Regional Supervisor classify... H2S unknown, an H2S Contingency Plan prepared under 30 CFR 250.490(f), or a reference to an approved... Protection Agency's (EPA) risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68....

  19. Potential pitfalls of relying on hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production to identify Salmonella in feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella can be difficult to assess and isolate in poultry feed due to stress, uneven distribution and poor growth. Previous studies have shown that several strains of Salmonella can be affected by environmental changes, resulting in H2S-negative colonies. This is a major concern, as H2S productio...

  20. Altered Sulfide (H2S) Metabolism in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H2S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H2S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed “gasotransmitters.” This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H2S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H2S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H2S has still to be achieved. PMID:23284046

  1. Cell-trappable fluorescent probes for endogenous hydrogen sulfide signaling and imaging H2O2-dependent H2S production

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Vivian S.; Lippert, Alexander R.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a reactive small molecule generated in the body that can be beneficial or toxic owing to its potent redox activity. In living systems, disentangling the pathways responsible for H2S production and their physiological and pathological consequences remains a challenge in part due to a lack of methods for monitoring changes in endogenous H2S fluxes. The development of fluorescent probes with appropriate selectivity and sensitivity for monitoring production of H2S at biologically relevant signaling levels offers opportunities to explore its roles in a variety of systems. Here we report the design, synthesis, and application of a family of azide-based fluorescent H2S indicators, Sulfidefluor-4, Sulfidefluor-5 acetoxymethyl ester, and Sulfidefluor-7 acetoxymethyl ester, which offer the unique capability to image H2S generated at physiological signaling levels. These probes are optimized for cellular imaging and feature enhanced sensitivity and cellular retention compared with our previously reported molecules. In particular, Sulfidefluor-7 acetoxymethyl ester allows for direct, real-time visualization of endogenous H2S produced in live human umbilical vein endothelial cells upon stimulation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Moreover, we show that H2S production is dependent on NADPH oxidase–derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which attenuates VEGF receptor 2 phosphorylation and establishes a link for H2S/H2O2 crosstalk. PMID:23589874

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Sequestration and Storage in Geothermal System: New Mitigation Strategy to Reduce H2S from the Atmosphere and Detect its Mineralization with Multiple Sulfur Isotopic Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marieni, C.; Stefansson, A.; Gudbrandsson, S.; Gunnarsson, I.; Aradottir, E. S.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the major components in geothermal fluids and is commonly emitted into the atmosphere from geothermal power plants causing potential environmental problems. Among several mitigation methods proposed to reduce the H2S emissions, is H2S sequestration into geothermal systems. Reykjavík Energy is undertaking a pilot project at Hellisheidi geothermal system (SW Iceland) called Sulfix project where H2S is being injected into the geothermal reservoir for permanent sequestration into pyrite. The SulFix project started its operation in June 2014: the soluble geothermal gases are dissolved in geothermal waste water, and injected at 8 bars into the high temperature reservoir (>200˚C) at 750 m below the wellhead. The reactions involving sulfur in the geothermal reservoir may be traced using sulfur fluid chemistry and multiple sulfur isotope systematics (32S, 33S, 34S and 36S), including mixing between the reservoir geothermal fluid and the injection fluid, sulfide mineralization and oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. In this study we investigated the multiple sulfur isotope systematics upon sulfide mineralization under geothermal conditions. High temperature flow through experiments were carried out in basaltic glass at 200-250°C and ~5 mmol/kg H2S to study the fluid-rock interaction. The results indicate that the sulfide mineralization occurs rapidly under geothermal conditions, highlighting the leaching rate of iron from the basaltic glass as the mineralization rate determining factor. Moreover, the formation of sulfide may be traced using the δ34S-Δ33S relationship in the fluids and pyrite formation - for example to determine if non-reactive mixing between the injection fluids and reservoir fluids occurs at Hellisheidi. The experimental results have been further supported by geochemical modeling involving multiple sulfur isotope fractionation between aqueous sulfide species and rocks upon basalt dissolution and secondary pyrite formation.

  3. Cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using NIR telecom laser sources near 1.6 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, H.; Lendl, B.

    2016-04-01

    Sensitive detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at different pressure levels using a cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic detector in combination with a telecom NIR L-band laser source is reported. Amplitude and wavelength modulation schemes for photoacoustic signal generation are compared. A detection limit (3 σ) of 8 ppmv was achieved for amplitude modulation mode with a 50-s averaging time for the H2S absorption near 1.6 µm. As compared to simulated spectra, the cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic detection approach in combination with the sufficiently stable and narrow bandwidth NIR laser is able to reproduce the rotationally resolved H2S spectrum at low pressures of 300 mbar.

  4. 30 CFR 550.245 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and production activities. (b) Classification. Under 30 CFR 250.490(c), a request that the Regional... production activities as either H2S present or H2S unknown, an H2S Contingency Plan prepared under 30 CFR 250... analysis must be consistent with the EPA's risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68....

  5. 30 CFR 550.245 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and production activities. (b) Classification. Under 30 CFR 250.490(c), a request that the Regional... production activities as either H2S present or H2S unknown, an H2S Contingency Plan prepared under 30 CFR 250... analysis must be consistent with the EPA's risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68....

  6. 30 CFR 550.245 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and production activities. (b) Classification. Under 30 CFR 250.490(c), a request that the Regional... production activities as either H2S present or H2S unknown, an H2S Contingency Plan prepared under 30 CFR 250... analysis must be consistent with the EPA's risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68....

  7. Reversion of stressed and unstressed hydrogen sulfide (H2S) producing strains of Salmonella in different media.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella can be difficult to assess and isolate in poultry feed due to uneven distribution and poor growth. Previous studies have shown that several strains of Salmonella can be affected by changes in environment, resulting in the growth of H2S-negative colonies. This is concerning, as H2S produ...

  8. Measurements of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using PTR-MS: calibration, humidity dependence, inter-comparison and results from field studies in an oil and gas production region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Field, R.; Geiger, F.; Veres, P. R.; Soltis, J.; Li, S.-M.; Murphy, S. M.; Sweeney, C.; Pétron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; de Gouw, J.

    2014-06-01

    Natural gas production is associated with emissions of several trace gases, some of them classified as air toxics. While volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have received much attention, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can also be of concern due to the known health impacts of exposure to this hazardous air pollutant. Here, we present quantitative, fast time-response measurements of H2S using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments. An Ultra-Light-Weight PTR-MS (ULW-PTR-MS) in a mobile laboratory was operated for measurements of VOCs and H2S in a gas and oil field during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2012 campaign. Measurements of VOCs and H2S by a PTR-MS were also made at the Horse Pool ground site in the Uintah Basin during UBWOS 2013. The H2S measurement by PTR-MS is strongly humidity dependent because the proton affinity of H2S is only slightly higher than that of water. The H2S sensitivity of PTR-MS ranged between 0.6-1.4 ncps ppbv-1 (normalized counts per second/parts per billion by volume) during UBWOS 2013. We compare the humidity dependence determined in the laboratory with in-field calibrations and determine the H2S mixing ratios for the mobile and ground measurements. The PTR-MS measurements at Horse Pool are evaluated by comparison with simultaneous H2S measurements using a PTR Time-of-Flight MS (PTR-ToF-MS) and a Picarro cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument for H2S/CH4. On average 0.6 ± 0.3 ppbv H2S was present at Horse Pool during UBWOS 2013. The correlation between H2S and methane enhancements suggests that the source of H2S is associated with oil and gas extraction in the basin. Significant H2S mixing ratios of up to 9 ppmv downwind of storage tanks were observed during the mobile measurements. This study suggests that H2S emissions associated with oil and gas production can lead to short-term high levels close to point sources, and elevated background levels away from those sources. In addition, our work has

  9. Measurements of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using PTR-MS: calibration, humidity dependence, inter-comparison and results from field studies in an oil and gas production region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Field, R.; Geiger, F.; Veres, P. R.; Soltis, J.; Li, S.-M.; Murphy, S. M.; Sweeney, C.; Pétron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; de Gouw, J.

    2014-10-01

    Natural gas production is associated with emissions of several trace gases, some of them classified as air toxics. While volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have received much attention, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can also be of concern due to the known health impacts of exposure to this hazardous air pollutant. Here, we present quantitative, fast time-response measurements of H2S using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments. An ultra-light-weight PTR-MS (ULW-PTR-MS) in a mobile laboratory was operated for measurements of VOCs and H2S in a gas and oil field during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2012 campaign. Measurements of VOCs and H2S by a PTR-MS were also made at the Horse Pool ground site in the Uintah Basin during UBWOS 2013. The H2S measurement by PTR-MS is strongly humidity dependent because the proton affinity of H2S is only slightly higher than that of water. The H2S sensitivity of PTR-MS ranged between 0.6-1.4 ncps ppbv-1 during UBWOS 2013. We compare the humidity dependence determined in the laboratory with in-field calibrations and determine the H2S mixing ratios for the mobile and ground measurements. The PTR-MS measurements at Horse Pool are evaluated by comparison with simultaneous H2S measurements using a PTR time-of-flight MS (PTR-ToF-MS) and a Picarro cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument for H2S / CH4. On average 0.6 ± 0.3 ppbv H2S was present at Horse Pool during UBWOS 2013. The correlation between H2S and methane enhancements suggests that the source of H2S is associated with oil and gas extraction in the basin. Significant H2S mixing ratios of up to 9 ppmv downwind of storage tanks were observed during the mobile measurements. This study suggests that H2S emissions associated with oil and gas production can lead to short-term high levels close to point sources, and elevated background levels away from those sources. In addition, our work has demonstrated that PTR-MS can make reliable measurements of

  10. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2′ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2′ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time. PMID:26911657

  11. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2‧ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2‧ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time.

  12. Impact of fluctuations in gaseous H2S concentrations on sulfide uptake by sewer concrete: The effect of high H2S loads.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Guangming; Bond, Philip L; Keller, Jurg

    2015-09-15

    The acid production from the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in sewer air results in serious corrosion of exposed concrete surfaces in sewers. Large fluctuations of gaseous H2S concentrations occur in sewers due to the diurnal profiles of sewage flow and retention times and the necessity of intermittent pumping of sewage from pressure pipes into gravity pipes. How the high concentrations of H2S due to these events may affect H2S uptake and subsequent corrosion by concrete sewers is largely unknown. This study determined the effect of short- and long-term increases in H2S levels on the sulfide uptake rate (SUR) of concrete surfaces with an active corrosion layer. The results showed that during the high load situation the SUR increased significantly but then decreased (compared to the baseline SUR) by about 7-14% and 41-50% immediately after short- and long-term H2S high-load periods, respectively. For both exposure conditions, the SUR gradually (over several hours) recovered to approximately 90% of the baseline SUR. Further tests suggest multiple factors may contribute to the observed decrease of SUR directly after the high H2S load. This includes the temporary storage of elemental sulfur in the corrosion layer and inhibition of sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) due to high H2S level and temporary acid surge. Additionally, the delay of the corrosion layer to fully recover the SUR after the high H2S load suggests that there is a longer-term inhibitive effect of the high H2S levels on the activity of the SOB in the corrosion layer. Due to the observed activity reductions, concrete exposed to occasional short-term high H2S load periods had an overall lower H2S uptake compared to concrete exposed to constant H2S levels at the same average concentration. To accurately predict H2S uptake by sewer concrete and hence the likely maximum corrosion rates, a correction factor should be adopted for the H2S fluctuations when average H2S levels are used in the prediction. PMID

  13. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits. PMID:24813672

  14. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) attenuates uranium-induced acute nephrotoxicity through oxidative stress and inflammatory response via Nrf2-NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jifang; Zhao, Tingting; Yuan, Yan; Hu, Nan; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2015-12-01

    As an endogenous gaseous mediator, H2S exerts anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects in kidneys. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of H2S against uranium-induced nephrotoxicity in adult SD male rats after in vivo effect of uranium on endogenous H2S formation was explored in kidneys. The levels of endogenous H2S and H2S-producing enzymes (CBS and CSE) were measured in renal homogenates from rats intoxicated by an intraperitoneally (i.p.) injection of uranyl acetate at a single dose of 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg. In rats injected i.p. with uranyl acetate (5 mg/kg) or NaHS (an H2S donor, 28 or 56 μmol/kg) alone or in combination, we determined biochemical parameters and histopathological alteration to assess kidney function, examined oxidative stress markers, and investigated Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways in kidney homogenates. The results suggest that uranium intoxication in rats decreased endogenous H2S generation as well as CBS and CSE protein expression. NaHS administration in uranium-intoxicated rats ameliorated the renal biochemical indices and histopathological effects, lowered MDA accumulation, and restored GSH level and anti-oxidative enzymes activities like SOD, CAT, GPx and GST. NaHS treatment in uranium-intoxicated rats activated uranium-inhibited protein expression and nuclear translocation of transcription factor Nrf2, which increased protein expression of downstream target-Nrf2 genes HO-1, NQO-1, GCLC, and TXNRD-1. NaHS administration in uranium-intoxicated rats inhibited uranium-induced nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of transcription factor κB/p65, which decreased protein expression of target-p65 inflammatory genes TNF-α, iNOS, and COX-2. Taken together, these data implicate that H2S can afford protection to rat kidneys against uranium-induced adverse effects through induction of antioxidant defense by activating Nrf2 pathway and reduction of inflammatory response by suppressing NF-κB pathway. PMID

  15. Synthesis of zinc sulfide nanoparticles during zinc oxidization by H2S and H2S/H2O supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, A. A.; Fedyaeva, O. N.; Sokol, M. Ya.; Shatrova, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of zinc sulfide nanoparticles was detected during interaction of bulk samples with hydrogen sulfide at supercritical parameters. Synthesis proceeds with liberation of H2 by the reaction nZn + nH2S = (ZnS) n + nH2. It has been found by the X-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy, and mass spectrometry that the addition of water stimulates coupled reactions of nanoparticle synthesis nZn + nH2O = (ZnO) n + nH2 and (ZnO) n + nH2S = (ZnS) n + nH2O and brings about an increase in the synthesis rate and morphological changes of (ZnS) n nanoparticles.

  16. A comparative study on the anti-inflammatory effects of single oral doses of naproxen and its hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-releasing derivative ATB-346 in rats with carrageenan-induced synovitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly prescribed agents for arthritic patients, although gastric effects limit their long-term use. Considering the reported gastric safety of hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-releasing NSAIDs, in addition to the anti-inflammatory effects of H2S administration to rats with synovitis, we decided to evaluate the effects of the H2S-releasing naproxen derivative ATB-346 in this animal model. Methods Male Wistar rats were anesthetized with inhalatory halothane and pre-treated with equimolar oral doses of either naproxen (0.3, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) or ATB-346 (0.48, 1.6, 4.8, or 16 mg/kg) 30 min before the i.art. injection of 7.5 mg of carrageenan (CGN) into the right knee joint cavity. Joint swelling and pain score were assessed after 1, 3 and 5 h, and tactile allodynia after 2 and 4 h. After the last measurement, the joint cavity lavages were performed for counting of the recruited leukocytes. The drugs (at the highest doses) were also tested for their gastric effects by evaluating macroscopical damage score and neutrophil recruitment (measured as myeloperoxidase – MPO activity) in the stomachs 5 h after administration of the drugs. In addition, the serum naproxen pharmacokinetic profiles of both compounds, administered at the highest equimolar doses, were obtained during the first 6 h after dosing. Results At the two highest tested doses, both naproxen and ATB-346 reduced edema and pain score (measured 3 and 5 h after CGN; P < 0.001). Tactile allodynia was similarly inhibited by ~45% 4 h after CGN by both naproxen (at 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) and ATB-346 (at 1.6 and 4.8 mg/kg; P < 0.001), as well as leukocyte infiltration. Naproxen (but not ATB-346) induced significant gastric damage and, despite the increased gastric MPO activity by ~130% in the naproxen-, but not in the ATB-346-treated rats, this effect was of no statistical significance. Conclusion The presence of a H2S-releasing moiety in

  17. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species. PMID:24747481

  18. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Lenz, Petra H

    2014-06-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species. PMID:24747481

  19. Reappraisal of H2S/sulfide concentration in vertebrate blood and its potential significance in ischemic preconditioning and vascular signaling.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Nathan L; Kreimier, Edward L; Verdial, Francys C; Skovgaard, Nini; Olson, Kenneth R

    2008-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is rapidly emerging as a biologically significant signaling molecule. Studies published before 2000 report low or undetectable H(2)S (usually as total sulfide) levels in blood or plasma, whereas recent work has reported sulfide concentrations between 10 and 300 microM, suggesting it acts as a circulating signal. In the first series of experiments, we used a recently developed polarographic sensor to measure the baseline level of endogenous H(2)S gas and turnover of exogenous H(2)S gas in real time in blood from numerous animals, including lamprey, trout, mouse, rat, pig, and cow. We found that, contrary to recent reports, H(2)S gas was essentially undetectable (<100 nM total sulfide) in all animals. Furthermore, exogenous sulfide was rapidly removed from blood, plasma, or 5% bovine serum albumin in vitro and from intact trout in vivo. To determine if blood H(2)S could transiently increase, we measured oxygen-dependent H(2)S production by trout hearts in vitro and in vivo. H(2)S has been shown to mediate ischemic preconditioning (IPC) in mammals. IPC is present in trout and, unlike mammals, the trout myocardium obtains its oxygen from relatively hypoxic systemic venous blood. In vitro, myocardial H(2)S production was inversely related to Po(2), whereas we failed to detect H(2)S in ventral aortic blood from either normoxic or hypoxic fish in vivo. These results provide an autocrine or paracrine mechanism for myocardial coupling of hypoxia to H(2)S in IPC, i.e., oxygen sensing, but they fail to provide any evidence that H(2)S signaling is mediated by the circulation. PMID:18417642

  20. Sulfide oxidation and nitrate reduction for potential mitigation of H2S in landfills.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Du, Yao; Feng, Huan; Hu, Li-Fang; Shen, Dong-Sheng; Long, Yu-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Because H2S emitted by landfill sites has seriously endangered human health, its removal is urgent. H2S removal by use of an autotrophic denitrification landfill biocover has been reported. In this process, nitrate-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria use a reduced sulfur source as electron donor when reducing nitrate to nitrogen gas and oxidizing sulfur compounds to sulfate. The research presented here was performed to investigate the possibility of endogenous mitigation of H2S by autotrophic denitrification of landfill waste. The sulfide oxidation bioprocess accompanied by nitrate reduction was observed in batch tests inoculated with mineralized refuse from a landfill site. Repeated supply of nitrate resulted in rapid oxidation of the sulfide, indicating that, to a substantial extent, the bioprocess may be driven by functional microbes. This bioprocess can be realized under conditions suitable for the autotrophic metabolic process, because the process occurred without addition of acetate. H2S emissions from landfill sites would be substantially reduced if this bioprocess was introduced. PMID:25680916

  1. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604...-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  2. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504...-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  3. Inhaled Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Gian Paolo; Searles, Robert; Yu, Binglan; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Breathing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to induce a suspended animation–like state with hypothermia and a concomitant metabolic reduction in rodents. However, the impact of H2S breathing on cardiovascular function remains incompletely understood. In this study, the authors investigated the cardiovascular and metabolic effects of inhaled H2S in a murine model. Methods The impact of breathing H2S on cardiovascular function was examined using telemetry and echocardiography in awake mice. The effects of breathing H2S on carbon dioxide production and oxygen consumption were measured at room temperature and in a warmed environment. Results Breathing H2S at 80 parts per million by volume at 27°C ambient temperature for 6 h markedly reduced heart rate, core body temperature, respiratory rate, and physical activity, whereas blood pressure remained unchanged. Echocardiography demonstrated that H2S exposure decreased both heart rate and cardiac output but preserved stroke volume. Breathing H2S for 6 h at 35°C ambient temperature (to prevent hypothermia) decreased heart rate, physical activity, respiratory rate, and cardiac output without altering stroke volume or body temperature. H2S breathing seems to induce bradycardia by depressing sinus node activity. Breathing H2S for 30 min decreased whole body oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production at either 27° or 35°C ambient temperature. Both parameters returned to baseline levels within 10 min after the cessation of H2S breathing. Conclusions Inhalation of H2S at either 27° or 35°C reversibly depresses cardiovascular function without changing blood pressure in mice. Breathing H2S also induces a rapidly reversible reduction of metabolic rate at either body temperature. PMID:18362598

  4. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S is a signaling molecule without definite effect. The use of existing H2S donors is limited because of the instant release and short lifetime of H2S. Thus, translational medicine involving the sustained and controlled release of H2S is of great value for both scientific and clinical uses. H2S donation can be manipulated by different ways, including where H2S is given, how H2S is donated, or the specific structures of H2S-releasing drugs and H2S donor molecules. This review briefly summarizes recent progress in research on the physiological and pathological functions of H2S and H2S-releasing drugs, and suggests hope for future investigations. PMID:24096643

  5. The loss of the hemoglobin H2S-binding function in annelids from sulfide-free habitats reveals molecular adaptation driven by Darwinian positive selection.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Xavier; Leroy, Riwanon; Carney, Susan; Collin, Olivier; Zal, Franck; Toulmond, Andre; Jollivet, Didier

    2003-05-13

    The hemoglobin of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila (annelid) is able to bind toxic hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) to free cysteine residues and to transport it to fuel endosymbiotic sulfide-oxidising bacteria. The cysteine residues are conserved key amino acids in annelid globins living in sulfide-rich environments, but are absent in annelid globins from sulfide-free environments. Synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution analysis from two different sets of orthologous annelid globin genes from sulfide rich and sulfide free environments have been performed to understand how the sulfide-binding function of hemoglobin appeared and has been maintained during the course of evolution. This study reveals that the sites occupied by free-cysteine residues in annelids living in sulfide-rich environments and occupied by other amino acids in annelids from sulfide-free environments, have undergone positive selection in annelids from sulfide-free environments. We assumed that the high reactivity of cysteine residues became a disadvantage when H(2)S disappeared because free cysteines without their natural ligand had the capacity to interact with other blood components, disturb homeostasis, reduce fitness and thus could have been counterselected. To our knowledge, we pointed out for the first time a case of function loss driven by molecular adaptation rather than genetic drift. If constraint relaxation (H(2)S disappearance) led to the loss of the sulfide-binding function in modern annelids from sulfide-free environments, our work suggests that adaptation to sulfide-rich environments is a plesiomorphic feature, and thus that the annelid ancestor could have emerged in a sulfide-rich environment. PMID:12721359

  6. The loss of the hemoglobin H2S-binding function in annelids from sulfide-free habitats reveals molecular adaptation driven by Darwinian positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Xavier; Leroy, Riwanon; Carney, Susan; Collin, Olivier; Zal, Franck; Toulmond, André; Jollivet, Didier

    2003-01-01

    The hemoglobin of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila (annelid) is able to bind toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to free cysteine residues and to transport it to fuel endosymbiotic sulfide-oxidising bacteria. The cysteine residues are conserved key amino acids in annelid globins living in sulfide-rich environments, but are absent in annelid globins from sulfide-free environments. Synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution analysis from two different sets of orthologous annelid globin genes from sulfide rich and sulfide free environments have been performed to understand how the sulfide-binding function of hemoglobin appeared and has been maintained during the course of evolution. This study reveals that the sites occupied by free-cysteine residues in annelids living in sulfide-rich environments and occupied by other amino acids in annelids from sulfide-free environments, have undergone positive selection in annelids from sulfide-free environments. We assumed that the high reactivity of cysteine residues became a disadvantage when H2S disappeared because free cysteines without their natural ligand had the capacity to interact with other blood components, disturb homeostasis, reduce fitness and thus could have been counterselected. To our knowledge, we pointed out for the first time a case of function loss driven by molecular adaptation rather than genetic drift. If constraint relaxation (H2S disappearance) led to the loss of the sulfide-binding function in modern annelids from sulfide-free environments, our work suggests that adaptation to sulfide-rich environments is a plesiomorphic feature, and thus that the annelid ancestor could have emerged in a sulfide-rich environment. PMID:12721359

  7. Sulfidation Kinetics of Natural Chromite Ore Using H2S Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sazzad; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Pownceby, Mark I.; Bruckard, Warren J.

    2015-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of natural chromite (FeCr2O4) sulfidation using 5 pct H2S (balance Ar) gas were studied in the temperature range 1173 K to 1473 K (900 °C to 1200 °C). Reaction products were examined using combined X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicated the formation of an outer sulfide-rich layer comprising mixed (Fe,Cr)1- x S and (Cr,Fe)1- x S phases, underlain by a cation-depleted diffusion zone. The kinetics investigation indicated that the reaction rate increased with increasing temperature and that the sulfidation of chromite followed a shrinking unreacted core model. It is proposed that Cr3+ cation diffusion through the reaction product was the rate controlling step with an apparent activation energy of 166 ± 4 kJ mol-1. The calculated activation energy lies between the activation energy for Fe2+ and Cr3+ diffusion through pure chromite spinel and Fe-Cr alloy. Possible reasons for the discrepancy from pure chromite are expected to be the presence of minor Al and Mg in the natural chromite sample, and the partial pressure of oxygen under the reaction conditions used.

