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Sample records for hydrogen-induced delayed cracking

  1. Observations on hydrogen induced delayed plasticity and cracking in 4340 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.

    1983-02-01

    The crack growth rates measured by potential drop provided strong evidence that crack advance occurs continuously during hydrogen assisted cracking. If crack growth occurred by the stepwise HIDP-C mechanism, variations in growth rate would be expected to appear in the potential drop results. For example, during the period of plastic zone extension, a low crack growth rate would be expected, followed by a period of higher crack growth rate during actual extension of the crack. The results obtained in this investigation do not eliminate the possibility that stepwise crack growth occurred at different points along the crack front at different times, appearing as continuous average crack advance. Furthermore, these results do not provide evidence for the mechanism of crack extension. The results do show that the average crack front advance is continuous during hydrogen assisted cracking, not stepwise, as would be expected for the HIDP-C mechanism of crack growth. 13 references.

  2. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  3. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-07

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]).

  4. Hydrogen-Induced Cold Cracking in High-Frequency Induction Welded Steel Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kumkum

    2016-04-01

    Detailed investigation was carried out on 0.4C steel tubes used for the telescopic front fork of two-wheelers to establish the root cause for the occurrence of transverse cracks at the weld heat-affected zone of the tubes. Fractographic and microstructural observations provide evidences of delayed hydrogen-induced cracking. The beneficial microstructure for avoiding the transverse cracks was found to be the bainitic-martensitic, while martensitic structure was noted to be deleterious.

  5. On Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Crack Propagation Under Sustained Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Somerday, Brian p.; Schembri, Philip E.; Sofronis, Petros; Foulk, James W.; Nibur, Kevin A.; Balch, Dorian K.

    2014-08-01

    The failure of hydrogen containment components is generally associated with subcritical cracking. Understanding subcritical crack growth behavior and its dependence on material and environmental variables can lead to methods for designing structural components in a hydrogen environment and will be beneficial in developing materials resistant to hydrogen embrittlement. In order to identify the issues underlying crack propagation and arrest, we present a model for hydrogen-induced stress-controlled crack propagation under sustained loading. The model is based on the assumptions that (I) hydrogen reduces the material fracture strength and (II) crack propagation takes place when the opening stress over the characteristic distance ahead of a crack tip is greater than the local fracture strength. The model is used in a finite-element simulation of crack propagation coupled with simultaneous hydrogen diffusion in a model material through nodal release. The numerical simulations show that the same physics, i.e., diffusion-controlled crack propagation, can explain the existence of both stages I and II in the velocity versus stress intensity factor ( V- K) curve.

  6. The threshold stress intensity for hydrogen-induced crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhurst, K. N.; Baker, T. J.

    1981-06-01

    The crack growth rates and threshold stress intensities, K TH, for a 3 1/2 NiCrMoV steel (0.2 pct proof stress 1200 MPa) have been measured in a hydrogen environment at various temperatures and hydrogen pressures. Fractographic evidence and the observation of alternating fast and slow crack growth near K TH suggests that the crack advances by the repeated nucleation of microcracks at microstructural features ahead of the main crack. Transient crack growth is observed following load increases just below K TH. Using the idea, from unstable cleavage fracture theory, that for fracture a critical stress must be exceeded over a critical distance ahead of the crack, and assuming that this critical stress is reduced in proportion to the local hydrogen concentration (in equilibrium with the external hydrogen at K TH), a theoretical dependence of K TH on hydrogen pressure is derived which compares well with the experimental evidence.

  7. Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of Titanium Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-09-08

    This paper reviews the current understanding of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) of Ti Grade 7 and other relevant titanium alloys within the context of the current waste package design for the repository environmental conditions anticipated within the Yucca Mountain repository. The review concentrates on corrosion processes possible in the aqueous environments expected within this site. A brief background discussion of the relevant properties of titanium alloys, the hydrogen absorption process, and the properties of passive film on titanium alloys is presented as the basis for the subsequent discussion of model developments. The key corrosion processes that could occur are addressed individually. Subsequently, the expected corrosion performance of these alloys under the specific environmental conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain is considered. It can be concluded that, based on the conservative modeling approaches adopted, hydrogen-induced cracking of titanium alloys will not occur under nuclear waste repository conditions since there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the alloy after 10,000 years of emplacement.

  8. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking Assessment in Pipeline Steels Through Permeation and Crystallographic Texture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Karimdadashi, R.; Eskandari, M.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrochemical hydrogen charging and permeation techniques were used to characterize hydrogen distribution, trapping, and diffusion in X60 and X60 sour service (X60SS) pipeline steels. The results obtained contribute to better understanding of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). SEM observations illustrated that all HIC cracks were formed at the center of cross section in the X60 steel after 3-h hydrogen charging and length of cracks increased with charging time. No HIC cracks were recorded at the cross section of X60SS steel after the same charging for different durations. Hydrogen permeation tests showed that the density of reversible hydrogen traps was lower at the center of cross section in the X60SS steel compared to the X60 one, and this is considered as one of the main reasons for high resistance of X60SS steel to HIC. EBSD orientation imaging results proved that the accumulation of <111>||ND-oriented grains at the center of the cross section in the X60SS steel was high. This is also considered as another reason for higher resistance of this steel to HIC. Finally, the center segregation zone with higher hardness value in the X60 steel was more pronounced than in the X60SS steel which made the X60 steel susceptible to HIC cracking.

  9. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  10. Hydrogen-induced crack nucleation in tensile testing of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitckii, Evgenii; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Hänninen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of continuous hydrogen charging on tensile properties of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels was studied at room and elevated temperatures of 100 °C and 300 °C. The hydrogen effect decreases with increase of the temperature for ODS-EUROFER steel, while susceptibility to hydrogen of EUROFER 97 steel remains approximately the same at all testing temperatures. Continuous hydrogen charging results in a reduction of the grain boundary cohesion of the EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels tested at RT. With increase of the testing temperature up to 300 °C EUROFER 97 steel exhibits relatively high amount of micro-cracks which agglomerate in sub-micrometer size cracks, while the hydrogen-induced intergranular crack nucleation in ODS-EUROFER steel is effectively suppressed. Possible mechanism of the hydrogen-induced crack nucleation and propagation under applied external stress is discussed.

  11. Quantitative observations of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in a low alloy steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth, da/dt, was studied in AISI-SAE 4130 low alloy steel in gaseous hydrogen and distilled water environments as a function of applied stress intensity, K, at various temperatures, hydrogen pressures, and alloy strength levels. At low values of K, da/dt was found to exhibit a strong exponential K dependence (Stage 1 growth) in both hydrogen and water. At intermediate values of K, da/dt exhibited a small but finite K dependence (Stage 2), with the Stage 2 slope being greater in hydrogen than in water. In hydrogen, at a constant K, (da/dt) sub 2 varied inversely with alloy strength level and varied essentially in the same complex manner with temperature and hydrogen pressure as noted previously. The results of this study provide support for most of the qualitative predictions of the lattice decohesion theory as recently modified by Oriani. The lack of quantitative agreement between data and theory and the inability of theory to explain the observed pressure dependence of slow crack growth are mentioned and possible rationalizations to account for these differences are presented.

  12. Design of an electrochemical probe for monitoring susceptibility of steel in pickling to hydrogen-induced cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.F.; Du, Y.L. . Corrosion Science Lab.)

    1993-09-01

    The relationship between the measured signals (hydrogen [H] permeating rate) of an electrochemical H sensor and the strength/embrittlement of plain carbon steel in acid solution as defined by slow strain rate tensile tests and scanning electron microscopy was studied. Critical parameters and criteria for hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) reported may be useful in software design of an electrochemical probe for inspecting and monitoring the HIC susceptibility of steel in pickling.

  13. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  14. Hydrogen-induced cold cracking in heat-affected zone of low-carbon high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Hu, Zhiyong; Qiu, Chunlin

    2014-12-01

    The Y-groove cracking test by submerged arc welding was employed to study the susceptibility of a low-carbon high-strength steel to hydrogen-induced cold cracking (HICC). The morphology of hydrogen cracks was observed using an electron probe microscope. The results showed that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has a higher susceptibility to HICC than the weld metal and that increasing heat input can improve the HICC resistance of the weldment. The intergranular microcracking is the main HICC mode at the lowest heat input condition, accompanied with some transgranular microcracks attached to complex inclusions. In combination with phase transformation behaviour in sub-zones, the effect of the phase transformation sequence is proposed to try to illustrate the fact that the fine-grained HAZ has higher probability of hydrogen cracking than the coarse-grained HAZ owing to the occurrence of hydrogen enrichment in the fine-grained HAZ after the transformation.

  15. Fractographic analysis of gaseous hydrogen induced cracking in 18Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscope fractographic analysis supplemented an extensive study of the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted cracking in 18Ni maraging steel. Temperature determined the crack path morphology in each steel which, in turn, was directly related to the temperature dependence of the crack growth rate. Crack growth in the low temperature regime proceeded along prior austenite grain boundaries. Increasing the temperature above a critical value produced a continuously increasing proportion of transgranular quasi-cleavage associated with lath martensite boundaries. The amount of transgranular cracking was qualitatively correlated with the degree of temperature-induced deviation from Arrhenius behavior. Fractographic observations are interpreted in terms of hypothesized mechanisms for gaseous hydrogen embrittlement. It is concluded that hydrogen segregation to prior austenite and lath martensite boundaries must be considered as a significant factor in developing mechanisms for gaseous embrittlement of high strength steels.

  16. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROGEN INDUCED CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TITANIUM ALLOYS IN US HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. De; K. Mon; G. Gordon; D. Shoesmith; F. Hua

    2006-02-21

    This paper evaluates hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) susceptibility of titanium alloys in environments anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository with particular emphasis on the. effect of the oxide passive film on the hydrogen absorption process of titanium alloys being evaluated. The titanium alloys considered in this review include Ti 2, 5 , 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 24 and 29. In general, the concentration of hydrogen in a titanium alloy can increase due to absorption of atomic hydrogen produced from passive general corrosion of that alloy or galvanic coupling of it to a less noble metal. It is concluded that under the exposure conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain repository, the HIC of titanium drip shield will not occur because there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the metal even after 10,000 years of emplacement. Due to the conservatisms adopted in the current evaluation, this assessment is considered very conservative.

  17. Investigation of hydrogen induced cracking in 2205 duplex stainless steel in wet H{sub 2}S environments after isothermal treatment at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Sozanska, Maria . E-mail: maria.sozanska@polsl.pl; Klyk-Spyra, Katarzyna

    2006-06-15

    The effect of isothermal treatment (at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C) on HIC (hydrogen induced cracking) in sour environments containing hydrogen sulphide of a 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. The performance and microstructure of failed material were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and also X-ray diffraction. Two kinds of Cr-, Mo-enriched intermetallic phases, {sigma} and {chi}, were found to precipitate preferentially at {alpha}/{gamma} interfaces and within {alpha} grains after different times of aging in the temperature range of 650-900 deg. C. After performing tests according to the NACE Standard TM 0284 (1987) the specimens were investigated by using quantitative metallography methods. The volume fraction of {sigma} phase was changed with the time of aging and {sigma} phase developed into coarse particles due to the high diffusibility of solute atoms at high temperatures. The variation of size and shape of {sigma} phase particles was obtained by applying different heat treatment conditions to 2205 steel specimens. The results showed that 2205 duplex stainless steel containing nearly 12 vol.% of {sigma} phase in dispersed conditions was resistant to step cracking in wet environments containing hydrogen sulphide. It was highly possible that a crack would propagate faster along the embrittled {sigma} phase. However, very small cracks were found at austenite-ferrite boundaries where o phase particles were also present.

  18. Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth of a plain carbon pipeline steel under conditions of cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation described was aimed at establishing the degree of compatibility between a plain carbon pipeline-type steel and hydrogen and also hydrogen-rich environments containing small additions of H2S, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, and natural gas at pressures near 1 atm. Test were carried out under conditions of static and cyclic loading; the subcritical crack growth was monitored. The rates of crack growth observed in the hydrogen and hydrogen-rich environments are compared with the crack rate observed in a natural gas environment to determine the compatibility of the present natural gas transmission system with gaseous hydrogen transport.

  19. Bulk Hydrides and Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, Eric F.

    Zirconium alloys are susceptible to engineering problems associated with the uptake of hydrogen throughout their design lifetime in nuclear reactors. Understanding of hydrogen embrittlement associated with the precipitation of brittle hydride phases and a sub-critical crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is required to provide the engineering justifications for safe reactor operation. The nature of bulk zirconium hydrides at low concentrations (< 100 wt. ppm) is subject to several contradictory descriptions in the literature associated with the stability and metastability of gamma-phase zirconium hydride. Due to the differing volume expansions (12-17%) and crystallography between gamma and delta hydride phases, it is suggested that the matrix yield strength may have an effect on the phase stability. The present work indicated that although yield strength can shift the phase stability, other factors such as microstructure and phase distribution can be as or more important. This suggests that small material differences are the reason for the literature discrepancies. DHC is characterised by the repeated precipitation, growth, fracture of brittle hydride phases and subsequent crack arrest in the ductile metal. DHC growth is associated primarily the ability of hydrogen to diffuse under a stress induced chemical potential towards a stress raiser. Knowledge of the factors controlling DHC are paramount in being able to appropriately describe DHC for engineering purposes. Most studies characterise DHC upon cooling to the test temperature. DHC upon heating has not been extensively studied and the mechanism by which it occurs is somewhat controversial in the literature. This work shows that previous thermo-mechanical processing of hydrided zirconium can have a significant effect on the dissolution behaviour of the bulk hydride upon heating. DHC tests with gamma-quenched, furnace cooled-delta and reoriented bulk hydrides upon heating and DHC upon

  20. Effect of Internal Hydrogen on Delayed Cracking of Metastable Low-Nickel Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papula, Suvi; Talonen, Juho; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu

    2014-10-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels, especially manganese-alloyed low-nickel grades, may be susceptible to delayed cracking after forming processes. Even a few wppm of hydrogen present in austenitic stainless steels as an inevitable impurity is sufficient to cause cracking if high enough fraction of strain-induced α'-martensite and high residual tensile stresses are present. The role of internal hydrogen content in delayed cracking of several metastable austenitic stainless steels having different alloying chemistries was investigated by means of Swift cup tests, both in as-supplied state and after annealing at 673 K (400 °C). Hydrogen content of the test materials in each state was analyzed with three different methods: inert gas fusion, thermal analysis, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Internal hydrogen content in as-supplied state was higher in the studied manganese-alloyed low-nickel grades, which contributed to susceptibility of unstable grades to delayed cracking. Annealing of the stainless steels reduced their hydrogen content by 1 to 3 wppm and markedly lowered the risk of delayed cracking. Limiting drawing ratio was improved from 1.4 to 1.7 in grade 204Cu, from 1.7 to 2.0 in grade 201 and from 1.8 to 2.12 in grade 301. The threshold levels of α'-martensite and residual stress for delayed cracking at different hydrogen contents were defined for the test materials.

  1. Delayed hydride cracking behavior of Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tubes for PHWR700

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, S.; Bind, A. K.; Khandelwal, H. K.; Singh, R. N.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    In order to attain improved in-reactor performance few prototypes pressure tubes of Zr-2.5Nb alloy were manufactured by employing forging to break the cast structure and to obtain more homogeneous microstructure. Both double forging and single forging were employed. The forged material was further processed by employing hot extrusion, cold pilgering and autoclaving. A detailed characterization in terms of mechanical properties and microstructure of the prototype tubes were carried for qualifying it for intended use as pressure tubes in PHWR700 reactors. In this work, Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) behavior of the forged Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material characterized in terms of DHC velocity and threshold stress intensity factor associated with DHC (KIH) was compared with that of conventionally manufactured material in the temperature range of 200-283 °C. Activation energy associated with the DHC in this alloy was found to be ˜60 kJ/mol for the forged materials.

  2. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  3. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  4. Hydrogen Induced Damage in Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Garrett R.

