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Sample records for hydrogenases related genes

  1. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H(+) + 2e(-)) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment. PMID:26903978

  2. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H+ + 2e-) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment. PMID:26903978

  3. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  4. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts indicative of active facultative aerobes and obligate anaerobes in earthworm gut contents.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2011-09-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H(2) production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H(2) producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content. PMID:21784904

  5. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts Indicative of Active Facultative Aerobes and Obligate Anaerobes in Earthworm Gut Contents▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K.; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A.; Drake, Harold L.

    2011-01-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H2) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H2 production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H2 producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content. PMID:21784904

  6. Molecular characterization of structural genes coding for a membrane bound hydrogenase in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Csáki, R; Hanczár, T; Bodrossy, L; Murrell, J C; Kovács, K L

    2001-12-18

    The first gene cluster encoding for a membrane bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from a methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), was cloned and sequenced. The cluster consisted of the structural genes hupS and hupL and accessory genes hupE, hupC and hupD. A DeltahupSL deletion mutant of Mc. capsulatus was constructed by marker exchange mutagenesis. Membrane associated hydrogenase activity disappeared. The membrane associated hydrogenase appeared to have a hydrogen uptake function in vivo. PMID:11750803

  7. Modeling three-dimensional structure of two closely related Ni-Fe hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Abdullatypov, A V; Tsygankov, A A

    2015-08-01

    The results of homology modeling of HydSL, a NiFe-hydrogenase from purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina BBS, and deep-water bacterium Alteromonas macleodii deep ecotype are presented in this work. It is shown that the models have larger confidence level than earlier published ones; full-size models of these enzymes are presented for the first time. The C-end fragment of small subunit of T. roseopersicina hydrogenase is shown to have random orientation in relation to the main protein globule. The obtained models of this enzyme have a large number of ion pairs, as well as thermostable HydSL hydrogenase from Allochromatium vinosum, in contrast to thermostable HydSL hydrogenase from Alt. macleodii and thermolabile HydAB hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The possible determinant of oxygen stability of studied hydrogenases could be the lack of several intramolecular tunnels. Hydrophobic and electrostatic surfaces were mapped in order to find out possible pathways of coupling hydrogenase to electron-transferring chains, as well as methods for construction of artificial photobiohydrogen-producing systems. PMID:25572109

  8. Flow-FISH analysis and isolation of clostridial strains in an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen producing system by hydrogenase gene target.

    PubMed

    Jen, Chang Jui; Chou, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Chen, Wei-En; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Wen, Fu-Shyan

    2007-04-01

    By using hydrogenase gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), the predominant clostridial hydrogenase that may have contributed to biohydrogen production in an anaerobic semi-solid fermentation system has been monitored. The results revealed that a Clostridium pasteurianum-like hydrogenase gene sequence can be detected by both PCR and RT-PCR and suggested that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene was dominant in hydrogenase activity and population. Whereas another Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene can be detected only by RT-PCR and suggest that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene may be less dominant in population. In this study, hydrogenase gene-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that only 6.6% of the total eubacterial cells in a hydrogen-producing culture were detected to express the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase, whereas the eubacteria that expressed the C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase was 25.6%. A clostridial strain M1 possessing the identical nucleotide sequences of the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene was then isolated and identified as Clostridium butyricum based on 16S rRNA sequence. Comparing to the original inoculum with mixed microflora, either using C. butyricum M1 as the only inoculum or co-culturing with a Bacillus thermoamylovorans isolate will guarantee an effective and even better production of hydrogen from brewery yeast waste. PMID:17277963

  9. Discovery of [NiFe] hydrogenase genes in metagenomic DNA: cloning and heterologous expression in Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Gergely; Tong, Yingkai; Yooseph, Shibu; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Smith, Hamilton O; Kovács, Kornél L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig; Xu, Qing

    2009-09-01

    Using a metagenomics approach, we have cloned a piece of environmental DNA from the Sargasso Sea that encodes an [NiFe] hydrogenase showing 60% identity to the large subunit and 64% to the small subunit of a Thiocapsa roseopersicina O2-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase. The DNA sequence of the hydrogenase identified by the metagenomic approach was subsequently found to be 99% identical to the hyaA and hyaB genes of an Alteromonas macleodii hydrogenase, indicating that it belongs to the Alteromonas clade. We were able to express our new Alteromonas hydrogenase in T. roseopersicina. Expression was accomplished by coexpressing only two accessory genes, hyaD and hupH, without the need to express any of the hyp accessory genes (hypABCDEF). These results suggest that the native accessory proteins in T. roseopersicina could substitute for the Alteromonas counterparts that are absent in the host to facilitate the assembly of a functional Alteromonas hydrogenase. To further compare the complex assembly machineries of these two [NiFe] hydrogenases, we performed complementation experiments by introducing the new Alteromonas hyaD gene into the T. roseopersicina hynD mutant. Interestingly, Alteromonas endopeptidase HyaD could complement T. roseopersicina HynD to cleave endoproteolytically the C-terminal end of the T. roseopersicina HynL hydrogenase large subunit and activate the enzyme. This study refines our knowledge on the selectivity and pleiotropy of the elements of the [NiFe] hydrogenase assembly machineries. It also provides a model for functionally analyzing novel enzymes from environmental microbes in a culture-independent manner. PMID:19633107

  10. Evolutionary Significance of an Algal Gene Encoding an [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with F-Domain Homology and Hydrogenase Activity in Chlorella Variabilis NC64A

    SciTech Connect

    Meuser, J. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Ananyev, G.; Karns, D.; Radakovits, R.; Murthy, U. M. N.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Dismukes, G. C.; Peters, J. W.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2011-10-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA) link the production of molecular H{sub 2} to anaerobic metabolism in many green algae. Similar to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) exhibits [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HYDA) activity during anoxia. In contrast to C. reinhardtii and other chlorophycean algae, which contain hydrogenases with only the HYDA active site (H-cluster), C. variabilis NC64A is the only known green alga containing HYDA genes encoding accessory FeS cluster-binding domains (F-cluster). cDNA sequencing confirmed the presence of F-cluster HYDA1 mRNA transcripts, and identified deviations from the in silico splicing models. We show that HYDA activity in C. variabilis NC64A is coupled to anoxic photosynthetic electron transport (PSII linked, as well as PSII-independent) and dark fermentation. We also show that the in vivo H{sub 2}-photoproduction activity observed is as O2 sensitive as in C. reinhardtii. The two C. variabilis NC64A HYDA sequences are similar to homologs found in more deeply branching bacteria (Thermotogales), diatoms, and heterotrophic flagellates, suggesting that an F-cluster HYDA is the ancestral enzyme in algae. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the algal HYDA H-cluster domains are monophyletic, suggesting that they share a common origin, and evolved from a single ancestral F-cluster HYDA. Furthermore, phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the multiple algal HYDA paralogs are the result of gene duplication events that occurred independently within each algal lineage. Collectively, comparative genomic, physiological, and phylogenetic analyses of the C. variabilis NC64A hydrogenase has provided new insights into the molecular evolution and diversity of algal [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  11. Enhancing hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes by heterologous expression of hydrogenase genes originated from Synechocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlu; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Jinfang; Zhang, Chuanxi; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogenase genes (hoxEFUYH) of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were cloned and heterologously expressed in Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC13408 for the first time in this study, and the hydrogen yield was significantly enhanced using the recombinant strain. A recombinant plasmid containing the gene in-frame with Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) gene was transformed into E. aerogenes ATCC13408 to produce a GST-fusion protein. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis confirm the successful expression of the hox genes. The hydrogenase activity of the recombinant strain is 237.6±9.3ml/(g-DW·h), which is 152% higher than the wild strain. The hydrogen yield of the recombinant strain is 298.3ml/g-glucose, which is 88% higher than the wild strain. During hydrogen fermentation, the recombinant strain produces more acetate and butyrate, but less ethanol. This is corresponding to the NADH metabolism in the cell due to the higher hydrogenase activity with the heterologous expression of hox genes. PMID:27343449

  12. Relating diffusion along the substrate tunnel and oxygen sensitivity in hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Leroux, Fanny; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien; Baffert, Carole; Lautier, Thomas; Fourmond, Vincent; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Cavazza, Christine; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    In hydrogenases and many other redox enzymes, the buried active site is connected to the solvent by a molecular channel whose structure may determine the enzyme's selectivity with respect to substrate and inhibitors. The role of these channels has been addressed using crystallography and molecular dynamics, but kinetic data are scarce. Using protein film voltammetry, we determined and then compared the rates of inhibition by CO and O2 in ten NiFe hydrogenase mutants and two FeFe hydrogenases. We found that the rate of inhibition by CO is a good proxy of the rate of diffusion of O2 toward the active site. Modifying amino acids whose side chains point inside the tunnel can slow this rate by orders of magnitude. We quantitatively define the relations between diffusion, the Michaelis constant for H2 and rates of inhibition, and we demonstrate that certain enzymes are slowly inactivated by O2 because access to the active site is slow. PMID:19966788

  13. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of four additional genes of the hydrogenase structural operon from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, E; Palacios, J M; Murillo, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 2.5-kbp region following the hydrogenase structural genes (hupSL) in the H2 uptake gene cluster from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 was determined. Four closely linked genes encoding peptides of 27.9 (hupC), 22.1 (hupD), 19.0 (hupE), and 10.4 (hupF) kDa were identified immediately downstream of hupL. Proteins with comparable apparent molecular weights were detected by heterologous expression of these genes in Escherichia coli. The six genes, hupS to hupF, are arranged as an operon, and by mutant complementation analysis, it was shown that genes hupSLCD are cotranscribed. A transcription start site preceded by the -12 to -24 consensus sequence characteristic of NtrA-dependent promoters was identified upstream of hupS. On the basis of the lack of oxygen-dependent H2 uptake activity of a hupC::Tn5 mutant and on structural characteristics of the protein, we postulate that HupC is a b-type cytochrome involved in electron transfer from hydrogenase to oxygen. The product from hupE, which is needed for full hydrogenase activity, exhibited characteristics typical of a membrane protein. The features of HupC and HupE suggest that they form, together with the hydrogenase itself, a membrane-bound protein complex involved in hydrogen oxidation. Images PMID:1597428

  14. The phylogeny of uptake hydrogenases in Frankia.

    PubMed

    Leul, Melakeselam; Normand, Philippe; Sellstedt, Anita

    2009-03-01

    Uptake hydrogenase is an enzyme that is beneficial for nitrogen fixation in bacteria. Recent studies have shown that Frankia sp. has two sets of uptake hydrogenase genes, organized in synton 1 and synton 2. In the present study, phylogenetic analysis of the structural subunits of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 showed a distinct clustering pattern between the proteins of Frankia strains that were isolated from different host plants and non-Frankia organisms. The structural subunits of hydrogenase synton 1 of Frankia sp. CpI1, Frankia alni ACN14a, and F. alni AvCI1 were grouped together while those of Frankia spp. CcI3, KB5, UGL140104, and UGL011102 formed another group. The structural subunits of hydrogenase synton 2 of F. alni ACN14a and Frankia spp. CcI3 and BCU110501 grouped together, but those of Frankia spp. KB5 and CpI1, F. alni ArI3, and F. alniAvCI1 comprised a separate group. The structural subunits of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 of Frankia sp. EAN1pec were more closely related to those of non-Frankia bacteria, i.e., Streptomyces avermitilis and Anaeromyxobacter sp., respectively, than to those of other Frankia strains, suggesting the occurrence of lateral gene transfer between these organisms. In addition, the accessory Hyp proteins of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 of F. alni ACN14a and Frankia sp. CcI3 were shown to be phylogenetically more related to each other than to those of Frankia EAN1pec. PMID:19440980

  15. Structural and gene expression analyses of uptake hydrogenases and other proteins involved in nitrogenase protection in Frankia.

    PubMed

    Richau, K H; Kudahettige, R L; Pujic, P; Kudahettige, N P; Sellstedt, A

    2013-11-01

    The actinorhizal bacterium Frankia expresses nitrogenase and can therefore convert molecular nitrogen into ammonia and the by-product hydrogen. However, nitrogenase is inhibited by oxygen. Consequently, Frankia and its actinorhizal hosts have developed various mechanisms for excluding oxygen from their nitrogen-containing compartments. These include the expression of oxygen-scavenging uptake hydrogenases, the formation of hopanoid-rich vesicles, enclosed by multi-layered hopanoid structures, the lignification of hyphal cell walls, and the production of haemoglobins in the symbiotic nodule. In this work, we analysed the expression and structure of the so-called uptake hydrogenase (Hup), which catalyses the in vivo dissociation of hydrogen to recycle the energy locked up in this 'waste' product. Two uptake hydrogenase syntons have been identified in Frankia: synton 1 is expressed under freeliving conditions while synton 2 is expressed during symbiosis. We used qPCR to determine synton 1 hup gene expression in two Frankia strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We also predicted the 3D structures of the Hup protein subunits based on multiple sequence alignments and remote homology modelling. Finally, we performed BLAST searches of genome and protein databases to identify genes that may contribute to the protection of nitrogenase against oxygen in the two Frankia strains. Our results show that in Frankia strain ACN14a, the expression patterns of the large (HupL1) and small (HupS1) uptake hydrogenase subunits depend on the abundance of oxygen in the external environment. Structural models of the membrane-bound hydrogenase subunits of ACN14a showed that both subunits resemble the structures of known [NiFe] hydrogenases (Volbeda et al. 1995), but contain fewer cysteine residues than the uptake hydrogenase of the Frankia DC12 and Eu1c strains. Moreover, we show that all of the investigated Frankia strains have two squalene hopane cyclase genes (shc1 and shc2). The

  16. The [FeFe] hydrogenase of Nyctotherus ovalis has a chimeric origin

    PubMed Central

    Boxma, Brigitte; Ricard, Guenola; van Hoek, Angela HAM; Severing, Edouard; Moon-van der Staay, Seung-Yeo; van der Staay, Georg WM; van Alen, Theo A; de Graaf, Rob M; Cremers, Geert; Kwantes, Michiel; McEwan, Neil R; Newbold, C Jamie; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Michalowski, Tadeusz; Pristas, Peter; Huynen, Martijn A; Hackstein, Johannes HP

    2007-01-01

    Background The hydrogenosomes of the anaerobic ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis show how mitochondria can evolve into hydrogenosomes because they possess a mitochondrial genome and parts of an electron-transport chain on the one hand, and a hydrogenase on the other hand. The hydrogenase permits direct reoxidation of NADH because it consists of a [FeFe] hydrogenase module that is fused to two modules, which are homologous to the 24 kDa and the 51 kDa subunits of a mitochondrial complex I. Results The [FeFe] hydrogenase belongs to a clade of hydrogenases that are different from well-known eukaryotic hydrogenases. The 24 kDa and the 51 kDa modules are most closely related to homologous modules that function in bacterial [NiFe] hydrogenases. Paralogous, mitochondrial 24 kDa and 51 kDa modules function in the mitochondrial complex I in N. ovalis. The different hydrogenase modules have been fused to form a polyprotein that is targeted into the hydrogenosome. Conclusion The hydrogenase and their associated modules have most likely been acquired by independent lateral gene transfer from different sources. This scenario for a concerted lateral gene transfer is in agreement with the evolution of the hydrogenosome from a genuine ciliate mitochondrion by evolutionary tinkering. PMID:18021395

  17. Artificial Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Olsen, Matthew T.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Decades of biophysical study on the hydrogenase (H2ase) enzymes have yielded sufficient information to guide the synthesis of analogues of their active sites. Three families of enzymes serve as inspiration for this work: the [FeFe]-, [NiFe]-, and [Fe]-H2ases, all of which feature iron centers bound to both CO and thiolate. Artificial H2ases effect the oxidation of H2 of H2 and the reverse reaction, the reduction of protons. These reactions occur via the intermediacy of metal hydrides. The inclusion of amine bases within the catalysts is an important design feature that is emulated in related bioinspired catalysts. Continuing challenges are the low reactivity of H2 towards biomimetic H2ases. PMID:20356731

  18. Analysis of extensive [FeFe] hydrogenase gene diversity within the gut microbiota of insects representing five families of Dictyoptera.

    PubMed

    Ballor, Nicholas R; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2012-04-01

    We have designed and utilized degenerate primers in the phylogenetic analysis of [FeFe] hydrogenase gene diversity in the gut ecosystems of roaches and lower termites. H(2) is an important free intermediate in the breakdown of wood by termite gut microbial communities, reaching concentrations in some species exceeding those measured for any other biological system. The primers designed target with specificity the largest group of enzymatic H domain proteins previously identified in a termite gut metagenome. "Family 3" hydrogenase sequences were amplified from the guts of lower termites, Incisitermes minor, Zootermopsis nevadensis, and Reticulitermes hesperus, and two roaches, Cryptocercus punctulatus and Periplaneta americana. Subsequent analyses revealed that all termite and Cryptocercus sequences were phylogenetically distinct from non-termite-associated hydrogenases available from public databases. The abundance of unique sequence operational taxonomic units (as many as 21 from each species) underscores the previously demonstrated physiological importance of H(2) to the gut ecosystems of these wood-feeding insects. The diversity of sequences observed might be reflective of multiple niches that the enzymes have been evolved to accommodate. Sequences cloned from Cryptocercus and the lower termite samples, all of which are wood feeding insects, clustered closely with one another in phylogenetic analyses to the exclusion of alleles from P. americana, an omnivorous cockroach, also cloned during this study. We present primers targeting a family of termite gut [FeFe] hydrogenases and provide results that are consistent with a pivotal role for hydrogen in the termite gut ecosystem and point toward unique evolutionary adaptations to the gut ecosystem. PMID:21935609

  19. Genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio spp. in environmental samples analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, C; Muyzer, G

    1995-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in environmental samples was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments. Five different PCR primers were designed after comparative analysis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene sequences from three Desulfovibrio species. These primers were tested in different combinations on the genomic DNAs of a variety of hydrogenase-containing and hydrogenase-lacking bacteria. One primer pair was found to be specific for Desulfovibrio species only, while the others gave positive results with other bacteria also. By using this specific primer pair, we were able to amplify the [NiFe] hydrogenase genes of DNAs isolated from environmental samples and to detect the presence of Desulfovibrio species in these samples. However, only after DGGE analysis of these PCR products could the number of different Desulfovibrio species within the samples be determined. DGGE analysis of PCR products from different bioreactors demonstrated up to two bands, while at least five distinguishable bands were detected in a microbial mat sample. Because these bands most likely represent as many Desulfovibrio species present in these samples, we conclude that the genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in the natural microbial mat is far greater than that in the experimental bioreactors. PMID:7793940

  20. H2-Producing Bacterial Community during Rice Straw Decomposition in Paddy Field Soil: Estimation by an Analysis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Ryuko; Asakawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription patterns of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes (hydA), which encode the enzymes responsible for H2 production, were investigated during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil using molecular biological techniques. Paddy soil amended with and without rice straw was incubated under anoxic conditions. RNA was extracted from the soil, and three clone libraries of hydA were constructed using RNAs obtained from samples in the initial phase of rice straw decomposition (day 1 with rice straw), methanogenic phase of rice straw decomposition (day 14 with rice straw), and under a non-amended condition (day 14 without rice straw). hydA genes related to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Thermotogae were mainly transcribed in paddy soil samples; however, their proportions markedly differed among the libraries. Deltaproteobacteria-related hydA genes were predominantly transcribed on day 1 with rice straw, while various types of hydA genes related to several phyla were transcribed on day 14 with rice straw. Although the diversity of transcribed hydA was significantly higher in the library on day 14 with rice straw than the other two libraries, the composition of hydA transcripts in the library was similar to that in the library on day 14 without rice straw. These results indicate that the composition of active H2 producers and/or H2 metabolic patterns dynamically change during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil. PMID:27319579

  1. Purification and characterization of membrane-associated hydrogenase from the deep-sea epsilonproteobacterium Hydrogenimonas thermophila.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Kitano, Yuki; Inoue, Takahiro; Nomura, Keigo; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-associated hydrogenase was purified from the chemolithoautotrophic epsilonproteobacterium Hydrogenimonas thermophila at 152-fold purity. The hydrogenase was found to be localized in the periplasmic space, and was easily solubilized with 0.1% Triton X-100 treatment. Hydrogen oxidation activity was 1,365 micromol H(2)/min/mg of protein at 80 degrees C at pH 9.0, with phenazine methosulphate as the electron acceptor. Hydrogen production activity was 900 micromol H(2)/min/mg of protein at 80 degrees C and pH 6.0, with reduced methyl viologen as the electron donor. The hydrogenase from this organism showed higher oxygen tolerance than those from other microorganisms showing hydrogen oxidation activity. The structural genes of this hydrogenase, which contains N-terminal amino acid sequences from both small and large subunits of purified hydrogenase, were successfully elucidated. The hydrogenase from H. thermophila was found to be phylogenetically related with H(2) uptake hydrogenases from pathogenic Epsilonproteobacteria. PMID:20699572

  2. Regulation and genetic organization of hydrogenase: Final progress report for the period June 1, 1985--July 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Krasna, A.I.

    1988-10-01

    Hydrogenase is an enzyme which plays an important role in the anaerobic metabolism of many bacteria. The objectives of the research were to elucidate the regulation and genetic organization of hydrogenase in microorganisms. A mutation in the E. coli hydE gene leads to loss of all hydrogenase activities and isoenzymes as well as all formate-related activities. A 0.9 kb DNA fragment has been cloned from an E. coli genomic DNA library which restored all hydrogenase and formate activities to a hydE mutant strain. This gene coded for a polypeptide of subunit mw 36 kDa which is required for hydrogenase synthesis. It is involved in incorporation of nickel into hydrogenase. A mutation in the E coli hupB gene leads to the loss of the uptake of H/sub 2/ by dyes and the ability to grow on fumarate plus H/sub 2/, but expresses normal levels of hydrogenase when assayed by deuterium exchange. This mutation also leads to loss of all formate-related activities. The mutation mapped near minute 17 and a single mutation was responsible for loss of both activities. A 1.4 kb DNA fragment was isolated which restored the hydrogen uptake activities and coded for a polypeptide of subunit mw 30 kDa. Dna fragments have been isolated from Chromatium vinosum and Proteus vulgaris which restored hydrogenase activities to E. coli strains with mutations in the hydA or hydB regulatory genes and which lack all hydrogenase activities. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  4. Hydrogen evolution in [NiFe] hydrogenases and related biomimetic systems: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Das, Ranjita; Neese, Frank; van Gastel, Maurice

    2016-09-21

    In this work, a detailed quantum chemical study of the mechanism of [Ni(bdt)(dppf)] (Ni(II)L) catalyzed hydrogen formation [A. Gan, T. L. Groy, P. Tarakeshwar, S. K. S. Mazinani, J. Shearer, V. Mujica and A. K. Jones, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2015, 137, 1109-1115] following an electro-chemical-electro-chemical (ECEC) pathway is reported. The complex exclusively catalyzes the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen. The calculations suggest that the first one-electron reduction of the [Ni(II)L] catalyst is the rate limiting step of the catalytic cycle and hence, the buildup of detectable reaction intermediates is not expected. The catalytic activity of the [Ni(II)L] complex is facilitated by the flexibility of the ligand system, which allows the ligand framework to adapt to changes in the Ni oxidation state over the course of the reaction. Additionally, a comparison is made with the catalytic activity of [NiFe] hydrogenase. It is argued that the directionality of the reversible hydrogen formation reaction is controlled by the ligand field of the nickel ion and the possibility for side-on (η(2)) binding of H2: if the ligand framework does not allow for η(2) binding of H2, as is the case for [Ni(II)L], the catalyst irreversibly reduces protons. If the ligand field allows η(2) binding of H2, the catalyst can in principle work reversibly. The conditions for η(2) binding are discussed. PMID:27545687

  5. Relation between anaerobic inactivation and oxygen tolerance in a large series of NiFe hydrogenase mutants.

    PubMed

    Abou Hamdan, Abbas; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Fourmond, Vincent; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; De Lacey, Antonio L; Infossi, Pascale; Rousset, Marc; Dementin, Sébastien; Léger, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Nickel-containing hydrogenases, the biological catalysts of oxidation and production, reversibly inactivate under anaerobic, oxidizing conditions. We aim at understanding the mechanism of (in)activation and what determines its kinetics, because there is a correlation between fast reductive reactivation and oxygen tolerance, a property of some hydrogenases that is very desirable from the point of view of biotechnology. Direct electrochemistry is potentially very useful for learning about the redox-dependent conversions between active and inactive forms of hydrogenase, but the voltammetric signals are complex and often misread. Here we describe simple analytical models that we used to characterize and compare 16 mutants, obtained by substituting the position-74 valine of the -sensitive NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans. We observed that this substitution can accelerate reactivation up to 1,000-fold, depending on the polarity of the position 74 amino acid side chain. In terms of kinetics of anaerobic (in)activation and oxygen tolerance, the valine-to-histidine mutation has the most spectacular effect: The V74H mutant compares favorably with the -tolerant hydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus, which we use here as a benchmark. PMID:23169623

  6. Expression of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Genes in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Katrin; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Cornish, Adam J.; Wolk, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    H2 generated from renewable resources holds promise as an environmentally innocuous fuel that releases only energy and water when consumed. In biotechnology, photoautotrophic oxygenic diazotrophs could produce H2 from water and sunlight using the cells' endogenous nitrogenases. However, nitrogenases have low turnover numbers and require large amounts of ATP. [FeFe]-hydrogenases found in other organisms can have 1,000-fold higher turnover numbers and no specific requirement for ATP but are very O2 sensitive. Certain filamentous cyanobacteria protect nitrogenase from O2 by sequestering the enzyme within internally micro-oxic, differentiated cells called heterocysts. We heterologously expressed the [FeFe]-hydrogenase operon from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 using the heterocyst-specific promoter PhetN. Active [FeFe]-hydrogenase was detected in and could be purified from aerobically grown Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, but only when the organism was grown under nitrate-depleted conditions that elicited heterocyst formation. These results suggest that the heterocysts protected the [FeFe]-hydrogenase against inactivation by O2. PMID:23023750

  7. Transcriptional regulation of genes encoding the selenium-free [NiFe]-hydrogenases in the archaeon Methanococcus voltae involves positive and negative control elements.

