Sample records for hydrogeology

  1. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and address remaining challenges by co-locating study areas, sharing approaches and fusing data, developing conceptual models from hydrogeologic data, numerical modeling, and training interdisciplinary scientists.

  2. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  3. Hydrogeologic Units Of Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Kamal; Aker, Nizar; Zahruddine, Khalil

    1992-01-01

    Based on geomorphologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of its territory, Lebanon is divided into three provinces: the West Lebanon province, the Bekaa province, and the East Anti-Lebanon province. These provinces are subdivided into smaller hydrogeologic units, the basins and subbasins. Significant features used in the subdivision are faults, relief, anticlinal axes, river channels, and water divides. Recharge to groundwater is a percentage of the intake area, the percipitation rate over this area, and the infiltration rate of outcropping rocks. The amounts of recharged water over the three provinces are 1609, 914, and 19 Mm3, respectively. Discharge is surface water from springs and water wells along the Lebanese coast. The discharge from the Lebanese rivers exceeds 3700 Mm3/year, an appreciable amount of which comes from natural springs. The quantity of groundwater pumped by wells or flowing into neighboring countries and to the sea as submarine springs, may exceed 800 Mm3/year.

  4. Hydrogeology Field Course

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Department of Geosciences

    This applied hydrogeology field course taught at Western Michigan University is designed to educate and train students in environmental surface geophysics, well drilling and installation, aquifer testing, groundwater sampling and testing, and remediation. The course also offers OSHA 40 hour hazardous waste operations training. This website provides a course outline, photo galleries, a list of skills that will be acquired by students, and logistical information.

  5. Hydrogeology Research Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tara Kulkarni

    This activity is for students to work in teams (2012) or individually (2013) to develop a project (such as a physical or numerical model), survey based research, case study, technical briefs on a remediation technology, etc. of the students' choice, based on their understanding of and interest in the subjects covered in the class. This is used in the GL 199 Hydrogeology course, which is offered through the Department of Geology and Environmental Sciences at Norwich University. This is an experimental course that has not made it to the course catalogue as yet. It is currently offered to students majoring in Geology, with an acknowledgement that a course in hydrogeology is a desirable component of a Geology curriculum. Environmental Science students are encouraged to take it to deepen their understanding of subsurface processes. This course is considered a science elective for Civil and Environmental Engineering majors, and greatly complements the Hydrology, and Soils and Materials classes that are a part of the regular CE&E curriculum. Students from freshmen through seniors across these three majors are accepted into the course. With a cross section of majors and academic years in the class, it was determined that a project that has students thinking about a topic of their choice and developing fundamental research and collaboration skills is critical to meeting common workplace demands.

  6. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  7. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  8. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  9. CHUNMIAO ZHENG Professor of Hydrogeology

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    , Higher Education Press, Beijing, China in collaboration with John Wiley & Sons, New York. #12;C. Zheng 2-0818 Email: czheng@ua.edu; Website: http://hydro.geo.ua.edu Education 1984-1988 Ph.D., Hydrogeology-1984 Postgraduate work in Geology and Applied Mathematics, Chengdu University of Technology, China. 1979-1983 B

  10. Using Scant Data in Hydrogeology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Don Siegel

    I presented the short case studies at the Teaching Hydrogeology workshop to illustrate the five fundamental points I emphasize in my basic hydrogeology class. These five points are what consultants tell me my students should know cold; what the difference is between the water table and potentiometric head, that a contaminant plume from an individual source should be narrow, that water table maps should be related to the topography, that major dissolved species are important to know about, and that organic matter conditions a lot of contaminant transport. How to apply this knowledge where there is scant data is the rub, and I draw from my consulting files to illustrate how I, at least, do it.

  11. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  12. Advanced Borehole Radar for Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar is a useful tool for monitoring the hydrogeological environment. We have developed GPR systems which can be applied to these purposes, and we will demonstrate examples borehole radar measurements. In order to have longer radar detection range, frequency lower than100MHz has been normally adopted in borehole radar. Typical subsurface fractures of our interests have a few mm aperture and radar resolution is much poorer than a few cm in this frequency range. We are proposing and demonstrating to use radar polarimetry to solve this problem. We have demonstrated that a full-polarimetry borehole radar can be used for characterization of subsurface fractures. Together with signal processing for antenna characteristic compensation to equalize the signal by a dipole antenna and slot antennas, we could demonstrate that polarimetric borehole radar can estimate the surface roughness of subsurface fractures, We believe the surface roughness is closely related to water permeability through the fractures. We then developed a directional borehole radar, which uses optical field sensor. A dipole antenna in a borehole has omni-directional radiation pattern, and we cannot get azimuthal information about the scatterers. We use multiple dipole antennas set around the borehole axis, and from the phase differences, we can estimate the 3-diemnational orientation of subsurface structures. We are using optical electric field sensor for receiver of borehole radar. This is a passive sensor and connected only with optical fibers and does not require any electric power supply to operate the receiver. It has two major advantages; the first one is that the receiver can be electrically isolated from other parts, and wave coupling to a logging cable is avoided. Then, secondary, it can operate for a long time, because it does not require battery installed inside the system. It makes it possible to set sensors in fixed positions to monitor the change of environmental conditions for a long period. We demonstrated this idea using cross- hole borehole radar measurement. We think this method is useful for detecting any changes in hydrogeological situations, which will be useful for subsurface storage such as LNG and nuclear waste.

  13. Uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, B.; Højberg, A. L.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Troldborg, L.

    2007-09-01

    Uncertainty in conceptual model structure and in environmental data is of essential interest when dealing with uncertainty in water resources management. To make quantification of uncertainty possible is it necessary to identify and characterise the uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data. This paper discusses a range of available techniques to describe the uncertainty related to geological model structure and scale of support. Literature examples on uncertainty in hydrogeological variables such as saturated hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, specific storage, effective porosity and dispersivity are given. Field data usually have a spatial and temporal scale of support that is different from the one on which numerical models for water resources management operate. Uncertainty in hydrogeological data variables is characterised and assessed within the methodological framework of the HarmoniRiB classification.

  14. Uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, B.; Højberg, A. L.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Troldborg, L.

    2006-08-01

    Uncertainty in conceptual model structure and in environmental data is of essential interest when dealing with uncertainty in water resources management. To make quantification of uncertainty possible it is necessary to identify and characterise the uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data. This paper discusses a range of available techniques to describe the uncertainty related to geological model structure and scale of support. Literature examples on uncertainty in hydrogeological variables such as saturated hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, specific storage, effective porosity and dispersivity are given. Field data usually have a spatial and temporal scale of support that is different from the one on which numerical models for water resources management operate. Uncertainty in hydrogeological data variables is characterised and assessed within the methodological framework of the HarmoniRiB classification.

  15. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  16. Hydrogeology Journal Official Journal of the International

    E-print Network

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    1 23 Hydrogeology Journal Official Journal of the International Association of Hydrogeologists ISSN-edge methods for determining fault characteristics have been widely applied for oil and gas reservoir morphology typically consists of two rheological zones, each with distinctive poro-mechan- ical behavior: (1

  17. GEO-SCI 587: Introduction to Hydrogeology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Boutt

    This is the home page of a hydrogeology course taught by Dr. David Boutt at the University of Massachusetts. The website includes the course syllabus, lecture notes, homework assignments and lab activities (including three field labs). The course addresses the hydrologic cycle, Darcy's Law, aquifer parameters, steady and transient flow equations, well hydraulics, elementary multi-phase flow, groundwater recharge, watershed hydrology, geological controls on groundwater flow, well construction, and groundwater chemistry and pollution.

  18. Hydrogeology, waste disposal, science and politics: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Link, P.K. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 48 papers were presented at the Engineering Geology and Geotechnical Engineering 30th Symposium. These papers are presented in this proceedings under the following headings: site characterization--Pocatello area; site characterization--Boise Area; site assessment; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; geophysical methods; remediation; geotechnical engineering; and hydrogeology, northern and western Idaho. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Analysis of hydrogeological structure uncertainty by estimation of hydrogeological acceptance probability of geostatistical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, D. R.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation describes a proposed approach to account for the equifinality of solutions that result from comparing observations to flow simulations when using realizations of geostatistical models. We introduce hydrogeological acceptance probability to rank the propensity of a geostatistical model to produce acceptable realizations with respect to the consistency of their simulations with observations. The estimation of hydrogeological acceptance probability is equivalent to the calculation of the sample mean of a binomial distribution. This allows the sampling of realizations to be preemptively terminated based on the current estimate and subject to the desired confidence level and interval length. We propose a uncertainty analysis of the hydrogeological heterogeneity utilizing acceptable realizations from a selected set of geostatistical models. In the case of a crisp definition of realization acceptance, this produces a facies probability map. If the definition of realization acceptance is imprecise, the analysis yields upper and lower bounds on the facies probability map in the form of facies plausibility and belief maps, respectively.

  20. Marine hydrogeology: recent accomplishments and future opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.

    2005-03-01

    Marine hydrogeology is a broad-ranging scientific discipline involving the exploration of fluid-rock interactions below the seafloor. Studies have been conducted at seafloor spreading centers, mid-plate locations, and in plate- and continental-margin environments. Although many seafloor locations are remote, there are aspects of marine systems that make them uniquely suited for hydrologic analysis. Newly developed tools and techniques, and the establishment of several multidisciplinary programs for oceanographic exploration, have helped to push marine hydrogeology forward over the last several decades. Most marine hydrogeologic work has focused on measurement or estimation of hydrogeologic properties within the shallow subsurface, but additional work has emphasized measurements of local and global fluxes, fluid source and sink terms, and quantitative links between hydrogeologic, chemical, tectonic, biological, and geophysical processes. In addition to summarizing selected results from a small number of case studies, this paper includes a description of several new experiments and programs that will provide outstanding opportunities to address fundamental hydrogeologic questions within the seafloor during the next 20-30 years. L'hydrogéologie marine est une large discipline scientifique impliquant l' exploration des interactions entre les fluides et les roches sous les fonds marins. Des études ont été menées dans les différents environnements sous-marins (zone abyssale, plaque océanique, marges continentales). Bien que de nombreux fonds marins soient connus, il existe des aspects des systèmes marins qui les rendent inadaptés à l'analyse hydrologique. De nouveaux outils et techniques, et la mise en oeuvre de nombreux programmes multidisciplinaires d'exploration océanographique, ont aidé à pousser en avant l'hydrogéologie marine ces dix dernières années. La plus part des études hydrogéologiques se sont concentrées jusqu'à présent sur la mesure ou l'estimation des propriétés à la sub-surface des fonds marins, et des travaux complémentaires ont mis en valeur les mesures de flux, local ou global, de termes « sources » et « pertes », et des liens quantitatifs entre l'hydrogéologie, la chimie, la tectonique, la biologie, et les processus géophysiques. Cet article vise à résumer des résultats sélectionnés parmi un petit nombre d'études, et à décrire plusieurs nouvelles expériences et programmes, qui sont autant d'opportunités pour répondre aux questions fondamentales relatives aux fonds marins, posées ces dernières 20-30 années. La hidrogeología marina es una disciplina científica de amplios alcances que involucra la exploración de interacciones fluido-roca por debajo del fondo del mar. Se han llevado a cabo estudios en centros de expansión del fondo del mar, lugares en medio de una placa, y en ambientes de placa y margen continental. Aunque muchos sitios en el fondo del mar son remotos, existen aspectos de estos sistemas marinos que los hacen particularmente adaptables para análisis hidrológico. Nuevas técnicas y herramientas desarrolladas, y el establecimiento de varios programas multidisciplinarios para exploración oceanográfica, han ayudado a impulsar la hidrogeología marina hacia delante durante las ultimas décadas. La mayor parte del trabajo hidrogeológico marino se ha enfocado en la medición o estimación de propiedades hidrogeológicas dentro del subsuelo superficial, pero trabajo adicionalha enfatizado mediciones de flujos globales y locales, términos de fuente y sumidero de fluidos, y vínculos cuantitativos entre procesos hidrogeológicos, químicos, tectónicos, biológicos y geofísicos. Además de resumir resultados seleccionados de un número pequeño de estudios de caso, este artículo incluye una descripción de varios programas y experimentos nuevos que aportarán oportunidades excepcionales para dirigir preguntas hidrogeológicas fundamentales dentro del fondo oceánico durante los siguientes 20-30 años.

  1. Hydrogeological aspects of agricultural drainage in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdon, David J.

    1986-02-01

    Hydrogeological principles and approaches have been applied to the problems of agricultural drainage in Ireland in the hope that such application will contribute to the better solution of the many drainage problems in Ireland. The legal position and a short history of drainage in Ireland are given, as well as a list of the many state bodies involved in arterial and agricultural drainage. The evolution of the present Irish environment is outlined, from the end of the last ice age to the present day, with emphasis on the formation of lands in need of drainage. Natural conditions indicate that agricultural drainage was required over some 50% (34,450 km2) of Ireland; the achieved agricultural drainage extends over some 29.3% of the country. Natural conditions affecting drainage are set out under the headings of topographical, geological, hydrogeological, vegetative, and hydrochemical influences as well as man's actions with regard to drainage. The third portion of the article deals with the ways in which areas now requiring agricultural drainage have been formed. Areas of low or nil infiltration are described, with some emphasis on such occurrences as lacustrine marls, pans of various types, the effects of the Calp and the Namurian in Carboniferous strate, and conditions under which rejected recharge by overfull aquifers produces winter marshes. Then areas afflicted by high, but often diffuse, groundwater discharge are noted. And the effect of bog growth, both raised bogs and blanket bog, are outlined; drainage of bogs is a very specialized operation, mainly undertaken by Bord na Mona. Some of the harmful affects of drainage are outlined, as reduction of grazing during rare droughts, of lands suitable for waterfowl, as well as some pollution from bog drainage. Drainage does not deplete the groundwater resources of Ireland, which are abundant and little used. The article ends with some general conclusions and a list of some 13 unusual ideas which arise from the application of hydrogeological principles and approaches to problems of agricultural drainage in Ireland.

  2. University of Tennessee: Hydrogeology Research Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The hydrogeology research program at the University of Tennessee developed this website to promote its investigation related primarily to groundwater flow and contaminant transport. After reading an overview of the program and its facilities, visitors can discover the endeavors and successes of the numerous researchers. Users can find information and publications discussing the three featured research projects: Chattanooga Creek, Pathogen Transport, and Saprolite Pore Structure; as well as materials on other recent projects. Students can discover the program's three excellent field teaching sites and research opportunities.

  3. Hydrogeologic framework of the Virginia coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meng, Andrew A., III; Harsh, John F.

    1988-01-01

    This report defines the hydrogeologic framework of the Virginia Coastal Plain and is a product of a comprehensive regional study to define the geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system extending from North Carolina to Long Island, New York. The Virginia Coastal Plain consists of an eastward-thickening wedge of generally unconsolidated, interbedded sands and clays, ranging in age from Early Cretaceous to Holocene. These sediments range in thickness from more than 6,000 feet beneath the northeastern part of the Eastern Shore Peninsula to nearly 0 feet along the Fall Line. Eight confined aquifers, eight confining units, and an uppermost water table aquifer are delineated as the hydrogeologic framework of the Coastal Plain sediments in Virginia. The nine regional aquifers, from oldest to youngest, are lower, middle, and upper Potomac, Brightseat, Aquia, Chickahominy-Piney Point, St. Marys-Choptank, Yorktown-Eastover, and Columbia. The Brightseat is a newly identified and correlated aquifer of early Paleoceneage. This study is one of other, similar studies of the Coastal Plain areas in North Carolina, Maryland-Delaware, New Jersey, and Long Island, New York. These combined studies provide a system of hydrogeologic units that can be identified and correlated throughout the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain. Data for this study were collected and analyzed from October 1979 to May 1983. The nine aquifers and eight confining units are identified and delineated by use of geophysical logs, drillers' information, and stratigraphic and paleontologic data. By correlating geophysical logs with hydrologic, stratigraphic, and paleontologic data throughout the Coastal Plain, a comprehensive multilayered framework of aquifers and confining units, each with distinct lithologic properties, was developed. Cross sections show the stratigraphic relationships of aquifers and confining units in the hydrogeologic framework of the Virginia Coastal Plain. Maps show confining-unit thicknesses and altitudes of aquifer tops, provide the basis for assigning aquifers to screened intervals of observation and production wells, and are used for the development of a comprehensive observation-well network in the Virginia Coastal Plain.