    The hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) resistance of several grades of plate steels was investigated using electrolytic hydrogen charging. HIC generated by electrolytic charging was also compared to the industrial standard test for HIC, the NACE standard TM0284. The electrolytic charging (EC) apparatus was designed to optimize the reproducibility of the HIC results and the robustness of the components during long charging times. A characterization study on the EC apparatus was undertaken. Alterations to applied current density and charging time were conducted on a highly susceptible plate steel, 100XF, to assess HIC damage as a function of charging conditions. Intermediate current densities of 10 to 15 mA/cm2 produced the greatest extent of cracking without significant corrosion related surface damage. The hydrogen charging time did not greatly affect the extent and depth of cracking for test times between 24 to 48 hours. Thus, for subsequent experiments, the applied current density was set to 15 mA/cm2 and the charging time was set to 24 hours. Plate steel grades X52, X60, X70, and 100XF were prestrained in tension to various levels and then electrolytically charged with hydrogen or tested with the NACE standard TM0284 test (solution A) saturated with H2S(g) to induce HIC. Prestrain was introduced to assess its impact on HIC. Hydrogen damage was quantified with the crack ratios defined in the NACE Standard TM0284. The results from the EC and NACE methods were very comparable to one, with respect to the magnitude of cracking and the trends between alloy and pre-strain conditions observed. Both methods showed that HIC substantially increased for the high strength 100XF steel compared to the lower strength alloys. This is consistent with NACE recommendations for HIC resistance steels, which suggests that alloy strength should be less than 116 ksi (800 MPa) or 248 HV (22 HRC). The HIC results were largely independent of the pre-strain levels imposed within the

  5. Temperature dependences of the delayed hydride cracking rate of fuel claddings made of zirconium alloys of various compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelov, V. A.; Gusev, A. Yu.; Kotov, P. V.; Novikov, V. V.; Saburov, N. S.

    2014-04-01

    The temperature dependences of the delayed hydride cracking (DHC) rate of Zr-1Nb and Zr-0.8Nb-0.8Sn-0.3Fe alloy claddings are studied in the range 127-300°C in comparison with the data obtained for Zr-2.5Nb and Zircaloy-4 alloys earlier. The samples are in the state of cold deformation and stress relief at 400°C for 24 h and in the state of preliminary hydrogen saturation to a hydrogen concentration of 0.02 wt %. As the strength of a zirconium alloy decreases and its ductility increases, the DHC rate and its high-temperature limit for a linear Arrhenius equation decreases, and the fractographic patterns of the fracture surfaces are different.

  6. Hydrogen Induced Stress Cracking of Materials Under Cathodic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCoursiere, Marissa P.

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 4340, InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 was studied using slow strain rate tests of both smooth and notched cylindrical specimens. Two heat treatments of the AISI 4340 material were used as a standard for two levels of yield strength: 1479 MPa, and 1140 MPa. A subset of the 1140 MPa AISI 4340 material also underwent plasma nitriding. The InconelRTM 718 material was hardened following AMS 5663M to obtain a yield strength of 1091 MPa. The Alloy 686 material was obtained in the Grade 3 condition with a minimum yield strength of 1034 MPa. The Alloy 59 material was obtained with a cold worked condition similar to the Alloy 686 and with a minimum yield strength of 1034 MPa. Ninety-nine specimens were tested, including smooth cylindrical tensile test specimens and smooth and notched cylindrical slow strain rate tensile tests specimens. Testing included specimens that had been precharged with hydrogen in 3.5% NaCl at 50°C for 2 weeks (AISI 4340), 4 weeks (InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686, Alloy 59) and 16 weeks (InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686, Alloy 59) using a potentiostat to deliver a cathodic potential of -1100 mV vs. SCE. The strain rate over the gauge section for the smooth specimens and in the notch root for the notched specimens was 1 x 10-6 /s. It was found that the AISI 4340 was highly embrittled in simulated ocean water when compared to the nickel based superalloys. The higher strength AISI 4340 showed much more embrittlement, as expected. Testing of the AISI 4340 at both 20°C and 4°C showed that the temperature had no effect on the hydrogen embrittlement response. The InconelRTM 718 was highly embrittled when precharged, although it only showed low levels of embrittlement when unprecharged. Both the Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 showed minimal embrittlement in all conditions. Therefore, for the materials examined, the use of Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 for components in salt water environments when under a cathodic potential of -1100 mV vs. SCE is recommended.

  7. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  8. A Hydrogen-Induced Decohesion Model for Treating Cold Dwell Fatigue in Titanium-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Moody, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold dwell fatigue in near-alpha Ti alloys is a time-dependent fracture process at ambient temperature that involves fatigue in the presence of creep to produce cracking on low-energy fracture ( e.g., cleavage) facets in hard alpha grains. In this article, cold dwell fatigue is treated as a hydrogen-induced decohesion process by using a nonlinear cohesive stress-strain relation to describe the decrease in the cohesive strength with increasing local hydrogen contents. It is postulated that during cold dwell fatigue, time-dependent deformation occurs by < a> slip that results in dislocation pileups in soft alpha grains. The stress and dilatational fields of the dislocation pileups assist the transport of internal hydrogen atoms from soft grains to neighboring hard grains. The accumulation of internal hydrogen atoms at the trap sites leads to decohesion along crystallographic planes, which can be slip or hydride habit planes. The decohesion model is applied to treat cold dwell fatigue in Ti-6Al-4V with a basal-transverse texture by modeling the effects of hydrogen-induced decohesion on the stress-fatigue life ( S- N f) response, the time-dependent crack growth response (d a/d t), and the fracture toughness ( K c) as functions of grain orientation. A probabilistic time-dependent fatigue crack growth analysis is then performed to assess the influence of microtexture on the dwell fatigue life of a Ti-6Al-4V ring disk subjected to a long-duration hold at the peak stress of the loading cycle. The results of the probabilistic life computations indicate that dwell fatigue resistance in Ti-6Al-4V may be improved and the risk of disk fracture may be reduced significantly by controlling the microtexture or reducing the size and volume fraction of hard alpha grains in the microstructure.

  9. Methodology to predict delayed failure due to slow crack growth in ceramic tubular components using data from simple specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadaan, O. M.; Tressler, R. E.

    1993-04-01

    The methodology to predict the lifetime of sintered alpha-silicon carbide (S4SC) tubes subjected to slow crack growth (SCG) conditions involved the experimental determination of the SCG parameters of that material and the scaling analysis to project the stress rupture data from small specimens to large components. Dynamic fatigue testing, taking into account the effect of threshold stress intensity factor, of O-ring and compressed C-ring specimens was used to obtain the SCG parameters. These SCG parameters were in excellent agreement with those published in the literature and extracted from stress rupture tests of tensile and bend specimens. Two methods were used to predict the lifetimes of internally heated and pressurized SASC tubes. The first is a fracture mechanics approach that is well known in the literature. The second method used a scaling analysis in which the stress rupture distribution (lifetime) of any specimen configuration can be predicted from stress rupture data of another.

  10. Hydrogen-Induced Plastic Deformation in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukáč, F.; Čížek, J.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Traeger, F.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    In the present work hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals covered with Pd over-layer were electrochemically loaded with hydrogen and the influence of hydrogen on ZnO micro structure was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) was employed for determination of depth profile of hydrogen concentration in the sample. NRA measurements confirmed that a substantial amount of hydrogen was introduced into ZnO by electrochemical charging. The bulk hydrogen concentration in ZnO determined by NRA agrees well with the concentration estimated from the transported charge using the Faraday's law. Moreover, a subsurface region with enhanced hydrogen concentration was found in the loaded crystals. Slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) investigations of hydrogen-loaded crystal revealed enhanced concentration of defects in the subsurface region. This testifies hydrogen-induced plastic deformation of the loaded crystal. Absorbed hydrogen causes a significant lattice expansion. At low hydrogen concentrations this expansion is accommodated by elastic straining, but at higher concentrations hydrogen-induced stress exceeds the yield stress in ZnO and plastic deformation of the loaded crystal takes place. Enhanced hydrogen concentration detected in the subsurface region by NRA is, therefore, due to excess hydrogen trapped at open volume defects introduced by plastic deformation. Moreover, it was found that hydrogen-induced plastic deformation in the subsurface layer leads to typical surface modification: formation of hexagonal shape pyramids on the surface due to hydrogen-induced slip in the [0001] direction.

  11. Long-term predictions relating to environment sensitive cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N.

    1993-12-31

    Consideration is given to the environmental requirements of environment sensitive cracking (ESC) of ferritic steels, involving hydrogen-induced or dissolution-related mechanisms of cracking. Pitting, with associated local pH changes, may result in hydrogen-induced cracking of simple ferritic steels, as had been observed with high pressure gas pipelines in contact with ground waters, and may constitute a greater potential failure mechanism for waste containers than dissolution-related cracking with its requirement of relatively concentrate solutions. However, the stochastic nature of pit initiation, together with the distributions of crack nucleation and growth rates, suggest that a probabilistic, as opposed to a purely deterministic, approach will need to be applied to life prediction estimates for waste containers.

  12. Modelling of hydride cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Glinka, G.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium alloys may be susceptible to hydride formation under certain service conditions, due to hydrogen diffusion and precipitation in the presence of stress concentrations and temperature gradients. The inhomogeneous brittle hydride platelets that form are modeled as plane defects of zero thickness, with fracture toughness less than that of the matrix. A fracture criterion based on sufficient energy and stress is proposed for either delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under constant loading conditions, or hydride cracking at rising loads, such as in a fracture toughness test. The fracture criterion is validated against available experimental data concerning initiation of hydride fracture in smooth specimens, and DHC in cracked specimens under various loading and temperature conditions.

  13. Recent Observation of Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Jr, C J; Liu, Xinyu; Kameda, Jun; Morgan, Michael J

    2008-09-14

    The present progress report shows that the ultra-high-strength 4340-type steel, even if ideally pure, cannot safely be used for service in a hydrogen environment. Some of the strength must be given up in favor of more toughness, which can be achieved by reducing the carbon content and increasing the nickel content. The 5%NiCrMoV steel with about 0.1% carbon shows promise in this regard, especially in an aqueous environment and in hydrogen at around atmospheric pressure. However, we have not yet achieved a purity level high enough to establish the baseline behavior of an ideally pure version of this steel in high-pressure hydrogen.

  14. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  15. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  16. Para-hydrogen induced polarization in heterogeneous hydrogenationreactions

    SciTech Connect

    Koptyug, Igor V.; Kovtunov, Kirill; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar, M.Sabieh; Hilty, Christian; Han, Song-I; Pines, Alexander; Sagdeev, Renad Z.

    2007-01-31

    We demonstrate the creation and observation ofpara-hydrogen-induced polarization in heterogeneous hydrogenationreactions. Wilkinson's catalyst, RhCl(PPh3)3, supported on eithermodified silica gel or a polymer, is shown to hydrogenate styrene intoethylbenzene and to produce enhanced spin polarizations, observed throughNMR, when the reaction was performed with H2 gas enriched in the paraspinisomer. Furthermore, gaseous phase para-hydrogenation of propylene topropane with two catalysts, the Wilkinson's catalyst supported onmodified silica gel and Rh(cod)(sulfos) (cod = cycloocta-1,5-diene;sulfos) - O3S(C6H4)CH2C(CH2PPh2)3) supported on silica gel, demonstratesheterogeneous catalytic conversion resulting in large spin polarizations.These experiments serve as a direct verification of the mechanism ofheterogeneous hydrogenation reactions involving immobilized metalcomplexes and can be potentially developed into a practical tool forproducing catalyst-free fluids with highly polarized nuclear spins for abroad range of hyperpolarized NMR and MRI applications.

  17. Modelling and measurement of crack closure and crack growth following overloads and underloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, R. J.; Hudak, S. J.; Davidson, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    Ignoring crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading. Crack closure is believed to contribute to the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is dabatable. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overload and overload/underload cycles were systematically measured as a function of load ratio and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth, i.e. the effective stress intensity factor range. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of a Dugdale-type (1960) crack closure model, and improvements in the model are suggested.

  18. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  19. Crack growth in a welded microalloyed steel under sulfide stress cracking conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Albarran, J.L.; Martinez, L.; Lopez, H.F.

    1998-12-01

    In this work, the hydrogen sulfide stress-corrosion cracking (SSC) susceptibility of a welded API X-80 pipeline was investigated. For this purpose, steel welding was carried out normal to the rolling direction using a 60{degree} single V-joint design. After welding, compact modified-wedge opening loading (M-WOL) fracture mechanics specimens were machined and loaded to an applied stress intensity factor, K{sub 1}, of 27 to 53 MPa {radical}m. This was followed by specimen exposure to H{sub 2}S saturated synthetic seawater. Each of the M-WOL specimens contained the typical microstructures developed during welding, such as the weld metal (WM), base metal (BM), and heat affected zone (HAZ). No attempt was made to establish a unique K{sub ISCC} for crack arrest because its significance was not clear. Qualitatively, the experimental outcome indicated that in mode I loading under a K{sub 1} of 40.3 MPa {radical}m only the base metal region underwent SSC. Apparently, active anodic dissolution of the crack tip started the growth process, but it was followed by a transition to hydrogen induced cracking. At an applied K{sub 1} of 55 MPa {radical}m and under similar exposure times, crack growth in the base metal was discontinuous and tended to follow the grain boundaries. Moreover, the HAZ exhibited the least SSC susceptibility as inferred from the relatively short crack propagation lengths (0.829 mm). In this case, it was found that the crack lengths of up to 4.2 mm developed. In this case, the presence of a relatively coarse dendritic structure coupled with interdendritic segregation provided a weak path for crack propagation.

  20. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation; Infertility - delayed ejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  1. Crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-W.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research on fatigue crack growth is summarized. Topics discussed include the use of the differential stress intensity factor to characterize crack tip deformation, the use of the unzipping model to study the growth of microcracks and the fatigue crack growth in a ferritic-martensitic steel, and the development of a model of fatige crack growth threshold. It is shown that in the case of small yielding, the differential stress intensity factor provides an adequate description of cyclic plastic deformation at the crack tip and correlates well with the crack growth rate. The unzipping model based on crack tip shear decohesion process is found to be in good agreement with the measured crack growth and striation spacing measurements. The proposed model of crack growth threshold gives correct predictions of the crack growth behavior in the near-threshold region.

  2. Microstructural changes induced near crack tip during corrosion fatigue tests in austenitic-ferritic steel.

    PubMed

    Gołebiowski, B; Swiatnicki, W A; Gaspérini, M

    2010-03-01

    Microstructural changes occurring during fatigue tests of austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel (DSS) in air and in hydrogen-generating environment have been investigated. Hydrogen charging of steel samples during fatigue crack growth (FCG) tests was performed by cathodic polarization of specimens in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solution. Microstructural investigations of specimens after FCG tests were carried out using transmission electron microscopy to reveal the density and arrangement of dislocations formed near crack tip. To determine the way of crack propagation in the microstructure, electron backscatter diffraction investigations were performed on fatigue-tested samples in both kinds of environment. To reveal hydrogen-induced phase transformations the atomic force microscopy was used. The above investigations allowed us to define the character of fatigue crack propagation and microstructural changes near the crack tip. It was found that crack propagation after fatigue tests in air is accompanied with plastic deformation; a high density of dislocations is observed at large distance from the crack. After fatigue tests performed during hydrogen charging the deformed zone containing high density of dislocations is narrow compared to that after fatigue tests in air. It means that hydrogenation leads to brittle character of fatigue crack propagation. In air, fatigue cracks propagate mostly transgranularly, whereas in hydrogen-generating environment the cracks have mixed transgranular/interfacial character. PMID:20500395

  3. Refinery experiences with cracking in wet H/sub 2/S environments

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The inspection of pressure vessels in wet hydrogen sulfide environments with the sensitive wet fluorescent magnetic particle technique was conducted because this technique had detected cracking in other services not detected by more commonly used methods. The results of the inspections showed that cracks of significant size were present in --20% of the 189 vessels inspected. The cracking was primarily in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of weldments or the shell plate adjacent to this area. Metallographic examination identified the cracking as sulfide stress cracking (SSC), stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking (SOHIC), and carbonate cracking. SOHIC and carbonate cracking in these refining process environments have not been previously reported. SSC leading to cracks of significant depth occurred at very small, hard areas in both the weld metal and adjacent HAZ that would not have been detected by the usual hardness measuring techniques used in vessel fabrication. Thermal stress relief appears to be an effective method of reducing the severity of cracking.

  4. Hydrogen induced fracture characteristics of single crystal nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Wilcox, Roy C.