    PubMed Central

    Noll, I; Müller, S; Klein, A

    1999-01-01

    Methanococcus voltae harbors genetic information for two pairs of homologous [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the enzymes contain selenocysteine, while the other two gene groups encode apparent isoenzymes that carry cysteinyl residues in the homologous positions. The genes coding for the selenium-free enzymes, frc and vhc, are expressed only under selenium limitation. They are transcribed out of a common intergenic region. A series of deletions made in the intergenic region localized a common negative regulatory element for the vhc and frc promoters as well as two activator elements that are specific for each of the two transcription units. Repeated sequences, partially overlapping the frc promoter, were also detected. Mutations in these repeated heptanucleotide sequences led to a weak induction of a reporter gene under the control of the frc promoters in the presence of selenium. This result suggests that the heptamer repeats contribute to the negative regulation of the frc transcription unit. PMID:10430564

  8. Anaerobic acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: anoxic gene expression, hydrogenase induction, and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Mus, Florence; Dubini, Alexandra; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-08-31

    Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic photosynthetic microbes experience conditions of anoxia, especially during the night when photosynthetic activity ceases. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, dark anoxia is characterized by the activation of an extensive set of fermentation pathways that act in concert to provide cellular energy, while limiting the accumulation of potentially toxic fermentative products. Metabolite analyses, quantitative PCR, and high density Chlamydomonas DNA microarrays were used to monitor changes in metabolite accumulation and gene expression during acclimation of the cells to anoxia. Elevated levels of transcripts encoding proteins associated with the production of H2, organic acids, and ethanol were observed in congruence with the accumulation of fermentation products. The levels of over 500 transcripts increased significantly during acclimation of the cells to anoxic conditions. Among these were transcripts encoding transcription/translation regulators, prolyl hydroxylases, hybrid cluster proteins, proteases, transhydrogenase, catalase, and several putative proteins of unknown function. Overall, this study uses metabolite, genomic, and transcriptome data to provide genome-wide insights into the regulation of the complex metabolic networks utilized by Chlamydomonas under the anaerobic conditions associated with H2 production. PMID:17565990

  9. Identification and sequence analysis of the hupR1 gene, which encodes a response regulator of the NtrC family required for hydrogenase expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Toussaint, B; Vignais, P M

    1991-01-01

    The hupR1 gene from Rhodobacter capsulatus was cloned and sequenced. It can encode a protein of 53,843 Da which shares significant similarity with several transcriptional regulators and activates transcription of the structural hupSL genes of [NiFe]hydrogenase, as shown by the use of a translational fusion of lacZ with the hupSL promoter. A Hup- mutant having a point mutation in the hupR1 gene is described. PMID:1885559

  10. Studies on hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    YAGI, Tatsuhiko; HIGUCHI, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogenases are microbial enzymes which catalyze uptake and production of H2. Hydrogenases are classified into 10 classes based on the electron carrier specificity, or into 3 families, [NiFe]-family (including [NiFeSe]-subfamily), [FeFe]-family and [Fe]-family, based on the metal composition of the active site. H2 is heterolytically cleaved on the enzyme (E) to produce EHaHb, where Ha and Hb have different rate constants for exchange with the medium hydron. X-ray crystallography unveiled the three-dimensional structures of hydrogenases. The simplest [NiFe]-hydrogenase is a heterodimer, in which the large subunit bears the Ni-Fe center buried deep in the protein, and the small subunit bears iron-sulfur clusters, which mediate electron transfer between the Ni-Fe center and the protein surface. Some hydrogenases have additional subunit(s) for interaction with their electron carriers. Various redox states of the enzyme were characterized by EPR, FTIR, etc. Based on the kinetic, structural and spectroscopic studies, the catalytic mechanism of [NiFe]-hydrogenase was proposed to explain H2-uptake, H2-production and isotopic exchange reactions. PMID:23318679

  11. Rubredoxin-related Maturation Factor Guarantees Metal Cofactor Integrity during Aerobic Biosynthesis of Membrane-bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Johannes; Siebert, Elisabeth; Priebe, Jacqueline; Zebger, Ingo; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Teutloff, Christian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase (MBH) supports growth of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with H2 as the sole energy source. The enzyme undergoes a complex biosynthesis process that proceeds during cell growth even at ambient O2 levels and involves 14 specific maturation proteins. One of these is a rubredoxin-like protein, which is essential for biosynthesis of active MBH at high oxygen concentrations but dispensable under microaerobic growth conditions. To obtain insights into the function of HoxR, we investigated the MBH protein purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of hoxR mutant cells. Compared with wild-type MBH, the mutant enzyme displayed severely decreased hydrogenase activity. Electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed features resembling those of O2-sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases and/or oxidatively damaged protein. The catalytic center resided partially in an inactive Niu-A-like state, and the electron transfer chain consisting of three different Fe-S clusters showed marked alterations compared with wild-type enzyme. Purification of HoxR protein from its original host, R. eutropha, revealed only low protein amounts. Therefore, recombinant HoxR protein was isolated from Escherichia coli. Unlike common rubredoxins, the HoxR protein was colorless, rather unstable, and essentially metal-free. Conversion of the atypical iron-binding motif into a canonical one through genetic engineering led to a stable reddish rubredoxin. Remarkably, the modified HoxR protein did not support MBH-dependent growth at high O2. Analysis of MBH-associated protein complexes points toward a specific interaction of HoxR with the Fe-S cluster-bearing small subunit. This supports the previously made notion that HoxR avoids oxidative damage of the metal centers of the MBH, in particular the unprecedented Cys6[4Fe-3S] cluster. PMID:24448806

  12. Application to Photocatalytic H2 Production of a Whole-Cell Reaction by Recombinant Escherichia coli Cells Expressing [FeFe]-Hydrogenase and Maturases Genes.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuki; Hagiwara, Hidehisa; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2016-07-01

    A photocatalytic H2 production system using an inorganic-bio hybrid photocatalyst could contribute to the efficient utilization of solar energy, but would require the development of a new approach for preparing a H2 -forming biocatalyst. In the present study, we constructed a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli expressing the genes encoding the [FeFe]-hydrogenase and relevant maturases from Clostridium acetobutylicum NBRC 13948 for use as a biocatalyst. We investigated the direct application of a whole-cell of the recombinant E. coli. The combination of TiO2 , methylviologen, and the recombinant E. coli formed H2 under light irradiation, demonstrating that whole cells of the recombinant E. coli could be employed for photocatalytic H2 production without any time-consuming and costly manipulations (for example, enzyme purification). This is the first report of the direct application of a whole-cell reaction of recombinant E. coli to photocatalytic H2 production. PMID:27194524

  13. Hydrogenase from Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, S W; Ljungdahl, L G

    1984-11-01

    Hydrogenase from fructose-grown cells of Acetobacterium woodii has been purified 70-fold to a specific activity of 3,500 mumol hydrogen oxidized per min per mg of protein measured at 35 degrees C and pH 7.6 with methyl viologen as electron acceptor. At the same conditions with reduced methyl viologen as electron donor the enzyme catalyzes the evolvement of 440 mumol of H2 per min per mg of protein. The enzyme was found in the soluble portion of the cell, indicating that it is either not membrane-bound or is loosely associated with the membrane. The purified enzyme, which does not contain nickel, exhibits spectroscopic properties similar to the iron-sulfur hydrogenase of Clostridium pasteurianum. The enzyme is strongly inhibited by carbon monoxide, with 50% inhibition occurring at approximately 7 nM CO. Ferredoxin, flavodoxin, and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase are reduced in hydrogen-dependent reaction by the A. woodi hydrogenase. PMID:6393895

  14. Distribution Analysis of Hydrogenases in Surface Waters of Marine and Freshwater Environments

    PubMed Central

    Barz, Martin; Beimgraben, Christian; Staller, Torsten; Germer, Frauke; Opitz, Friederike; Marquardt, Claudia; Schwarz, Christoph; Gutekunst, Kirstin; Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich; Schmitz, Ruth; LaRoche, Julie; Schulz, Rüdiger; Appel, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Background Surface waters of aquatic environments have been shown to both evolve and consume hydrogen and the ocean is estimated to be the principal natural source. In some marine habitats, H2 evolution and uptake are clearly due to biological activity, while contributions of abiotic sources must be considered in others. Until now the only known biological process involved in H2 metabolism in marine environments is nitrogen fixation. Principal Findings We analyzed marine and freshwater environments for the presence and distribution of genes of all known hydrogenases, the enzymes involved in biological hydrogen turnover. The total genomes and the available marine metagenome datasets were searched for hydrogenase sequences. Furthermore, we isolated DNA from samples from the North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, North Sea, Baltic Sea, and two fresh water lakes and amplified and sequenced part of the gene encoding the bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase. In 21% of all marine heterotrophic bacterial genomes from surface waters, one or several hydrogenase genes were found, with the membrane-bound H2 uptake hydrogenase being the most widespread. A clear bias of hydrogenases to environments with terrestrial influence was found. This is exemplified by the cyanobacterial bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase that was found in freshwater and coastal areas but not in the open ocean. Significance This study shows that hydrogenases are surprisingly abundant in marine environments. Due to its ecological distribution the primary function of the bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase seems to be fermentative hydrogen evolution. Moreover, our data suggests that marine surface waters could be an interesting source of oxygen-resistant uptake hydrogenases. The respective genes occur in coastal as well as open ocean habitats and we presume that they are used as additional energy scavenging devices in otherwise nutrient limited environments. The membrane-bound H2-evolving

  15. Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Paula; Axelsson, Rikard; Lindberg, Pia; Oxelfelt, Fredrik; Wünschiers, Röbbe; Lindblad, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cyanobacteria may possess several enzymes that are directly involved in dihydrogen metabolism: nitrogenase(s) catalyzing the production of hydrogen concomitantly with the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia, an uptake hydrogenase (encoded by hupSL) catalyzing the consumption of hydrogen produced by the nitrogenase, and a bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by hoxFUYH) which has the capacity to both take up and produce hydrogen. This review summarizes our knowledge about cyanobacterial hydrogenases, focusing on recent progress since the first molecular information was published in 1995. It presents the molecular knowledge about cyanobacterial hupSL and hoxFUYH, their corresponding gene products, and their accessory genes before finishing with an applied aspect—the use of cyanobacteria in a biological, renewable production of the future energy carrier molecular hydrogen. In addition to scientific publications, information from three cyanobacterial genomes, the unicellular Synechocystis strain PCC 6803 and the filamentous heterocystous Anabaena strain PCC 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme (PCC 73102/ATCC 29133) is included. PMID:11875125

  16. Microbial communities responsible for fixation of CO2 revealed by using mcrA, cbbM, cbbL, fthfs, fefe-hydrogenase genes as molecular biomarkers in petroleum reservoirs of different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-F.; Mbadinga, S. M.; Sun, X.-B.; Yang, G.-C.; Yang, S.-Z.; Gu, J.-D.; Mu, B.-Z.

    2015-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in oil reservoir is one of the feasible options for mitigating atmospheric CO2 building up. The in situ bioconversion of sequestrated CO2 to methane by microorganisms inhabiting oil reservoirs is feasible. To evaluate the potential of in situ microbial fixation and conversion of CO2 into CH4 in oil reservoirs, a comprehensive molecular survey was performed to reveal microbial communities inhabiting four oil reservoirs with different temperatures by analysis of functional genes involved in the biochemical pathways of CO2 fixation and CH4 synthesis (cbbM, cbbL, fthfs, [FeFe]-hydrogenase encoding gene, and mcrA). A rich diversity of these functional genes was found in all the samples with both high and low temperatures and they were affiliated to members of the Proteobacteria (cbbL and cbbM, fthfs), Firmicutes and Actinobacteria (fthfs), uncultured bacteria ([FeFe]-hydrogenase), and Methanomirobiales, Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (mcrA). The predominant methanogens were all identified to be hydrogenotrophic CO2-reducing physiological types. These results showed that functional microbial communities capable of microbial fixation and bioconversion of CO2 into methane inhabit widely in oil reservoirs, which is helpful to microbial recycling of sequestrated CO2 to further new energy in oil reservoirs.

  17. Role of nickel in membrane-bound hydrogenase and nickel metabolism in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Stults, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase of Rhizobium japonicum requires nickel for activity. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni co-migrates with hydrogenase activity in native gel systems and co-elutes with purified hydrogenase form an affinity matrix column. A simplified scheme for the purification of hydrogenase has been developed and constitutes the first report of the aerobic purification of this enzyme from R. japonicum. The aerobic purification utilizes the general affinity matrix. Reactive Red 120-agarose and results in higher specific activity and yield of enzyme than previously reported. The stability of aerobically purified hydrogenase to oxygen is substantially greater than that reported for anaerobically isolated enzyme. Reduction of the aerobically purified enzyme in the presence of oxygen, however, results in the rapid loss of activity. R. japonicum cells accumulate nickel during heterotrophic growth and as non-growing cells. The hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 accumulates substantially greater amounts of nickel under both conditions. Kinetic studies indicate that the nickel uptake system in the hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 is upregulated relative to SRwt cells. The uptake system is specific for nickel, although a 10-fold excess (relative to nickel) of copper or zinc inhibits nickel uptake. The nickel uptake system appears to require energy. Under nickel-free conditions hydrogenase protein is not synthesized as determined by cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against hydrogenase, indicating that nickel regulates the formation of the enzyme as well as being a constituent of the active protein.

  18. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe] hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.

  19. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe]more » hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.« less

  20. Production of biohydrogen by recombinant expression of [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hydrogenases catalyze reversible reaction between hydrogen (H2) and proton. Inactivation of hydrogenase by exposure to oxygen is a critical limitation in biohydrogen production since strict anaerobic conditions are required. While [FeFe]-hydrogenases are irreversibly inactivated by oxygen, it was known that [NiFe]-hydrogenases are generally more tolerant to oxygen. The physiological function of [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 is still ambiguous. We herein investigated the H2 production potential of [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 of Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro. The hyaA and hyaB genes corresponding to the small and large subunits of [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 core enzyme, respectively, were expressed in BL21, an E. coli strain without H2 producing ability. Results Recombinant BL21 expressing [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 actively produced H2 (12.5 mL H2/(h·L) in 400 mL glucose minimal medium under micro-aerobic condition, whereas the wild type BL21 did not produce H2 even when formate was added as substrate for formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) pathway. The majority of recombinant protein was produced as an insoluble form, with translocation of a small fraction to the membrane. However, the membrane fraction displayed high activity (~65% of total cell fraction), based on unit protein mass. Supplement of nickel and iron to media showed these metals contribute essentially to the function of [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 as components of catalytic site. In addition, purified E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 using his6-tag displayed oxygen-tolerant activity of ~12 nmol H2/(min·mg protein) under a normal aeration environment, compared to [FeFe]-hydrogenase, which remains inactive under this condition. Conclusions This is the first report on physiological function of E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 for H2 production. We found that [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 has H2 production ability even under the existence of oxygen. This oxygen-tolerant property is a significant advantage because it is not necessary to protect

  1. Reversible oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase carried by free-living N2-fixing bacteria isolated from the rhizospheres of rice, maize, and wheat

    PubMed Central

    Roumagnac, Philippe; Richaud, Pierre; Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Heulin, Thierry; Peltier, Gilles; Achouak, Wafa; Cournac, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen production by microorganisms is often described as a promising sustainable and clean energy source, but still faces several obstacles, which prevent practical application. Among them, oxygen sensitivity of hydrogenases represents one of the major limitations hampering the biotechnological implementation of photobiological production processes. Here, we describe a hierarchical biodiversity-based approach, including a chemochromic screening of hydrogenase activity of hundreds of bacterial strains collected from several ecosystems, followed by mass spectrometry measurements of hydrogenase activity of a selection of the H2-oxidizing bacterial strains identified during the screen. In all, 131 of 1266 strains, isolated from cereal rhizospheres and basins containing irradiating waste, were scored as H2-oxidizing bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., Stenotrophomonas sp., Enterobacter sp., Rahnella sp., Burkholderia sp., and Ralstonia sp. isolates. Four free-living N2-fixing bacteria harbored a high and oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase activity, which was not fully inhibited within entire cells up to 150–250 μmol/L O2 concentration or within soluble protein extracts up to 25–30 μmol/L. The only hydrogenase-related genes that we could reveal in these strains were of the hyc type (subunits of formate hydrogenlyase complex). The four free-living N2-fixing bacteria were closely related to Enterobacter radicincitans based on the sequences of four genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp60, and hycE genes). These results should bring interesting prospects for microbial biohydrogen production and might have ecophysiological significance for bacterial adaptation to the oxic–anoxic interfaces in the rhizosphere. PMID:23233392

  2. Hydrogenase synthesis in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Hupc mutants is altered in sensitivity to DNA gyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Novak, P D; Maier, R J

    1989-01-01

    In the Hupc mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum SR, regulation of expression of hydrogenase is altered; the mutants synthesize hydrogenase constitutively in the presence of atmospheric levels of oxygen. The DNA gyrase inhibitors nalidixic acid, novobiocin, and coumermycin were used to inhibit growth of wild-type and mutant cells. For each inhibitor tested, growth of mutant and wild-type strains was equally sensitive. However, in contrast to the wild type, the Hupc mutants synthesized hydrogenase in the presence of high levels of any inhibitor. Cells were incubated with the drugs and simultaneously labeled with 14C-labeled amino acids, and hydrogenase was immunoprecipitated with antibody to the large subunit of the enzyme. Fluorograms of antibody blots then were scanned to determine the relative amount of hydrogenase (large subunit) synthesized in the presence or absence of the gyrase inhibitors. The amount of hydrogenase synthesized by the Hupc mutants in the presence of 300 micrograms of nalidixic acid per ml was near the level of enzyme synthesized in the absence of the inhibitor. No hydrogenase was detected in antibody blots of wild-type cultures which were derepressed for hydrogenase in the presence of 100 micrograms of coumermycin or novobiocin per ml. In contrast, hydrogenase was synthesized by the Hupc mutants in the presence of 100 micrograms of either drug per ml. The amount synthesized ranged from 5 to 32% and 20 to 49%, respectively, of that in the absence of those inhibitors, but nevertheless, hydrogenase synthesis was detected in all of the mutants examined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2547335

  3. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-ReducingBacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He,Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-24

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate theoxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe]hydrogenase, an[NiFeSe]hydrogenase, and two [NiFe]hydrogenases encoded by the hyd,hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand theircellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hydand hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those ofthe wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5or 50 percent (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfatereduction. Only strains missing the [Fe]hydrogenase were significantlyaffected during growth with lactate or with 50 percent (vol/vol) hydrogenas the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5 percent[vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate datacorrelated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarrayhybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grownunder the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed theorder 5 percent hydrogen>50 percent hydrogen>lactate, whereasexpression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These resultssuggest that growth with lactate and 50 percent hydrogen is associatedwith high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best capturedby the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe]hydrogenase. In contrast,growth with 5 percent hydrogen is associated with a low intracellularhydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity[NiFeSe]hydrogenase.

  4. Mutational analysis of the hyc-operon determining the relationship between hydrogenase-3 and NADH pathway in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jian; Jawed, Muhammad; Wang, Jun; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hydrogenase-3 gene cluster (hycDEFGH) was isolated and identified from Enterobacter aerogenes CCTCC AB91102. All gene products were highly homologous to the reported bacterial hydrogenase-3 (Hyd-3) proteins. The genes hycE, hycF, hycG encoding the subunits of hydrogenase-3 were targeted for genetic knockout to inhibit the FHL hydrogen production pathway via the Red recombination system, generating three mutant strains AB91102-E (ΔhycE), AB91102-F (ΔhycF) and AB91102-G (ΔhycG). Deletion of the three genes affected the integrity of hydrogenase-3. The hydrogen production experiments with the mutant strains showed that no hydrogen was detected compared with the wild type (0.886 mol/mol glucose), demonstrating that knocking out any of the three genes could inhibit NADH hydrogen production pathway. Meanwhile, the metabolites of the mutant strains were significantly changed in comparison with the wild type, indicating corresponding changes in metabolic flux by mutation. Additionally, the activity of NADH-mediated hydrogenase was found to be nil in the mutant strains. The chemostat experiments showed that the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the mutant strains increased nearly 1.4-fold compared with the wild type. The NADH-mediated hydrogenase activity and NADH/NAD(+) ratio analysis both suggested that NADH pathway required the involvement of the electron transport chain of hydrogenase-3. PMID:26672442

  5. Dual role of HupF in the biosynthesis of [NiFe] hydrogenase in Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background [NiFe] hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of hydrogen into protons and electrons, to use H2 as energy source, or the production of hydrogen through proton reduction, as an escape valve for the excess of reduction equivalents in anaerobic metabolism. Biosynthesis of [NiFe] hydrogenases is a complex process that occurs in the cytoplasm, where a number of auxiliary proteins are required to synthesize and insert the metal cofactors into the enzyme structural units. The endosymbiotic bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum requires the products of eighteen genes (hupSLCDEFGHIJKhypABFCDEX) to synthesize an active hydrogenase. hupF and hupK genes are found only in hydrogenase clusters from bacteria expressing hydrogenase in the presence of oxygen. Results HupF is a HypC paralogue with a similar predicted structure, except for the C-terminal domain present only in HupF. Deletion of hupF results in the inability to process the hydrogenase large subunit HupL, and also in reduced stability of this subunit when cells are exposed to high oxygen tensions. A ΔhupF mutant was fully complemented for hydrogenase activity by a C-terminal deletion derivative under symbiotic, ultra low-oxygen tensions, but only partial complementation was observed in free living cells under higher oxygen tensions (1% or 3%). Co-purification experiments using StrepTag-labelled HupF derivatives and mass spectrometry analysis indicate the existence of a major complex involving HupL and HupF, and a less abundant HupF-HupK complex. Conclusions The results indicate that HupF has a dual role during hydrogenase biosynthesis: it is required for hydrogenase large subunit processing and it also acts as a chaperone to stabilize HupL when hydrogenase is synthesized in the presence of oxygen. PMID:23136881

  6. Cyanide inactivation of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii

    SciTech Connect

    Seefeldt, L.C.; Arp, D.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The effects of cyanide on membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii were characterized. Inactivation of hydrogenase by cyanide was dependent on the activity (oxidation) state of the enzyme. Active (reduced) hydrogenase showed no inactivation when treated with cyanide over several hours. Treatment of reversibly inactive (oxidized) states of both membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase, however, resulted in a time-dependent, irreversible loss of hydrogenase activity. The rate of cyanide inactivation was dependent on the cyanide concentration and was an apparent first-order process for purified enzyme (bimolecular rate constant, 23.1 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} for CN{sup {minus}}). The rate of inactivation decreased with decreasing pH. ({sup 14}C)cyanide remained associated with cyanide-inactivated hydrogenase after gel filtration chromatography, with a stoichiometry of 1.7 mol of cyanide bound per mol of inactive enzyme. The presence of saturating concentrations of CO had no effect on the rate or extent of cyanide inactivation of hydrogenases. The results indicate that cyanide can cause a time-dependent, irreversible inactivation of hydrogenase in the oxidized, activatable state but has no effect when hydrogenase is in the reduced, active state.

  7. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wombwell, Claire; Caputo, Christine A; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-11-17

    The development of technology for the inexpensive generation of the renewable energy vector H2 through water splitting is of immediate economic, ecological, and humanitarian interest. Recent interest in hydrogenases has been fueled by their exceptionally high catalytic rates for H2 production at a marginal overpotential, which is presently only matched by the nonscalable noble metal platinum. The mechanistic understanding of hydrogenase function guides the design of synthetic catalysts, and selection of a suitable hydrogenase enables direct applications in electro- and photocatalysis. [FeFe]-hydrogenases display excellent H2 evolution activity, but they are irreversibly damaged upon exposure to O2, which currently prevents their use in full water splitting systems. O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases are known, but they are typically strongly biased toward H2 oxidation, while H2 production by [NiFe]-hydrogenases is often product (H2) inhibited. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases are a subclass of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with a selenocysteine residue coordinated to the active site nickel center in place of a cysteine. They exhibit a combination of unique properties that are highly advantageous for applications in water splitting compared with other hydrogenases. They display a high H2 evolution rate with marginal inhibition by H2 and tolerance to O2. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases are therefore one of the most active molecular H2 evolution catalysts applicable in water splitting. Herein, we summarize our recent progress in exploring the unique chemistry of [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases through biomimetic model chemistry and the chemistry with [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases in semiartificial photosynthetic systems. We gain perspective from the structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties of the [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases and compare them with the chemistry of synthetic models of this hydrogenase active site. Our synthetic models give insight into the effects on the electronic properties and reactivity of

  8. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    PubMed

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement. PMID:26357049

  9. A Functional Model of [Fe]-Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Yin, Chih-Juo Madeline; Wodrich, Matthew D; Mazza, Simona; Schultz, Katherine M; Scopelliti, Rosario; Hu, Xile

    2016-03-16

    [Fe]-Hydrogenase catalyzes the hydrogenation of a biological substrate via the heterolytic splitting of molecular hydrogen. While many synthetic models of [Fe]-hydrogenase have been prepared, none yet are capable of activating H2 on their own. Here, we report the first Fe-based functional mimic of the active site of [Fe]-hydrogenase, which was developed based on a mechanistic understanding. The activity of this iron model complex is enabled by its unique ligand environment, consisting of biomimetic pyridinylacyl and carbonyl ligands, as well as a bioinspired diphosphine ligand with a pendant amine moiety. The model complex activates H2 and mediates hydrogenation of an aldehyde. PMID:26926708

  10. Genomic and metagenomic surveys of hydrogenase distribution indicate H2 is a widely utilised energy source for microbial growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Biswas, Ambarish; Carere, Carlo R; Jackson, Colin J; Taylor, Matthew C; Stott, Matthew B; Cook, Gregory M; Morales, Sergio E

    2016-03-01

    Recent physiological and ecological studies have challenged the long-held belief that microbial metabolism of molecular hydrogen (H2) is a niche process. To gain a broader insight into the importance of microbial H2 metabolism, we comprehensively surveyed the genomic and metagenomic distribution of hydrogenases, the reversible enzymes that catalyse the oxidation and evolution of H2. The protein sequences of 3286 non-redundant putative hydrogenases were curated from publicly available databases. These metalloenzymes were classified into multiple groups based on (1) amino acid sequence phylogeny, (2) metal-binding motifs, (3) predicted genetic organisation and (4) reported biochemical characteristics. Four groups (22 subgroups) of [NiFe]-hydrogenase, three groups (6 subtypes) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and a small group of [Fe]-hydrogenases were identified. We predict that this hydrogenase diversity supports H2-based respiration, fermentation and carbon fixation processes in both oxic and anoxic environments, in addition to various H2-sensing, electron-bifurcation and energy-conversion mechanisms. Hydrogenase-encoding genes were identified in 51 bacterial and archaeal phyla, suggesting strong pressure for both vertical and lateral acquisition. Furthermore, hydrogenase genes could be recovered from diverse terrestrial, aquatic and host-associated metagenomes in varying proportions, indicating a broad ecological distribution and utilisation. Oxygen content (pO2) appears to be a central factor driving the phylum- and ecosystem-level distribution of these genes. In addition to compounding evidence that H2 was the first electron donor for life, our analysis suggests that the great diversification of hydrogenases has enabled H2 metabolism to sustain the growth or survival of microorganisms in a wide range of ecosystems to the present day. This work also provides a comprehensive expanded system for classifying hydrogenases and identifies new prospects for investigating H2

  11. Hydrogenase polypeptide and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Michael W.W.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Jenney, JR, Francis E.; Sun, Junsong

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are polypeptides having hydrogenase activity. The polypeptide may be multimeric, and may have hydrogenase activity of at least 0.05 micromoles H.sub.2 produced min.sup.-1 mg protein.sup.-1. Also provided herein are polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, genetically modified microbes that include polynucleotides encoding one or more subunits of the multimeric polypeptide, and methods for making and using the polypeptides.