  4. Hydrogeology of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.; Finn, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogeologic maps were constructed for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The ground-water flow system in the country can best be described as two interconnected regional systems: the porous Continental Terminal coastal system and the interior, fractured sedimentary Taoudeni Basin system. In these systems, ground-water flow occurs in fill deposits and carbonate, clastic, metasedimentary, and metavolcanic rocks. Based on an evaluation of the potentiometric surface, there are three areas of ground-water recharge in the Taoudeni Basin system. One region occurs in the northwest at the edge of the Shield, one occurs to the south overlying the Tillites, and one is centered at the city of Tidjikdja. In contrast to the flow system in the Taoudeni Basin, the potentiometric surfaces reveal two areas of discharge in the Continental Terminal system but no localized recharge areas; the recharge is more likely to be areal. In addition to these recharge and discharge areas, ground water flows across the country's borders. Specifically, ground water from the Atlantic Ocean flows into Mauritania, transporting dissolved sodium from the west as a salt water intrusion, whereas fresh ground water discharges from the east into Mali. To the north, there is a relatively low gradient with inflow of fresh water to Mauritania, whereas ground-water flow discharges to the Senegal River to the south. A geographical information system (GIS) was used to digitize, manage, store, and analyze geologic data used to develop the hydrogeologic map. The data acquired for map development included existing digital GIS files, published maps, tabulated data in reports and public-access files, and the SIPPE2 Access database. Once in digital formats, regional geologic and hydrologic features were converted to a common coordinate system and combined into one map. The 42 regional geologic map units were then reclassified into 13 hydrogeologic units, each having considerable lateral extent and distinct hydrologic properties. Because the hydrologic properties of these units are also influenced by depth and degree of fracturing, the hydraulic conductivity values of these hydrogeologic units can range over many orders of magnitude.

  5. SRS baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, H.W.; Aadland, R.K. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Sargent, K.A. (Furman Univ., Greenville, SC (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1990-11-01

    Work on the Savannah River Site (SRS) Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation began in 1983 when it was determined that the knowledge of the plant hydrogeologic systems needed to be expanded and improved in response to changing stratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic terminology and increased involvement by regulatory agencies (Bledsoe, 1984). Additionally, site-wide data were needed to determine flow paths, gradients, and velocities associated with the different aquifers underlying the plant site. The program was divided into three phases in order to allow the results of one phase to be evaluated and necessary changes and improvements incorporated into the following phases. This report summarizes the results of all three phases and includes modified graphic logs, lithologic descriptions of the different geologic formations, profiles of each cluster site, hydrostratigraphic cross sections, hydrographs of selected wells within each cluster for the first full year of uninterrupted water level measurements, potentiometric maps developed from data collected from all clusters, completion diagrams for each well, and a summary of laboratory tests. Additionally, the proposed new classification of hydrostratigraphic units at SRS (Aadland and Bledsoe, 1990) has been incorporated.

  6. Hydrogeology in North America: past and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    2005-03-01

    This paper is a retrospective on the evolution of hydrogeology in North America over the past two centuries, and a brief speculation of its future. The history of hydrogeology is marked by developments in many different fields such as groundwater hydrology, soil mechanics, soil science, economic geology, petroleum engineering, structural geology, geochemistry, geophysics, marine geology, and more recently, ecology. The field has been enriched by the contributions of distinguished researchers from all these fields. At present, hydrogeology is in transition from a state of discovering new resources and exploiting them efficiently for maximum benefit, to one of judicious management of finite, interconnected resources that are vital for the sustenance of humans and other living things. The future of hydrogeology is likely to be dictated by the subtle balance with which the hydrological, erosional, and nutritional cycles function, and the decision of a technological society to either adapt to the constraints imposed by the balance, or to continue to exploit hydrogeological systems for maximum benefit. Although there is now a trend towards ecological and environmental awareness, human attitudes could change should large parts of the populated world be subjected to the stresses of droughts that last for many decades. Cet article est une rétrospective de l'évolution de l'hydrogéologie en Amérique du Nord sur les deux derniers siècles, et une brève évaluation de son futur. L'histoire de l'hydrogéologie est marquée par le développement de plusieurs techniques de terrain telles, l'hydrologie des eaux souterraines, la mécanique des sols, les sciences du sol, la géologie économique, l' ingénierie pétrolière, la géologie structurale, la géochimie, la géophysique, la géologie marine et plus récemment l'écologie. La science a été enrichie par la contribution de plusieurs chercheurs distingués, provenant de toutes ces branches. A présent, l'hydrogéologie est à la transition entre la volonté de découvrir de nouvelles ressources et l' exploitation la plus bénéfique au possible, et un management judicieux des ressources finies, interconnectées, qui sont vitales pour l' approvisionnement des hommes et autres formes de vie. Le futur de l' hydrogéologie sera dicté par la balance subtile dans laquelle intervient les cycles de l'hydrologie, de l'érosion, de la nutrition, et la décision d'une société technologique qui s'adapterait aux contraintes de la balance, ou qui continuerait d'exploiter les systèmes hydrologiques pour un bénéfice maximum. Par ailleurs il y a une nette tendance à inclure les aspects écologiques, les aspects environnementaux, et les changements humains qui pourraient être influencés par les modifications hydrogéologiques observées depuis une dizaine d'années. Este articulo es una retrospectiva sobre la evolución de la hidrogeología en Norte América en los pasados dos siglos, y una breve especulación de su futuro. La historia de la hidrogeología está marcada por desarrollos en muchos campos diferentes tal como hidrología de aguas subterráneas, mecánica de suelos, ciencia del suelo, geología económica, ingeniería del petróleo, geología estructural, geoquímica, geofísica, geología marina, y más recientemente, ecología. El campo se ha enriquecido por las contribuciones de investigadores distinguidos en todos esos campos. Actualmente, la hidrogeología se encuentra en transición de un estado de descubrir nuevos recursos y explotarlos eficientemente para un beneficio máximo, a un estado de gestión juiciosa de recursos finitos, interconectados, que son vitales para el sustento de humanos y otras cosas vivientes. El futuro de la hidrogeología posiblemente esté determinado por el balance sutil con el cual funcionan los ciclos nutricionales, erosionales e hidrológicos, y la decisión de una sociedad tecnológica para ya sea adaptarse a las restricciones impuestas por el balance o para continuar con la explotación de los sistemas hidrogeológicos para un benefici

  7. Hydrogeology Laboratory Semester Project: Hydrogeologic Assessment for CenTex Water Supply, Inc.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Matthew Uliana

    This activity is a single, semester-long project that involves a hydrogeologic assessment of a property in Central Texas. The project is presented in the lab portion of a hydrogeology class, and it is broken into several separate steps. Each step is treated as a separate assignment, however, the data and results associated with each assignment are applied towards the overall goal of the project. Students are required to maintain a file and a master Excel workbook containing all information, data, and results from each of the steps. All this information is then used to develop an analytical model that simulated drawdowns in the aquifer. This model is used to answer the primary question associated with the project. The results are then documented in a technical report.

  8. Analysis of hydrogeological structure uncertainty by estimation of hydrogeological acceptance probability of geostatistical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Dylan R.; Vesselinov, Velimir V.

    2012-02-01

    The following describes a proposed approach to account for the equifinality of solutions that result from comparing observations to flow simulations when using realizations of geostatistical models. We introduce hydrogeological acceptance probability to estimate the propensity of a geostatistical model to produce acceptable realizations with respect to the consistency of their simulations with observations. The estimation of hydrogeological acceptance probability is equivalent to the calculation of the sample mean of a Bernoulli distribution. This allows the estimation of the acceptance probability to be preemptively terminated based on the current estimate and subject to the desired confidence level and interval length. We propose a composite uncertainty analysis of the hydrogeological heterogeneity utilizing acceptable realizations from multiple geostatistical models collected during the estimation of their acceptance probability. In the case of a non-fuzzy definition of realization acceptance, this produces a facies probability map. If the definition of realization acceptance is imprecise, the analysis yields upper and lower bounds on the facies probability map in the form of facies plausibility and belief maps, respectively. These maps can provide indications of the information content of the data and provide guidance for the collection of additional data.

  9. Insights into Mejerda basin hydrogeology, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guellala, Rihab; Tagorti, Mohamed Ali; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi; Amri, Faouzi

    2012-09-01

    The present study concentrates on the interpretation of Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) and well logs to understand the geometry and the functioning of the Ghardimaou multilayered aquifer, a potential target for water supply in the Mejerda basin (Tunisia). The analysis of isobath and isopach maps established in this study, shows a tectonic influence on the reservoirs structure; the Villafranchian folding and the NE-SW, and E-W normal faulting in the recent Quaternary created an aquifer system compartmentalized by raised and tilted blocks. Geoelectrical cross sections reveal that this structure influences the thickness of permeable formations and the groundwater circulation. These results will be useful for rationalizing the future hydrogeological research that will be undertaken in the Mejerda basin.

  10. Stochastic hydrogeologic units and hydrogeologic properties development for total-system performance assessments. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schenker, A.R.; Guerin, D.C. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rautman, C.A.; Barnard, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A stochastic representation of the lithologic units and associated hydrogeologic parameters of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository are developed for use in performance-assessment calculations, including the Total-System Performance Assessment for Yucca Mountain-SNL Second Iteration (TSPA-1993). A simplified lithologic model has been developed based on the physical characteristics of the welded and nonwelded units at Yucca Mountain. Ten hydrogeologic units are developed from site-specific data (lithologic and geophysical logs and core photographs) obtained from the unsaturated and saturated zones. The three-dimensional geostatistical model of the ten hydrogeologic units is based on indicator-coding techniques and improves on the two-dimensional model developed for TSPA91. The hydrogeologic properties (statistics and probability distribution functions) are developed from the results of laboratory tests and in-situ aquifer tests or are derived through fundamental relationships. Hydrogeologic properties for matrix properties, bulk conductivities, and fractures are developed from existing site specific data. Extensive data are available for matrix porosity, bulk density, and matrix saturated conductivity. For other hydrogeologic properties, the data are minimal or nonexistent. Parameters for the properties are developed as beta probability distribution functions. For the model units without enough data for analysis, parameters are developed as analogs to existing units. A relational, analytic approach coupled with bulk conductivity parameters is used to develop fracture parameters based on the smooth-wall-parallel-plate theory. An analytic method is introduced for scaling small-core matrix properties to the hydrogeologic unit scales.

  11. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIE(PRESENTATION FOR MNA WORKSHOP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  12. GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY 2012-2014 CATALOG

    E-print Network

    Texas at Austin, University of

    GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY 2012-2014 CATALOG Suggested Arrangement of Courses Calculus ..............................4 GEO 416M, Sedimentary Rocks, and Multivariable Calculus........4 GEO 303, Introduction to Geology ............................................3

  13. The use of multicomponent statistical analysis in hydrogeological environmental research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolaos Lambrakis; Andreas Antonakos; George Panagopoulos

    2004-01-01

    The present article examines the possibilities of investigating NO3? spread in aquifers by applying multicomponent statistical methods (factor, cluster and discriminant analysis) on hydrogeological, hydrochemical, and environmental parameters.A 4-R-Mode factor model determined from the analysis showed its useful role in investigating hydrogeological parameters affecting NO3? concentration, such as its dilution by upcoming groundwater of the recharge areas. The relationship between

  14. 2101-M Pond hydrogeologic characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Bates, D.J.; Martin, W.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory {sup (a)} at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report is the interpretation of the hydrogeologic environment at the 2101-M Pond, located in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretation were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the installation of four ground-water monitoring wells, in addition to data gathered from several previously existing wells. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a groundwater monitoring program initiated in 1988. The four new monitoring wells were installed around the 2101-M Pond between May 23 and August 27, 1988. Geologic sampling, aquifer testing, and initial ground-water sampling were performed during the installation of these wells. Laboratory analyses of the sediment samples for particle size, calcium carbonate content, and selected natural and contaminant constituents were performed. A full year of quarterly ground-water sampling and the first statistical analysis of background and downgradient data have also been performed. 112 refs., 49 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Vacher, H. L.; Shinn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter discusses the geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys, and focuses on the islands formed of Pleistocene limestone. These islands, which are crossed when driving from Miami to Key West, are typically regarded as "the Florida Keys." The outstanding and fragile character of ecosystems on and around the Florida Keys has prompted State and Federal efforts to protect and preserve the remaining public portions of the region. The Florida Keys were largely ignored during the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, although the waters just offshore provided a major shipping thoroughfare to and from the New World. The Florida Keys are now recognized as one of the great recreational and environmental resources of the United States. The islands are outposts of a laid-back, tropical resort culture that has as its foundation warmth and clear water. A significant part of the attraction is fishing, diving, and boating around the area's coral reefs, which the islands protect. But the reefs were not always so highly valued. The Florida Keys that have protected the reefs for millennia, may now be the source of the agents that may accomplish what Agassiz thought was beyond man's power a century ago.

  16. Geophysics and hydrogeology: will they ever marry?.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera Ramirez, J.; Martinez-Landa, L.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Vazquez-Sune, E.

    2012-12-01

    The use of geophysics in hydrogeology has long been subject to debate. Geophysicists contend that much information about hydraulic parameters can be obtained from geophysical data, a view shared by some hydrogeologists. On the other hand, many hydrogeologists discuss in private their frustration at failures. The fact that only successes find their way into the published literature justifies the latter in their scepticism. Here, we outline four experiences. In the first case, electrical vertical soundings failed to identify paleochannels at a 10-20 m deep fluvial aquifer overlying marls. In the second case, ERT produced a critically erroneous orientation of terrace deposits less than 10 m deep. In the third case, seismics yielded the location and orientation of singular water conducting faults, which allowed successful non-trivial predictions of the response to long term pumping in a granite pluton. Seismics were also used successfully in the fourth case to identify the location of water conducting faults during the construction of the Barcelona subway. We contend that the difference in these cases does not lie as much in the use of seismic or electrical methods as in the reliance on geology. Whereas geophysical interpretation did not benefit from sedimentologists in the first two cases, structural geologists heavily conditioned the last two through criticism (and rejection) of early interpretations. This, together with the extensive and successful use of electrical methods in regions where geology is well known, suggests that a solid geological model should be a prerequisite for geophysical applications.

  17. Hydrogeological controls on post-fire moss recovery in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukenbach, Max; Devito, Kevin; Kettridge, Nicholas; Petrone, Richard; Waddington, James

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire is the largest disturbance affecting peatlands, however, little is known about the spatiotemporal variability of post-fire recovery in these ecosystems. High water table (WT) positions after wildfire are critical to limit atmospheric carbon losses and enable the re-establishment of keystone peatland mosses (i.e. Sphagnum). While small-scale variation in burn severity can reduce capillary flow from the WT and lead to a dry surface after fire, steep WT declines can also limit post-fire moss water availability. As such, post-fire moss water availability is also a function of large-scale controls on peatland WT dynamics, specifically, connectivity to groundwater flow systems (i.e. hydrogeological setting). For this reason, we assessed the interacting controls of hydrogeological setting and burn severity on post-fire moss water availability by measuring peatland WTs, soil tension (?) and surface volumetric moisture content (?) in three burned, Sphagnum-dominated peatlands located in different hydrogeological settings for three years following wildfire. The effect of burn severity on post-fire moss water availability did not vary with hydrogeological setting, however, the spatial coverage of high and low burn severity did vary between peatlands located in different hydrogeological settings due to its influence on pre-fire fuel loads and species cover. Locations covered by S. fuscum prior to fire exhibited decreasing post-fire water availability with increasing burn severity. In contrast, the lowest water availability (? > 400 cm, ? < 0.02) was observed in feather mosses that underwent low burn severity (residual branches identifiable). Where depth of burn was > 0.05 m (high burn severity) and pre-fire species were not identifiable, water availability was highest (? < 90 cm). Where burn severity did not limit water availability through a reduction of capillary flow, depth to WT (and therefore hydrogeological setting) played a large role in affecting post-fire moss water availability. A peatland located in a groundwater flow-through system exhibited high post-fire moss water availability (surface ? > 0.15, ? < 60 cm) and shallow WTs that were less variable and exhibited lagged responses to climatic variability. In contrast, peatlands in hydrogeological settings that were not connected or ephemerally connected to groundwater flow systems exhibited deeper and more dynamic WTs that led to lower post-fire moss water availability (surface ? < 0.15, ? > 60 cm), especially during dry periods. As such, we argue that the post-fire recovery of keystone peatland mosses is strongly linked to a peatland's hydrogeological setting. These results suggest that post-fire moss re-establishment in peatlands located in dry hydrogeological settings may be particularly vulnerable to post-fire droughts and future climate change.

  18. DRASTIC: A STANDARDIZED SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING GROUND WATER POLLUTION POTENTIAL USING HYDROGEOLOGIC SETTINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology is described that will allow the pollution potential of any hydrogeologic setting to be systematically evaluated anywhere in the United States. The system has two major portions: the designation of mappable units, termed hydrogeologic settings, and the superposition...

  19. DRASTIC: A STANDARDIZED SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING GROUND WATER POLLUTION USING HYDROGEOLOGIC SETTINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology is described that will allow the pollution potential of any hydrogeologic setting to be systematically evaluated anywhere in the United States. The system has two major portions: the designation of mappable units, termed hydrogeologic settings, and the superposit...