    1990-01-01

    A stereoscopic method for use with x ray energy dispersive spectroscopy of rough surfaces was adapted and applied to the fracture surfaces single crystals of PWA 1480E to permit rapid orientation determinations of small cleavage planes. The method uses a mathematical treatment of stereo pair photomicrographs to measure the angle between the electron beam and the surface normal. One reference crystal orientation corresponding to the electron beam direction (crystal growth direction) is required to perform this trace analysis. The microstructure of PWA 1480E was characterized before fracture analysis was performed. The fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was studied. The hydrogen-induced fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was also studied. In order to understand the temperature dependence of hydrogen-induced embrittlement, notched single crystals with three different crystal growth orientations near zone axes (100), (110), and (111) were tensile tested at 871 C (1600 F) in both helium and hydrogen atmospheres at 34 MPa. Results and conclusions are given.

  5. Mechanics of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Elber, Wolf (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on plasticity induced crack closure, crack closure in fatigue crack growth, the dependence of crack closure on fatigue loading variables, and a procedure for standardizing crack closure levels. Also considered are a statistical approach to crack closure determination, the crack closure behavior of surface cracks under pure bending, closure measurements on short fatigue cracks, and crack closure under plane strain conditions. Other topics include fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios, the use of acoustic waves for the characterization of closed fatigue cracks, and the influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure.

  6. Crack, crack house sex, and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A

    1995-06-01

    Limited attention has been focused on HIV risk behaviors of crack smokers and their sex partners, yet there is evidence that the crack house and the crack-using life-style may be playing significant roles in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The purposes of this research were to study the attributes and patterns of "sex for crack" exchanges, particularly those that occurred in crack houses, and to assess their potential impact on the spread of HIV. Structured interviews were conducted with 17 men and 35 women in Miami, Florida, who were regular users of crack and who had exchanged sex for crack (or for money to buy crack) during the past 30 days. In addition, participant observation was conducted in 8 Miami crack houses. Interview and observational data suggest that individuals who exchange sex for crack do so with considerable frequency, and through a variety of sexual activities. Systematic data indicated that almost a third of the men and 89% of the women had had 100 or more sex partners during the 30-day period prior to study recruitment. Not only were sexual activities anonymous, extremely frequent, varied, uninhibited (often undertaken in public areas of crack houses), and with multiple partners but, in addition, condoms were not used during the majority of contacts. Of the 37 subjects who were tested for HIV and received their test results 31% of the men and 21% of the women were HIV seropositive. PMID:7611845

  7. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  8. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  9. Hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Jing; Li, Xianglong; Wang, Bin; Hao, Long; Liang, Minghui; Jin, Meihua; Zhi, Linjie

    2013-09-21

    In this work, the hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene have been systematically studied by regulating the growth parameters mainly related to hydrogen. Experimental results demonstrate that under a high hydrogen flow rate, the competitive etching effect during the growth process is more prominent and even shows macroscopic selectivity. Based on these understandings, the hexagonal graphene domains with diverse edge modalities are controllably synthesized on a large scale by elaborately managing the competitive etching effect of hydrogen that existed during the formation of graphene. This study not only contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of CVD growth, especially the effects of hydrogen used in the system, but also provides a facile method to synthesize high-quality graphene structures with trimmed edge morphologies. PMID:23715011

  10. Hydrogenation-induced atomic stripes on the 2 H -MoS2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang Wook; Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J. D.; Hwang, Y. H.; Baik, J.; Shin, H. J.; Lee, Wang G.; Park, Young S.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-12-01

    We report that the hydrogenation of a single crystal 2 H -MoS2 induces a novel-intermediate phase between 2H and 1T phases on its surface, i.e., the large-area, uniform, robust, and surface array of atomic stripes through the intralayer atomic-plane gliding. The total energy calculations confirm that the hydrogenation-induced atomic stripes are energetically most stable on the MoS2 surface between the semiconducting 2H and metallic 1T phase. Furthermore, the electronic states associated with the hydrogen ions, which is bonded to sulfur anions on both sides of the MoS2 surface layer, appear in the vicinity of the Fermi level (EF) and reduces the band gap. This is promising in developing the monolayer-based field-effect transistor or vanishing the Schottky barrier for practical applications.

  11. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies for combined-cycle propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a technical assessment of the realization of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction technologies in a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process setting. The technical findings related to the status of air liquefaction technologies are reviewed. Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers, heat exchanger atmospheric constituent fouling alleviation measures, para/ortho-hydrogen shift-conversion catalysts, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps, hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as a heat sink, liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices, and technically related engine concepts are discussed. Much of the LACE work is related to aerospaceplane propulsion concepts that were developed in the 1960's. Emphasis is placed on the Liquid Air Cycle Engine (LACE).

  12. Gettering of copper to hydrogen-induced cavities in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A.; Horino, Y.; Nakano, Y.; Williams, J.S.

    2005-09-15

    The gettering properties of hydrogen-induced cavities have been examined for Cu impurity atoms inherent in multicrystalline Si. Initial areal densities of Cu atoms in the multicrystalline samples were in the range of (3-5)x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, below the level that would provide a complete monolayer coverage of the internal surfaces of the cavities. Samples were first implanted with hydrogen and then annealed at 750 or 850 deg. C for 1 h to form cavities and induce subsequent gettering. Neutron activation analysis with chemical etching of the samples indicated that more than 90% of Cu atoms could be removed from the entire wafer by cavity gettering for both of the annealing temperatures.

  13. Hydrogen-induced program threshold voltage degradation analysis in SONOS wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qing; Zhao, Crystal; Sheng, Nan

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies the hydrogen-induced program state threshold voltage degradation in SONOS wafers, which ultimately impacts wafer sort test yield. During wafer sort step, all individual integrated circuits noted as die are tested for functional defects by applying special test patterns to them. The proportion between the passing die (good die) and the non-passing die (bad die) is sort yield. The different N2/H2 ratio in IMD1 alloy process yields differently at flash checkerboard test. And the SIMS curves were also obtained to depict the distribution profile of H+ in SONOS ONO stack structure. It is found that, the H+ accumulated in the interface between the Tunnel oxide and Si layer, contributes the charge loss in Oxynitride layer, which leads to the program threshold voltage degradation and even fall below lower specification limit, and then impacts the sort yield of SONOS wafers.

  14. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  15. Fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, C. Christopher; Carman, C. Davis; Hillberry, Ben M.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack delay behavior at high stress ratio caused by single peak overloads was investigated in two thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy. Closure measurements indicated no closure occurred before or throughout the overload plastic zones following the overload. This was further substantiated by comparing the specimen compliance following the overload with the compliance of a low R ratio test when the crack was fully open. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that crack tunneling and possibly reinitiation of the crack occurred, most likely a result of crack-tip blunting. The number of delay cycles was greater for the thinner mixed mode stress state specimen than for the thicker plane strain stress state specimen, which is similar to low R ratio test results and may be due to a larger plastic zone for the mixed mode cased.

  16. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  17. Effect of Microstructure on Low Temperature Cracking Behavior of EN82H Welds

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Mills; C. M. Brown; M. G. Burke

    2001-04-30

    As-fabricated EN82H welds are susceptible to low temperature embrittlements in 54 degree C hydrogenated water. Values of J[sub]IC in water are typically 90% to 98% lower than those in air due to a fracture mechanism transition from microvoid coalescence to hydrogen-included intergranular fracture. Environmental J[sub]IC testing demonstrated that a high temperature (1093 degree C) anneal and furnace-cool alleviates the material's susceptibility to hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking. To identify metallurgical and compositional features that are responsible for the material's environment-sensitive behavior, detailed characterization of the microstructure and grain boundary chemistry for the as-fabricated and as-annealed materials was performed. Results from light optical microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, Auger electron spectroscopy and mechanical property characterization are used to provide insight into the observed low temperature embrittlement phenomenon. The key microstructural feature responsible for low temperature cracking in as-fabricated welds appears to be fine niobium and titanium-rich carbonitrides that cover most grain boundaries. These precipitates are effective hydrogen traps that promote hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking. Dissolution the fine carbonitrides during the 1093 degree C anneal reduces grain boundary trapping sites, which accounts for the improved fracture resistance displayed by the annealed weld. The role of strength level in promoting low temperature embrittlement is evaluated by cold-rolling the annealed weld to increase its yield strength from 280 to 640 MPa. The annealed and cold-rolled weld exhibits high toughness in 54 degree C water and shows no evidence of hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking, thereby demonstrating that strength is not a primary cause of low temperature embrittlement.

  18. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  19. Electrochemical investigation on the hydrogen permeation behavior of 7075-T6 Al alloy and its influence on stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chuan-bo; Yan, Bing-hao; Zhang, Ke; Yi, Guo

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen permeation behavior and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of precharged 7075-T6 Al alloy were investigated in this paper. Devanthan-Stachurski (D-S) cell tests were used to measure the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and hydrogen permeation current density of specimens immersed in 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Electrochemical experiment results show that the SCC susceptibility is low during anodic polarization. Both corrosion pits and hydrogen-induced cracking are evident in scanning electron microscope images after the specimens have been charging for 24 h.

  20. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  1. Crack propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budarapu, P. R.; Javvaji, B.; Sutrakar, V. K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Zi, G.; Rabczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    The crack initiation and growth mechanisms in an 2D graphene lattice structure are studied based on molecular dynamics simulations. Crack growth in an initial edge crack model in the arm-chair and the zig-zag lattice configurations of graphene are considered. Influence of the time steps on the post yielding behaviour of graphene is studied. Based on the results, a time step of 0.1 fs is recommended for consistent and accurate simulation of crack propagation. Effect of temperature on the crack propagation in graphene is also studied, considering adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Total energy and stress fields are analyzed. A systematic study of the bond stretching and bond reorientation phenomena is performed, which shows that the crack propagates after significant bond elongation and rotation in graphene. Variation of the crack speed with the change in crack length is estimated.

  2. Delayed discharge.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Essential facts Delays in discharging older peo ple from hospital cost the NHS £820 million a year, according to a report from the National Audit Office (NAO). Last year in acute hospitals, 1.15 million bed days were lost to delayed transfers of care, an increase of 31% since 2013. The NAO says rising demand for NHS services is compounded by reduced local authority spending on adult social care - down by 10% since 2009-10. PMID:27380673

  3. Short crack growth behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A.K.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have re-evaluated short crack growth behavior using concepts developed recently, and they show that these concepts provide a unified framework that can explain both short and long crack growth behavior without resorting to the crack closure effect. They consider that the behavior of long cracks, including the effects of load ratio, R, is fundamental. they had shown previously that, since fatigue is at least a two-parameter problem in that at least two load parameters are required for an unambiguous description, there are two critical driving forces required simultaneously for fatigue cracks to grow. In extending this analysis to the growth of short cracks, they reject the current notion of the lack of similitude for short cracks and express the similitude as a fundamental postulate that, for a given crack growth mechanism, equal crack tip driving forces result in equal crack growth rates. Short crack growth behavior confirms the concept that two parameters are required to define fatigue; consequently, for fatigue cracks to grow, two thresholds need to be satisfied simultaneously. The authors present examples from the literature to illustrate the concepts discussed.

  4. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Agraz, Jose Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-15

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 ({sup 13}C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (B{sub o}), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of {sup 13}C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  5. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-01

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 (13C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (Bo), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of 13C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  6. Temperature dependencies of hydrogen-induced blistering of thin film multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Gleeson, M. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-05-07

    We report on the influence of sample temperature on the development of hydrogen-induced blisters in Mo/Si thin-film multilayers. In general, the areal number density of blisters decreases with increasing exposure temperature, whereas individual blister size increases with exposure temperatures up to ∼200 °C but decreases thereafter. Comparison as a function of sample temperature is made between exposures to a flux containing both hydrogen ions and neutrals and one containing only neutrals. In the case of the neutral-only flux, blistering is observed for exposure temperatures ≥90 °C. The inclusion of ions promotes blister formation at <90 °C, while retarding their growth at higher temperatures. In general, ion-induced effects become less evident with increasing exposure temperature. At 200 °C, the main effect discernable is reduced blister size as compared with the equivalent neutral-only exposure. The temperature during exposure is a much stronger determinant of the blistering outcome than either pre- or post-annealing of the sample. The trends observed for neutral-only exposures are attributed to competing effects of defect density thermal equilibration and H-atom induced modification of the Si layers. Energetic ions modify the blistering via (temperature dependent) enhancement of H-mobility and re-crystallization of amorphous Si.

  7. Multiple Dirac Points and Hydrogenation-Induced Magnetism of Germanene Layer on Al (111) Surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Liu, S B; Xu, B; Ouyang, C Y; Song, H Y; Guan, S; Yang, Shengyuan A

    2015-12-17

    A continuous germanene layer grown on the Al (111) surface has recently been achieved in experiment. In this work, we investigate its structural, electronic, and hydrogenation-induced properties through first-principles calculations. We find that despite having a different lattice structure from its free-standing form, germanene on Al (111) still possesses Dirac points at high-symmetry K and K' points. More importantly, there exist another three pairs of Dirac points on the K(K')-M high-symmetry lines, which have highly anisotropic dispersions due to the reduced symmetry. These massless Dirac Fermions become massive when spin-orbit coupling is included. Hydrogenation of the germanene layer strongly affects its structural and electronic properties. Particularly, when not fully hydrogenated, ferromagnetism can be induced due to unpaired local orbitals from the unsaturated Ge atoms. Remarkably, we discover that the one-side semihydrogenated germanene turns out to be a two-dimensional half-semimetal, representing a novel state of matter that is simultaneously a half-metal and a semimetal. PMID:26606861

  8. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  9. Developmental delay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition support is essential for the care of the child with developmental delay. After a thorough evaluation, an individualized intervention plan that accounts for the child’s nutrition status, feeding ability, and medical condition may be determined. Nutrition assessments may be performed at leas...

  10. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  11. Simulations of a Liquid Hydrogen Inducer at Low-Flow Off-Design Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.; Ungewitter, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to accurately model details of inlet back flow for inducers operating a t low-flow, off-design conditions is evaluated. A sub-scale version of a three-bladed liquid hydrogen inducer tested in water with detailed velocity and pressure measurements is used as a numerical test bed. Under low-flow, off-design conditions the length of the separation zone as well as the swirl velocity magnitude was under predicted with a standard k-E model. When the turbulent viscosity coefficient was reduced good comparison was obtained a t all the flow conditions examined with both the magnitude and shape of the profile matching well with the experimental data taken half a diameter upstream of the leading edge. The velocity profiles and incidence angles a t the leading edge itself were less sensitive to the back flow length predictions indicating that single-phase performance predictions may be well predicted even if the details of flow separation modeled are incorrect. However, for cavitating flow situations the prediction of the correct swirl in the back flow and the pressure depression in the core becomes critical since it leads to vapor formation. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD(Registered Trademark) code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework and a n advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids. The framework has been validated rigorously for predictions of temperature and pressure depression in cryogenic fluid cavities and has also been shown to predict the cavitation breakdown point for inducers a t design conditions.

  12. CRACK MODELLING FOR RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Napierala, L.

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  13. Thermal cracking of butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Duisters, H.A.M. )

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the thermal cracking of butadiene in a pilot plant, under conditions representative of industrial operation. The product distribution of pure-butadiene cracking is shown. Results from cocracking experiments in naphtha and C[sub 4]-raffinate are also presented. It is shown that butadiene cracking can be an interesting outlet for the increasing butadiene overcapacity in steam crackers. Some aspects of coke formation during butadiene pyrolysis are addressed as well.

  14. Crack Modelling for Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Napierała, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  15. Traction–separation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rémi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a traction–separation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the traction–separation relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted traction–separation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.

  16. Traction–separation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rémi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a traction–separation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the traction–separationmore » relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted traction–separation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.« less

  17. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  18. Crack depth measurement in concrete using diffuse ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Chi Won; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence L.; Kurtis, Kimberly

    2012-05-01

    Cracking in concrete structures is problematic because these cracks can significantly influence the stability of a concrete structure and compromise its durability. The first step to evaluate the serviceability of an in-field concrete structure is to have accurate information on existing crack depth. It is thus of paramount importance to be able to accurately determine the depth of cracks in these concrete structures. This research employs a diffusive ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of surface cracks in concrete. Ultrasonic measurements on a 25.4 × 33 × 60.96 cm3 concrete block containing an artificial crack with varying depths from 2.54 to 10.16 cm are conducted. Contact transducers with one transmitting and the other receiving the ultrasonic signals are mounted on the concrete surface on opposite sides of the crack. A pulse signal with the duration of 2μs is transmitted. In this frequency regime, wavelengths are sufficiently short (comparable with the aggregate size) so that a diffuse ultrasonic signal is detected. The arrival of the diffuse ultrasonic energy at the receiver is delayed by the existence of the crack. This lag-time and the diffusivity of the concrete sample are measured, and a finite element model is employed to solve the inverse problem to determine the crack depth from these measured diffuse ultrasonic parameters.