  12. Hydrogenases in green algae: do they save the algae's life and solve our energy problems?

    PubMed

    Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja; Winkler, Martin; Kaminski, Annette

    2002-06-01

    Green algae are the only known eukaryotes with both oxygenic photosynthesis and a hydrogen metabolism. Recent physiological and genetic discoveries indicate a close connection between these metabolic pathways. The anaerobically inducible hydA genes of algae encode a special type of highly active [Fe]-hydrogenase. Electrons from reducing equivalents generated during fermentation enter the photosynthetic electron transport chain via the plastoquinone pool. They are transferred to the hydrogenase by photosystem I and ferredoxin. Thus, the [Fe]-hydrogenase is an electron 'valve' that enables the algae to survive under anaerobic conditions. During sulfur deprivation, illuminated algal cultures evolve large quantities of hydrogen gas, and this promises to be an alternative future energy source. PMID:12049920

  13. Engineering Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus to Overproduce Its Cytoplasmic [NiFe]-Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; McTernan, Patrick M.; Hopkins, R. Christopher; Sun, Junsong; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic hydrogenase (SHI) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is an NADP(H)-dependent heterotetrameric enzyme that contains a nickel-iron catalytic site, flavin, and six iron-sulfur clusters. It has potential utility in a range of bioenergy systems in vitro, but a major obstacle in its use is generating sufficient amounts. We have engineered P. furiosus to overproduce SHI utilizing a recently developed genetic system. In the overexpression (OE-SHI) strain, transcription of the four-gene SHI operon was under the control of a strong constitutive promoter, and a Strep-tag II was added to the N terminus of one subunit. OE-SHI and wild-type P. furiosus strains had similar rates of growth and H2 production on maltose. Strain OE-SHI had a 20-fold higher transcription of the polycistronic hydrogenase mRNA encoding SHI, and the specific activity of the cytoplasmic hydrogenase was ∼10-fold higher when compared with the wild-type strain, although the expression levels of genes encoding processing and maturation of SHI were the same in both strains. Overexpressed SHI was purified by a single affinity chromatography step using the Strep-tag II, and it and the native form had comparable activities and physical properties. Based on protein yield per gram of cells (wet weight), the OE-SHI strain yields a 100-fold higher amount of hydrogenase when compared with the highest homologous [NiFe]-hydrogenase system previously reported (from Synechocystis). This new P. furiosus system will allow further engineering of SHI and provide hydrogenase for efficient in vitro biohydrogen production. PMID:22157005

  14. Molecular detection of the clostridia in an anaerobic biohydrogen fermentation system by hydrogenase mRNA-targeted reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Jen; Chen, Wei-En; Shih, Shiou-Yun; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Wen, Fu-Shyan; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2006-05-01

    Molecular biological approaches were developed to monitor the potential biohydrogen-producing clostridia in an anaerobic semisolid fermentation system that used brewery yeast waste as the fermentation substrate. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with 16S rDNA gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was employed to confirm the existence of clostridia in the system. Remarkably, reproducible nucleotide sequences of clostridia were obtained from different hydrogen production stages by using hydrogenase gene-targeted reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. These RNA-based information suggested that the predominant hydrogen-producing strains possess either a specific Clostridium pasteurianum-like or a specific Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase sequence. Comparison of the hydrogenase gene-targeted sequence profiles between PCR and RT-PCR revealed that the specific C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase harboring bacterial strains were dominant in both mRNA and bacterial population level. On the other hand, the specific C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase harboring strains expressed high level of hydrogenase mRNA but may not be dominant in population. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed the expression pattern of the clostridial hydrogenase mRNA and may serve as an activity index for the system. PMID:16217655

  15. Cobaloxime-based artificial hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Marine; Berggren, Gustav; Niklas, Jens; Veinberg, Elias; Mara, Michael W; Shelby, Megan L; Poluektov, Oleg G; Chen, Lin X; Tiede, David M; Cavazza, Christine; Field, Martin J; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Cobaloximes are popular H2 evolution molecular catalysts but have so far mainly been studied in nonaqueous conditions. We show here that they are also valuable for the design of artificial hydrogenases for application in neutral aqueous solutions and report on the preparation of two well-defined biohybrid species via the binding of two cobaloxime moieties, {Co(dmgH)2} and {Co(dmgBF2)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime), to apo Sperm-whale myoglobin (SwMb). All spectroscopic data confirm that the cobaloxime moieties are inserted within the binding pocket of the SwMb protein and are coordinated to a histidine residue in the axial position of the cobalt complex, resulting in thermodynamically stable complexes. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations indicated a coordination preference for His93 over the other histidine residue (His64) present in the vicinity. Interestingly, the redox activity of the cobalt centers is retained in both biohybrids, which provides them with the catalytic activity for H2 evolution in near-neutral aqueous conditions. PMID:25029381

  16. Evolutionary and Biotechnological Implications of Robust Hydrogenase Activity in Halophilic Strains of Tetraselmis

    PubMed Central

    D'Adamo, Sarah; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Brown, Susan L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Peters, John W.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water algae (e.g. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), relatively few studies have focused on H2 production and hydrogenase adaptations in marine or halophilic algae. Salt water organisms likely offer several advantages for biotechnological H2 production due to the global abundance of salt water, decreased H2 and O2 solubility in saline and hypersaline systems, and the ability of extracellular NaCl levels to influence metabolism. We screened unialgal isolates obtained from hypersaline ecosystems in the southwest United States and identified two distinct halophilic strains of the genus Tetraselmis (GSL1 and QNM1) that exhibit both robust fermentative and photo H2-production activities. The influence of salinity (3.5%, 5.5% and 7.0% w/v NaCl) on H2 production was examined during anoxic acclimation, with the greatest in vivo H2-production rates observed at 7.0% NaCl. These Tetraselmis strains maintain robust hydrogenase activity even after 24 h of anoxic acclimation and show increased hydrogenase activity relative to C. reinhardtii after extended anoxia. Transcriptional analysis of Tetraselmis GSL1 enabled sequencing of the cDNA encoding the FeFe-hydrogenase structural enzyme (HYDA) and its maturation proteins (HYDE, HYDEF and HYDG). In contrast to freshwater Chlorophyceae, the halophilic Tetraselmis GSL1 strain likely encodes a single HYDA and two copies of HYDE, one of which is fused to HYDF. Phylogenetic analyses of HYDA and concatenated HYDA, HYDE, HYDF and HYDG in Tetraselmis GSL1 fill existing knowledge gaps in the evolution of algal hydrogenases and indicate that the algal hydrogenases sequenced to date are derived from a common ancestor. This is consistent with recent hypotheses that suggest fermentative metabolism in the majority of eukaryotes is derived from a common base set of enzymes that emerged early in eukaryotic evolution with subsequent losses in some organisms. PMID

  17. Evolutionary and biotechnological implications of robust hydrogenase activity in halophilic strains of Tetraselmis.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Sarah; Jinkerson, Robert E; Boyd, Eric S; Brown, Susan L; Baxter, Bonnie K; Peters, John W; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water algae (e.g. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), relatively few studies have focused on H2 production and hydrogenase adaptations in marine or halophilic algae. Salt water organisms likely offer several advantages for biotechnological H2 production due to the global abundance of salt water, decreased H2 and O2 solubility in saline and hypersaline systems, and the ability of extracellular NaCl levels to influence metabolism. We screened unialgal isolates obtained from hypersaline ecosystems in the southwest United States and identified two distinct halophilic strains of the genus Tetraselmis (GSL1 and QNM1) that exhibit both robust fermentative and photo H2-production activities. The influence of salinity (3.5%, 5.5% and 7.0% w/v NaCl) on H2 production was examined during anoxic acclimation, with the greatest in vivo H2-production rates observed at 7.0% NaCl. These Tetraselmis strains maintain robust hydrogenase activity even after 24 h of anoxic acclimation and show increased hydrogenase activity relative to C. reinhardtii after extended anoxia. Transcriptional analysis of Tetraselmis GSL1 enabled sequencing of the cDNA encoding the FeFe-hydrogenase structural enzyme (HYDA) and its maturation proteins (HYDE, HYDEF and HYDG). In contrast to freshwater Chlorophyceae, the halophilic Tetraselmis GSL1 strain likely encodes a single HYDA and two copies of HYDE, one of which is fused to HYDF. Phylogenetic analyses of HYDA and concatenated HYDA, HYDE, HYDF and HYDG in Tetraselmis GSL1 fill existing knowledge gaps in the evolution of algal hydrogenases and indicate that the algal hydrogenases sequenced to date are derived from a common ancestor. This is consistent with recent hypotheses that suggest fermentative metabolism in the majority of eukaryotes is derived from a common base set of enzymes that emerged early in eukaryotic evolution with subsequent losses in some organisms. PMID

  18. Hydrogen Formation and Its Regulation in Ruminococcus albus: Involvement of an Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase, of a Non-Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase, and of a Putative Hydrogen-Sensing [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanning; Kahnt, Jörg; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2014-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 has played a key role in the development of the concept of interspecies hydrogen transfer. The rumen bacterium ferments glucose to 1.3 acetate, 0.7 ethanol, 2 CO2, and 2.6 H2 when growing in batch culture and to 2 acetate, 2 CO2, and 4 H2 when growing in continuous culture in syntrophic association with H2-consuming microorganisms that keep the H2 partial pressure low. The organism uses NAD+ and ferredoxin for glucose oxidation to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and CO2, NADH for the reduction of acetyl-CoA to ethanol, and NADH and reduced ferredoxin for the reduction of protons to H2. Of all the enzymes involved, only the enzyme catalyzing the formation of H2 from NADH remained unknown. Here, we report that R. albus 7 grown in batch culture on glucose contained, besides a ferredoxin-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA2), a ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydABC) that couples the endergonic formation of H2 from NADH to the exergonic formation of H2 from reduced ferredoxin. Interestingly, hydA2 is adjacent to the hydS gene, which is predicted to encode an [FeFe]-hydrogenase with a C-terminal PAS domain. We showed that hydS and hydA2 are part of a larger transcriptional unit also harboring putative genes for a bifunctional acetaldehyde/ethanol dehydrogenase (Aad), serine/threonine protein kinase, serine/threonine protein phosphatase, and a redox-sensing transcriptional repressor. Since HydA2 and Aad are required only when R. albus grows at high H2 partial pressures, HydS could be a H2-sensing [FeFe]-hydrogenase involved in the regulation of their biosynthesis. PMID:25157086

  19. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Abundance and Diversity along a Vertical Redox Gradient in Great Salt Lake, USA

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Swanson, Kevin D.; Howells, Alta E.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Meuser, Jonathan E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Peters, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes for the biotechnological production of H2 or other reduced products has been limited by their sensitivity to oxygen (O2). Here, we apply a PCR-directed approach to determine the distribution, abundance, and diversity of hydA gene fragments along co-varying salinity and O2 gradients in a vertical water column of Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The distribution of hydA was constrained to water column transects that had high salt and relatively low O2 concentrations. Recovered HydA deduced amino acid sequences were enriched in hydrophilic amino acids relative to HydA from less saline environments. In addition, they harbored interesting variations in the amino acid environment of the complex H-cluster metalloenzyme active site and putative gas transfer channels that may be important for both H2 transfer and O2 susceptibility. A phylogenetic framework was created to infer the accessory cluster composition and quaternary structure of recovered HydA protein sequences based on phylogenetic relationships and the gene contexts of known complete HydA sequences. Numerous recovered HydA are predicted to harbor multiple N- and C-terminal accessory iron-sulfur cluster binding domains and are likely to exist as multisubunit complexes. This study indicates an important role for [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the functioning of the GSL ecosystem and provides new target genes and variants for use in identifying O2 tolerant enzymes for biotechnological applications. PMID:25464382

  20. RAPD analysis and sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 and Fe-hydrogenase as tools for genetic classification of potentially pathogenic isolates of Trichomonas gallinae.

    PubMed

    Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Garijo-Toledo, María Magdalena; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a worldwide parasite that causes oropharyngeal avian trichomonosis. During eight years, 60 axenic isolates were obtained from different bird species and characterized by three molecular methods: RAPD analysis and PCR-sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 fragment and Fe-hydrogenase gene. We have found two genotypes of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 widely distributed among bird populations, a new variant and also two sequences with mixed pattern. Genotype ITS-OBT-Tg-1 was associated with the presence of gross lesions in birds. We have found eight genotypes of the Fe-hydrogenase (A1, A2, C2, C2.1, C4, C5, C6 and C7), three of them are new reports (C5, C6 and C7), and also three sequences with mixed pattern. Subtype A1 of the Fe-hydrogenase was also related with the presence of lesions. RAPD analyses included most of the strains isolated from animals with lesions in one of the sub-clusters. Potentially pathogenic isolates of T. gallinae obtained in this study fulfill the following criteria with one exception: isolated from lesions+ITS-OBT-Tg-1 genotype+FeHyd A1+RAPD sub-cluster I2. PMID:27473993

  1. Immunity-related genes and gene families in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Christophides, George K; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Birney, Ewan; Blandin, Stephanie; Blass, Claudia; Brey, Paul T; Collins, Frank H; Danielli, Alberto; Dimopoulos, George; Hetru, Charles; Hoa, Ngo T; Hoffmann, Jules A; Kanzok, Stefan M; Letunic, Ivica; Levashina, Elena A; Loukeris, Thanasis G; Lycett, Gareth; Meister, Stephan; Michel, Kristin; Moita, Luis F; Müller, Hans-Michael; Osta, Mike A; Paskewitz, Susan M; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Troxler, Laurent; Vernick, Kenneth D; Vlachou, Dina; Volz, Jennifer; von Mering, Christian; Xu, Jiannong; Zheng, Liangbiao; Bork, Peer; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-10-01

    We have identified 242 Anopheles gambiae genes from 18 gene families implicated in innate immunity and have detected marked diversification relative to Drosophila melanogaster. Immune-related gene families involved in recognition, signal modulation, and effector systems show a marked deficit of orthologs and excessive gene expansions, possibly reflecting selection pressures from different pathogens encountered in these insects' very different life-styles. In contrast, the multifunctional Toll signal transduction pathway is substantially conserved, presumably because of counterselection for developmental stability. Representative expression profiles confirm that sequence diversification is accompanied by specific responses to different immune challenges. Alternative RNA splicing may also contribute to expansion of the immune repertoire. PMID:12364793

  2. A broad survey reveals substitution tolerance of residues ligating FeS clusters in [NiFe] hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to understand the effects of FeS cluster attachment in [NiFe] hydrogenase, we undertook a study to substitute all 12 amino acid positions normally ligating the three FeS clusters in the hydrogenase small subunit. Using the hydrogenase from Alteromonas macleodii “deep ecotype” as a model, we substituted one of four amino acids (Asp, His, Asn, Gln) at each of the 12 ligating positions because these amino acids are alternative coordinating residues in otherwise conserved-cysteine positions found in a broad survey of NiFe hydrogenase sequences. We also hoped to discover an enzyme with elevated hydrogen evolution activity relative to a previously reported “G1” (H230C/P285C) improved enzyme in which the medial FeS cluster Pro and the distal FeS cluster His were each substituted for Cys. Results Among all the substitutions screened, aspartic acid substitutions were generally well-tolerated, and examination suggests that the observed deficiency in enzyme activity may be largely due to misprocessing of the small subunit of the enzyme. Alignment of hydrogenase sequences from sequence databases revealed many rare substitutions; the five substitutions present in databases that we tested all exhibited measurable hydrogen evolution activity. Select substitutions were purified and tested, supporting the results of the screening assay. Analysis of these results confirms the importance of small subunit processing. Normalizing activity to quantity of mature small subunit, indicative of total enzyme maturation, weakly suggests an improvement over the “G1” enzyme. Conclusions We have comprehensively screened 48 amino acid substitutions of the hydrogenase from A. macleodii “deep ecotype”, to understand non-canonical ligations of amino acids to FeS clusters and to improve hydrogen evolution activity of this class of hydrogenase. Our studies show that non-canonical ligations can be functional and also suggests a new limiting factor in the production of

  3. Designed surface residue substitutions in [NiFe] hydrogenase that improve electron transfer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yonemoto, Isaac T; Smith, Hamilton O; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an attractive, carbon-neutral means to convert solar energy to hydrogen. We build on previous research improving the Alteromonas macleodii "Deep Ecotype" [NiFe] hydrogenase, and report progress towards creating an artificial electron transfer pathway to supply the hydrogenase with electrons necessary for hydrogen production. Ferredoxin is the first soluble electron transfer mediator to receive high-energy electrons from photosystem I, and bears an electron with sufficient potential to efficiently reduce protons. Thus, we engineered a hydrogenase-ferredoxin fusion that also contained several other modifications. In addition to the C-terminal ferredoxin fusion, we truncated the C-terminus of the hydrogenase small subunit, identified as the available terminus closer to the electron transfer region. We also neutralized an anionic patch surrounding the interface Fe-S cluster to improve transfer kinetics with the negatively charged ferredoxin. Initial screening showed the enzyme tolerated both truncation and charge neutralization on the small subunit ferredoxin-binding face. While the enzyme activity was relatively unchanged using the substrate methyl viologen, we observed a marked improvement from both the ferredoxin fusion and surface modification using only dithionite as an electron donor. Combining ferredoxin fusion and surface charge modification showed progressively improved activity in an in vitro assay with purified enzyme. PMID:25603181

  4. Designed Surface Residue Substitutions in [NiFe] Hydrogenase that Improve Electron Transfer Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yonemoto, Isaac T.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Weyman, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an attractive, carbon-neutral means to convert solar energy to hydrogen. We build on previous research improving the Alteromonas macleodii “Deep Ecotype” [NiFe] hydrogenase, and report progress towards creating an artificial electron transfer pathway to supply the hydrogenase with electrons necessary for hydrogen production. Ferredoxin is the first soluble electron transfer mediator to receive high-energy electrons from photosystem I, and bears an electron with sufficient potential to efficiently reduce protons. Thus, we engineered a hydrogenase-ferredoxin fusion that also contained several other modifications. In addition to the C-terminal ferredoxin fusion, we truncated the C-terminus of the hydrogenase small subunit, identified as the available terminus closer to the electron transfer region. We also neutralized an anionic patch surrounding the interface Fe-S cluster to improve transfer kinetics with the negatively charged ferredoxin. Initial screening showed the enzyme tolerated both truncation and charge neutralization on the small subunit ferredoxin-binding face. While the enzyme activity was relatively unchanged using the substrate methyl viologen, we observed a marked improvement from both the ferredoxin fusion and surface modification using only dithionite as an electron donor. Combining ferredoxin fusion and surface charge modification showed progressively improved activity in an in vitro assay with purified enzyme. PMID:25603181

  5. A bacterial electron-bifurcating hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2012-09-01

    The Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of anaerobic CO(2) fixation with hydrogen as reductant is considered a candidate for the first life-sustaining pathway on earth because it combines carbon dioxide fixation with the synthesis of ATP via a chemiosmotic mechanism. The acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii uses an ancient version of the pathway that has only one site to generate the electrochemical ion potential used to drive ATP synthesis, the ferredoxin-fueled, sodium-motive Rnf complex. However, hydrogen-based ferredoxin reduction is endergonic, and how the steep energy barrier is overcome has been an enigma for a long time. We have purified a multimeric [FeFe]-hydrogenase from A. woodii containing four subunits (HydABCD) which is predicted to have one [H]-cluster, three [2Fe2S]-, and six [4Fe4S]-clusters consistent with the experimental determination of 32 mol of Fe and 30 mol of acid-labile sulfur. The enzyme indeed catalyzed hydrogen-based ferredoxin reduction, but required NAD(+) for this reaction. NAD(+) was also reduced but only in the presence of ferredoxin. NAD(+) and ferredoxin reduction both required flavin. Spectroscopic analyses revealed that NAD(+) and ferredoxin reduction are strictly coupled and that they are reduced in a 1:1 stoichiometry. Apparently, the multimeric hydrogenase of A. woodii is a soluble energy-converting hydrogenase that uses electron bifurcation to drive the endergonic ferredoxin reduction by coupling it to the exergonic NAD(+) reduction. PMID:22810230

  6. Light-induced reactivation of O2-tolerant membrane-bound [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus under turnover conditions.

    PubMed

    Ciaccafava, Alexandre; Hamon, Cyrille; Infossi, Pascale; Marchi, Valérie; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Lojou, Elisabeth

    2013-10-21

    We report the effect of UV-Vis light on the membrane-bound [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus under turnover conditions. Using electrochemistry, we show a potential dependent light sensitivity and propose that a light-induced structural change of the [Ni-Fe] active site is related to an enhanced reactivation of the hydrogenase under illumination at high potentials. PMID:23999766

  7. Hydrogenase/ferredoxin charge-transfer complexes: effect of hydrogenase mutations on the complex association.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2009-04-23

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii utilize photogenerated electrons to reduce protons into hydrogen gas. The electrons are supplied from photosystem I and transferred to the [FeFe]-hydrogenase through specific hydrogenase-ferredoxin association. To understand how structural and kinetic factors control the association better, we used Brownian dynamics simulation methods to simulate the charge-transfer complex formation between both native and in silico mutants of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA2 and the [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin FDX1 from C. reinhardtii . The changes in binding free energy between different HYDA2 mutants and the native FDX1 were calculated by the free-energy perturbation method. Within the limits of our current models, we found that two HYDA2 mutations, T99K(H) and D102K(H), led to lower binding free energies and higher association rate with FDX1 and are thus promising targets for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered organisms. PMID:19317477

  8. Synthesis of nickel-iron hydrogenase in Cupriavidus metallidurans is controlled by metal-dependent silencing and un-silencing of genomic islands.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Martin; Schüttau, Marcel; Reimers, Matthias; Große, Cornelia; Hans-Günther-Schlegel; Nies, Dietrich H

    2015-04-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is able to grow autotrophically as a hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium and produces nickel-dependent hydrogenases, even under heterotrophic conditions. Loss of its two native plasmids resulted in inability of the resulting strain AE104 to synthesize the hydrogenases and to grow autotrophically in phosphate-poor, Tris-buffered mineral salts medium (TMM). Three of eleven previously identified catabolic genomic islands (CMGIs; Van Houdt et al., 2009), two of which harbor the genes for the membrane-bound (CMGI-2) and the soluble hydrogenase (CMGI-3), were silenced in strain AE104 when cultivated in phosphate-poor TMM, explaining its inability to produce hydrogenases. Production of the soluble hydrogenase from the aut region 1 of CMGI-3, and concomitant autotrophic growth, was recovered when the gene for the zinc importer ZupT was deleted in strain AE104. The transcriptome of the ΔzupT mutant exhibited two up-regulated gene regions compared to its parent strain AE104. Expression of the genes in the aut region 1 increased independently of the presence of added zinc. A second gene region was expressed only under metal starvation conditions. This region encoded a TonB-dependent outer membrane protein, a putative metal chaperone plus paralogs of essential zinc-dependent proteins, indicating the presence of a zinc allocation pathway in C. metallidurans. Thus, expression of the genes for the soluble hydrogenase and the Calvin cycle enzymes on aut region 1 of CMGI-3 of C. metallidurans is under global control and needs efficient ZupT-dependent zinc allocation for a regulatory role, which might be discrimination of nickel. PMID:25720835

  9. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour. PMID:25142712

  10. Activation and de novo synthesis of hydrogenase in Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.; Lien, S.

    1984-12-01

    Two distinct processes are involved in the formation of active hydrogenase during anaerobic adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. In the first 30 minutes of anaerobiosis, nearly all of the hydrogenase activity can be attributed to activation of constituitive polypeptide precursor, based on the insensitivity of the process to treatment with cycloheximide (15 micrograms per milliliter). This concentration of cycloheximide inhibits protein synthesis by greater than 98%. After the initial activation period, de novo protein synthesis plays a critical role in the adaptation process since cycloheximide inhibits the expression of hydrogenase in maximally adapted cells by 70%. Chloramphenicol (500 micrograms per milliliter) has a much lesser effect on the adaptation process. Incubation of cell-free extracts under anaerobic conditions in the presence of dithionite, dithiothreitol, NADH, NADP, ferredoxin, ATP, Mg/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and iron does not lead to active hydrogenase formation. Furthermore, in vivo reactivation of oxygen-inactivated hydrogenase does not appear to take place. The adaptation process is very sensitive to the availability of iron. Iron-deficient cultures lose the ability to form active hydrogenase before growth, photosynthesis, and respiration are significantly affected. Preincubation of iron-deficient cells with iron 2 hours prior to the adaptation period fully restores the capacity of the cells to synthesize functional hydrogenase.

  11. Biomimetic assembly and activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Berggren, G; Adamska, A; Lambertz, C; Simmons, T R; Esselborn, J; Atta, M; Gambarelli, S; Mouesca, J-M; Reijerse, E; Lubitz, W; Happe, T; Artero, V; Fontecave, M

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogenases are the most active molecular catalysts for hydrogen production and uptake, and could therefore facilitate the development of new types of fuel cell. In [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis takes place at a unique di-iron centre (the [2Fe] subsite), which contains a bridging dithiolate ligand, three CO ligands and two CN(-) ligands. Through a complex multienzymatic biosynthetic process, this [2Fe] subsite is first assembled on a maturation enzyme, HydF, and then delivered to the apo-hydrogenase for activation. Synthetic chemistry has been used to prepare remarkably similar mimics of that subsite, but it has failed to reproduce the natural enzymatic activities thus far. Here we show that three synthetic mimics (containing different bridging dithiolate ligands) can be loaded onto bacterial Thermotoga maritima HydF and then transferred to apo-HydA1, one of the hydrogenases of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Full activation of HydA1 was achieved only when using the HydF hybrid protein containing the mimic with an azadithiolate bridge, confirming the presence of this ligand in the active site of native [FeFe]-hydrogenases. This is an example of controlled metalloenzyme activation using the combination of a specific protein scaffold and active-site synthetic analogues. This simple methodology provides both new mechanistic and structural insight into hydrogenase maturation and a unique tool for producing recombinant wild-type and variant [FeFe]-hydrogenases, with no requirement for the complete maturation machinery. PMID:23803769

  12. Maturation of [NiFe]-hydrogenases in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Forzi, Lucia; Sawers, R Gary

    2007-06-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of dihydrogen. Catalysis occurs at bimetallic active sites that contain either nickel and iron or only iron and the nature of these active sites forms the basis of categorizing the enzymes into three classes, the [NiFe]-hydrogenases, the [FeFe]-hydrogenases and the iron sulfur cluster-free [Fe]-hydrogenases. The [NiFe]-hydrogenases and the [FeFe]-hydrogenases are unrelated at the amino acid sequence level but the active sites share the unusual feature of having diatomic ligands associated with the Fe atoms in the these enzymes. Combined structural and spectroscopic studies of [NiFe]-hydrogenases identified these diatomic ligands as CN- and CO groups. Major advances in our understanding of the biosynthesis of these ligands have been achieved primarily through the study of the membrane-associated [NiFe]-hydrogenases of Escherichia coli. A complex biosynthetic machinery is involved in synthesis and attachment of these ligands to the iron atom, insertion of the Fe(CN)2CO group into the apo-hydrogenase, introduction of the nickel atom into the pre-formed active site and ensuring that the holoenzyme is correctly folded prior to delivery to the membrane. Although much remains to be uncovered regarding each of the individual biochemical steps on the pathway to synthesis of a fully functional enzyme, our understanding of the initial steps in CN- synthesis have revealed that it is generated from carbamoyl phosphate. What is becoming increasingly clear is that the metabolic origins of the carbonyl group may be different. PMID:17216401

  13. Gene Transfers Between Distantly Related Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of numerous microbial genome sequences, reports of individual gene transfers between distantly related prokaryotes have become commonplace. On the other hand, transfers between prokaryotes and eukaryotes still excite the imagination. Many of these claims may be premature, but some are certainly valid. In this chapter, the kinds of supporting data needed to propose transfers between distantly related organisms and cite some interesting examples are considered.

  14. Photosensitized production of hydrogen by hydrogenase in reversed micelles

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Riet; Laane, Colja; Veeger, Cees

    1982-01-01

    Hydrogenase (hydrogen:ferricytochrome c3 oxidoreductase, EC 1.12.2.1) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris was encapsulated in reversed micelles with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant and a chloroform/octane mixture as solvent. Reducing equivalents for hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production were provided by vectorial photosensitized electron transfer from a donor (thiophenol) in the organic phase through a surfactant-Ru2+ sensitizer located in the interphase to methyl viologen concentrated in the aqueous core of the reversed micelle. The results show that reversed micelles provide a microenvironment that (i) stabilizes hydrogenase against inactivation and (ii) allows an efficient vectorial photosensitized electron and proton flow from the organic phase to hydrogenase in the aqueous phase. Images PMID:16593204

  15. Activation and de novo synthesis of hydrogenase in chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Roessler, P G; Lien, S

    1984-12-01

    Two distinct processes are involved in the formation of active hydrogenase during anaerobic adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. In the first 30 minutes of anaerobiosis, nearly all of the hydrogenase activity can be attributed to activation of a constituitive polypeptide precursor, based on the insensitivity of the process to treatment with cycloheximide (15 micrograms per milliliter). This concentration of cycloheximide inhibits protein synthesis by greater than 98%. After the initial activation period, de novo protein synthesis plays a critical role in the adaptation process since cycloheximide inhibits the expression of hydrogense in maximally adapted cells by 70%. Chloramphenicol (500 micrograms per milliliter) has a much lesser effect on the adaptation process.Incubation of cell-free extracts under anaerobic conditions in the presence of dithionite, dithiothreitol, NADH, NADP, ferredoxin, ATP, Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and iron does not lead to active hydrogenase formation. Futhermore, in vivo reactivation of oxygen-inactivated hydrogenase does not appear to take place.The adaptation process is very sensitive to the availability of iron. Iron-deficient cultures lose the ability to form active hydrogenase before growth, photosynthesis, and respiration are significantly affected. Preincubation of iron-deficient cells with iron 2 hours prior to the adaptation period fully restores the capacity of the cells to synthesize functional hydrogenase. PMID:16663954

  16. Gene Ontology and KEGG Enrichment Analyses of Genes Related to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Xing, ZhiHao; Ma, Mingming; Wang, Ning; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chen, Lei; Xu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Identifying disease genes is one of the most important topics in biomedicine and may facilitate studies on the mechanisms underlying disease. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a serious eye disease; it typically affects older adults and results in a loss of vision due to retina damage. In this study, we attempt to develop an effective method for distinguishing AMD-related genes. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of known AMD-related genes were performed, and a classification system was established. In detail, each gene was encoded into a vector by extracting enrichment scores of the gene set, including it and its direct neighbors in STRING, and gene ontology terms or KEGG pathways. Then certain feature-selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were adopted to extract key features for the classification system. As a result, 720 GO terms and 11 KEGG pathways were deemed the most important factors for predicting AMD-related genes. PMID:25165703

  17. Transcriptional and Mutational Analysis of the Uptake Hydrogenase of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    PubMed Central

    Happe, Thomas; Schütz, Kathrin; Böhme, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    A 10-kb DNA region of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 containing the structural genes of the uptake hydrogenase (hupSL) was cloned and sequenced. In contrast to the hupL gene of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which is interrupted by a 10.5-kb DNA fragment in vegetative cells, there is no programmed rearrangement within the hupL gene during the heterocyst differentiation of A. variabilis. The hupSL genes were transcribed as a 2.7-kb operon and were induced only under nitrogen-fixing conditions, as shown by Northern blot experiments and reverse transcriptase PCR. Primer extension experiments with a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide primer confirmed these results and identified the 5′ start of the mRNA transcript 103 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. A consensus sequence in the promoter that is recognized by the fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (Fnr) could be detected. The hupSL operon in A. variabilis was interrupted by an interposon deletion (mutant strain AVM13). Under N2-fixing conditions, the mutant strain exhibited significantly increased rates in H2 accumulation and produced three times more hydrogen than the wild type. These results indicate that the uptake hydrogenase is catalytically active in the wild type and that the enzyme reoxidizes the H2 developed by the nitrogenase. The Nif phenotype of the mutant strain showed a slight decrease of acetylene reduction compared to that of the wild type. PMID:10692368

  18. [PRRT2 gene-related paroxysmal disorders].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Mao, Xiao; Wang, Junling; Li, Nan; Tang, Beisha

    2014-10-01

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2), the causative gene of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesias (PKD), benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS) and infantile convulsions with paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA), also causes a variety of neurological paroxysmal disorders. These diseases share the same characteristics which may be due to the same genetic defect. We therefore propose to name them as PRRT2-related paroxysmal disorders (PRPDs) in order to assist clinical diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. This paper has reviewed the clinical phenotype, common features and pathogenesis of the PRPDs. PMID:25297589

  19. [FeFe]-hydrogenases and photobiological hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; Cohen, Jordi; King, Paul; Schulten, Klaus; Kim, Kwiseon; Seibert, Michael

    2006-08-01

    The promise of efficient, economic and renewable H II photoproduction from water can potentially be met by green algae. These organisms are able to functionally link photosynthetic water oxidation to the catalytic recombination of protons and electrons to generate H II gas through the activity of the hydrogenase enzyme. Green algal hydrogenases contain a unique metallo-catalytic H-cluster that performs the reversible H II oxidation /evolution reactions. The H-cluster, located in the interior of the protein structure is irreversibly inactivated by O II, the by-product of water oxidation. We developed an Escherichi coli expression system to produce [FeFe]-hydrogenases from different biological sources and demonstrated that clostridial [FeFe]-hydrogenases have higher tolerance to O II inactivation compared to their algal counterparts. We have been using computational simulations of gas diffusion within the Clostridium pasteurianum CpI hydrogenase to identify the pathways through which O II can reach its catalytic site. Subsequently, we modify the protein structure at specific sites along the O II pathways (identified by the computational simulations) by site-directed mutagenesis with the goal of generating recombinant enzymes with higher O II tolerance. In this paper, we review the computational simulation work and report on preliminary results obtained through this strategy.