  20. WFD and hydrogeological setting plans: the example of the Tevere River Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfredo Di Domenicantonio; Manuela Ruisi; Paolo Traversa

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, the Tevere River Basin Authority developed a hydrogeological setting plan (HSP) on hydrogeological risk from floods and landslides, which was taken into consideration during the first phase of the testing activity of the water framework directive (WFD), in order to compare the HSP objectives with the directive's objectives. With particular reference to the measures to reduce hydrogeological risk

  1. Hydrogeology of the Mogollon Highlands, central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.; Steinkampf, William C.; Flynn, Marilyn E.

    2005-01-01

    The Mogollon Highlands, 4,855 square miles of rugged, mountainous terrain at the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau in central Arizona, is characterized by a bedrock-dominated hydrologic system that results in an incompletely integrated regional ground-water system, flashy streamflow, and various local water-bearing zones that are sensitive to drought. Increased demand on the water resources of the area as a result of recreational activities and population growth have made necessary an increased understanding of the hydrogeology of the region. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the geology and hydrology of the region in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources under the auspices of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative, a program launched in 1998 to assist rural areas in dealing with water-resources issues. The study involved the analysis of geologic maps, surface-water and ground-water flow, and water and rock chemical data and spatial relationships to characterize the hydrogeologic framework. The study area includes the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau and the Mogollon Rim, which is the eroded edge of the plateau. A 3,000- to 4,000-foot sequence of early to late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks forms the generally south-facing scarp of the Mogollon Rim. The area adjacent to the edge of the Mogollon Rim is an erosional landscape of rolling, step-like terrain exposing Proterozoic metamorphic and granitic rocks. Farther south, the Sierra Ancha and Mazatzal Mountain ranges, which are composed of various Proterozoic rocks, flank an alluvial basin filled with late Cenozoic sediments and volcanic flows. Eight streams with perennial to intermittent to ephemeral flow drain upland regions of the Mogollon Rim and flow into the Salt River on the southern boundary or the Verde River on the western boundary. Ground-water flow paths generally are controlled by large-scale fracture systems or by karst features in carbonate rocks. Stream channels are also largely controlled by structural features, such as regional joint or fault systems. Precipitation, which shows considerable variability in amount and intensity, recharges the ground-water system along the crest of the Mogollon Rim and to a lesser extent along the crests and flanks of the rim and the Mazatzal Mountains and Sierra Ancha. Flashy runoff in the mainly bedrock stream channels is typical. Springs are distributed throughout the region, typically discharging at or above the contact of variably permeable formations along the face of the Mogollon Rim with a scattering of low-discharge springs in the Proterozoic rocks below the rim. The surface of the Colorado Plateau is the primary recharge area for the C aquifer in which ground-water flows north toward the Little Colorado River and south toward the Mogollon Highlands. Within the study area, flow from the C aquifer primarily discharges from large, stable springs in the upper East Verde River, Tonto Creek, and Canyon Creek Basins along the top of the Mogollon Rim and to the west as base flow in West Clear Creek. On the basis of chemical evidence and the distribution and flow characteristics of springs and perennial streams, the C aquifer is also the source of water for the limestone aquifer that discharges from carbonate rocks near the base of the Mogollon Rim. Vertical flow from the C aquifer, the base of which is in the Schnebly Hill Formation, recharges the limestone aquifer that discharges mainly at Fossil Springs in the western part of the study area and as base flow in Cibecue Creek on the eastern edge of the study area. Local, generally shallow aquifers of variable productivity occur in plateau and mesa-capping basalts in the sedimentary rocks of the Schnebly Hill and Supai Formations, in fractured zones of the Proterozoic Payson granite, and in the alluvium of the lower Tonto Creek Basin. Where time series data exist, such water-bearing zones are shown to be sensitive to short-

  2. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Montazer; W. E. Wilson

    1985-01-01

    The unsaturated volcanic tuff beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy as a host rock for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Assessment of site suitability needs an efficient and focused investigative program. A conceptual hydrogeologic model that simulates the flow of fluids through the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain was

  3. Hydrogeological and environmental impact of coal mining, Jharia coalfield, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vishnu D. Choubey

    1991-01-01

    The Jharia coalfield is the most important and active minig region; it experiences groundwater inflow and affects groundwater levels in overlying aquifers, and it provides the basis for a conceptual model of the hydrogeological impacts of coal mining. The several sandstone aquifers of the overburden are separated by aquitards that limit vertical hydraulic connection, but the inflow responds to seasonal

  4. GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY 2014-2016 CATALOG

    E-print Network

    Lightsey, Glenn

    Fall Semester Hours Spring Semester Hours PGE 323K, Reservoir Engineering I - GEO 420K, Introduction.............................4 GEO 476K, Groundwater Hydrology .......................4 PGE 323L, Reservoir Engineering II - PGEGEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY 2014-2016 CATALOG Suggested Arrangement of Courses

  5. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Watson, Katelyn A; Mayer, Alex S; Reeves, Howard W

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources?Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications. PMID:23582026

  6. An integrated theoretical and practical approach for teaching hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomi, Tullia; Fumagalli, Letizia; Cavallin, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeology as an earth science intersects the broader disciplines of geology, engineering, and environmental studies but it does not overlap fully with any of them. It is focused on its own range of problems and over time has developed a rich variety of methods and approaches. The resolution of many hydrogeological problems requires knowledge of elements of geology, hydraulics, physics and chemistry; moreover in recent years the knowledge of modelling techniques has become a necessary ability. Successful transfer of all this knowledge to the students depends on the breadth of material taught in courses, the natural skills of the students and any practical experience the students can obtain. In the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of Milano-Bicocca, the teaching of hydrogeology is developed in three inter-related courses: 1) general hydrogeology, 2) applied hydrogeology, 3) groundwater pollution and remediation. The sequence focuses on both groundwater flux and contaminant transport, supplemented by workshops involving case studies and computer labs, which provide the students with practical translation of the theoretical aspects of the science into the world of work. A second key aspect of the program utilizes the students' skill at learning through online approaches, and this is done through three approaches: A) by developing the courses on a University e-learning platform that allows the students to download lectures, articles, and teacher comments, and to participate in online forums; B) by carring out exercises through computer labs where the student analyze and process hydrogeological data by means of different numerical codes, that in turn enable them to manage databases and to perform aquifer test analysis, geostatistical analysis, and flux and transport modelling both in the unsaturated and saturated zone. These exercises are of course preceded by theoretical lectures on codes and software, highlighting their features and their limitations; C) by an evaluation process whose results contribute to the final examination, so that the students are evaluated on the basis of their ability to discuss theoretical subjects and/or projects and to resolving exercises and case studies either by hand calculations or by modelling. The applied hydrogeology examination is an example of the evaluation process. It involves development of a plan to resolve a real hydrogeological issue, such as the design of a hydraulic barrier for a landfill, the design of a well field to meet the supply requirements of a muncipality, or the control of possible seepage from a contaminated site close to to sensitive discharge features such as wells, springs, rivers. The students are allowed to work on computers for three consecutive mornings for a total 15 hours, and in the end are required to produce a technical report and a hydrogeological model. Obviously their solutions are neither unique nor completely optimized (just as in the real world), but the comparisons and debates among the students are important portals to learning and improvement. A second example: the groundwater pollution and remediation examination is based on the discussion of a remediation project elaborated in stages during the course, with the addition of increasing complex types of data and information. The students have one hour a week, during the course, to submit to the teacher their analysis of the problem and possible solutions. In ten years of experience all students have considered this method of examination a challenge, and found it engaging and helpful, even if unusual, at least in Italy. The University of Milano Bicocca has recently drilled a piezometric well both to monitor the flow of groundwater and to allow students to perform aquifer tests and to conduct standard groundwater sampling procedure, without any longer needing to rely on outside private donors for access to a field site. The overall approach, which includes, lectures, exercises, modelling and applied projects, help the students to consider hydrogeology from various poi

  7. Development of China Hydrogeology Exploring Techniques in 30 Years --Comparison of Handbook of Hydrogeology of 1st and 2nd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Handbook of Hydrogeology (2nd edition) is supported by one program from China Geological Survey (CGS): Research of Technical Methods of Hydrogeological Survey and Revision of Handbook of Hydrogeology. It is a reference book for those who are engaged in hydrogeological survey and research in China and covers fundamental principles, theories, survey and exploring techniques, and traditional experiences and achievements in hydrogeology. By comparing the 1st (1978) and 2nd (2012) edition of Handbook of Hydrogeology (in Chinese), this paper analyses the development of China hydrogeological survey and exploring techniques in last 30 years, especially the great change and progress in survey techniques of hydro-remote sensing and hydro-geophysical prospecting. In the first edition of Handbook of Hydrogeology, hydro-remote sensing was only mentioned as an interpretation of aerial pictures in a hydrogeological way, but had not yet formed an independent system and discipline. In the second edition, hydro-remote sensing is an important and independent chapter as one of the hydrogeological techniques. In it, various survey techniques of hydro-remote sensing and types and features of remote sensing data are classified. General systems of interpretation marks of remote sensing images are established, including marks of landform and Quaternary sediment, bedrock, structure types, water yield property, environmental elements of hydrogeology, aquifer group and so on. Systematic workflow is constructed, esp. in remote sensing images mapping and interpreting techniques. GPS and GIS are integrated into remote sensing. Remote sensing exploring instruments and interpreting softwares are also introduced and classified. Although hydro-geophysical prospecting, in the first edition of Handbook of Hydrogeology, was one independent chapter, there were only 10 exploring techniques. Equipments and instruments were simple and lagged in comparison to those in the second edition. The precision and depth were limited. In the last 30 years, geophysical exploring techniques have been widely used in oil and mineral exploration, and have laid a solid foundation for hydro-geophysics. In the second edition, systems of hydro-geophysical techniques are more complete and there are 26 techniques of 2 types. Combination of various geophysical techniques plays a much more effective role in solving hydrogeological problems and makes groundwater exploration more extensively utilized in range, depth and types. After the publication of Handbook of Hydrogeology, it is popular in the field of hydrogeology in China. It is a necessary reference book for hydrogeologists and those in related fields.

  8. Hydrogeologic framework and estimates of ground-water volumes in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinaman, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana is an important source of energy resources for the United States. Coalbed methane gas is contained in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin. This gas is released when water pressure in coalbeds is lowered, usually by pumping ground water. Issues related to disposal and uses of by-product water from coalbed methane production have developed, in part, due to uncertainties in hydrologic properties. One hydrologic property of primary interest is the amount of water contained in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, conducted a study to describe the hydrogeologic framework and to estimate ground-water volumes in different facies of Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. A geographic information system was used to compile and utilize hydrogeologic maps, to describe the hydrogeologic framework, and to estimate the volume of ground water in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming. Maps of the altitudes of potentiometric surfaces, altitudes of the tops and bottoms of hydrogeologic units, thicknesses of hydrogeologic units, percent sand of hydrogeologic units, and outcrop boundaries for the following hydrogeologic units were used: Tongue River-Wasatch aquifer, Lebo confining unit, Tullock aquifer, Upper Hell Creek confining unit, and the Fox Hills-Lower Hell Creek aquifer. Literature porosity values of 30 percent for sand and 35 percent for non-sand facies were used to calculate the volume of total ground water in each hydrogeologic unit. Literature specific yield values of 26 percent for sand and 10 percent for non-sand facies, and literature specific storage values of 0.0001 ft-1 (1/foot) for sand facies and 0.00001 ft-1 for non-sand facies, were used to calculate a second volume of ground water for each hydrogeologic unit. Significant figure considerations limited estimates of ground-water volumes to two significant digits. A total ground-water volume of 2.0x1014 ft3 (cubic feet) was calculated using porosity values, and a total ground-water volume of 3.6x1013 ft3 was calculated using specific yield and specific storage values. These results are consistent with retention properties, which would have some of the total water being retained in the sediments. Sensitivity analysis shows that the estimates of ground-water volume are most sensitive to porosity. The estimates also are sensitive to confined thickness and saturated thickness. Better spatial information for hydrogeologic units could help refine the ground-water volume estimates.

  9. Hydrogeologic Framework of Onslow County, North Carolina, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fine, Jason M.

    2008-01-01

    The unconsolidated sediments that underlie the Onslow County area are composed of interlayered permeable and impermeable beds, which overlie the crystalline basement rocks. The aquifers, composed mostly of sand and limestone, are separated by confining units composed mostly of clay and silt. The aquifers from top to bottom are the surficial, Castle Hayne, Beaufort, Peedee, Black Creek, and Upper and Lower Cape Fear aquifers. For this study, the Castle Hayne aquifer is informally divided into the upper and lower Castle Hayne aquifers. The eight aquifers and seven confining units of the Tertiary and Cretaceous strata beneath Onslow County are presented in seven hydrogeologic sections. The hydrogeologic framework was refined from existing interpretations by using geophysical logs, driller's logs, and other available data from 123 wells and boreholes.

  10. Hydrogeologic data from parts of the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, T.J.; Robson, S.G.; Romero, J.C.; Zawistowski, Stanley

    1983-01-01

    This report presents hydrogeologic data collected and compiled during 1956-81 as part of a comprehensive hydrogeologic data collected and compiled during 1956-81 as part of a comprehensive hdryogeologic investigation of the Denver basin, Colorado, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, Office of the State Engineer. The data, in tabular and graphic form, consist of records for 870 wells which include water-level data for 158 wells and water-quality analyses for 561 wells; geophysical logs from three wells which include resistivity, self potential, and natural gamma logs; and gain-and-loss data of streamflow measured at 54 sites. (USGS)

  11. The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

    1989-01-01

    As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Hydrogeologic model of the Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect

    Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Retana, M.; Cuellar, G. (Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) (El Salvador))

    1989-01-01

    A hydrogeological model of the Ahuachapan geothermal field has been developed. It considers the lithology and structural features of the area and discerns their impact on the movement of cold and hot fluids in the system. Three aquifers were identified, their zones of mixing and flow patterns were obtained on the basis of temperature and geochemical data from wells and surface manifestations. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Hydrogeological monitoring in the newly restored Cheonggyecheon stream, Seoul, Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jae-Ha, Y.; Yoon-Young, K.; Doo-Hyung, C.; Kang-Kun, L.

    2006-12-01

    The understanding of hydrogeological characteristics related to the Cheonggyecheon (Cheonggye-stream) restoration is important from the viewpoint of water cycle in the city and stream flow after restoration. The hydrogeological characteristics in the Cheonggyecheon is very complicated by the pumping, underground structure, pumping associated with subway tunnel and road pavement. A impervious layer beneath the stream and barrier walls along the stream was installed for the leakage prevention of the stream water. We monitored the hydraulic head, hydrogeochemical properties and changes of hydrogeological properties for the sustainability in the restored Cheonggyecheon. The range of hydraulic head fluctuation was about 2 m ~ 3 m due to a rainfall event before the restoration. But the fluctuation range of hydraulic head was not so high after the restoration to be about 0.5 m to 1 m. The hydrogeochemical properties indicated that the groundwater quality is likely to be recovered gradually because the incoming of contaminants from the surface water to groundwater have been decreased. For example, the concentration of nitrate contaminant inside the barrier wall in groundwater was 0.28 ppm after the barrier wall installation but the nitrate concentration outside the barrier wall was 46.11 ppm.

  14. Mine Hydrogeology Information Management System Based on VB and MapObjects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fan Shu-kai; Wu Qiang; Pan Guo-ying; Liu Shou-qiang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract-According to the problem existed in the work of mine hydrogeology information management, based on the analysis of functional requirement and system structure of mine hydrogeology information management system, mine hydrogeology information management system was developed on the basis of MapObjects , with VB 6.0 as development language, and with Access 2000 as back-end database. The system realized the inputting,

  15. Summary of Hydrogeologic Conditions by County for the State of Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apple, Beth A.; Reeves, Howard W.

    2007-01-01

    Summaries of the major hydrogeologic features for each county in Michigan are presented. Each summary includes a listing of the major watersheds in the county and a description of the hydrogeology of the major aquifers in the county. Aquifer properties reported in the literature are given if available. Reports describing the hydrogeology of each county are cited. This work was prepared to provide a brief introduction to the ground-water setting for each county.

  16. Developing a Modular Hydrogeology Ontology Extending the SWEET Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A.; Babaie, H. A.