  8. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  9. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  10. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  11. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  12. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  13. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  14. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  15. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  16. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  17. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  18. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  19. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  20. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  1. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs-a review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation by Myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bostelaar, Trever; Vitvitsky, Victor; Kumutima, Jacques; Lewis, Brianne E; Yadav, Pramod K; Brunold, Thomas C; Filipovic, Milos; Lehnert, Nicolai; Stemmler, Timothy L; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-07-13

    Enzymes in the sulfur network generate the signaling molecule, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), from the amino acids cysteine and homocysteine. Since it is toxic at elevated concentrations, cells are equipped to clear H2S. A canonical sulfide oxidation pathway operates in mitochondria, converting H2S to thiosulfate and sulfate. We have recently discovered the ability of ferric hemoglobin to oxidize sulfide to thiosulfate and iron-bound hydropolysulfides. In this study, we report that myoglobin exhibits a similar capacity for sulfide oxidation. We have trapped and characterized iron-bound sulfur intermediates using cryo-mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Further support for the postulated intermediates in the chemically challenging conversion of H2S to thiosulfate and iron-bound catenated sulfur products is provided by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopy in addition to density functional theory computational results. We speculate that the unusual sensitivity of skeletal muscle cytochrome c oxidase to sulfide poisoning in ethylmalonic encephalopathy, resulting from the deficiency in a mitochondrial sulfide oxidation enzyme, might be due to the concentration of H2S by myoglobin in this tissue. PMID:27310035

  3. HIGH DOSE HYDROXOCOBALAMIN ADMINISTERED AFTER H2S EXPOSURE COUNTERACTS SULFIDE POISONING INDUCED CARDIAC DEPRESSION IN SHEEP

    PubMed Central

    Haouzi, Philippe; Chenuel, Bruno; Sonobe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Context Severe H2S poisoning leads to death by rapid respiratory and cardiac arrest, the latter can occur within seconds or minutes in severe forms of intoxication. Objectives Determine the time course and the nature of H2S induced cardiac arrest and the effects of high dose Hydroxocobalamin administered after the end of sulfide exposure. Materials and methods In 16 sedated mechanically ventilated sheep, NaHS was infused to reach concentrations of H2S in the blood we previously found to lead to cardiac arrest within minutes following the cessation of H2S exposure. High dose Hydroxocobalamin (5 g) or saline solution was administered intravenously, one minute after the cessation of NaHS infusion. Results All animals were still alive at the cessation of H2S exposure. Three animals (18%) presented a cardiac arrest within 90 seconds and were unable to receive any antidote or vehicle. In the animals that survived long enough to receive either Hydroxocobalamin or saline, 71% (5/7) died in the control group by cardiac arrest within 10 minutes. In all instances, cardiac arrest was the result of a pulseless electrical activity (PEA). In the group that received the antidote, intravenous injection of 5 g Hydroxocobalamin provoked an abrupt increase in blood pressure and blood flow; PEA was prevented in all instances. However, we could not find any evidence for a recovery in oxidative metabolism in the group receiving Hydroxocobalamin, as blood lactate remained elevated and even continued to rise after one hour, despite restored hemodynamics. This, along with an unaltered recovery of H2S kinetics, suggests that Hydroxocobalamin did not act through a mechanism of H2S trapping. Conclusion In this sheep model, there was a high risk for cardiac arrest, by PEA, persisting up to 10 minutes after H2S exposure. Very high dose of Hydroxocobalamin (5 g), injected very early after the cessation of H2S exposure, improved cardiac contractility and prevented PEA. PMID:25546714

  4. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide ; 7783 - 06 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  5. Electrochemical and Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of Tubing Steels in a H2S/CO2 Annular Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, R. K.; Du, C. W.; Li, X. G.

    2014-04-01

    The electrochemical and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) behaviors of 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel were investigated in a simulated acidic annular environment with low-temperature and high-pressure H2S/CO2 using electrochemical methods, U-bend immersion tests, and scanning electron microscopy. In the solution containing high pressure CO2, 13Cr, and P110 steels exhibited general corrosion and severe pitting, respectively. Compared with sweet corrosion, additional H2S in the solution enhanced the corrosion of 13Cr steel but inhibited the corrosion of P110 steel. By contrast, in a solution containing 4 MPa CO2 and different (0-0.3 MPa), the susceptibility of both 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel toward SSCC was significantly promoted by increases in H2S partial pressure. The 13Cr stainless steel exhibited higher susceptibility toward SSCC than P110 steel under a H2S/CO2 environment but lower susceptibility under a pure CO2 environment.

  6. Characterization of recycled rubber media for hydrogen sulphide (H2S) control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Park, Jaeyoung; Evans, Eric A; Ellis, Timothy G

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) adsorption capacities on recycled rubber media, tyre-derived rubber particle (TDRP), and other rubber material (ORM) have been evaluated. As part of the research, densities, moisture contents, and surface properties of TDRP and ORM have been determined. The research team findings show that TDRP and ORM are more particulate in nature and not highly porous-like activated carbon. The characteristics of surface area, pore size, and moisture content support chemisorption on the macrosurface rather than physical adsorption in micropores. For example, moisture content is essential for H2S adsorption on ORM, and an increase in moisture content results in an increase in adsorption capacity. PMID:25145205

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Gasotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are well established as messenger molecules throughout the body, gasotransmitters, based on striking alterations in mice lacking the appropriate biosynthetic enzymes. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is even more chemically reactive, but till recently there was little definitive evidence for its physiologic formation. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22), and Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE; EC 4.4.1.1), also known as cytathionase, can generate H2S from cyst(e)ine. Very recent studies with mice lacking these enzymes have established that CSE is responsible for H2S formation in the periphery, while in the brain CBS is the biosynthetic enzyme. Endothelial-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) activity is reduced 80% in the mesenteric artery of mice with deletion of CSE, establishing H2S as a major physiologic EDRF. H2S appears to signal predominantly by S-sulfhydrating cysteines in its target proteins, analogous to S-nitrosylation by NO. Whereas S-nitrosylation typically inhibits enzymes, S-sulfhydration activates them. S-nitrosylation basally affects 1–2% of its target proteins, while 10–25% of H2S target proteins are S-sulfhydrated. In summary, H2S appears to be a physiologic gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO. PMID:20067586

  8. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Basic, Amina; Blomqvist, Susanne; Carlén, Anette; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways. PMID:26130377

  9. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Basic, Amina; Blomqvist, Susanne; Carlén, Anette; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways. PMID:26130377

  10. Measurements of dimethyl sulfide and H2S over the western North Atlantic and the tropical Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, T. W.; Andreae, M. O.; Bingemer, H. G.; Leck, C.

    1993-01-01

    Airborne measurements of DMS and H2S were made off the east coast of the United States and over the tropical Atlantic off Brazil. Samples were collected through a fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon inlet manifold. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was preconcentrated onto gold wool and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame photometric detection. H2S was collected on AgNO3-impregnated filters and determined by fluorescence quenching. Use of a new scrubber material (cotton) to remove negative interference on DMS measurements was investigated. Comparison with a Na2CO3/Anakrom scrubber gave good overall agreement. Only under extreme conditions, e.g., on flight 9 (continental air mass, low humidity, high O3, and low DMS values) did Na2CO3 show noticeable loss of DMS compared to cotton. On most flights, especially in marine air masses with high humidity and relatively low O3, the results from both scrubbers agreed well with each other and with other instruments used during the intercalibration. Off the U.S. East Coast, DMS levels showed strong dependence on air mass origin with high values (up to 83 ppt) in marine tropical air masses and low values (10-20 ppt) in continental and polar air. Over the tropical Atlantic, DMS ranged over 20-100 ppt in the mixed layer. Nighttime values were a factor of 1.6-2.3 higher than daytime levels. DMS decreased with altitude to less than 1 ppt at 4000 m. H2S in the mixed layer off the U.S. East Coast ranged from 10 to 200 ppt. Significant influence from terrestrial and pollution sources was evident. H2S in air masses originating over the eastern seaboard was much higher than in continental polar air or over the remote tropical continents. In contrast, over the tropical Atlantic, concentrations were very low (5-10 ppt), typical of truly marine air. Night/day ratios were about 1.4. No significant geographical variability was seen in H2S levels over the tropical Atlantic. The correlation of atmospheric Rn-222 and H2S was significant, with both

  11. Chemical Foundations of Hydrogen Sulfide Biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  12. Chemical foundations of hydrogen sulfide biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R

    2013-11-30

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  13. Adaptations of a tropical swamp worm, alma emini, for subsistence in a H2S-rich habitat: evolution of endosymbiotic bacteria, sulfide metabolizing bodies, and novel processes of elimination of neutralized sulfide complexes

    PubMed

    Maina; Maloiy

    1998-01-01

    The epithelial cell lining of the respiratory groove of Alma emini, an oligochaete glossoscolecid worm that lives in a hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-rich tropical swamp, was investigated by transmission electron microscopy to determine the underlying structural adaptations which enable the worm to subsist in a highly inimical habitat. The epithelium of the respiratory groove is made up of squamous cells with a highly amplified free epithelial surface. The cells are tightly packed with electron dense sulfur metabolizing bodies (SMBs) and contain endosymbiotic bacteria. Presence of sulfur in the electron dense SMBs was confirmed by X-ray microanalysis. Certain eukaryotic cells with prominent filopodia-like cytoplasmic extensions were observed under the epithelial cells and in the muscle tissue. The cells contained numerous heteromorphic endosymbiotic bacteria and scattered SMBs. Both the SMBs and the bacteria are reckoned to be involved in scavenging and detoxifying H2S. The removal of sulfide complexes was observed to occur through excision of blebs formed by epithelial cell membrane elaborations and by exocytosis of crystalline-like particles. These adaptive stratagems generally correspond with those that have been adopted by many marine and hydrothermal vent organisms that occupy sulfide-rich biomes. The congruent adaptive stratagems and ultrastructural morphologies in such a diverse community of organisms have been imposed by a common need to neutralize the insidious effects of H2S in their environments. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9774530

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide in Biochemistry and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Predmore, Benjamin Lee; Lefer, David Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: An abundance of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays a prominent role in physiology and pathophysiology. Many targets exist for H2S therapy. The molecular targets of H2S include proteins, enzymes, transcription factors, and membrane ion channels. Recent Advances: Novel H2S precursors are being synthesized and discovered that are capable of releasing H2S in a slow and sustained manner. This presents a novel and advantageous approach to H2S therapy for treatment of chronic conditions associated with a decline in endogenous H2S, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Critical Issues: While H2S is cytoprotective at physiological concentrations, it is not universally cytoprotective, as it appears to have pro-apoptotic actions in cancer cells and is well known to be toxic at supraphysiological concentrations. Many of the pleiotropic effects of H2S on health are associated with the inhibition of inflammation and upregulation of prosurvival pathways. The powerful anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, immunomodulating, and trophic effects of H2S on the vast majority of normal cells seem to be mediated mainly by its actions as an extremely versatile direct and indirect antioxidant and free radical scavenger. While the overall effects of H2S on transformed (i.e., malignant) cells can be characterized as pro-oxidant and pro-apoptotic, they contrast sharply with the cytoprotective effects on most normal cells. Future Directions: H2S has become a molecule of great interest, and several slow-releasing H2S prodrugs are currently under development. We believe that additional agents regulating H2S bioavailability will be developed during the next 10 years. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 119–140. PMID:22432697

  16. Hydrogen sulfide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a hazard primarily in the oil and gas industry, agriculture, sewage and animal waste handling, construction (asphalt operations and disturbing marshy terrain), and other settings where organic material decomposes under reducing conditions, and in geothermal operations. It is an insoluble gas, heavier than air, with a very low odor threshold and high toxicity, driven by concentration more than duration of exposure. Toxicity presents in a unique, reliable, and characteristic toxidrome consisting, in ascending order of exposure, of mucosal irritation, especially of the eye ("gas eye"), olfactory paralysis (not to be confused with olfactory fatigue), sudden but reversible loss of consciousness ("knockdown"), pulmonary edema (with an unusually favorable prognosis), and death (probably with apnea contributing). The risk of chronic neurcognitive changes is controversial, with the best evidence at high exposure levels and after knockdowns, which are frequently accompanied by head injury or oxygen deprivation. Treatment cannot be initiated promptly in the prehospital phase, and currently rests primarily on supportive care, hyperbaric oxygen, and nitrite administration. The mechanism of action for sublethal neurotoxicity and knockdown is clearly not inhibition of cytochrome oxidase c, as generally assumed, although this may play a role in overwhelming exposures. High levels of endogenous sulfide are found in the brain, presumably relating to the function of hydrogen sulfide as a gaseous neurotransmitter and immunomodulator. Prevention requires control of exposure and rigorous training to stop doomed rescue attempts attempted without self-contained breathing apparatus, especially in confined spaces, and in sudden release in the oil and gas sector, which result in multiple avoidable deaths. PMID:26563786

  17. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  18. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  19. Hydrogen sulfide exposure in an adult male

    PubMed Central

    Doujaiji, Bassam; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is responsible for many incidents of occupational toxic exposure, especially in the petroleum industry. The clinical effects of H2S depend on its concentration and the duration of exposure. H2S is immediately fatal when concentrations are over 500-1000 parts per million (ppm) but exposure to lower concentrations, such as 10-500 ppm, can cause various respiratory symptoms that range from rhinitis to acute respiratory failure. H2S may also affect multiple organs, causing temporary or permanent derangements in the nervous, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, and hematological systems. We present a case of occupational exposure to H2S leading to multi-organ involvement, acute respiratory failure, organizing pneumonia, and shock resembling acute sepsis. The patient also developed mild obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:20103963

  20. H2S regulation of nitric oxide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K.; Yuan, Shuai; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are two major gaseous signaling molecules that regulate diverse physiological functions. Recent publications indicate the regulatory role of H2S on NO metabolism. In this chapter, we discuss the latest findings on H2S-NO interactions through formation of novel chemical derivatives, and experimental approaches to study these adducts. This chapter also addresses potential H2S interference on various NO detection techniques, along with precautions for analyzing biological samples from various sources. This information will facilitate critical evaluation and clearer insight into H2S regulation of NO signaling and its influence on various physiological functions. PMID:25725527

  1. Signaling Molecules: Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a signaling molecule as well as a cytoprotectant. It modulates neurotransmission, regulates vascular tone, and protects various tissues and organs, including neurons, the heart, and kidneys, from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury. H2S is produced from l-cysteine by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) along with cysteine aminotransferase. Recent Advances: In addition to these enzymes, we recently identified a novel pathway to produce H2S from d-cysteine, which involves d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) along with 3MST. These enzymes are localized in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. However, some enzymes translocate to organelles under specific conditions. Moreover, H2S-derived potential signaling molecules such as polysulfides and HSNO have been identified. Critical Issues: The physiological stimulations, which trigger the production of H2S and its derivatives and maintain their local levels, remain unclear. Future Directions: Understanding the regulation of the H2S production and H2S-derived signaling molecules and the specific stimuli that induce their release will provide new insights into the biology of H2S and therapeutic development in diseases involving these substances. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 362–376. PMID:24800864

  2. Production and Physiological Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions. It regulates synaptic transmission, vascular tone, inflammation, transcription, and angiogenesis; protects cells from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury; and promotes healing of ulcers. Recent Advances: In addition to cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase along with cysteine aminotransferase was recently demonstrated to produce H2S. Even in bacteria, H2S produced by these enzymes functions as a defense against antibiotics, suggesting that the cytoprotective effect of H2S is a universal defense mechanism in organisms from bacteria to mammals. Critical Issues: The functional form of H2S—undissociated H2S gas, dissociated HS ion, or some other form of sulfur—has not been identified. Future Directions: The regulation of H2S production by three enzymes may lead to the identification of the physiological signals that are required to release H2S. The identification of the physiological functions of other forms of sulfur may also help understand the biological significance of H2S. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 783–793. PMID:23581969

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  4. Release and control of hydrogen sulfide during sludge thermal drying

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Huanxin; Dai, Zhixin; Ji, Zhongqiang; Gao, Caixia; Liu, Chongxuan

    2015-04-15

    The release of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during sludge drying is a major environmental problem because of its toxicity to human health. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms and factors controlling the H2S release. Results of this study show that: 1) the biomass and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sludge were the major factors controlling the amount of H2S release, 2) the sludge drying temperature had an important effect on both the extent and the timing of H2S release from the sludge, and 3) decreasing sludge pH increased the H2S release. Based on the findings from this study, a new system that integrates sludge drying and H2S gas treatment was developed to reduce the amount of H2S released from sludge treatments.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Is a Signaling Molecule and a Cytoprotectant

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Norihiro; Kimura, Yuka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Accumulating evidence shows that hydrogen sulfide may function as a signaling molecule in processes such as neuromodulation in the brain and smooth muscle relaxation in the vascular system. It also has a cytoprotective effect, since it can protect neurons and cardiac muscle from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury, respectively. Hydrogen sulfide can also modulate inflammation, insulin release, and angiogenesis. Recent Advances: The regulation of the activity of 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase (3MST) along with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT), one of the H2S producing pathways, has been demonstrated. The production of H2S by the pathway, which is regulated by Ca2+ and facilitated by thioredoxin and dihydrolipoic acid, is also involved in H2S signaling as well as cytoprotection. Sulfur hydration of proteins by H2S has been proposed to modulate protein functions. H2S-sensitive fluorescent probes, which enable us to measure the localization of H2S in real time, have been developed. Critical Issues: The basal concentrations of H2S have recently been measured and found to be much lower than those initially reported. However, the concentration of H2S reached in stimulated cells, as well as the regulation of H2S producing enzymes is not well understood. It has been proposed that some of the effects of H2S on the regulation of enzymes and receptors might be explained through the properties of sulfane sulfur (S0), another form of active sulfur. Future Directions: The determination of H2S concentrations in activated cells using new methods including H2S-sensitive fluorescent probes, as well as the investigation of the effects of H2S using specific inhibitors, may provide better understanding of the physiological function of this molecule. Clarifying mechanisms of H2S activity may also facilitate the development of new therapeutic compounds. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 45–57. PMID:22229673

  6. Genetically Anchored Fluorescent Probes for Subcellular Specific Imaging of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiqian; Sizovs, Antons; Wang, Meng C.; Provost, Christopher R.; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Imaging hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at the subcellular resolution will greatly improve the understanding of functions of this signaling molecule. Taking advantage of the protein labeling technologies, we report a general strategy for the development of organelle specific H2S probes, which enables sub-cellular H2S imaging essentially in any organelles of interest. PMID:26806071

  7. Chemiluminescent Detection of Enzymatically Produced H2S

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, T. Spencer; Pluth, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important biological signaling molecule. To better understand the multifaceted biological roles of H2S, the development of selective and sensitive biocompatible assays for H2S is becoming increasingly important. Motivated by these challenges, our laboratory is developing new methods to further detect and monitor biological H2S. Here, we describe in detail our recent advances in the development and the use of chemiluminescence-based H2S sensors to assist other investigators with use of these chemical tools. We highlight the use of these tools use by displaying their selectivity and high sensitivity toward H2S and provide examples of assays we have developed to detect enzymatically produced H2S. PMID:25725517

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide as an Oxygen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance Although oxygen (O2)-sensing cells and tissues have been known for decades, the identity of the O2-sensing mechanism has remained elusive. Evidence is accumulating that O2-dependent metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is this enigmatic O2 sensor. Recent Advances The elucidation of biochemical pathways involved in H2S synthesis and metabolism have shown that reciprocal H2S/O2 interactions have been inexorably linked throughout eukaryotic evolution; there are multiple foci by which O2 controls H2S inactivation, and the effects of H2S on downstream signaling events are consistent with those activated by hypoxia. H2S-mediated O2 sensing has been demonstrated in a variety of O2-sensing tissues in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, including smooth muscle in systemic and respiratory blood vessels and airways, carotid body, adrenal medulla, and other peripheral as well as central chemoreceptors. Critical Issues Information is now needed on the intracellular location and stoichometry of these signaling processes and how and which downstream effectors are activated by H2S and its metabolites. Future Directions Development of specific inhibitors of H2S metabolism and effector activation as well as cellular organelle-targeted compounds that release H2S in a time- or environmentally controlled way will not only enhance our understanding of this signaling process but also provide direction for future therapeutic applications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 377–397. “Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution” —Theodosius Dobzhansky (29) PMID:24801248

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1) is also one of the focuses of this review. PMID:26881033

  10. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic contributions to colonic hydrogen sulfide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Kyle L; McCoy, Kathy D; Wallace, John L

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important modulator of many aspects of digestive function, both in health and disease. Colonic tissue H(2)S synthesis increases markedly during injury and inflammation and appears to contribute to resolution. Some of the bacteria residing in the colon can also produce H(2)S. The extent to which bacterial H(2)S synthesis contributes to what is measured as colonic H(2)S synthesis is not clear. Using conventional and germ-free mice, we have delineated the eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic contributions to colonic H(2)S synthesis, both in healthy and colitic mice. Colonic tissue H(2)S production is entirely dependent on the presence of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (vitamin B(6)), while bacterial H(2)S synthesis appears to occur independent of this cofactor. As expected, approximately one-half of the H(2)S produced by feces is derived from eukaryotic cells. While colonic H(2)S synthesis is markedly increased when the tissue is inflamed, and, in proportion to the extent of inflammation, fecal H(2)S synthesis does not change and tissue granulocytes do not appear to be the source of the elevated H(2)S production. Rats fed a B vitamin-deficient diet for 6 wk exhibited significantly diminished colonic H(2)S synthesis, but fecal H(2)S synthesis was not different from that of rats on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that H(2)S production by colonic bacteria does not contribute significantly to what is measured as colonic tissue H(2)S production, using the acetate trapping assay system employed in this study. PMID:21474649

  11. Microbial oxidation of mixtures of methylmercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, A; Kolhatkar, R; Sublette, K L; Beitle, R

    1998-01-01

    Refinery spent-sulfidic caustic, containing only inorganic sulfides, has previously been shown to be amenable to biotreatment with Thiobacillus denitrificans strain F with complete oxidation of sulfides to sulfate. However, many spent caustics contain mercaptans that cannot be metabolized by this strict autotroph. An aerobic enrichment culture was developed from mixed Thiobacilli and activated sludge that was capable of simultaneous oxidation of inorganic sulfide and mercaptans using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methylmercaptan (MeSH) gas feeds used to simulate the inorganic and organic sulfur of a spent-sulfidic caustic. The enrichment culture was also capable of biotreatment of an actual mercaptan-containing, spent-sulfidic caustic but at lower rates than predicted by operation on MeSH and H2S fed to the culture in the gas phase, indicating that the caustic contained other inhibitory components. PMID:18576062

  12. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-09-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2 S: (i) H2 S accelerated the recovery of photosynthesis after prolonged exposure to darkness and anoxia. We suggest that this is possibly due to regulatory effects of H2 S on photosystem I components and/or on the Calvin cycle. (ii) H2 S concentrations of up to 210 μM temporarily enhanced the photosynthetic rates at low irradiance. Modelling showed that this enhancement is plausibly based on changes in the light-harvesting efficiency. (iii) Above a certain light-dependent concentration threshold H2 S also acted as an inhibitor. Intriguingly, this inhibition was not instant but occurred only after a specific time interval that decreased with increasing light intensity. That photosynthesis is most sensitive to inhibition at high light intensities suggests that H2 S inactivates an intermediate of the oxygen evolving complex that accumulates with increasing light intensity. We discuss the implications of these three effects of H2 S in the context of cyanobacterial photosynthesis under conditions with diurnally fluctuating light and H2 S concentrations, such as those occurring in microbial mats and biofilms. PMID:25630511

  13. Identification of H2S3 and H2S produced by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuka; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Koike, Shin; Shibuya, Norihiro; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Lefer, David; Ogasawara, Yuki; Kimura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen polysulfides (H2Sn) have a higher number of sulfane sulfur atoms than hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which has various physiological roles. We recently found H2Sn in the brain. H2Sn induced some responses previously attributed to H2S but with much greater potency than H2S. However, the number of sulfur atoms in H2Sn and its producing enzyme were unknown. Here, we detected H2S3 and H2S, which were produced from 3-mercaptopyruvate (3 MP) by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST), in the brain. High performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FL) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses showed that H2S3 and H2S were produced from 3 MP in the brain cells of wild-type mice but not 3MST knockout (3MST-KO) mice. Purified recombinant 3MST and lysates of COS cells expressing 3MST produced H2S3 from 3 MP, while those expressing defective 3MST mutants did not. H2S3 was localized in the cytosol of cells. H2S3 was also produced from H2S by 3MST and rhodanese. H2S2 was identified as a minor H2Sn, and 3 MP did not affect the H2S5 level. The present study provides new insights into the physiology of H2S3 and H2S, as well as novel therapeutic targets for diseases in which these molecules are involved. PMID:26437775