  19. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  20. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  1. Small-crack test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  2. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, W.J.; Gokhale, A.M.; Antolovich, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  3. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, W. J.; Gokhale, Arun M.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measures of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. Our objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such as height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scaledependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  4. Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

  5. Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

  6. The initial stages of the hydrogen-induced reconstruction of Pd(1 1 0) studied with STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Marko; Becker, Conrad; Wandelt, Klaus

    2006-09-01

    The hydrogen-induced reconstruction of the Pd(1 1 0) surface was investigated in situ with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Focusing on the initial stages of the restructuring, which ultimately leads to a stable (1 × 2) reconstructed surface, we find an exponential increase of the reconstructed surface area with hydrogen exposure, up to 8 Langmuir, which can be explained by an autocatalytic behavior. Moreover, the steps, especially those running along the [0 0 1] direction, play a distinctive role in the buildup of the (1 × 2) reconstruction.

  7. Effect of periodic surface cracks on the interfacial fracture of thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, X. L.; Xu, R.; Zhang, W. X.; Wang, T. J.

    2012-10-01

    Periodic surface cracks and interfacial debonding in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system may be induced during cooling process. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of periodic surface cracks on the interfacial fracture of TBC system. The finite element method (FEM) incorporating cohesive zone model is used in analysis. It is found that surface crack spacing has significant effect on the initiation and propagation of short interface crack. Three different regions are identified for describing the effect of surface crack spacing. In Region I the interface crack driving force is dramatically reduced due to high surface crack density. In this case, the initiation of interfacial delamination can be delayed. Region II applies as the surface crack spacing is moderate. Analysis of this transition zone brings to the definition of normalized critical surface crack spacing. Region III arises for sufficient large surface crack spacing. In this case, the interface crack driving force reaches a steady state, where the effects of adjacent surface cracks are relatively insignificant and can be ignored. It can be concluded that an appropriately high surface crack density can enhance the durability of TBC system.

  8. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-04-29

    The octane number of a cracked naphtha can be significantly improved in a catalytic cracking unit, without significant decrease in naphtha yield, by maintaining certain critical concentrations of metals on the catalyst, suitably by blending or adding a heavy metals-containing component to the gas oil feed. Suitably, in a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking reactor (Zone) at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regenerator (Regeneration zone) by burning coke off the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the reactor and regenerator, sufficient of a metals-containing heavy feedstock is admixed, intermittantly or continuously, with the gas oil feed to deposit metals on said catalyst and raise the metals-content of said catalyst to a level of from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million, preferably from about 2500 to about 4000 parts per million expressed as equivalent nickel, base the weight of the catalyst, and said metals level is maintained on the catalyst throughout the operation by withdrawing high metals-containing catalyst and adding low metals-containing catalyst to the regenerator.

  9. Delaying obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Rob

    2015-04-01

    This paper argues that those who emphasise that designers and engineers need to plan for obsolescence are too conservative. Rather, in addition to planning for obsolescence, designers and engineers should also think carefully about what they could do in order delay obsolescence. They should so this by thinking about the design itself, thinking of ways in which products could be useful and appealing for longer before becoming obsolete, as well thinking about the wider context in terms of the marketing of products, and also the social and legal. The paper also considers objections that these suggestions are unrealistically idealistic, failing to recognise the economic realities. I respond to these objections appealing to research in advertising, psychology, cognitive linguistics, philosophy, history, and economics, as well as drawing on the Statement of Ethical Principles developed by the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Engineering Council. PMID:24792878

  10. Microstructure and hydrogen induced failure mechanisms in iron-nickel weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenske, Jamey Alan

    A recent series of inexplicable catastrophic failures of specific subsea dissimilar metal Fe-Ni butter welds has illuminated a fundamental lack of understanding of both the microstructure created along the fusion line as well as its impact on the hydrogen susceptibility of these interfaces. In order to remedy this, the present work compares and contrasts the microstructure and hydrogen-induced fracture morphology of AISI 8630-IN 625 and F22-IN 625 dissimilar metal weld interfaces as a function of post-weld heat treatment duration. A variety of techniques were used to study details of both the microstructure and fracture morphology including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. For both systems, the microstructure along the weld interface consisted of a coarse grain heat-affected zone in the Fe-base metal followed by discontinuous martensitic partially-mixed zones and a continuous partially-mixed zone on the Ni-side of the fusion line. Within the partially mixed zone on the Ni-side there exists a 200 nm-wide transition zone within a 20 mum-wide planar solidification region followed by a cellular dendritic region with Nb-Mo rich carbides decorating the dendrite boundaries. The size, area fraction and composition of the discontinuous PMZ were determined to be controlled by uneven mixing in the liquid weld pool influenced by convection currents produced from the welding procedure. The virgin martensitic microstructure produced in these regions is formed as consequence of a both the local composition and the post-weld heat treatment. The local higher Ni content results in these regions being retransformed into austenite during the post-weld heat treatment and then virgin martensite while cooling to room temperature. Although there were differences in the volume of the discontinuous partially mixed-zones, the major

  11. The role of hydrogen in stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in hot MgCl{sub 2} solution

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, L.; Mao, X.; Chu, W.

    1995-07-01

    The role of hydrogen in stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel was investigated in boiling chloride solution. The tests in the mixed melted salt verified that hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) could occur at 160 C if sufficient hydrogen could be supplied continuously. It was found that the threshold SCC intensity factors of both 321 and 310 steels were lower than those of HIC during dynamic charging at high fugacity at 40 C and 160 C. In addition, anodic polarization decreased hydrogen concentration and promoted SCC in hot LiCl solution, while cathodic polarization increased hydrogen concentration and restrained SCC. Hydrogen could be introduced into the specimen and be concentrated at the crack tip during SCC. It could promote anodic dissolution and SCC remarkably, although it was not enough to produce cracking.

  12. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  13. Atomistic simulation of the hydrogen-induced fracture process in an iron-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Baskes, M.I.; Angelo, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Austenitic superalloys exhibit dramatic reductions in ductility and crack growth resistance when high fugacity hydrogen and hydrogen-producing environments trigger a change in fracture mode from microvoid coalescence to slip band and intergranular fracture. Of particular importance is the change to intergranular fracture. We have therefore combined the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) with Monte Carlo simulations and molecular dynamics calculations to help define the effects of hydrogen on segregation and fracture at the atomic level. Nickel was used to simulate the face-centered-cubic austenite lattice while symmetric and asymmetric {sigma}9 tilt boundaries were used to simulate grain boundaries. These simulations show that grain boundaries are strong trap sites for hydrogen. They further show that hydrogen dramatically reduces the bond strength between atoms at grain boundary sites while inhibiting dislocation generation.

  14. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  15. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  16. Thermal cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

    1988-09-01

    Knowledge of thermal cracking of hydrocarbons is important in understanding and modeling petroleum maturation. We have reviewed the literature on the thermal cracking of pure hydrocarbons and mixtures of hydrocarbons, with particular attention given to dependence of the kinetics on temperature, pressure, and phase. Major uncertainties remain with regard to pressure dependence. Based on this review, we developed a simple, four-component, three-reaction model for oil-cracking. We also developed a simple, kerogen-maturation, kinetic model that incorporates hydrogen and carbon balance and includes the most important oil- and gas-forming reactions: kerogen pyrolysis, three oil-cracking reactions, and three coke-pyrolysis reactions. Tentative stoichiometry parameters are given for lacustrine and marine kerogens. 35 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Elevated Temperature Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  18. Crack-growth analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianca, C.; Creager, M.

    1976-01-01

    Flexible, adaptable, integrative routine, computer program incorporates Collipriest-Ehret and Paris-Forman equations. Calculates growth from initial defect size and terminates calculation when crack is sufficiently large for critical condition. Wheeler, Willenborg, and Grumman Closure models are available.

  19. A study on fatigue crack growth behavior subjected to a single tensile overload: Part II. Transfer of stress concentration and its role in overload-induced transient crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K; An, Ke; Hubbard, Camden R

    2011-01-01

    The combined effects of overload-induced enlarged compressive residual stresses and crack tip blunting with secondary cracks are suggested to be responsible for the observed changes in the crack opening load and resultant post-overload transient crack growth behavior [Lee SY, Liaw PK, Choo H, Rogge RB, Acta Mater 2010;59:485-94]. In this article, in situ neutron diffraction experiments were performed to quantify the influence of the combined effects by investigating the internal-stress evolution at various locations away from the crack tip. In the overload-retardation period, stress concentration occurs in the crack blunting region (an overload point) until a maximum crack arrest load is reached. The stress concentration is then transferred from the blunting region to the propagating crack tip (following the overload), requiring a higher applied load, as the closed crack is gradually opened. The transfer phenomena of the stress concentration associated with a crack opening process account for the nonlinearity of strain response in the vicinity of the crack tip. The delaying action of stress concentration at the crack tip is understood in conjunction with the concept of a critical stress (i.e. the stress required to open the closed crack behind the crack tip). A linear relationship between {Delta}{var_epsilon}{sub eff} and {Delta}K{sub eff} provides experimental support for the hypothesis that {Delta}K{sub eff} can be considered as the fatigue crack tip driving force.

  20. The kinked interface crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzer, Joerg

    1992-05-01

    Two methods for the numerical solution of the integral equation describing the kinked interface crack, one proposed by Erdogan et al. (1973) and the other by Theokaris and Iokimidis (1979), are examined. The method of Erdogan et al. is then used to solve the equation in order to determine the kinking angle of the interface crack. Results are presented for two material combinations, aluminum/epoxy and glass/ceramic, under uniaxial tension in the direction normal to the interface.

  1. Steady crack growth through ductile metals: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, James C.

    focus on steady crack growth within a hydrogen-charged material to explore primary features of the streamline integration methodology while providing new results relevant to hydrogen embrittlement at engineering scales. Ductile crack propagation occurs through a homogeneous, high solubility material characteristic of niobium and through a steel weld in the presence of hydrogen. The constitutive model includes the influence of hydrogen on elastic-plastic regimes of material response at the continuum level, e.g. hydrogen-induced material softening, based on the hydrogen-enhanced, localized plasticity (HELP) mechanism, and reflects the amount of hydrogen in the material under stress and the intensity of hydrogen-induced softening in the material. Achievements using this two-dimensional framework encouraged further extensions of the research to a fully three-dimensional setting. Subsequent work, and the focal point of this thesis, develops a finite element formulation to investigate key features of the elastic-plastic fields near a steadily advancing crack under three-dimensional, small-scale yielding conditions. The computational model represents a structurally thin component constructed of a material (e.g. Al and Ti alloys) with flow stress and fracture toughness properties that together limit the size of the in-plane plastic zone during steady growth to no more than several multiples of the plate thickness. These studies consider a straight crack front advancing under local and global mode-I loading in a moderately hardening material. The nonsingular T-stress provides a first-order estimate of geometry and loading mode (e.g. tension vs. bending) effects on elastic-plastic, crack front fields. The T-stress has a marked effect on measured crack-growth resistance curves (J --Delta a) -- trends most computational models confirm using a two-dimensional setting. In the first computations of this type to be modeled, the 3D numerical results here demonstrate similarity scaling

  2. FITNESS-FOR-SERVICE ASSESSMENT FOR A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK THAT CONTAINS STRESS CORROSION CRACKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; James Elder, J; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Charles Mckeel, C

    2009-04-23

    residual stresses do not drive the identified cracks to instability. This tank expected to be decommissioned in the near future. However, if these plans are delayed, it was recommended that a third examination of selected cracks in the tank be performed in 2014.

  3. Role of Grain Boundaries and Microstructure on the Environment Assisted Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    In this research, two common types of environment assisted cracking (EAC) of pipeline steels, namely the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), have been studied, and computer models have been developed to simulate the intergranular stress corrosion crack propagation behaviour in pipeline steel as well as to predict the intergranular fracture susceptibility, due to mechanical loading in non-corrosive environment, of polycrystalline materials. First, a new understanding of the IGSCC resistance of pipeline steel has been obtained by studying the grain boundary character and crystallographic orientation in both cracked and non-cracked pipeline steel samples using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray texture measurements. It has been found that the low-angle and certain types of special boundaries, known as the coincident site lattice (CSL) boundaries (S5, S11, and S13b types), are crack-resistant while the random high angle boundaries are prone to cracking. However, it has been also observed that the grain boundaries associated with {110} and {111} neighbour grain orientations having <110> and <111> rotation axis, respectively, are crack-resistant, while the cracked boundaries are mainly linked to the {100} orientation with <100> rotation axis. Subsequently, a novel integrated modeling approach, combining Voronoi Algorithm, Markov Chain theory, and Monte Carlo simulations, has been developed in order to predict the IGSCC behaviour of pipeline steels. The model takes both the physical microstructural features, such as the grain shape and grain size distribution, as well as the grain boundary characters and their orientations with respect to the external stress axis into account. The predicted crack propagation behaviour has been found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental crack-propagation and arrest data in API X65 pipeline steel. In addition, a texture based grain boundary character

  4. Acoustic emission characterization using AE (parameter) delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) parameter delay concept is defined as that particular measured value of a parameter at which a specified baseline level of cumulative AE activity is reached. The parameter can be from any of a broad range of elastic, plastic, viscoelastic, and fracture mechanics parameters, as well as their combinations. Such parameters include stress, load, strain, displacement, time, temperature, loading cycle, unloading stress, stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and crack tip plasticity zone size, while the AE activity may be AE event counts, ringdown counts, energy, event duration, etc., as well as their combinations. Attention is given to examples for the AE parameter delay concept, together with various correlations.

  5. Refinery ring groove cracking experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmke, E.F.

    1982-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a questionnaire on the problem of ring groove cracking in reactors. The results were found to be inconclusive in providing any information on correcting the problem. One report pertaining to a ring groove crack on a 24-inch reactor nozzle served as a warning that cracks may progress beyond the overlay, through it is not known if the base metal can easily crack at low temperatures. The results did not indicate at what point the cracks occurred, but what was common to almost all cracks was that the flange had been in high-temperature, high-pressure hydrogen suggesting that dissolved hydrogen or environmental hydrogen assisted the cracking. The type of stress that contributes in the cracking has not been determined. It is indicated that many cracks were found after the questionnaire was done.

  6. Modelling (1 0 0) hydrogen-induced platelets in silicon with a multi-scale molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasa, G.; Colombi Ciacchi, L.; Csanyi, G.; de Vita, A.

    2007-12-01

    We introduce a multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) approach to study the thermal evolution of (1 0 0) hydrogen-induced platelets (HIPs) in silicon. The HIPs are modeled by ∼10 nm long planar defects in a periodically repeated crystalline model system containing ∼25,000 silicon atoms. The initial defect models are created either by cleavage of atomic planes or by planar assemblies of vacancies, and are stabilized by saturating the resulting surface dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms. The time evolution of the defects is studied by finite-temperature MD using the “Learn On The Fly” (LOTF) technique. This hybrid scheme allows us to perform accurate density-functional-tight-binding (DFTB) force calculations only on the chemically reactive platelet zone, while the surrounding silicon crystal is described by the Stillinger-Weber (SW) classical potential. Reliable dynamical trajectories are obtained by choosing the DFTB zone in a way which minimizes the errors on the atomic forces.

  7. Surface crack problems in plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1989-01-01

    The mode I crack problem in plates under membrane loading and bending is reconsidered. The purpose is to examine certain analytical features of the problem further and to provide some new results. The formulation and the results given by the classical and the Reissner plate theories for through and part-through cracks are compared. For surface cracks the three-dimensional finite element solution is used as the basis of comparison. The solution is obtained and results are given for the crack/contact problem in a plate with a through crack under pure bending and for the crack interaction problem. Also, a procedure is developed to treat the problem of subcritical crack growth and to trace the evolution of the propagating crack.