    2005-12-01

    Reengineering upper-level ontologies to make them useful for specific domains can be achieved using modular software development techniques. The challenge of manipulating complex and general, upper-level ontologies can be overcome by using ontology development tools for the purpose of analysis and design of new concepts and extension of existing concepts. As a use case representing this approach we present the reengineering of NASA's Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies to include part of the hydrogeology concepts. We have maintained the modular design of the SWEET ontologies for maximum extensibility and reusability. The modular reengineering of the SWEET ontologies to include hydrogeology domain involved the following steps: (1): Identify the terms and concepts relevant to the hydrogeology domain through scenarios, competency questions, and interviews with domain experts. (2): Establish the inter-relationships between concepts (e.g., vadose zone = unsaturated zone). (3): Identify the dependent concepts, such as physical properties or units, and determine their relationships to external concepts. (4): Download the OWL files from SWEET, and save them on local systems for editing. (5): Use ontology editing tools like SWOOP and Protege to analyze the structure of the existing OWL files. (6): Add new domain concepts as new classes in the OWL files, or as subclasses of already existing classes in the SWEET ontologies. The step involved changing the relationships (properties) and/or adding new relationships where they were required in the domain. Sometimes the entire structure of the existing concepts needed to be changed to represent the domain concept more meaningfully. (7): Test the consistency of concepts using appropriate tools (e.g., Protege, which uses the Racer reasoner to check consistency of concepts). (8) Add individuals to the new concepts to test the modified ontologies. We present an example of a simple RDQL query to test and demonstrate the new hydrogeology ontology. Our work shows that SWEET ontologies can successfully be extended and reused by other Earth science domains without losing their modular structure.

  17. Hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characterization of a karstic mountain region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Celalettin; Elci, Alper; Gunduz, Orhan; Erdogan, Burhan

    2008-03-01

    Karstic limestone formations in the Mediterranean basin are potential water resources that can meet a significant portion of groundwater demand. Therefore, it is necessary to thoroughly study the hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry of karstic mountain regions. This paper presents a detailed hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characterization of the Nif Mountain karstic aquifer system in western Turkey, an important recharge source for the densely populated surrounding area. Based on the geological and hydrogeological studies, four major aquifers were identified in the study area including the allochthonous limestone in Bornova flysch, conglomerate-sandstone and clayey-limestone in Neogene series, and the Quaternary alluvium. Physicochemical characteristics of groundwater were measured in situ, and samples were collected at 59 locations comprised of springs and wells. Samples were analyzed for major ions, isotopic composition, arsenic, boron and heavy metals among other trace elements. It was found that the hydrogeological structure is complex with many springs having a wide range of discharge rates. High-discharge springs originate from allochthonous limestone units, whereas low-discharge springs are formed at the contacts with claystone and limestone units. Using stable isotope analysis data, a ?18O-deuterium relationship was obtained that lies between the Mediterranean meteoric and mean global lines. Tritium analyses showed that low-discharge springs originating from contact zones had longer circulation times compared to the high-discharge karstic springs. Furthermore, hydrogeochemical data revealed that groundwater quality significantly deteriorated as water moved from the mountain to the plains. Heavy metal, arsenic and boron concentrations were generally within drinking-water quality standards with a few exceptions occurring in residential and industrial areas located at the foothills of the mountain. Elevated arsenic concentrations were related to local geologic formations, which are likely to contain oxidized sulfite minerals in claystones. It is concluded that Nif Mountain overall has a significant potential to provide high-quality water with a safe yield of at least 50 million m3/year, which corresponds to about 28% of the mean annual inflow to the Tahtali reservoir, a major water resource for the city of Izmir.

  18. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  19. Improvements in near-surface geophysical applications for hydrogeological parameter estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian Demond Addison

    2009-01-01

    One application of near-surface geophysical techniques is the hydrogeological parameter estimation. Hydrogeological estimated parameters such as volumetric water content, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity are useful in predicting groundwater flow. Therefore, any improvements in the field acquisition and data processing of the geophysical data will provide better results in estimating these parameters. This research examines the difficulties associated with processing and

  20. ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Geodetic tools for hydrogeological surveys: 3D-displacements above a fractured

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and discharge of fluids (oil, gas or water), either naturally or induced by human exploitation. This leadsACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Geodetic tools for hydrogeological surveys: 3D of applications. After a review of the geodetic studies applied to hydrogeological processes, we describe two

  1. Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting at the Raleigh Hydrogeologic Research Station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2009-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station, located in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from May 2005 through September 2007 are presented in this report. Three well clusters and four piezometers were installed at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station along an assumed flow path from recharge to discharge areas. Each well cluster includes four wells to monitor the regolith, transition zone, and shallow and deep bedrock. Borehole, surface, and waterborne geophysics were conducted to examine the lithology and physical properties of the bedrock and to determine the aerial extent of near vertical diabase dikes. Slug tests were conducted in the wells at each cluster to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the formation tapped by each well. Periodic water-level altitudes were measured in all wells and in four piezometers. Continuous hourly water levels were measured in wells for variable periods of time during the study, and a surface-water gage collected 15-minute stage data from April to June 2006. In October 2005 and April 2006, water-quality samples were collected from a tributary and in all wells at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station. Continuous water-quality data were collected hourly in three wells from December 2005 through January 2007 and every 15 minutes in the tributary from May to June 2006. In August 2006, streambed temperatures and drive-point ground-water samples were collected across lines of section spanning the Neuse River.

  2. Mapping pollution and coastal hydrogeology with helicopterborne transient electromagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Niels B.; Halkjær, Max

    2014-03-01

    Coastal hydrology is becoming the focus of increasing interest for several reasons. Hydrogeological models need good boundary conditions at the coastline, and with the expected sea level rise due to climate changes, it becomes increasingly important to grasp the dynamics of coastal hydrology in order to predict the consequences of sea level rise for nature and society. We present a helicopterborne transient electromagnetic survey from a region at the North Sea coast in western Jutland, Denmark, carried out at a seriously polluted site with the dual purpose of assessing the extent of the pollution and mapping the coastal hydrogeology to provide data for remediation activities. Data are subjected to constrained inversion with one-dimensional multi-layer (smooth) models. The extent of the pollution plume estimated from a conductive anomaly in the survey results is mainly in accordance with results from other investigations, but also points to hitherto unknown directions of seepage. The interleaving of freshwater extending under the offshore shallow sea and saltwater infiltrating under the onshore freshwater aquifer can be clearly discerned and preferential flow channels are revealed.

  3. GIS-based hydrogeological databases and groundwater modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogu, Radu Constantin; Carabin, Guy; Hallet, Vincent; Peters, Valerie; Dassargues, Alain

    2001-12-01

    Reliability and validity of groundwater analysis strongly depend on the availability of large volumes of high-quality data. Putting all data into a coherent and logical structure supported by a computing environment helps ensure validity and availability and provides a powerful tool for hydrogeological studies. A hydrogeological geographic information system (GIS) database that offers facilities for groundwater-vulnerability analysis and hydrogeological modelling has been designed in Belgium for the Walloon region. Data from five river basins, chosen for their contrasting hydrogeological characteristics, have been included in the database, and a set of applications that have been developed now allow further advances. Interest is growing in the potential for integrating GIS technology and groundwater simulation models. A "loose-coupling" tool was created between the spatial-database scheme and the groundwater numerical model interface GMS (Groundwater Modelling System). Following time and spatial queries, the hydrogeological data stored in the database can be easily used within different groundwater numerical models. Résumé. La validité et la reproductibilité de l'analyse d'un aquifère dépend étroitement de la disponibilité de grandes quantités de données de très bonne qualité. Le fait de mettre toutes les données dans une structure cohérente et logique soutenue par les logiciels nécessaires aide à assurer la validité et la disponibilité et fournit un outil puissant pour les études hydrogéologiques. Une base de données pour un système d'information géographique (SIG) hydrogéologique qui offre toutes les facilités pour l'analyse de la vulnérabilité des eaux souterraines et la modélisation hydrogéologique a été établi en Belgique pour la région Wallonne. Les données de cinq bassins de rivières, choisis pour leurs caractéristiques hydrogéologiques différentes, ont été introduites dans la base de données, et un ensemble d'applications qui ont été développées permet dès maintenant de prochaines avancées. L'intérêt grandit pour le potentiel d'intégration de la technologie des SIG et les modèles de simulation des nappes. Un outil de couplage a été créé entre le schéma de base de données spatiales et l'interface GMS (GroundWater Modelling System, système de modélisation de nappe) du modèle numérique de nappe. Suivant les requêtes en fonction du temps et de l'espace, les données hydrogéologiques stockées dans la base de données peuvent être aisément utilisées dans différents modèles numériques de nappes. Resumen. La fiabilidad y validez de los análisis de aguas subterráneas dependen enormemente de la disponibilidad de muchos datos de alta calidad. Integrarlos en una estructura consistente y lógica mediante un entorno informático sirve para asegurar su validez y disponibilidad, y rrepresenta una herramienta muy potente para ulteriores estudios hidrogeológicos. Se ha diseñado en la región de Valonia (Bélgica) una base de datos hidrogeológica basada en un sistema de información geográfica (GIS), con el que se dispone de útiles para elaborar análisis de vulnerabilidad y modelos hidregeológicos. Se ha utilizado datos de cinco cuencas fluviales, elegidas por sus características hidrogeológicas contrastadas, así como un conjunto de aplicaciones desarrolladas con vistas al futuro. El interés por el potencial que ofrece la integración de la tecnología GIS y los modelos de simulación de aguas subterráneas está en auge. Se ha desarrollado un "emulador" que integra el esquema espacial de la base de datos y la interfaz GMS (GroundWater Modelling System) de modelación numérica de aguas subterráneas. A partir de búsquedas temporales y espaciales, los datos hidrogeológicos almacenados en la base de datos pueden ser utilizados fácilmente en modelos numéricos diferentes de aguas subterráneas.

  4. Incorporating Fuzzy Systems Modeling and Possibility Theory in Hydrogeological Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogeological predictions are subject to numerous uncertainties, including the development of conceptual, mathematical, and numerical models, as well as determination of their parameters. Stochastic simulations of hydrogeological systems and the associated uncertainty analysis are usually based on the assumption that the data characterizing spatial and temporal variations of hydrogeological processes are random, and the output uncertainty is quantified using a probability distribution. However, hydrogeological systems are often characterized by imprecise, vague, inconsistent, incomplete or subjective information. One of the modern approaches to modeling and uncertainty quantification of such systems is based on using a combination of statistical and fuzzy-logic uncertainty analyses. The aims of this presentation are to: (1) present evidence of fuzziness in developing conceptual hydrogeological models, and (2) give examples of the integration of the statistical and fuzzy-logic analyses in modeling and assessing both aleatoric uncertainties (e.g., caused by vagueness in assessing the subsurface system heterogeneities of fractured-porous media) and epistemic uncertainties (e.g., caused by the selection of different simulation models) involved in hydrogeological modeling. The author will discuss several case studies illustrating the application of fuzzy modeling for assessing the water balance and water travel time in unsaturated-saturated media. These examples will include the evaluation of associated uncertainties using the main concepts of possibility theory, a comparison between the uncertainty evaluation using probabilistic and possibility theories, and a transformation of the probabilities into possibilities distributions (and vice versa) for modeling hydrogeological processes.

  5. Application of End-Member Mixing Analysis to karst hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marechal, J.; Ladouche, B.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.; Seidel, J.

    2013-12-01

    The End-Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA) is used in hydrology to determine the origin of water from solute contents measurements. This method assumes that the water collected at a sampling point originates from a mixing between several end-members. Classically, in hydrology, the water sampled at the outlet of a small head watershed may result from a mixing between rainfall, soil water and groundwater. The objective of EMMA is to compute the relative contributions of the end-members and their evolution with time. This provides valuable information on the origin of water and hydrologic characteristics of the water cycle. Similarly, in hydrogeology, the origin of groundwater can vary according to hydrological conditions, during a pumping test for example or during a flood event. In this paper, this approach still poorly used in hydrogeology, is applied to two Mediterranean karst systems with contrasted objectives. The Lez karst system is a major resource for the water supply of Montpellier city in Southern France. During autumn, it is observed that the first rainy events create an increase of water mineralization at the main karstic spring. An EMMA analysis (Figure 1) has been conducted on the spring water during three hydrological cycles. It determines the respective contributions of two carbonate reservoirs to the spring discharge that fluctuate according to hydrologic conditions. In addition, a contribution from a deep aquifer during the first rainy events is also highlighted (Figure 2). The Nîmes city (Southern France) faced many flood events with devastating inundations. The main spring of the Nimes karst system is located in the centre of the city. Hydrochemical and water level data have highlighted the role of the karst groundwater in the flood genesis in surface streams. EMMA has confirmed the role of the epikarst during flood event once the karst system is saturated. The monitoring of water streams during high flow conditions shows the relative contributions of pre-event water stored in the karst and of epikarst water to the runoff. The application of EMMA to hydrogeology looks promising, especially in complex aquifers where the origin of groundwater is not straightforward. Principal Component Analysis of Lez spring water bounded by three end-members Water level and deep end-member contribution at Lez spring

  6. Importance of Hydrogeological Conditions on Open-loop Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D.; Bae, G.; Kim, S.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    The open-loop geothermal system has been known as an eco-friendly, energy-saving, and cost-efficient alternative for the cooling and heating of buildings with directly using the relatively stable temperature of groundwater. Thus, hydrogeological properties of aquifer, such as hydraulic conductivity and storage, must be important in the system application. The study site is located near Han-river, Korea, and because of the well-developed alluvium it might be a typical site appropriate to this system requiring an amount of groundwater. In this study, the first objective of numerical experiments was to find the best distributions of pumping and injection wells suitable to the hydrogeological conditions of the site for the efficient and sustainable system operation. The aquifer has a gravel layer at 15m depth below the ground surface and the river and the agricultural field, which may be a potential contaminant source, are located at the west and east sides, respectively. Under the general conditions that the regional groundwater flows from the east to the river, the locally reversed well distribution, locating the pumping well at upgradient and the injection well at downgradient of the regional flow, was most sustainable. The gravel layer with high hydraulic conductivity caused a little drawdown despite of an amount of pumping and allowed to stably reinject the used groundwater in all the cases, but it provided a passage transferring the injected heat to the pumping well quickly, particularly in the cases locating the injection well at the upgradient. This thermal interference was more severe in the cases of the short distance between the wells. The high conductive layer is also a reason that the seasonal role conversion of wells for the aquifer thermal energy storage was ineffective in this site. Furthermore, the well distribution vertical to the regional groundwater flow was stable, but not best, and, thus, it may be a good choice in the conditions that the regional groundwater flow direction has often been changed. Any effects of the seasonal river temperature variation and contaminant sources were not found on the wells because of the well screen installed at only the relatively deep gravel layer. Finally, it was evaluated whether if these results are valid in a homogeneous aquifer with the full screen of wells and the aquifer having a sediment layer with high hydraulic conductivity at a shallow depth, which are also typical aquifers near river. All the results concluded that it is essential to investigate and understand the site-specific hydrogeological conditions for the successful application of open-loop geothermal system.

  7. Viability of using seismic data to predict hydrogeological parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mela, K. [Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Design of modem contaminant mitigation and fluid extraction projects make use of solutions from stochastic hydrogeologic models. These models rely heavily on the hydraulic parameters of hydraulic conductivity and the correlation length of hydraulic conductivity. Reliable values of these parameters must be acquired to successfully predict flow of fluids through the aquifer of interest. An inexpensive method of acquiring these parameters by use of seismic reflection surveying would be beneficial. Relationships between seismic velocity and porosity together with empirical observations relating porosity to permeability may lead to a method of extracting the correlation length of hydraulic conductivity from shallow high resolution seismic data making the use of inexpensive high density data sets commonplace for these studies.

  8. Water and Mud: Linking hydrogeology and landscape change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kyle Nichols

    This exercise demonstrates the role of groundwater in Earth's surface processes and natural hazards through a simple sensitivity analysis using Excel and a case study of a landslide in glacial sediments. In the first part of the exercise, students use a spreadsheet to model the infinite slope equation to determine which variables are sensitive to change. In this part of the exercise students discover the relationship and importance between hydrogeology and Earth's surface processes. In the second part of the exercise students use a case study, of a landslide that occurred in glacial sediments, to calculate the lag time between precipitation events and slope failure. This exercise highlights the relationship between groundwater and natural hazards. Finally, students combine their knowledge of both exercises and use the infinite slope equation to predict the percent of ground saturation for the landslide case study.