  20. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; Mastroianni, Giulia; Spence, Edward M.; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Appel, Jens; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Bryan, Samantha J.

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to the dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.

  1. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; Mastroianni, Giulia; Spence, Edward M.; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Appel, Jens; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Bryan, Samantha J.

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to themore » dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.« less

  2. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E.; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  3. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  4. Hydrogen activation by [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Evans, Rhiannon M; Brooke, Emily J; Wehlin, Sara A M; Nomerotskaia, Elena; Sargent, Frank; Armstrong, Fraser A; Phillips, Simon E V

    2016-06-15

    Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd-1) from Escherichia coli is a membrane-bound enzyme that catalyses the reversible oxidation of molecular H2 The active site contains one Fe and one Ni atom and several conserved amino acids including an arginine (Arg(509)), which interacts with two conserved aspartate residues (Asp(118) and Asp(574)) forming an outer shell canopy over the metals. There is also a highly conserved glutamate (Glu(28)) positioned on the opposite side of the active site to the canopy. The mechanism of hydrogen activation has been dissected by site-directed mutagenesis to identify the catalytic base responsible for splitting molecular hydrogen and possible proton transfer pathways to/from the active site. Previous reported attempts to mutate residues in the canopy were unsuccessful, leading to an assumption of a purely structural role. Recent discoveries, however, suggest a catalytic requirement, for example replacing the arginine with lysine (R509K) leaves the structure virtually unchanged, but catalytic activity falls by more than 100-fold. Variants containing amino acid substitutions at either or both, aspartates retain significant activity. We now propose a new mechanism: heterolytic H2 cleavage is via a mechanism akin to that of a frustrated Lewis pair (FLP), where H2 is polarized by simultaneous binding to the metal(s) (the acid) and a nitrogen from Arg(509) (the base). PMID:27284053

  5. Distribution and activity of hydrogenase enzymes in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Glombitza, C.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Metabolically active microbial communities are present in a wide range of subsurface environments. Techniques like enumeration of microbial cells, activity measurements with radiotracer assays and the analysis of porewater constituents are currently being used to explore the subsurface biosphere, alongside with molecular biological analyses. However, many of these techniques reach their detection limits due to low microbial activity and abundance. Direct measurements of microbial turnover not just face issues of insufficient sensitivity, they only provide information about a single specific process rather than an overall microbial activity. Since hydrogenase enzymes are intracellular and ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, the enzyme activity represents a measure of total activity of the entire microbial community. A hydrogenase activity assay could quantify total metabolic activity without having to identify specific processes. This would be a major advantage in subsurface biosphere studies, where several metabolic processes can occur simultaneously. We quantified hydrogenase enzyme activity and distribution in sediment samples from different aquatic subsurface environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico) using a tritium-based assay. We found enzyme activity at all sites and depths. Volumetric hydrogenase activity did not show much variability between sites and sampling depths, whereas cell-specific activity ranged from 10-5 to 1 nmol H2 cell-1 d-1. Activity was lowest in sediment layers where nitrate was detected. Higher activity was associated with samples in which sulfate was the predominant electron acceptor. We found highest activity in samples from environments with >10 ppm methane in the pore water. The results show that cell-specific hydrogenase enzyme activity increases with decreasing energy yield of the electron acceptor used. It is not possible to convert volumetric or cell-specific hydrogenase activity into a

  6. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain. This review discusses mechanisms whereby CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Future studies on epistatic and epigenetic regulators of CGRP actions are expected to shed further light on CGRP actions in migraine. In conclusion, targeting CGRP represents an approachable therapeutic strategy for migraine. PMID:25340934

  7. Genome Data Mining and Soil Survey for the Novel Group 5 [NiFe]-Hydrogenase To Explore the Diversity and Ecological Importance of Presumptive High-Affinity H2-Oxidizing Bacteria ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Constant, Philippe; Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Hesse, Laura; Pratscher, Jennifer; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces soil isolates exhibiting the unique ability to oxidize atmospheric H2 possess genes specifying a putative high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenase. This study was undertaken to explore the taxonomic diversity and the ecological importance of this novel functional group. We propose to designate the genes encoding the small and large subunits of the putative high-affinity hydrogenase hhyS and hhyL, respectively. Genome data mining revealed that the hhyL gene is unevenly distributed in the phyla Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Acidobacteria. The hhyL gene sequences comprised a phylogenetically distinct group, namely, the group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes. The presumptive high-affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria constituting group 5 were shown to possess a hydrogenase gene cluster, including the genes encoding auxiliary and structural components of the enzyme and four additional open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function. A soil survey confirmed that both high-affinity H2 oxidation activity and the hhyL gene are ubiquitous. A quantitative PCR assay revealed that soil contained 106 to 108 hhyL gene copies g (dry weight)−1. Assuming one hhyL gene copy per genome, the abundance of presumptive high-affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria was higher than the maximal population size for which maintenance energy requirements would be fully supplied through the H2 oxidation activity measured in soil. Our data indicate that the abundance of the hhyL gene should not be taken as a reliable proxy for the uptake of atmospheric H2 by soil, because high-affinity H2 oxidation is a facultatively mixotrophic metabolism, and microorganisms harboring a nonfunctional group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase may occur. PMID:21742924

  8. Nucleotide sequences and genetic analysis of hydrogen oxidation (hox) genes in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, A L; Mortenson, L E; Robson, R L

    1992-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii contains a heterodimeric, membrane-bound [NiFe]hydrogenase capable of catalyzing the reversible oxidation of H2. The beta and alpha subunits of the enzyme are encoded by the structural genes hoxK and hoxG, respectively, which appear to form part of an operon that contains at least one further potential gene (open reading frame 3 [ORF3]). In this study, determination of the nucleotide sequence of a region of 2,344 bp downstream of ORF3 revealed four additional closely spaced or overlapping ORFs. These ORFs, ORF4 through ORF7, potentially encode polypeptides with predicted masses of 22.8, 11.4, 16.3, and 31 kDa, respectively. Mutagenesis of the chromosome of A. vinelandii in the area sequenced was carried out by introduction of antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. Disruption of hoxK and hoxG by a kanamycin resistance gene abolished whole-cell hydrogenase activity coupled to O2 and led to loss of the hydrogenase alpha subunit. Insertional mutagenesis of ORF3 through ORF7 with a promoterless lacZ-Kmr cassette established that the region is transcriptionally active and involved in H2 oxidation. We propose to call ORF3 through ORF7 hoxZ, hoxM, hoxL, hoxO, and hoxQ, respectively. The predicted hox gene products resemble those encoded by genes from hydrogenase-related operons in other bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Alcaligenes eutrophus. Images PMID:1624446

  9. Purification and properties of the membrane-bound by hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.

    PubMed

    Lalla-Maharajh, W V; Hall, D O; Cammack, R; Rao, K K; Le Gall, J

    1983-02-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase from the anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (Norway strain) has been purified to homogeneity, with an overall 80-fold purification and a specific activity of 70 mumol of H2 evolved/min per mg of protein. The hydrogenase had a relative molecular mass of 58 000 as determined by gel filtration and was estimated to contain six iron atoms and six acid-labile sulphur groups per molecule. The absorption spectrum of the enzyme was characteristic of an iron-sulphur protein. The E400 and E280 were 28 500 and 109 000 M-1.cm-1 respectively. The e.s.r. of the oxidized protein indicated the presence of [4Fe-4S]3+ or [3Fe-3S]3+, and another paramagnetic centre, probably Ni(III). The hydrogenase was inhibited by heavy-metal salts, carbon monoxide and high ionic strength. However, it was resistant to inhibition by thiol-blocking and metal-complexing reagents. N-Bromosuccinimide totally inhibited the enzyme activity at low concentrations. The enzyme was stable to O2 over long periods and to high temperatures. It catalyses both H2-evolution and H2-uptake with a variety of artificial electron carriers. D. desulfuricans cytochrome C3, its natural electron carrier, had a high affinity for the enzyme (Km = 2 microns). Rate enhancement was observed when cytochrome C3 was added to Methyl Viologen in the H2-evolution assay. The pH optimum for H2-evolution was 6.5. PMID:6303306

  10. From enzyme maturation to synthetic chemistry: the case of hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Berggren, Gustav; Atta, Mohamed; Caserta, Giorgio; Roy, Souvik; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-08-18

    Water splitting into oxygen and hydrogen is one of the most attractive strategies for storing solar energy and electricity. Because the processes at work are multielectronic, there is a crucial need for efficient and stable catalysts, which in addition have to be cheap for future industrial developments (electrolyzers, photoelectrochemicals, and fuel cells). Specifically for the water/hydrogen interconversion, Nature is an exquisite source of inspiration since this chemistry contributes to the bioenergetic metabolism of a number of living organisms via the activity of fascinating metalloenzymes, the hydrogenases. In this Account, we first briefly describe the structure of the unique dinuclear organometallic active sites of the two classes of hydrogenases as well as the complex protein machineries involved in their biosynthesis, their so-called maturation processes. This knowledge allows for the development of a fruitful bioinspired chemistry approach, which has already led to a number of interesting and original catalysts mimicking the natural active sites. More specifically, we describe our own attempts to prepare artificial hydrogenases. This can be achieved via the standard bioinspired approach using the combination of a synthetic bioinspired catalyst and a polypeptide scaffold. Such hybrid complexes provide the opportunity to optimize the system by manipulating both the catalyst through chemical synthesis and the protein component through mutagenesis. We also raise the possibility to reach such artificial systems via an original strategy based on mimicking the enzyme maturation pathways. This is illustrated in this Account by two examples developed in our laboratory. First, we show how the preparation of a lysozyme-{Mn(I)(CO)3} hybrid and its clean reaction with a nickel complex led us to generate a new class of binuclear Ni-Mn H2-evolving catalysts mimicking the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Then we describe how we were able to rationally design and

  11. A 4.6 kb DNA region of Rhizobium meliloti involved in determining urease and hydrogenase activities carries the structural genes for urease (ureA, ureB, ureC) interrupted by other open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Miksch, G; Arnold, W; Lentzsch, P; Priefer, U B; Pühler, A

    1994-03-01

    A 4.6 kb DNA region of the Rhizobium meliloti strain AK631 was found to contain seven open reading frames (ORFs), all oriented in the same direction. The putative gene products of four of these ORFs were highly homologous to UreA, UreB and UreC of Klebsiella aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Canavalia ensiformis. The overall organisation of the DNA region analysed was ORF1, ureA (ORF2), ORF3, ureB (ORF4), ORF5, ORF6 and ureC (ORF7), indicating that the organisation of the urease structural genes in R. meliloti differs from that of other urease genes so far characterized. ORF1 was incomplete; only the 3' end of the coding region was present. The six complete ORFs coded for polypeptides of 11.1 (UreA), 8.9 (ORF3), 10.8 (UreB), 15.0 (ORF5), 13.8 (ORF6) and 60.7 kDa (UreC). No sequence homology to known polypeptides could be detected for the gene products of ORF1, ORF3, ORF5 and ORF6. Using a lacZ fusion and insertional mutagenesis it was shown that the seven ORFs identified were all located in the same transcription unit. For mutational analysis a resistance gene cassette was introduced into each of the complete ORFs resulting in apolar mutations. Mutations in ureA, ureB and ureC, but not in ORF3, ORF5 and ORF6, abolished urease activity in R. meliloti. The determination of hydrogen uptake in these R. meliloti mutants revealed that only ORF6 and ureB are necessary for hydrogen uptake. PMID:8121412

  12. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions change the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Takayoshi; Kintaka, Yuri; Suzuki, Yoko; Nakata, Eiko; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Inoue, Shuji

    2009-05-01

    There are no reports that hypothalamus can directly affect the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in liver. We identified genes of which expression profiles showed significant modulation in rat liver after ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions. Total RNA was extracted, and differences in the gene expression profiles between rats at day 3 after VMH lesioning and sham-VMH lesioned rats were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The result revealed that VMH lesions regulated the genes that were involved in functions related to neuronal development and immunofunction in the liver. Real-time PCR also confirmed that gene expression of SULT4A1 was upregulated, but expression of ACSL1 and CISH were downregulated at day 3 after VMH lesions. VMH lesions may change the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in rat liver. PMID:19429097

  13. Characterization of an operon encoding an NADP-reducing hydrogenase in Desulfovibrio fructosovorans.

    PubMed Central

    Malki, S; Saimmaime, I; De Luca, G; Rousset, M; Dermoun, Z; Belaich, J P

    1995-01-01

    A genomic DNA fragment from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans, which strongly hybridized with the hydAB genes from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, was cloned and sequenced. This fragment was found to contain four genes, named hndA, hndB, hndC, and hndD. Analysis of the sequence homologies indicated that HndA shows 29, 21, and 26% identity with the 24-kDa subunit from Bos taurus complex I, the 25-kDa subunit from Paracoccus denitrificans NADH dehydrogenase type I, and the N-terminal domain of HoxF subunit of the NAD-reducing hydrogenase from Alcaligenes eutrophus, respectively. HndB does not show any significant homology with any known protein. HndC shows 37 and 33% identity with the C-terminal domain of HoxF and the 51-kDa subunit from B. taurus complex I, respectively, and has the requisite structural features to be able to bind one flavin mononucleotide, one NAD, and three [4Fe-4S] clusters. HndD has 40, 42, and 48% identity with hydrogenase I from Clostridium pasteurianum and HydC and HydA from D. vulgaris Hildenborough, respectively. The 4.5-kb length of the transcripts expressed in D. fructosovorans and in Escherichia coli (pSS13) indicated that all four genes were present on the same transcription unit. The sizes of the four polypeptides were measured by performing heterologous expression of hndABCD in E. coli, using the T7 promoter/polymerase system. The products of hndA, hndB, hndC, and hndD were 18.8, 13.8, 52, and 63.4 kDa, respectively. One hndC deletion mutant, called SM3, was constructed by performing marker exchange mutagenesis. Immunoblotting studies carried out on cell extracts from D. fructosovorans wild-type and SM3 strains, using antibodies directed against HndC, indicated that the 52-kDa protein was recognized in extracts from the wild-type strain only. In soluble extracts from D. fructosovorans wild type, a 10-fold induction of NADP reduction was observed when H(2) was present, but no H(2)-dependent NAD reduction ever occurred. This H(2

  14. Production and Engineering of Hydrogenase as a Biocatalyst for Hydrogen Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guangyi

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogenases are fascinating redox proteins, showing tremendous promise in the utilization of hydrogen fuel as a bioelectrocatalyst. They play critical roles in both biohydrogen production and hydrogen oxidation. Specifically, the recently-established comparability of the oxidative activity of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site to that of the fuel cell catalyst platinum marks a significant milestone for the potential application of hydrogenase in hydrogen fuel cells to replace platinum. However, the ability of producing hydrogenase in heterologous expression hosts and the sensitivity of hydrogenases to oxygen and carbon monoxide, etc. have seriously limited the viable macroscale utilization and production of hydrogen from the renewable source. A new technology for the production of up-take hydrogenase is being developed for the utilization of hydrogenase as a hydrogen catalyst. The development of this new technology integrates knowledge of structural biology, molecular biology, and principles of metabolic engineering to produce and engineer a stable hydrogenase as a hydrogen bioelectrocatalyst. It contributes to the critical issues of “expensive noble metal catalysts (i.e., platinum) and their limited reserves threatening the long-term sustainability of a hydrogen economy”. It also provides a model to “design natural materials and enzyme catalyst” for “efficient and cost-effective technologies” for a clean and sustainable energy in 21st century. This new technology includes 3 major components. The first component is the synthetic operons, which carry hydrogenase maturation pathways of Ralstonia eutropha. These synthetic operons are engineered to produce RH hydrogenase in the Escherichia coli strains based on our current molecular and genetic information of hydrogenase maturation mechanisms and pathways of R. eutropha. It presents the first example of producing hydrogenase in the conventional expression host using synthetic biology principles and tool

  15. Photosensitivity of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F with visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Osuka, Hisao; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase showed light sensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New FT-IR bands were observed with light irradiation of the Ni-A state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR g-values of the Ni-A state shifted upon light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The light-induced state converted back to the Ni-A state under the dark condition. -- Abstract: [NiFe] hydrogenase catalyzes reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Its active site is constructed of a hetero dinuclear Ni-Fe complex, and the oxidation state of the Ni ion changes according to the redox state of the enzyme. We found that the Ni-A state (an inactive unready, oxidized state) of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) is light sensitive and forms a new state (Ni-AL) with irradiation of visible light. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) bands at 1956, 2084 and 2094 cm{sup -1} of the Ni-A state shifted to 1971, 2086 and 2098 cm{sup -1} in the Ni-AL state. The g-values of g{sub x} = 2.30, g{sub y} = 2.23 and g{sub z} = 2.01 for the signals in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the Ni-A state at room temperature varied for -0.009, +0.012 and +0.010, respectively, upon light irradiation. The light-induced Ni-AL state converted back immediately to the Ni-A state under dark condition at room temperature. These results show that the coordination structure of the Fe site of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase is perturbed significantly by light irradiation with relatively small coordination change at the Ni site.

  16. Hydrogenase activity in aged, nonviable Desulfovibrio vulgaris cultures and its significance in anaerobic biocorrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatelus, C.; Carrier, P.; Saignes, P.; Libert, M.F.; Berlier, Y.; Lespinat, P.A.; Fauque, G.; Legall, J.

    1987-07-01

    Batch cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris stored at 32 degrees C for 10 months have been found to retain 50% of the hydrogenase activity of a 1-day culture. The hydrogenase found in old cultures needs reducing conditions for its activation. Viable cell counts are negative after 6 months, showing that the hydrogenase activity does not depend on the presence of viable cells. These observations are of importance in the understanding of anaerobic biocorrosion of metals caused by depolarization phenomena. (Refs. 16).

  17. [The molecular evolution of rice stress-related genes].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojun; Xie, Kaibin; Zhang, Yanping; Jin, Ping

    2014-10-01

    In the processes of evolution, plants have formed a perfect regulation system to tolerate adverse environmental conditions. However, there has not been any report about the molecular evolution of rice stress-related genes. We derived a family of 22 stress-related genes in rice from Plant Stress Gene Database, and analyzed it by bioinformatics and comparative genome method. The results showed that these genes are relatively conservative in low organisms, and their copy numbers increase along with the environmental changes and the evolution. We also found four conserved sequence motifs and three other specific motifs. We propose that these motifs are closely associated with the function of rice stress-related genes. The analysis of selection pressure showed that about 50% rice stress-related genes have positive selection sites, although they were subject to a strong purifying selection. Positive selection sites might be very significant for plants to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:25406251

  18. Electrochemistry of Simple Organometallic Models of Iron-Iron Hydrogenases in Organic Solvent and Water.

    PubMed

    Gloaguen, Frederic

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic models of the active site of iron-iron hydrogenases are currently the subjects of numerous studies aimed at developing H2-production catalysts based on cheap and abundant materials. In this context, the present report offers an electrochemist's view of the catalysis of proton reduction by simple binuclear iron(I) thiolate complexes. Although these complexes probably do not follow a biocatalytic pathway, we analyze and discuss the interplay between the reduction potential and basicity and how these antagonist properties impact the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer to the metal centers. This question is central to any consideration of the activity at the molecular level of hydrogenases and related enzymes. In a second part, special attention is paid to iron thiolate complexes holding rigid and unsaturated bridging ligands. The complexes that enjoy mild reduction potentials and stabilized reduced forms are promising iron-based catalysts for the photodriven evolution of H2 in organic solvents and, more importantly, in water. PMID:26641526

  19. Overproduction of the membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Thermococcus kodakarensis and its effect on hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Simons, Jan-Robert; Tsukamoto, Ryohei; Nakajima, Akihito; Omori, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Ryoji; Beppu, Haruki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis can utilize sugars or pyruvate for growth. In the absence of elemental sulfur, the electrons via oxidation of these substrates are accepted by protons, generating molecular hydrogen (H2). The hydrogenase responsible for this reaction is a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Mbh). In this study, we have examined several possibilities to increase the protein levels of Mbh in T. kodakarensis by genetic engineering. Highest levels of intracellular Mbh levels were achieved when the promoter of the entire mbh operon (TK2080-TK2093) was exchanged to a strong constitutive promoter from the glutamate dehydrogenase gene (TK1431) (strain MHG1). When MHG1 was cultivated under continuous culture conditions using pyruvate-based medium, a nearly 25% higher specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) of 35.3 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1 was observed at a dilution rate of 0.31 h−1. We also combined mbh overexpression using an even stronger constitutive promoter from the cell surface glycoprotein gene (TK0895) with disruption of the genes encoding the cytosolic hydrogenase (Hyh) and an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), both of which are involved in hydrogen consumption (strain MAH1). At a dilution rate of 0.30 h−1, the SHPR was 36.2 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, corresponding to a 28% increase compared to that of the host T. kodakarensis strain. Increasing the dilution rate to 0.83 h−1 or 1.07 h−1 resulted in a SHPR of 120 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, which is one of the highest production rates observed in microbial fermentation. PMID:26379632

  20. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael

    2009-03-10

    The invention provides oxygen- resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  1. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Seibert, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The invention provides oxygen-resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H.sub.2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  2. Krypton Derivatization of an O2 -Tolerant Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reveals a Hydrophobic Tunnel Network for Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Kalms, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Andrea; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; van der Linden, Peter; von Stetten, David; Lenz, Oliver; Carpentier, Philippe; Scheerer, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen into protons and electrons. Gas tunnels make the deeply buried active site accessible to substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the architecture and function of the tunnels is pivotal to modulating the feature of O2 tolerance in a subgroup of these [NiFe] hydrogenases, as they are interesting for developments in renewable energy technologies. Here we describe the crystal structure of the O2 -tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha (ReMBH), using krypton-pressurized crystals. The positions of the krypton atoms allow a comprehensive description of the tunnel network within the enzyme. A detailed overview of tunnel sizes, lengths, and routes is presented from tunnel calculations. A comparison of the ReMBH tunnel characteristics with crystal structures of other O2 -tolerant and O2 -sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases revealed considerable differences in tunnel size and quantity between the two groups, which might be related to the striking feature of O2 tolerance. PMID:26913499

  3. Molecular evolution of gas cavity in [NiFeSe] hydrogenases resurrected in silico.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tolerance of selenium-containing [NiFeSe] hydrogenases (Hases) is attributable to the high reducing power of the selenocysteine residue, which sustains the bimetallic Ni-Fe catalytic center in the large subunit. Genes encoding [NiFeSe] Hases are inherited by few sulphate-reducing δ-proteobacteria globally distributed under various anoxic conditions. Ancestral sequences of [NiFeSe] Hases were elucidated and their three-dimensional structures were recreated in silico using homology modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, which suggested that deep gas channels gradually developed in [NiFeSe] Hases under absolute anaerobic conditions, whereas the enzyme remained as a sealed edifice under environmental conditions of a higher oxygen exposure risk. The development of a gas cavity appears to be driven by non-synonymous mutations, which cause subtle conformational changes locally and distantly, even including highly conserved sequence regions. PMID:26818780

  4. Molecular evolution of gas cavity in [NiFeSe] hydrogenases resurrected in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tolerance of selenium-containing [NiFeSe] hydrogenases (Hases) is attributable to the high reducing power of the selenocysteine residue, which sustains the bimetallic Ni-Fe catalytic center in the large subunit. Genes encoding [NiFeSe] Hases are inherited by few sulphate-reducing δ-proteobacteria globally distributed under various anoxic conditions. Ancestral sequences of [NiFeSe] Hases were elucidated and their three-dimensional structures were recreated in silico using homology modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, which suggested that deep gas channels gradually developed in [NiFeSe] Hases under absolute anaerobic conditions, whereas the enzyme remained as a sealed edifice under environmental conditions of a higher oxygen exposure risk. The development of a gas cavity appears to be driven by non-synonymous mutations, which cause subtle conformational changes locally and distantly, even including highly conserved sequence regions.