  14. Hydrogen sulfide: physiological properties and therapeutic potential in ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Eelke M; van Goor, Harry; Joles, Jaap A; Whiteman, Matthew; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has become a molecule of high interest in recent years, and it is now recognized as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the physiology of endogenous and exogenous H2S, focusing upon the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide in models of hypoxia and ischaemia. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:25091411

  15. Enamel surface changes caused by hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hanabusa, Masao; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Chiba, Toshie; Yoshida, Takumasa; Morito, Akiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced inside the mouth are a well-known cause of halitosis. Recent studies have suggested that VSCs modify the pathology of periodontitis by encouraging the migration of bacterial toxins associated with increased permeability of gingival epithelia, and enhancing the production of matrix metalloproteinases in gingival connective tissue. Nonetheless, the effects on the enamel of direct exposure to VSCs within the oral cavity remain unclear. In the present study, we observed the effects of VSCs in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on enamel surfaces and determined their effects on restorations. Materials and Methods: Extracted human tooth and bovine tooth samples were divided into the H2S experimental side and the control side. We observed the effects of H2S on enamel surfaces using electron microscopy and conducted a shear test. Results: We found that exposure to H2S obscured the enamel surface's crystal structure. The surface also exhibited coarseness and reticular changes. Shear testing did not reveal any differences in bond strength. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that H2S occurring inside the mouth causes changes to the crystal structure of the enamel surface that can lead to tooth wear, but that it does not diminish the effects of dental bonding in adhesive restorations. PMID:26752833

  16. Biochemistry and therapeutic potential of hydrogen sulfide - reality or fantasy?

    PubMed

    Brodek, Paulina; Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a signaling gasotransmitter, involved in different physiological and pathological processes. H2S regulates apoptosis, the cell cycle and oxidative stress. H2S exerts powerful effects on smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, inflammatory cells, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclear transcription factors. H2S is known to be produced from L-cysteine, D-cysteine and L-homocysteine in the body. Four enzymes - cystathionine-b synthase (CBS), mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT) - are involved in H2S synthesis. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine involves 3-MST and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). The therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. However, recently results have demonstrated that H2S has protective action for ischemic heart disease or hypertension, and protects against ischemia of the brain. This review summarizes the negative and the positive roles of H2S in various biological systems, for example the cardiovascular system and nervous system. We also discuss the function of classical, therapeutic and natural (for example garlic) donors of H2S in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27516569

  17. Molecularly engineered quantum dots for visualization of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yehan; Yu, Huan; Zhang, Yajiao; Zhang, Kui; Zhu, Houjuan; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Suhua

    2015-02-18

    Among various fluorescence nanomaterials, the II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals (usually called quantum dots, QDs) should be very promising in sensing application because of their high quantum yields, capability for surface property manipulation, and unlimited possible chemical reactions. Herein, we present a fluorescence probe for hydrogen sulfide, which was prepared by first encapsulating inorganic cadmium telluride (CdTe) QDs in silica nanospheres, and subsequently engineering the silica surface with functional molecules azidocoumarin-4-acetic acid reactive to hydrogen sulfide. The nanohybrid probe exhibited two fluorescence bands centered at 452 and 657 nm, respectively. The red fluorescence at 657 nm of the nanohybrid probe is stable against H2S, while the blue fluorescence is specifically sensitive to H2S. The probe showed a distinct fluorescence color evolution from light magenta to blue upon exposure to different amounts of H2S, and a detection limit of 7.0 nM was estimated in aqueous solution. We further applied the nanohybrid probe for visual detection of gaseous H2S with a low concentration of 0.5 ppm using glass indicating spots sensors, suggesting its potential application for gaseous H2S sensing. Such an efficient on-site visual determination of gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is highly demanded in on-site environmental monitoring and protection. PMID:25615270

  18. Reaction between H2, CO, and H2S over Fe,Ni metal in the solar nebula: Experimental evidence for the formation of sulfur-bearing organic molecules and sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorca, Jordi; Casanova, Ignasi

    2000-07-01

    Detailed laboratory studies have been carried out in order to simulate the interaction between nanometer-sized kamacite metal particles and different gas mixtures consisting of H2:H2S (250:0.1), H2:CO (250:1) and H2:CO:H2S (250:1:0.1) under nebular-type conditions (5x10-4 atm and 473 K). Reaction of H2+H2S with kamacite particles for 1000 h leads to the formation of pyrrhotite. Incorporation of CO into the gaseous reactant mixture results in the formation of both sulfide and carbide phases. At the same time, amorphous carbon is deposited onto the metal particles and organic molecules are evolved, namely hydrocarbons and thiols in the C1-C5 and C1-C2 range, respectively. Carbon deposition and production of organics are enhanced with respect to experiments performed with H2+CO, where a carbide phase is formed. There is no evidence for the existence of sulfur poisoning effects on the metal-catalysed hydrogenation of CO through Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions in nebular environments. In fact, it is experimentally demonstrated that sulfur-containing organic species could be synthesized by such reactions from nebular gas.

  19. Self-Immolative Thiocarbamates Provide Access to Triggered H2S Donors and Analyte Replacement Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Andrea K; Pardue, Sibile; Kevil, Christopher G; Pluth, Michael D

    2016-06-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological signaling molecule, and chemical tools for H2S delivery and detection have emerged as important investigative methods. Key challenges in these fields include developing donors that are triggered to release H2S in response to stimuli and developing probes that do not irreversibly consume H2S. Here we report a new strategy for H2S donation based on self-immolation of benzyl thiocarbamates to release carbonyl sulfide, which is rapidly converted to H2S by carbonic anhydrase. We leverage this chemistry to develop easily modifiable donors that can be triggered to release H2S. We also demonstrate that this approach can be coupled with common H2S-sensing motifs to generate scaffolds which, upon reaction with H2S, generate a fluorescence response and also release caged H2S, thus addressing challenges of analyte homeostasis in reaction-based probes. PMID:27218691

  20. Self-Immolative Thiocarbamates Provide Access to Triggered H2S Donors and Analyte Replacement Fluorescent Probes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological signaling molecule, and chemical tools for H2S delivery and detection have emerged as important investigative methods. Key challenges in these fields include developing donors that are triggered to release H2S in response to stimuli and developing probes that do not irreversibly consume H2S. Here we report a new strategy for H2S donation based on self-immolation of benzyl thiocarbamates to release carbonyl sulfide, which is rapidly converted to H2S by carbonic anhydrase. We leverage this chemistry to develop easily modifiable donors that can be triggered to release H2S. We also demonstrate that this approach can be coupled with common H2S-sensing motifs to generate scaffolds which, upon reaction with H2S, generate a fluorescence response and also release caged H2S, thus addressing challenges of analyte homeostasis in reaction-based probes. PMID:27218691

  1. Therapeutic application of hydrogen sulfide donors: the potential and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Hu, Qingxun; Zhu, Yizhun

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless gas smelling of rotten egg, has long been considered a toxic gas and environment hazard. However, evidences show that H2S plays a great role in many physiological and pathological activities, and it exhibits different effects when applied at various doses. In this review, we summarize the chemistry and biomedical applications of H2S-releasing compounds, including inorganic salts, phosphorodithioate derivatives, derivatives of Allium sativum extracts, derivatives of thioaminoacids, and derivatives of antiinflammatory drugs. PMID:26597301

  2. Biology and therapeutic potential of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen sulfide-releasing chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Kashfi, Khosrow; Olson, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, H2S, is a colorless gas with a strong odor that until recently was only considered to be a toxic environmental pollutant with little or no physiological significance. However, the past few years have demonstrated its role in many biological systems and it is becoming increasingly clear that H2S is likely to join nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) as a major player in mammalian biology. In this review, we have provided an overview of the chemistry and biology of H2S and have summarized the chemistry and biological activity of some natural and synthetic H2S-donating compounds. The naturally occurring compounds discussed include, garlic, sulforaphane, erucin, and iberin. The synthetic H2S donors reviewed include, GYY4137; cysteine analogs; S-propyl cysteine, S-allyl cysteine, S-propargyl cysteine, and N-acetyl cysteine. Dithiolethione and its NSAID and other chimeras such as, L-DOPA, sildenafil, aspirin, diclofenac, naproxen, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and mesalamine have also been reviewed in detail. The newly reported NOSH-aspirin that releases both NO and H2S has also been discussed. PMID:23103569

  3. Endogenous mitigation of H2S inside of the landfills.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Zhong, Zhong; Shen, Dongsheng; Du, Yao; Xu, Jing; Long, Yuyang

    2016-02-01

    Vast quantities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emitted from landfill sites require urgent disposal. The current study focused on source control and examined the migration and conversion behavior of sulfur compounds in two lab-scale simulated landfills with different operation modes. It aimed to explore the possible strategies and mechanisms for H2S endogenous mitigation inside of landfills during decomposition. It was found that the strength of H2S emissions from the landfill sites was dependent on the municipal solid waste (MSW) degradation speed and vertical distribution of sulfide. Leachate recirculation can shorten both the H2S influence period and pollution risk to the surrounding environment. H2S endogenous mitigation may be achieved by chemical oxidation, biological oxidation, adsorption, and/or precipitation in different stages. Migration and conversion mainly affected H2S release behavior during the initial stabilization phase in the landfill. Microbial activities related to sulfur, nitrogen, and iron can further promote H2S endogenous mitigation during the high reducing phase. Thus, H2S endogenous mitigation can be effectively enhanced via control of the aforementioned processes. PMID:26423286

  4. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    PubMed

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S. PMID:26989248

  5. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Wang, Jun; Li, Hui; Xue, Mengzhou; Ji, Ailing; Li, Yanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is one of the major causes of high morbidity, disability, and mortality in the world. I/R injury remains a complicated and unresolved situation in clinical practice, especially in the field of solid organ transplantation. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gaseous signaling molecule and plays a broad range of physiological and pathophysiological roles in mammals. H2S could protect against I/R injury in many organs and tissues, such as heart, liver, kidney, brain, intestine, stomach, hind-limb, lung, and retina. The goal of this review is to highlight recent findings regarding the role of H2S in I/R injury. In this review, we present the production and metabolism of H2S and further discuss the effect and mechanism of H2S in I/R injury. PMID:26064416

  6. Sulfur as a Signaling Nutrient Through Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Kabil, Omer; Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important signaling molecule with beneficial effects on various cellular processes affecting, for example, cardiovascular and neurological functions. The physiological importance of H2S is motivating efforts to develop strategies for modulating its levels. However, advancement in the field of H2S-based therapeutics is hampered by fundamental gaps in our knowledge of how H2S is regulated, its mechanism of action, and its molecular targets. This review provides an overview of sulfur metabolism; describes recent progress that has shed light on the mechanism of H2S as a signaling molecule; and examines nutritional regulation of sulfur metabolism, which pertains to health and disease. PMID:25033061

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Chemical Biology: Pathophysiological roles and detection

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K; Shen, Xinggui; Bir, Shyamal C.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the most recent endogenous gasotransmitter that has been reported to serve many physiological and pathological functions in different tissues. Studies over the past decade have revealed that H2S can be synthesized through numerous pathways and its bioavailability regulated through its conversion into different biochemical forms. H2S exerts its biological effects in various manners including redox regulation of protein and small molecular weight thiols, polysulfides, thiosulfate/sulfite, iron-sulfur cluster proteins, and anti-oxidant properties that affect multiple cellular and molecular responses. However, precise measurement of H2S bioavailability and its associated biochemical and pathophysiological roles remains less well understood. In this review, we discuss recent understanding of H2S chemical biology, its relationship to tissue pathophysiological responses and possible therapeutic uses. PMID:23850632

  8. No facilitator required for membrane transport of hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, John C.; Missner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Lee, John K.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as a new and important member in the group of gaseous signaling molecules. However, the molecular transport mechanism has not yet been identified. Because of structural similarities with H2O, it was hypothesized that aquaporins may facilitate H2S transport across cell membranes. We tested this hypothesis by reconstituting the archeal aquaporin AfAQP from sulfide reducing bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus into planar membranes and by monitoring the resulting facilitation of osmotic water flow and H2S flux. To measure H2O and H2S fluxes, respectively, sodium ion dilution and buffer acidification by proton release (H2S ⇆ H+ + HS−) were recorded in the immediate membrane vicinity. Both sodium ion concentration and pH were measured by scanning ion-selective microelectrodes. A lower limit of lipid bilayer permeability to H2S, PM,H2S ≥ 0.5 ± 0.4 cm/s was calculated by numerically solving the complete system of differential reaction diffusion equations and fitting the theoretical pH distribution to experimental pH profiles. Even though reconstitution of AfAQP significantly increased water permeability through planar lipid bilayers, PM,H2S remained unchanged. These results indicate that lipid membranes may well act as a barrier to water transport although they do not oppose a significant resistance to H2S diffusion. The fact that cholesterol and sphingomyelin reconstitution did not turn these membranes into an H2S barrier indicates that H2S transport through epithelial barriers, endothelial barriers, and membrane rafts also occurs by simple diffusion and does not require facilitation by membrane channels. PMID:19805349

  9. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. PMID:25280920

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shufang; Pan, Chuli; Zhou, Feifei; Yuan, Zhi; Wang, Huiying; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Gensheng

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced endogenously by the activation of two major H2S-generating enzymes (cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase), plays important regulatory roles in different physiologic and pathologic conditions. The abnormal metabolism of H2S is associated with fibrosis pathogenesis, causing damage in structure and function of different organs. A number of in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that both endogenous H2S level and the expressions of H2S-generating enzymes in plasma and tissues are significantly downregulated during fibrosis. Supplement with exogenous H2S mitigates the severity of fibrosis in various experimental animal models. The protective role of H2S in the development of fibrosis is primarily attributed to its antioxidation, antiapoptosis, anti-inflammation, proangiogenesis, and inhibition of fibroblasts activities. Future studies might focus on the potential to intervene fibrosis by targeting the pathway of endogenous H2S-producing enzymes and H2S itself. PMID:26078809

  11. Working with "H2S": facts and apparent artifacts.

    PubMed

    Wedmann, Rudolf; Bertlein, Sarah; Macinkovic, Igor; Böltz, Sebastian; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Muñoz, Luis E; Herrmann, Martin; Filipovic, Milos R

    2014-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important signaling molecule with physiological endpoints similar to those of nitric oxide (NO). Growing interest in its physiological roles and pharmacological potential has led to large sets of contradictory data. The principle cause of these discrepancies can be the common neglect of some of the basic H2S chemistry. This study investigates how the experimental outcome when working with H2S depends on its source and dose and the methodology employed. We show that commercially available NaHS should be avoided and that traces of metal ions should be removed because these can reduce intramolecular disulfides and change protein structure. Furthermore, high H2S concentrations may lead to a complete inhibition of cell respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and superoxide generation, which should be considered when discussing the biological effects observed upon treatment with high concentrations of H2S. In addition, we provide chemical evidence that H2S can directly react with superoxide. H2S is also capable of reducing cytochrome c(3+) with the concomitant formation of superoxide. H2S does not directly react with nitrite but with NO electrodes that detect H2S. In addition, H2S interferes with the Griess reaction and should therefore be removed from the solution by Cd(2+) or Zn(2+) precipitation prior to nitrite quantification. 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) is reduced by H2S, and its use should be avoided in combination with H2S. All these constraints must be taken into account when working with H2S to ensure valid data. PMID:24932545

  12. The diagenesis of carbohydrates by hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Frank D.

    1983-08-01

    Carbohydrates react with hydrogen sulfide under low temperature (100° to 200°C) yielding a variety of organosulfur compounds including thiophenes, thiols, sulfides and sulfones. A polymer is also produced, whose elemental composition is within the range of natural coals. When reductive dehydration is carried out in the presence of hydrocarbon, organosulfur compounds are formed in the carbon number range of the hydrocarbon used. In these processes, an active hydrogen transfer catalyst is produced which facilitates the passage of hydrogen between normal paraffins and saccharide units, distributing sulfur between these two families primarily in the form of thiophene rings. The simplicity of these systems - H 2S, carbohydrates, H 2O, hydrocarbon - and the facility of the chemistry would suggest that the carbohydrates and hydrogen sulfide may be important agents in the diagenetic processes leading to petroleum and coal. Carbohydrate reduction by hydrogen sulfide may constitute an important route through which certain organosulfur compounds found in petroleum and coal entered these materials in early diagenesis.

  13. The Cardioprotective Actions of Hydrogen Sulfide in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Calvert, John W.; Butler, Javed; Lefer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    It has now become universally accepted that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), previously considered only as a lethal toxin, has robust cytoprotective actions in multiple organ systems. The diverse signaling profile of H2S impacts multiple pathways to exert cytoprotective actions in a number of pathological states. This paper will review the recently described cardioprotective actions of hydrogen sulfide in both myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and congestive heart failure. PMID:25045576

  14. Transformation of two chlorinated fumigants by hydrogen sulfide species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chlorinated fumigants chloropicrin and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) are extensively used to control soilborne pests. Transformation of these two pesticides by hydrogen sulfide species (H2S and HS-) was examined in well-defined anoxic aqueous solutions. Chloropicrin underwent an extremely rapid re...

  15. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  16. H2S and Blood Vessels: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangdong; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biomedical importance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been fully recognized in the cardiovascular system as well as in the rest of the body. In blood vessels, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) is a major H2S-producing enzyme expressed in both smooth muscle and endothelium as well as periadventitial adipose tissues. Regulation of H2S production from CSE is controlled by a complex integration of transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational mechanisms in blood vessels. In smooth muscle cells, H2S regulates cell apoptosis, phenotypic switch, relaxation and contraction, and calcification. In endothelial cells, H2S controls cell proliferation, cellular senescence, oxidative stress, inflammation, etc. H2S interacts with nitric oxide and acts as an endothelium-derived relaxing factor and an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S generated from periadventitial adipose tissues acts as an adipocyte-derived relaxing factor and modulates the vascular tone. Extensive evidence has demonstrated the beneficial roles of the CSE/H2S system in various blood vessel diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and aortic aneurysm. The important roles signaling in the cardiovascular system merit further intensive and extensive investigation. H2S-releasing agents and CSE activators will find their great applications in the prevention and treatment of blood vessel-related disorders. PMID:26162830

  17. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    PubMed Central

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  18. REACTION OF H2S AND SULFUR WITH LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the direct-displacement reaction of limestone with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) over the temperature range 570-850 C in a differential reactor. It is one of several possible mechanisms of sulfur capture in limestone-injection multistage burners whi...

  19. Targeting hydrogen sulfide as a promising therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suowen; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-03-15

    Physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) have multiple protective effects in the cardiovascular system. Recent studies have implicated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a new member of vasculoprotective gasotransmitter family, behaving similarly to NO and CO. H2S has been demonstrated to inhibit multiple key aspects of atherosclerosis, including atherogenic modification of LDL, monocytes adhesion to the endothelial cells, macrophage-derived foam cell formation and inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, neointimal hyperplasia, vascular calcification, and thrombogenesis. H2S also decreases plasma homocysteine levels in experimental animal models. In the human body, H2S production is predominantly catalyzed by cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). CSE is the primary H2S-producing enzyme in the vasculature. Growing evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is associated with vascular CSE/H2S deficiency and that H2S supplementation by exogenous H2S donors (such as NaHS and GYY4137) attenuates, and H2S synthesis suppression by inhibitors (such as D, L-propargylglycine) aggravates the development of atherosclerotic plaques. However, it remains elusive whether CSE deficiency plays a causative role in atherosclerosis. A recent study (Circulation. 2013; 127: 2523-2534) demonstrates that decreased endogenous H2S production by CSE genetic deletion accelerates atherosclerosis in athero-prone ApoE-/- mice, pinpointing that endogenously produced H2S by CSE activation may be of benefit in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. This study will facilitate the development of H2S-based pharmaceuticals with therapeutic applications in atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24491853

  20. Polysulfides Link H2S to Protein Thiol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Romy; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Nagy, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is suggested to act as a gaseous signaling molecule in a variety of physiological processes. Its molecular mechanism of action was proposed to involve protein S-sulfhydration, that is, conversion of cysteinyl thiolates (Cys-S−) to persulfides (Cys-S-S−). A central and unresolved question is how H2S—that is, a molecule with sulfur in its lowest possible oxidation state (−2)—can lead to oxidative thiol modifications. Results: Using the lipid phosphatase PTEN as a model protein, we find that the “H2S donor” sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) leads to very rapid reversible oxidation of the enzyme in vitro. We identify polysulfides formed in NaHS solutions as the oxidizing species, and present evidence that sulfane sulfur is added to the active site cysteine. Polysulfide-mediated oxidation of PTEN was induced by all “H2S donors” tested, including sodium sulfide (Na2S), gaseous H2S, and morpholin-4-ium 4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate (GYY4137). Moreover, we show that polysulfides formed in H2S solutions readily modify PTEN inside intact cells. Innovation: Our results shed light on the previously unresolved question of how H2S leads to protein thiol oxidation, and suggest that polysulfides formed in solutions of H2S mediate this process. Conclusion: This study suggests that the effects that have been attributed to H2S in previous reports may in fact have been mediated by polysulfides. It also supports the notion that sulfane sulfur rather than sulfide is the actual in vivo agent of H2S signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1749–1765. PMID:23646934

  1. A Single Fluorescent Probe to Visualize Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Polysulfides with Different Fluorescence Signals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Pacheco, Armando; Takano, Yoko; Day, Jacob J; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Xian, Ming

    2016-08-16

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) and hydrogen polysulfides (H2 Sn , n>1) are endogenous regulators of many physiological processes. In order to better understand the symbiotic relationship and cellular cross-talk between H2 S and H2 Sn , it is highly desirable to develop single fluorescent probes which enable dual-channel discrimination between H2 S and H2 Sn . Herein, we report the rational design, synthesis, and evaluation of the first dual-detection fluorescent probe DDP-1 that can visualize H2 S and H2 Sn with different fluorescence signals. The probe showed high selectivity and sensitivity to H2 S and H2 Sn in aqueous media and in cells. PMID:27410794

  2. Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Pouokam, Ervice; Althaus, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well-known environmental chemical threat with an unpleasant smell of rotten eggs. Aside from the established toxic effects of high-dose H2S, research over the past decade revealed that cells endogenously produce small amounts of H2S with physiological functions. H2S has therefore been classified as a “gasotransmitter.” A major challenge for cells and tissues is the maintenance of low physiological concentrations of H2S in order to prevent potential toxicity. Epithelia of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract are especially faced with this problem, since these barriers are predominantly exposed to exogenous H2S from environmental sources or sulfur-metabolising microbiota. In this paper, we review the cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells maintain physiological, endogenous H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest a concept by which epithelia use their electrolyte and liquid transport machinery as defence mechanisms in order to eliminate exogenous sources for potentially harmful H2S concentrations. PMID:26904165

  3. Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Pouokam, Ervice; Althaus, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well-known environmental chemical threat with an unpleasant smell of rotten eggs. Aside from the established toxic effects of high-dose H2S, research over the past decade revealed that cells endogenously produce small amounts of H2S with physiological functions. H2S has therefore been classified as a "gasotransmitter." A major challenge for cells and tissues is the maintenance of low physiological concentrations of H2S in order to prevent potential toxicity. Epithelia of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract are especially faced with this problem, since these barriers are predominantly exposed to exogenous H2S from environmental sources or sulfur-metabolising microbiota. In this paper, we review the cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells maintain physiological, endogenous H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest a concept by which epithelia use their electrolyte and liquid transport machinery as defence mechanisms in order to eliminate exogenous sources for potentially harmful H2S concentrations. PMID:26904165

  4. Physiological Importance of Hydrogen Sulfide: Emerging Potent Neuroprotector and Neuromodulator.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Sandesh; Chung, Hyung-Joo; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Na Young

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging neuromodulator that is considered to be a gasotransmitter similar to nitrogen oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). H2S exerts universal cytoprotective effects and acts as a defense mechanism in organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. It is produced by the enzymes cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine ϒ-lyase (CSE), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST), and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), which are also involved in tissue-specific biochemical pathways for H2S production in the human body. H2S exerts a wide range of pathological and physiological functions in the human body, from endocrine system and cellular longevity to hepatic protection and kidney function. Previous studies have shown that H2S plays important roles in peripheral nerve regeneration and degeneration and has significant value during Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation but it is also associated with axonal degradation and the remyelination of Schwann cells. To date, physiological and toxic levels of H2S in the human body remain unclear and most of the mechanisms of action underlying the effects of H2S have yet to be fully elucidated. The primary purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the role of H2S in the human body and to describe its beneficial effects. PMID:27413423

  5. Physiological Importance of Hydrogen Sulfide: Emerging Potent Neuroprotector and Neuromodulator

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging neuromodulator that is considered to be a gasotransmitter similar to nitrogen oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). H2S exerts universal cytoprotective effects and acts as a defense mechanism in organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. It is produced by the enzymes cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine ϒ-lyase (CSE), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST), and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), which are also involved in tissue-specific biochemical pathways for H2S production in the human body. H2S exerts a wide range of pathological and physiological functions in the human body, from endocrine system and cellular longevity to hepatic protection and kidney function. Previous studies have shown that H2S plays important roles in peripheral nerve regeneration and degeneration and has significant value during Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation but it is also associated with axonal degradation and the remyelination of Schwann cells. To date, physiological and toxic levels of H2S in the human body remain unclear and most of the mechanisms of action underlying the effects of H2S have yet to be fully elucidated. The primary purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the role of H2S in the human body and to describe its beneficial effects. PMID:27413423

  6. Hydrogen sulfide on Io - Evidence from telescopic and laboratory infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Howell, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    Evidence is reported for hydrogen sulfide on Io's surface. An infrared band at 3.915 (+ or - 0.015) micrometers in several ground-based spectra of Io can be accounted for by reflectance from H2S frost deposited on or cocondensed with sulfur dioxide frost. Temporal variation in the occurrence and intensity of the band suggests that condensed H2S on Io's surface is transient, implying a similar variation of H2S abundance in Io's atmosphere.