  8. Catalytic cracking process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  9. Cracking the Credit Hour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit hour. If…

  10. Crack patterns over uneven substrates.

    PubMed

    Nandakishore, Pawan; Goehring, Lucas

    2016-02-28

    Cracks in thin layers are influenced by what lies beneath them. From buried craters to crocodile skin, crack patterns are found over an enormous range of length scales. Regardless of absolute size, their substrates can dramatically influence how cracks form, guiding them in some cases, or shielding regions from them in others. Here we investigate how a substrate's shape affects the appearance of cracks above it, by preparing mud cracks over sinusoidally varying surfaces. We find that as the thickness of the cracking layer increases, the observed crack patterns change from wavy to ladder-like to isotropic. Two order parameters are introduced to measure the relative alignment of these crack networks, and, along with Fourier methods, are used to characterise the transitions between crack pattern types. Finally, we explain these results with a model, based on the Griffith criteria of fracture, that identifies the conditions for which straight or wavy cracks will be seen, and predicts how well-ordered the cracks will be. Our metrics and results can be applied to any situation where connected networks of cracks are expected, or found. PMID:26762761

  11. Random loading fatigue crack growth: Crack closure considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Keith

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of fatigue crack growth is an important element of effective fracture control for metallic structures and mechanical components, especially in the aerospace industry. The prediction techniques available and applied today are mostly based on fatigue crack growth measurements determined in constant amplitude testing. However, while many service loadings are constant amplitude, many more loadings are random amplitude. An investigation to determine which statistics of random loadings are relevant to fatigue crack closure was conducted. The fundamentals of random processes and crack closure are briefly reviewed, then the relevance of certain random process parameters to the crack closure calculation are discussed qualitatively. A course for further research is outlined.

  12. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  13. Statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the use of plasticity theory to characterize the inelastic behavior of solids is to represent the flaws by statistical methods. We have taken such an approach to study fragmentation because it offers a number of advantages. Foremost among these is that, by considering the effects of flaws, it becomes possible to address the underlying physics directly. For example, we have been able to explain why rocks exhibit large strain-rate effects (a consequence of the finite growth rate of cracks), why a spherical explosive imbedded in oil shale produces a cavity with a nearly square section (opening of bedding cracks) and why propellants may detonate following low-speed impact (a consequence of frictional hot spots).

  14. Replica-based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, R. S.; Willard, Scott A.; Dawicke, David S.

    2007-01-01

    A surface replica-based crack inspection method has recently been developed for use in Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hydrogen feedline flowliners. These flowliners exist to ensure favorable flow of liquid hydrogen over gimble joint bellows, and consist of two rings each containing 38 elongated slots. In the summer of 2002, multiple cracks ranging from 0.1 inches to 0.6 inches long were discovered; each orbiter contained at least one cracked flowliner. These long cracks were repaired and eddy current inspections ensured that no cracks longer than 0.075 inches were present. However, subsequent fracture-mechanics review of flight rationale required detection of smaller cracks, and was the driving force for development of higher-resolution inspection method. Acetate tape surface replicas have been used for decades to detect and monitor small cracks. However, acetate tape replicas have primarily been limited to laboratory specimens because complexities involved in making these replicas - requiring acetate tape to be dissolved with acetone - are not well suited for a crack inspection tool. More recently developed silicon-based replicas are better suited for use as a crack detection tool. A commercially available silicon-based replica product has been determined to be acceptable for use in SSME hydrogen feedlines. A method has been developed using this product and a scanning electron microscope for analysis, which can find cracks as small as 0.005 inches and other features (e.g., pits, scratches, tool marks, etc.) as small as 0.001 inches. The resolution of this method has been validated with dozens of cracks generated in a laboratory setting and this method has been used to locate 55 cracks (ranging in size from 0.040 inches to 0.004 inches) on space flight hardware. These cracks were removed by polishing away the cracked material and a second round of replicas confirmed the repair.

  15. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  16. Cracks and Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an odd area of the south polar region that has sets of fine, nearly parallel lines running from the northeast (upper right) toward southwest (lower left) and a darker, wider set of cracks with a major trend running almost perpendicular to the finer lines. The appearance of these features is enhanced by seasonal frost. Dark areas have no frost, bright areas still have frozen carbon dioxide ice. In summer, the ice would be gone and the cracks and lines less obvious when viewed from orbit. Although unknown, wind might be responsible for forming the fine set of lines, and perhaps freeze-thaw cycles of ground ice or structural deformation would have contributed to formation of the wider cracks. The image is located near 85.0oS, 324.0oW, and covers an area about 1.5 km (nearly 1 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  17. Spontaneous Cracking in Unfired Magnesia Compacts Upon Standing in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Myron O.; Grimes, Hubert H.; May, Charles E.

    1961-01-01

    Analytical-grade magnesium oxide powder without binder was compressed hydrostatically to 50,000 lb. per sq. in. to form compacts. When exposed to moist air immediately after pressing, these compacts developed irregularly shaped cracks. Controlled tests, in which these compacts were exposed for various lengths of time to various atmospheres, indicated that in general water vapor, carbon dioxide, and residual stresses had to be present if cracking was to occur. The probable cause of the cracking was the formation of a less dense and mechanically weak basic carbonate of magnesium at crystallite surface points of high stress concentration which developed during the compacting. The adsorption of dry CO2 at such sites prevented subsequent delayed fracture.

  18. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  19. Automatic crack growth tracking of bimaterial interface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yehia, Nabil A. B.; Shephard, Mark S.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation process of an interfacial crack in composite material is studied using the modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion, NT-criterion. Some necessary assumptions have been adopted to facilitate the use of the NT-criterion in this case. The stress intensity factors at the crack tip are extracted from the complex displacement field and finite element results. A simple algorithm for automatic crack propagation is presented with an illustrative example.

  20. Asperities, Crack Front Waves and Crack Self Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajak, Pankaj; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    We have performed petascale simulations to study nanomaterial systems capable of sensing and repairing damage in high temperature/high pressure operating conditions. The system we have studied is a ceramic nanocomposite consisting of silicon carbide/silicon dioxide core/shell nanoparticles embedded in alumina. We observe that the interaction of the crack with core/shell asperities gives rise to crack-front waves. We also study crack healing by diffusion of silica into the crack as a function of nanoparticle size and inter-particle distance. Our results are well supported by experimental observations.

  1. On the Crack Bifurcation and Fanning of Crack Growth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Crack growth data obtained from ASTM load shedding method for different R values show some fanning especially for aluminum alloys. It is believed by the authors and it has been shown before that the observed fanning is due to the crack bifurcation occurs in the near threshold region which is a function of intrinsic properties of the alloy. Therefore, validity of the ASTM load shedding test procedure and results is confirmed. However, this position has been argued by some experimentalists who believe the fanning is an artifact of the test procedure and thus the obtained results are invalid. It has been shown that using a special test procedure such as using compressively pre-cracked specimens will eliminate the fanning effect. Since not using the fanned data fit can result in a significantly lower calculated cyclic life, design of a component, particularly for rotorcraft and propeller systems will considerably be impacted and therefore this study is of paramount importance. In this effort both test procedures i.e. ASTM load shedding and the proposed compressive pre-cracking have been used to study the fatigue crack growth behavior of compact tension specimens made of aluminum alloy 2524-T3. Fatigue crack growth paths have been closely observed using SEM machines to investigate the effects of compression pre-cracking on the crack bifurcation behavior. The results of this study will shed a light on resolving the existing argument by better understanding of near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior.

  2. Fatigue crack retardation of low carbon steel in saltwater

    SciTech Connect

    Kokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Kojima, T.

    1984-01-01

    The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was examined using a low carbon steel, which has a considerably lower static strength than high strength steel used in previous report. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of O and a frequency of 10 Hz, and the effects of saltwater were evaluated by comparing with the result in air and result on high strength steel. A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size was not affected by saltwater and showed the same value in both environments. This observed trend differed from the result on high strength steel in which the overload affected zone size was larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air, and thus it was found that the effect of saltwater on retardation behavior was different even in the similar steels. Retardation cycles were smaller in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the overload affected zone size was not affected by saltwater, the decrease in retardation cycles was attributed to the higher rates of fatigue crack propagation in 3 percent saltwater. Thinner specimen showed stronger retardation than thicker one. The behavior at midthickness of thicker specimen showed delayed retardation as well as the result in air. Moreover, the crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept.

  3. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  4. Fatigue-Crack-Tip Locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Clendenin, C. Gerald; Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, James P.; Todhunter, Ronald G.; Simpson, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue-testing system includes automated subsystem continuously tracking location of fatigue-crack tip in metal or other highly electrically conductive specimen. Fatigue-crack-tip-locating subsystem also searches specimen to find initial fatigue crack and its tip and to trace out hidden fatigue cracks and other flaws inside specimen. Subsystem operates under overall control of personal computer, which also controls load frame applying prescribed cyclic stresses to specimen. Electromagnetic flaw detector based on eddy-current principle scanned over surface of specimen. Flaw detector described in "Electromagnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use" (LAR-15046). System provides automated control and monitoring of fatigue experiments, saving time for researchers and enabling experiments to run unattended 24 hours a day. All information on crack-tip trajectories and rates of growth of cracks recorded automatically, so researchers have access to more information.

  5. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  6. Retrofitting olefin cracking plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, C.; Fernandez-Baujin, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    This article discusses the retrofitting of liquid crackers which produce olefins so that gaseous feedstocks can be used. Naphtha and gas oil are the predominant design feedstocks for producing olefins. The price of gaseous feedstocks such as ethane, propane and butane have become economically more attractive than liquid feedstocks. Existing liquid crackers will be able to produce ethylene at 85% or higher capacity when cracking propane and butane feedstock with only minor changes. Topics considered include revamping for vacuum gas oil (VGO) feedstocks and revamping for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) feedstocks.

  7. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lawrence C; Mulhall, John P

    2015-11-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies, which include medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation, and psychological etiologies. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. PMID:26439762

  8. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  9. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  10. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  11. Speech and Language Delay

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Speech and Language Delay Overview How do I know if my child has speech delay? Every child develops at his or her ... of the same age, the problem may be speech delay. Your doctor may think your child has ...

  12. Delay Discounting and Gambling

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Gregory J.; Francisco, Monica T.; Brewer, Adam T.; Stein, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Delay discounting describes the decline in the value of a reinforcer as the delay to that reinforcer increases. A review of the available studies revealed that steep delay discounting is positively correlated with problem or pathological gambling. One hypothesis regarding this correlation derives from the discounting equation proposed by Mazur (1989). According to the equation, steeper discounting renders the difference between fixed-delayed rewards and gambling-like variable-delayed rewards larger; with the latter being more valuable. The present study was designed to test this prediction by first assessing rats’ impulsive choices across four delays to a larger-later reinforcer. A second condition quantified strength of preference for mixed- over fixed-delays, with the duration of the latter adjusted between sessions to achieve indifference. Strength of preference for the mixed-delay alternative is given by the fixed delay at indifference (lower fixed-delay values reflect stronger preferences). Percent impulsive choice was not correlated with the value of the fixed delay at indifference and, therefore, the prediction of the hyperbolic model of gambling was not supported. A follow-up assessment revealed a significant decrease in impulsive choice after the second condition. This shift in impulsive choice could underlie the failure to observe the predicted correlation between impulsive choice and degree of preference for mixed- over fixed delays. PMID:21352902

  13. Fatigue crack retardation of high strength steel in saltwater

    SciTech Connect

    Tokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Imai, T.; Kojima, T.

    1983-04-01

    A high strength steel was studied in 3 percent saltwater to investigate the effects of a corrosive environment and sheer thickness on fatigue crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of 0 and frequency of 10 H /SUB z/ . A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, and the crack propagation rate at first increased, followed by fairly rapid decrease to a minimum value and then increased gradually to its steady-state value, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size and the retardation cycles increased with decreasing sheet thickness, just as they did in air. However, the zone size and the cycles were larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the crack propagation rates through the overload affected zone were not affected by the test environment, the longer retardation cycles in 3 percent saltwater were attributed to an enlargement of the overload affected zone size. The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept.

  14. Fatigue crack monitoring via load-differential guided wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Jun; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Chen, Xin; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2012-05-01

    Detection and localization of fatigue cracks is an important application for inspection and monitoring of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures, but assessment of such damage via ultrasonic guided waves can be problematic when cracks are tightly closed in the absence of applied tensile loads. Proposed here are load-differential methods, which compare signals at one load to those at another load at the same damage state. The main advantage of such methods is that cracks can be detected and localized by analyzing current signals obtained from different loading conditions without using baseline data from the damage-free state. The efficacy of the proposed load-differential imaging method is examined using fatigue test data where multiple cracks grow from a single through-hole. Data were acquired with a spatially distributed array of piezoelectric discs by recording ultrasonic signals as a function of applied uniaxial load at intervals throughout the fatigue test. Load-differential guided wave images are generated from residual signals via delay-and-sum imaging methods, and these images are evaluated in terms of their ability to detect and localize fatigue cracks.

  15. Effect of Crack Opening on Penetrant Crack Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Devin

    2009-01-01

    Results: From the testing we were able to determine all the cracks within the test range were detectable or better with developer. Many of the indications after development lost their linearity and gave circular indications. Our tests were performed in a laboratory and our procedure would be difficult in an industrial setting. Conclusions: The "V" did not significantly affect our ability to detect the POD cracks with fluorescent penetrant. Conduct same experiment with more cracks. The 0.025 and 0.050 POD specimens are clean and documented with the SEM. Conduct water-wash fluorescent penetrant test at EAFB. The poppet cracks are tighter than the POD specimen cracks. Flight FCV poppets: 0.01 mils (0.3 microns) Langley fatigue cracked poppets: 0.02 mils (0.5 microns) POD specimen (post 5 mils): 0.05 mils (1.4 microns) We could not detect cracks in Langley fatigue-cracked poppets with fluorescent penetrant. Investigate inability of penetrant to wet the poppet surface.

  16. ''KN'' series cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klapstov, V.F.; Khlebrikova, M.A.; Maslova, A.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    The basic directions in improving high-activity zeolitic cracking catalysts at the present stage are improvements in the resistance to attrition and increases in the bulk density of the catalysts, along with a changeover to relatively waste-free catalyst manufacturing technology. Catalysts of the ''KN'' series have been synthesized recently with improved quality characteristics. Low-waste technology is used in manufacturing them. Data are presented which show that the KN catalysts are better than the other Soviet catalysts. The starting materials and reagents in preparing the KN catalysts are technical alumina, rare-earth element nitrates, a natural component (such as clay conforming to specification TU-21-25-146-75), sodium hydroxide, and granulated sodium silicate. The preparation of the KN catalysts is described and no silica gel is used in manufacturing the KN series catalyst, in contrast to the RSG-6Ts catalyst. The use of KN series catalysts in place of KMTsR in catalytic cracking units will result in an increase in the naphtha yield by at least 20% by weight, as well as a reduction of the catalyst consumption by a factor of 2-3. A changeover to the commerical production of this catalyst will make it possible to reduce saline waste by a factor of 8-10 and reduce the catalyst cost by a factor of 1.5-2.

  17. Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility and Hydrogen-Induced Additive Stress of 7050 Aluminum Alloy Under Various Aging States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, W. J.; Song, R. G.; Qi, X.; Li, H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, C.; Jin, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of 7050 aluminum alloy under various aging states has been investigated by means of cathodic hydrogen permeation, slow strain rate test, hydrogen determinator, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope, and effect of hydrogen on atomic binding force of charged alloy has been calculated by free electron theory in this paper. Simultaneously, hydrogen-induced additive stress (σad) of 7050 aluminum alloy hydrogen charged with different current densities under various aging states have been investigated by flowing stress differential method. The results showed that hydrogen concentration of examined alloy increased with increasing charging time or current density under the same aging state. Hydrogen segregation occurred at grain boundaries which enlarged the crystal lattice constant, meanwhile, it reduced the average bonding energy and interatomic bonding force of the grain boundary atoms, thus resulting in hydrogen embrittlement; moreover, σad of 7050 aluminum alloy increased linearly with increasing hydrogen concentration under the same aging state, i.e., under aged: σad = -1.61 + 9.93 × 105 C H, peak aged: σad = -1.55 + 9.67 × 105 C H, over aged: σad = -0.16 + 9.35 × 105 C H, correspondingly, σad increased the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement ( I HE) further. Under the same charging condition, aging states had a great influence on σad and I HE, the under-aged state alloy was of the highest, the over-aged state alloy was of the lowest, and peak-aged was in the middle.