  9. Hydrogeology in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: significance, processes and implications for

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Sarah-Jane

    1 Hydrogeology in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: significance, processes and implications................................................... 13 1.2Glacial retreat in Peru in a poorly gauged catchment of the Cordillera Blanca (Peru)................. 20 2.1 Abstract

  10. Using GA-Ridge regression to select hydro-geological parameters influencing groundwater pollution vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Joon; Kim, Young Min; Yoo, Keunje; Park, Joonhong; Oh, Kyong Joo

    2012-11-01

    For groundwater conservation and management, it is important to accurately assess groundwater pollution vulnerability. This study proposed an integrated model using ridge regression and a genetic algorithm (GA) to effectively select the major hydro-geological parameters influencing groundwater pollution vulnerability in an aquifer. The GA-Ridge regression method determined that depth to water, net recharge, topography, and the impact of vadose zone media were the hydro-geological parameters that influenced trichloroethene pollution vulnerability in a Korean aquifer. When using these selected hydro-geological parameters, the accuracy was improved for various statistical nonlinear and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, such as multinomial logistic regression, decision trees, artificial neural networks, and case-based reasoning. These results provide a proof of concept that the GA-Ridge regression is effective at determining influential hydro-geological parameters for the pollution vulnerability of an aquifer, and in turn, improves the AI performance in assessing groundwater pollution vulnerability. PMID:22124584

  11. Global hydrogeological systems and groundwater of the Pacific segment of the Earth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. P. Karavanov; V. V. Kulakov

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the main results of almost half-century-long theoretical and applied studies by the late K.P. Karavanov\\u000a dedicated to hydrogeological systems of continents and the oceanic floor as well as to the regional hydrogeology of the Pacific\\u000a segment of the Earth. This research is not yet over; it is being developed by his followers and serves as a basis

  12. Hydrogeologic and topographic factors influencing well yields in fractured crystalline rocks - Seoul, Republic of Korea 

    E-print Network

    Kim, Sang-Il

    1990-01-01

    HYDROGEOLOGIC AND TOPOGRAPHIC FACTORS INFLUENCING WELL YIELDS IN FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS: SEOUL, REPUBLIC OF KOREA A Thesis by SANG-IL KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Geology HYDROGEOLOGIC AND TOPOGRAPH1C FACTORS INFLUENCING WELL YIELDS IN FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS: SEOUL, REPUBLIC OF KOREA A Thesis by SANG-IL KIM Approved as to style...

  13. Conceptual hydrogeological model of volcanic Easter Island (Chile) after chemical and isotopic surveys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Herrera; Emilio Custodio

    2008-01-01

    Most human activities and hydrogeological information on small young volcanic islands are near the coastal area. There are\\u000a almost no hydrological data from inland areas, where permanent springs and\\/or boreholes may be rare or nonexistent. A major\\u000a concern is the excessive salinity of near-the-coast wells. Obtaining a conceptual hydrogeological model is crucial for groundwater\\u000a resources development and management. Surveys of

  14. A Hydrogeologic Map of the Death Valley Region, Nevada and California, Developed Using GIS Techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faunt, Claudia C.; D'Agnese, Frank A.; Turner, A. Keith

    1997-01-01

    In support of Yucca Mountain site characterization studies, a hydrogeologic framework was developed, and a hydrogeologic map was constructed for the Death Valley region. The region, covering approximately 100,000 km 2 along the Nevada-California border near Las Vegas, is characterized by isolated mountain ranges juxtaposed against broad, alluvium-filled valleys. Geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. The regional ground-water flow system can best be described as a series of connected intermontane basins in which ground-water flow occurs in basin-fill deposits, carbonate rocks, clastic rocks, and volcanic rocks. Previous investigations have developed more site-specific hydrogeologic relationships; however, few have described all the lithologies within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Information required to characterize the hydrogeologic units in the region was obtained from regional geologic maps and reports. Map data were digitized from regional geologic maps and combined into a composite map using a geographic information system. This map was simplified to show 10 laterally extensive hydrogeologic units with distinct hydrologic properties. The hydraulic conductivity values for the hydrogeologic units range over 15 orders of magnitude due to the variability in burial depth and degree of fracturing.

  15. A hydrogeologic map of the Death Valley region, Nevada, and California, developed using GIS techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Faunt, C.C.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Turner, A.K.

    1997-12-31

    In support of Yucca Mountain site characterization studies, a hydrogeologic framework was developed, and a hydrogeologic map was constructed for the Death Valley region. The region, covering approximately 100,000 km{sup 2} along the Nevada-California border near Las Vegas, is characterized by isolated mountain ranges juxtaposed against broad, alluvium-filled valleys. Geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. The regional ground-water flow system can best be described as a series of connected intermontane basins in which ground-water flow occurs in basin-fill deposits, carbonate rocks, clastic rocks, and volcanic rocks. Previous investigations have developed more site-specific hydrogeologic relationships; however, few have described all the lithologies within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Information required to characterize the hydrogeologic units in the region was obtained from regional geologic maps and reports. Map data were digitized from regional geologic maps and combined into a composite map using a geographic information system. This map was simplified to show 10 laterally extensive hydrogeologic units with distinct hydrologic properties. The hydraulic conductivity values for the hydrogeologic units range over 15 orders of magnitude due to the variability in burial depth and degree of fracturing.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories site-wide hydrogeologic characterization project calendar year 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowson, D.; Gibson, J.D.; Haase, C.S.; Holt, R.; Hyndman, D.; Krumhansl, J.; Lauffer, F.; McCord, J.P.; McCord, J.T.; Neel, D. [and others

    1993-10-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) project has been implemented as part of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to develop the regional hydrogeologic framework and baseline for the approximately 100 mi of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) and adjacent withdrawn public lands upon which SNL/NM has performed research and development activities. Additionally, the SWHC project will investigate and characterize generic hydrogeologic issues associated with the 172 ER sites owned by SNL/NM across its facilities on KAFB. As called for in the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the permitter and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL/NM as the permittees, an annual report is to be prepared by the SWHC project team. This document serves two primary purposes: (1) to identify and describe the conceptual framework for the hydrogeologic system underlying SNL/NM and (2) to describe characterization activities undertaken in the preceding year that add to our understanding (reduce our uncertainties) regarding the conceptual and quantitative hydrogeologic framework. This SWHC project annual report focuses primarily on purpose 1, providing a summary description of the current {open_quotes}state of knowledge{close_quotes} of the Sandia National Laboratories/Kirtland Air Force Base (SNL/KAFB) hydrogeologic setting.

  17. West Siberian basin hydrogeology - regional framework for contaminant migration from injected wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, M.G.

    1994-05-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle activities of the former Soviet Union (FSU) have resulted in massive contamination of the environment in western Siberia. We are developing three-dimensional numerical models of the hydrogeology and potential contaminant migration in the West Siberian Basin. Our long-term goal at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is to help determine future environmental and human impacts given the releases that have occurred to date and the current waste management practices. In FY 1993, our objectives were to (1) refine and implement the hydrogeologic conceptual models of the regional hydrogeology of western Siberia developed in FY 1992 and develop the detailed, spatially registered digital geologic and hydrologic databases to test them, (2) calibrate the computer implementation of the conceptual models developed in FY 1992, and (3) develop general geologic and hydrologic information and preliminary hydrogeologic conceptual models relevant to the more detailed models of contaminated site hydrogeology. Calibration studies of the regional hydrogeologic computer model suggest that most precipitation entering the ground-water system moves in the near-surface part of the system and discharges to surface waters relatively near its point of infiltration. This means that wastes discharged to the surface and near-surface may not be isolated as well as previously thought, since the wastes may be carried to the surface by gradually rising ground waters.

  18. Hydrogeologic Modeling at the Sylvania Corning FUSRAP Site - 13419

    SciTech Connect

    Ewy, Ann [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District (United States); Heim, Kenneth J. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District (United States); McGonigal, Sean T.; Talimcioglu, Nazmi M. [The Louis Berger Group, Inc. (United States)] [The Louis Berger Group, Inc. (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A comparative groundwater hydrogeologic modeling analysis is presented herein to simulate potential contaminant migration pathways in a sole source aquifer in Nassau County, Long Island, New York. The source of contamination is related to historical operations at the Sylvania Corning Plant ('Site'), a 9.49- acre facility located at 70, 100 and 140 Cantiague Rock Road, Town of Oyster Bay in the westernmost portion of Hicksville, Long Island. The Site had historically been utilized as a nuclear materials manufacturing facility (e.g., cores, slug, and fuel elements) for reactors used in both research and electric power generation in early 1950's until late 1960's. The Site is contaminated with various volatile organic and inorganic compounds, as well as radionuclides. The major contaminants of concern at the Site are tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), nickel, uranium, and thorium. These compounds are present in soil and groundwater underlying the Site and have migrated off-site. The Site is currently being investigated as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The main objective of the current study is to simulate the complex hydrogeologic features in the region, such as numerous current and historic production well fields; large, localized recharge basins; and, multiple aquifers, and to assess potential contaminant migration pathways originating from the Site. For this purpose, the focus of attention was given to the underlying Magothy formation, which has been impacted by the contaminants of concern. This aquifer provides more than 90% of potable water supply in the region. Nassau and Suffolk Counties jointly developed a three-dimensional regional groundwater flow model to help understand the factors affecting groundwater flow regime in the region, to determine adequate water supply for public consumption, to investigate salt water intrusion in localized areas, to evaluate the impacts of regional pumping activity, and to better understand the contaminant transport and fate mechanisms through the underlying aquifers. This regional model, developed for the N.Y. State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) by Camp Dresser and McKee (CDM), uses the finite element model DYNFLOW developed by CDM, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The coarseness of the regional model, however, could not adequately capture the hydrogeologic heterogeneity of the aquifer. Specifically, the regional model did not adequately capture the interbedded nature of the Magothy aquifer and, as such, simulated particles tended to track down-gradient from the Site in relatively straight lines while the movement of groundwater in such a heterogeneous aquifer is expected to proceed along a more tortuous path. This paper presents a qualitative comparison of site-specific groundwater flow modeling results with results obtained from the regional model. In order to assess the potential contaminant migration pathways, a particle tracking method was employed. Available site-specific and regional hydraulic conductivity data measured in-situ with respect to depth and location were incorporated into the T-PROG module in GMS model to define statistical variation to better represent the actual stratigraphy and layer heterogeneity. The groundwater flow characteristics in the Magothy aquifer were simulated with the stochastic hydraulic conductivity variation as opposed to constant values as employed in the regional model. Contaminant sources and their exact locations have been fully delineated at the Site during the Remedial Investigation (RI) phase of the project. Contaminant migration pathways originating from these source locations at the Site are qualitatively traced within the sole source aquifer utilizing particles introduced at source locations. Contaminant transport mechanism modeled in the current study is based on pure advection (i.e., plug flow) and mechanical dispersion while molecular diffusion effects are neglected due to relatively high groundwater velocities encountered in the aquifer. In addition, fate of contam

  19. Hydrogeological factors: their association and relationship with seasonal water-table fluctuation in the composite hardrock Aravalli terrain, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chandrashekhar Bhuiyan

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal rise of groundwater level manifests aquifer recharge through infiltration. Spatial variation of aquifer recharge\\u000a within the same basin or terrain is a function of terrain heterogeneity governed by different hydrogeological factors. However,\\u000a assessment of relations between water-level fluctuations (WLF) with various hydrogeological factors is not straightforward.\\u000a In the present study, various hydrogeological factors that could influence aquifer recharge in

  20. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (IL); Hunley, A.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation contains some areas contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater at that depth is saline and has previously been considered stagnant. On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of flow of the saline groundwater and its potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial temperature variations, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. In addition, chemical analyses of brine in adjacent areas in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia were compared with the deep water underlying the reservation to help assess the origin of the brine. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and freshwater-bearing units. The confined water (along with dissolved solutes) moves along open fractures (or man-made shortcuts) at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow probably are small.

  1. Quantitative methods to direct exploration based on hydrogeologic information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graettinger, A.J.; Lee, J.; Reeves, H.W.; Dethan, D.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitatively Directed Exploration (QDE) approaches based on information such as model sensitivity, input data covariance and model output covariance are presented. Seven approaches for directing exploration are developed, applied, and evaluated on a synthetic hydrogeologic site. The QDE approaches evaluate input information uncertainty, subsurface model sensitivity and, most importantly, output covariance to identify the next location to sample. Spatial input parameter values and covariances are calculated with the multivariate conditional probability calculation from a limited number of samples. A variogram structure is used during data extrapolation to describe the spatial continuity, or correlation, of subsurface information. Model sensitivity can be determined by perturbing input data and evaluating output response or, as in this work, sensitivities can be programmed directly into an analysis model. Output covariance is calculated by the First-Order Second Moment (FOSM) method, which combines the covariance of input information with model sensitivity. A groundwater flow example, modeled in MODFLOW-2000, is chosen to demonstrate the seven QDE approaches. MODFLOW-2000 is used to obtain the piezometric head and the model sensitivity simultaneously. The seven QDE approaches are evaluated based on the accuracy of the modeled piezometric head after information from a QDE sample is added. For the synthetic site used in this study, the QDE approach that identifies the location of hydraulic conductivity that contributes the most to the overall piezometric head variance proved to be the best method to quantitatively direct exploration. ?? IWA Publishing 2006.

  2. Hydrogeologic insights for a Devil's Slide-like system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Matthew A.; Loague, Keith

    2014-08-01

    Tectonically active coastal margins commonly host landslides that are influenced by hydrologic, geologic, and/or anthropogenic perturbations. The work reported here is motivated by the hydrologically driven, deep-seated bedrock slides that intersect the (former) Pacific Coast Highway in the active landslide zone at Devil's Slide near Pacifica, California. Numerical simulation of subsurface flow is employed to investigate saturated zone fluid pressure scenarios for 3-D Devil's Slide-like systems. The four-phase concept-development effort is comprised of 134 hydrogeologic simulation scenarios which investigate fluid pressure response for complex subsurface conditions and historically based climate forcings. Recharge, heterogeneity, and anisotropy are shown to increase fluid pressures in targeted failure-prone locations by up to 73.8, 10.3, and 1.8 %, respectively. The interaction between fault zone characteristics and topographically driven flow are shown to influence fluid pressures for up to 85% of the approximately 7.0 × 105 m2 study area. Simulated fluid pressures support the known slope instability for the Devil's Slide site. A quantitative hypothesis-testing discussion explores the likelihood of perched water above the regional water table at the site. Further understanding of hydrologically driven slope movement in the active landslide zone will require additional data focused on rigorous characterization of the unsaturated zone.

  3. Hydrogeologic characterization of a fractured granitic rock aquifer, Raymond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.J.B.

    1993-10-01

    The hydrogeologic properties of a shallow, fractured granitic rock aquifer in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California were investigated via the analysis of borehole geophysical logs and pumping tests. The drawdowns produced during these tests are not indicative of any simple conceptual aquifer model, and borehole logs show that the granite is intensely fractured. These observations are suggestive of a complex fracture-flow geometry which is extremely difficult to decipher. However, through the measurement of orientations of individual subsurface fractures from acoustic televiewer logs, and correlation between particular fractures and electrical resistivity and thermal-pulse flowmeter logs, it was found that the aquifer is, in general, comprised of two subhorizontal and nearly parallel zones of unloading fractures. Downhole flowmeter measurements taken in several wells provide further evidence for the inferred dual-layer structure of the aquifer, as well as yield quantitative measures of the contribution of flow from each zone. Analysis of drawdowns in pumped wells reveals that there are zones of relatively high transmissivity immediately around them. It was found that these properties, as well as a nearby zone of lower transmissivity, can account for their observed drawdowns. A numerical model was constructed to test whether these major heterogeneities could also account for the drawdowns in observation wells. This stepwise analysis of both the geophysical and hydrological data resulted in the formulation of a conceptual model of the aquifer which is consistent with observations, and which can account for its behavior when subjected to pumping.