  7. Understanding hydrogen sulfide storage: probing conditions for sulfide release from hydrodisulfides.

    PubMed

    Bailey, T Spencer; Zakharov, Lev N; Pluth, Michael D

    2014-07-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological signaling agent that exerts action on numerous (patho)physiological processes. Once generated, H2S can be oxidized to generate reductant-labile sulfane sulfur pools, which include hydrodisulfides/persulfides. Despite the importance of hydrodisulfides in H2S storage and signaling, little is known about the physical properties or chemical reactivity of these compounds. We report here the synthesis, isolation, and characterization (NMR, IR, Raman, HRMS, X-ray) of a small-molecule hydrodisulfide and highlight its reactivity with reductants, nucleophiles, electrophiles, acids, and bases. Our experimental results establish that hydrodisulfides release H2S upon reduction and that deprotonation results in disproportionation to the parent thiol and S(0), thus providing a mechanism for transsulfuration in the sulfane sulfur pool. PMID:25010540

  8. Chronic Ambient Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure and Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Crane, Julian; Garrett, Nick; Woods, David L.; Bates, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposures to hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) have been inconclusively linked to a variety of negative cognitive outcomes. We investigated possible effects on cognitive function in an urban population with chronic, low-level exposure to H2S. Methods Participants were 1,637 adults, aged 18-65 years from Rotorua city, New Zealand, exposed to ambient H2S from geothermal sources. Exposures at homes and workplaces were estimated from data collected by summer and winter H2S monitoring networks across Rotorua in 2010/11. Metrics for H2S exposure at the time of participation and for exposure over the last 30 years were calculated. H2S exposure was modeled both as continuous variables and as quartiles of exposure covering the range of 0 – 64 ppb (0-88 μg/m3). Outcomes were neuropsychological tests measuring visual and verbal episodic memory, attention, fine motor skills, psychomotor speed and mood. Associations between cognition and measures of H2S exposure were investigated with multiple regression, while covarying demographics and factors known to be associated with cognitive performance. Results The consistent finding was of no association between H2S exposure and cognition. Quartiles of H2S exposure had a small association with simple reaction time: higher exposures were associated with faster response times. Similarly, for digit symbol, higher H2S exposures tended to be marginally associated with better performance. Conclusion The results provide evidence that chronic H2S exposure, at the ambient levels found in and around Rotorua, is not associated with impairment of cognitive function. PMID:24548790

  9. Is Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Suspended Animation General Anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rosie Q.; McKinstry, Andrew R.; Moore, Jason T.; Caltagarone, Breanna M.; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) depresses mitochondrial function and thereby metabolic rates in mice, purportedly resulting in a state of “suspended animation.” Volatile anesthetics also depress mitochondrial function, an effect that may contribute to their anesthetic properties. In this study, we ask whether H2S has general anesthetic properties, and by extension, whether mitochondrial effects underlie the state of anesthesia. We compared loss of righting reflex, electroencephalography, and electromyography in mice exposed to metabolically equipotent concentrations of halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and H2S. We also studied combinations of H2S and anesthetics to assess additivity. Finally, the long-term effects of H2S were assessed by using the Morris water maze behavioral testing 2 to 3 weeks after exposures. Exposure to H2S decreases O2 consumption, CO2 production, and body temperature similarly to that of the general anesthetics, but fails to produce a loss of righting reflex or muscle atonia at metabolically equivalent concentrations. When combined, H2S antagonizes the metabolic effects of isoflurane, but potentiates the isoflurane-induced loss of righting reflex. We found no effect of prior H2S exposure on memory or learning. H2S (250 ppm), not itself lethal, produced delayed lethality when combined with subanesthetic concentrations of isoflurane. H2S cannot be considered a general anesthetic, despite similar metabolic suppression. Metabolic suppression, presumably via mitochondrial actions, is not sufficient to account for the hypnotic or immobilizing components of the anesthetic state. Combinations of H2S and isoflurane can be lethal, suggesting extreme care in the combination of these gases in clinical situations. PMID:22414854

  10. Working with nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are gasotransmitter molecules important in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Although these molecules were first known as environmental toxicants, it is now evident that that they are intricately involved in diverse cellular functions with impact on numerous physiological and pathogenic processes. NO and H2S share some common characteristics but also have unique chemical properties that suggest potential complementary interactions between the two in affecting cellular biochemistry and metabolism. Central among these is the interactions between NO, H2S, and thiols that constitute new ways to regulate protein function, signaling, and cellular responses. In this review, we discuss fundamental biochemical principals, molecular functions, measurement methods, and the pathophysiological relevance of NO and H2S. PMID:25550314

  11. Detection of interstellar hydrogen sulfide in cold, dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Minh, Y C; Irvine, W M; Ziurys, L M

    1989-10-01

    We have detected interstellar hydrogen sulfide (H2S) toward the cold, dark clouds L134N and TMC 1. We derive total column densities of approximately 2.6 x 10(13) cm-2 and approximately 7.0 x 10(12) cm-2 at the SO peak of L134N and at the NH3 peak of TMC 1, respectively. Since the expected gas phase reactions leading to the formation of H2S are thought to be endothermic, grain surface reactions may play a major role in the synthesis of this species in cold, dark clouds. If the carbon abundance is high and grain surface reactions are the dominant formation route, H2CS would be expected to form instead of H2S, and the abundances of H2CS have been observed to be high where those of H2S are low in L134N and TMC 1. PMID:11538326

  12. Enhanced hydrogen oxidation activity and H2S tolerance of Ni-infiltrated ceria solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirfakhraei, Behzad; Paulson, Scott; Thangadurai, Venkataraman; Birss, Viola

    2013-12-01

    The effect of Ni infiltration into porous Gd-doped ceria (GDC) anodes on their H2 oxidation performance, with and without added 10 ppm H2S, is reported here. Porous GDC anodes (ca. 10 μm thick) were deposited on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) supports and then infiltrated with catalytic amounts of a Ni nitrate solution, followed by electrochemical testing in a 3-electrode half-cell setup at 500-800 °C. Infiltration of 3 wt.% Ni into the porous GDC anode lowered the polarization resistance by up to 85%, affecting mainly the low frequency impedance arc. When exposed to 10 ppm H2S, the Ni-infiltrated anodes exhibited a ca. 5 times higher tolerance toward sulfur poisoning compared to GDC anodes alone, also showing excellent long-term stability in 10 ppm H2S. In the presence of H2S, it is proposed that Ni, likely distributed as a nanophase, helps to maintain a clean GDC surface at the Ni/GDC interface at which the H2 oxidation reaction takes place. In turn, the GDC will readily supply oxygen anions to the adjacent Ni surfaces, thus helping to remove adsorbed sulfur.

  13. The metallization and superconductivity of dense hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Yanling; Ma, Yanming

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a prototype molecular system and a sister molecule of water (H2O). The phase diagram of solid H2S at high pressures remains largely unexplored arising from the challenges in dealing with the pressure-induced weakening of S-H bond and larger atomic core difference between H and S. Metallization is yet achieved for H2O, but it was observed for H2S above 96 GPa. However, the metallic structure of H2S remains elusive, greatly impeding the understanding of its metallicity and the potential superconductivity. We have performed an extensive structural study on solid H2S at pressure ranges of 10-200 GPa through an unbiased structure prediction method based on particle swarm optimization algorithm. Besides the findings of candidate structures for nonmetallic phases IV and V, we are able to establish stable metallic structures violating an earlier proposal of elemental decomposition into sulfur and hydrogen [R. Rousseau, M. Boero, M. Bernasconi, M. Parrinello, and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1254 (2000)]. Our study unravels a superconductive potential of metallic H2S with an estimated maximal transition temperature of ˜80 K at 160 GPa, higher than those predicted for most archetypal hydrogen-containing compounds (e.g., SiH4, GeH4, etc.).

  14. Ab initio calculations on the structure and nature of the hydrogen bonded complex H2S ṡṡṡ HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. Chandra; Kollman, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing an extended basis set and correlation energy estimates at the MP2 (second order Möller-Plesset) level have been used to estimate the binding energy, minimum energy S ...F distance, and minimum energy bisector angle θ (angle between the twofold axis of H2S and the S ...F line) for the hydrogen bonded complex H2S ... HF. The calculated distance and bisector angle θ are in reasonable agreement with experiment; the calculated binding energy can be used to provide a good estimate of the (as yet unknown) experimental value. Morokuma component analyses and simple electrostatic (molecular mechanics) calculations have been carried out on the complex as a function of bisector angle and they demonstrated that, despite suggestions to the contrary, the H2S ... HF bisector angle is predominantly determined by the electrostatic energy.

  15. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions. PMID:27446159

  16. Hydrogen sulfide and endothelial dysfunction: relationship with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Altaany, Zaid; Moccia, Francesco; Munaron, Luca; Mancardi, Daniele; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is a cellular monolayer that lines the inner surface of blood vessels and plays a central role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis by controlling platelet aggregation, vascular tone, blood fluidity and fibrinolysis, adhesion and transmigration of inflammatory cells, and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunctions are associated with various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Numerous studies have established the anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the latest member to join the gasotransmitter family along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, on vascular endothelium. In addition, H2S may prime endothelial cells (ECs) toward angiogenesis and contribute to wound healing, besides to its well-known ability to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and thereby reducing blood pressure. Finally, H2S may inhibit VSMC proliferation and platelet aggregation. Consistently, a deficit in H2S homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of hyperglycaemic endothelial injury. Therefore, the application of H2S-releasing drugs or using gene therapy to increase endogenous H2S level may help restore endothelial function and antagonize the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The present article reviews recent studies on the role of H2S in endothelial homeostasis, under both physiological and pathological conditions, and its putative therapeutic applications. PMID:25005182

  17. Chemically Reversible Reactions of Hydrogen Sulfide with Metal Phthalocyanines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important signaling molecule that exerts action on various bioinorganic targets. Despite this importance, few studies have investigated the differential reactivity of the physiologically relevant H2S and HS– protonation states with metal complexes. Here we report the distinct reactivity of H2S and HS– with zinc(II) and cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (Pc) complexes and highlight the chemical reversibility and cyclability of each metal. ZnPc reacts with HS–, but not H2S, to generate [ZnPc-SH]−, which can be converted back to ZnPc by protonation. CoPc reacts with HS–, but not H2S, to form [CoIPc]−, which can be reoxidized to CoPc by air. Taken together, these results demonstrate the chemically reversible reaction of HS– with metal phthalocyanine complexes and highlight the importance of H2S protonation state in understanding the reactivity profile of H2S with biologically relevant metal scaffolds. PMID:24785654

  18. Chemically reversible reactions of hydrogen sulfide with metal phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Hartle, Matthew D; Sommer, Samantha K; Dietrich, Stephen R; Pluth, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important signaling molecule that exerts action on various bioinorganic targets. Despite this importance, few studies have investigated the differential reactivity of the physiologically relevant H2S and HS(-) protonation states with metal complexes. Here we report the distinct reactivity of H2S and HS(-) with zinc(II) and cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (Pc) complexes and highlight the chemical reversibility and cyclability of each metal. ZnPc reacts with HS(-), but not H2S, to generate [ZnPc-SH](-), which can be converted back to ZnPc by protonation. CoPc reacts with HS(-), but not H2S, to form [Co(I)Pc](-), which can be reoxidized to CoPc by air. Taken together, these results demonstrate the chemically reversible reaction of HS(-) with metal phthalocyanine complexes and highlight the importance of H2S protonation state in understanding the reactivity profile of H2S with biologically relevant metal scaffolds. PMID:24785654

  19. pH-Controlled Hydrogen Sulfide Release for Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jianming; Li, Zhen; Organ, Chelsea L; Park, Chung-Min; Yang, Chun-Tao; Pacheco, Armando; Wang, Difei; Lefer, David J; Xian, Ming

    2016-05-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical signaling molecule that regulates many physiological and/or pathological processes. Modulation of H2S levels could have potential therapeutic value. In this work, we report the rational design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a class of phosphonamidothioate-based H2S-releasing agents (i.e., H2S donors). A novel pH-dependent intramolecular cyclization was employed to promote H2S release from the donors. These water-soluble compounds showed slow, controllable, and pH-sensitive production of H2S in aqueous solutions. The donors also showed significant cytoprotective effects in cellular models of oxidative damage. Most importantly, the donors were found to exhibit potent cardioprotective effects in an in vivo murine model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury through a H2S-related mechanism. PMID:27172143

  20. H2S Analysis in Biological Samples Using Gas Chromatography with Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a metabolite and signaling molecule in biological tissues that regulates many physiological processes. Reliable and sensitive methods for H2S analysis are necessary for a better understanding of H2S biology and for the pharmacological modulation of H2S levels in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the use of gas chromatography coupled to sulfur chemiluminescence detection to measure the rates of H2S production and degradation by tissue homogenates at physiologically relevant concentrations of substrates. This method allows separation of H2S from other sulfur compounds and provides sensitivity of detection to ~15 pg (or 0.5 pmol) of H2S per injected sample. PMID:25725519

  1. Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duangmanee, Thanapong

    The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. The high sulfide level in the biogas stream is not only poisonous to many novel metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes but also reduces the quality of methane to produce renewable energy. This study used an innovative, low-maintenance, low-cost biological sulfide removal technology to remove sulfides simultaneously from both gas and liquid phase. ORP (Oxidation-Reduction-Potential) was used as the controlling parameter to precisely regulate air injection to the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU). The microaeration technique provided just enough oxygen to partially oxidize sulfides to elemental sulfur without inhibiting methanogenesis. The SOU was equipped with a diffuser at the bottom for the dispersion of sulfide-laden biogas and injected air throughout the column. The SOU can be operated as a standalone unit or coupled with an anaerobic digester to simultaneously remove sulfide from the biogas and effluent. The integrated system was capable of reducing hydrogen sulfide in biogas from 2,450 to less than 2 ppmV with minimal sulfate production at the highest available sulfide loading rate of 0.24 kg/m3-day. More than 98% of sulfide removed was recovered as elemental sulfur. However, the standalone SOU was able to operate at high hydrogen sulfide loading of 1.46 kg/m 3-day at inlet sulfide concentration of 3000 ppmV and reduce the off-gas hydrogen sulfide concentrations to less than 10 ppmV. The experiment also revealed that the ORP controlled aeration was sensitive enough to prevent oxygen overdosing (dampening effect) during unexpected surges of aeration. Using generalized linear regression, a model predicting output H2S concentration based on input H2S concentrations, SOU medium heights, and biogas flow rates, was derived. With 95% confidence, output H2S concentration

  2. Emerging role of hydrogen sulfide in hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guoliang; Ma, Yan; Xie, Liping; Ferro, Albert; Ji, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has traditionally been viewed as a highly toxic gas; however, recent studies have implicated H2 S as a third member of the gasotransmitter family, exhibiting properties similar to NO and carbon monoxide. Accumulating evidence has suggested that H2 S influences a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, among which blood vessel relaxation, cardioprotection and atherosclerosis have been particularly studied. In the cardiovascular system, H2 S production is predominantly catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). Decreased endogenous H2 S levels have been found in hypertensive patients and animals, and CSE(-/-) mice develop hypertension with age, suggesting that a deficiency in H2 S contributes importantly to BP regulation. H2 S supplementation attenuates hypertension in different hypertensive animal models. The mechanism by which H2 S was originally proposed to attenuate hypertension was by virtue of its action on vascular tone, which may be related to effects on different ion channels. Both H2 S and NO cause vasodilatation and there is cross-talk between these two molecules to regulate BP. Suppression of oxidative stress may also contribute to antihypertensive effects of H2 S. This review also summarizes the state of research on H2 S and hypertension in China. A better understanding of the role of H2 S in hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases will allow novel strategies to be devised for their treatment. PMID:25204754

  3. Roles of H2S in adaptation of alpine plants Lamiophlomis rotata to altitude gradients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous transmitter in organisims. It widespreads in the organs and tissues of animals and participates in the biological process of cardiovascular relaxation, cell apoptosis and protection, inflammation and neuromodulation. H2S also can be synthesized in plants system and is involved in stress responses and the biological process of growth and development. This review describes the synthesis and biological function of H2S in plants. Based on our research for the adaptation of Lamiophlomis rotata to different altitude gradients, we firstly proposed H2S plays an important role in the adaptation of Lamiophlomis rotata to alpine environment. PMID:26786014

  4. Roles of H2S in adaptation of alpine plants Lamiophlomis rotata to altitude gradients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous transmitter in organisims. It widespreads in the organs and tissues of animals and participates in the biological process of cardiovascular relaxation, cell apoptosis and protection, inflammation and neuromodulation. H2S also can be synthesized in plants system and is involved in stress responses and the biological process of growth and development. This review describes the synthesis and biological function of H2S in plants. Based on our research for the adaptation of Lamiophlomis rotata to different altitude gradients, we firstly proposed H2S plays an important role in the adaptation of Lamiophlomis rotata to alpine environment. PMID:26786014

  5. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1982-01-19

    A process for the removal of H2S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO2 at temperatures between 250 and 450/sup 0/F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H2, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H2S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO2 and H2S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO CS2, SO3 and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H2S and subsequently removing the H2S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  6. H2S during circulatory shock: Some unresolved questions

    PubMed Central

    McCook, Oscar; Radermacher, Peter; Volani, Chiara; Asfar, Pierre; Ignatius, Anita; Kemmler, Julia; Möller, Peter; Szabó, Csaba; Whiteman, Matthew; Wood, Mark E.; Wang, Rui; Georgieff, Michael; Wachter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Numerous papers have been published on the role of H2S during circulatory shock. Consequently, knowledge about vascular sulfide concentrations may assume major importance, in particular in the context of “acute on chronic disease”, i.e., during circulatory shock in animals with pre-existing chronic disease. This review addresses the questions i) of the “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock, and, ii) to which extent injury and pre-existing co-morbidity may affect the expression of H2S producing enzymes under these conditions. In the literature there is a huge range on sulfide blood levels during circulatory shock, in part as a result of the different analytical methods used, but also due to the variable of the models and species studied. Clearly, some of the very high levels reported should be questioned in the context of the well-known H2S toxicity. As long as “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock are unknown and/or undetectable “on line” due to the lack of appropriate techniques, it appears to be premature to correlate the measured blood levels of hydrogen sulfide with the severity of shock or the H2S therapy-related biological outcomes. The available data on the tissue expression of the H2S-releasing enzymes during circulatory shock suggest that a “constitutive” CSE expression may play a crucial role of for the maintenance of organ function, at least in the kidney. The data also indicate that increased CBS and CSE expression, in particular in the lung and the liver, represents an adaptive response to stress states. PMID:24650697

  7. H2S during circulatory shock: some unresolved questions.

    PubMed

    McCook, Oscar; Radermacher, Peter; Volani, Chiara; Asfar, Pierre; Ignatius, Anita; Kemmler, Julia; Möller, Peter; Szabó, Csaba; Whiteman, Matthew; Wood, Mark E; Wang, Rui; Georgieff, Michael; Wachter, Ulrich

    2014-09-15

    Numerous papers have been published on the role of H2S during circulatory shock. Consequently, knowledge about vascular sulfide concentrations may assume major importance, in particular in the context of "acute on chronic disease", i.e., during circulatory shock in animals with pre-existing chronic disease. This review addresses the questions (i) of the "real" sulfide levels during circulatory shock, and (ii) to which extent injury and pre-existing co-morbidity may affect the expression of H2S producing enzymes under these conditions. In the literature there is a huge range on sulfide blood levels during circulatory shock, in part as a result of the different analytical methods used, but also due to the variable of the models and species studied. Clearly, some of the very high levels reported should be questioned in the context of the well-known H2S toxicity. As long as "real" sulfide levels during circulatory shock are unknown and/or undetectable "on line" due to the lack of appropriate techniques, it appears to be premature to correlate the measured blood levels of hydrogen sulfide with the severity of shock or the H2S therapy-related biological outcomes. The available data on the tissue expression of the H2S-releasing enzymes during circulatory shock suggest that a "constitutive" CSE expression may play a crucial role of for the maintenance of organ function, at least in the kidney. The data also indicate that increased CBS and CSE expression, in particular in the lung and the liver, represents an adaptive response to stress states. PMID:24650697

  8. An intercomparison of aircraft instrumentation for tropospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Davis, Douglas D.; Thornton, Donald C.; Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Barrick, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports results of NASA's Chemical Instrumentation and Test Evaluation (CITE 3) during which airborne measurements for carbonyl sulfide (COS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were intercompared. Instrumentation included a gas chromatograph using flame photometric detection (COS, H2S, and CS2), a gas chromatograph using mass spectrometric detection (COS) and CS2), a gas chromatograph using fluorination and subsequent SF6 detection via electron capture (COS and CS2), and the Natusch technique (H2S). The measurements were made over the Atlantic Ocean east of North and South America during flights from NASA's Wallops Flight Center, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil, in August/September 1989. Most of the intercomparisons for H2S and CS2 were at mixing ratios less than 25 pptv and less than 10 pptv, respectively, with a maximum mixing ratio of about 100 pptv and 50 pptv, respectively. Carbonyl sulfide intercomparisons were at mixing ratios between 400 and 600 pptv. Measurements were intercompared from data bases constructed from time periods of simultaneous or overlapping measurements. Agreement among the COS techniques averaged about 5%, and individual measurements were generally within 10%. For H2S and at mixing ratio greater than 25 pptv, the instruments agreed on average to about 15%. At mixing ratios less than 25 pptv the agreement was about 5 pptv. For CS2 (mixing ratios less than 50 pptv), two techniques agreed on average to about 4 pptv, and the third exhibited a bias (relative to the other two) that varied in the range of 3-7 pptv. CS2 mixing ratios over the ocean east of Natal as measured by the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer technique were only a few pptv and were below the detection limits of the other two techniques. The CITE 3 data are used to estimate the current uncertainty associated with aircraft measurements of COS, H2S, and CS2 in the remote troposphere.

  9. An intercomparison of aircraft instrumentation for tropospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Davis, Douglas D.; Thornton, Donald C.; Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Barrick, John D.