  5. Molecular evolution of gas cavity in [NiFeSe] hydrogenases resurrected in silico

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tolerance of selenium-containing [NiFeSe] hydrogenases (Hases) is attributable to the high reducing power of the selenocysteine residue, which sustains the bimetallic Ni–Fe catalytic center in the large subunit. Genes encoding [NiFeSe] Hases are inherited by few sulphate-reducing δ-proteobacteria globally distributed under various anoxic conditions. Ancestral sequences of [NiFeSe] Hases were elucidated and their three-dimensional structures were recreated in silico using homology modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, which suggested that deep gas channels gradually developed in [NiFeSe] Hases under absolute anaerobic conditions, whereas the enzyme remained as a sealed edifice under environmental conditions of a higher oxygen exposure risk. The development of a gas cavity appears to be driven by non-synonymous mutations, which cause subtle conformational changes locally and distantly, even including highly conserved sequence regions. PMID:26818780

  6. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  7. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Walter, Mary E; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity's growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed. PMID:26543406

  8. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity's growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed. PMID:26543406

  9. Mechanism of hydrogen activation by [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rhiannon M; Brooke, Emily J; Wehlin, Sara A M; Nomerotskaia, Elena; Sargent, Frank; Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2016-01-01

    The active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases contains a strictly conserved arginine that suspends a guanidine nitrogen atom <4.5 Å above the nickel and iron atoms. The guanidine headgroup interacts with the side chains of two conserved aspartic acid residues to complete an outer-shell canopy that has thus far proved intractable to investigation by site-directed mutagenesis. Using hydrogenase-1 from Escherichia coli, the strictly conserved residues R509 and D574 have been replaced by lysine (R509K) and asparagine (D574N) and the highly conserved D118 has been replaced by alanine (D118A) or asparagine (D118N/D574N). Each enzyme variant is stable, and their [(RS)2Niμ(SR)2Fe(CO)(CN)2] inner coordination shells are virtually unchanged. The R509K variant had >100-fold lower activity than native enzyme. Conversely, the variants D574N, D118A and D118N/D574N, in which the position of the guanidine headgroup is retained, showed 83%, 26% and 20% activity, respectively. The special kinetic requirement for R509 implicates the suspended guanidine group as the general base in H2 activation by [NiFe] hydrogenases. PMID:26619250

  10. Wiring of Photosystem II to Hydrogenase for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Mersch, Dirk; Lee, Chong-Yong; Zhang, Jenny Zhenqi; Brinkert, Katharina; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Rutherford, A William; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    In natural photosynthesis, light is used for the production of chemical energy carriers to fuel biological activity. The re-engineering of natural photosynthetic pathways can provide inspiration for sustainable fuel production and insights for understanding the process itself. Here, we employ a semiartificial approach to study photobiological water splitting via a pathway unavailable to nature: the direct coupling of the water oxidation enzyme, photosystem II, to the H2 evolving enzyme, hydrogenase. Essential to this approach is the integration of the isolated enzymes into the artificial circuit of a photoelectrochemical cell. We therefore developed a tailor-made hierarchically structured indium-tin oxide electrode that gives rise to the excellent integration of both photosystem II and hydrogenase for performing the anodic and cathodic half-reactions, respectively. When connected together with the aid of an applied bias, the semiartificial cell demonstrated quantitative electron flow from photosystem II to the hydrogenase with the production of H2 and O2 being in the expected two-to-one ratio and a light-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.4% under low-intensity red-light irradiation. We thereby demonstrate efficient light-driven water splitting using a pathway inaccessible to biology and report on a widely applicable in vitro platform for the controlled coupling of enzymatic redox processes to meaningfully study photocatalytic reactions. PMID:26046591

  11. Experimental approaches to kinetics of gas diffusion in hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Fanny; Dementin, Sébastien; Burlat, Bénédicte; Cournac, Laurent; Volbeda, Anne; Champ, Stéphanie; Martin, Lydie; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenases, which catalyze H2 to H+ conversion as part of the bioenergetic metabolism of many microorganisms, are among the metalloenzymes for which a gas-substrate tunnel has been described by using crystallography and molecular dynamics. However, the correlation between protein structure and gas-diffusion kinetics is unexplored. Here, we introduce two quantitative methods for probing the rates of diffusion within hydrogenases. One uses protein film voltammetry to resolve the kinetics of binding and release of the competitive inhibitor CO; the other is based on interpreting the yield in the isotope exchange assay. We study structurally characterized mutants of a NiFe hydrogenase, and we show that two mutations, which significantly narrow the tunnel near the entrance of the catalytic center, decrease the rates of diffusion of CO and H2 toward and from the active site by up to 2 orders of magnitude. This proves the existence of a functional channel, which matches the hydrophobic cavity found in the crystal. However, the changes in diffusion rates do not fully correlate with the obstruction induced by the mutation and deduced from the x-ray structures. Our results demonstrate the necessity of measuring diffusion rates and emphasize the role of side-chain dynamics in determining these. PMID:18685111

  12. Reconstitution of [Fe]-hydrogenase using model complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Seigo; Chen, Dafa; Xu, Tao; Wodrich, Matthew D.; Fujishiro, Takashi; Schultz, Katherine M.; Kahnt, Jörg; Ataka, Kenichi; Hu, Xile

    2015-12-01

    [Fe]-Hydrogenase catalyses the reversible hydrogenation of a methenyltetrahydromethanopterin substrate, which is an intermediate step during the methanogenesis from CO2 and H2. The active site contains an iron-guanylylpyridinol cofactor, in which Fe2+ is coordinated by two CO ligands, as well as an acyl carbon atom and a pyridinyl nitrogen atom from a 3,4,5,6-substituted 2-pyridinol ligand. However, the mechanism of H2 activation by [Fe]-hydrogenase is unclear. Here we report the reconstitution of [Fe]-hydrogenase from an apoenzyme using two FeGP cofactor mimics to create semisynthetic enzymes. The small-molecule mimics reproduce the ligand environment of the active site, but are inactive towards H2 binding and activation on their own. We show that reconstituting the enzyme using a mimic that contains a 2-hydroxypyridine group restores activity, whereas an analogous enzyme with a 2-methoxypyridine complex was essentially inactive. These findings, together with density functional theory computations, support a mechanism in which the 2-hydroxy group is deprotonated before it serves as an internal base for heterolytic H2 cleavage.

  13. Experimental approaches to kinetics of gas diffusion in hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Fanny; Dementin, Sébastien; Burlat, Bénédicte; Cournac, Laurent; Volbeda, Anne; Champ, Stéphanie; Martin, Lydie; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2008-08-12

    Hydrogenases, which catalyze H(2) to H(+) conversion as part of the bioenergetic metabolism of many microorganisms, are among the metalloenzymes for which a gas-substrate tunnel has been described by using crystallography and molecular dynamics. However, the correlation between protein structure and gas-diffusion kinetics is unexplored. Here, we introduce two quantitative methods for probing the rates of diffusion within hydrogenases. One uses protein film voltammetry to resolve the kinetics of binding and release of the competitive inhibitor CO; the other is based on interpreting the yield in the isotope exchange assay. We study structurally characterized mutants of a NiFe hydrogenase, and we show that two mutations, which significantly narrow the tunnel near the entrance of the catalytic center, decrease the rates of diffusion of CO and H(2) toward and from the active site by up to 2 orders of magnitude. This proves the existence of a functional channel, which matches the hydrophobic cavity found in the crystal. However, the changes in diffusion rates do not fully correlate with the obstruction induced by the mutation and deduced from the x-ray structures. Our results demonstrate the necessity of measuring diffusion rates and emphasize the role of side-chain dynamics in determining these. PMID:18685111

  14. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H+ and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN− ligands of the H-cluster, tracing 57Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe–S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN− ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications. PMID:26508821

  15. Network analysis of EtOH-related candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, An-Yuan; Sun, Jingchun; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-05-01

    Recently, we collected many large-scale datasets for alcohol dependence and EtOH response in five organisms and deposited them in our EtOH-related gene resource database (ERGR, http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ERGR/). Based on multidimensional evidence among these datasets, we prioritized 57 EtOH-related candidate genes. To explore their biological roles, and the molecular mechanisms of EtOH response and alcohol dependence, we examined the features of these genes by the Gene Ontology (GO) term-enrichment test and network/pathway analysis. Our analysis revealed that these candidate genes were highly enriched in alcohol dependence/alcoholism and highly expressed in brain or liver tissues. All the significantly enriched GO terms were related to neurotransmitter systems or EtOH metabolic processes. Using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis system, we found that these genes were involved in networks of neurological disease, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory response, and small molecular metabolism. Many key genes in signaling pathways were in the central position of these networks. Furthermore, our protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis suggested some novel candidate genes which also had evidence in the ERGR database. This study demonstrated that our candidate gene selection is effective and our network/pathway analysis is useful for uncovering the molecular mechanisms of EtOH response and alcohol dependence. This approach can be applied to study the features of candidate genes of other complex traits/phenotypes. PMID:20491071

  16. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  17. Purification and properties of a protein linked to the soluble hydrogenase of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kärst, U; Suetin, S; Friedrich, C G

    1987-01-01

    In Alcaligenes eutrophus, the formation of the hydrogenases and of five new peptides is subject to the hydrogenase control system. Of these, the B peptide was purified to homogeneity. This protein (Mr, 37,500) was composed of two identical subunits (Mr, 18,800). Antibodies against the B protein were used for its quantification by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. About 4% of the total protein consisted of the B protein; its molar ratio to the NAD-linked hydrogenase was about 4:1. The B protein appeared to be associated with the NAD-linked hydrogenase, as shown by gel filtration analysis with Sephadex G-200. The B protein was not detected in cells that had not expressed the hydrogenase proteins or that lacked the genetic information of the hydrogen-oxidizing character; it was also not detected in Tn5 insertional mutants that were unable to form soluble hydrogenase antigens. Immunochemical analysis of other species and genera than A. eutrophus revealed that only strains able to form a NAD-linked hydrogenase also formed B-protein antigens. The B protein is not required for the catalytic activity of soluble hydrogenase in vitro; its function is at present unknown. Images PMID:3553156

  18. A [NiFe]hydrogenase model that catalyses the release of hydrogen from formic acid.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nga T; Mori, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Yatabe, Takeshi; Kabe, Ryota; Nakai, Hidetaka; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-11-11

    We report the decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen and carbon dioxide, catalysed by a NiRu complex originally developed as a [NiFe]hydrogenase model. This is the first example of H2 evolution, catalysed by a [NiFe]hydrogenase model, which does not require additional energy. PMID:25234420

  19. Covariation of Branch Lengths in Phylogenies of Functionally Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wai Lok Sibon; Rodrigo, Allen G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for the coevolution of functionally-related genes. This coevolution is a result of constraints to maintain functional relationships between interacting proteins. The studies have focused on the correlation in gene tree branch lengths of proteins that are directly interacting with each other. We here hypothesize that the correlation in branch lengths is not limited only to proteins that directly interact, but also to proteins that operate within the same pathway. Using generalized linear models as a basis of identifying correlation, we attempted to predict the gene ontology (GO) terms of a gene based on its gene tree branch lengths. We applied our method to a dataset consisting of proteins from ten prokaryotic species. We found that the degree of accuracy to which we could predict the function of the proteins from their gene tree varied substantially with different GO terms. In particular, our model could accurately predict genes involved in translation and certain ribosomal activities with the area of the receiver-operator curve of up to 92%. Further analysis showed that the similarity between the trees of genes labeled with similar GO terms was not limited to genes that physically interacted, but also extended to genes functioning within the same pathway. We discuss the relevance of our findings as it relates to the use of phylogenetic methods in comparative genomics. PMID:20041191

  20. Hydrogenase-based nanomaterials as anode electrode catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Muneyuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    We consider hydrogenase-based nanomaterials for possible use as anode electrode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). We choose Fe-only hydrogenase component of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (DdHase) as a hydrogenase complex, and investigate its catalytic activity for H 2 dissociation using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We found two possible H-H bond cleavage pathways, which are heterolytic and possess low activation barriers. Moreover, the H 2 dissociation can be promoted by inducing spin polarization of the H 2 adduct. We report that hydrogenase or hydrogenase-based nanomaterials can manipulate to exhibit the catalytic activity equivalent to the well-known platinum catalyst.

  1. Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics study of the association between hydrogenase and ferredoxin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Chang, Christopher H; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2008-10-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer. PMID:18621810

  2. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of the [Fe]-hydrogenase Hmd active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomone-Stagni, Marco; Vogt, Sonja; Shima, Seigo; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Although their structure and catalytic mechanism are of considerable applied interest as models for the development of efficient catalysts for hydrogen fueled processes, the understanding of how hydrogenases react with H2 is only in its infancy. Two of the three known types of hydrogenases are iron-sulfur proteins that contain a dinuclear metal center, either [NiFe] or [FeFe]. In contrast, [Fe]-hydrogenase is the only mononuclear hydrogenase and thus a perfect system for studying the structural and electronic determinants of these enzymes. Here we summarize recent improvements in modeling based on the EXAFS signal and the geometric structure of this metalloenzyme in its as isolated or reconstituted form. The individual contributions to the EXAFS resulting in two different structural models are presented and discussed. Inspired by the new crystal structure, we show an advanced EXAFS model for the enzyme from Methanothermobacter marburgensis.

  3. Detection and localization of two hydrogenases in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and their potential role in methane metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hanczár, Tímea; Csáki, Robert; Bodrossy, Levente; Murrell, J Colin; Kovács, Kornél L

    2002-02-01

    Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was shown to contain two distinct hydrogenases, a soluble hydrogenase and a membrane-bound hydrogenase. This is the first report of a membrane-bound hydrogenase in methanotrophs. Both enzymes were expressed apparently constitutively under normal growth conditions. The soluble hydrogenase was capable of reducing NAD(+) with molecular hydrogen. The activities of both soluble and particulate methane monooxygenases could be driven by molecular hydrogen. This confirmed that molecular hydrogen could be used as a source of reducing power for methane oxidation. Hydrogen-driven methane monooxygenase activities tolerated elevated temperatures and moderate oxygen concentrations. The significance of these findings for biotechnological applications of methanotrophs is discussed. PMID:11807566

  4. Sex chromosome complement regulates expression of mood-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on major depressive and anxiety disorders suggest dysfunctions in brain corticolimbic circuits, including altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and modulatory (serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmission. Interestingly, sexual dimorphisms in GABA, serotonin, and dopamine systems are also reported. Understanding the mechanisms behind these sexual dimorphisms may help unravel the biological bases of the heightened female vulnerability to mood disorders. Here, we investigate the contribution of sex-related factors (sex chromosome complement, developmental gonadal sex, or adult circulating hormones) to frontal cortex expression of selected GABA-, serotonin-, and dopamine-related genes. Methods As gonadal sex is determined by sex chromosome complement, the role of sex chromosomes cannot be investigated individually in humans. Therefore, we used the Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mouse model, in which sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex are artificially decoupled, to examine the expression of 13 GABA-related genes, 6 serotonin- and dopamine-related genes, and 8 associated signal transduction genes under chronic stress conditions. Results were analyzed by three-way ANOVA (sex chromosome complement × gonadal sex × circulating testosterone). A global perspective of gene expression changes was provided by heatmap representation and gene co-expression networks to identify patterns of transcriptional activities related to each main factor. Results We show that under chronic stress conditions, sex chromosome complement influenced GABA/serotonin/dopamine-related gene expression in the frontal cortex, with XY mice consistently having lower gene expression compared to XX mice. Gonadal sex and circulating testosterone exhibited less pronounced, more complex, and variable control over gene expression. Across factors, male conditions were associated with a tightly co-expressed set of signal transduction genes. Conclusions Under chronic stress conditions

  5. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize

    PubMed Central

    Asters, Matthew C.; Williams, W. Paul; Perkins, Andy D.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Windham, Gary L.; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  6. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize.

    PubMed

    Asters, Matthew C; Williams, W Paul; Perkins, Andy D; Mylroie, J Erik; Windham, Gary L; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  7. Molecular functions of genes related to grain shape in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia; Zhang, Yadong; Wang, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    Because grain shape is an important component of rice grain yield, the discovery of genes related to rice grain shape has attracted much attention of rice breeding programs. In recent years, some of these genes have been cloned and studied. They have been found not only regulate grain shape by changing the shape of the spikelet hull, but also regulate endosperm development through control of cell division using different molecular mechanisms. In this paper, we review the recent research on genes related to rice grain shape and their possible regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26069441

  8. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  9. The Model [NiFe]-Hydrogenases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sargent, F

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, hydrogen metabolism plays a prominent role in anaerobic physiology. The genome contains the capability to produce and assemble up to four [NiFe]-hydrogenases, each of which are known, or predicted, to contribute to different aspects of cellular metabolism. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of the structure, function, and roles of the E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, respiratory Hyd-1 isoenzyme has become one of the most important paradigm systems for understanding an important class of oxygen-tolerant enzymes, as well as providing key information on the mechanism of hydrogen activation per se. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, Hyd-2 isoenzyme has emerged as an unusual, bidirectional redox valve able to link hydrogen oxidation to quinone reduction during anaerobic respiration, or to allow disposal of excess reducing equivalents as hydrogen gas. The membrane-bound, cytoplasmically oriented, Hyd-3 isoenzyme is part of the formate hydrogenlyase complex, which acts to detoxify excess formic acid under anaerobic fermentative conditions and is geared towards hydrogen production under those conditions. Sequence identity between some Hyd-3 subunits and those of the respiratory NADH dehydrogenases has led to hypotheses that the activity of this isoenzyme may be tightly coupled to the formation of transmembrane ion gradients. Finally, the E. coli genome encodes a homologue of Hyd-3, termed Hyd-4, however strong evidence for a physiological role for E. coli Hyd-4 remains elusive. In this review, the versatile hydrogen metabolism of E. coli will be discussed and the roles and potential applications of the spectrum of different types of [NiFe]-hydrogenases available will be explored. PMID:27134027

  10. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  11. Review of Literature: Genes Related to Postaxial Polydactyly

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Prashant Kumar; El-Harouni, Ashraf A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) is one of the commonest congenital malformations and usually is associated to several syndromes. There is no primary investigational strategy for PAP cases with single gene disorder in literature. PAP cases with single gene disorder can be classified according to common pathways and molecular basis. Molecular classification may help in diagnostic approach. Materials and Methods: All single gene disorders associated with PAP reported on PubMed and OMIM are analyzed and classified according to molecular basis. Results: Majority of genes related to cilia structure and functions are associated with PAP, so we classified them as ciliopathies and non-ciliopathies groups. Genes related to Shh–Gli3 pathway was the commonest group in non-ciliopathies. Conclusion: Genes related to cilia are most commonly related to PAP due to their indirect relationship to Shh–Gli3 signaling pathway. Initially, PAP may be the only clinical finding with ciliopathies so those cases need follow up. Proper diagnosis is helpful for management and genetic counseling. Molecular approach may help to define pleiotropy. PMID:25717468

  12. A synthetic system links FeFe-hydrogenases to essential E. coli sulfur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background FeFe-hydrogenases are the most active class of H2-producing enzymes known in nature and may have important applications in clean H2 energy production. Many potential uses are currently complicated by a crucial weakness: the active sites of all known FeFe-hydrogenases are irreversibly inactivated by O2. Results We have developed a synthetic metabolic pathway in E. coli that links FeFe-hydrogenase activity to the production of the essential amino acid cysteine. Our design includes a complementary host strain whose endogenous redox pool is insulated from the synthetic metabolic pathway. Host viability on a selective medium requires hydrogenase expression, and moderate O2 levels eliminate growth. This pathway forms the basis for a genetic selection for O2 tolerance. Genetically selected hydrogenases did not show improved stability in O2 and in many cases had lost H2 production activity. The isolated mutations cluster significantly on charged surface residues, suggesting the evolution of binding surfaces that may accelerate hydrogenase electron transfer. Conclusions Rational design can optimize a fully heterologous three-component pathway to provide an essential metabolic flux while remaining insulated from the endogenous redox pool. We have developed a number of convenient in vivo assays to aid in the engineering of synthetic H2 metabolism. Our results also indicate a H2-independent redox activity in three different FeFe-hydrogenases, with implications for the future directed evolution of H2-activating catalysts. PMID:21615937

  13. Hydrogen Production Catalyzed by Bidirectional, Biomimetic Models of the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site.

    PubMed

    Lansing, James C; Camara, James M; Gray, Danielle E; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2014-10-27

    Active site mimics of [FeFe]-hydrogenase are shown to be bidirectional catalysts, producing H2 upon treatment with protons and reducing equivalents. This reactivity complements the previously reported oxidation of H2 by these same catalysts in the presence of oxidants. The complex Fe2(adt(Bn))(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*(Et2) ) ([1](0); adt(Bn) = (SCH2)2NBn, dppv = cis-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethylene, PFc*(Et2) = Et2PCH2C5Me4FeCp*) reacts with excess [H(OEt2)2]BAr(F) 4 (BAr(F) 4 (-) = B(C6H3-3,5-(CF3)2)4 (-)) to give ∼0.5 equiv of H2 and [Fe2(adt(Bn)H)(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*(Et2) )](2+) ([1H](2+)). The species [1H](2+) consists of a ferrocenium ligand, an N-protonated amine, and an Fe(I)Fe(I) core. In the presence of additional reducing equivalents in the form of decamethylferrocene (Fc*), hydrogen evolution is catalytic, albeit slow. The related catalyst Fe2(adt(Bn))(CO)3(dppv)(PMe3) (3) behaves similarly in the presence of Fc*, except that in the absence of excess reducing agent it converts to the catalytically inactive μ-hydride derivative [μ-H3](+). Replacement of the adt in [1](0) with propanedithiolate (pdt) results in a catalytically inactive complex. In the course of synthesizing [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimics, new routes to ferrocenylphosphine ligands and nonamethylferrocene were developed. PMID:25364093

  14. Hydrogen Production Catalyzed by Bidirectional, Biomimetic Models of the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Active site mimics of [FeFe]-hydrogenase are shown to be bidirectional catalysts, producing H2 upon treatment with protons and reducing equivalents. This reactivity complements the previously reported oxidation of H2 by these same catalysts in the presence of oxidants. The complex Fe2(adtBn)(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*Et2) ([1]0; adtBn = (SCH2)2NBn, dppv = cis-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethylene, PFc*Et2 = Et2PCH2C5Me4FeCp*) reacts with excess [H(OEt2)2]BArF4 (BArF4– = B(C6H3-3,5-(CF3)2)4–) to give ∼0.5 equiv of H2 and [Fe2(adtBnH)(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*Et2)]2+ ([1H]2+). The species [1H]2+ consists of a ferrocenium ligand, an N-protonated amine, and an FeIFeI core. In the presence of additional reducing equivalents in the form of decamethylferrocene (Fc*), hydrogen evolution is catalytic, albeit slow. The related catalyst Fe2(adtBn)(CO)3(dppv)(PMe3) (3) behaves similarly in the presence of Fc*, except that in the absence of excess reducing agent it converts to the catalytically inactive μ-hydride derivative [μ-H3]+. Replacement of the adt in [1]0 with propanedithiolate (pdt) results in a catalytically inactive complex. In the course of synthesizing [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimics, new routes to ferrocenylphosphine ligands and nonamethylferrocene were developed. PMID:25364093

  15. A complex network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Hu, Jing-Bo; Cao, Ke-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a network of hypertension-related genes is constructed by analyzing the correlations of gene expression data among the Dahl salt-sensitive rat and two consomic rat strains. The numerical calculations show that this sparse and assortative network has small-world and scale-free properties. Further, 16 key hub genes (Col4a1, Lcn2, Cdk4, etc.) are determined by introducing an integrated centrality and have been confirmed by biological/medical research to play important roles in hypertension.

  16. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-09-22

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  17. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-01-01

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  18. Cross-Ontological Analytics: Combining Associative and Hierarchical Relations in the Gene Ontologies to Assess Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.

    2006-05-28

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the gene ontologies, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes/gene products is obtained by comparing gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with the gene/gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene ontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene ontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy.

  19. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein).

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni-Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression. PMID:27547572

  20. Disruption of the Operon Encoding Ehb Hydrogenase Limits Anabolic CO2 Assimilation in the Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Porat, Iris; Kim, Wonduck; Hendrickson, Erik L.; Xia, Qiangwei; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tiansong; Taub, Fred; Moore, Brian C.; Anderson, Iain J.; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A.; Whitman, William B.

    2006-01-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis is a mesophilic archaeon that reduces CO2 to methane with H2 or formate as an energy source. It contains two membrane-bound energy-conserving hydrogenases, Eha and Ehb. To determine the role of Ehb, a deletion in the ehb operon was constructed to yield the mutant, strain S40. Growth of S40 was severely impaired in minimal medium. Both acetate and yeast extract were necessary to restore growth to nearly wild-type levels, suggesting that Ehb was involved in multiple steps in carbon assimilation. However, no differences in the total hydrogenase specific activities were found between the wild type and mutant in either cell extracts or membrane-purified fractions. Methanogenesis by resting cells with pyruvate as the electron donor was also reduced by 30% in S40, suggesting a defect in pyruvate oxidation. CO dehydrogenase/acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthase and pyruvate oxidoreductase had higher specific activities in the mutant, and genes encoding these enzymes, as well as AMP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase, were expressed at increased levels. These observations support a role for Ehb in anabolic CO2 assimilation in methanococci. PMID:16452419

  1. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein)

    PubMed Central

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni–Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression. PMID:27547572

  2. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity’s growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus ,more » a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed.« less

  3. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Min Sub; Wang, David T.; Zane, Grant M.; Wall, Judy D.; Bosak, Tanja; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    The sulfur isotope effect produced by sulfate reducing microbes is commonly used to trace biogeochemical cycles of sulfur and carbon in aquatic and sedimentary environments. To test the contribution of intracellular coupling between carbon and sulfur metabolisms to the overall magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect, this study compared sulfur isotope fractionations by mutants of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. We tested mutant strains lacking one or two periplasmic (Hyd, Hyn-1, Hyn-2, and Hys) or cytoplasmic hydrogenases (Ech and CooL), and a mutant lacking type I tetraheme cytochrome (TpI-c3). In batch culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and its hydrogenase mutants had comparable growth kinetics and produced the same sulfur isotope effects. This is consistent with the reported redundancy of hydrogenases in D. vulgaris. However, the TpI-c3 mutant (ΔcycA) exhibited slower growth and sulfate reduction rates in batch culture, and produced more H2 and an approximately 50% larger sulfur isotope effect, compared to the wild type. The magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation in the CycA deletion strain, thus, increased due to the disrupted coupling of the carbon oxidation and sulfate reduction pathways. In continuous culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and the CycA mutant produced similar sulfur isotope effects, underscoring the influence of environmental conditions on the relative contribution of hydrogen cycling to the electron transport. The large sulfur isotope effects associated with the non-ideal stoichiometry of sulfate reduction in this study imply that simultaneous fermentation and sulfate reduction may be responsible for some of the large naturally-occurring sulfur isotope effects. Overall, mutant strains provide a powerful tool to test the effect of specific redox proteins and pathways on sulfur isotope fractionation. PMID:23805134

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  5. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  6. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  7. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  8. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  9. The Uptake Hydrogenase in the Unicellular Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Strain PCC 7822 Protects Nitrogenase from Oxygen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Sherman, Debra M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can produce large quantities of H2 when grown diazotrophically. This strain is also capable of genetic manipulations and can represent a good model for improving H2 production from cyanobacteria. To this end, a knockout mutation was made in the hupL gene (ΔhupL), and we determined how this would affect the amount of H2 produced. The ΔhupL mutant demonstrated virtually no nitrogenase activity or H2 production when grown under N2-fixing conditions. To ensure that this mutation only affected the hupL gene, a complementation strain was constructed readily with wild-type properties; this indicated that the original insertion was only in hupL. The mutant had no uptake hydrogenase activity but had increased bidirectional hydrogenase (Hox) activity. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry under the electron microscope indicated that the mutant had neither HupL nor NifHDK, although the nif genes were transcribed. Interestingly, biochemical analysis demonstrated that both HupL and NifH could be membrane associated. The results indicated that the nif genes were transcribed but that NifHDK was either not translated or was translated but rapidly degraded. We hypothesized that the Nif proteins were made but were unusually susceptible to O2 damage. Thus, we grew the mutant cells under anaerobic conditions and found that they grew well under N2-fixing conditions. We conclude that in unicellular diazotrophs, like Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822, the HupLS complex helps remove oxygen from the nitrogenase, and that this is a more important function than merely oxidizing the H2 produced by the nitrogenase. PMID:24317398

  10. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    PubMed

    Adato, Orit; Ninyo, Noga; Gophna, Uri; Snir, Sagi

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM). Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain. PMID:26439115

  11. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Adato, Orit; Ninyo, Noga; Gophna, Uri; Snir, Sagi

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM). Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on “unusual” sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain. PMID:26439115

  12. Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Chemistry in the Synthesis of Hydrogenase and Nitrogenase Metal Cofactors*

    PubMed Central

    Byer, Amanda S.; Shepard, Eric M.; Peters, John W.; Broderick, Joan B.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. The FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. This minireview presents and discusses the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of these remarkable metal cofactors. PMID:25477518

  13. Interaction of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases with Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D. S.; McDonald, T. J.; Kim, Y.-H.; Blackburn, J. L.; Heben, M. J.; King, P. W.

    2007-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H{sub 2}. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  14. Interaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedruzic Chang, Drazenka; McDonald, Timothy J.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Heben, Michael J.; King, Paul W.

    2007-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H II. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  15. High presence/absence gene variability in defense-related gene clusters of Cucumis melo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Changes in the copy number of DNA sequences are one of the main mechanisms generating genome variability in eukaryotes. These changes are often related to phenotypic effects such as genetic disorders or novel pathogen resistance. The increasing availability of genome sequences through the application of next-generation massive sequencing technologies has allowed the study of genomic polymorphisms at both the interspecific and intraspecific levels, thus helping to understand how species adapt to changing environments through genome variability. Results Data on gene presence/absence variation (PAV) in melon was obtained by resequencing a cultivated accession and an old-relative melon variety, and using previously obtained resequencing data from three other melon cultivars, among them DHL92, on which the current draft melon genome sequence is based. A total of 1,697 PAV events were detected, involving 4.4% of the predicted melon gene complement. In all, an average 1.5% of genes were absent from each analyzed cultivar as compared to the DHL92 reference genome. The most populated functional category among the 304 PAV genes of known function was that of stress response proteins (30% of all classified PAVs). Our results suggest that genes from multi-copy families are five times more likely to be affected by PAV than singleton genes. Also, the chance of genes present in the genome in tandem arrays being affected by PAV is double that of isolated genes, with PAV genes tending to be in longer clusters. The highest concentration of PAV events detected in the melon genome was found in a 1.1 Mb region of linkage group V, which also shows the highest density of melon stress-response genes. In particular, this region contains the longest continuous gene-containing PAV sequence so far identified in melon. Conclusions The first genome-wide report of PAV variation among several melon cultivars is presented here. Multi-copy and clustered genes, especially those with

  16. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENE AND EARLY AGE-RELATED MACULOPATHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene and early age-related maculopathy (ARM) in middle-aged persons. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: Participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (n = 10139; age range, 49-73 ye...