  18. Replica-Based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  19. Reciprocity principle and crack identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieux, Stéphane; Ben Abda, Amel; Duong Bui, Huy

    1999-02-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the planar crack identification problem defined by a unique complete elastostatic overdetermined boundary datum. Based on the reciprocity gap principle, we give a direct process for locating the host plane and we establish a new constuctive identifiability result for 3D planar cracks.

  20. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  1. Interface cracks in piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorukha, V.; Kamlah, M.; Loboda, V.; Lapusta, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their intrinsic electromechanical coupling behavior, piezoelectric materials are widely used in sensors, actuators and other modern technologies. It is well known that piezoelectric ceramics are very brittle and susceptible to fracture. In many cases, fracture occurs at interfaces as debonding and cracks. This leads to an undesired degradation of electrical and mechanical performance. Because of the practical and fundamental importance of the problem, interface cracks in piezoelectric materials have been actively studied in the last few decades. This review provides a comprehensive survey of recent works on cracks situated at the interface of two materials, at least one of which has piezoelectric or piezoelectromagnetic properties. Different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces are discussed. The oscillating and contact zone models for in-plane straight interface cracks between two dissimilar piezoelectric materials or between piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric ones are reviewed. Different peculiarities related to the investigation of interface cracks in piezoelectric materials for the anti-plane case, for functionally graded and thermopiezoelectric materials are presented. Papers related to magnetoelectroelastic bimaterials, to steady state motion of interface cracks in piezoelectric bimaterials and to circular arc-cracks at the interface of piezoelectric materials are reviewed, and various methods used to address these problems are discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on future research directions.

  2. Shapes Formed By Interacting Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, K.

    2014-12-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in rocks to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated stress geometries and different microscopic mechanisms, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths. We investigate the origins of this widely observed "en passant" crack pattern by fracturing a rectangular slab which is notched on two sides and then subjected to quasistatic uniaxial, biaxial, or shear strain. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until they pass each other, after which they curve and release a lens-shaped fragment. Under uniaxial strain, we find that each crack path has a universal shape and aspect ratio which is independent of the material. By changing the geometry of the applied strain, we are able to achieve different aspect ratios for the crack paths. With birefringent materials, it is possible to interpret these patterns in light of the stress geometry, and we are able to explain the origins of these universal shapes with a simple geometrical model. Since a variety of aspect ratios have similarly been observed in geological contexts, this raises the possibility of using observed crack shapes as a diagnostic for the stress conditions under which cracks were formed in nature. In particular, the shape may serve as a means to infer the boundary loading in situations where history and dynamics are inaccessible.

  3. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. It is assumed that the plane contains a series of collinear cracks perpendicular to the interfaces and is loaded in tension away from and perpendicular to the cracks. The problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. The singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. An interesting result found from the analysis of the latter is that for certain orthotropic material combinations the stress state at the point of intersection of a crack and an interface may be bounded whereas in isotropic materials at this point stresses are always singular. A number of numerical examples are worked out to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  4. What Crack Does to Babies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Janice

    1991-01-01

    Describes the effect of crack on the user and on the pregnant user's offspring. Children of the first crack addicts are now in school and exhibit an array of behavioral and cognitive difficulties. Early intervention in a supportive environment has succeeded in preparing some of these children for the classroom. (DM)

  5. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. First, the problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. Then, the singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied in some detail. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. A number of numerical examples are worked out in order to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Finally, some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  6. Hydrocarbon cracking and reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Q.N.; Schipper, P.H.; Owen, H.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a process for upgrading paraffinic naphtha to high octane fuel. It comprises: contacting a fresh naphtha feedstock stream containing a major amount of C{sub 7+} alkanes and naphthenes with medium pore acid cracking catalyst under low pressure selective cracking conditions effective to produce 4-C5 isoalkene and C4-C5 isoalkane, the cracking catalyst being substantially free of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation metal components and having an acid cracking activity less than 15; separating cracking effluent to obtain an olefinic fraction rich in C4-C5 isoalkene and a C6+ fraction; etherifying the C4-C5 isoalkene fraction by catalytic reaction with lower alkanol to produce tertiary-alkyl ether product; and reforming the C6+ fraction to provide high octane gasoline components.

  7. High speed thin plate fatigue crack monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device and method are provided which non-destructively detect crack length and crack geometry in thin metallic plates. A non-contacting vibration apparatus produces resonant vibrations without introducing extraneous noise. Resulting resonant vibration shifts in cracked plates are correlated to known crack length in plates with similar resonant vibration shifts. In addition, acoustic emissions of cracks at resonance frequencies are correlated to acoustic emissions from known crack geometries.

  8. Mechanistic studies on stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steels in near-neutral pH environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Biao

    2000-10-01

    potential (ECorr), hydrogen was evolved from environment and accumulated in a highly stressed region of the steel, which enhanced local dissolution or pitting process. The combination of preferential dissolution with stresses induced SCC cracks initiation. Once crack initiated it propagated by hydrogen-facilitated dissolution. At cathodic potentials, when hydrogen concentration reached a critical value, the cracking process is controlled by hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC).

  9. Prediction of fatigue crack-growth patterns and lives in three-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth patterns and lives for surface cracks, surface cracks at holes, and corner cracks at holes in three dimensional bodies were predicted using linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts that were modified to account for crack-closure behavior. The predictions were made by using stress intensity factor equations for these crack configurations and the fatigue crack-growth (delta K against rate) relationship for the material of interest. The crack configurations were subjected to constant-amplitude fatigue loading under either remote tension or bending loads. The predicted crack growth patterns and crack growth lives for aluminum alloys agreed well with test data from the literature.

  10. CGI delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during aggressive tasks such as nap-of-the-earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer-generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitide distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  11. Current research on fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Jono, M.; Komai, K.

    1987-01-01

    This first volume of CJMR (Current Japanese Materials Research), contains thirteen chapters concerning the above three themes of fatigue cracks. Each chapter is not a single paper as appearing in many academic journals and transactions, but a systematic review of the current achievement by each author with the emphasis on important points. The common feature is that the elaborated experimental techniques and theoretical approaches, some of which are quite unique, are introduced by respective authors to make clear the difficulty arising in the observation of small cracks and analysis of data. Theoretical models are proposed from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics to link the two thresholds of fatigue limit and crack growth, and intensive discussions are made for further development of the theory. Threshold stress intensity factors and the growth rate of medium and long sized cracks are also discussed, together with their opening behavior. The influencing factors are plastic zone size, the stress ratio and residual stress distribution occurring in welded joints. Mode II crack growth is of great significance since the initial fatigue cracks propagate mainly in shear mode. The problems of fatigue crack growth in corrosive environment is highly important since its retardation and enhancement take place in structural steels affected by the variety of factors. Life prediction in such environments poses another important problem. These are systematically discussed in this book.

  12. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  13. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  14. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  15. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  16. Application of Viscoelastic Fracture Model and Non-uniform Crack Initiation at Clinically Relevant Notches in Crosslinked UHMWPE

    PubMed Central

    Sirimamilla, P. Abhiram; Furmanski, Jevan; Rimnac, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of crack initiation from a clinically relevant notch is not well-understood for crosslinked ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) used in total joint replacement components. Static mode driving forces, rather than the cyclic mode conditions typically associated with fatigue processes, have been shown to drive crack propagation in this material. Thus, in this study, crack initiation in a notched specimen under a static load was investigated. A video microscope was used to monitor the notch surface of the specimen and crack initiation time was measured from the video by identifying the onset of crack initiation at the notch. Crack initiation was considered using a viscoelastic fracture theory. It was found that the mechanism of crack initiation involved both single layer and a distributed multi-layer phenomenon and that multi-layer crack initiation delayed the crack initiation time for all loading conditions examined. The findings of this study support that the viscoelastic fracture theory governs fracture mechanics in crosslinked UHMWPE. The findings also support that crack initiation from a notch in UHMWPE is a more complex phenomenon than treated by traditional fracture theories for polymers. PMID:23127638

  17. Digital time delay

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  18. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  19. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  20. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  1. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  2. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  3. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  4. Shaft vibrations in turbomachinery excited by cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabowski, B.

    1982-01-01

    During the past years the dynamic behavior of rotors with cracks has been investigated mainly theoretically. This paper deals with the comparison of analytical and experimental results of the dynamics of a rotor with an artificial crack. The experimental results verify the crack model used in the analysis. They show the general possibility to determine a crack by extended vibration control.

  5. Vibrations Caused By Cracked Turbopump Bearing Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.; Dweck, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Expansion gives rise to eccentricity. Report presents analysis of dynamic effects caused by cracking of inner race of ball bearing in turbopump. Crack manifested itself via increase in vibrations synchronous with rotation and smaller increase at twice frequency of rotation. Analysis conducted to verify these increases were caused solely by crack and to understand implications for future such cracks.

  6. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); Kelly, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  7. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K.; Kelly, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  8. Compliance matrices for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, R.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which can be used to develop compliance matrices for cracked bodies. The method relies on the numerical solution of singular integral equations with Cauchy-type kernels and provides an efficient and accurate procedure for relating applied loadings to crack opening displacements. The algorithm should be of interest to those performing repetitive calculations in the analysis of experimental results obtained from fracture specimens.

  9. Crack growth sparse pursuit for wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhibo; Zhang, Han; Du, Zhaohui; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    One critical challenge to achieving reliable wind turbine blade structural health monitoring (SHM) is mainly caused by composite laminates with an anisotropy nature and a hard-to-access property. The typical pitch-catch PZTs approach generally detects structural damage with both measured and baseline signals. However, the accuracy of imaging or tomography by delay-and-sum approaches based on these signals requires improvement in practice. Via the model of Lamb wave propagation and the establishment of a dictionary that corresponds to scatters, a robust sparse reconstruction approach for structural health monitoring comes into view for its promising performance. This paper proposes a neighbor dictionary that identifies the first crack location through sparse reconstruction and then presents a growth sparse pursuit algorithm that can precisely pursue the extension of the crack. An experiment with the goal of diagnosing a composite wind turbine blade with an artificial crack is performed, and it validates the proposed approach. The results give competitively accurate crack detection with the correct locations and extension length.

  10. Analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    The correlation between fatigue crack propagation and stress intensity factor is analyzed. When determining fatigue crack propagation rate, a crack increment, delta a, and its corresponding increment in load cycles, delta N, are measured. Fatigue crack propagation must be caused by a shear and/or a normal separation mode. Both of these two processes are discrete if one looks at the atomic level. If the average deformation and fracture properties over the crack increments, delta a, can be considered as homogeneous, if the characteristic discrete lengths of sigma a, if the plastic zone size is small, and if a plate is thick enough to insure a plane strain case, da/dN is proportional to delta K squared. Any deviation of empirical data from this relation must be caused by the fact that one or more of these conditions are not satisfied. The effects of plate thickness and material inhomogeneity are discussed in detail. A shear separation mode of fatigue crack propagation is described and is used to illustrate the effects of material inhomogeneity.

  11. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  12. Dual function cracking catalyst (DFCC) composition

    SciTech Connect

    Occelli, M.L.

    1986-10-07

    The patent describes a novel catalytic cracking composition comprising a cracking catalyst having high activity and, as a separate and distinct entity, a diluent comprising a substantially catalytically inactive crystalline aluminosilicte having a fresh MAT Activity below about 1. The diluent is clinoptilolite and the cracking catalyst contains a rare earth-exchanged crystalline aluminium silicate. The cracking catalyst comprises from about ten to about 60 weight percent of a zeolite having cracking characteristics dispersed in a refractory metal oxide matrix.

  13. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  14. Observation of Intralaminar Cracking in the Edge Crack Torsion Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Davidson, Barry D.

    2013-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is evaluated to determine its suitability for measuring fracture toughness associated with mode III delamination growth onset. A series of ECT specimens with preimplanted inserts with different lengths is tested and examined using nondestructive and destructive techniques. Ultrasonic inspection of all tested specimens reveals that delamination growth occurs at one interface ply beneath the intended midplane interface. Sectioning and optical microscopy suggest that the observed delamination growth results from coalescence of angled intralaminar matrix cracks that form and extend across the midplane plies. The relative orientation of these cracks is approximately 45 deg with respect to the midplane, suggesting their formation is caused by resolved principal tensile stresses arising due to the global mode-III shear loading. Examination of ECT specimens tested to loads below the level corresponding to delamination growth onset reveals that initiation of intralaminar cracking approximately coincides with the onset of nonlinearity in the specimen's force-displacement response. The existence of intralaminar cracking prior to delamination growth onset and the resulting delamination extension at an unintended interface render the ECT test, in its current form, unsuitable for characterization of mode III delamination growth onset. The broader implications of the mechanisms observed in this study are also discussed with respect to the current understanding of shear-driven delamination in tape-laminate composites.

  15. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1986-10-01

    This paper presents results on: (a) the influence of simulated BWR environments on the stress-corrosion-craking (SCC) susceptibility of Types 304, 316NG, and 347 stainless (SS); (b) fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate measurements on these materials and weld overlay specimens in different environments; and (c) residual stress measurements and metallographic evaluations of conventional pipe weldments treated by a mechanical-stress-improvement process (MSIP) as well as those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure. Crack initiation studies on Types 304 and 316NG SS under crevice and non-crevice conditions in 289/sup 0/C water containing 0.25 ppM dissolved oxygen with low sulfate concentrations indicate that SCC initiates at very low strains (<3%) in the nuclear grade material. Crack growth measurements on fracture-mechanics-type specimens, under low-frequency cyclic loading, show that the Type 316NG steel cracks at a somewhat lower rate (approx.40%) than sensitized Type 304 SS in an impurity environment with 0.25 ppM dissolved-oxygen; however, the latter material stops cracking when sulfate is removed from the water. Crack growth in both materials ceases under simulated hydrogen-water chemistry conditions (<5 ppB oxygen) even with 100 ppB sulfate present in the water. An unexpected result was obtained in the test on a weld overlay specimen in the impurity environment, viz., the crack grew to the overlay interface at a nominal rate, branched at 90/sup 0/ in both directions, and then grew at high rate (parallel to the nominal applied load). Residual stress measurements on MSIP-treated weldments and those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure indicate that these techniques produce compressive stresses over most of the inner surface near the weld and heat-affected zones.

  16. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up. PMID:25912729

  17. Scattering attenuation, dispersion and reflection of SH waves in two-dimensional elastic media with densely distributed cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    We compute the synthetic seismograms of multiply scattered SH waves in 2-D elastic media with densely distributed parallel cracks. We assume randomly distributed cracks in a rectangular-bounded region, which simulate a cracked zone. The crack surfaces are assumed to be stress-free. When the incident wavelength is longer than the crack size, the delay in the arrival of the primary wave is observed at stations beyond the cracked zone and the amplitude of the primary wave is amplified in the cracked zone in the synthetic seismograms. This is because the cracked zone behaves as a low velocity and soft material to the incident long-wavelength wave due to the crack distribution. When the half-wavelength of the incident wave is shorter than the crack length, the scattered waves are clearly observed in the synthetic seismograms and the amplitude of the primary wave is largely attenuated beyond the cracked zone. The calculated attenuation coefficient Q-1 of the primary wave is directly proportional to the crack density in the range of νa2 <= 0.1, where ν and a are the number density and half the length of cracks, respectively. This is consistent with that obtained by a stochastic analysis based on Foldy's approximation. A periodic distribution of cracks in a zone is considered as an utterly different model in order to investigate the effect of spatial distributions on the attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. When cracks are distributed densely, the values of Q-1 for the periodic crack distribution appear to differ from those for the random distribution of cracks in the low wavenumber range. This suggests that the effect of multiple interactions among densely distributed cracks depends on not only the density but also the spatial distribution of cracks at low wavenumbers. The calculated phase velocity of the primary wave is consistent with that from the stochastic analysis in the range of νa2 <= 0.1 and does not depend on the spatial distribution of cracks. This

  18. Time delay spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A device for delaying specified frequencies of a multiple frequency laser beam. The device separates the multiple frequency beam into a series of spatially separated single frequency beams. The propagation distance of the single frequency beam is subsequently altered to provide the desired delay for each specific frequency. Focusing reflectors can be utilized to provide a simple but nonadjustable system or, flat reflectors with collimating and focusing optics can be utilized to provide an adjustable system.

  19. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.