  4. Hydrogeology of the Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliveros, J.P.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Geologic and borehole geophysical logs made at 77 sites show that the hydrogeologic framework of the study area consists of a sequence of unconsolidated sediments typical of the Coastal Plain of Maryland. Three aquifers and two confining units were delineated within the study area. From the surface down, they are: (1) the surficial aquifer; (2) the upper confining unit; (3) the Canal Creek aquifer; (4) the lower confining unit; and (5) the lower confined aquifer. The aquifer materials range from fine sand to coarse sand and gravel. Clay lenses were commonly found interfingered with the sand, isolating parts of the aquifers. All the units are continuous throughout the study area except for the upper confining unit, which crops out within the study area but is absent in updip outcrops. The unit also is absent within a Pleistocene paleochannel, where it has been eroded. The surficial and Canal Creek aquifers are hydraulically connected where the upper confining unit is absent, and a substantial amount of groundwater may flow between the two aquifers. Currently, no pumping stresses are known to affect the aquifers within the study area. Under current conditions, downward vertical hydraulic gradients prevail at topographic highs, and upward gradients typically prevail near surface-water bodies. Regionally, the direction of groundwater flow in the confined aquifers is to the east and southeast. Significant water level fluctuations correspond with seasonal variations in rainfall, and minor daily fluctuations reflect tidal cycles. (USGS)

  5. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Modesto Area, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Hevesi, Joseph A.; Weissmann, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeologic characterization was done to develop an understanding of the hydrogeologic setting near Modesto by maximizing the use of existing data and building on previous work in the region. A substantial amount of new lithologic and hydrologic data are available that allow a more complete and updated characterization of the aquifer system. In this report, geologic units are described, a database of well characteristics and lithology is developed and used to update the regional stratigraphy, a water budget is estimated for water year 2000, a three-dimensional spatial correlation map of aquifer texture is created, and recommendations for future data collection are summarized. The general physiography of the study area is reflected in the soils. The oldest soils, which have low permeability, exist in terrace deposits, in the interfan areas between the Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers, at the distal end of the fans, and along the San Joaquin River floodplain. The youngest soils have high permeability and generally have been forming on the recently deposited alluvium along the major stream channels. Geologic materials exposed or penetrated by wells in the Modesto area range from pre-Cretaceous rocks to recent alluvium; however, water-bearing materials are mostly Late Tertiary and Quaternary in age. A database containing information from more than 3,500 drillers'logs was constructed to organize information on well characteristics and subsurface lithology in the study area. The database was used in conjunction with a limited number of geophysical logs and county soil maps to define the stratigraphic framework of the study area. Sequences of red paleosols were identified in the database and used as stratigraphic boundaries. Associated with these paleosols are very coarse grained incised valley-fill deposits. Some geophysical well logs and other sparse well information suggest the presence of one of these incised valley-fill deposits along and adjacent to the Tuolumne River east of Modesto, a feature that may have important implications for ground-water flow and transport in the region. Although extensive work has been done by earlier investigators to define the structure of the Modesto area aquifer system, this report has resulted in some modification to the lateral extent of the Corcoran Clay and the regional dip of the Mehrten Formation. Well logs in the database indicating the presence of the Corcoran Clay were used to revise the eastern extent of the Corcoran Clay, which lies approximately parallel to the axis of valley. The Mehrten Formation is distinguished in the well-log database by its characteristic black sands consisting of predominantly andesitic fragments. Black sands in wells listed in the database indicate that the formation may lie as shallow as 120 meters (400 feet) below land surface under Modesto, approximately 90 meters (300 feet) shallower than previously thought. The alluvial aquifer system in the Modesto area comprises an unconfined to semiconfined aquifer above and east of the Corcoran Clay confining unit and a confined aquifer beneath the Corcoran Clay. The unconfined aquifer is composed of alluvial sediments of the Modesto, Riverbank, and upper Turlock Lake formations. The unconfined aquifer east of the Corcoran Clay becomes semiconfined with depth due to the numerous discontinuous clay lenses and extensive paleosols throughout the aquifer thickness. The confined aquifer is composed primarily of alluvial sediments of the Turlock Lake and upper Mehrten Formations, extending from beneath the Corcoran Clay to the base of fresh water. Ground water in the unconfined to semiconfined aquifer flows to the west and southwest. The primary source of present-day recharge is percolating excess irrigation water. The primary ground-water discharge is extensive ground-water pumping in the unconfined to semiconfined aquifer, imposing a significant component of vertical flo

  6. Groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    More than 40 percent of California's drinking water is from groundwater. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter referred to as San Diego) is one of the study units being evaluated. The San Diego study unit is approximately 3,900 square miles and consists of the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and 12 other alluvial basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). The study unit also consists of all areas outside defined groundwater basins that are within 3 kilometers of a public-supply well. The study unit was separated, based primarily on hydrogeologic settings, into four study areas: Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, Alluvial Basins, and Hard Rock (Wright and others, 2005). The sampling density for the Hard Rock study area, which consists of areas outside of groundwater basins, was much lower than for the other study areas. Consequently, aquifer proportions for the Hard Rock study area are not used to calculate the aquifer proportions shown by the pie charts. An assessment of groundwater quality for the Hard Rock study area can be found in Wright and Belitz, 2011. The temperatures in the coastal part of the study unit are mild with dry summers, moist winters, and an average annual rainfall of about 10 inches. The temperatures in the mountainous eastern part of the study unit are cooler than in the coastal part, with an annual precipitation of about 45 inches that occurs mostly in the winter. The primary aquifers consist of Quaternary-age alluvium and weathered bedrock in the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and Alluvial Basins study areas, whereas in the Hard Rock study area the primary aquifers consist mainly of fractured and decomposed granite of Mesozoic age. The primary aquifers are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. Public-supply wells typically are drilled to depths between 200 and 700 feet, consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of about 60 to 170 feet, and are perforated, or consist of an open hole, below the solid casing. Water quality in the shallow and deep parts of the aquifer system may differ from water quality in the primary aquifers. Municipal water use accounts for approximately 70 percent of water used in the study unit; the majority of the remainder is used for agriculture, industry, and commerce. Groundwater accounts for approximately 8 percent of the municipal supply, and surface water, the majority of which is imported, accounts for the rest. Recharge to groundwater occurs through stream-channel infiltration from rivers and their tributaries, infiltration in engineered recharge basins, and infiltration of water from precipitation and irrigation. The primary source of discharge is water pumped from wells.

  7. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Salt Basin, New Mexico and Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, A. B.; Phillips, F. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Salt Basin is a closed drainage basin located in southeastern New Mexico (Otero, Chaves, and Eddy Counties), and northwestern Texas (Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, and Presidio Counties), which can be divided into a northern and a southern system. Since the 1950s, extensive groundwater withdrawals have been associated with agricultural irrigation in the Dell City, Texas region, just south of the New Mexico-Texas border. Currently, there are three major applications over the appropriations of groundwater in the Salt Basin. Despite these factors, relatively little is known about the recharge rates and storage capacity of the basin, and the estimates that do exist are highly variable. The Salt Basin groundwater system was declared by the New Mexico State Engineer during 2002 in an attempt to regulate and control growing interest in the groundwater resources of the basin. In order to help guide long-term management strategies, a conceptual model of groundwater flow in the Salt Basin was developed by reconstructing the tectonic forcings that have affected the basin during its formation, and identifying the depositional environments that formed and the resultant distribution of facies. The tectonic history of the Salt Basin can be divided into four main periods: a) Pennsylvanian-to-Early Permian, b) Mid-to-Late Permian, c) Late Cretaceous, and d) Tertiary-to-Quaternary. Pennsylvanian-to-Permian structural features affected deposition throughout the Permian, resulting in three distinct hydrogeologic facies: basin, shelf-margin, and shelf. Permian shelf facies rocks form the primary aquifer within the northern Salt Basin, although minor aquifers occur in Cretaceous rocks and Tertiary-to-Quaternary alluvium. Subsequent tectonic activity during the Late Cretaceous resulted in the re-activation of many of the earlier structures. Tertiary-to-Quaternary Basin-and-Range extension produced the current physiographic form of the basin.

  8. Hydrogeologic Controls on Lake Level at Mountain Lake, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roningen, J. M.; Burbey, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Mountain Lake in Giles County, Virginia has a documented history of severe natural lake-level changes involving groundwater seepage that extend over the past 4200 years. Featured in the 1986 movie Dirty Dancing, the natural lake dried up completely in September 2008 and levels have not yet recovered. A hydrogeologic investigation was undertaken in an effort to determine the factors influencing lake level changes. A daily water balance, dipole-dipole electrical resistivity surveying, well logging and chemical sampling have shed light on: 1) the influence of a fault not previously discussed in literature regarding the lake, 2) the seasonal response to precipitation of a forested first-order drainage system in fractured rock, and 3) the possibility of flow pathways related to karst features. Geologic controls on lake level were investigated using several techniques. Geophysical surveys using dipole-dipole resistivity located possible subsurface flowpaths both to and from the lake. Well logs, lineament analysis, and joint sampling were used to assess structural controls on lake hydrology. Major ions were sampled at wells, springs, streams, and the lake to evaluate possible mixing of different sources of water in the lake. Groundwater levels were monitored for correlation to lake levels, rainfall events, and possible seismic effects. The hydrology of the lake was quantified with a water balance on a daily time step. Results from the water balance indicate steady net drainage and significant recharge when vegetation is dormant, particularly during rain-on-snow melt events. The resistivity survey reveals discrete areas that represent flow pathways from the lake, as well as flowpaths to springs upgradient of the lake located in the vicinity of the fault. The survey also suggests that some flowpaths may originate outside of the topographic watershed of the lake. Chemical evidence indicates karst may underlie the lakebed. Historical data suggest that artificial intervention to mitigate seepage would be required for lake level recovery in the near future.

  9. A new hydrogeologic model to predict anthropogenic uplift of Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teatini, P.; Castelletto, N.; Ferronato, M.; Gambolati, G.; Tosi, L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent numerical studies based on a simplified lithostratigraphy of the Venice subsurface suggest that the city may be raised by pumping seawater into deep aquifers through 12 wells located on a 10 km diameter circle. Using an updated 3-D reconstruction of the Quaternary deposits, developed very recently from about 1050 km of multichannel seismic profiles and eight exploration wells, along with a more accurate representation of the injection boreholes, novel finite-element predictions are performed. The new model simulates the lithostratigraphy of the lagoon subsurface and allows for a reliable assessment of the water volumes injected into the geologic formations based on the actual bottom hole overpressure that can vary both in space and time. Pumping occurs into two Pleistocene sequences that are originated from the Alps and Apennine sedimentation and terminate just south and north of Venice, respectively, and the shelf portion of a Pliocene sequence that is rather continuous below the central lagoon with arenite layers to depths as much as 1000 m below mean sea level. With a proper tuning of the injection pressure the new hydrogeologic model allows for a prediction of a quite uniform 25-30 cm uplift over 10 years after the inception of injection. The gradient of the vertical displacement ?z does not exceed 5 × 10-5 and 1 × 10-5 in the whole lagoon and Venice, respectively, i.e., well below the most conservative bound recommended for the safety of the structures. If ad hoc calibrated injection overpressures are implemented in each single well, ?z may be reduced to as much as 0.1 × 10-5 throughout the city.

  10. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Yakima River Basin Aquifer System, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, J.J.; Jones, M.A.; Ely, D.M.; Keys, M.E.; Olsen, T.D.; Welch, W.B.; Cox, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Yakima River basin aquifer system underlies about 6,200 square miles in south-central Washington. The aquifer system consists of basin-fill deposits occurring in six structural-sedimentary basins, the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and generally older bedrock. The basin-fill deposits were divided into 19 hydrogeologic units, the CRBG was divided into three units separated by two interbed units, and the bedrock was divided into four units (the Paleozoic, the Mesozoic, the Tertiary, and the Quaternary bedrock units). The thickness of the basin-fill units and the depth to the top of each unit and interbed of the CRBG were mapped. Only the surficial extent of the bedrock units was mapped due to insufficient data. Average mapped thickness of the different units ranged from 10 to 600 feet. Lateral hydraulic conductivity (Kh) of the units varies widely indicating the heterogeneity of the aquifer system. Average or effective Kh values of the water-producing zones of the basin-fill units are on the order of 1 to 800 ft/d and are about 1 to 10 ft/d for the CRBG units as a whole. Effective or average Kh values for the different rock types of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary units appear to be about 0.0001 to 3 ft/d. The more permeable Quaternary bedrock unit may have Kh values that range from 1 to 7,000 ft/d. Vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of the units is largely unknown. Kv values have been estimated to range from about 0.009 to 2 ft/d for the basin-fill units and Kv values for the clay-to-shale parts of the units may be as small as 10-10 to 10-7 ft/d. Reported Kv values for the CRBG units ranged from 4x10-7 to 4 ft/d. Variations in the concentrations of geochemical solutes and the concentrations and ratios of the isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon in groundwater provided information on the hydrogeologic framework and groundwater movement. Stable isotope ratios of water (deuterium and oxygen-18) indicated dispersed sources of groundwater recharge to the CRBG and basin-fill units and that the source of surface and groundwater is derived from atmospheric precipitation. The concentrations of dissolved methane were larger than could be attributable to atmospheric sources in more than 80 percent of wells with measured methane concentrations. The concentrations of the stable isotope of carbon-13 of methane were indicative of a thermogenic source of methane. Most of the occurrences of methane were at locations several miles distant from mapped structural fault features, suggesting the upward vertical movement of thermogenic methane from the underlying bedrock may be more widespread than previously assumed or there may be a more general occurrence of unmapped (buried) fault structures. Carbon and tritium isotope data and the concentrations of dissolved constituents indicate a complex groundwater flow system with multiple contributing zones to groundwater wells and relative groundwater residence time on the order of a few tens to many thousands of years. Potential mean annual recharge for water years 1950-2003 was estimated to be about 15.6 in. or 7,149 ft3/s (5.2 million acre-ft) and includes affects of human activities such as irrigation of croplands. If there had been no human activities (predevelopment conditions) during that time period, estimated recharge would have been about 11.9 in. or 5,450 ft3/s (3.9 million acre-ft). Estimated mean annual recharge ranges from virtually zero in the dry parts of the lower basin to more than 100 in. in the humid uplands, where annual precipitation is more than 120 in. Groundwater in the different hydrogeologic units occurs under perched, unconfined, semiconfined, and confined conditions. Groundwater moves from topographic highs in the uplands to topographic low areas along the streams. The flow system in the basin-fill units is compartmentalized due to topography and geologic structure. The flow system also is compartmentalized for the CRBG units but not to as large

  11. Hydrogeology and ground-water quality of northern Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Schreffler, Curtis L.

    1994-01-01

    Water from wells in the crystalline rocks has the lowest median pH (5.8), the lowest median specific conductance (139 microsiemens per centimeter), the lowest median alkalinity [16 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as CaCOg], and the highest dissolved oxygen concentration (9.0 mg/L) of the hydrogeologic units. Water from wells in carbonate rocks has the highest median pH (7.8) and the highest median alkalinity (195 mg/L as CaCO3) of the hydrogeologic units. Water from wells in the Lockatong Formation has the highest median specific conductance (428 microsiemens per centimeter) and the lowest dissolved oxygen concentration (0.8 mg/L) of the hydrogeologic units. Water from wells in crys

  12. Soft computing and hydrogeologic characterization of the Serra Geral-Guarani aquifer system, Parana state, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, F.; Friedel, M. J.; Ferreira, F. J.; Fraser, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Self-organizing map (SOM) technique is used to estimate missing hydrogeologic (hydraulic and hydrochemical) properties and evaluate potential connectivity between the Serra Geral and Guarani aquifer system. K-means clustering of SOM neurons is useful for identifying hydrogeologic units (conceptual models) in which the Serra Geral waters are carbonate-calcium and carbonate-magnesium, and Guarani waters are sodium, chloride, fluoride and sulfate as characteristic elements. SOM predictions appear generally consistent with current connectivity models with vertical fluxes from Guarani aquifer strongly influenced by geological structures. Additionally, we identify other new hydrochemical facies in the Serra Geral aquifer indicating areas with potential connections between the two aquifers.

  13. Final Technical Report - Integrated Hydrogeophysical and Hydrogeologic Driven Parameter Upscaling for Dual-Domain Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, John M

    2012-11-05

    The three major components of this research were: 1. Application of minimally invasive, cost effective hydrogeophysical techniques (surface and borehole), to generate fine scale (~1m or less) 3D estimates of subsurface heterogeneity. Heterogeneity is defined as spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity and/or hydrolithologic zones. 2. Integration of the fine scale characterization of hydrogeologic parameters with the hydrogeologic facies to upscale the finer scale assessment of heterogeneity to field scale. 3. Determination of the relationship between dual-domain parameters and practical characterization data.

  14. AGU Chapman Conference Hydrogeologic Processes: Building and Testing Atomistic- to Basin-Scale Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B. [American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report presents details of the Chapman Conference given on June 6--9, 1994 in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This conference covered the scale of processes involved in coupled hydrogeologic mass transport and a concept of modeling and testing from the atomistic- to the basin- scale. Other topics include; the testing of fundamental atomic level parameterizations in the laboratory and field studies of fluid flow and mass transport and the next generation of hydrogeologic models. Individual papers from this conference are processed separately for the database.

  15. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization. Groundwater geochemistry of the Savannah River Site and vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  16. Hydrogeological influences on radionuclide migration from the major radioactive waste burial sites at Chernobyl (A review)

    SciTech Connect

    Dgepo, S.P.; Skalsky, A.S.; Bugai, D.A.; Marchuk, V.V. [Inst. of Geological Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine); Waters, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This paper summarizes the recent hydrogeological investigations of several research organizations on waste confinement at the major radioactive waste (RW) burial sites immediately adjacent to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ch. NPP). Hydrogeological conditions and radiologic ground-water contamination levels are described. Ongoing ground-water monitoring practices are evaluated. The chemical and physical characteristics of the radionuclides within the burial sites are considered. Ground water and radionuclide transport modeling studies related to problems of the RW disposal sites are also reviewed. Current concerns on future impacts of the RW burial sites on the hydrological environment and water resources of the Ch.NPP area are discussed.

  17. Integrated Research Methods for Applied Urban Hydrogeology of Karst Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epting, J.; Romanov, D. K.; Kaufmann, G.; Huggenberger, P.