  17. High-Yield Expression of Heterologous [FeFe] Hydrogenases in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kuchenreuther, Jon M.; Grady-Smith, Celestine S.; Bingham, Alyssa S.; George, Simon J.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Swartz, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The realization of hydrogenase-based technologies for renewable H2 production is presently limited by the need for scalable and high-yielding methods to supply active hydrogenases and their required maturases. Principal Findings In this report, we describe an improved Escherichia coli-based expression system capable of producing 8–30 mg of purified, active [FeFe] hydrogenase per liter of culture, volumetric yields at least 10-fold greater than previously reported. Specifically, we overcame two problems associated with other in vivo production methods: low protein yields and ineffective hydrogenase maturation. The addition of glucose to the growth medium enhances anaerobic metabolism and growth during hydrogenase expression, which substantially increases total yields. Also, we combine iron and cysteine supplementation with the use of an E. coli strain upregulated for iron-sulfur cluster protein accumulation. These measures dramatically improve in vivo hydrogenase activation. Two hydrogenases, HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and HydA (CpI) from Clostridium pasteurianum, were produced with this improved system and subsequently purified. Biophysical characterization and FTIR spectroscopic analysis of these enzymes indicate that they harbor the H-cluster and catalyze H2 evolution with rates comparable to those of enzymes isolated from their respective native organisms. Significance The production system we describe will facilitate basic hydrogenase investigations as well as the development of new technologies that utilize these prolific H2-producing enzymes. These methods can also be extended for producing and studying a variety of oxygen-sensitive iron-sulfur proteins as well as other proteins requiring anoxic environments. PMID:21124800

  18. Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Final technical report, August 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    This project is focused on investigations of the catalytic mechanism of the hydrogenase found in the aerobic, N{sub 2}-fixing microorganism Azotobacter vinelandii. This report summarizes the progress during the first two years of the current project and include the anticipated course of the research for the remaining year of the current project. Because the current proposal represents a change in direction, the authors also include a brief progress report of prior DOE-sponsored research dealing with hydrogenases.

  19. How should we measure proportionality on relative gene expression data?

    PubMed

    Erb, Ionas; Notredame, Cedric

    2016-06-01

    Correlation is ubiquitously used in gene expression analysis although its validity as an objective criterion is often questionable. If no normalization reflecting the original mRNA counts in the cells is available, correlation between genes becomes spurious. Yet the need for normalization can be bypassed using a relative analysis approach called log-ratio analysis. This approach can be used to identify proportional gene pairs, i.e. a subset of pairs whose correlation can be inferred correctly from unnormalized data due to their vanishing log-ratio variance. To interpret the size of non-zero log-ratio variances, a proposal for a scaling with respect to the variance of one member of the gene pair was recently made by Lovell et al. Here we derive analytically how spurious proportionality is introduced when using a scaling. We base our analysis on a symmetric proportionality coefficient (briefly mentioned in Lovell et al.) that has a number of advantages over their statistic. We show in detail how the choice of reference needed for the scaling determines which gene pairs are identified as proportional. We demonstrate that using an unchanged gene as a reference has huge advantages in terms of sensitivity. We also explore the link between proportionality and partial correlation and derive expressions for a partial proportionality coefficient. A brief data-analysis part puts the discussed concepts into practice. PMID:26762323

  20. Inferring gene transcriptional modulatory relations: a genetical genomics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqiang; Lu, Lu; Manly, Kenneth; Chesler, Elissa J; Bao, Lei; Wang, Jintao; Zhou, Mi; Williams, Robert; Cui, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Bayesian network modeling is a promising approach to define and evaluate gene expression circuits in diverse tissues and cell types under different experimental conditions. The power and practicality of this approach can be improved by restricting the number of potential interactions among genes and by defining causal relations before evaluating posterior probabilities for billions of networks. A newly developed genetical genomics method that combines transcriptome profiling with complex trait analysis now provides strong constraints on network architecture. This method detects those chromosomal intervals responsible for differences in mRNA expression using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. We have developed an efficient Bayesian approach that exploits the genetical genomics method to focus computational effort on the most plausible gene modulatory networks. We exploit a dense marker map for a genetic reference population (GRP) that consists of 32 BXD strains of mice made by intercrossing two progenitor strains- C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. These progenitors differ at 1.3 million known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), all of which can be exploited to estimate the probability that a gene contains functional polymorphisms that segregate within the GRP. We constructed 66 candidate networks that include all the candidate modulator genes located in the 209 statistically significant trans-acting QTL regions. SNPs that distinguish between the two progenitor strains were used to further winnow the list of candidate modulators. Bayesian network was then used to identify the genetic modulatory relations that best explain the microarray data.

  1. A human TAPBP (TAPASIN)-related gene, TAPBP-R.

    PubMed

    Teng, Michelle S; Stephens, Richard; Du Pasquier, Louis; Freeman, Tom; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Trowsdale, John

    2002-04-01

    TAPASIN, a V-C1 (variable-constant) immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) molecule that links MHC class I molecules to the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is encoded by the TAPBP gene, located near to the MHC at 6p21.3. A related gene was identified at chromosome position 12p13.3 between the CD27 and VAMP1 genes near a group of MHC-paralogous loci. The gene, which we have called TAPBP-R (R for related), also encodes a member of the IgSF, TAPASIN-R. Its putative product contains similar structural motifs to TAPASIN, with some marked differences, especially in the V domain, transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. By using the mouse ortholog to screen tissue, we revealed that the TAPBP-R gene was broadly expressed. Sub-cellular localization showed that the bulk of TAPASIN-R is located within the ER but biotinylation experiments were consistent with some expression at thecell surface. TAPASIN-R lacks an obvious ER retention signal. The function of TAPASIN-R will be of interest in regards to the evolution of the immune system as well as antigen processing. PMID:11920573

  2. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP+. Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  3. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  4. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  5. Gene-environment interactions of circadian-related genes for cardiometabolic traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs1...

  6. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis. PMID:27125224

  7. Studies of Hybrid Nano-Bio-System: Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Svedruzic-Chang, D.; Blackburn, J. L.; McDonald, T. J.; Heben, M. J.; King, P. W.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) optical signals upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum or Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We found evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed only under conditions of hydrogenase catalytic turnover. Formation of the complex sensitizes the nanotubes to the proton-to-hydrogen redox half-reaction. Thus, the experimental potential can be altered by changing the pH or molecular hydrogen concentration. In the presence of molecular hydrogen, hydrogenase mediates electron injection into the conduction band of semiconducting SWNT, which was observed as a quenching of the photoluminescence signals. Here, we will present recent Raman studies, which revealed that SWNTs in a complex with hydrogenase may undergo either oxidation or reduction, depending on the electronic structure of the SWNT and the oxidation state of the enzyme. In addition, we will describe our efforts to prepare stable, solubilized SWNT/hydrogenase complexes in the absence of detergent. This work shows that SWNT/hydrogenase complexes have potential applications as a component of an energy conversion device.

  8. Effects of alcohols on the reactivity and stability of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Arp, D J

    1988-02-15

    The effects of alcohols on the reactivity of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase were investigated. Hydrogenase catalyzed H2 oxidation coupled to methylene blue, benzyl viologen, or phenazine methosulfate when in the presence of solvents containing 15 or 40% ethanol or 40% methanol or 2-propanol. In general, the Km's for the electron acceptors were increased substantially by the presence of the alcohols, while the Km for H2 was not altered in a solvent containing 40% ethanol. Calculation of the apparent maximum velocities for H2 oxidation in the presence of alcohols indicated that the maximum velocity was not decreased in most cases. In contrast, the rates of both H2 evolution and isotope exchange by hydrogenase were substantially decreased when solvent containing alcohol. Hydrogenase was inactivated by 100% ethanol with a half-life of 17 s. Hydrogenase from A. vinelandii was stable when stored in alcohol/buffer solvents at 20 degrees C or below. However, the thermal stability of hydrogenase was greatly decreased by inclusion of an alcohol in the solvent. When incubated at 55 degrees C in a solvent containing 40% ethanol, activity decreased in a first-order process with a half-life of 7 min. When incubated at the same temperature in aqueous buffer, no loss of activity was observed over 30 min. PMID:3277540

  9. Occurrence and localization of two distinct hydrogenases in the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7120.

    PubMed Central

    Houchins, J P; Burris, R H

    1981-01-01

    Two distinct types of hydrogenase occur in Anabaena 7120 and are distinguishable in whole filaments by the application of selective assay methods. A reversible hydrogenase occurs both in heterocysts and vegetative cells and can be selectively assayed by measuring H2 evolution from reduced methyl viologen. Activities in aerobically grown filaments were low but could be increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude by growing cells microaerobically. The presence of the reversible hydrogenase was independent of the N2-fixing properties of the organism, and activity did not respond to added H2 in the culture. Illumination was necessary during derepression of the reversible hydrogenase, and addition of 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea increased the amount of enzyme that was synthesized. An uptake hydrogenase occurred only in heterocysts of aerobically grown filaments, but a small amount of activity also was present in the vegetative cells of filaments grown microaerobically with 20% H2. It was assayed selectively by measuring an oxyhydrogen reaction at atmospheric levels of O2. Additional uptake hydrogenase could be elicited by including H2 or by removing O2 from the sparging gas of a culture. PMID:6783614

  10. Integration of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase into the anaerobic metabolism of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciarán L.; Pinske, Constanze; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Biohydrogen is a potentially useful product of microbial energy metabolism. One approach to engineering biohydrogen production in bacteria is the production of non-native hydrogenase activity in a host cell, for example Escherichia coli. In some microbes, hydrogenase enzymes are linked directly to central metabolism via diaphorase enzymes that utilise NAD+/NADH cofactors. In this work, it was hypothesised that heterologous production of an NAD+/NADH-linked hydrogenase could connect hydrogen production in an E. coli host directly to its central metabolism. To test this, a synthetic operon was designed and characterised encoding an apparently NADH-dependent, hydrogen-evolving [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Caldanaerobacter subterranus. The synthetic operon was stably integrated into the E. coli chromosome and shown to produce an active hydrogenase, however no H2 production was observed. Subsequently, it was found that heterologous co-production of a pyruvate::ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima was found to be essential to drive H2 production by this system. This work provides genetic evidence that the Ca.subterranus [FeFe]-hydrogenase could be operating in vivo as an electron-confurcating enzyme. PMID:26839796

  11. Model study of CO inhibition of [NiFe]hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kabe, Ryota; Nonaka, Kyoshiro; Ando, Tatsuya; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Nakai, Hidetaka; Ogo, Seiji

    2011-09-19

    We propose a modified mechanism for the inhibition of [NiFe]hydrogenase ([NiFe]H(2)ase) by CO. We present a model study, using a NiRu H(2)ase mimic, that demonstrates that (i) CO completely inhibits the catalytic cycle of the model compound, (ii) CO prefers to coordinate to the Ru(II) center rather than taking an axial position on the Ni(II) center, and (iii) CO is unable to displace a hydrido ligand from the NiRu center. We combine these studies with a reevaluation of previous studies to propose that, under normal circumstances, CO inhibits [NiFe]H(2)ase by complexing to the Fe(II) center. PMID:21853978

  12. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  13. The evolution of cancer-related genes in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of cancer suppression is essential for the maintenance of multicellularity. The lack of correlation between body size and cancer risk across species, known as Peto's paradox, suggests that genetic variation in cancer resistance is sufficient to compensate for increases of cell numbers in bigger animals. To assess evolutionary dynamics of cancer-related genes, we analyzed Ka, Ks,and Ka/Ks values in 120 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSG) among seven hominoid species, including two extinct species, Neanderthal and Denisovan. Ka/Ks of tumor suppressor genes tended to be higher relative to that of oncogenes, consistent with relaxed purifying selection acting on the former. Ka/Ks values were positively correlated with TSG scores, but negatively correlated with oncogene scores, suggesting opposing selection pressures operating on the two groups of cancer-related genes. Additionally, we found 108 species-divergent substitutions that were prevalent germline genotypes in some species but in humans appeared only as somatic cancerous mutations. Better understanding the resistance to cancer may lead to new methods of cancer prevention in humans. PMID:25249249

  14. Combinatorial gene regulation by modulation of relative pulse timing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Sohn, Chang Ho; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Cai, Long; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individual living cells have revealed that many transcription factors activate in dynamic, and often stochastic, pulses within the same cell. However, it has remained unclear whether cells might modulate the relative timing of these pulses to control gene expression. Here, using quantitative single-cell time-lapse imaging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the pulsatile transcription factors Msn2 and Mig1 combinatorially regulate their target genes through modulation of their relative pulse timing. The activator Msn2 and repressor Mig1 pulsed in either a temporally overlapping or non-overlapping manner during their transient response to different inputs, with only the non-overlapping dynamics efficiently activating target gene expression. Similarly, under constant environmental conditions, where Msn2 and Mig1 exhibit sporadic pulsing, glucose concentration modulated the temporal overlap between pulses of the two factors. Together, these results reveal a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation. Regulation through relative signal timing is common in engineering and neurobiology, and these results suggest that it could also function broadly within the signaling and regulatory systems of the cell. PMID:26466562

  15. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  16. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo, Michele; Missiroli, Filippo; Borgiani, Paola; Angelucci, Francesco; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Cusumano, Andrea; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ricci, Federico; Giardina, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old). AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension). In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species) have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2) that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines), immune cells (macrophages), and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25478207

  17. Key Role for Sulfur in Peptide Metabolism and in Regulation of Three Hydrogenases in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W. W.; Holden, James F.; Menon, Angeli Lal; Schut, Gerrit J.; Grunden, Amy M.; Hou, Chun; Hutchins, Andrea M.; Jenney, Francis E.; Kim, Chulhwan; Ma, Kesen; Pan, Guangliang; Roy, Roopali; Sapra, Rajat; Story, Sherry V.; Verhagen, Marc F. J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally at 100°C by the fermentation of peptides and carbohydrates. Growth of the organism was examined in media containing either maltose, peptides (hydrolyzed casein), or both as the carbon source(s), each with and without elemental sulfur (S0). Growth rates were highest on media containing peptides and S0, with or without maltose. Growth did not occur on the peptide medium without S0. S0 had no effect on growth rates in the maltose medium in the absence of peptides. Phenylacetate production rates (from phenylalanine fermentation) from cells grown in the peptide medium containing S0 with or without maltose were the same, suggesting that S0 is required for peptide utilization. The activities of 14 of 21 enzymes involved in or related to the fermentation pathways of P. furiosus were shown to be regulated under the five different growth conditions studied. The presence of S0 in the growth media resulted in decreases in specific activities of two cytoplasmic hydrogenases (I and II) and of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, each by an order of magnitude. The primary S0-reducing enzyme in this organism and the mechanism of the S0 dependence of peptide metabolism are not known. This study provides the first evidence for a highly regulated fermentation-based metabolism in P. furiosus and a significant regulatory role for elemental sulfur or its metabolites. PMID:11133967

  18. CO and CN- syntheses by [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturase HydG are catalytically differentiated events.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Adrien; Martin, Lydie; Zeppieri, Laura; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of the active site [FeFe] unit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases require at least three maturases. The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine HydG, the best characterized of these proteins, is responsible for the synthesis of the hydrogenase CO and CN(-) ligands from tyrosine-derived dehydroglycine (DHG). We speculated that CN(-) and the CO precursor (-):CO2H may be generated through an elimination reaction. We tested this hypothesis with both wild type and HydG variants defective in second iron-sulfur cluster coordination by measuring the in vitro production of CO, CN(-), and (-):CO2H-derived formate. We indeed observed formate production under these conditions. We conclude that HydG is a multifunctional enzyme that produces DHG, CN(-), and CO at three well-differentiated catalytic sites. We also speculate that homocysteine, cysteine, or a related ligand could be involved in Fe(CO)x(CN)y transfer to the HydF carrier/scaffold. PMID:26699472

  19. CO and CN− syntheses by [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturase HydG are catalytically differentiated events

    PubMed Central

    Pagnier, Adrien; Martin, Lydie; Zeppieri, Laura; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of the active site [FeFe] unit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases require at least three maturases. The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine HydG, the best characterized of these proteins, is responsible for the synthesis of the hydrogenase CO and CN− ligands from tyrosine-derived dehydroglycine (DHG). We speculated that CN− and the CO precursor −:CO2H may be generated through an elimination reaction. We tested this hypothesis with both wild type and HydG variants defective in second iron-sulfur cluster coordination by measuring the in vitro production of CO, CN−, and −:CO2H-derived formate. We indeed observed formate production under these conditions. We conclude that HydG is a multifunctional enzyme that produces DHG, CN−, and CO at three well-differentiated catalytic sites. We also speculate that homocysteine, cysteine, or a related ligand could be involved in Fe(CO)x(CN)y transfer to the HydF carrier/scaffold. PMID:26699472

  20. A patient with PMP22-related hereditary neuropathy and DBH-gene-related dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Contin, Manuela; Scaglione, Cesa; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Garagnani, Paolo; Tieri, Paolo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Piras, Silvia; Franceschi, Claudio; Delledonne, Massimo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent focal neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a relatively frequent autosomal-dominant demyelinating neuropathy linked to peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene deletions. The combination of PMP22 gene mutations with other genetic variants is known to cause a more severe phenotype than expected. We present the case of a patient with severe orthostatic hypotension since 12 years of age, who inherited a PMP22 gene deletion from his father. Genetic double trouble was suspected because of selective sympathetic autonomic disturbances. Through exome-sequencing analysis, we identified two novel mutations in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene. Moreover, with interactome analysis, we excluded a further influence on the origin of the disease by variants in other genes. This case increases the number of unique patients presenting with dopamine-β-hydroxylase deficiency and of cases with genetically proven double trouble. Finding the right, complete diagnosis is crucial to obtain adequate medical care and appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:26410747

  1. Genes related to high temperature tolerance during maize seed germination.

    PubMed

    Dutra, S M F; Von Pinho, E V R; Santos, H O; Lima, A C; Von Pinho, R G; Carvalho, M L M

    2015-01-01

    The identification of genes related to heat tolerance is fundamental for the development of high-quality seeds that are tolerant to heat stress condition. The objective of this study was to evaluate maize lineages and the gene expression involved in high temperature tolerance during germination using physiological tests, proteomics, and transcriptome analysis. Seeds from six maize lineages (30, 44, 54, 63, 64, and 91) with different levels of tolerance to high temperatures were used. Lineages 54 and 91 were observed to be more tolerant to high temperature conditions. The highest expression of α-amylase was observed in maize seeds from lineages 30 and 91 that were subjected to controlled deterioration. The highest expression of α-amylase was observed in maize seeds from lineages 30 and 91 that were subjected to controlled deterioration; with the controlled deterioration, the highest level of gene expression did not occur in the most tolerant materials; the association of lower expression of genes involved in heat-resistant protein systems was observed in seeds from lineage 44, which were more susceptible to high temperatures, and the highest gene expression of LEA D-34, ZmAN13, and AOX-1 was observed in seeds from lineage 64 when submitted to controlled deterioration. PMID:26782452

  2. Globin gene expression in correlation with G protein-related genes during erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. G proteins are also implicated in erythroid differentiation, and some of them are expressed principally in hematopoietic cells. GPCRs-linked NO/cGMP and p38 MAPK signaling pathways already demonstrated potency for globin gene stimulation. By analyzing erythroid progenitors, derived from hematopoietic cells through in vitro ontogeny, our study intends to determine early markers and signaling pathways of globin gene regulation and their relation to GPCR expression. Results Human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitors are isolated from fetal liver (FL), cord blood (CB), adult bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) and G-CSF stimulated mobilized PB (mPB), and then differentiated in vitro into erythroid progenitors. We find that growth capacity is most abundant in FL- and CB-derived erythroid cells. The erythroid progenitor cells are sorted as 100% CD71+, but we did not find statistical significance in the variations of CD34, CD36 and GlyA antigens and that confirms similarity in maturation of studied ontogenic periods. During ontogeny, beta-globin gene expression reaches maximum levels in cells of adult blood origin (176 fmol/μg), while gamma-globin gene expression is consistently up-regulated in CB-derived cells (60 fmol/μg). During gamma-globin induction by hydroxycarbamide, we identify stimulated GPCRs (PTGDR, PTGER1) and GPCRs-coupled genes known to be activated via the cAMP/PKA (ADIPOQ), MAPK pathway (JUN) and NO/cGMP (PRPF18) signaling pathways. During ontogeny, GPR45 and ARRDC1 genes have the most prominent expression in FL-derived erythroid progenitor cells, GNL3 and GRP65 genes in CB-derived cells (high gamma-globin gene expression), GPR110 and GNG10 in BM-derived cells, GPR89C and GPR172A in PB-derived cells, and GPR44 and GNAQ genes in mPB-derived cells (high beta-globin gene expression). Conclusions These results

  3. Obtain osteoarthritis related molecular signature genes through regulation network.

    PubMed

    Li, Yawei; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guohua; Xiong, Guangzhong; Liu, Wei Dong; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease or osteoarthrosis, is the most common form of arthritis. OA occurs when cartilage in the joints wears down over time. We used the GSE1919 series to identify potential genes that correlated to OA. The aim of our study was to obtain a molecular signature of OA through the regulation network based on differentially expressed genes. From the result of regulation network construction in OA, a number of transcription factors (TFs) and pathways closely related to OA were linked by our method. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ also arises as hub nodes in our transcriptome network and certain TFs containing CEBPD, EGR2 and ETS2 were shown to be related to OA by a previous study. PMID:21946934

  4. Unification of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into three structural and functional groups

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poudel, Saroj; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Colman, Daniel R.; Refai, Mohammed; Schut, Gerrit J.; King, Paul W.; Maness, Pin-Ching; Adams, Michael W. W.; Peters, John W.; Bothner, Brian; et al

    2016-05-27

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (Hyd) are structurally diverse enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation of hydrogen (H2). Recent biochemical data demonstrate new functional roles for these enzymes, including those that function in electron bifurcation where an exergonic reaction is coupled with an endergonic reaction to drive the reversible oxidation/production of H2. To identify the structural determinants that underpin differences in enzyme functionality, a total of 714 homologous sequences of the catalytic subunit, HydA, were compiled. Bioinformatics approaches informed by biochemical data were then used to characterize differences in inferred quaternary structure, HydA active site protein environment, accessory iron-sulfur clusters in HydA, and regulatorymore » proteins encoded in HydA gene neighborhoods. HydA homologs were clustered into one of three classification groups, Group 1 (G1), Group 2 (G2), and Group 3 (G3). G1 enzymes were predicted to be monomeric while those in G2 and G3 were predicted to be multimeric and include HydB, HydC (G2/G3) and HydD (G3) subunits. Variation in the HydA active site and accessory iron-sulfur clusters did not vary by group type. Group-specific regulatory genes were identified in the gene neighborhoods of both G2 and G3 Hyd. Analyses of purified G2 and G3 enzymes by mass spectrometry strongly suggests that they are post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results suggest that bifurcation capability is dictated primarily by the presence of both HydB and HydC in Hyd complexes, rather than by variation in HydA.« less

  5. Hydrogenase Activity of Mineral-Associated and Suspended Populations of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex 6

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Reardon; T.S. Magnuson; E.S. Boyd; W.D. Leavitt; D.W. Reed; G.G. Geesey

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate electron transfer to metals and may contribute to the formation and speciation of ferrous sulfides formed at the cell–mineral interface. In the present study, we compared the whole cell hydrogenase activity of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Essex 6 growing as biofilms on hematite (hematite-associated) or as suspended populations using different metabolic pathways. Hematite-associated cells exhibited significantly greater hydrogenase activity than suspended populations during sulfate respiration but not during pyruvate fermentation. The enhanced activity of the hematite-associated, sulfate-grown cells appears to be dependent on iron availability rather than a general response to surface attachment since the activity of glass-associated cells did not differ from that of suspended populations. Hydrogenase activity of pyruvate-fermenting cells was stimulated by addition of iron as soluble Fe(II)Cl2 and, in the absence of added iron, both sulfate-reducing and pyruvate-fermenting cells displayed similar rates of hydrogenase activity. These data suggest that iron exerts a stronger influence on whole cell hydrogenase activity than either metabolic pathway or mode of growth. The location of hydrogenase to the cell envelope and the enhanced activity at the hematite surface in sulfate-reducing cells may influence the redox conditions that control the species of iron sulfides on the mineral surface.

  6. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  7. Expression and interaction analysis of Arabidopsis Skp1-related genes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Kuromori, Takashi; Hirayama, Takashi; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shimada, Hiroaki; Matsui, Minami

    2004-01-01

    Specific protein degradation has been observed in several aspects of development and differentiation in many organisms. One example of such proteolysis is regulated by protein polyubiquitination that is promoted by the SCF complex consisting of Skp1, cullin, and an F-box protein. We examined the activities of the Arabidopsis Skp1-related proteins (ASKs). Among 19 annotated ASK genes, we isolated 16 of the corresponding cDNAs (ASK1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19), and examined their gene products for interactions with 24 representatives of F-box proteins carrying various classes of the C-terminal domains using the yeast two-hybrid system. As a result, we found diverse binding specificities: ASK1, ASK2, ASK11 and ASK12 interacted well with COI1, FKF1, UFO-like protein, LRR-containing F-box proteins, and other F-box proteins with unknown C-terminal motifs. We also observed specific interaction between F-box proteins and ASK3, ASK9, ASK13, ASK14, ASK16 and ASK18. In contrast, we detected no interaction between any of the 12 ASK proteins and F-box proteins containing CRFA, CRFB or CRFC domains. Both histochemical and RT-PCR analysis of eight ASK genes expression revealed unique expression patterns for the respective genes. PMID:14749489

  8. The Drosophila gene escargot encodes a zinc finger motif found in snail-related genes.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, M; Noguchi, P D; Sensabaugh, S M; Odenwald, W F; Kassis, J A

    1992-02-01

    Two independent P-element enhancer detection lines were obtained that express lacZ in a pattern of longitudinal stripes early in germband elongation. In this paper, molecular and genetic characterization of a gene located near these transposons is presented. Sequence analysis of a cDNA clone from the region reveals that this gene has a high degree of similarity with the Drosophila snail gene (Boulay et al., 1987). The sequence similarity extends over 400 nucleotides, and includes a region encoding five tandem zinc finger motifs (72% nucleotide identity; 76% amino acid identity). This region is also conserved in the snail homologue from Xenopus laevis (76% nucleotide identity; 83% amino acid identity) (Sargent and Bennett, 1990). We have named the Drosophila snail-related gene escargot (esg), and the region of sequence conservation common to all three genes the 'snailbox'. A number of Drosophila genomic DNA fragments cross-hybridize to a probe from the snailbox region suggesting that snail and escargot are members of a multigene family. The expression pattern of escargot is dynamic and complex. Early in germband elongation, escargot RNA is expressed in a pattern of longitudinal stripes identical to the one observed in the two enhancer detection lines. Later in development, escargot is expressed in cells that will form the larval imaginal tissues, escargot is allelic with l(2)35Ce, an essential gene located near snail in the genome. PMID:1571289

  9. Differential regulation of the 70K heat shock gene and related genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ellwood, M S; Craig, E A

    1984-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a family of genes related to Hsp70, the major heat shock gene of Drosophila melanogaster. The transcription of three of these genes, which show no conservation of sequences 5' to the protein-coding region, was analyzed. The 5' flanking regions from the three genes were fused to the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase structural gene and introduced into yeasts on multicopy plasmids, putting the beta-galactosidase production under yeast promoter control. Analysis of beta-galactosidase mRNA and protein production in these transformed strains revealed that transcription from the three promoters is differentially regulated. The number of transcripts from one promoter is vastly increased for a brief period after heat shock, whereas mRNA from another declines. Transcripts from a third gene are slightly enhanced upon heat shock; however, multiple 5' ends of the mRNA are found, and a minor species increases in amount after heat shock. Transcription of these promoters in their native state on the chromosome appears to be modulated in the same manner. Images PMID:6436685

  10. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum. PMID:21127986

  11. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  12. Leptin regulates gallbladder genes related to absorption and secretion.