    1993-12-01

    This paper reports results of NASA's Chemical Instrumentation and Test Evaluation (CITE 3) during which airborne measurements for carbonyl sulfide (COS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were intercompared. Instrumentation included a gas chromatograph using flame photometric detection (COS, H2S, and CS2), a gas chromatograph using mass spectrometric detection (COS and CS2), a gas chromatograph using fluorination and subsequent SF6 detection via electron capture (COS and CS2), and the Natusch technique (H2S). The measurements were made over the Atlantic Ocean east of North and South America during flights from NASA's Wallops Flight Center, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil, in August/September 1989. Most of the intercomparisons for H2S and CS2 were at mixing ratios <25 pptv and <10 pptv, respectively, with a maximum mixing ratio of about 100 pptv and 50 pptv, respectively. Carbonyl sulfide intercomparisons were at mixing ratios between 400 and 600 pptv. Measurements were intercompared from data bases constructed from time periods of simultaneous or overlapping measurements. Agreement among the COS techniques averaged about 5%, and individual measurements were generally within 10%. For H2S and at mixing ratio >25 pptv, the instruments agreed on average to about 15%. At mixing ratios <25 pptv the agreement was about 5 pptv. For CS2 (mixing ratios <50 pptv), two techniques agreed on average to about 4 pptv, and the third exhibited a bias (relative to the other two) that varied in the range of 3-7 pptv. CS2 mixing ratios over the ocean east of Natal as measured by the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer technique were only a few pptv and were below the detection limits of the other two techniques. The CITE 3 data are used to estimate the current uncertainty associated with aircraft measurements of COS, H2S, and CS2 in the remote troposphere.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide: the third gasotransmitter in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui

    2010-05-01

    The last two decades have seen one of the greatest excitements and discoveries in science, gasotransmitters in biology and medicine. Leading the trend by nitric oxide and extending the trudge by carbon monoxide, here comes hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) who builds up the momentum as the third gasotransmitter. Being produced by different cells and tissues in our body, H(2)S, alone or together with the other two gasotransmitters, regulates an array of physiological processes and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of various diseases from neurodegenerative diseases to diabetes or heart failure, to name a few. As a journal dedicated to serve the emergent and challenging field of H(2)S biology and medicine, Antioxidant and Redox Signaling assembles the most recent discoveries and most provoking ideas from leading scientists in H(2)S fields, which were communicated in the First International Conference of H(2)S in Biology and Medicine, and brings them to our readers in two Forum Issues. Through intellectual exchange and intelligent challenge with an open-mind approach, we can reasonably expect that sooner rather than later the exploration of metabolism and function of H(2)S will provide solutions for many of the biological mysteries of life and pave way for the arrival of many more gasotransmitters. PMID:19845469

  11. Emerging role of hydrogen sulfide-microRNA crosstalk in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Hackfort, Bryan T; Mishra, Paras K

    2016-04-01

    Despite an obnoxious smell and toxicity at a high dose, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging as a cardioprotective gasotransmitter. H2S mitigates pathological cardiac remodeling by regulating several cellular processes including fibrosis, hypertrophy, apoptosis, and inflammation. These encouraging findings in rodents led to initiation of a clinical trial using a H2S donor in heart failure patients. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which H2S mitigates cardiac remodeling are not completely understood. Empirical evidence suggest that H2S may regulate signaling pathways either by directly influencing a gene in the cascade or interacting with nitric oxide (another cardioprotective gasotransmitter) or both. Recent studies revealed that H2S may ameliorate cardiac dysfunction by up- or downregulating specific microRNAs. MicroRNAs are noncoding, conserved, regulatory RNAs that modulate gene expression mostly by translational inhibition and are emerging as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Few microRNAs also regulate H2S biosynthesis. The inter-regulation of microRNAs and H2S opens a new avenue for exploring the H2S-microRNA crosstalk in CVD. This review embodies regulatory mechanisms that maintain the physiological level of H2S, exogenous H2S donors used for increasing the tissue levels of H2S, H2S-mediated regulation of CVD, H2S-microRNAs crosstalk in relation to the pathophysiology of heart disease, clinical trials on H2S, and future perspectives for H2S as a therapeutic agent for heart failure. PMID:26801305

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide, Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Diseases: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Greabu, Maria; Totan, Alexandra; Miricescu, Daniela; Radulescu, Radu; Virlan, Justina; Calenic, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, biomedical research has recognized hydrogen sulfide (H2S) not only as an environmental pollutant but also, along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, as an important biological gastransmitter with paramount roles in health and disease. Current research focuses on several aspects of H2S biology such as the biochemical pathways that generate the compound and its functions in human pathology or drug synthesis that block or stimulate its biosynthesis. The present work addresses the knowledge we have to date on H2S production and its biological roles in the general human environment with a special focus on the oral cavity and its involvement in the initiation and development of periodontal diseases. PMID:26805896

  13. Hydrogen sulfide poisoning: review of 5 years' experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, W. W.; King, E. G.; Grace, M.; Hall, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The workforce of Alberta, a province rich in fossil fuel, faces an increasing risk of exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Basic knowledge of the population exposed during the years 1969 to 1973 inclusive was accumulated to identify the immediate medical and management problems. Data were recorded from three sources of records: the Workers' Compensation Board of Alberta, the Alberta Hospital Services Commission and the provincial coroner's office. There were 221 cases of exposure to H2S. The overall mortality was 6%; 5% of victims were dead on arrival at hospital. Admission to hospital was required for 65% of the victims arriving at a hospital emergency room (78% of the 221). Acute problems were coma, dysequilibrium and respiratory insufficiency with pulmonary edema. Increased attention to cardiopulmonary resuscitation at the exposure site and during transportation to hospital is necessary to reduce the mortality from H2S exposure. No long-term adverse effects were apparent in the survivors. PMID:144553

  14. Protein-based nanobiosensor for direct detection of hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Meisam; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Yazdian, Fatemeh; Habibi-Rezaei, M.

    2015-01-01

    The chemically modified cytochrome c from equine heart, EC (232-700-9), was immobilized onto gold nanoparticles in order to develop a specific biosensing system for monitoring hydrogen sulfide down to the micromolar level, by means of a localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The sensing mechanism is based on the cytochrome-c conformational changes in the presence of H2S which alter the dielectric properties of the gold nanoparticles and the surface plasmon resonance peak undergoes a redshift. According to the experiments, it is revealed that H2S can be detected at a concentration of 4.0 μ \\text{M} (1.3 \\text{ppb}) by the fabricated biosensor. This simple, quantitative and sensitive sensing platform provides a rapid and convenient detection for H2S at concentrations far below the hazardous limit.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide regulates abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Han, Ning; Bian, Hongwu; Liu, Xiaodong; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous molecule in various plant developmental processes and plant stress responses. In this study, the transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with modulated expressions of two cysteine desulfhydrases, and exogenous H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) and H2S scavenger (hypotaurine, HT) pre-treated plants were used to dissect the involvement of H2S in plant stress responses. The cysteine desulfhydrases overexpressing plants and NaHS pre-treated plants exhibited higher endogenous H2S level and improved abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, while cysteine desulfhydrases knockdown plants and HT pre-treated plants displayed lower endogenous H2S level and decreased stress resistance. Moreover, H2S upregulated the transcripts of multiple abiotic and biotic stress-related genes, and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Interestingly, MIR393-mediated auxin signaling including MIR393a/b and their target genes (TIR1, AFB1, AFB2, and AFB3) was transcriptionally regulated by H2S, and was related with H2S-induced antibacterial resistance. Moreover, H2S regulated 50 carbon metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, sugar alcohols, and aromatic amines. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine desulfhydrase and H2S conferred abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, via affecting the stress-related gene expressions, ROS metabolism, metabolic homeostasis, and MIR393-targeted auxin receptors. PMID:25329496

  16. Novel cooperative interactions and structural ordering in H2S-H2

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and hydrogen (H2) crystallize into a 'guest-host' structure at 3.5 GPa and, at the initial formation pressure, the rotationally disordered component molecules exhibit weak van der Waals type interactions. With increasing pressure, hydrogen bonding develops and strengthens between neighboring H2S molecules, reflected in a pronounced drop in S-H vibrational stretching frequency and also observed in first-principles calculations. At 17 GPa, an ordering process occurs where H2S molecules orient themselves to maximize hydrogen bonding and H2 molecules simultaneously occupy a chemically distinct lattice site. Intermolecular forces in the H2S+H2 system may be tuned with pressure from the weak hydrogen-bonding limit to the ordered hydrogen-bonding regime, resulting in a novel clathrate structure stabilized by cooperative interactions.

  17. Novel Cooperative Interactions and Structural Ordering in H2S-H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Timothy A.; Ganesh, P.; Somayazulu, Maddury; Kent, P. R. C.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and hydrogen (H2) crystallize into a ‘guest-host’ structure at 3.5 GPa and, at the initial formation pressure, the rotationally disordered component molecules exhibit weak van der Waals-type interactions. With increasing pressure, hydrogen bonding develops and strengthens between neighboring H2S molecules, reflected in a pronounced drop in S-H vibrational stretching frequency and also observed in first-principles calculations. At 17 GPa, an ordering process occurs where H2S molecules orient themselves to maximize hydrogen bonding and H2 molecules simultaneously occupy a chemically distinct lattice site. Intermolecular forces in the H2S+H2 system may be tuned with pressure from the weak hydrogen-bonding limit to the ordered hydrogen-bonding regime, resulting in a novel clathrate structure stabilized by cooperative interactions.

  18. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Inward-Rectifying K+ Channels in Conjunction with Stomatal Closure1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Papanatsiou, Maria; Scuffi, Denisse; Blatt, Michael R.; García-Mata, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third biological gasotransmitter, and in animals, it affects many physiological processes by modulating ion channels. H2S has been reported to protect plants from oxidative stress in diverse physiological responses. H2S closes stomata, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the selective inactivation of current carried by inward-rectifying K+ channels of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) guard cells and show its close parallel with stomatal closure evoked by submicromolar concentrations of H2S. Experiments to scavenge H2S suggested an effect that is separable from that of abscisic acid, which is associated with water stress. Thus, H2S seems to define a unique and unresolved signaling pathway that selectively targets inward-rectifying K+ channels. PMID:25770153

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide, the Next Potent Preventive and Therapeutic Agent in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Tang, Zhi-Han; Ren, Zhong; Qu, Shun-Lin; Liu, Mi-Hua; Liu, Lu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third endogenous signaling gasotransmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. It is physiologically generated by cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. H2S has been gaining increasing attention as an important endogenous signaling molecule because of its significant effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Substantial evidence shows that H2S is involved in aging by inhibiting free-radical reactions, activating SIRT1, and probably interacting with the age-related gene Klotho. Moreover, H2S has been shown to have therapeutic potential in age-associated diseases. This article provides an overview of the physiological functions and effects of H2S in aging and age-associated diseases, and proposes the potential health and therapeutic benefits of H2S. PMID:23297346

  20. Thioredoxin and dihydrolipoic acid are required for 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase to produce hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Shibuya, Norihiro; Kimura, Yuka; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Ogasawara, Yuki; Kimura, Hideo

    2011-11-01

    H2S (hydrogen sulfide) has recently been recognized as a signalling molecule as well as a cytoprotectant. We recently demonstrated that 3MST (3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase) produces H2S from 3MP (3-mercaptopyruvate). Although a reducing substance is required for an intermediate persulfide at the active site of 3MST to release H2S, the substance has not been identified. In the present study we show that Trx (thioredoxin) and DHLA (dihydrolipoic acid) associate with 3MST to release H2S. Other reducing substances, such as NADPH, NADH, GSH, cysteine and CoA, did not have any effect on the reaction. We also show that 3MST produces H2S from thiosulfate. The present study provides a new insight into a mechanism for the production of H2S by 3MST. PMID:21732914

  1. Hydrogen sulfide mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Ruijing; Jia, Yujie; Ef, Abd Allah; Jia, Aiqun; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a signal to induce many physiological processes in plants, but its role in controlling the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is not well established. In this study, we found that high temperature (HT) treatment induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and promoted the rapid accumulation of H2S. Furthermore, HT triggered the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone that promotes nicotine biosynthesis. Suppression of the H2S signal using chemical inhibitors or via RNAi suppression of l-cysteine desulphydrase (L-CD) in transgenic plants, compromised JA production and nicotine biosynthesis under HT treatments, and these inhibitory effects could be reversed by applying exogenous H2S. Based on these data, we propose that H2S is an important trigger of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under HT conditions, and that H2S acts upstream of JA signaling by modulating the transcription of genes associated with JA biosynthesis. PMID:27035256

  2. Removal of H 2S via an iron catalytic cycle and iron sulfide precipitation in the water column of dead end tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shufen; Noble, Abigail; Butcher, Derek; Trouwborst, Robert E.; Luther, George W., III

    2006-11-01

    The oxidation and precipitation of H 2S were investigated in Torquay Canal and Bald Eagle Creek, two tributaries of northern Rehoboth Bay, one of the Delaware Inland Bays. These man-made dead end canals develop seasonal anoxia and have been the site of past fish kills and harmful algal blooms. The canals have multiple holes over 5.5 m deep compared to an average low tide depth of 2 m. In situ determination for dissolved O 2, H 2S and other Fe and S redox species were conducted with a solid-state Au/Hg microelectrode in 2003 and 2004. Laboratory analyses of discrete samples were also performed to measure dissolved and particulate Fe, Mn, and S 8 to follow the seasonal dynamics of O, S, Fe and Mn redox species. Our results indicate that the water in the holes becomes stratified with O 2 decreasing with depth and H 2S increasing with depth. Dissolved Fe was as high as 30 μM whereas dissolved Mn was only 0.2 μM in the water column, indicating that Fe is the dominant metal involved in S redox cycling and precipitation. In surface oxic waters, the dominant form of Fe was particulate Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides. When seasonal anoxia developed, Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides were reduced by H 2S to Fe(II) at the oxic-anoxic interface. The Fe(II) reduced from particulate Fe can be re-oxidized to Fe(III) by O 2 above and at the interface to form a catalytic cycle to oxidize H 2S. Elemental S is the predominant oxidation product and was as high as 30 μM level (as S 0) at the interface. When the system was stable, the Fe catalytic cycle prevented H 2S from being released into surface waters during seasonal anoxia. However, when storms came, the water column was overturned and H 2S was released to the surface water. The reaction rates for the Fe catalytic cycle are not fast enough and the concentration of Fe was not high enough to regulate the high concentration of H 2S in surface waters during storm and mixing events.

  3. MET17 and Hydrogen Sulfide Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Spiropoulos, Apostolos; Bisson, Linda F.

    2000-01-01

    Commercial isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differ in the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during fermentation, which has been attributed to variation in the ability to incorporate reduced sulfur into organic compounds. We transformed two commercial strains (UCD522 and UCD713) with a plasmid overexpressing the MET17 gene, which encodes the bifunctional O-acetylserine/O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase (OAS/OAH SHLase), to test the hypothesis that the level of activity of this enzyme limits reduced sulfur incorporation, leading to H2S release. Overexpression of MET17 resulted in a 10- to 70-fold increase in OAS/OAH SHLase activity in UCD522 but had no impact on the level of H2S produced. In contrast, OAS/OAH SHLase activity was not as highly expressed in transformants of UCD713 (0.5- to 10-fold) but resulted in greatly reduced H2S formation. Overexpression of OAS/OAH SHLase activity was greater in UCD713 when grown under low-nitrogen conditions, but the impact on reduction of H2S was greater under high-nitrogen conditions. Thus, there was not a good correlation between the level of enzyme activity and H2S production. We measured cellular levels of cysteine to determine the impact of overexpression of OAS/OAH SHLase activity on sulfur incorporation. While Met17p activity was not correlated with increased cysteine production, conditions that led to elevated cytoplasmic levels of cysteine also reduced H2S formation. Our data do not support the simple hypothesis that variation in OAS/OAH SHLase activity is correlated with H2S production and release. PMID:11010893

  4. Contribution of cysteine aminotransferase and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase to hydrogen sulfide production in peripheral neurons.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ryo; Otsuguro, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) is a gaseous neuromodulator produced from L-cysteine. H2 S is generated by three distinct enzymatic pathways mediated by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) coupled with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT). This study investigated the relative contributions of these three pathways to H2 S production in PC12 cells (rat pheochromocytoma-derived cells) and the rat dorsal root ganglion. CBS, CAT, and MPST, but not CSE, were expressed in the cells and tissues, and appreciable amounts of H2 S were produced from L-cysteine in the presence of α-ketoglutarate, together with dithiothreitol. The production of H2 S was inhibited by a CAT inhibitor (aminooxyacetic acid), competitive CAT substrates (L-aspartate and oxaloacetate), and RNA interference (RNAi) against MPST. Immunocytochemistry revealed a mitochondrial localization of MPST in PC12 cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons, and the amount of H2 S produced by CAT/MPST at pH 8.0, a physiological mitochondrial matrix pH, was comparable to that produced by CSE and CBS in the liver and the brain, respectively. Furthermore, H2 S production was markedly increased by alkalization. These results indicate that CAT and MPST are primarily responsible for H2 S production in peripheral neurons, and that the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism may influence neuronal H2 S generation. In the peripheral nervous system, hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has been implicated in neurogenic pain or hyperalgesia. This study provides evidence that H2 S is synthesized in peripheral neurons through two mitochondrial enzymes, cysteine aminotransferase (CAT) and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST). We propose that mitochondrial metabolism plays key roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the peripheral nervous system via regulation of neuronal H2 S production. PMID:24611772

  5. Characteristics of H2S emission from aged refuse after excavation exposure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dong-Sheng; Du, Yao; Fang, Yuan; Hu, Li-Fang; Fang, Cheng-Ran; Long, Yu-Yang

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S(g)) emission from landfills is a widespread problem, especially when aged refuse is excavated. H2S(g) emission from aged refuse exposed to air was investigated and the results showed that large amounts of H2S(g) can be released, especially in the first few hours after excavation, when H2S(g) concentrations in air near refuse could reach 2.00 mg m(-3). Initial exposure to air did not inhibit the emission of H2S(g), as is generally assumed, but actually promoted it. The amounts of H2S(g) emitted in the first 2 d after excavation can be very dangerous, and the risks associated with the emission of H2S(g) could decrease significantly with time. Unlike a large number of sulfide existed under anaerobic conditions, the sulfide in aged municipal solid waste can be oxidized chemically to elemental sulfur (but not sulfate) under aerobic conditions, and its conversion rate was higher than 80%. Only microorganisms can oxidize the reduced sulfur species to sulfate, and the conversion rate could reach about 50%. Using appropriate techniques to enhance these chemical and biological transformations could allow the potential health risks caused by H2S(g) after refuse excavation to be largely avoided. PMID:25725388

  6. Thioethers as markers of hydrogen sulfide production in homocystinurias.

    PubMed

    Kožich, Viktor; Krijt, Jakub; Sokolová, Jitka; Melenovská, Petra; Ješina, Pavel; Vozdek, Roman; Majtán, Tomáš; Kraus, Jan P

    2016-07-01

    Two enzymes in the transsulfuration pathway of homocysteine -cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) and gamma-cystathionase (CTH)-use cysteine and/or homocysteine to produce the important signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and simultaneously the thioethers lanthionine, cystathionine or homolanthionine. In this study we explored whether impaired flux of substrates for H2S synthesis and/or deficient enzyme activities alter production of hydrogen sulfide in patients with homocystinurias. As an indirect measure of H2S synthesis we determined by LC-MS/MS concentrations of thioethers in plasma samples from 33 patients with different types of homocystinurias, in 8 patient derived fibroblast cell lines, and as reaction products of seven purified mutant CBS enzymes. Since chaperoned recombinant mutant CBS enzymes retained capacity of H2S synthesis in vitro it can be stipulated that deficient CBS activity in vivo may impair H2S production. Indeed, in patients with classical homocystinuria we observed significantly decreased cystathionine and lanthionine concentrations in plasma (46% and 74% of median control levels, respectively) and significantly lower cystathionine in fibroblasts (8% of median control concentrations) indicating that H2S production from cysteine and homocysteine may be also impaired. In contrast, the grossly elevated plasma levels of homolanthionine in CBS deficient patients (32-times elevation compared to median of controls) clearly demonstrates a simultaneous overproduction of H2S from homocysteine by CTH. In the remethylation defects the accumulation of homocysteine and the increased flux of metabolites through the transsulfuration pathway resulted in elevation of cystathionine and homolanthionine (857% and 400% of median control values, respectively) indicating a possibility of an increased biosynthesis of H2S by both CBS and CTH. This study shows clearly disturbed thioether concentrations in homocystinurias, and modeling using these data indicates

  7. Physiological Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Plants: Pleasant Exploration behind Its Unpleasant Odour

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhuping

    2015-01-01

    Recently, overwhelming evidence has proven that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which was identified as a gasotransmitter in animals, plays important roles in diverse physiological processes in plants as well. With the discovery and systematic classification of the enzymes producing H2S in vivo, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which H2S influences plant responses to various stimuli was reached. There are many functions of H2S, including the modulation of defense responses and plant growth and development, as well as the regulation of senescence and maturation. Additionally, mounting evidence indicates that H2S signaling interacts with plant hormones, hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and other molecules in signaling pathways. PMID:26078806

  8. EFFECTS OF INFUSION OF HUMAN METHEMOGLOBIN SOLUTION FOLLOWING HYDROGEN SULFIDE POISONING

    PubMed Central

    Chenuel, Bruno; Sonobe, Takashi; Haouzi, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Rationale We have recently reported that infusion of a solution containing methemoglobin (MetHb) during exposure to hydrogen sulfide results in a rapid and large decrease in the concentration of the pool of soluble/diffusible H2S in the blood. However, since the pool of dissolved H2S disappears very quickly after H2S exposure, it is unclear if the ability of MetHb to “trap” sulfide in the blood has any clinical interest and relevance in the treatment of sulfide poisoning. Methods In anesthetized rats, repetition of short bouts of high level of H2S infusions were applied to allow the rapid development of an oxygen deficit. A solution containing methemoglobin (600mg/kg) or its vehicle was administered one minute and a half after the end of H2S intoxication. Results The injection of methemoglobin solution increased methemoglobinemia to about 6%, almost instantly, but was unable to decrease the blood concentration of soluble H2S, which had already vanished at the time of infusion, or to increase combined H2S. In addition H2S-induced O2 deficit and lactate production as well as the recovery of carotid blood flow and blood pressure were similar in treated or control animals. Conclusion Our results do not support the view that administration of MetHb or drugs induced methemoglobinemia during the recovery phase following severe H2S intoxication in sedated rats can restore cellular oxidative metabolism, as the pool of diffusible sulfide, accessible to MetHb, disappears rapidly from the blood after H2S exposure. PMID:25634666

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide: A Therapeutic Candidate for Fibrotic Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Li, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ya; Lu, Ying; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases including chronic kidney disease, liver cirrhosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and chronic disease account for 45% mortality in the developed countries and pose a great threat to the global health. Many great targets and molecules have been reported to be involved in the initiation and/or progression of fibrosis, among which inflammation and oxidative stress are well-recognized modulation targets. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gasotransmitter with potent properties in inhibiting inflammation and oxidative stress in various organs. Recent evidence suggests that plasma H2S level is decreased in various animal models of fibrotic diseases and supplement of exogenous H2S is able to ameliorate fibrosis in the kidney, lung, liver, and heart. This leads us to propose that modulation of H2S production may represent a promising therapeutic venue for the treatment of a variety of fibrotic diseases. Here, we summarize and discuss the current data on the role and underlying mechanisms of H2S in fibrosis diseases related to heart, liver, kidney, and other organs. PMID:26078807

  10. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Production Is Essential for Dietary Restriction Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Christopher; Harputlugil, Eylul; Zhang, Yue; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Lee, Byung Cheon; Brace, Lear; Longchamp, Alban; Trevino-Villarreal, Jose H.; Mejia, Pedro; Ozaki, C. Keith; Wang, Rui; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Madeo, Frank; Mair, William B.; Mitchell, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition encompasses numerous regimens with overlapping benefits including longevity and stress resistance, but unifying nutritional and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In a mouse model of DR-mediated stress resistance, we found that sulfur amino acid (SAA) restriction increased expression of the transsulfuration pathway (TSP) enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL), resulting in increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production and protection from hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury. SAA supplementation, mTORC1 activation, or chemical/genetic CGL inhibition reduced H2S production and blocked DR-mediated stress resistance. In vitro, the mitochondrial protein SQR was required for H2S-mediated protection during nutrient/oxygen deprivation. Finally, TSP-dependent H2S production was observed in yeast, worm, fruit fly and rodent models of DR-mediated longevity. Together, these data are consistent with evolutionary conservation of TSP-mediated H2S as a novel mediator of DR benefits with broad implications for clinical translation. PMID:25542313

  11. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production is essential for dietary restriction benefits.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher; Harputlugil, Eylul; Zhang, Yue; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Lee, Byung Cheon; Brace, Lear; Longchamp, Alban; Treviño-Villarreal, Jose H; Mejia, Pedro; Ozaki, C Keith; Wang, Rui; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Madeo, Frank; Mair, William B; Mitchell, James R

    2015-01-15

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition encompasses numerous regimens with overlapping benefits including longevity and stress resistance, but unifying nutritional and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In a mouse model of DR-mediated stress resistance, we found that sulfur amino acid (SAA) restriction increased expression of the transsulfuration pathway (TSP) enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL), resulting in increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production and protection from hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury. SAA supplementation, mTORC1 activation, or chemical/genetic CGL inhibition reduced H2S production and blocked DR-mediated stress resistance. In vitro, the mitochondrial protein SQR was required for H2S-mediated protection during nutrient/oxygen deprivation. Finally, TSP-dependent H2S production was observed in yeast, worm, fruit fly, and rodent models of DR-mediated longevity. Together, these data are consistent with evolutionary conservation of TSP-mediated H2S as a mediator of DR benefits with broad implications for clinical translation. PAPERFLICK: PMID:25542313

  12. Hydrogen sulfide as a potent cardiovascular protective agent.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Hua; Cui, Li-Bao; Wu, Kai; Zheng, Xi-Long; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well-known toxic gas with the characteristic smell of rotten eggs. It is synthesized endogenously in mammals from the sulfur-containing amino acid l-cysteine by the action of several distinct enzymes: cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-ß-synthase (CBS), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) along with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT). In particular, CSE is considered to be the major H2S-producing enzyme in the cardiovascular system. As the third gasotransmitter next to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), H2S plays an important role in the regulation of vasodilation, angiogenesis, inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Growing evidence has demonstrated that this gas exerts a significant protective effect against the progression of cardiovascular diseases by a number of mechanisms such as vasorelaxation, inhibition of cardiovascular remodeling and resistance to form foam cells. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the physiological functions of H2S and its protection against several major cardiovascular diseases, and to explore its potential health and therapeutic benefits. A better understanding will help develop novel H2S-based therapeutic interventions for these diseases. PMID:25058799

  13. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya C; Wang, Xiao J; Yu, Le; Chan, Francis K L; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y; Wu, William K K; Cho, Chi H

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2)S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC) and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116) were exposed to H(2)S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2)S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2)S was accompanied by G(1)-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip). Moreover, exposure to H(2)S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+) autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2)S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2)S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2)S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2)S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway. PMID:22679478

  14. Water vapor inhibits hydrogen sulfide detection in pulsed fluorescence sulfur monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhme, Anders B.; Ingemar, Jonas L.; Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The Thermo Scientific 450 Hydrogen Sulfide-Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Sulfur dioxide is measured by pulsed fluorescence, while H2S is converted to SO2 with a molybdenum catalyst prior to detection. The 450 is widely used to measure ambient concentrations, e.g., for emissions monitoring and pollution control. An air stream with a constant H2S concentration was generated and the output of the analyzer recorded as a function of relative humidity (RH). The analyzer underreported H2S as soon as the relative humidity was increased. The fraction of undetected H2S increased from 8.3 at 5.3 % RH (294 K) to over 34 % at RH > 80 %. Hydrogen sulfide mole fractions of 573, 1142, and 5145 ppb were tested. The findings indicate that previous results obtained with instruments using similar catalysts should be re-evaluated to correct for interference from water vapor. It is suspected that water decreases the efficiency of the converter unit and thereby reduces the measured H2S concentration.