    1990-06-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  20. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  1. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  2. Crack growth in single-crystal silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Crack growth in single-crystal silicon at room temperature in air was evaluated by double torsion (DT) load-relaxation method and monitored by acoustic emission (AE) technique. Both DT and AE methods indicated lack of subcritical crack growth in silicon. At the critical stress intensity factor, the crack front was found to be jumping several times in a 'mirror' region and then followed by fast crack growth in a 'hackle' region. Hackle marks were found to be associated with plastic deformation at the tip of the fast moving crack. No dislocation etch pits were found in the 'mirror' region, in which crack growth may result from interatomic bonds broken at the crack tip under stress without any plastic deformation. Acoustic emission appears to be spontaneously generated from both interatomic bonds broken and dislocation generation at the moving crack tip during the crack growth in single-crystal silicon.

  3. Delayed voice communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Reagan, Marcum L.

    2013-10-01

    We present results from simulated deep-space exploration missions that investigated voice communication with significant time delays. The simulations identified many challenges: confusion of sequence, blocked calls, wasted crew time, impaired ability to provide relevant information to the other party, losing track of which messages have reached the other party, weakened rapport between crew and ground, slow response to rapidly changing situations, and reduced situational awareness. These challenges were met in part with additional training; greater attention and foresight; longer, less frequent transmissions; meticulous recordkeeping and timekeeping; and specific alerting and acknowledging calls. Several simulations used both delayed voice and text messaging. Text messaging provided a valuable record of transmissions and allowed messages to be targeted to subsets of the flight and ground crew, but it was a poor choice for high-workload operators such as vehicle drivers and spacewalkers. Even with the foregoing countermeasures, delayed voice communication is difficult. Additional aids such as automatic delay timers and voice-to-text transcription would help. Tests comparing delays of 50 and 300 s unexpectedly revealed that communicating with the shorter delay was just as challenging as with the longer one.

  4. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  5. Crack-path effect on material toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1990-01-01

    The main features of a toughening mechanism associated with a curvilinear crack path are examined using a model consisting of a macrocrack in a brittle solid with a curvilinear segment at the crack tip. A numerical procedure for finite and semiinfinite cracks is formulated and evaluated using an example which has an exact solution (a finite crack in the form of a circular arc in a uniform stress field). It is shown that, for a relatively small amplitude of crack path oscillations, the toughening ratio can be taken equal to the ratio of the corresponding crack path lengths.

  6. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  7. Why do drying films crack?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai Peng; Routh, Alexander F

    2004-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which films fail during drying is the first step in controlling this natural process. Previous studies have examined the spacing between cracks with predictions made by assuming a balance between elastic energy released with a surface energy consumed. We introduce a new scaling for the spacing between cracks in drying dispersions. The scaling relates to the distance that solvent can flow, to relieve capillary stresses, as a film fails. The scaling collapses data for a range of evaporation rates, film thicknesses, particle sizes, and materials. This work identifies capillary pressures, induced by packed particle fronts travelling horizontally across films, as responsible for the failure in dried films. PMID:15518466

  8. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  9. Monitoring fatigue cracks in gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalpiaz, G.; Meneghetti, U.

    1991-12-01

    Vibration analysis is the most common means of gear monitoring and diagnostics. Gear vibration is affected by faults but the signal is usually picked up at the case, where it is also affected by the structural response. An appropriate filtering function is therefore proposed to recover the torsional gear vibration from the case vibration signal. The restored gear vibration can then be used with greater confidence than case vibration both for particular diagnostics purposes like crack detection and for more general objectives. This technique and its possible advantages in fatigue crack detection are illustrated in the paper.

  10. Automatic inspection of pavement cracking distress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Huang, Y.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents the image-processing algorithm customized for high-speed, real-time inspection of pavement cracking. In the algorithm, a pavement image is divided into grid cells of 8x8 pixels and each cell is classified as a non-crack or crack cell using the grayscale information of the border pixels. Whether a crack cell can be regarded as a basic element (or seed) depends on its contrast to the neighboring cells. A number of crack seeds can be called a crack cluster if they fall on a linear string. A crack cluster corresponds to a dark strip in the original image that may or may not be a section of a real crack. Additional conditions to verify a crack cluster include the requirements in the contrast, width and length of the strip. If verified crack clusters are oriented in similar directions, they will be joined to become one crack. Because many operations are performed on crack seeds rather than on the original image, crack detection can be executed simultaneously when the frame grabber is forming a new image, permitting real-time, online pavement survey. The trial test results show a good repeatability and accuracy when multiple surveys were conducted at different driving conditions.

  11. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  12. The Vernier delay unit

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.B.

    1985-02-01

    One of the most critical timing specifications for the SLC machine occurs at the injector and ejector magnets for the Damping Ring. It has been determined that the trigger pulses to the magnets must be controlled to 0.1 ns. The primary source for all trigger pulses for the SLC machine is the Programmable Delay Unit (PDU). The PDU generates a 67.2 ns wide pulse with delay increments of 8.7 ns. The gap between the required accuracy and that available from the PDU requires the design of a new module that is called the Vernier Delay Unit (VDU). This module accepts the 67.2 ns pulse from the PDU and is capable of increasing the delay in steps of 0.1 ns from 0 to 10.7 ns plus the minimum 9 ns delay. The module has two totally independent channels. The pulse input to the module is software selectable from either the auxiliary backplane or a front panel Lemo connector. The auxiliary backplane pulses are to be the 67 ns differential ECL pulses from the PDU. The front panel input is to be a NIM level (-0.7 V 50 termination).

  13. Corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior of titanium alloys in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shipilov, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior, the effect of applied potential on corrosion FCG rates, and the fracture surfaces of VT20 (near-{alpha}) and TS6 (near-{beta}) titanium alloys were studied. Environments were aqueous solutions of sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}), and chromic acid (H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}) with and without NaCl. Depending upon solution composition, corrosion FCG rates were found to be higher or lower than those in air. Cathodic polarization retarded the corrosion FCG, while anodic polarization accelerated insignificantly or almost did not influence it in most of the solutions investigated. However, cathodic polarization accelerated corrosion FCG in 0.6 M FeCl{sub 3} and 0.5 M to 2 M H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} + 0.01 M to 0.1 M NaCl solutions by a dozen times when the maximum stress intensity (K{sub max}) exceeded certain critical values. When K{sub max} was lower than the critical values, the same cathodic polarization (with all other /conditions being equal) retarded corrosion FCG. Results suggested the accelerated crack growth at cathodic potentials resulted from hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). Therefore, critical values of K{sub max}, as well as the stress intensity range ({Delta}K) were regarded as corresponding to the beginning of corrosion FCG according to a HIC mechanism and designated as K{sub HIC} and {Delta}K{sub HIC}.

  14. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2003-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world

  15. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2004-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world

  16. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  17. Mechanics of the crack path formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of experimentally obtained curvilinear crack path trajectories formed in a heterogeneous stress field is presented. Experimental crack path trajectories were used as data for the numerical simulations, recreating the actual stress field governing the development of the crack path. Thus, the current theories of crack curving and kinking could be examined by comparing them with the actual stress field parameters as they develop along the experimentally observed crack path. The experimental curvilinear crack path trajectories were formed in the tensile specimens with a hole positioned in the vicinity of a potential crack path. The numerical simulation, based on the solution of equivalent boundary value problems with the possible perturbations of the crack path, is presented.

  18. Mechanics of the crack path formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed analysis of experimentally obtained curvilinear crack path trajectories formed in a heterogeneous stress field is presented. Experimental crack path trajectories were used as data for numerical simulations, recreating the actual stress field governing the development of the crack path. Thus, the current theories of crack curving and kinking could be examined by comparing them with the actual stress field parameters as they develop along the experimentally observed crack path. The experimental curvilinear crack path trajectories were formed in the tensile specimens with a hole positioned in the vicinity of a potential crack path. The numerical simulation, based on the solution of equivalent boundary value problems with the possible perturbations of the crack path, is presented here.

  19. Damage analysis of a crack layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botsis, J.

    1989-01-01

    Damage analysis of a crack layer in polystyrene is carried out by employing optical microscopy and principles of quantitative stereology. The results show that, within the quasistatic phase of crack layer propagation, the average crazing density, along the trailing edge of the active zone, is constant. This is consistent with a self-similarity hypothesis of damage evolution employed by the crack layer theory. The average crazing densities within the active zone and along its trailing edge are found to be practically equal. A layer of constant crazing density, adjacent to the crack planes, accompanies the crack during its quasi-static growth. This suggests that: (1) a certain level of crazing density should be reached, around the crack tip, prior to crack advance; (2) the specific energy, associated with this 'core' of damage, could be considered as a Griffith's type energy. The results are in favor of certain hypothesis adopted by the crack layer theory.

  20. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  1. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  2. Thermal cracking with hydrogen donor diluent

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Varghese, P.; Whitehurst, D.D.

    1983-07-26

    An improved hydrogen donor for hydrogen donor diluent cracking is provided by extraction with naphtha from the cracked product and hydrogenation by hydrogen transfer from a lower boiling hydrogen donor such as tetralin.

  3. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  4. TV fatigue crack monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for monitoring the development and growth of fatigue cracks in a test specimen subjected to a pulsating tensile load. A plurality of television cameras photograph a test specimen which is illuminated at the point of maximum tensile stress. The television cameras have a modified vidicon tube which has an increased persistence time thereby eliminating flicker in the displayed images.

  5. Crack-Defined Electronic Nanogaps.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Valentin; Niklaus, Frank; Stemme, Göran

    2016-03-01

    Achieving near-atomic-scale electronic nanogaps in a reliable and scalable manner will facilitate fundamental advances in molecular detection, plasmonics, and nanoelectronics. Here, a method is shown for realizing crack-defined nanogaps separating TiN electrodes, allowing parallel and scalable fabrication of arrays of sub-10 nm electronic nanogaps featuring individually defined gap widths. PMID:26784270

  6. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasagara Nagarajan, Varun

    hydrogen induced failure mechanism in this material during cyclic loading. The secondary objective of this investigation was to determine the role of inclusions and their influence in affecting the fatigue crack growth rate of this material. Compact tension and tensile specimens were prepared as per ASTM E-647, E-399 and E-8 standards. The specimens were tested in three different heat treated conditions i.e. annealed (as received) as well as two austempered conditions. These specimens were precharged with hydrogen (ex situ) using cathodic charging method at a constant current density at three different time periods ranging from 150 to 250 hours before conducting fatigue crack growth tests. Mode 1 type fatigue tests were then performed in ambient atmosphere at constant amplitude using load ratio R of 0.1. The near threshold fatigue crack growth rate, fatigue threshold and the fatigue crack growth rate in the linear region were determined. Fatigue crack growth behaviour of specimens without any dissolve hydrogen were then compared with the specimens with different concentration of dissolved hydrogen. The test results show that the dissolved hydrogen concentration increases with the increase in charging time in all three heat treated conditions and the hydrogen uptake shows a strong dependence on the microstructure of the alloy. It was also observed that the microstructure has a significant influence of on the fatigue crack growth and SCC behaviour of the alloy with dissolved hydrogen. As the dissolved hydrogen concentration increases, the fatigue threshold was found to decrease and the near threshold crack growth rate increases in all three heat treated conditions showing the deleterious effect of hydrogen, but to a different extent in each condition. Current test results also indicate that the fatigue crack growth rates in the linear region increases as the dissolved hydrogen content increases in all three heat treated conditions. It is also observed that increasing the

  7. Automatic inspection of pavement cracking distress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yaxiong; Xu, Bugao

    2006-01-01

    We present an image processing algorithm customized for high-speed, real-time inspection of pavement cracking. In the algorithm, a pavement image is divided into grid cells of 8×8 pixels, and each cell is classified as a noncrack or crack cell using the grayscale information of the border pixels. Whether a crack cell can be regarded as a basic element (or seed) depends on its contrast to the neighboring cells. A number of crack seeds can be called a crack cluster if they fall on a linear string. A crack cluster corresponds to a dark strip in the original image that may or may not be a section of a real crack. Additional conditions to verify a crack cluster include the requirements in the contrast, width, and length of the strip. If verified crack clusters are oriented in similar directions, they will be joined to become one crack. Because many operations are performed on crack seeds rather than on the original image, crack detection can be executed simultaneously when the frame grabber is forming a new image, permitting real-time, online pavement surveys. The trial test results show a good repeatability and accuracy when multiple surveys were conducted at different driving conditions.

  8. Jumplike fatigue crack growth in compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limar', L. V.; Demina, Yu. A.; Botvina, L. R.

    2014-04-01

    It is shown that power relations between the two main fractographic characteristics of fracture surfaces forming during jumplike fatigue crack growth, namely, the crack depth and the corresponding crack front length, can be used to estimate the fracture stress during vibration tests of the compressor blades of an aviation gas turbine engine, which are made of VT3-1 titanium alloy.

  9. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... the total length of any crack or series of consecutive cracks does not exceed two staybolt pitches. (d) Cracks in plain, circular or Adamson ring or similar type furnaces may be welded provided any one...

  10. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... the total length of any crack or series of consecutive cracks does not exceed two staybolt pitches. (d) Cracks in plain, circular or Adamson ring or similar type furnaces may be welded provided any one...

  11. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cracks. 59.10-5 Section 59.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING REPAIRS TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending from the calking edge of plates...

  12. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... the total length of any crack or series of consecutive cracks does not exceed two staybolt pitches. (d) Cracks in plain, circular or Adamson ring or similar type furnaces may be welded provided any one...

  13. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... the total length of any crack or series of consecutive cracks does not exceed two staybolt pitches. (d) Cracks in plain, circular or Adamson ring or similar type furnaces may be welded provided any one...

  14. Cracking process with catalyst of combined zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E. M.; Winter, W. E.

    1981-09-01

    A hydrocarbon cracking catalyst comprises an ultrastable y-type crystalline zeolite, a small pore crystalline zeolite such as mordenite, an inorganic oxide matrix and, optionally, a porous inert component. The cracking catalyst has a high activity and selectivity for the production of high octane naphtha fractions from higher boiling point hydrocarbonaceous oils. Catalytic cracking processes utilizing the catalyst are also provided.

  15. Cracked Teeth: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lubisich, Erinne B.; Hilton, Thomas J.; FERRACANE, JACK

    2013-01-01

    Although cracked teeth are a common problem for patients and dentists, there is a dearth of evidence-based guidelines on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat cracks in teeth. The purpose of this article is to review the literature to establish what evidence exists regarding the risk factors for cracked teeth and their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:20590967

  16. The transition from subsonic to supersonic cracks

    PubMed Central

    Behn, Chris; Marder, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the full analytical solution for steady-state in-plane crack motion in a brittle triangular lattice. This allows quick numerical evaluation of solutions for very large systems, facilitating comparisons with continuum fracture theory. Cracks that propagate faster than the Rayleigh wave speed have been thought to be forbidden in the continuum theory, but clearly exist in lattice systems. Using our analytical methods, we examine in detail the motion of atoms around a crack tip as crack speed changes from subsonic to supersonic. Subsonic cracks feature displacement fields consistent with a stress intensity factor. For supersonic cracks, the stress intensity factor disappears. Subsonic cracks are characterized by small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in the vertical displacement of an atom along the crack line, while supersonic cracks have large-amplitude, low-frequency oscillations. Thus, while supersonic cracks are no less physical than subsonic cracks, the connection between microscopic and macroscopic behaviour must be made in a different way. This is one reason supersonic cracks in tension had been thought not to exist. PMID:25713443

  17. A review of fatigue crack growth analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1991-01-01

    Stress intensity factor range, Delta K, has been shown to correlate well with fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN. A number of fatigue crack growth theories have been developed for such correlations. Often, conjectory theories of fatigue crack growth are constructed from experimental data. On the other hand, fatigue crack growth theories can also be derived rigorously with deductive logic. Four such deductive theories are reviewed: (1) that for the growth of a small crack in a very wide homogeneous plate, (2) the theory of similitude for the correlation of da/dN with Delta K, (3) a theory of crack growth in homogeneous materials in small-scale yielding, and (4) the unzipping theory of fatigue crack growth. This paper synthesizes these four theories into a logic framework useful for fatigue crack growth analysis. The deductive theories and the conjectory theories complement each other in the advances of the understanding of fatigue crack growth. The applications of logic framework to formulating an overview of fatigue crack growth behavior and to defining the complex issues of the growth of small cracks and crack growth in composites are illustrated.