    PubMed

    Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Lu, Debao; Basile, David P; Graewin, Shannon J; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Kiely, James M; Mathur, Abhishek; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A

    2007-07-01

    Dysregulation of gallbladder ion and water absorption and/or secretion has been linked to cholesterol crystal and gallstone formation. We have recently demonstrated that obese, leptin-deficient (Lep(ob)) mice have enlarged gallbladder volumes and decreased gallbladder contractility and that leptin administration to these mice normalizes gallbladder function. However, the effect of leptin on gallbladder absorption/secretion is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine whether leptin would alter the expression of genes involved in water and ion transport across the gallbladder epithelium. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays representing 39,000 transcripts were used to compare gallbladder gene-expression profiles from 12-wk-old control saline-treated Lep(ob) and from leptin-treated Lep(ob) female mice. Leptin administration to Lep(ob) mice decreased gallbladder volume, bile sodium concentration, and pH. Leptin repletion upregulated the expression of aquaporin 1 water channel by 1.3-fold and downregulated aquaporin 4 by 2.3-fold. A number of genes involved in sodium transport were also influenced by leptin replacement. Epithelial sodium channel-alpha and sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 were moderately downregulated by 2.0-, 1.6-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase-IV, which plays a role in the acidification of bile, was upregulated 3.7-fold. In addition, a number of inflammatory cytokines that are known to influence gallbladder epithelial cell absorption and secretion were upregulated. Thus leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved with satiety and energy balance, influences gallbladder bile volume, sodium, and pH as well as multiple inflammatory cytokine genes and genes related to water, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate transport. PMID:17463181

  13. Cloning and characterization of temperature-related gene TRS1.

    PubMed

    Han, X-B; Zhou, X-C; Hu, Z-Y; Zhang, Z-H; Liu, Y-X

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of spermatogenesis arrest derived from heat treatment and to screen temperature-related genes involved in spermatogenesis, the authors analyzed the differences in gene expression between cryptorchid and scrotal testes in rats, and cloned a full-length cDNA named TRS1. In situ hybridization showed that TRS1 mRNA was mainly expressed in spermatocyte and round spermatids in testis. The expression level decreased in cryptorchid testis, suggesting that the lower scrotal temperature is a key factor in keeping the normal expression of TRS1. At the N-terminal of TRS1, there was a plecstrin homology (PH) domain signature. This PH domain has high similarity to that in PEPP2, a homosapien protein, which has a characteristic of binding phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate via its PH domain in vitro. These findings suggest that TRS1 may be important in spermatogenesis and give clues for further research on the function of TRS1. PMID:12137588

  14. Functional model for the [Fe] hydrogenase inspired by the frustrated Lewis pair concept.

    PubMed

    Kalz, Kai F; Brinkmeier, Alexander; Dechert, Sebastian; Mata, Ricardo A; Meyer, Franc

    2014-11-26

    [Fe] hydrogenase (Hmd) catalyzes the heterolytic splitting of H2 by using, in its active site, a unique organometallic iron-guanylylpyridinol (FeGP) cofactor and, as a hydride acceptor, the substrate methenyltetrahydromethanopterin (methenyl-H4MPT(+)). The combination FeGP/methenyl-H4MPT(+) and its reactivity bear resemblance to the concept of frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), some of which have been shown to heterolytically activate H2. The present work exploits this interpretation of Hmd reactivity by using the combination of Lewis basic ruthenium metalates, namely K[CpRu(CO)2] (KRp) and a related polymeric Cp/Ru/CO compound (Rs), with the new imidazolinium salt 1,3-bis(2,6-difluorophenyl)-2-(4-tolyl)imidazolinium bromide ([(Tol)Im(F4)](+)Br(-)) that was designed to emulate the hydride acceptor properties of methenyl-H4MPT(+). Solid-state structures of [(Tol)Im(F4)](+)Br(-) and the corresponding imidazolidine H(Tol)Im(F4) reveal that the heterocycle undergoes similar structural changes as in the biological substrate. DFT calculations indicate that heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen by the FLP Rp(-)/[(Tol)Im(F4)](+) is exothermic, but the formation of the initial Lewis pair should be unfavorable in polar solvents. Consequently the combination Rp(-)/[(Tol)Im(F4)](+) does not react with H2 but leads instead to side products from nucleophilic substitution (k = 4 × 10(-2) L mol (-1) s(-1) at room temperature). In contrast, the heterogeneous combination Rs/[(Tol)Im(F4)](+) does split H2 heterolytically to give H(Tol)Im(F4) and HRuCp(CO)2 (HRp) or D(Tol)Im(F4) and DRp when using D2. The reaction has been followed by (1)H/(2)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy as well as by IR spectroscopy and reaches 96% conversion after 1 d. Formation of H(Tol)Im(F4) under these conditions demonstrates that superelectrophilic activation by protonation, which has been proposed for methenyl-H4MPT(+) to increase its carbocationic character, is not necessarily required for an imidazolinium ion to

  15. A gene and protein expression study on four porcine genes related to intramuscular fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Zappaterra, Martina; Deserti, Marzia; Mazza, Roberta; Braglia, Silvia; Zambonelli, Paolo; Davoli, Roberta

    2016-11-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has a prominent role in meat quality, affecting sensory attributes such as flavour and texture. In the present research, we studied in samples of porcine Semimembranosus muscle four genes related to lipid metabolism and whose gene expressions have been associated to IMF deposition: FASN, SCD, LIPE and LPL. We analysed both mRNA and protein expressions in two groups of Italian Large White pigs divergent for Semimembranosus IMF deposition, with the aim of comparing the levels of four genes and enzymes between the two groups and identifying possible coexpression links. The obtained results suggest a prominent role of LIPE enzyme in IMF hydrolysis, as the samples with low IMF deposition show a significantly higher amount of this lipase. Finally, a poorly known correlation was found between LIPE and FASN enzymes only in female individuals. These results provide new information for the understanding of IMF deposition. PMID:27236338

  16. (Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from aerobic N sub 2 -fixing microorganisms)

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes which catalyze reactions involving dihydrogen. They serve integral roles in a number of microbial metabolic pathways. Our research is focussed on investigations of the catalytic mechanism of the hydrogenases found in aerobic, N{sub 2}-fixing microorganisms such as Azotobacter vinelandii and the agronomically important Bradyrhizobium japonicum as well as microorganisms with similar hydrogenases. The hydrogenases isolated from these microorganisms are Ni- and Fe-containing heterodimers. Our work has focussed on three areas during the last grant period. In all cases, a central theme has been the role of inhibitors in the characteristics under investigation. In addition, a number of collaborative efforts have yielded interesting results. In metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, inhibitors often influence the activity of the enzyme through ligand interactions with redox centers, often metals, within the enzyme. Therefore, investigations of the ability of various compounds to inhibit an enzyme's activity, as well as the mechanism of inhibition, can provide insight into the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme as well as the role of various redox centers in catalysis. We have investigated in detail four inhibitors of A. vinelandii and the results are summarized here. The influence of these inhibitors on the spectral properties of the enzyme are summarized. Electron paramagnetic resonance and ultraviolet spectra investigations are discussed. 9 figs.

  17. [NiFe] hydrogenases: structural and spectroscopic studies of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2009-10-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of dihydrogen. For this simple reaction the molecule has developed a complex catalytic mechanism, during which the enzyme passes through various redox states. The [NiFe] hydrogenase contains several metal centres, including the bimetallic Ni-Fe active site, iron-sulfur clusters and a Mg(2+) ion. The Ni-Fe active site is located in the inner part of the protein molecule, therefore a number of pathways are involved in the catalytic reaction route. These consist of an electron transfer pathway, a proton transfer pathway and a gas-access channel. Over the last 10-15 years we have been investigating the crystal structures of the [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F, which is a sulfate-reducing anaerobic bacterium. So far the crystal structures of the oxidized, H(2)-reduced and carbon monoxide inhibited states have been determined at high resolution and have revealed a rather unique structure of the hetero-bimetallic Ni-Fe active site. Furthermore, intensive spectroscopic studies have been performed on the enzyme. Based on the crystal structure, a water-soluble Ni-Ru complex has been synthesized as a functional model for the [NiFe] hydrogenases. The present review gives an overview of the catalytic reaction mechanism of the [NiFe] hydrogenases. PMID:19759926

  18. [NiFe]-hydrogenase is essential for cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 aerobic growth in the dark

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Edith; Checchetto, Vanessa; Franchin, Cinzia; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Berto, Paola; Szabò, Ildikò; Giacometti, Giorgio M.; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Costantini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has a bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Hox hydrogenase) which reversibly reduces protons to H2. This enzyme is composed of a hydrogenase domain and a diaphorase moiety, which is distinctly homologous to the NADH input module of mitochondrial respiratory Complex I. Hox hydrogenase physiological function is still unclear, since it is not required for Synechocystis fitness under standard growth conditions. We analyzed the phenotype under prolonged darkness of three Synechocystis knock-out strains, lacking either Hox hydrogenase (ΔHoxE-H) or one of the proteins responsible for the assembly of its NiFe active site (ΔHypA1 and ΔHypB1). We found that Hox hydrogenase is required for Synechocystis growth under this condition, regardless of the functional status of its catalytic site, suggesting an additional role beside hydrogen metabolism. Moreover, quantitative proteomic analyses revealed that the expression levels of several subunits of the respiratory NADPH/plastoquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) are reduced when Synechocystis is grown in the dark. Our findings suggest that the Hox hydrogenase could contribute to electron transport regulation when both photosynthetic and respiratory pathways are down-regulated, and provide a possible explanation for the close evolutionary relationship between mitochondrial respiratory Complex I and cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenases. PMID:26215212

  19. A modular system for regeneration of NAD cofactors using graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and diaphorase moieties.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Holly A; Lauterbach, Lars; Ash, Philip A; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Kylie A

    2012-02-01

    Pyrolytic graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and an NAD(+)/NADH cycling enzyme provide a modular heterogeneous catalyst system for regeneration of oxidised or reduced nicotinamide cofactors using H(2) and H(+) as electron source or sink. Particles can be tuned for cofactor supply under different conditions by appropriate choice of hydrogenase. PMID:21986817

  20. Tenm, a Drosophila gene related to tenascin, is a new pair-rule gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, S; Martin, D; Hagios, C; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe the molecular characterization of the Drosophila gene tenm, a large transcription unit spanning > 110 kb of DNA. tenm encodes a large extracellular protein of 2515 amino acids related to the extracellular matrix molecule tenascin. The Tenm protein is found in seven stripes during the blastoderm stage, and each stripe overlaps with the even-skipped stripes. tenm mutants show a phenotype resembling that of odd-paired (opa), a member of the pair-rule class of segmentation genes. Thus, Tenm is the first example of a pair-rule gene product acting from outside the cell. While the Tenm protein is under the control of fushi tarazu and even-skipped, but not of opa, at least two pair-rule genes, paired (prd) and sloppy paired (slp), and all segment-polarity genes analysed to date are under the control of tenm. Our data suggest that Tenm initiates a signal transduction cascade which acts, via or in concert with opa, on downstream targets such as prd, slp, gooseberry, engrailed and wingless, leading to an opa-like phenotype. Images PMID:8070401

  1. Modulation of adipogenesis-related gene expression by estrogen-related receptor gamma during adipocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Mayumi; Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

    2009-02-01

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue and heart. However, the physiological role of ERRgamma in adipogenesis and the development of white adipose tissue has not been well studied. Here we show that ERRgamma was up-regulated in murine mesenchyme-derived cells, especially in ST2 and C3H10T1/2 cells, at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. The up-regulation of ERRgamma mRNA was also observed in inguinal white adipose and brown adipose tissues of mice fed a high-fat diet. Gene knockdown by ERRgamma-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of adipogenic marker genes including fatty acid binding protein 4, PPARgamma, and PGC-1beta in a preadipocyte cell line 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and mesenchymal ST2 and C3H10T1/2 cells in the adipogenesis medium. In contrast, stable expression of ERRgamma in 3T3-L1 cells resulted in up-regulation of these adipogenic marker genes under the adipogenic condition. These results suggest that ERRgamma positively regulate the adipocyte differentiation with modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes. PMID:18809516

  2. Intact functional fourteen-subunit respiratory membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase complex of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    McTernan, Patrick M; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vaccaro, Brian J; Lancaster, W Andrew; Yang, Qingyuan; Fu, Dax; Hura, Greg L; Tainer, John A; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-07-11

    The archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally at 100 °C by converting carbohydrates to acetate, CO2, and H2, obtaining energy from a respiratory membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH). This conserves energy by coupling H2 production to oxidation of reduced ferredoxin with generation of a sodium ion gradient. MBH is encoded by a 14-gene operon with both hydrogenase and Na(+)/H(+) antiporter modules. Herein a His-tagged MBH was expressed in P. furiosus and the detergent-solubilized complex purified under anaerobic conditions by affinity chromatography. Purified MBH contains all 14 subunits by electrophoretic analysis (13 subunits were also identified by mass spectrometry) and had a measured iron:nickel ratio of 15:1, resembling the predicted value of 13:1. The as-purified enzyme exhibited a rhombic EPR signal characteristic of the ready nickel-boron state. The purified and membrane-bound forms of MBH both preferentially evolved H2 with the physiological donor (reduced ferredoxin) as well as with standard dyes. The O2 sensitivities of the two forms were similar (half-lives of ∼ 15 h in air), but the purified enzyme was more thermolabile (half-lives at 90 °C of 1 and 25 h, respectively). Structural analysis of purified MBH by small angle x-ray scattering indicated a Z-shaped structure with a mass of 310 kDa, resembling the predicted value (298 kDa). The angle x-ray scattering analyses reinforce and extend the conserved sequence relationships of group 4 enzymes and complex I (NADH quinone oxidoreductase). This is the first report on the properties of a solubilized form of an intact respiratory MBH complex that is proposed to evolve H2 and pump Na(+) ions. PMID:24860091

  3. Prostate Cancer Related JAZF1 Gene is Associated with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Zuo, Lingjun; Owusu, Daniel; Pan, Yue; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that there is a reduced risk of prostate cancer among persons diagnosed with schizophrenia (SCZ). However, the mechanism of such relationship is not clear. The reduced incidence of cancer observed in SCZ patients may be related to differences in genetic background. Recently, the JAZF1 gene is found to be associated with prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes. However, no study has focused on the association of JAZF1 with the risk of SCZ. Methods We examined genetic associations of 118 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the JAZF1 gene with SCZ using one European American (EA) sample of 1,149 cases and 1,347 controls. Logistic regression analysis of SCZ as a binary trait was performed using PLINK software. Results The most significant association with SCZ was observed with rs10258132 (p = 0.0011); while the next best signal was rs17156259 (p = 0.0031). The third best associated SNP was rs7791865 (p = 0.00889). In addition, haplotype analyses revealed that the A-C haplotype from rs10244184 and rs10258132 was associated with SCZ (p = 0.00093); and the G-G haplotype from rs17156238 and rs17156259 was associated with SCZ (p = 0.00455). Conclusion These findings provide evidence of several genetic variants in JAZF1 gene influencing the risk of SCZ and will serve as a resource for replication in other populations.

  4. Genes related to chromate resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Sonia L; Vargas, Eréndira; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    Chromate-hypersensitive mutants of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain were isolated using transposon-insertion mutagenesis. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the regions interrupted in the mutants with the PAO1 genome revealed that the genes affected in three mutant strains were oprE (ORF PA0291), rmlA (ORF PA5163), and ftsK (ORF PA2615), respectively. A relationship of these genes with chromate tolerance has not been previously reported. No other phenotypic changes were observed in the oprE mutant but its resistance to chromate was not fully restored by expressing the ChrA protein, which extrudes chromate ions from the cytoplasm to the periplasmic space. These data suggest that OprE participates in the efflux of chromate from the periplasm to the outside. Increased susceptibility of the rmlA mutant to the metals cadmium and mercury and to the anion-superoxide generator paraquat suggests a protective role of LPS against chromate toxicity. A higher susceptibility of the ftsK mutant to compounds affecting DNA structure (ciprofloxacin, tellurite, mitomycin C) suggests a role of FtsK in the recombinational repair of DNA damage caused by chromate. In conclusion, the P. aeruginosa genome contains diverse genes related to its intrinsic resistance to chromate. Systems pertaining to the outer membrane (OprE), the cell wall (LPS), and the cytoplasm (FtsK) were identified in this work as involved in chromate protection mechanisms. PMID:18446454

  5. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: Effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bonam, D.; Lehman, L.; Roberts, G.P.; Ludden, P.W.

    1989-06-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of (/sup 35/S)methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase.

  6. Efficiency of hydrogen photoproduction by chloroplast-bacterial hydrogenase systems.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A; Van Ni, C; Nikandrov, V V; Brin, G P

    1980-11-01

    A comparative study of H(2) photoproduction by chloroplasts and solubilized chlorophyll was performed in the presence of hydrogenase preparations of Clostridium butyricum. The photoproduction of H(2) by chloroplasts in the absence of exogenous electron donors, and with irreversibly oxidized dithiothreitol and cysteine, is thought to be limited by a cyclic transport of electrons wherein methylviologen short-circuits the electron transport in photosystem I. The efficiency of H(2) photoproduction by chloroplasts with ascorbate and NADPH is limited by a back reaction between light-reduced methylviologen and the oxidized electron donors. The use of a combination of electron donors (dithiothreitol and ascorbate), providing anaerobiosis without damage to chloroplasts, makes it possible to avoid consumption of reduced methylviologen for the reduction of oxidized electron donors and to exclude the short-circuiting of electron transfer. Under these conditions, photoproduction of H(2) was observed to occur with a rate of 350 to 400 micromoles H(2) per milligram chlorophyll per hour. In this case, the full electron-transferring capability of photosystem I (measured by irreversible photoreduction of methyl red or O(2)) is used to produce H(2). PMID:16661554

  7. Expression of Uptake Hydrogenase and Molybdenum Nitrogenase in Rhodobacter capsulatus Is Coregulated by the RegB-RegA Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, Sylvie; Dischert, Wanda; Colbeau, Annette; Bauer, Carl E.

    2000-01-01

    Purple photosynthetic bacteria are capable of generating cellular energy from several sources, including photosynthesis, respiration, and H2 oxidation. Under nutrient-limiting conditions, cellular energy can be used to assimilate carbon and nitrogen. This study provides the first evidence of a molecular link for the coregulation of nitrogenase and hydrogenase biosynthesis in an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium. We demonstrated that molybdenum nitrogenase biosynthesis is under the control of the RegB-RegA two-component regulatory system in Rhodobacter capsulatus. Footprint analyses and in vivo transcription studies showed that RegA indirectly activates nitrogenase synthesis by binding to and activating the expression of nifA2, which encodes one of the two functional copies of the nif-specific transcriptional activator, NifA. Expression of nifA2 but not nifA1 is reduced in the reg mutants up to eightfold under derepressing conditions and is also reduced under repressing conditions. Thus, although NtrC is absolutely required for nifA2 expression, RegA acts as a coactivator of nifA2. We also demonstrated that in reg mutants, [NiFe]hydrogenase synthesis and activity are increased up to sixfold. RegA binds to the promoter of the hydrogenase gene operon and therefore directly represses its expression. Thus, the RegB-RegA system controls such diverse processes as energy-generating photosynthesis and H2 oxidation, as well as the energy-demanding processes of N2 fixation and CO2 assimilation. PMID:10781552

  8. Isolation of tumor suppressor genes from MEN-1 related neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Yavari, R.; Kinder, B.; Bale, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a cancer predisposition syndrome marked by the development of tumors in specific endocrine tissues such as the pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islets. Genetic linkage studies have mapped the MEN 1 gene to 11q13, and allelic loss in related tumors suggests that the gene is a tumor suppressor. Because inactivation of tumor suppressors may be accompanied by underexpression, subtractive hybridization was used to isolate potential candidate genes underexpressed in MEN 1 tumors. cDNA was synthesized from tumor and normal parathyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Biotinylated tumor cDNA was used as a driver and normal cDNA as a tester in subtractive hybridization. Following annealing of the driver and tester amplicons, the biotinylated strands were removed with streptavidin. The subtracted material was then used as a probe to isolate clones from a normal pancreatic islet library. Screening 2 x 10{sup 5} plaques yielded 14 positive clones. Of 6 clones analyzed, 3 were confirmed to be underexpressed in parathyroid tumors. Sequence analysis identified 2 clones as human ribosomal protein S10 (RPS10, chromosome 6) and 1 as the islet amyloid polypeptide (1AP, chromosome 12). The precise function of human RPS10 is not known but the related RPS6 functions as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila. 1AP has been implicated in modulation of G protein activity. The remaining positive clones will be mapped to determine if any fall on chromosome 11q13, and additional subtractions with parathyroid and pancreatic islet neoplasms are underway.

  9. Electrocatalytic mechanism of reversible hydrogen cycling by enzymes and distinctions between the major classes of hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Hexter, Suzannah V.; Grey, Felix; Happe, Thomas; Climent, Victor; Armstrong, Fraser A.

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary ability of Fe- and Ni-containing enzymes to catalyze rapid and efficient H+/H2 interconversion—a property otherwise exclusive to platinum metals—has been investigated in a series of experiments combining variable-temperature protein film voltammetry with mathematical modeling. The results highlight important differences between the catalytic performance of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and [NiFe]-hydrogenases and justify a simple model for reversible catalytic electron flow in enzymes and electrocatalysts that should be widely applicable in fields as diverse as electrochemistry, catalysis, and bioenergetics. The active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases, an intricate Fe-carbonyl complex known as the “H cluster,” emerges as a supreme catalyst. PMID:22802675

  10. [Stability of the hydrogenase from Tetraselmis subcordiformis and its preliminary purification].

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Chen, Zhao'an; Cao, Xupeng; Lu, Hongbin; Xue, Song; Zhang, Wei

    2010-07-01

    Tetraselmis subcordiformis, a marine green alga, can produce hydrogen by photobiologically hydrolyzing seawater with hydrogenase. In this study, the preliminary purification of the enzyme was explored by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and the impact of sodium dithionite, beta-mercaptoethanol and glycerol on the enzyme stability during the process was investigated. The experimental results illustrated that sodium dithionite provided significant protection on the hydrogenase by depleting oxygen, while glycerol, a protectant against the structure instability of the enzyme, also presented protection. Crude enzyme with specific activity of 0.557 U/mg protein was extracted using 60%-70% saturated ammonium sulfate solution supplemented with 200 mmol/L sodium dithionite and 5% glycerol, and the hydrogenase recovery yield was about 30%. PMID:20954403

  11. Mechanism of inhibition of NiFe hydrogenase by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Etienne, Emilien; Dementin, Sébastien; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Léger, Christophe; Burlat, Bénédicte

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenases reversibly catalyze the oxidation of molecular hydrogen and are inhibited by several small molecules including O2, CO and NO. In the present work, we investigate the mechanism of inhibition by NO of the oxygen-sensitive NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans by coupling site-directed mutagenesis, protein film voltammetry (PFV) and EPR spectroscopy. We show that micromolar NO strongly inhibits NiFe hydrogenase and that the mechanism of inhibition is complex, with NO targeting several metallic sites in the protein. NO reacts readily at the NiFe active site according to a two-step mechanism. The first and faster step is the reversible binding of NO to the active site followed by a slower and irreversible transformation at the active site. NO also induces irreversible damage of the iron-sulfur centers chain. We give direct evidence of preferential nitrosylation of the medial [3Fe-4S] to form dinitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:26827939

  12. Immobilization of isolated and cellular hydrogenase of D. desulfuricans in radiation-polymerized polyacrylamides

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, E.; Martin, W.G.; Williams, R.E.

    1984-02-01

    Purified hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was immobilized either by entrapment or absorption onto porous neutral and charged acrylamide beads. Surface absorption and crosslinking on the beads resulted in a high hydrogenase activity and a good immobilization coefficient compared to the enzyme and whole cells entrapped in the same matrix. Maximum enzyme activity (citrate-phosphate buffer) was shifted to pH 6.5 upon immobilization in contrast to 6.0 for the free enzyme and the range of 6-7 for whole cells. Both the purified enzyme and whole cells were most active when held in neutral matrices. Immobilization improved the temperature stability (65 degrees C) and long term storage (4 degrees C) of the hydrogenase activity of both the purified enzyme and whole cells.

  13. Immobilization of isolated and cellular hydrogenase of D. desulfuricans in radiation-polymerized polyacrylamides.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, E; Martin, W G; Williams, R E

    1984-02-01

    Purified hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was immobilized either by entrapment or absorption onto porous neutral and charged acrylamide beads. Surface absorption and crosslinking on the beads resulted in a high hydrogenase activity and a good immobilization coefficient compared to the enzyme and whole cells entrapped in the same matrix. Maximum enzyme activity (citrate-phosphate buffer) was shifted to pH 6.5 upon immobilization in contrast to 6.0 for the free enzyme and the range of 6-7 for whole cells. Both the purified enzyme and whole cells were most active when held in neutral matrices. Immobilization improved the temperature stability (65 degrees C) and long term storage (4 degrees C) of the hydrogenase activity of both the purified enzyme and whole cells. PMID:6383215

  14. Acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J.

    1987-10-06

    The inhibition of purified and membrane-bound hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii by dihydrogen-free acetylene was investigated. The inhibition was a time-dependent process which exhibited first-order kinetics. Both H/sub 2/ and CO protected against the inhibition by acetylene. K/sub protect(app)/ values of 0.41 and 24 ..mu..M were derived for these gases, respectively. Both H/sub 2/-oxidizing activity and the tritium exchange capacity of the purified enzyme were inhibited at the same rate by acetylene. Removal of acetylene reversed the inhibition for both the purified and the membrane-associated form of the enzyme. The purified hydrogenases from both Rhizobium japonicum and Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were also inhibited by acetylene in a time-dependent fashion. These findings suggest that acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of some membrane-bound hydrogenases from aerobic bacteria.

  15. [Construction of nervous system relative protein and gene secondary database].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Chen, Xinhao; Liu, Xiangming

    2007-10-01

    Along with the rapid research of neural molecular biology, abundant data are produced so that the collection and coordination of high-throughout data about nervous system relative proteins and genes are imperative. Through analyzing the biological primary databases maintained by NCBI and RCSB as the main data source and designing a new data model, a local specialized secondary database is constructed, which mainly includes nucleotide sequences, protein sequences and protein structures, and is established on Sun Blade 2000 System and Oracle 9i. All programs are developed by Java technology. A method of web information automatic retrieval with XML is proposed for sequence data collection and submission to the database. JSP + JavaBean technology is used to support data promulgation on Internet. The establishment of this database provides an excellent platform for the research of neural molecular biology and the pathogenesis of related diseases. PMID:18027688

  16. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  17. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  18. Gene Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Constable, Ian Jeffery; Blumenkranz, Mark Scott; Schwartz, Steven D; Barone, Sam; Lai, Chooi-May; Rakoczy, Elizabeth Piroska

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate safety and signals of efficacy of gene therapy with subretinal rAAV.sFlt-1 for wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD). A phase 1 dose-escalating single-center controlled unmasked human clinical trial was followed up by extension of the protocol to a phase 2A single-center trial. rAAV.sFlt-1 vector was used to deliver a naturally occurring anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent, sFlt-1, into the subretinal space. In phase 1, step 1 randomized 3 subjects to low-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm; step 2 randomized an additional 3 subjects to treatment with high-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm. Follow-up studies demonstrated that rAAV.sFlt-1 was well tolerated with a favorable safety profile in these elderly subjects with wet AMD. Subretinal injection was highly reproducible, and no drug-related adverse events were reported. Procedure-related adverse events were mild and self-resolving. Two phakic patients developed cataract and underwent cataract surgery. Four of the 6 patients responded better than the small control group in this study and historical controls in terms of maintaining vision and a relatively dry retina with zero ranibizumab retreatments per annum. Two patients required 1 ranibizumab injection over the 52-week follow-up period. rAAV.sFlt-1 gene therapy may prove to be a potential adjunct or alternative to conventional intravitreal injection for patients with wet AMD by providing extended delivery of a naturally occurring antiangiogenic protein. PMID:27488071

  19. [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenase diversity, mechanism, and maturation.