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide Alleviates Postharvest Senescence of Grape by Modulating the Antioxidant Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhi-Jing; Hu, Kang-Di; Song, Chang-Bing; Ma, Run-Hui; Li, Zhi-Rong; Zheng, Ji-Lian; Fu, Liu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been identified as an important gaseous signal in plants. Here, we investigated the mechanism of H2S in alleviating postharvest senescence and rotting of Kyoho grape. Exogenous application of H2S released from 1.0 mM NaHS remarkably decreased the rotting and threshing rate of grape berries. H2S application also prevented the weight loss in grape clusters and inhibited the decreases in firmness, soluble solids, and titratable acidity in grape pulp during postharvest storage. The data of chlorophyll and carotenoid content suggested the role of H2S in preventing chlorophyll breakdown and carotenoid accumulation in both grape rachis and pulp. In comparison to water control, exogenous H2S application maintained significantly higher levels of ascorbic acid and flavonoid and total phenolics and reducing sugar and soluble protein in grape pulp. Meanwhile, H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and superoxide anion (O2∙−) in grape pulp. Further investigations showed that H2S enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) and decreased those of lipoxygenase (LOX) in both grape peels and pulp. In all, we provided strong evidence that H2S effectively alleviated postharvest senescence and rotting of Kyoho grape by modulating antioxidant enzymes and attenuating lipid peroxidation. PMID:27594971

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide Alleviates Postharvest Senescence of Grape by Modulating the Antioxidant Defenses.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhi-Jing; Hu, Kang-Di; Song, Chang-Bing; Ma, Run-Hui; Li, Zhi-Rong; Zheng, Ji-Lian; Fu, Liu-Hui; Wei, Zhao-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been identified as an important gaseous signal in plants. Here, we investigated the mechanism of H2S in alleviating postharvest senescence and rotting of Kyoho grape. Exogenous application of H2S released from 1.0 mM NaHS remarkably decreased the rotting and threshing rate of grape berries. H2S application also prevented the weight loss in grape clusters and inhibited the decreases in firmness, soluble solids, and titratable acidity in grape pulp during postharvest storage. The data of chlorophyll and carotenoid content suggested the role of H2S in preventing chlorophyll breakdown and carotenoid accumulation in both grape rachis and pulp. In comparison to water control, exogenous H2S application maintained significantly higher levels of ascorbic acid and flavonoid and total phenolics and reducing sugar and soluble protein in grape pulp. Meanwhile, H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and superoxide anion (O2 (∙-)) in grape pulp. Further investigations showed that H2S enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) and decreased those of lipoxygenase (LOX) in both grape peels and pulp. In all, we provided strong evidence that H2S effectively alleviated postharvest senescence and rotting of Kyoho grape by modulating antioxidant enzymes and attenuating lipid peroxidation. PMID:27594971

  17. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.490 Section 250.490 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Hydrogen Sulfide § 250.490 Hydrogen sulfide. (a)...

  18. Role of hydrogen sulfide in skeletal muscle biology and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel endogenous gaseous signal transducer (gasotransmittor). Its emerging role in multiple facets of inter- and intra-cellular signaling as a metabolic, inflammatory, neuro and vascular modulator has been increasingly realized. Although H2S is known for its effects as an anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant molecule, the relevance of these effects in skeletal muscle biology during health and during metabolic syndromes is unclear. H2S has been implicated in vascular relaxation and vessel tone enhancement, which might lead to mitigation of vascular complications caused by the metabolic syndromes. Metabolic complications may also lead to mitochondrial remodeling by interfering with fusion and fission, therefore, leading to mitochondrial mitophagy and skeletal muscle myopathy. Mitochondrial protection by H2S enhancing treatments may mitigate deterioration of muscle function during metabolic syndromes. In addition, H2S might upregulate uncoupling proteins and might also cause browning of white fat, resulting in suppression of imbalanced cytokine signaling caused by abnormal fat accumulation. Likewise, as a source for H+ ions, it has the potential to augment anaerobic ATP synthesis. However, there is a need for studies to test these putative H2S benefits in different patho-physiological scenarios before its full-fledged usage as a therapeutic molecule. The present review highlights current knowledge with regard to exogenous and endogenous H2S roles in skeletal muscle biology, metabolism, exercise physiology and related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity, and also provides future directions. PMID:25461301

  19. Hydrogen sulfide promotes calcium uptake in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Perry, Steve F

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can act as a signaling molecule for various ion channels and/or transporters; however, little is known about its potential involvement in Ca(2+) balance. Using developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an in vivo model system, the present study demonstrated that acute exposure to H2S donors increased Ca(2+) influx at 4 days postfertilization, while chronic (3-day) exposure caused a rise in whole body Ca(2+) levels. The mRNA expression of Ca(2+)-transport-related genes was unaffected by H2S exposure, suggesting that posttranscriptional modifications were responsible for the altered rates of Ca(2+) uptake. Indeed, treatment of fish with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 abolished the H2S-mediated stimulation of Ca(2+) influx, suggesting that H2S increased Ca(2+) influx by activating cAMP-protein kinase A pathways. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) are two key enzymes in the endogenous synthesis of H2S. Using an antisense morpholino knockdown approach, we demonstrated that Ca(2+) influx was reduced in CBS isoform b (CBSb)- but not in CSE-deficient fish. Interestingly, the reduction in Ca(2+) influx in CBSb-deficient fish was observed only in fish that were acclimated to low-Ca(2+) water (i.e., 25 μM Ca(2+); control: 250 μM Ca(2+)). Similarly, mRNA expression of cbsb but not cse was increased in fish acclimated to low-Ca(2+) water. Results from whole-mount immunohistochemistry further revealed that CBSb was expressed in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-rich cells, which are implicated in Ca(2+) uptake in zebrafish larvae. Collectively, the present study suggests a novel role for H2S in promoting Ca(2+) influx, particularly in a low-Ca(2+) environment. PMID:25948733

  20. Medicinal Chemistry: Insights into the Development of Novel H2S Donors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Pacheco, Armando; Xian, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was traditionally considered as a toxic gas. However, recent studies have demonstrated H2S is an endogenously generated gaseous signaling molecule (gasotransmitter) with importance on par with that of two other well-known endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Although H2S's exact mechanisms of action are still under investigation, the production of endogenous H2S and the exogenous administration of H2S have been demonstrated to elicit a wide range of physiological responses including modulation of blood pressure and protection of ischemia reperfusion injury, exertion of anti-inflammatory effects, and reduction of metabolic rate. These results strongly suggest that modulation of H2S levels could have potential therapeutic values. In this regard, synthetic H2S-releasing agents (i.e., H2S donors) are not only important research tools, but also potential therapeutic agents. This chapter summarizes the knowledge of currently available H2S donors. Their preparation, H2S releasing mechanisms, and biological applications are discussed. PMID:26162844

  1. Reduced Glutathione Mediates Resistance to H2S Toxicity in Oral Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Xi Jia; Tan, Kai Soo

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with changes in the composition of the oral microflora, where health-associated oral streptococci decrease while Gram-negative anaerobes predominate in disease. A key feature of periodontal disease-associated anaerobes is their ability to produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abundantly as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. So far, H2S has been reported to be either cytoprotective or cytotoxic by modulating bacterial antioxidant defense systems. Although oral anaerobes produce large amounts of H2S, the potential effects of H2S on oral streptococci are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of H2S on the survival and biofilm formation of oral streptococci. The growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were inhibited by H2S. However, H2S did not significantly affect the growth of Streptococcus gordonii or Streptococcus sanguinis. The differential susceptibility of oral streptococci to H2S was attributed to differences in the intracellular concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH). In the absence of GSH, H2S elicited its toxicity through an iron-dependent mechanism. Collectively, our results showed that H2S exerts antimicrobial effects on certain oral streptococci, potentially contributing to the decrease in health-associated plaque microflora. PMID:26801579

  2. Simultaneous absorption of H2S and Co2 into aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Haimour, N.; Bidarian, A.; Sandall, O.C.

    1987-01-01

    The tertiary amine methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) is finding increasing application as a chemical solvent for selective absorption of hydrogen sulfide from gases containing hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. Gas streams of this type include some natural gases, synthetic gases from coal and heavy oil gasification and tail gases from sulfur plants. Selectivity for H2S is needed either to enrich Claus sulfur plant feed in H2S or to remove only H2S when CO2 removal is not necessary of economic. For the absorption of hydrogen sulfide into MDEA, the reaction which occurs can be considered to be instantaneous while carbon dioxide undergoes a second-order reaction with MDEA. In this work, the simultaneous absorption of two gases into a liquid containing a reactant with which both gases react is modelled using the film theory. Physical properties and kinetic rate parameters used in the model have been measured in the laboratory. The model is used to study the effect of process variables on the selectivity of MDEA for H2S over CO2. The simultaneous absorption of H2S and CO2 gases into aqueous MDEA is studied experimentally using a continuous stirred tank absorber. Experimental absorption rates are compared to predictions based on a multicomponent mass transfer model. The average deviations of the theoretical calculations from the experimental results are 10.2% and 12.9% for CO2 and H2S, respectively.

  3. A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide and natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yixin; Schaefer, Laura

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) occurs naturally in crude petroleum, natural gas, volcanic gases, hot springs, and some lakes. Hydrogen sulfide can also result as a by-product from industrial activities, such as food processing, coke ovens, paper mills, tanneries, and petroleum refineries. Sometimes, it is considered to be an industrial pollutant. However, hydrogen can be decomposed from H 2S and then used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This paper presents an examination of a simple hydrogen sulfide and natural gas-fed solid oxide fuel cell system. The possibility of utilization of hydrogen sulfide as a feedstock in a solid oxide fuel cell is discussed. A system configuration of an SOFC combined with an external H 2S decomposition device is proposed, where a certain amount of natural gas is supplied to the SOFC. The exhaust fuel gas of the SOFC is after-burned with exhaust air from the SOFC, and the heat of the combustion gas is utilized in the decomposition of H 2S in a decomposition reactor (DR) to produce hydrogen to feed the SOFC. The products are electricity and industry-usable sulfur. Through a mass and energy balance, a preliminary thermodynamic analysis of this system is performed, and the system efficiency is calculated. Also in this paper, the challenges in creating the proposed configuration are discussed, and the direction of future work is presented.

  4. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingzhe; Wu, Lingyun; Montaut, Sabine; Yang, Guangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer. PMID:27019751

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingzhe; Wu, Lingyun; Montaut, Sabine; Yang, Guangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer. PMID:27019751

  7. Hydrogen sulfide production during yeast fermentation causes the accumulation of ethanethiol, S-ethyl thioacetate and diethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Kinzurik, Matias I; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Gardner, Richard C; Fedrizzi, Bruno

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced by yeast during winemaking and possesses off-flavors reminiscent of rotten eggs. The production of H2S during fermentation has also been associated in the finished wine with the rise of additional volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) with strong aromas of cooked onions and vegetables. To characterize these more complex VSCs produced from H2S, we performed fermentations in synthetic grape juice. H2S production was manipulated experimentally by feeding increasing concentrations of sulfate to mutant strains that are unable to incorporate H2S efficiently as part of the sulfur assimilation pathway. In finished wines from these mutants, three VSCs - ethanethiol, S-ethyl thioacetate and diethyl disulfide - increased proportionally to H2S. (34)S-labeled sulfate fed to the MET17-deleted strain was incorporated into same three VSCs, demonstrating that they are formed directly from H2S. PMID:27173572

  8. The hydrogen sulfide emissions abatement program at the Geysers Geothermal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. W.; Mccluer, H. K.

    1974-01-01

    The scope of the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abatement program at The Geysers Geothermal Power Plant and the measures currently under way to reduce these emissions are discussed. The Geysers steam averages 223 ppm H2S by weight and after passing through the turbines leaves the plant both through the gas ejector system and by air-stripping in the cooling towers. The sulfide dissolved in the cooling water is controlled by the use of an oxidation catalyst such as an iron salt. The H2S in the low Btu ejector off gases may be burned to sulfur dioxide and scrubbed directly into the circulating water and reinjected into the steam field with the excess condensate. Details are included concerning the disposal of the impure sulfur, design requirements for retrofitting existing plants and modified plant operating procedures. Discussion of future research aimed at improving the H2S abatement system is also included.

  9. Evaluation of thiosulfate as a substitute for hydrogen sulfide in sour corrosion fatigue studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappes, Mariano Alberto

    This work evaluates the possibility of replacing hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) with thiosulfate anion (S2O32- ) in sour corrosion fatigue studies. H2S increases the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) and can be present in carbon steel risers and flowlines used in off-shore oil production. Corrosion tests with gaseous H2S require special facilities with safety features, because H2S is a toxic and flammable gas. The possibility of replacing H2S with S2O32-, a non-toxic anion, for studying stress corrosion cracking of stainless and carbon steels in H2S solutions was first proposed by Tsujikawa et al. ( Tsujikawa et al., Corrosion, 1993. 49(5): p. 409-419). In this dissertation, Tsujikawa work will be extended to sour corrosion fatigue of carbon steels. H2S testing is often conducted in deareated condition to avoid oxygen reaction with sulfide that yields sulfur and to mimic oil production conditions. Nitrogen deareation was also adopted in S2O3 2- testing, and gas exiting the cell was forced through a sodium hydroxide trap. Measurements of the sulfide content of this trap were used to estimate the partial pressure of H2S in nitrogen, and Henry's law was used to estimate the content of H2S in the solution in the cell. H2S was produced by a redox reaction of S2O 32-, which required electrons from carbon steel corrosion. This reaction is spontaneous at the open circuit potential of steel. Therefore, H2S concentration was expected to be maximum at the steel surface, and this concentration was estimated by a mass balance analysis. Carbon steel specimens exposed to S2O32- containing solutions developed a film on their surface, composed by iron sulfide and cementite. The film was not passivating and a good conductor of electrons. Hydrogen permeation experiments proved that this film controls the rate of hydrogen absorption of steels exposed to thiosulfate containing solutions. The absorption of hydrogen in S2O3 2- solutions was compared with the absorption of hydrogen in

  10. Production of Hydrogen Sulfide by Streptomycetes and Methods for its Detection

    PubMed Central

    Küster, E.; Williams, S. T.

    1964-01-01

    The ability of streptomycetes to produce hydrogen sulfide is generally used for taxonomic purposes. It was found that the previously used method, the blackening of Peptone Iron Agar, does not clearly indicate formation of hydrogen sulfide. It was shown that the blackening of a lead acetate strip is the most accurate indicator for H2S-producing streptomycetes. A great variety of organic and inorganic sulfur compounds were examined and compared, and the choice of the most suitable sulfur source and method for the detection of hydrogen sulfide is discussed. PMID:14106940

  11. Colorimetric detection of biological hydrogen sulfide using fluorosurfactant functionalized gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Wenjuan; Yuan, Zhiqin; Lu, Chao

    2015-11-01

    As a well-known environmental pollutant but also an important gaseous transmitter, the specific detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is significant in biological systems. In this study, fluorosurfactant functionalized gold nanorods (FSN-AuNRs) have been proposed to act as selective colorimetric nanoprobes for H2S. With the combination of strong gold-S interactions and small FSN bilayer interstices, FSN-AuNRs demonstrate favorable selectivity and sensitivity toward H2S over other anions and small biological molecules. The practical application of the present method in biological H2S detection was validated with human and mouse serum samples. Moreover, the proposed nanoprobe can also be used for evaluating the activity of H2S synthetase. PMID:26415625

  12. Postsynthetic modification of metal-organic framework for hydrogen sulfide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jianmin; Hu, Quan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has recently been identified as the third biological gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) that is involved in regulating many important physiological processes. The detection of H2S is thus essential for its roles but remain challenging in living systems. We report herein a novel turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection based on azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF). The MOF probe displayed high sensitivity (detection limit, 28.3 μM), excellent selectivity, and fast response (<2 min) toward H2S over other biologically relevant species. We envisage that this MOF probe can be employed as a useful tool to further elucidate the biological roles of H2S.

  13. Effects of pH and Lactate on Hydrogen Sulfide Production by Oral Veillonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Jumpei; Shimada, Yuko; Yamada, Masakazu; Sakamaki, Ryouichi

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous oral bacteria in the tongue coating such as Veillonella have been identified as the main producers of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), one of the major components of oral malodor. However, there is little information on the physiological properties of H2S production by oral Veillonella such as metabolic activity and oral environmental factors which may affect H2S production. Thus, in the present study, the H2S-producing activity of growing cells, resting cells, and cell extracts of oral Veillonella species and the effects of oral environmental factors, including pH and lactate, were investigated. Type strains of Veillonella atypica, Veillonella dispar, and Veillonella parvula were used. These Veillonella species produced H2S during growth in the presence of l-cysteine. Resting cells of these bacteria produced H2S from l-cysteine, and the cell extracts showed enzymatic activity to convert l-cysteine to H2S. H2S production by resting cells was higher at pH 6 to 7 and lower at pH 5. The presence of lactate markedly increased H2S production by resting cells (4.5- to 23.7-fold), while lactate had no effect on enzymatic activity in cell extracts. In addition to H2S, ammonia was produced in cell extracts of all the strains, indicating that H2S was produced by the catalysis of cystathionine γ-lyase (EC 4.4.1.1). Serine was also produced in cell extracts of V. atypica and V. parvula, suggesting the involvement of cystathionine β-synthase lyase (EC 4.2.1.22) in these strains. This study indicates that Veillonella produce H2S from l-cysteine and that their H2S production can be regulated by oral environmental factors, namely, pH and lactate. PMID:24795374

  14. Bioconversion of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in airlift bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zytoon, Mohamed Abdel-Monaem; AlZahrani, Abdulraheem Ahmad; Noweir, Madbuli Hamed; El-Marakby, Fadia Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Several bioreactor systems are used for biological treatment of hydrogen sulfide. Among these, airlift bioreactors are promising for the bioconversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. The performance of airlift bioreactors is not adequately understood, particularly when directly fed with hydrogen sulfide gas. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of an airlift bioreactor fed with high concentrations of H2S with special emphasis on the effect of pH in combination with other factors such as H2S loading rate, oxygen availability, and sulfide accumulation. H2S inlet concentrations between 1,008 ppm and 31,215 ppm were applied and elimination capacities up to 113 g H2S m(-3) h(-1) were achieved in the airlift bioreactor under investigation at a pH range 6.5-8.5. Acidic pH values reduced the elimination capacity. Elemental sulfur recovery up to 95% was achieved under oxygen limited conditions (DO < 0.2 mg/L) and at higher pH values. The sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the bioreactor tolerated accumulated dissolved sulfide concentrations >500 mg/L at pH values 8.0-8.5, and near 100% removal efficiency was achieved. Overall, the resident microorganisms in the studied airlift bioreactor favored pH values in the alkaline range. The bioreactor performance in terms of elimination capacity and sulfur recovery was better at pH range 8-8.5. PMID:25147857

  15. H2S mediated thermal and photochemical methane activation

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; de Graaf, Coen; Broer, Ria; Patterson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable, low temperature methods of natural gas activation are critical in addressing current and foreseeable energy and hydrocarbon feedstock needs. Large portions of natural gas resources are still too expensive to process due to their high content of hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) in mixture with methane, CH4, altogether deemed as sub-quality or “sour” gas. We propose a unique method for activating this “sour” gas to form a mixture of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon intermediates, CH3SH and CH3SCH3, and an energy carrier, such as H2. For this purpose, we computationally investigated H2S mediated methane activation to form a reactive CH3SH species via direct photolysis of sub-quality natural gas. Photoexcitation of hydrogen sulfide in the CH4+H2S complex results in a barrier-less relaxation via a conical intersection to form a ground state CH3SH+H2 complex. The resulting CH3SH can further be heterogeneously coupled over acidic catalysts to form higher hydrocarbons while the H2 can be used as a fuel. This process is very different from a conventional thermal or radical-based processes and can be driven photolytically at low temperatures, with enhanced controllability over the process conditions currently used in industrial oxidative natural gas activation. Finally, the proposed process is CO2 neutral, as opposed to the currently industrially used methane steam reforming (SMR). PMID:24150813

  16. Detrimental effects for colonocytes of an increased exposure to luminal hydrogen sulfide: The adaptive response.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Martin; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Lan, Annaïg; Khodorova, Nadezda; Audebert, Marc; Blouin, Jean-Marc; Grauso, Marta; Lancha, Luciana; Benetti, Pierre-Henri; Benamouzig, Robert; Tomé, Daniel; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Davila, Anne-Marie; Blachier, François

    2016-04-01

    Protein fermentation by the gut microbiota releases in the large intestine lumen various amino-acid derived metabolites. Among them, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in excess has been suspected to be detrimental for colonic epithelium energy metabolism and DNA integrity. The first objective of this study was to evaluate in rats the epithelial response to an increased exposure to H2S. Experiments from colonocyte incubation and intra-colonic instillation indicate that low millimolar concentrations of the sulfide donor NaHS reversibly inhibited colonocyte mitochondrial oxygen consumption and increased gene expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (Hif-1α) together with inflammation-related genes namely inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos) and interleukin-6 (Il-6). Additionally, rat colonocyte H2S detoxification capacity was severely impaired in the presence of nitric oxide. Based on the γH2AX ICW technique, NaHS did not induce DNA damage in colonocytes. Since H2S is notably produced by the gut microbiota from sulfur containing amino acids, the second objective of the study was to investigate the effects of a high protein diet (HPD) on large intestine luminal sulfide content and on the expression of genes involved in H2S detoxification in colonocytes. We found that HPD markedly increased H2S content in the large intestine but the concomitant increase of the content mass maintained the luminal sulfide concentration. HPD also provoked an increase of sulfide quinone reductase (Sqr) gene expression in colonocytes, indicating an adaptive response to increased H2S bacterial production. In conclusion, low millimolar NaHS concentration severely affects colonocyte respiration in association with increased expression of genes associated with intestinal inflammation. Although HPD increases the sulfide content of the large intestine, the colonic adaptive responses to this modification limit the epithelial exposure to this deleterious bacterial metabolite. PMID:26849947

  17. Emergence of Hydrogen Sulfide as an Endogenous Gaseous Signaling Molecule in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Lefer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Long recognized as a malodorous and highly toxic gas, recent experimental studies have revealed that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced enzymatically in all mammalian species including man and exerts a number of critical actions to promote cardiovascular homeostasis and health. During the past 15 years, scientists have determined that H2S is produced by three endogenous enzymes and exerts powerful effects on endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nuclear transcription factors. These effects have been reported in multiple organ systems and the vast majority of data clearly indicate that H2S produced by the endogenous enzymes exerts cytoprotective actions. Recent preclinical studies investigating cardiovascular diseases have demonstrated that the administration of physiological or pharmacological levels of H2S attenuates myocardial injury, protects blood vessels, limits inflammation, and regulates blood pressure. H2S has emerged as a critical cardiovascular signaling molecule similar to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) with a profound impact on the heart and circulation (Figure 1). Our improved understanding of how H2S elicits protective actions, coupled with the very rapid development of novel H2S releasing agents, has resulted in heightened enthusiasm for the clinical translation of this ephemeral gaseous molecule. This review will examine our current state of knowledge regarding the actions of H2S within the cardiovascular system with an emphasis on the therapeutic potential and molecular crosstalk between H2S, NO, and CO. PMID:24526678