    2008-12-01

    Integrated and adaptive surface- and groundwater monitoring and management in urban areas require innovative process-oriented approaches. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop and combine interdisciplinary instruments that facilitate adequately quantifying cumulative effects on groundwater flow regimes. While the characterization and modeling of flow in heterogeneous and fractured media has been investigated intensively, there are no well-developed long-term hydrogeological research sites for gypsum karst. Considering that infrastructures in karst regions, particularly in gypsum, are prone to subsidence, severe problems can arise in urban areas. In the 1880's, a river dam was constructed on gypsum-containing rock, Southeast of Basel, Switzerland. Over the last 30 years, subsidence of the dam and an adjacent highway has been observed. Surface water infiltrates upstream of the dam, circulates in the gravel deposits and in the weathered bedrock around and beneath the dam and exfiltrates downstream into the river. These processes enhance karstification processes in the soluble units of the gypsum. As a result an extended weathering zone within the bedrock and the development of preferential flow paths within voids and conduits can be observed. To prevent further subsidence, construction measures were conducted in two major project phases in 2006 and 2007. The highway was supported by a large number of pillars embedded in the non- weathered rock and by a sealing pile wall, to prevent infiltrating river water circulating around the dam and beneath the foundation of the highway. To safeguard surface and subsurface water resources during the construction measures, an extensive observation network was set up. Protection schemes and geotechnical investigations that are necessary for engineering projects often provide "windows of opportunity", bearing the possibility to change perceptions concerning the sustainable development of water resources and coordinate future measures. Theories describing the evolution of karst systems are mainly based on conceptual models. Although these models are based on fundamental and well established physical and chemical principles that allow studying important processes from initial small scale fracture networks to the mature karst, systems for monitoring the evolution of karst phenomena are rare. Integrated process-oriented investigation methods are presented, comprising the combination of multiple data sources (lithostratigraphic information of boreholes, extensive groundwater monitoring, dye tracer tests, geophysics) with high-resolution numerical groundwater modeling and model simulations of karstification below the dam. Subsequently, different scenarios evaluated the future development of the groundwater flow regime, the karstification processes as well as possible remediation measures. The approach presented assists in optimizing investigation methods, including measurement and monitoring technologies with predictive character for similar subsidence problems within karst environments in urban areas.

  18. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model and Parameter Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the research described in this report is the development and application of a methodology for comprehensively assessing the hydrogeologic uncertainties involved in dose assessment, including uncertainties associated with conceptual models, parameters, and scenarios. This report describes and applies a statistical method to quantitatively estimate the combined uncertainty in model predictions arising from conceptual model and parameter uncertainties. The method relies on model averaging to combine the predictions of a set of alternative models. Implementation is driven by the available data. When there is minimal site-specific data the method can be carried out with prior parameter estimates based on generic data and subjective prior model probabilities. For sites with observations of system behavior (and optionally data characterizing model parameters), the method uses model calibration to update the prior parameter estimates and model probabilities based on the correspondence between model predictions and site observations. The set of model alternatives can contain both simplified and complex models, with the requirement that all models be based on the same set of data. The method was applied to the geostatistical modeling of air permeability at a fractured rock site. Seven alternative variogram models of log air permeability were considered to represent data from single-hole pneumatic injection tests in six boreholes at the site. Unbiased maximum likelihood estimates of variogram and drift parameters were obtained for each model. Standard information criteria provided an ambiguous ranking of the models, which would not justify selecting one of them and discarding all others as is commonly done in practice. Instead, some of the models were eliminated based on their negligibly small updated probabilities and the rest were used to project the measured log permeabilities by kriging onto a rock volume containing the six boreholes. These four projections, and associated kriging variances, were averaged using the posterior model probabilities as weights. Finally, cross-validation was conducted by eliminating from consideration all data from one borehole at a time, repeating the above process, and comparing the predictive capability of the model-averaged result with that of each individual model. Using two quantitative measures of comparison, the model-averaged result was superior to any individual geostatistical model of log permeability considered.

  19. Geophysical and hydrogeological investigations of an area of Pesquería, Nuevo León, México

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Garza-Rocha; J. D. Marín-Solís

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogeological and geophysical investigations were carried out with the aim to obtain a model that can us explain the depth groundwater and the direction of groundwater flow. The area is located in the northeastern of México, in a region where the pluvial precipitation is erratic and concentrated. On the basis of the superficial geology we decide to carry out the

  20. ASSESSING THE HYDROGEOLOGIC CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM IN MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN STREAMS USING BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing classification systems that describe natural variation across regions is an important first step for developing indicators. We evaluated a hydrogeologic framework for first order streams in the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain as part of the LIPS-MACS (Landscape Indicators f...

  1. Groundwater Sampling and THOMAS HARTER is UC Cooperative Extension Hydrogeology Specialist, University of

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Hydrogeology Specialist, University of California, Davis, Kearney Agricultural Center. Water quality data are only as good as the water samples from which the measure- ments are made. Even the most precise practices. The short course teaches the basic concepts of watersheds, nonpoint source pollution (NPS), self

  2. Role of hydrogeology in Rocky Mountain 1 underground coal gasification test, Hanna basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, D.J.; Schmit, C.R.; Beaver, F.W.; Evans, J.M. (North Dakota Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute, Grand Forks (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Experience has shown that the designs and implementation of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) operations that are technically sound and environmentally safe require a thorough understanding of the hydrogeology of the UCG site, complemented by an understanding of the potential interactions between the elements of the hydrogeologic system and UCG process. This is significant because UCG is conducted in the saturated zone, consumes large volumes of ground water, and has the potential to adversely affect ground water quality and flow. The textural, mineralogical, chemical, and structural character of the geologic materials constituting the UCG reactor, as well as the occurrence, flow, and quality of fluids moving through that three-dimensional matrix of geologic materials, must be understood. The US Department of Energy and an industry consortium led by the Gas Research Institute recently conducted the Rocky Mountain 1 Test in the Hanna basin of Wyoming. For this test, the hydrogeologic aspects of the site were characterized to an extent unprecedented in UCG testing. This information was then used to develop and evaluate operating strategies intended to prevent or minimize contamination. Such strategies included gasifying at less than hydrostatic pressure to enhance ground water flow toward the gasification modules and to restrict contamination to the module area. Hydrogeologic information also allowed a more complete evaluation of process-setting interactions. For example, a substantial and widespread drop in elevation heat noted for the ground water in the target coal emphasized the importance of an adequate water supply for UCG, particularly in a long-term commercial operation.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIC MAPPING TO DELINEATE PROTECTION ZONES AROUND SPRINGS: REPORT OF TWO CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods commonly used to delineate protection zones for water-supply wells are often not directly applicable for springs. This investigation focuses on the use of hydrogeologic mapping methods to identify physical and hydrologic features that control ground-water flow to springs...

  4. Prime candidate sites for astrobiological exploration through the hydrogeological history of Mars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto G. Fairén; James M. Dohm; Esther R. Uceda; Alexis P. Rodríguez; Victor R. Baker; David Fernández-Remolar; Dirk Schulze-Makuch; Ricardo Amils

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogeological evolution of Mars has been proposed to be dominated by the development of the Tharsis Magmatic Complex through superplume activity, with related magmatic-pulse-driven flood inundations that directly influence the shaping of the northern plains, the evolution of the atmosphere and climate, and subsurface and surface water processes. On the other hand, several possible biological models and terrestrial analogues

  5. Linking Physical and Numerical Modelling in Hydrogeology Using Sand Tank Experiments and Comsol Multiphysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singha, Kamini; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2011-01-01

    Visualising subsurface processes in hydrogeology and building intuition for how these processes are controlled by changes in forcing is hard for many undergraduate students. While numerical modelling is one way to help undergraduate students explore outcomes of multiple scenarios, many codes are not user-friendly with respect to defining domains,…

  6. HYDROGEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOCHEMISTRY OF THE QUATERNARY AQUIFER IN THE MIDDLE NILE DELTA AREA, EGYPT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. El Kashouty; A. A. El Sabbagh

    2005-01-01

    The study aimed to give an insight on the hydro-geological regime, and the hydro- geochemistry of the groundwater aquifer, detection the seawater intrusion limit, and applying irrigation with water of medium salinity. The study reveals that EC, Br, and Mg are contributed mainly by seawater intrusion, whereas F, I, and Ca are attributed to the anthropogenic sources mainly by agricultural

  7. American hydrogeology at the millennium: An annotated chronology of 100 most influential papers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, W.; Herman, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogeology developed as scientists undertook activities to describe how a groundwater system functions to explain why it is that way, in order to solve practical problems of water supply. This paper demonstrates the evolutionary nature and growth of hydrogeology in the United States on the basis of a selection of one hundred papers that had a significant impact on subsequent activities. We have identified three revolutionary concepts that resulted directly from this evolutionary understanding and have selected papers that demonstrate important consequences. These three concepts are 1) that the mathematical expression for heat flow can be paraphrased for groundwater and used in transient flow conditions to determine aquifer characteristics; 2) that the distribution of fluid potential can be formulated in mathematical equations suitable for solution by various analytical techniques; and 3) that chemical thermodynamics can be applied to hydrogeologic systems in order to understand the processes controlling the chemical character of groundwater. One purpose of this paper is to encourage scientists to gain an additional dimension of satisfaction from their work by being aware of the contributions of those who went before them and to see how their own work fits into the current understanding of hydrogeology.

  8. Numerical modeling of the transient hydrogeological response produced by tunnel construction in fractured bedrocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Molinero; Javier Samper; Rubén Juanes

    2002-01-01

    Groundwater inflows into tunnels constructed in fractured bedrocks not only constitute an important factor controlling the rate of advancement in driving the tunnel but may pose potential hazards. Drawdowns caused by tunnel construction may also induce geotechnical and environmental impacts. Here we present a numerical methodology for the dynamic simulation of the hydrogeological transient conditions induced by the tunnel front

  9. HYDROGEOLOGIC CONTROLS ON NITRATE TRANSPORT IN A SMALL AGRICULTURAL CATCHMENT, IOWA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of subsurface lithology on nitrate loss in stream riparian zones are recognized but little attention has been focused on similar processes occurring in upland agricultural settings. In this paper, we evaluated hydrogeologic controls on nitrate transport processes occurring in a small 7.6 ha ...

  10. Inventory and Review of Existing PRISM Hydrogeologic Data for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The USGS entered into an agreement with the Mauritania Ministry of Mines and Industry to inventory and review the quality of information collected as part of the Project for Strengthening of the Institutions in the Mining Sector (PRISM). Whereas the PRISM program collected geophysical, geochemical, geological, satellite, and hydrogeologic information, this report focuses on an inventory and review of available hydrogeologic data provided to the USGS in multiple folders, files, and formats. Most of the information pertained to the hydrogeologic setting and the water budget of evaporation, evapotranspiration, and precipitation in the Choum-Zouerate area in northwestern Mauritania, and the country of Mauritania itself. Other information about the quantity and quality of groundwater was found in the relational Access database. In its present form, the limited hydrogeologic information was not amenable to conducting water balance, geostatistical, and localized numerical modeling studies in support of mineral exploration and development. Suggestions are provided to remedy many of the data's shortcomings, such as performing quality assurance on all SIPPE2 data tables and sending questionnaires to appropriate agencies, mining and other companies to populate the database with additional meteorology, hydrology, and groundwater data.

  11. The impact of damaging hydro-geological events: a methodological approach of historical data interpretation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Petrucci; V. de Matteis; P. Versace

    2003-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out on damaging hydro-geological events occurred in Calabria between 1971 and 1990, using the data of ASICal data-base. Only events characterised by the highest regional impact have been selected. On these events, responsible of widespread damages, a characterisation of triggering rainfall has been carried out. Induced damages have been described through the effects on nine

  12. Reconnaissance of the Hydrogeology of Ta'u, American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of existing data and information collected on a reconnaissance field visit supports a conceptual model of ground-water occurrence in Ta'u, American Samoa, in which a thin freshwater lens exists in a predominantly high-permeability aquifer that receives high rates of recharge. Because the freshwater lens is thin throughout most of the island, the productivity of wells, especially those near the coast where the lens is the thinnest, is likely to be limited by saltwater intrusion. The landfill in northwestern Ta'u is closer to the north coast of the island than to any of the existing or proposed well sites. Although this may indicate that ground water beneath the landfill would flow away from the existing and proposed well sites, this interpretation may change depending on the hydraulic properties of a fault and rift zone in the area. Of four plausible scenarios tested with a numerical ground-water flow model, only one scenario indicated that ground water from beneath the landfill would flow toward the existing and proposed well sites; the analysis does not, however, assess which of the four scenarios is most plausible. The analysis also does not consider the change in flow paths that will result from ground-water withdrawals, dispersion of contaminants during transport by ground water, other plausible hydrogeologic scenarios, transport of contaminants by surface-water flow, or that sources of contamination other than the landfill may exist. Accuracy of the hydrologic interpretations in this study is limited by the relatively sparse data available for Ta'u. Understanding water resources on Ta'u can be advanced by monitoring rainfall, stream-flow, evaporation, ground-water withdrawals, and water quality, and with accurate surveys of measuring point elevations for all wells and careful testing of well-performance. Assessing the potential for contaminants in the landfill to reach existing and proposed well sites can be improved with additional information on the landfill itself (history, construction, contents, water chemistry), surface-water flow directions, spatial distribution of ground-water levels, and the quality of water in nearby wells. Monitoring water levels and chemistry in one or more monitoring wells between the landfill and existing or proposed wells can provide a means to detect movement of contaminants before they reach production wells. Steps that can be implemented in the short term include analyzing water in the landfill and monitoring of water chemistry and water levels in all existing and new production wells. Placing future wells farther inland may mitigate saltwater intrusion problems, but the steep topography of Ta'u limits the feasibility of this approach. Alternative solutions include distributing ground-water withdrawal among several shallow-penetrating, low-yield wells.

  13. Hydrogeological modelling as a tool for understanding rockslides evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; De Caro, Mattia; Frattini, Paolo; Volpi, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Several case studies of large rockslides have been presented in the literature showing dependence of displacement rate on seasonal and annual changes of external factors (e.g. rainfall, snowmelt, temperature oscillations) or on human actions (e.g. impounding of landslide toe by artificial lakes, toe excavation). The study of rockslide triggering can focus on either the initial failure or the successive reactivations driven by either meteo-climatic events or other perturbations (e.g. seismic, anthropic). A correlation between groundwater level oscillations and slope movements has been observed at many different sites and in very different materials and slope settings. This seasonal dynamic behavior generally shows a delay between perturbation (e.g., groundwater recharge and increase in water table level) and system reaction (e.g., increase in displacement rate). For this reason, groundwater modeling offers the means for assessing the oscillation of groundwater level which is a major input in rockslide and deep-seated gravitational slope deformation modelling, and that could explain both the initial failure event as well the successive reactivation or the continuous slow motion. Using a finite element software (FEFLOW, WASY GmbH) we developed 2D saturated/unsaturated and steady-state/transient groundwater flow models for two case studies for which a suitable dataset is available: the Vajont rockslide (from 1960 to October 9th 1963) and the Mt. de La Saxe rockslide (2009-2012, Aosta valley; Italian Western Alps). The transient models were implemented starting from hydraulic head distributions simulated in the previous steady-state models to investigate the groundwater fluctuation within the two chosen times interval (Vajont: 1960-1963 ; La Saxe: 2009-2012). Time series of infiltration resulting from precipitation, temperature, snowmelt data (La Saxe rockslide) and reservoir level (Vajont rockslide) were applied to the models. The assumptions made during the construction of the models, in particular the partition of the slope in different sectors with different hydraulic conductivities, are coherent with the geological, structural, hydrological and hydrogeological field and laboratory data. The sensitivity analysis shows that the hydraulic conductivity of some slope sectors (e.g. morphostructures, compressed or relaxed slope-toe, basal shear band) strongly influence the water table position and evolution. In transient models, the values of specific storage coefficient play a major control on the amplitude of groundwater level fluctuations, deriving from snowmelt or induced reservoir level rise. The calibrated groundwater flow-models are consistent with groundwater levels measured in the proximity of the piezometers aligned along the sections. The two examples can be considered important for a more advanced understanding of the evolution of rockslides and suggest the required set of data and modelling approaches both for seasonal and long term slope stability analyses. The use of the results of such analyses is reported, for both the case studies, in a companion abstract in session 3.7 where elasto-visco-plastic rheologies have been adopted for the shear band materials to replicate the available displacement time-series.