    PubMed

    Peters, John W; Schut, Gerrit J; Boyd, Eric S; Mulder, David W; Shepard, Eric M; Broderick, Joan B; King, Paul W; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-06-01

    The [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the formal interconversion between hydrogen and protons and electrons, possess characteristic non-protein ligands at their catalytic sites and thus share common mechanistic features. Despite the similarities between these two types of hydrogenases, they clearly have distinct evolutionary origins and likely emerged from different selective pressures. [FeFe]-hydrogenases are widely distributed in fermentative anaerobic microorganisms and likely evolved under selective pressure to couple hydrogen production to the recycling of electron carriers that accumulate during anaerobic metabolism. In contrast, many [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze hydrogen oxidation as part of energy metabolism and were likely key enzymes in early life and arguably represent the predecessors of modern respiratory metabolism. Although the reversible combination of protons and electrons to generate hydrogen gas is the simplest of chemical reactions, the [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases have distinct mechanisms and differ in the fundamental chemistry associated with proton transfer and control of electron flow that also help to define catalytic bias. A unifying feature of these enzymes is that hydrogen activation itself has been restricted to one solution involving diatomic ligands (carbon monoxide and cyanide) bound to an Fe ion. On the other hand, and quite remarkably, the biosynthetic mechanisms to produce these ligands are exclusive to each type of enzyme. Furthermore, these mechanisms represent two independent solutions to the formation of complex bioinorganic active sites for catalyzing the simplest of chemical reactions, reversible hydrogen oxidation. As such, the [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases are arguably the most profound case of convergent evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25461840

  20. Production and purification of a soluble hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 for potential hydrogen fuel cell applications

    PubMed Central

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Lebhar, Helene; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Marquis, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    The soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a promising candidate enzyme for H2-based biofuel application as it favours H2 oxidation and is relatively oxygen-tolerant. In this report, bioprocess development studies undertaken to produce and purify an active SH are described, based on the methods previously reported [1], [2], [3], [4]. Our modifications are: • Upstream method optimizations were undertaken on heterotrophic growth media and cell lysis involving ultrasonication. • Two anion exchangers (Q Sepharose and RESOURCE Q) and size exclusion chromatographic (Superdex 200) matrices were successfully employed for purification of a hexameric SH from R. eutropha. • The H2 oxidizing activity of the SH was demonstrated spectrophotometrically in solution and also immobilized on an EPG electrode using cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27077052

  1. Production and purification of a soluble hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 for potential hydrogen fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Lebhar, Helene; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    The soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a promising candidate enzyme for H2-based biofuel application as it favours H2 oxidation and is relatively oxygen-tolerant. In this report, bioprocess development studies undertaken to produce and purify an active SH are described, based on the methods previously reported [1], [2], [3], [4]. Our modifications are: •Upstream method optimizations were undertaken on heterotrophic growth media and cell lysis involving ultrasonication.•Two anion exchangers (Q Sepharose and RESOURCE Q) and size exclusion chromatographic (Superdex 200) matrices were successfully employed for purification of a hexameric SH from R. eutropha.•The H2 oxidizing activity of the SH was demonstrated spectrophotometrically in solution and also immobilized on an EPG electrode using cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27077052

  2. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  3. Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study allows large-scale analyses of breast and prostate cancer risk in relation to genetic polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions that affect hormone metabolism.

  4. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  5. Gene Therapies for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pechan, Peter; Wadsworth, Samuel; Scaria, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    Pathological neovascularization is a key component of the neovascular form (also known as the wet form) of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Several preclinical studies have shown that antiangiogenesis strategies are effective for treating neovascular AMD in animal models. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the main inducers of ocular neovascularization, and several clinical trials have shown the benefits of neutralizing VEGF in patients with neovascular AMD or diabetic macular edema. In this review, we summarize several preclinical and early-stage clinical trials with intraocular gene therapies, which have the potential to reduce or eliminate the repeated intravitreal injections that are currently required for the treatment of neovascular AMD. PMID:25524721

  6. Structural studies of the carbon monoxide complex of [NiFe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F: suggestion for the initial activation site for dihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Mizoguchi, Yasutaka; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Miki, Kunio; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Yasuoka, Noritake; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Yamauchi, Osamu; Hirota, Shun; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2002-10-01

    The carbon monoxide complex of [NiFe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Nine crystal structures of the [NiFe]hydrogenase in the CO-bound and CO-liberated forms were determined at 1.2-1.4 A resolution. The exogenously added CO was assigned to be bound to the Ni atom at the Ni-Fe active site. The CO was not replaced with H(2) in the dark at 100 K, but was liberated by illumination with a strong white light. The Ni-C distances and Ni-C-O angles were about 1.77 A and 160 degrees, respectively, except for one case (1.72 A and 135 degrees ), in which an additional electron density peak between the CO and Sgamma(Cys546) was recognized. Distinct changes were observed in the electron density distribution of the Ni and Sgamma(Cys546) atoms between the CO-bound and CO-liberated structures for all the crystals tested. The novel structural features found near the Ni and Sgamma(Cys546) atoms suggest that these two atoms at the Ni-Fe active site play a role during the initial H(2)-binding process. Anaerobic addition of CO to dithionite-reduced [NiFe]hydrogenase led to a new absorption band at about 470 nm ( approximately 3000 M(-1)cm(-1)). Resonance Raman spectra (excitation at 476.5 nm) of the CO complex revealed CO-isotope-sensitive bands at 375/393 and 430 cm(-1) (368 and 413 cm(-1) for (13)C(18)O). The frequencies and relative intensities of the CO-related Raman bands indicated that the exogenous CO is bound to the Ni atom with a bent Ni-C-O structure in solution, in agreement with the refined structure determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:12296727

  7. Function of the chloroplast hydrogenase in the microalga Chlamydomonas: the role of hydrogenase and state transitions during photosynthetic activation in anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Ghysels, Bart; Godaux, Damien; Matagne, René F; Cardol, Pierre; Franck, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Like a majority of photosynthetic microorganisms, the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may encounter O2 deprived conditions on a regular basis. In response to anaerobiosis or in a respiration defective context, the photosynthetic electron transport chain of Chlamydomonas is remodeled by a state transition process to a conformation that favours the photoproduction of ATP at the expense of reductant synthesis. In some unicellular green algae including Chlamydomonas, anoxia also triggers the induction of a chloroplast-located, oxygen sensitive hydrogenase, which accepts electrons from reduced ferredoxin to convert protons into molecular hydrogen. Although microalgal hydrogen evolution has received much interest for its biotechnological potential, its physiological role remains unclear. By using specific Chlamydomonas mutants, we demonstrate that the state transition ability and the hydrogenase function are both critical for induction of photosynthesis in anoxia. These two processes are thus important for survival of the cells when they are transiently placed in an anaerobic environment. PMID:23717558

  8. The retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) gene and fear-related psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Wolf, Erika J.; Logue, Mark W.; Baldwin, Clinton T.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study followed on findings from a recent genome-wide association study of PTSD that implicated the retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) gene (Logue et al, 2012) by examining its relationship to broader array of disorders. Methods Using data from the same cohort (N = 540), we analyzed patterns of association between 606 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the RORA gene and comorbidity factors termed fear, distress (i.e., internalizing factors) and externalizing. Results Results showed that rs17303244 was associated with the fear component of internalizing (i.e., defined by symptoms of panic, agoraphobia, specific phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) at a level of significance that withstood correction for gene-wide multiple testing. Limitations The primary limitations were the modest size of the cohort and the absence of a replication sample. Conclusions Results add to a growing literature implicating the RORA gene in a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders and offer new insight into possible molecular mechanisms of the effects of traumatic stress on the brain and the role of genetic factors in those processes. PMID:24007783

  9. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi . E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERR{alpha} in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERR{alpha} and ERR{alpha}-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and PGC-1{beta}, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERR{alpha}-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPAR{gamma}, and PGC-1{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERR{alpha} and PGC-1{beta} mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERR{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERR{alpha} may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  10. GeneMesh: a web-based microarray analysis tool for relating differentially expressed genes to MeSH terms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important objective of DNA microarray-based gene expression experimentation is determining inter-relationships that exist between differentially expressed genes and biological processes, molecular functions, cellular components, signaling pathways, physiologic processes and diseases. Results Here we describe GeneMesh, a web-based program that facilitates analysis of DNA microarray gene expression data. GeneMesh relates genes in a query set to categories available in the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) hierarchical index. The interface enables hypothesis driven relational analysis to a specific MeSH subcategory (e.g., Cardiovascular System, Genetic Processes, Immune System Diseases etc.) or unbiased relational analysis to broader MeSH categories (e.g., Anatomy, Biological Sciences, Disease etc.). Genes found associated with a given MeSH category are dynamically linked to facilitate tabular and graphical depiction of Entrez Gene information, Gene Ontology information, KEGG metabolic pathway diagrams and intermolecular interaction information. Expression intensity values of groups of genes that cluster in relation to a given MeSH category, gene ontology or pathway can be displayed as heat maps of Z score-normalized values. GeneMesh operates on gene expression data derived from a number of commercial microarray platforms including Affymetrix, Agilent and Illumina. Conclusions GeneMesh is a versatile web-based tool for testing and developing new hypotheses through relating genes in a query set (e.g., differentially expressed genes from a DNA microarray experiment) to descriptors making up the hierarchical structure of the National Library of Medicine controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH. The system further enhances the discovery process by providing links between sets of genes associated with a given MeSH category to a rich set of html linked tabular and graphic information including Entrez Gene summaries, gene ontologies, intermolecular interactions

  11. Powerful fermentative hydrogen evolution of photosynthate in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii BL J mediated by a bidirectional hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ankita; Parameswaran, Prathap; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered good models for biohydrogen production because they are relatively simple organisms with a demonstrable ability to generate H2 under certain physiological conditions. However, most produce only little H2, revert readily to H2 consumption, and suffer from hydrogenase sensitivity to O2. Strains of the cyanobacteria Lyngbya aestuarii and Microcoleus chthonoplastes obtained from marine intertidal cyanobacterial mats were recently found to display much better H2 production potential. Because of their ecological origin in environments that become quickly anoxic in the dark, we hypothesized that this differential ability may have evolved to serve a role in the fermentation of the photosynthate. Here we show that, when forced to ferment internal substrate, these cyanobacteria display desirable characteristics of physiological H2 production. Among them, the strain L. aestuarii BL J had the fastest specific rates and attained the highest H2 concentrations during fermentation of photosynthate, which proceeded via a mixed acid fermentation pathway to yield acetate, ethanol, lactate, H2, CO2, and pyruvate. Contrary to expectations, the H2 yield per mole of glucose was only average compared to that of other cyanobacteria. Thermodynamic analyses point to the use of electron donors more electronegative than NAD(P)H in Lyngbya hydrogenases as the basis for its strong H2 production ability. In any event, the high specific rates and H2 concentrations coupled with the lack of reversibility of the enzyme, at the expense of internal, photosynthetically generated reductants, makes L. aestuarii BL J and/or its enzymes, a potentially feasible platform for large-scale H2 production. PMID:25540642

  12. Hydrogenase of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus is an elemental sulfur reductase or sulfhydrogenase: evidence for a sulfur-reducing hydrogenase ancestor.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Schicho, R N; Kelly, R M; Adams, M W

    1993-06-01

    Microorganisms growing near and above 100 degrees C have recently been discovered near shallow and deep sea hydrothermal vents. Most are obligately dependent upon the reduction of elemental sulfur (S0) to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) for optimal growth, even though S0 reduction readily occurs abiotically at their growth temperatures. The sulfur reductase activity of the anaerobic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100 degrees C by a metabolism that produces H2S if S0 is present, was found in the cytoplasm. It was purified anaerobically and was shown to be identical to the hydrogenase that had been previously purified from this organism. Both S0 and polysulfide served as substrates for H2S production, and the S0 reduction activity but not the H2-oxidation activity was enhanced by the redox protein rubredoxin. The H2-oxidizing and S0-reduction activities of the enzyme also showed different responses to pH, temperature, and inhibitors. This bifunctional "sulfhydrogenase" enzyme can, therefore, dispose of the excess reductant generated during fermentation using either protons or polysulfides as the electron acceptor. In addition, purified hydrogenases from both hyperthermophilic and mesophilic representatives of the archaeal and bacterial domains were shown to reduce S0 to H2S. It is suggested that the function of some form of ancestral hydrogenase was S0 reduction rather than, or in addition to, the reduction of protons. PMID:8389482

  13. The Soluble NAD+-Reducing [NiFe]-Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 Consists of Six Subunits and Can Be Specifically Activated by NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; van der Linden, Eddy; Bernhard, Michael; Yuan Yin, Qing; Back, Jaap W.; Hartog, Aloysius F.; Muijsers, Anton O.; de Koster, Chris G.; Albracht, Simon P. J.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2005-01-01

    The soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) of the facultative lithoautotrophic proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 has up to now been described as a heterotetrameric enzyme. The purified protein consists of two functionally distinct heterodimeric moieties. The HoxHY dimer represents the hydrogenase module, and the HoxFU dimer constitutes an NADH-dehydrogenase. In the bimodular form, the SH mediates reduction of NAD+ at the expense of H2. We have purified a new high-molecular-weight form of the SH which contains an additional subunit. This extra subunit was identified as the product of hoxI, a member of the SH gene cluster (hoxFUYHWI). Edman degradation, in combination with protein sequencing of the SH high-molecular-weight complex, established a subunit stoichiometry of HoxFUYHI2. Cross-linking experiments indicated that the two HoxI subunits are the closest neighbors. The stability of the hexameric SH depended on the pH and the ionic strength of the buffer. The tetrameric form of the SH can be instantaneously activated with small amounts of NADH but not with NADPH. The hexameric form, however, was also activated by adding small amounts of NADPH. This suggests that HoxI provides a binding domain for NADPH. A specific reaction site for NADPH adds to the list of similarities between the SH and mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). PMID:15838039

  14. Odd-skipped related 2 regulates genes related to proliferation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-07-23

    Cell proliferation is a biological process in which chromosomes replicate in one cell and equally divide into two daughter cells. Our previous findings suggested that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation under epigenetic regulation. However, the mechanism used by Osr2 to establish and maintain proliferation is unknown. To examine the functional role of Osr2 in cell proliferation, we analyzed its downstream target genes using microarray analysis following adenovirus-induced overexpression of Osr2 as well as knockdown with Osr2 siRNA, which showed that Osr2 regulates a multitude of genes involved in proliferation and the cell cycle, as well as development. Additional proliferation assays also indicated that Osr2 likely functions to elicit cell proliferation. Together, these results suggest that Osr2 plays important roles in proliferation and development.

  15. Evolution of xyloglucan-related genes in green plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cell shape and morphology of plant tissues are intimately related to structural modifications in the primary cell wall that are associated with key processes in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The primary cell wall is composed mainly of cellulose immersed in a matrix of hemicellulose, pectin, lignin and some structural proteins. Xyloglucan is a hemicellulose polysaccharide present in the cell walls of all land plants (Embryophyta) and is the main hemicellulose in non-graminaceous angiosperms. Results In this work, we used a comparative genomic approach to obtain new insights into the evolution of the xyloglucan-related enzymatic machinery in green plants. Detailed phylogenetic analyses were done for enzymes involved in xyloglucan synthesis (xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, α-xylosidase, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase and α-fucosidase) and mobilization/degradation (β-(1→4)-glucan synthase, α-fucosyltransferases, β-galactosyltransferases and α-xylosyl transferase) based on 12 fully sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tags from 29 species of green plants. Evidence from Chlorophyta and Streptophyta green algae indicated that part of the Embryophyta xyloglucan-related machinery evolved in an aquatic environment, before land colonization. Streptophyte algae have at least three enzymes of the xyloglucan machinery: xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, β-(1→4)-glucan synthase from the celullose synthase-like C family and α-xylosidase that is also present in chlorophytes. Interestingly, gymnosperm sequences orthologs to xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolases with exclusively hydrolytic activity were also detected, suggesting that such activity must have emerged within the last common ancestor of spermatophytes. There was a positive correlation between the numbers of founder genes within each gene family and the complexity of the plant cell wall. Conclusions Our data support the idea that a primordial xyloglucan

  16. Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders: 25 Years of Gene Discovery.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Aline; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder, presenting with skeletal, ocular, skin, and cardiovascular symptoms. Significant clinical overlap with other systemic connective tissue diseases, including Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS), and the MASS phenotype, has been documented. In MFS and LDS, the cardiovascular manifestations account for the major cause of patient morbidity and mortality, rendering them the main target for therapeutic intervention. Over the past decades, gene identification studies confidently linked the aforementioned syndromes, as well as nonsyndromic aneurysmal disease, to genetic defects in proteins related to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, greatly expanding our knowledge on the disease mechanisms and providing us with novel therapeutic targets. As a result, the focus of the developing pharmacological treatment strategies is shifting from hemodynamic stress management to TGF-β antagonism. In this review, we discuss the insights that have been gained in the molecular biology of MFS and related disorders over the past 25 years. PMID:26919284

  17. Metabolic control of Clostridium thermocellum via inhibition of hydrogenase activity and the glucose transport rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium thermocellum has the ability to catabolize cellulosic biomass into ethanol, but acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen gas (H2) are also produced. The effect of hydrogenase inhibitors (H2, carbon monoxide (CO) and methyl viologen) on product selectivity was investigated....

  18. A Cell-Free Microtiter Plate Screen for Improved [FeFe] Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, James A.; Swartz, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background [FeFe] hydrogenase enzymes catalyze the production and dissociation of H2, a potential renewable fuel. Attempts to exploit these catalysts in engineered systems have been hindered by the biotechnologically inconvenient properties of the natural enzymes, including their extreme oxygen sensitivity. Directed evolution has been used to improve the characteristics of a range of natural catalysts, but has been largely unsuccessful for [FeFe] hydrogenases because of a lack of convenient screening platforms. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe an in vitro screening technology for oxygen-tolerant and highly active [FeFe] hydrogenases. Despite the complexity of the protocol, we demonstrate a level of reproducibility that allows moderately improved mutants to be isolated. We have used the platform to identify a mutant of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe] hydrogenase HydA1 with a specific activity ∼4 times that of the wild-type enzyme. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using the screen presented here for large-scale efforts to identify improved biocatalysts for energy applications. The system is based on our ability to activate these complex enzymes in E. coli cell extracts, which allows unhindered access to the protein maturation and assay environment. PMID:20479937

  19. Antigenic determinants of the membrane-bound hydrogenase in Alcaligenes eutrophus are exposed toward the periplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Eismann, K; Mlejnek, K; Zipprich, D; Hoppert, M; Gerberding, H; Mayer, F

    1995-01-01

    Electron microscopic immunogold labeling experiments were performed with ultrathin sections of plasmolyzed cells of Alcaligenes eutrophus and "whole-mount" samples of spheroplasts and protoplasts. They demonstrated that antigenic determinants of the membrane-bound hydrogenase are exposed, at the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane, to the periplasm. PMID:7592402

  20. Hydrogenase activity of mineral-associated and suspended populations of Desulfovibrio Desulfuricans Essex 6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate...

  1. Nickel-Substituted Rubredoxin as a Minimal Enzyme Model for Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Slater, Jeffrey W; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2015-09-17

    A simple, functional mimic of [NiFe] hydrogenases based on a nickel-substituted rubredoxin (NiRd) protein is reported. NiRd is capable of light-initiated and solution-phase hydrogen production and demonstrates high electrocatalytic activity using protein film voltammetry. The catalytic voltammograms are modeled using analytical expressions developed for hydrogenase enzymes, revealing maximum turnover frequencies of approximately 20-100 s(-1) at 4 °C with an overpotential of 540 mV. These rates are directly comparable to those observed for [NiFe] hydrogenases under similar conditions. Like the native enzymes, the proton reduction activity of NiRd is strongly inhibited by carbon monoxide. This engineered rubredoxin-based enzyme is chemically and thermally robust, easily accessible, and highly tunable. These results have implications for understanding the enzymatic mechanisms of native hydrogenases, and, using NiRd as a scaffold, it will be possible to optimize this catalyst for application in sustainable fuel generation. PMID:26722748

  2. Lyophilization protects [FeFe]-hydrogenases against O2-induced H-cluster degradation.

    PubMed

    Noth, Jens; Kositzki, Ramona; Klein, Kathrin; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Happe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nature has developed an impressive repertoire of metal-based enzymes that perform complex chemical reactions under moderate conditions. Catalysts that produce molecular hydrogen (H2) are particularly promising for renewable energy applications. Unfortunately, natural and chemical H2-catalysts are often irreversibly degraded by molecular oxygen (O2). Here we present a straightforward procedure based on freeze-drying (lyophilization), that turns [FeFe]-hydrogenases, which are excellent H2-producers, but typically extremely O2-sensitive in solution, into enzymes that are fully resistant against O2. Complete dryness protects and conserves both, the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins and their inorganic active-site cofactor (H-cluster), when exposed to 100% O2 for days. The full H2-formation capacity is restored after solvation of the lyophilized enzymes. However, even minimal moisturizing re-establishes O2-sensitivity. The dry [FeFe]-hydrogenase material is superior also for advanced spectroscopic investigations on the H-cluster reaction mechanism. Our method provides a convenient way for long-term storage and impacts on potential biotechnological hydrogen production applications of hydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26364994

  3. Lyophilization protects [FeFe]-hydrogenases against O2-induced H-cluster degradation

    PubMed Central

    Noth, Jens; Kositzki, Ramona; Klein, Kathrin; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Happe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nature has developed an impressive repertoire of metal-based enzymes that perform complex chemical reactions under moderate conditions. Catalysts that produce molecular hydrogen (H2) are particularly promising for renewable energy applications. Unfortunately, natural and chemical H2-catalysts are often irreversibly degraded by molecular oxygen (O2). Here we present a straightforward procedure based on freeze-drying (lyophilization), that turns [FeFe]-hydrogenases, which are excellent H2-producers, but typically extremely O2-sensitive in solution, into enzymes that are fully resistant against O2. Complete dryness protects and conserves both, the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins and their inorganic active-site cofactor (H-cluster), when exposed to 100% O2 for days. The full H2-formation capacity is restored after solvation of the lyophilized enzymes. However, even minimal moisturizing re-establishes O2-sensitivity. The dry [FeFe]-hydrogenase material is superior also for advanced spectroscopic investigations on the H-cluster reaction mechanism. Our method provides a convenient way for long-term storage and impacts on potential biotechnological hydrogen production applications of hydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26364994

  4. Photocatalytic hydrogen production from a simple water-soluble [FeFe]-hydrogenase model system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei-Ning; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hong-Yan; Chen, Bin; Feng, Ke; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2012-08-21

    Combined with a simple water soluble [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic 1, Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and ascorbic acid enable hydrogen production photocatalytically. More than 88 equivalents of H(2) were achieved in water, which is much better than that obtained in an organic solvent or a mixture of organic solvent and water. PMID:22772838

  5. How the oxygen tolerance of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase depends on quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Philip; Thomas, Claudia; Sargent, Frank; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2016-03-01

    'Oxygen-tolerant' [NiFe]-hydrogenases can catalyze H2 oxidation under aerobic conditions, avoiding oxygenation and destruction of the active site. In one mechanism accounting for this special property, membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases accommodate a pool of electrons that allows an O2 molecule attacking the active site to be converted rapidly to harmless water. An important advantage may stem from having a dimeric or higher-order quaternary structure in which the electron-transfer relay chain of one partner is electronically coupled to that in the other. Hydrogenase-1 from E. coli has a dimeric structure in which the distal [4Fe-4S] clusters in each monomer are located approximately 12 Å apart, a distance conducive to fast electron tunneling. Such an arrangement can ensure that electrons from H2 oxidation released at the active site of one partner are immediately transferred to its counterpart when an O2 molecule attacks. This paper addresses the role of long-range, inter-domain electron transfer in the mechanism of O2-tolerance by comparing the properties of monomeric and dimeric forms of Hydrogenase-1. The results reveal a further interesting advantage that quaternary structure affords to proteins. PMID:26861789

  6. Importance of the Protein Framework for Catalytic Activity of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Knörzer, Philipp; Silakov, Alexey; Foster, Carina E.; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Happe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The active center (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases is embedded into a hydrophobic pocket within the protein. We analyzed several amino acids, located in the vicinity of this niche, by site-directed mutagenesis of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases from Clostridium pasteurianum (CpI) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1). These amino acids are highly conserved and predicted to be involved in H-cluster coordination. Characterization of two hydrogenase variants confirmed this hypothesis. The exchange of residues CrHydA1Met415 and CrHydA1Lys228 resulted in inactive proteins, which, according to EPR and FTIR analyses, contain no intact H-cluster. However, [FeFe]-hydrogenases in which CpIMet353 (CrHydA1Met223) and CpICys299 (CrHydA1Cys169) were exchanged to leucine and serine, respectively, showed a structurally intact H-cluster with catalytic activity either absent (CpIC299S) or strongly diminished (CpIM353L). In the case of CrHydA1C169S, the H-cluster was trapped in an inactive state exhibiting g values and vibrational frequencies that resembled the Htrans state of DdH from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. This cysteine residue, interacting with the bridge head nitrogen of the di(methyl)amine ligand, seems therefore to represent an essential contribution of the immediate protein environment to the reaction mechanism. Exchanging methionine CpIM353 (CrHydA1M223) to leucine led to a strong decrease in turnover without affecting the Km value of the electron donor. We suggest that this methionine constitutes a “fine-tuning” element of hydrogenase activity. PMID:22110126

  7. Identification of Hub Genes Related to the Recovery Phase of Irradiation Injury by Microarray and Integrated Gene Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yue; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Jinyuan; Wang, Zejian; Yin, Ming; Shen, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    Background Irradiation commonly causes long-term bone marrow injury charactertized by defective HSC self-renewal and a decrease in HSC reserve. However, the effect of high-dose IR on global gene expression during bone marrow recovery remains unknown. Methodology Microarray analysis was used to identify differentially expressed genes that are likely to be critical for bone marrow recovery. Multiple bioinformatics analyses were conducted to identify key hub genes, pathways and biological processes. Principal Findings 1) We identified 1302 differentially expressed genes in murine bone marrow at 3, 7, 11 and 21 days after irradiation. Eleven of these genes are known to be HSC self-renewal associated genes, including Adipoq, Ccl3, Ccnd1, Ccnd2, Cdkn1a, Cxcl12, Junb, Pten, Tal1, Thy1 and Tnf; 2) These 1302 differentially expressed genes function in multiple biological processes of immunity, including hematopoiesis and response to stimuli, and cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and signaling; 3) Dynamic Gene Network analysis identified a subgroup of 25 core genes that participate in immune response, regulation of transcription and nucleosome assembly; 4) A comparison of our data with known irradiation-related genes extracted from literature showed 42 genes that matched the results of our microarray analysis, thus demonstrated consistency between studies; 5) Protein-protein interaction network and pathway analyses indicated several essential protein-protein interactions and signaling pathways, including focal adhesion and several immune-related signaling pathways. Conclusions Comparisons to other gene array datasets indicate that global gene expression profiles of irradiation damaged bone marrow show significant differences between injury and recovery phases. Our data suggest that immune response (including hematopoiesis) can be considered as a critical biological process in bone marrow recovery. Several critical hub genes that are

  8. The AbrB2 Autorepressor, Expressed from an Atypical Promoter, Represses the Hydrogenase Operon To Regulate Hydrogen Production in Synechocystis Strain PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Dutheil, Jérémy; Saenkham, Panatda; Sakr, Samer; Leplat, Christophe; Ortega-Ramos, Marcia; Bottin, Hervé; Cournac, Laurent; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    We have thoroughly investigated the abrB2 gene (sll0822) encoding an AbrB-like regulator in the wild-type strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis strain PCC6803. We report that abrB2 is expressed from an active but atypical promoter that possesses an extended −10 element (TGTAATAT) that compensates for the absence of a −35 box. Strengthening the biological significance of these data, we found that the occurrence of an extended −10 promoter box and the absence of a −35 element are two well-conserved features in abrB2 genes from other cyanobacteria. We also show that AbrB2 is an autorepressor that is dispensable to cell growth under standard laboratory conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that AbrB2 also represses the hox operon, which encodes the Ni-Fe hydrogenase of biotechnological interest, and that the hox operon is weakly expressed even though it possesses the two sequences resembling canonical −10 and −35 promoter boxes. In both the AbrB2-repressed promoters of the abrB2 gene and the hox operon, we found a repeated DNA motif [TT-(N5)-AAC], which could be involved in AbrB2 repression. Supporting this hypothesis, we found that a TT-to-GG mutation of one of these elements increased the activity of the abrB2 promoter. We think that our abrB2-deleted mutant with increased expression of the hox operon and hydrogenase activity, together with the reporter plasmids we constructed to analyze the abrB2 gene and the hox operon, will serve as useful tools to decipher the function and the regulation of hydrogen production in Synechocystis. PMID:22865847

  9. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance. Database URL: http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco PMID:27074804

  10. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance.Database URL:http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco. PMID:27074804