  18. Genetic Targets of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury – A Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, Sashko; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Strosing, Karl; Ryter, Stefan; Hummel, Matthias; Faller, Simone; Hoetzel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that inhalation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study, we aimed to determine the underlying molecular mechanisms of H2S-dependent lung protection by analyzing gene expression profiles in mice. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to spontaneous breathing or mechanical ventilation in the absence or presence of H2S (80 parts per million). Gene expression profiles were determined by microarray, sqRT-PCR and Western Blot analyses. The association of Atf3 in protection against VILI was confirmed with a Vivo-Morpholino knockout model. Mechanical ventilation caused a significant lung inflammation and damage that was prevented in the presence of H2S. Mechanical ventilation favoured the expression of genes involved in inflammation, leukocyte activation and chemotaxis. In contrast, ventilation with H2S activated genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis, and inflammation. Amongst others, H2S administration induced Atf3, an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic regulator. Morpholino mediated reduction of Atf3 resulted in elevated lung injury despite the presence of H2S. In conclusion, lung protection by H2S during mechanical ventilation is associated with down-regulation of genes related to oxidative stress and inflammation and up-regulation of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Here we show that Atf3 is clearly involved in H2S mediated protection. PMID:25025333

  19. The role of hydrogen sulfide in pathologies of the vital organs and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Chan, H; Ning, J; Lu, K; Ma, D

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is one of the more recently recognised gaseous transmitters that have been shown to be involved in a large range of cellular functions. While H(2)S generally has pro-survival and anti-apoptotic effects, at higher concentrations, this effect is reversed and it becomes anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic instead. H(2)S is also involved in a number of organ specific functions such as thermoregulation, modulating myocardial activity and broncho-dilation. H(2)S has organ protective effects in ischaemia, acting as a vasodilator and negative inotrope to reduce blood pressure. H(2)S generally has a protective effect in acute inflammation and oxidative stress from causes such as allergy and toxins. In chronic organ pathology, low H(2)S levels have been observed in a number of different diseases, while there is evidence that H(2)S may be beneficial in a number of chronic organ degenerations. A number of studies on human tissue and cell line conducted in the recent years shows H(2)S exerting largely similar effects in humans as those in animals. This may indicate that the pharmacological potential of H(2)S modulators could have therapeutic value in a large range of acute conditions such as ischaemia, toxin exposure as well as chronic conditions such as hypertension, lung diseases and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25903948

  20. Regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetic function by hydrogen sulfide. Part II. Pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Módis, Katalin; Bos, Eelke M; Calzia, Enrico; van Goor, Harry; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R; Radermacher, Peter; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-04-01

    Emerging work demonstrates the dual regulation of mitochondrial function by hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), including, at lower concentrations, a stimulatory effect as an electron donor, and, at higher concentrations, an inhibitory effect on cytochrome C oxidase. In the current article, we overview the pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of these processes. During cellular hypoxia/acidosis, the inhibitory effect of H2 S on complex IV is enhanced, which may shift the balance of H2 S from protective to deleterious. Several pathophysiological conditions are associated with an overproduction of H2 S (e.g. sepsis), while in other disease states H2 S levels and H2 S bioavailability are reduced and its therapeutic replacement is warranted (e.g. diabetic vascular complications). Moreover, recent studies demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells up-regulate the H2 S-producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), and utilize its product, H2 S, as a metabolic fuel and tumour-cell survival factor; pharmacological CBS inhibition or genetic CBS silencing suppresses cancer cell bioenergetics and suppresses cell proliferation and cell chemotaxis. In the last chapter of the current article, we overview the field of H2 S-induced therapeutic 'suspended animation', a concept in which a temporary pharmacological reduction in cell metabolism is achieved, producing a decreased oxygen demand for the experimental therapy of critical illness and/or organ transplantation. PMID:23991749

  1. Hydrogen sulfide post-conditioning preserves interfibrillar mitochondria of rat heart during ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Banu, Shakila A; Ravindran, Sriram; Kurian, Gino A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be the main manifestation in the pathology of ischemia reperfusion injury, and by restoring its functional activity, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gaseotransmitter renders cardioprotection. Given that interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria are the two main types in the heart, the present study investigates the specific H2S-mediated action on IFM and SSM during ischemic reperfusion in the Langendorff rat heart model. Rats were randomly divided into five groups, namely normal, ischemic control, reperfusion control (I/R), ischemic post-conditioning (POC), and H2S post-conditioning (POC_H2S). In reperfusion control, cardiac contractility decreased, and lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and infracted size increased compared to both normal and ischemic group. In hearts post-conditioned with H2S and the classical method improved cardiac mechanical function and decreased cardiac markers in the perfusate and infarct size significantly. Both POC and POC_H2S exerts its cardioprotective effect of preserving the IFM, as evident by significant improvement in electron transport chain enzyme activities and mitochondrial respiration. The in vitro action of H2S on IFM and SSM from normal and I/R rat heart supports H2S and mediates cardioprotection via IFM preservation. Our study indicates that IFM play an important role in POC_H2S mediated cardioprotection from reperfusion injury. PMID:26951457

  2. Development of Selective Colorimetric Probes for Hydrogen Sulfide Based on Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Leticia A.; Pearce, Taylor F.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Pluth, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important biological signalling molecule and an important environmental target for detection. A major challenge in developing H2S detection methods is separating the often similar reactivity of thiols and other nucleophiles from H2S. To address this need, the nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reaction of H2S with electron-poor aromatic electrophiles was developed as a strategy to separate H2S and thiol reactivity. Treatment of aqueous solutions of nitrobenzofurazan (7-nitro-1,2,3-benzoxadiazole, NBD) thioethers with H2S resulted in thiol extrusion and formation of nitrobenzofurazan thiol (λmax = 534 nm). This reactivity allows for unwanted thioether products to be converted to the desired nitrobenzofurazan thiol upon reaction with H2S. The scope of the reaction was investigated using a Hammett linear free energy relationship study, and the determined ρ = +0.34 is consistent with the proposed SN2Ar reaction mechanism. The efficacy of the developed probes was demonstrated in buffer and in serum with associated sub-micromolar detection limits as low as 190 nM (buffer) and 380 nM (serum). Furthermore, the sigmoidal response of nitrobenzofurazan electrophiles with H2S can be fit to accurately quantify H2S. The developed detection strategy offers a manifold for H2S detection that we foresee being applied in various future applications. PMID:23735055

  3. Garlic-derived natural polysulfanes as hydrogen sulfide donors: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Yagdi, Esma; Cerella, Claudia; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies reported the anti-cancer potential of organosulfur compounds (OSCs) as they trigger biological effects leading to cell cycle arrest with accumulation of cells in G2/M, alteration of the microtubular network, modulation of Bcl-2 family protein expression patterns and changes of the redox status. Despite these well-described effects, no OSC derivative is yet undergoing clinical trials even though their chemistry is well understood as OSCs act as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donors. H2S is a biological mediator, synthesized through cysteine degradation and modulates vasodilation, cytoprotection, inflammation and angiogenesis. It is well accepted that H2S plays a biphasic pharmacological role: the inhibition of endogenous synthesis of H2S and paradoxically also the use of H2S donors to increase H2S concentration, induce both anti-cancer effects leading therefore to controversial discussions. Altogether, the role of H2S in the anti-cancer action of OSCs remains poorly understood. In this review, we hypothesize that OSCs act through H2S signaling pathways in cancer cells, and that a clearer understanding of the mechanism of action of H2S in OSC-mediated anti-cancer activity is required for further application of these compounds in translational medicine. PMID:27430419

  4. Endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide and its regulation in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Genfu; Li, Ning; Mao, Yinting; Zhou, Guangqi; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions across all domains of life. In this study, mechanisms of endogenous H2S generation in Shewanella oneidensis were investigated. As a research model with highly diverse anaerobic respiratory pathways, the microorganism is able to produce H2S by respiring on a variety of sulfur-containing compounds with SirACD and PsrABC enzymatic complexes, as well as through cysteine degradation with three enzymes, MdeA, SO_1095, and SseA. We showed that the SirACD and PsrABC complexes, which are predominantly, if not exclusively, responsible for H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species, do not interplay with each other. Strikingly, a screen for regulators controlling endogenous H2S generation by transposon mutagenesis identified global regulator Crp to be essential to all H2S-generating processes. In contrast, Fnr and Arc, two other global regulators that have a role in respiration, are dispensable in regulating H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species. Interestingly, Arc is involved in the H2S generation through cysteine degradation by repressing expression of the mdeA gene. We further showed that expression of the sirA and psrABC operons is subjected to direct regulation of Crp, but the mechanisms underlying the requirement of Crp for H2S generation through cysteine degradation remain elusive. PMID:25972854

  5. Hydrogen sulfide and the vasculature: a novel vasculoprotective entity and regulator of nitric oxide bioavailability?

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Matthew; Moore, Philip K

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well known and pungent toxic gas that has recently been shown to be synthesised in man from the amino acids cystathionine, homocysteine and cysteine by at least two distinct enzymes; cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase. In the past few years, H2S has emerged as a novel and increasingly important mediator in the cardiovascular system but delineating the precise physiology and pathophysiology of H2S is proving to be complex and difficult to unravel with disparate findings reported with cell types, tissue types and animal species reported. Therefore, in this review we summarize the mechanisms by which H2S has been proposed to regulate blood pressure and cardiac function, discuss the mechanistic discrepancies reported in the literature as well as the therapeutic potential of H2S. We also examine the methods of H2S detection in biological fluids, processes for H2S removal and discuss the reported blood levels of H2S in man and animal models of cardiovascular pathology. We also highlight the complex interaction of H2S with nitric oxide in regulating cardiovascular function in health and disease. PMID:19374684

  6. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine. PMID:27133282

  7. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weihua; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC), T-type calcium channels (TTCC), sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX), transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26078804

  8. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:27469291

  9. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:27469291

  10. Hydrogen sulfide and nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions from broiler houses in the Southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions from two mechanically ventilated commercial broiler houses located in the Southeastern United States were continuously monitored over 12 flocks during the one-year period of 2006-2007 as a joint effort between Iowa State University a...

  11. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR HYDROGEN SULFIDE (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas with a strong odor of rotten eggs. Its primary uses include the production of elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid, the manufacture of heavy water and other chemicals. Occupational exposure occurs primarily from its presence in petroleum, n...

  12. CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is of biological significance and may be implicated in the overall toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic. The course of the reaction in aqueous phase was monitored and an initial product, dimethylthioarsin...

  13. Enhanced Synthesis and Diminished Degradation of Hydrogen Sulfide in Experimental Colitis: A Site-Specific, Pro-Resolution Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Ferraz, Jose G. P.; Wang, Rui; Wallace, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced throughout the gastrointestinal tract, and it contributes to maintenance of mucosal integrity, resolution of inflammation, and repair of damaged tissue. H2S synthesis is elevated in inflamed and damaged colonic tissue, but the enzymatic sources of that synthesis are not completely understood. In the present study, the contributions of three enzymatic pathways to colonic H2S synthesis were determined, with tissues taken from healthy rats and rats with colitis. The ability of the colonic tissue to inactivate H2S was also determined. Colonic tissue from rats with hapten-induced colitis produced significantly more H2S than tissue from healthy controls. The largest source of the H2S synthesis was the pathway involving cysteine amino transferase and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (an α-ketoglutarate-dependent pathway). Elevated H2S synthesis occurred specifically at sites of mucosal ulceration, and was not related to the extent of granulocyte infiltration into the tissue. Inactivation of H2S by colonic tissue occurred rapidly, and was significantly reduced at sites of mucosal ulceration. This correlated with a marked decrease in the expression of sulfide quinone reductase in these regions. Together, the increased production and decreased inactivation of H2S at sites of mucosal ulceration would result in higher H2S levels at these sites, which promotes of resolution of inflammation and repair of damaged tissue. PMID:23940796

  14. Hydrogen sulfide at high pressure: change in stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander; Lobanov, Sergey; Kruglov, Ivan; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Oganov, Artem; Konopkova, Zuzana; Prakapenka, Vitali

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was studied by x-ray synchrotron diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy up to 144 GPa at 180-295 K. We find that H2S compound become unstable with respect to formation of new compounds with different composition including pure S, H3S and HS2 depending on the thermodynamic P-T path. These results are supported by our quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations that show the stability of the above mentioned compounds at elevated pressures. The stability of H3S at high pressures, which we find a strong experimental and theoretical confirmation here, suggests that it is this material which is responsible for high-temperature superconducting properties reported previously. We thank DARPA, NSF, ISSP (Hefei, China), Government of Russian Federation, and Foreign Talents Introduction and Academic Exchange Program. Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide at high pressure: Change in stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Kruglov, Ivan; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Oganov, Artem R.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S ) was studied by x-ray synchrotron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy up to 150 GPa at 180-295 K and by quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations. The experiments show that H2S becomes unstable with respect to formation of compounds with different structure and composition, including Cccm and a body-centered cubic like (R 3 m or I m -3 m ) H3S , the latter one predicted previously to show a record-high superconducting transition temperature, a Tc of 203 K. These experiments provide experimental ground for understanding of this record-high Tc. The experimental results are supported by theoretical structure searches that suggest the stability of H3S , H4S3 , H5S8 , H3S5 , and H S2 compounds that have not been reported previously at elevated pressures.

  16. Interactions between oxygen homeostasis, food availability, and hydrogen sulfide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Iranon, Nicole N.; Miller, Dana L.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to stressful conditions is essential to maintain organismal homeostasis. It has long been recognized that stress response factors that improve survival in changing conditions can also influence longevity. In this review, we discuss different strategies used by animals in response to decreased O2 (hypoxia) to maintain O2 homeostasis, and consider interactions between hypoxia responses, nutritional status, and H2S signaling. O2 is an essential environmental nutrient for almost all metazoans as it plays a fundamental role in development and cellular metabolism. However, the physiological response(s) to hypoxia depend greatly on the amount of O2 available. Animals must sense declining O2 availability to coordinate fundamental metabolic and signaling pathways. It is not surprising that factors involved in the response to hypoxia are also involved in responding to other key environmental signals, particularly food availability. Recent studies in mammals have also shown that the small gaseous signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects against cellular damage and death in hypoxia. These results suggest that H2S signaling also integrates with hypoxia response(s). Many of the signaling pathways that mediate the effects of hypoxia, food deprivation, and H2S signaling have also been implicated in the control of lifespan. Understanding how these pathways are coordinated therefore has the potential to reveal new cellular and organismal homeostatic mechanisms that contribute to longevity assurance in animals. PMID:23233860

  17. Kinetics and mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochars.

    PubMed

    Shang, Guofeng; Shen, Guoqing; Liu, Liang; Chen, Qin; Xu, Zhiwei

    2013-04-01

    Three different biochars as cost-effective substitutes for activated carbon (AC) were tested for their hydrogen sulfide (H2S) adsorption ability. The biochars were produced from camphor (SC), bamboo (SB), and rice hull (SR) at 400°C by oxygen-limited pyrolysis. The surface area (SA), pH, and Fourier transform infrared spectras of the biochars and AC were compared. The maximum removal rates and the saturation constants were obtained using the Michaelis-Menten-type equation. The three biochars were found to be alkaline, and the SAs of the biochars were much smaller than that of the AC. The H2S breakthrough capacity was related to the local pH within the pore system of the biochar. The order observed in terms of both biochar and AC adsorption capacity was SR>SB>SC>AC. SR efficiently removed H2S within the inlet concentration range of 10-50 μL/L. Biochars derived from agricultural/forestry wastes are a promising H2S adsorbent with distinctive properties. PMID:23455220

  18. A prototype reversible polymersome-stabilized H2S photoejector operating under pseudophysiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Tron, A; Peyret, A; Thevenot, J; Bofinger, R; Lecommandoux, S; McClenaghan, N D

    2016-07-01

    Persistent self-assembled polymersome capsules are shown to solubilise and stabilize a new hydrosulfide-containing (), as well as hydroxylated (), malachite green derivatives in their leuco-forms in aqueous buffer solution. Photoirradiation resulted in reversible hydroxide release/hydrogen sulfide generation. Notably, the efficient augmentation of H2S concentration to physiologically-relevant levels is shown. PMID:27282806

  19. The Redox Chemistry and Chemical Biology of H2S, Hydropersulfides and Derived Species: Implications to Their Possible Biological Activity and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Katsuhiko; Akaike, Takaake; Sawa, Tomohiro; Kumagai, Yoshito; Wink, David A.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Hobbs, Adrian J.; Nagy, Peter; Xian, Ming; Lin, Joseph; Fukuto, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously generated and putative signaling/effector molecule. In spite of its numerous reported functions, the chemistry by which it elicits its functions is not understood. Moreover, recent studies allude to the existence of other sulfur species besides H2S that may play critical physiological roles. Herein, the basic chemical biology of H2S as well as other related or derived species is discussed and reviewed. A particular focus of this review are the per- and poly-sulfides which are likely in equilibrium with free H2S and which may be important biological effectors themselves. PMID:25229186

  20. A critical review of pharmacological significance of Hydrogen Sulfide in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Sattar, Munavvar A.; Rathore, Hassaan A.; Khan, Safia Akhtar; Lazhari, M. I.; Afzal, Sheryar; Hashmi, F.; Abdullah, Nor A.; Johns, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    In the family of gas transmitters, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is yet not adequately researched. Known for its rotten egg smell and adverse effects on the brain, lungs, and kidneys for more than 300 years, the vasorelaxant effects of H2S on blood vessel was first observed in 1997. Since then, research continued to explore the possible therapeutic effects of H2S in hypertension, inflammation, pancreatitis, different types of shock, diabetes, and heart failure. However, a considerable amount of efforts are yet needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects of H2S, such as nitric oxide-dependent or independent vasodilation in hypertension and regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. More than a decade of good repute among researchers, H2S research has certain results that need to be clarified or reevaluated. H2S produces its response by multiple modes of action, such as opening the ATP-sensitive potassium channel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, and calcium channel blockade. H2S is endogenously produced from two sulfur-containing amino acids L-cysteine and L-methionine by the two enzymes cystathionine γ lyase and cystathionine β synthase. Recently, the third enzyme, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase, along with cysteine aminotransferase, which is similar to aspartate aminotransferase, has been found to produce H2S in the brain. The H2S has interested researchers, and a great deal of information is being generated every year. This review aims to provide an update on the developments in the research of H2S in hypertension amid the ambiguity in defining the exact role of H2S in hypertension because of insufficient number of research results on this area. This critical review on the role of H2S in hypertension will clarify the gray areas and highlight its future prospects. PMID:26069359

  1. A critical review of pharmacological significance of Hydrogen Sulfide in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Sattar, Munavvar A; Rathore, Hassaan A; Khan, Safia Akhtar; Lazhari, M I; Afzal, Sheryar; Hashmi, F; Abdullah, Nor A; Johns, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    In the family of gas transmitters, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is yet not adequately researched. Known for its rotten egg smell and adverse effects on the brain, lungs, and kidneys for more than 300 years, the vasorelaxant effects of H2S on blood vessel was first observed in 1997. Since then, research continued to explore the possible therapeutic effects of H2S in hypertension, inflammation, pancreatitis, different types of shock, diabetes, and heart failure. However, a considerable amount of efforts are yet needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects of H2S, such as nitric oxide-dependent or independent vasodilation in hypertension and regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. More than a decade of good repute among researchers, H2S research has certain results that need to be clarified or reevaluated. H2S produces its response by multiple modes of action, such as opening the ATP-sensitive potassium channel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, and calcium channel blockade. H2S is endogenously produced from two sulfur-containing amino acids L-cysteine and L-methionine by the two enzymes cystathionine γ lyase and cystathionine β synthase. Recently, the third enzyme, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase, along with cysteine aminotransferase, which is similar to aspartate aminotransferase, has been found to produce H2S in the brain. The H2S has interested researchers, and a great deal of information is being generated every year. This review aims to provide an update on the developments in the research of H2S in hypertension amid the ambiguity in defining the exact role of H2S in hypertension because of insufficient number of research results on this area. This critical review on the role of H2S in hypertension will clarify the gray areas and highlight its future prospects. PMID:26069359

  2. Dissociation products and structures of solid H2S at strong compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinwei; Wang, Lin; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Yunwei; Hao, Jian; Pickard, Chris J.; Nelson, Joseph R.; Needs, Richard J.; Li, Wentao; Huang, Yanwei; Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco; Ma, Yanming

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfides have recently received a great deal of interest due to the record high superconducting temperatures of up to 203 K observed on strong compression of dihydrogen sulfide (H2S ). A joint theoretical and experimental study is presented in which decomposition products and structures of compressed H2S are characterized, and their superconducting properties are calculated. In addition to the experimentally known H2S and H3S phases, our first-principles structure searches have identified several energetically competitive stoichiometries that have not been reported previously: H2S3 , H3S2 , HS2, and H4S3 . In particular, H4S3 is predicted to be thermodynamically stable within a large pressure range of 25-113 GPa. High-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements confirm the presence of H3S and H4S3 through decomposition of H2S that emerges at 27 GPa and coexists with residual H2S , at least up to the highest pressure of 140 GPa studied in our experiments. Electron-phonon coupling calculations show that H4S3 has a small T c of below 2 K, and that H2S is mainly responsible for the observed superconductivity of samples prepared at low temperature (<100 K).

  3. Reaction-based epoxide fluorescent probe for in vivo visualization of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sathyadevi, Palanisamy; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wu, Shou-Cheng; Chen, Yen-Hao; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2015-06-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as the most important biosynthetic gasotransmitters along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). In this study, we report the design and the synthesis of a new epoxide fluorescent probe 7-glycidyloxy-9-(2-glycidyloxycarbonylphenyl)-2-xanthone (FEPO) for use in in vivo visualization of hydrogen sulfide. The probe employs a fluorescein as a fluorophore, and is equipped with an operating epoxide unit. FEPO functions via epoxide ring opening upon nucleophilic attack of H2S. This ring opening strategy may open a new avenue for the development of various H2S fluorescent sensors. FEPO showed high selectivity and high sensitivity for H2S. FEPO's cytotoxicity was tested using MTT (2-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-3,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. Furthermore, the use of confocal imaging of H2S and in vivo imaging in live zebra fish demonstrated FEPO's potential biological applications. We anticipate that, owing to their ideal properties, probes of this type will find great uses in exploring the role of H2S in biology. PMID:25660659

  4. Controlled release hydrogen sulfide delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles protects graft endothelium from ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenshuo; Sun, Xiaotian; Zhang, Huili; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Ye; Yang, Wuli; Guo, Changfa; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) functions as a protective gas transmitter in various physiological and pathological processes, but the lack of ideal donors severely hampers the clinical application of H2S. This study aims to construct a controlled release H2S donor and evaluate its protective effect on graft endothelium. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were synthesized using the sol–gel method and loaded with diallyl trisulfide (DATS), an H2S-releasing agent named DATS-MSN. In vitro experiments showed that DATS-MSN could alleviate endothelial cell inflammation and enhance endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the apoptosis of graft endothelium was mitigated in the presence of DATS-MSN. Our results indicated that DATS-MSN, releasing H2S in a controlled release fashion, could serve as an ideal H2S donor. PMID:27486324

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Mitigates Kidney Injury in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Gao, Biao; Li, Mengling; Yao, Ling; Wang, Shuaiwei; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Hui; Ma, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is a major risk factor for the development and progression of kidney disease. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in renal physiological and pathophysiological processes. However, whether H2S is able to mitigate kidney injury induced by obesity in mice remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of lipids in the kidneys of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced obese mice. The results of hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and Masson's trichrome staining showed that H2S ameliorated the kidney structure, decreased the extent of interstitial injury, and reduced the degree of kidney fibrosis in HFD-induced obese mice. We found that H2S decreased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 but increased the expression level of IL-10. Furthermore, H2S treatment decreased the protein expression of p50, p65, and p-p65 in the kidney of HFD-induced obese mice. In conclusion, H2S is able to mitigate renal injury in HFD-induced obese mice through the reduction of kidney inflammation by downregulating the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B. H2S or its releasing compounds may serve as a potential therapeutic molecule for obesity-induced kidney injury. PMID:27413418

  6. An Antifungal Role of Hydrogen Sulfide on the Postharvest Pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Hong; Hu, Liang-Bin; Yan, Hong; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the antifungal role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the postharvest pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum growing on fruits and under culture conditions on defined media was investigated. Our results show that H2S, released by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) effectively reduced the postharvest decay of fruits induced by A. niger and P. italicum. Furthermore, H2S inhibited spore germination, germ tube elongation, mycelial growth, and produced abnormal mycelial contractions when the fungi were grown on defined media in Petri plates. Further studies showed that H2S could cause an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. niger. In accordance with this observation we show that enzyme activities and the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) genes in A. niger treated with H2S were lower than those in control. Moreover, H2S also significantly inhibited the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rhizopus oryzae, the human pathogen Candida albicans, and several food-borne bacteria. We also found that short time exposure of H2S showed a microbicidal role rather than just inhibiting the growth of microbes. Taken together, this study suggests the potential value of H2S in reducing postharvest loss and food spoilage caused by microbe propagation. PMID:25101960