  18. On Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Newman, James, Jr.; Forman, Royce G.

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth threshold, defining crack growth as either very slow or nonexistent, has been traditionally determined with standardized load reduction methodologies. These experimental procedures can induce load history effects that result in crack closure. This history can affect the crack driving force, i.e. during the unloading process the crack will close first at some point along the wake or blunt at the crack tip, reducing the effective load at the crack tip. One way to reduce the effects of load history is to propagate a crack under constant amplitude loading. As a crack propagates under constant amplitude loading, the stress intensity factor range, Delta K, will increase, as will the crack growth rate. da/dN. A fatigue crack growth threshold test procedure is experimentally validated that does not produce load history effects and can be conducted at a specified stress ratio, R. The authors have chosen to study a ductile aluminum alloy where the plastic deformations generated during testing may be of the magnitude to impact the crack opening.

  19. Estimating Delays In ASIC's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary; Nesheiwat, Jeffrey; Su, Ling

    1994-01-01

    Verification is important aspect of process of designing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). Design must not only be functionally accurate, but must also maintain correct timing. IFA, Intelligent Front Annotation program, assists in verifying timing of ASIC early in design process. This program speeds design-and-verification cycle by estimating delays before layouts completed. Written in C language.

  20. Contingencies promote delay tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid; Hanley, Gregory P; Jessel, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of functional communication training as treatment for problem behavior depends on the extent to which treatment can be extended to typical environments that include unavoidable and unpredictable reinforcement delays. Time-based progressive delay (TBPD) often results in the loss of acquired communication responses and the resurgence of problem behavior, whereas contingency-based progressive delay (CBPD) appears to be effective for increasing tolerance for delayed reinforcement. No direct comparison of TBPD and CBPD has, however, been conducted. We used single-subject designs to compare the relative efficacy of TBPD and CBPD. Four individuals who engaged in problem behavior (e.g., aggression, vocal and motor disruptions, self-injury) participated. Results were consistent across all participants, and showed lower rates of problem behavior and collateral responses during CBPD than during TBPD. The generality of CBPD treatment effects, including optimal rates of communication and compliance with demands, was demonstrated across a small but heterogeneous group of participants, reinforcement contingencies, and contexts. PMID:27449401

  1. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  2. Cracking behavior of structural slab bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baah, Prince

    Bridge deck cracking is a common problem throughout the United States, and it affects the durability and service life of concrete bridges. Several departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States prefer using continuous three-span solid structural slab bridges without stringers over typical four-lane highways. Recent inspections of such bridges in Ohio revealed cracks as wide as 0.125 in. These measured crack widths are more than ten times the maximum limit recommended in ACI 224R-01 for bridge decks exposed to de-icing salts. Measurements using digital image correlation revealed that the cracks widened under truck loading, and in some cases, the cracks did not fully close after unloading. This dissertation includes details of an experimental investigation of the cracking behavior of structural concrete. Prism tests revealed that the concrete with epoxy-coated bars (ECB) develops the first crack at smaller loads, and develops larger crack widths compared to the corresponding specimens with uncoated (black) bars. Slab tests revealed that the slabs with longitudinal ECB developed first crack at smaller loads, exhibited wider cracks and a larger number of cracks, and failed at smaller ultimate loads compared to the corresponding test slabs with black bars. To develop a preventive measure, slabs with basalt and polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete were also included in the test program. These test slabs exhibited higher cracking loads, smaller crack widths, and higher ultimate loads at failure compared to the corresponding slab specimens without fibers. Merely satisfying the reinforcement spacing requirements given in AASHTO or ACI 318-11 is not adequate to limit cracking below the ACI 224R-01 recommended maximum limit, even though all the relevant design requirements are otherwise met. Addition of fiber to concrete without changing any steel reinforcing details is expected to reduce the severity and extent of cracking in reinforced concrete bridge decks.

  3. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  4. Use of fabrics and other measures for retarding reflective cracking of asphaltic concrete overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. D.

    1980-03-01

    Prevention or control of reflection cracks in asphaltic concrete overlays has been a problem from the inception of this type of construction. The many different treatments that have been tried in an effort to solve this problem are: (1) reinforcement within and below the overlay, (2) bond breakers, (3) stress relieving layers, (4) asphalt-mix additives, and (5) placement of fabrics between the existing pavement and the overlay. At the present time, no treatment has been tried that will completely prevent the formation of reflection cracks. Some treatments do delay the formation of cracks, while others do not appear to help at all. Indications are that fabrics do have some beneficial effects, such as a moisture barrier, even though the overlays develop reflection cracks. The fabrics that have been tried for the control of reflection cracks included: (1) Petromat, (2) Bidim, (3) Typar, (4) Cerex, (5) Mirafi, (6) Structofors, (7) Bituthene, (8) Protecto-Wrap, and (9) Fiberglass. Asphalt-rubber interlayers, as formulated by the Arizona Refining Company and the Sahuaro Petroleum Company, show promise in retarding reflection cracks.

  5. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  6. The three thresholds for fatigue crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    The three governing threshold conditions in metal fatigue are considered, one relating to crack growth in single crystals, one concerned with crack growth in polycrystalline materials, and one based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). All three conditions are examined in relation to the two physical processes of cracking, i.e., Stage I (shear) and Stage II (tensile) crack growth. The LEFM threshold is seen as a lower bound condition for fatigue crack growth rate, and the single crystal threshold is viewed in relation to the fundamental threshold pertaining to the fatigue resistance of polycrystalline metals.

  7. Cracks in Flow Liners and Their Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Raju, I. S.

    2005-01-01

    Cracks were detected in flow liners at the gimbal joints in the LH2 feedlines of the space shuttle's main engines. The cracks initiated at defects in the drainage slots of the flow liners and grew due to high cycle fatigue. Fracture mechanics analyses were conducted to evaluate the life of the liners. These analyses yielded extremely short lives in the presence of small surface or corner cracks. A high fidelity detection method, edge replication, was used to detect the very small cracks. The detected cracks were removed by polishing and the surface quality of the slots was reestablished to improve life of the liners.

  8. Crack detection by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the potential of stimulated infrared thermography is studied for the detection of cracks located in metallic materials. To start with, the feasibility of the method is shown with the use of numerical simulations. Stimulated infrared thermography allows detecting emerging cracks in samples whether reflective or not as well as non-emerging cracks. In addition, crack detection is due to the radiative effects and/or the thermal effects induced by the defects. Then, the experimental device implemented for the study is detailed. Finally, experiments confirm that stimulated infrared thermography enables to detect microscopic cracks, whether emerging or non-emerging, in metal samples.

  9. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformations calculated under variety of loading conditions. Prediction of fatigue-crack-growth lives made with FatigueCrack-Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to initial crack configuration, FASTRAN predicts crack length and other parameters until complete break occurs. Loads are tensile or compressive and of variable or constant amplitude. FASTRAN incorporates linear-elastic fracture mechanics with modifications of load-interaction effects caused by crack closure. FASTRAN considered research tool, because of lengthy calculation times. FASTRAN written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  10. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289{degree}C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320{degree}C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections.

  11. Visual simulation of fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Margolin, H.; Lin, F.B.

    1998-07-01

    An attempt has been made to visually simulate fatigue crack propagation from a precrack. An integrated program was developed for this purpose. The crack-tip shape was determined at four load positions in the first load cycle. The final shape was a blunt front with an ear profile at the precrack tip. A more general model, schematically illustrating the mechanism of fatigue crack growth and striation formation in a ductile material, was proposed based on this simulation. According to the present model, fatigue crack growth is an intermittent process; cyclic plastic shear strain is the driving force applied to both state 1 and 2 crack growth. No fracture mode transition occurs between the two stages in the present study. The crack growth direction alternates, moving up and down successively, producing fatigue striations. A brief examination has been made of the crack growth path in a ductile two-phase material.

  12. Improved imaging algorithm for bridge crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jingxiao; Song, Pingli; Han, Kaihong

    2012-04-01

    This paper present an improved imaging algorithm for bridge crack detection, through optimizing the eight-direction Sobel edge detection operator, making the positioning of edge points more accurate than without the optimization, and effectively reducing the false edges information, so as to facilitate follow-up treatment. In calculating the crack geometry characteristics, we use the method of extracting skeleton on single crack length. In order to calculate crack area, we construct the template of area by making logical bitwise AND operation of the crack image. After experiment, the results show errors of the crack detection method and actual manual measurement are within an acceptable range, meet the needs of engineering applications. This algorithm is high-speed and effective for automated crack measurement, it can provide more valid data for proper planning and appropriate performance of the maintenance and rehabilitation processes of bridge.

  13. Further progress on the wavy-crack model of dynamic crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Pawlikowski, K.

    1995-12-31

    The state-of-the-art theory of dynamic crack propagation has not been able to provide an unequivocal explanation for a number of experimental findings. An important observation is that the crack surfaces, as the trace of fracture path, tend to exhibit a rough surface morphology during rapid crack propagation. In a wavy-crack model proposed recently by the author, the crack surface roughening is attributed to an inherent instability which causes the tip of the crack to propagate along an oscillatory fracture path. It appears that the wavy-crack model is capable of explaining important discrepancies currently existing between theory and experiments. In particular, experimentally observed terminal fracture speeds are significantly lower than the theoretically predicted value, i.e. the Rayleigh wave speed CR. This may be attributed to the oscillatory fracture path which makes the measured crack velocity appear lower than the actual crack speed. Also, the wavy-crack model explains how the local crack tip motion can exhibit high inertia behaviors while the measurable crack motion remains in the low inertia domain. As a result of different inertia effects associated with local and apparent crack motion, the high inertia field near the crack tip tends to induce nucleation of microcrack branches while the low inertia apparent crack field tends to suppress the microbranching. This view of dynamic fracture is not inconsistent with relevant experimental observations (e.g. see and references therein) and recent numerical simulation of fast crack motion. A planar wavy motion of a 3D crack front has been analyzed by Pice et al.. The wavy-crack model has also been applied to dynamic crack propagation along a weak interface having lower fracture resistance than the adjacent material. Further analytical and numerical developments of this model will be discussed in this presentation.

  14. Immunotoxicity of cocaine and crack.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, Maria; Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Chasapis, Christos T; Spiliopoulou, Chara A

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of cocaine and crack was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, using several endpoints, such as the DNA content of the macronuclei and the phagocytic ability. Both forms induced an increase in the DNA content of the protozoan, which indicates the stimulation of the mitotic process. In contrast, the phagocytic activity, of the protozoan was decreased after the administration of cocaine, an effect that was more extensive after the administration of crack. These results, derived from previous experiments, suggest a possible relationship between the observed immunosuppression in cocaine abusers and the immunosuppression found in the protozoan. This suppression subsequently may play a role in the development of other opportunistic infections in drug abusers. This paper, based on in vivo experiments with the protozoan Tetrahymena, suggests the compromised immune response in cocaine addicts and assures the reported effects of cocaine on immune cell function. PMID:21696343

  15. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  16. Compliance matrices for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, R.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to construct the compliance matrix for a cracked solid in the integral-equation formulation of two-dimensional linear-elastic fracture mechanics. The integral equation is reduced to a system of algebraic equations for unknown values of the dislocation-density function at discrete points on the interval from -1 to 1, using the numerical procedure described by Gerasoulis (1982). Sample numerical results are presented, and it is suggested that the algorithm is especially useful in cases where iterative solutions are required; e.g., models of fiber-reinforced concrete, rocks, or ceramics where microcracking, fiber bridging, and other nonlinear effects are treated as nonlinear springs along the crack surfaces (Ballarini et al., 1984).

  17. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (less than 35 microns) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500X) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% NaCl environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  18. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  19. [Acromegaly: reducing diagnostic delay].

    PubMed

    Giustina, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic delay of acromegaly is still very relevant (6-8 years on average) without substantial changes in last twenty years. Clinical impact of this diagnostic delay is significant: tumor growth (2/3 of the patients at diagnosis bear a pituitary macroadenoma), development of irreversible complications (arthropathy, sleep apnea) and in all increased mortality. Reasons for this delay are related to the disease itself (facial and acral changes are very slow and subtle) but also to medical unawareness. Simple tools based on a few sufficiently sensitive and specific signs and symptoms which can trigger the diagnostic suspect would be useful in clinical practice. Global evaluation during follow-up (tumor volume, signs and symptoms, complications, circulating levels of growth hormone and its peripheral mediator IGF-I) has become crucial for the therapeutic decision making. In this regard, tools like SAGIT are now under validation and are expected to improve management of acromegaly. In fact, in the last 30 years there has been a relevant growth of the medical options to treat acromegaly and in the near future there will be an expansion of the medical options. This will greatly help the needed personalization of treatment which necessarily should consider patient convenience and preference and control of complications such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:27571562

  20. Time-Delay Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, Sanjeev V.; Tinto, Massimo

    2005-07-01

    Equal-arm interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers), the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called Time-Delay Interferometry (TDI). This article provides an overview of the theory and mathematical foundations of TDI as it will be implemented by the forthcoming space-based interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. We have purposely left out from this first version of our "Living Review" article on TDI all the results of more practical and experimental nature, as well as all the aspects of TDI that the data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the LISA TDI data combinations. Our forthcoming "second edition" of this review paper will include these topics.

  1. Assessing delay discounting in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting (also intertemporal choice or impulsive choice) is the process by which delayed outcomes, such as delayed food delivery, are valued less than the same outcomes delivered immediately or with a shorter delay. This process is of interest because many psychopathologies, including substance dependence, pathological gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder, are characterized by heightened levels of delay discounting. Some of these disorders are heritable, and data indicate that delay discounting also has a genetic component. To identify the genes underlying the delay discounting decision-making process and genetic correlates of heightened discounting, researchers have used mouse models. This unit describes a protocol for generating delay discounting behavior in mice and discusses analysis techniques for such behavior. PMID:24510779

  2. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which the tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  3. Delayed Speech or Language Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Delayed Speech or Language Development KidsHealth > For Parents > Delayed Speech or Language ... your child is right on schedule. Normal Speech & Language Development It's important to discuss early speech and ...

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Carbon Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    POH-SANG, LAM

    2005-01-13

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the role of weld residual stress on stress corrosion cracking in welded carbon steel plates prototypic to those used for nuclear waste storage tanks. Carbon steel specimen plates were butt-joined with Gas Metal Arc Welding technique. Initial cracks (seed cracks) were machined across the weld and in the heat affected zone. These specimen plates were then submerged in a simulated high level radioactive waste chemistry environment. Stress corrosion cracking occurred in the as-welded plate but not in the stress-relieved duplicate. A detailed finite element analysis to simulate exactly the welding process was carried out, and the resulting temperature history was used to calculate the residual stress distribution in the plate for characterizing the observed stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that the cracking can be predicted for the through-thickness cracks perpendicular to the weld by comparing the experimental KISCC to the calculated stress intensity factors due to the welding residual stress. The predicted crack lengths agree reasonably well with the test data. The final crack lengths appear to be dependent on the details of welding and the sequence of machining the seed cracks, consistent with the prediction.

  5. Crack Turning in Integrally Stiffened Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    2000-01-01

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener--a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation.

  6. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOEpatents

    DeRyckere, John F.; Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank Nolan

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  7. Dual-memory processes in crack cocaine dependents: The effects of childhood neglect on recall.

    PubMed

    Tractenberg, Saulo G; Viola, Thiago W; Gomes, Carlos F A; Wearick-Silva, Luis Eduardo; Kristensen, Christian H; Stein, Lilian M; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to adversities during sensitive periods of neurodevelopment is associated with the subsequent development of substance dependence and exerts harmful, long-lasting effects upon memory functioning. In this study, we investigated the relationship between childhood neglect (CN) and memory using a dual-process model that quantifies recollective and non-recollective retrieval processes in crack cocaine dependents. Eighty-four female crack cocaine-dependent inpatients who did (N = 32) or did not (N = 52) report a history of CN received multiple opportunities to study and recall a short list composed of familiar and concrete words and then received a delayed-recall test. Crack cocaine dependents with a history of CN showed worse performance on free-recall tests than did dependents without a history of CN; this finding was associated with declines in recollective retrieval (direct access) rather than non-recollective retrieval. In addition, we found no evidence of group differences in forgetting rates between immediate- and delayed-recall tests. The results support developmental models of traumatology and suggest that neglect of crack cocaine dependents in early life disrupts the adult memory processes that support the retrieval of detailed representations of events from the past. PMID:25056695

  8. Online bridge crack monitoring with smart film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2013-01-01

    Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed. PMID:24489496

  9. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  10. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-a; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317