  7. Hydrogen sulfide induces apoptosis in epithelial cells derived from human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Murata, T; Yaegaki, K; Qian, W; Herai, M; Calenic, B; Imai, T; Sato, T; Tanaka, T; Kamoda, T; Ii, H

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is not only one of the main causes of halitosis but is also an agent of toxicity against periodontal cells and tissues in biofilm-related periodontal diseases. Also, apoptosis of gingival epithelial cells may play an important role in the onset and progress of periodontitis. We examined the effect of H(2)S on the induction of apoptosis, using human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and keratinocyte-like Ca9-22 cells derived from human gingiva. The cells were incubated with H(2)S (100 ng ml(-1)) for 24, 48 or 72 h by adding H(2)S to air containing 5% CO(2), supplied constantly to the culture environment during incubation. The incidence of apoptosis caused by H(2)S was determined with Annexin V staining by flow cytometry. The proportion of apoptotic cells was significantly increased by exposure to H(2)S for 48 h in comparison with the control in both Ca9-22 cells and HGF. A concentration of 100 ng ml(-1) H(2)S in air is possible in the gingival sulcus. This study indicates that apoptosis in gingival epithelial cells and HGF by H(2)S may occur in the oral cavity, which may cause a periodontal condition. PMID:21386151

  8. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation from disposed gypsum drywall using chemical inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Bitton, Gabriel

    2011-07-15

    Disposal of gypsum drywall in landfills has been demonstrated to elevate hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentrations in landfill gas, a problem with respect to odor, worker safety, and deleterious effect on gas-to-energy systems. Since H(2)S production in landfills results from biological activity, the concept of inhibiting H(2)S production through the application of chemical agents to drywall during disposal was studied. Three possible inhibition agents - sodium molybdate (Na(2)MoO(4)), ferric chloride (FeCl(3)), and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) - were evaluated using flask and column experiments. All three agents inhibited H(2)S generation, with Na(2)MoO(4) reducing H(2)S generation by interrupting the biological sulfate reduction process and Ca(OH)(2) providing an unfavorable pH for biological growth. Although FeCl(3) was intended to provide an electron acceptor for a competing group of bacteria, the mechanism found responsible for inhibiting H(2)S production in the column experiment was a reduction in pH. Application of both Na(2)MoO(4) and FeCl(3) inhibited H(2)S generation over a long period (over 180 days), but the impact of Ca(OH)(2) decreased with time as the alkalinity it contributed was neutralized by the generated H(2)S. Practical application and potential environmental implications need additional exploration. PMID:21592650

  9. Hydrogen sulfide prevents Abeta-induced neuronal apoptosis by attenuating mitochondrial translocation of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weigang; Zhang, Yinghua; Yang, Chenxi; Sun, Yiyuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Songtao

    2016-06-14

    Neuronal cell apoptosis is an important pathological change in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is known to be a novel gaseous signaling molecule and a cytoprotectant in many diseases including AD. However, the molecular mechanism of the antiapoptosis activity of H(2)S in AD is not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the inhibitory effects of H(2)S on Abeta (Aβ)-induced apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying primary neuron cells. Our results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H(2)S, significantly ameliorated Aβ-induced cell apoptosis. NaHS also reversed the Aβ-induced translocation of the phosphatase and tensin homologs deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) from the cytosol to the mitochondria. Furthermore, H(2)S increased the level of p-AKT/AKT significantly. Interestingly, the antiapoptosis effects of H(2)S were blocked down by specific PI3K/AKT inhibitor wortmannin. In conclusion, these data indicate that H(2)S inhibits Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis by attenuating mitochondrial translocation of PTEN and that activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in H(2)S-mediated neuronal protection. Our findings provide a novel route into the molecular mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis in AD. PMID:27026591

  10. Ferric Iron and Cobalt (III) compounds to safely decrease hydrogen sulfide in the body?

    PubMed

    Van de Louw, Andry; Haouzi, Philippe

    2013-08-10

    To sort out the putative roles of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in clinical conditions wherein systemic inflammation or hypoxia is present, it becomes crucial to develop approaches capable of affecting H2S concentration that can be safely applied in humans. We have investigated a paradigm, which could achieve such a goal, using vitamin B12 (vit.B12), at the dose recommended in cyanide poisoning, and very low levels of methemoglobin (MetHb). Hydroxocobalamin in the plasma, supernatant of kidney, and heart tissue homogenates of rats that had received vit.B12 (140 mg.kg(-1) intravenous) was found in the μM range. Exogenous H2S (100 μM) added to the plasma or supernatants of these rats decreased at a significantly higher rate than in control rats. In the latter however a spontaneous oxidation of exogenous H2S occurred. In vitro, hydroxocobalamin solution (100 μM) decreased, within <2 min, an equimolar concentration of H2S by 80%. Three to five percent MetHb prevented H2S induced hyperventilation in vivo and decreased exogenous H2S in vitro by 25-40 μM within 30 s. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that innocuous levels of MetHb and vit.B12 could be a used as an effective and safe way to test the role of endogenous H2S in vivo. PMID:22233239

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Mitigates Kidney Injury in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongdong; Gao, Biao; Li, Mengling; Yao, Ling; Wang, Shuaiwei; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Hui; Ma, Chunyan; Ji, Ailing; Li, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is a major risk factor for the development and progression of kidney disease. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in renal physiological and pathophysiological processes. However, whether H2S is able to mitigate kidney injury induced by obesity in mice remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of lipids in the kidneys of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced obese mice. The results of hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and Masson's trichrome staining showed that H2S ameliorated the kidney structure, decreased the extent of interstitial injury, and reduced the degree of kidney fibrosis in HFD-induced obese mice. We found that H2S decreased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 but increased the expression level of IL-10. Furthermore, H2S treatment decreased the protein expression of p50, p65, and p-p65 in the kidney of HFD-induced obese mice. In conclusion, H2S is able to mitigate renal injury in HFD-induced obese mice through the reduction of kidney inflammation by downregulating the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B. H2S or its releasing compounds may serve as a potential therapeutic molecule for obesity-induced kidney injury. PMID:27413418

  12. FRET ratiometric probes reveal the chiral-sensitive cysteine-dependent H2S production and regulation in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lv; Yi, Long; Song, Fanbo; Wei, Chao; Wang, Bai-Fan; Xi, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signalling molecule with multiple biological functions. In order to visualize and quantify the endogenous in situ production of H2S in living cells, here we developed two new sulphide ratiometric probes (SR400 and SR550) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) strategy for live capture of H2S. The FRET-based probes show excellent selectivity toward H2S in a high thiol background under physiological buffer. The probe can be used to in situ visualize cysteine-dependent H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. The ratiometric imaging studies indicated that D-Cys induces more H2S production than that of L-Cys in mitochondria of human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The cysteine mimics propargylglycine (PPG) has also been found to inhibit the cysteine-dependent endogenous H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. D-PPG inhibited D-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than L-PPG, while, L-PPG inhibited L-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than D-PPG. Our bioimaging studies support Kimura's discovery of H2S production from D-cysteine in mammalian cells and further highlight the potential of D-cysteine and its derivatives as an alternative strategy for classical H2S-releasing drugs.

  13. A batch assay to measure microbial hydrogen sulfide production from sulfur-containing solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Sun, Wenjie; Barlaz, Morton A

    2016-05-01

    Large volumes of sulfur-containing wastes enter municipal solid waste landfills each year. Under the anaerobic conditions that prevail in landfills, oxidized forms of sulfur, primarily sulfate, are converted to sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is corrosive to landfill gas collection and treatment systems, and its presence in landfill gas often necessitates the installation of expensive removal systems. For landfill operators to understand the cost of managing sulfur-containing wastes, an estimate of the H2S production potential is needed. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate a biochemical sulfide potential (BSP) test to measure the amount of H2S produced by different types of sulfur-containing wastes in a relatively fast (30days) and inexpensive (125mL serum bottles) batch assay. This study confirmed the toxic effect of H2S on both sulfate reduction and methane production in batch systems, and demonstrated that removing accumulated H2S by base adsorption was effective for mitigating inhibition. H2S production potentials of coal combustion fly ash, flue gas desulfurization residual, municipal solid waste combustion ash, and construction and demolition waste were determined in BSP assays. After 30days of incubation, most of the sulfate in the wastes was converted to gaseous or aqueous phase sulfide, with BSPs ranging from 0.8 to 58.8mLH2S/g waste, depending on the chemical composition of the samples. Selected samples contained solid phase sulfide which contributed to the measured H2S yield. A 60day incubation in selected samples resulted in 39-86% additional sulfide production. H2S production measured in BSP assays was compared with that measured in simulated landfill reactors and that calculated from chemical analyses. H2S production in BSP assays and in reactors was lower than the stoichiometric values calculated from chemical composition for all wastes tested, demonstrating the importance of assays to estimate the microbial sulfide production

  14. Passive monitors to measure hydrogen sulfide near concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Pavilonis, Brian T; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of many airborne pollutants emitted by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, few studies have characterized ambient H2S levels near these facilities, largely due to the lack of low-cost, reliable, and easily transportable instrumentation available to researchers. We determined intermediate environmental H2S exposure near CAFOs using Radiello passive monitors. First, a laboratory study was performed to determine the accuracy of the device. Next, a total of eight passive H2S monitors were deployed bi-weekly in close proximity (<40 m) to a medium-sized swine confinement for seven months in order to determine the temporal and spatial variability of H2S. Finally, we measured H2S concentrations across two rural Iowa counties to characterize ambient exposure near thirteen CAFOs and two schools. The value of the temperature-adjusted H2S passive diffusion rate provided by the supplier was 29% larger than the 24 h rate determined experimentally. Concentrations of H2S measured near the medium-sized confinement were varied and ranged from 0.2 to 48.6 ppb depending on the sampling period and proximity to a lagoon on the property. Two-week concentrations near the schools were low (<1 ppb), while concentrations near the thirteen CAFOs ranged from 0.1 to 42.9 ppb. The passive monitors were effective in measuring H2S concentrations near a swine CAFO as long as they were exposed for a sufficient period of time (two weeks). Radiello passive monitors are a promising new device in measuring intermediate H2S exposure in rural populations. Measured values in excess of an Iowa state limit of 30 ppb (24 h average) suggest that enforcement actions are needed to mitigate H2S migration from swine CAFOs. PMID:23681048

  15. Hydrogen sulfide replacement therapy protects the vascular endothelium in hyperglycemia by preserving mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunihiro; Olah, Gabor; Modis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Kulp, Gabriella; Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Chang, Tuanjie; Zhou, Zongmin; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-08-16

    The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of changes in hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) homeostasis in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of bEnd3 microvascular endothelial cells to elevated extracellular glucose (in vitro "hyperglycemia") induced the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted in an increased consumption of endogenous and exogenous H(2)S. Replacement of H(2)S or overexpression of the H(2)S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of ROS formation, attenuated nuclear DNA injury, reduced the activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and improved cellular viability. In vitro hyperglycemia resulted in a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, an effect that was partially corrected by H(2)S supplementation. Exposure of isolated vascular rings to high glucose in vitro induced an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, which was prevented by CSE overexpression or H(2)S supplementation. siRNA silencing of CSE exacerbated ROS production in hyperglycemic endothelial cells. Vascular rings from CSE(-/-) mice exhibited an accelerated impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to in vitro hyperglycemia, compared with wild-type controls. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats resulted in a decrease in the circulating level of H(2)S; replacement of H(2)S protected from the development of endothelial dysfunction ex vivo. In conclusion, endogenously produced H(2)S protects against the development of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that, in hyperglycemic endothelial cells, mitochondrial ROS production and increased H(2)S catabolism form a positive feed-forward cycle. H(2)S replacement protects against these alterations, resulting in reduced ROS formation, improved endothelial metabolic state, and maintenance of normal endothelial function. PMID:21808008

  16. Passive monitors to measure hydrogen sulfide near concentrated animal feeding operations

    PubMed Central

    Pavilonis, Brian T.; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of many airborne pollutants emitted by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, few studies have characterized ambient H2S levels near these facilities, largely due to the lack of low-cost, reliable, and easily transportable instrumentation available to researchers. We determined intermediate environmental H2S exposure near CAFOs using Radiello passive monitors. First, a laboratory study was performed to determine the accuracy of the device. Next, a total of eight passive H2S monitors were deployed bi-weekly in close proximity (<40 m) to a medium-sized swine confinement for seven months in order to determine the temporal and spatial variability of H2S. Finally, we measured H2S concentrations across two rural Iowa counties to characterize ambient exposure near thirteen CAFOs and two schools. The value of the temperature-adjusted H2S passive diffusion rate provided by the supplier was 29% larger than the 24-hr rate determined experimentally. Concentrations of H2S measured near the medium-sized confinement were varied and ranged from 0.2 to 48.6 ppb depending on the sampling period and proximity to a lagoon on the property. Two-week concentrations near the schools were low (<1 ppb), while concentrations near the thirteen CAFOs ranged from 0.1 to 42.9 ppb. The passive monitors were effective in measuring H2S concentrations near a swine CAFO as long as they were exposed for a sufficient period of time (two weeks). Radiello passive monitors are a promising new device in measuring intermediate H2S exposure in rural populations. Measured values in excess of an Iowa state limit of 30 ppb (24-hr average) suggest that enforcement actions are needed to mitigate H2S migration from swine CAFOs. PMID:23681048

  17. Hydrogen sulfide improves neural function in rats following cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    LIN, JI-YAN; ZHANG, MIN-WEI; WANG, JIN-GAO; LI, HUI; WEI, HONG-YAN; LIU, RONG; DAI, GANG; LIAO, XIAO-XING

    2016-01-01

    The alleviation of brain injury is a key issue following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiological process of ischemia-reperfusion injury, and exerts a protective effect on neurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of H2S on neural functions following cardiac arrest (CA) in rats. A total of 60 rats were allocated at random into three groups. CA was induced to establish the model and CPR was performed after 6 min. Subsequently, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), hydroxylamine or saline was administered to the rats. Serum levels of H2S, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100β were determined following CPR. In addition, neurological deficit scoring (NDS), the beam walking test (BWT), prehensile traction test and Morris water maze experiment were conducted. Neuronal apoptosis rates were detected in the hippocampal region following sacrifice. After CPR, as the H2S levels increased or decreased, the serum NSE and S100β concentrations decreased or increased, respectively (P<0.0w. The NDS results of the NaHS group were improved compared with those of the hydroxylamine group at 24 h after CPR (P<0.05). In the Morris water maze experiment, BWT and prehensile traction test the animals in the NaHS group performed best and rats in the hydroxylamine group performed worst. At day 7, the apoptotic index and the expression of caspase-3 were reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region, while the expression of Bcl-2 increased in the NaHS group; and results of the hydroxylamine group were in contrast. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that H2S is able to improve neural function in rats following CPR. PMID:26893650

  18. Sensory and Cognitive Effects of Acute Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Kipen, Howard; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhang, Junfeng; Weisel, Clifford; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Olejeme, Kelechi; Lioy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Some epidemiologic studies have reported compromised cognitive and sensory performance among individuals exposed to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Objectives We hypothesized a dose–response increase in symptom severity and reduction in sensory and cognitive performance in response to controlled H2S exposures. Methods In separate exposure sessions administered in random order over three consecutive weeks, 74 healthy subjects [35 females, 39 males; mean age (± SD) = 24.7 ± 4.2; mean years of education = 16.5 ± 2.4], were exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm H2S. During each exposure session, subjects completed ratings and tests before H2S exposure (baseline) and during the final hour of the 2-hr exposure period. Results Dose–response reduction in air quality and increases in ratings of odor intensity, irritation, and unpleasantness were observed. Total symptom severity was not significantly elevated across any exposure condition, but anxiety symptoms were significantly greater in the 5-ppm than in the 0.05-ppm condition. No dose–response effect was observed for sensory or cognitive measures. Verbal learning was compromised during each exposure condition. Conclusions Although some symptoms increased with exposure, the magnitude of these changes was relatively minor. Increased anxiety was significantly related to ratings of irritation due to odor. Whether the effect on verbal learning represents a threshold effect of H2S or an effect due to fatigue across exposure requires further investigation. These acute effects in a healthy sample cannot be directly generalized to communities where individuals have other health conditions and concomitant exposures. PMID:18197303

  19. Involvement of hydrogen sulfide and homocysteine transsulfuration pathway in the progression of kidney fibrosis after ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyong-Jin; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Han, Sang Jun; Park, Jeen-Woo; Park, Kwon Moo

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) in the transsulfuration pathway of homocysteine plays a number of pathophysiological roles. Hyperhomocysteinemia is involved in kidney fibrosis. However, the role of H2S in kidney fibrosis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated the role of H2S and its acting mechanism in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UO)-induced kidney fibrosis in mice. UO decreased expressions of CBS and CSE in the kidney with decrease of H2S concentration. Treatment with sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, a H2S producer) during UO reduced UO-induced oxidative stress with preservations of catalase, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) expression, and glutathione level. In addition, NaHS mitigated decreases of CBS and CSE expressions, and H2S concentration in the kidney. NaHS treatment attenuated UO-induced increases in levels of TGF-β1, activated Smad3, and activated NF-κB. This study provided the first evidence of involvement of the transsulfuration pathway and H2S in UO-induced kidney fibrosis, suggesting that H2S and its transsulfuration pathway may be a potential target for development of therapeutics for fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:23846016

  20. Efficient new process for the desulfurization of mixtures of air and hydrogen sulfide via a dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, S.

    2015-10-01

    The efficient removal of hydrogen sulfide, H2S, from streams of H2S in air via a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A suitable plasma device with a reservoir for storing sorbent powder of various kinds within the plasma region was constructed. Plasma treatments of gas streams with high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in air yielded a removal of more than 98% of the initial hydrogen sulfide and a deposition of sulfur at the surface of the dielectric, while small amounts of sulfur dioxide were generated. The presence of calcium carbonate within the plasma region of the DBD device resulted in the removal of over 99% of the initial hydrogen sulfide content and the removal of 98% of the initial sulfur dioxide impurities from the gas mixture.

  1. Homocysteine in renovascular complications: hydrogen sulfide is a modulator and plausible anaerobic ATP generator

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Utpal; Pushpakumar, Sathnur B.; Amin, Matthew A.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a non-protein amino acid derived from dietary methionine. High levels of Hcy, known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is known to cause vascular complications. In the mammalian tissue, Hcy is metabolized by transsulfuration enzymes to produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S). H2S, a pungent smelling gas was previously known for its toxic effects in the central nervous system, recent studies however has revealed protective effects in a variety of diseases including hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and renal disease progression and failure. Interestingly, under stress conditions including hypoxia, H2S can reduce metabolic demand and also act as a substrate for ATP production. This review highlights some of the recent advances in H2S research as a potential therapeutic agent targeting renovascular diseases associated with HHcy. PMID:24963795

  2. Regulation of hydrogen sulfide liberation in wine-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by assimilable nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Jiranek, V; Langridge, P; Henschke, P A

    1995-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine-producing yeast cultures grown under model winemaking conditions could be induced to liberate hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by starvation for assimilable nitrogen. The amount of H2S produced was dependent on the yeast strain, the sulfur precursor compound, the culture growth rate, and the activity of the sulfite reductase enzyme (EC 1.8.1.2) immediately before nitrogen depletion. Increased H2S formation relative to its utilization by metabolism was not a consequence of a de novo synthesis of sulfite reductase. The greatest amount of H2S was produced when nitrogen became depleted during the exponential phase of growth or during growth on amino acids capable of supporting short doubling times. Both sulfate and sulfite were able to act as substrates for the generation of H2S in the absence of assimilable nitrogen; however, sulfate reduction was tightly regulated, leading to limited H2S liberation, whereas sulfite reduction appeared to be uncontrolled. In addition to ammonium, most amino acids were able to suppress the liberation of excess H2S when added as sole sources of nitrogen, particularly for one of the strains studied. Cysteine was the most notable exception, inducing the liberation of H2S at levels exceeding that of the nitrogen-depleted control. Threonine and proline also proved to be poor substitutes for ammonium. These data suggest that any compound that can efficiently generate sulfide-binding nitrogenous precursors of organic sulfur compounds will prevent the liberation of excess H2S. PMID:7574581

  3. Regulation of hydrogen sulfide liberation in wine-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by assimilable nitrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Jiranek, V; Langridge, P; Henschke, P A

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine-producing yeast cultures grown under model winemaking conditions could be induced to liberate hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by starvation for assimilable nitrogen. The amount of H2S produced was dependent on the yeast strain, the sulfur precursor compound, the culture growth rate, and the activity of the sulfite reductase enzyme (EC 1.8.1.2) immediately before nitrogen depletion. Increased H2S formation relative to its utilization by metabolism was not a consequence of a de novo synthesis of sulfite reductase. The greatest amount of H2S was produced when nitrogen became depleted during the exponential phase of growth or during growth on amino acids capable of supporting short doubling times. Both sulfate and sulfite were able to act as substrates for the generation of H2S in the absence of assimilable nitrogen; however, sulfate reduction was tightly regulated, leading to limited H2S liberation, whereas sulfite reduction appeared to be uncontrolled. In addition to ammonium, most amino acids were able to suppress the liberation of excess H2S when added as sole sources of nitrogen, particularly for one of the strains studied. Cysteine was the most notable exception, inducing the liberation of H2S at levels exceeding that of the nitrogen-depleted control. Threonine and proline also proved to be poor substitutes for ammonium. These data suggest that any compound that can efficiently generate sulfide-binding nitrogenous precursors of organic sulfur compounds will prevent the liberation of excess H2S. PMID:7574581

  4. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain...

  5. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Fullerton; Ward, J.W.; Yorba, L.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  6. New biologically active hydrogen sulfide donors.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thomas; Raynaud, Francoise; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Ransy, Céline; Simonet, Serge; Crespo, Christine; Bourguignon, Marie-Pierre; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Artaud, Isabelle; Galardon, Erwan

    2013-11-25

    Generous donors: The dithioperoxyanhydrides (CH3 COS)2 , (PhCOS)2 , CH3 COSSCO2 Me and PhCOSSCO2 Me act as thiol-activated hydrogen sulfide donors in aqueous buffer solution. The most efficient donor (CH3 COS)2 can induce a biological response in cells, and advantageously replace hydrogen sulfide in ex vivo vascular studies. PMID:24115650

  7. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  8. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters. PMID:18261510

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Small Clusters and Liquid Hydrogen Sulfide at Different Thermodynamic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Albertí, M; Amat, A; Aguilar, A; Pirani, F

    2016-07-14

    A new force field for the intermolecular H2S-H2S interaction has been used to study the most relevant properties of the hydrogen sulfide system from gaseous to liquid phases by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In order to check the validity of the interaction formulation, ab initio CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations, including the counterpoise correction on the H2S, (H2S)2, and (H2S)3 structures optimized at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level, have been performed. The (H2S)2,3 systems have been characterized by performing NVE MD simulations at decreasing values of the temperature, while the liquid sulfide behavior has been investigated considering a NpT ensemble of 512 molecules at several thermodynamic states, defined by different pressure and temperature values. Additional calculations using an ensemble of 2197 molecules at two different temperatures have been performed to investigate the liquid/vapor interface of the system. The S-S, S-H, and H-H radial distribution functions and the coordination number, calculated at the same conditions used in X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments, and the evaluated thermodynamic and structural properties have been compared successfully with experimental data, thus confirming the reliability of the force field formulation and of the MD predictions. PMID:26835966

  10. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation to Life in Hydrogen Sulfide-Rich Environments.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Joanna L; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Patacsil Martin, Dorrelyn; Yee, Muh-Ching; Bustamante, Carlos D; Tobler, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a potent toxicant interfering with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and creating extreme environmental conditions in aquatic ecosystems. The mechanistic basis of adaptation to perpetual exposure to H2S remains poorly understood. We investigated evolutionarily independent lineages of livebearing fishes that have colonized and adapted to springs rich in H2S and compared their genome-wide gene expression patterns with closely related lineages from adjacent, nonsulfidic streams. Significant differences in gene expression were uncovered between all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Variation in the number of differentially expressed genes among population pairs corresponded to differences in divergence times and rates of gene flow, which is consistent with neutral drift driving a substantial portion of gene expression variation among populations. Accordingly, there was little evidence for convergent evolution shaping large-scale gene expression patterns among independent sulfide spring populations. Nonetheless, we identified a small number of genes that was consistently differentially expressed in the same direction in all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Functional annotation of shared differentially expressed genes indicated upregulation of genes associated with enzymatic H2S detoxification and transport of oxidized sulfur species, oxidative phosphorylation, energy metabolism, and pathways involved in responses to oxidative stress. Overall, our results suggest that modification of processes associated with H2S detoxification and toxicity likely complement each other to mediate elevated H2S tolerance in sulfide spring fishes. Our analyses allow for the development of novel hypotheses about biochemical and physiological mechanisms of adaptation to extreme environments. PMID:26861137