  14. Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Constraining a Hydrogeological Model in a Data Sparse Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Geological and hydrogeological data are often spatially limited in mountainous regions. In these settings, geophysical techniques can be used to constrain hydrogeological models by providing insight into the hydrostratigraphy and the continuity of units in the subsurface. This study we used electrical resistivity tomography coupled with a priori geological data from residential water wells to improve the accuracy and confidence of a hydrogeological model. The study area is situated within the mountainous Cowichan watershed in British Columbia, Canada. Throughout the watershed, unconsolidated deposits of variable thickness overlie bedrock. Based on available water well information, at high elevation, sediment thickness is on the order of a few metres, but within the valley bottom, sediment thickness can be up to 300 m. The unconsolidated deposits are heterogeneous due to a complex depositional environment that was controlled by glacial advances and recessions, most notably during the Fraser Glaciation. Six electrical resistivity transects of various lengths spanning 135 to 830 metres were conducted in an area of the watershed that is particularly data poor. The electrical resistivity transects were strategically placed, first, to make use of available lithology information from existing water wells in order to constrain the geophysical interpretation, and second, to contribute data to areas that lack subsurface lithological records. Electrical resistivity was measured using a AGI SuperSting R1 system, and data were processed using robust inversion software to identify stark geophysical contacts. The technique successfully delineated zones of conductive and resistive units that have been interpreted as aquitards (clay and till formations), aquifers (water bearing sand and gravel lenses), and bedrock based on dielectric contrast. Available surficial geology and bedrock geology maps, coupled with residential well drilling records, further assisted in mapping the continuity of the hydrogeological units at a larger scale, and the results were digitized and integrated to construct a three dimensional hydrogeological model of the watershed.

  15. Digital Surfaces and Thicknesses of Selected Hydrogeologic Units within the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Rheannon M.; Clark, Brian R.; Bolyard, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Digital surfaces of selected Tertiary and younger age hydrogeologic units within the Mississippi embayment aquifer system were created using more than 2,600 geophysical logs for an area that covers approximately 70,000 square miles and encompasses parts of eight states. The digital surfaces were developed to define and display the hydrogeologic framework for the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS). The digital surfaces also provide a foundation of the selected hydrogeologic units for development of a steady-state and transient regional ground-water flow model of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system from the top of the Midway confining unit upwards to land surface. The ground-water flow model is under development as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Ground-Water Resources Program. Using a Geographic Information System, nine digital surfaces of the tops of selected hydrogeologic units were created using the Australian National University Digital Elevation Model method as an interpolation scheme. Thickness maps also were constructed using the Geographic Information System by calculating the difference between the altitude of the interpreted base of an overlying unit and the altitude of the interpreted top of an underlying unit. In general, the highest hydrogeologic unit altitudes are located along the eastern edge of the study area in the outcrop, and the lowest altitudes, in general, are located along the southern edge of the study area along the axis of the embayment. The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer and the lower Claiborne aquifer are the thinnest aquifers of importance in the study area; the thickest aquifer of importance is the middle Claiborne aquifer.

  16. Morphometric analysis with open source software to explore shallow hydrogeological features in Senegal and Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussi, Fabio; Di Leo, Margherita; Bonomi, Tullia; Di Mauro, Biagio; Fava, Francesco; Fumagalli, Letizia; Hamidou Kane, Cheikh; Faye, Gayane; Niang, Magatte; Wade, Souleye; Hamidou, Barry; Colombo, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Water represents a vital resource for everyone on this Planet, but, for some populations, the access to potable water is not given for granted. Recently, the interest in low cost technical solutions to improve access to ground water in developing countries, especially for people located in remote areas, has increased. Manual drilling (techniques to drill boreholes for water using human or animal power) is well known and practiced for centuries in many countries and represents a valid alternative to increase water access. Lately, this practice has raised the attention of national governments and international organizations. This technique is applicable only where hydrogeological conditions are suitable, namely in presence of thick layers of unconsolidated sediments and a shallow water table Aim of this study is exploring the potential of morphometric analysis to improve the methodology to identify areas with suitable hydrogeological conditions for manual drilling, supporting the implementation of water supply programs that can have great impact on living condition of the population. The characteristics of shallow geological layers are strongly dependent from geomorphological processes and are usually reflected in the morphological characteristics of landforms. Under these hypotheses, we have been investigating the geo-statistical correlation between several morphometric variables and a set of hydrogeological variables used in the estimation of suitability for manual drilling: thickness of unconsolidated sediments, texture, hydraulic conductivity of shallow aquifer, depth of water table. The morphology of two study areas with different landscape characteristics in Guinea and Senegal has been investigated coupling the Free and Open Source Software GRASS GIS and R. Several morphometric parameters have been extracted from ASTER GDEM digital elevation model, and have been compared with a set of hydrogeological characteristics obtained from semi-automatic analysis of stratigraphic logs from water boreholes. We observed the relationships between the spatial distribution of hydrogeological features and the morphology, applying multivariate statistical analysis. The ultimate goal of this study is to infer hydrogeological information of shallow aquifers, exploiting morphometric parameters (together with other layers of information from existing thematic maps and remote sensing) and to reconstruct the geometry and the characteristic of shallow porous aquifer. This research is part of a larger project financed by NERC (National Environment Research Council, UK) in the framework of the program UPGRO (Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poors), with the collaboration of different partners from Italy, Senegal and Guinea

  17. Hydrogeological properties of bank storage area in Changwon city, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, S.-Y.; Kim, H.-S.; Cheong, J.-Y.; Ryu, S. M.; Kim, M. J.

    2003-04-01

    Bank filtrated water has been used in developed countries such as United States, France, Germany, Austria, Nederland and so on. In Korea, most of the drinking water is provided from the surface water. However, drinking water acquisition is becoming difficult due to the degradation of surface water quality. In special, the quality of drinking water source is much lower in downstream area than in upstream area. Thus, the use of bank filtrated water is getting attracted by central and local governments in Korea. The bank filtrated water was surveyed in the areas of Yeongsan river, Nakdong river, Geum river and Han river. Up to present, however, the downstream areas of Nakdong river are most suitable places to apply the bank filtration system. This study investigates hydrogeological characteristics of bank-storage area located in Daesan- Myeon, Changwon city, adjacent the downstream of Nakdong river. Changwon city is the capital city of Gyeongsangnam-Do province. Changwon city uses water derived from Nakdong river as municipal water. However, the quantity and quality of the river water are gradually decreased. Thus, Changwon city developed two sites of bank filtration system in Daesan-myeon and Buk-myeon. Pumping rate is 2,000m3/day at present and will be increased to 60,000m3/day in Daesan-myeon site at the end of the first stage of the project. For the study, we conducted pumping tests four times on seven pumping wells (PW1, PW2, PW3, PW4, PW5, PW6, and PW7) and twelve drill holes (BH-2, OW2-OW12) in the area of 370 m x 100 m. Pumping wells PW1 and PW2 were drilled in 1999 by Samjung Engineering Co. and pumping wells PW3, PW4, PW5, PW6 and PW7 were drilled in 2000 by Donga Construction Co. and Daeduk Gongyeong Co. The pumping wells are located at 45-110 meters from Nakdong riverside. The geology of the study area is composed of volcanic rocks (Palryeongsan tuff and Jusasan andesitic rock) and alluvium. Palryeongsan tuff consists of mostly green tuff with partly tuffaceous sandstone, shale, mudstone and sandstone. Thick alluvium is overlain on Palryeongsan tuff (Samjung Engineering Co., 1999; Donga Construction Co. and Daeduk Gongyeong Co., 2000; Kim and Lee, 1964). The alluvium is composed of sand, sandy gravel and weathered zone from the surface (Table 1, Fig. 3). The aquifer is sandy gravel layer (Samjung Engineering Co., 1999). The gravel layer is thicker near the wells of PW1, PW2, PW3, and PW4 (13.5-17.5m), whereas is thinner near the wells of PW5, PW6, and PW7 (6.3-10.5m). The pumping data obtained were analyzed to determine hydraulic parameters (transmissivity and storativity) using various models of pumping test analysis. The appropriate models for the study area were found from several models. The selected model for observation well is Theis model using corrected drawdown and the selected model for pumped well is Papadopulos-Cooper model using corrected drawdown. As a result, alluvial aquifer in the study area behaviors as confined aquifer rather than phreatic aquifer. Thus, infiltration amount from the river to the aquifer in the study area is lower than that from river to phreatic aquifer for the same water level change. And also storativity of the aquifer is represented by elastic storativity rather than specific yield. Transmissivity obtained by the models ranges from 4.54x10-4 to 1.79x10-1 m2/s with arithmetic mean 2.92x10-2 m2/s. Storativity ranges from 2.59x10-4-5.54x10-1 with arithmetic mean 6.36x10-2. Frequency distribution of hydraulic parameters was determined from statistical analyses. The distribution of transmissivity values does not follow normal distribution showing skewness 2.36 and kurtosis 5.085. Aquifer heterogeneity was found by hydraulic parameters and subsurface geology data in the study area. Furthermore, hydraulic parameters obtained at a well that serves as both pumping well and observation well were compared, and the correlation equation was determined to evaluate hydraulic parameters considering aquifer loss. Transmissivity values obtained by the two cases do not show distinct correlati

  18. Hydrogeologic Framework of Bedrock Units and Initial Salinity Distribution for a Simulation of Groundwater Flow for the Lake Michigan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lampe, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is assessing groundwater availability in the Lake Michigan Basin. As part of the assessment, a variable-density groundwater-flow model is being developed to simulate the effects of groundwater use on water availability throughout the basin. The hydrogeologic framework for the Lake Michigan Basin model was developed by grouping the bedrock geology of the study area into hydrogeologic units on the basis of the functioning of each unit as an aquifer or confining layer within the basin. Available data were evaluated based on the areal extent of coverage within the study area, and procedures were established to characterize areas with sparse data coverage. Top and bottom altitudes for each hydrogeologic unit were interpolated in a geographic information system for input to the model and compared with existing maps of subsurface formations. Fourteen bedrock hydrogeologic units, making up 17 bedrock model layers, were defined, and they range in age from the Jurassic Period red beds of central Michigan to the Cambrian Period Mount Simon Sandstone. Information on groundwater salinity in the Lake Michigan Basin was compiled to create an input dataset for the variable-density groundwater-flow simulation. Data presented in this report are referred to as 'salinity data' and are reported in terms of total dissolved solids. Salinity data were not available for each hydrogeologic unit. Available datasets were assigned to a hydrogeologic unit, entered into a spatial database, and data quality was visually evaluated. A geographic information system was used to interpolate salinity distributions for each hydrogeologic unit with available data. Hydrogeologic units with no available data either were set equal to neighboring units or were vertically interpolated by use of values from units above and below.

  19. Hydrogeologic framework of sedimentary deposits in six structural basins, Yakima River basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, M.A.; Vaccaro, J.J.; Watkins, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework was delineated for the ground-water flow system of the sedimentary deposits in six structural basins in the Yakima River Basin, Washington. The six basins delineated, from north to south are: Roslyn, Kittitas, Selah, Yakima, Toppenish, and Benton. Extent and thicknesses of the hydrogeologic units and total basin sediment thickness were mapped for each basin. Interpretations were based on information from about 4,700 well records using geochemical, geophysical, geologist's or driller's logs, and from the surficial geology and previously constructed maps and well interpretations. The sedimentary deposits were thickest in the Kittitas Basin reaching a depth of greater than 2,000 ft, followed by successively thinner sedimentary deposits in the Selah basin with about 1,900 ft, Yakima Basin with about 1,800 ft, Toppenish Basin with about 1,200 ft, Benton basin with about 870 ft and Roslyn Basin with about 700 ft.

  20. Characterizing the hydrogeologic framework of the Death Valley region, Southern Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faunt, Claudia; D'Agnese, Frank; Downey, Joe S.; Turner, A. Keith

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) hydrogeologic modeling of the complex geology of the Death Valley region requires the application of a number of Geoscientific Information System (GSIS) techniques. This study, funded by United States Department of Energy as a part of the Yucca Mountain Project, focuses on an area of approximately 100,000 square kilometers (three degrees of latitude by three degrees of longitude) and extends up to ten kilometers in depth. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. GSIS techniques allow the synthesis of geologic, hydrologic and climatic information gathered from many sources, including satellite imagery and published maps and cross-sections. Construction of a 3-D hydrogeological model is possible with the combined use of software products available from several vendors, including traditional GIS products and sophisticated contouring, interpolation, visualization, and numerical modeling packages.

  1. Hydrogeology and soil gas at J-field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water resources investigations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1993-01-01

    Disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, has contaminated soil, ground water, and surface water. Seven exploratory borings and 38 observation wells were drilled to define the hydrogeologic framework at J-Field and to determine the type, extent, and movement of ground-water contaminants. Water in the surficial aquifer flows laterally from topographically high

  2. Geohydrodynamic properties of hydrogeological units in parts of Niger Delta, southern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Nyakno J.; Emah, Joseph B.; Ekong, Ufot N.

    2015-05-01

    We used geophysical and laboratory techniques to study the geohydraulic properties of the geological units in the Niger Delta of southern Nigeria. Our main objective was to investigate the distribution of the geohydrodynamic parameters and to establish the interrelationships among them in the study area for effective characterisation of hydrogeological units. Measurements on the core samples aided in the estimation of effective porosities. The hydrogeological units' bulk resistivities measured from 1-D resistivity data constrained by nearby boreholes and the formation pore-water resistivities measured in the laboratory were used in computing the hydrogeological unit formation factor resistivity. Integration of field and laboratory measurements in conjunction with regression analysis of the data led to the determination of the hydrodynamic coefficients of the hydrogeological units. The graphs and the contour maps generated from the data show the variations and the interrelationships among the parameters. A theoretical model for the porosity-resistivity formation factor relation which conforms to Dakhnov's formulation, obtained for similar sediment with different grain sizes in another geological province has been developed based on the measured data. A good approximation with error of the mean square of 2.48 and standard deviation of 1.5 was obtained between the experimental aquifer formation factor F and the predicted aquifer formation factor Fm. Generally, the results of our study reveal good correlations with similar studies carried out in literatures at different places. The juxtaposition of contour maps which show variations of geohydraulic parameters in a continuum is worthwhile. The changes in geohydraulic parameters are influenced by size of grains, magnitude of pore sizes and shapes, pore-water and formation conductivities, facies changes and anisotropy of aquifer sediments. Our results have not really shown any interaction between freshwater and saltwater within the potential aquifers despite the proximity of the salt water within the area.

  3. Borehole Completion and Conceptual Hydrogeologic Model for the IFRC Well Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Lanigan, David C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2009-04-20

    A tight cluster of 35 new wells was installed over a former waste site, the South Process Pond (316-1 waste site), in the Hanford Site 300 Area in summer 2008. This report documents the details of the drilling, sampling, and well construction for the new array and presents a summary of the site hydrogeology based on the results of drilling and preliminary geophysical logging.

  4. Ground-water hydrogeology and geochemistry of a reclaimed lignite surface mine 

    E-print Network

    Pollock, Clifford Ralph

    1982-01-01

    ' (HeadWf Department) August 1982 ABSTRACT Ground-Water Hydrogeology and Geochemistry of a Reclaimed Lignite Surface Mine (August 1982) Clifford Ralph Pollock, B. S. , Colorado School of Mines Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Christopher C... in intermediate-depth Calvert Bluff sand aquifers. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank the members of my thesis committee, Dr. Wayne A. Dunlap, Dr, Steven J. Fritz and Dr. Brann Johnson, for their support, helpful suggestions and critical review of my...

  5. Evaluation of hydrogeologic aspects of proposed salinity control in Paradox Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Bedinger, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    The salt load in the Dolores River increases by about 200,000 tons per year where it crosses Paradox Valley, Colorado, because of the discharge of a sodium chloride brine from an underlying aquifer. A ground-water management program to nearly eliminate this major source of salt, which eventually enters the Colorado River, can be designed on the basis of an accurate description of the hydrogeologic framework of Paradox Valley.

  6. Hydrogeological and hydrochemical framework of regional aquifer system in Kali-Ganga sub-basin, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Asad Umar; R. Umar; M. S. Ahmad

    2001-01-01

    The central Ganga Basin is one of the major groundwater reservoirs in India. The Kali-Ganga sub-basin is a micro watershed\\u000a of the central Ganga Basin, containing a number of productive aquifers. A detailed hydrogeological investigation was carried\\u000a out, which reveals the occurrence of a single-tier aquifer system down to 163?m?bgl (metres below ground level), but at places\\u000a it is interleaved

  7. Teaching and learning hydrogeology using a physically-based modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Dessirier, Benoit; Pannetier, Romain

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogeology involves studying the occurrence, distribution, movement and quality of water in geological formations. Hydrogeology typically enters in the curriculum of physical geography as well as civil and environmental engineering courses, is a multidisciplinary subject which encompasses several scientific areas including mathematics, physics, geology, geochemistry and numerical analysis. For applications such as resource management, decision and policy making, and an understanding and interpretation of uncertainty and risk assessment is also necessary. Teaching hydrogeology is not only challenged by its multidisciplinary nature, but also since groundwater occurrence and movement is hidden from view in the subsurface, and is generally inaccessible to direct observation. Field experiments are often costly and time consuming, and laboratory experiments limited in scale. However, suitably designed computational systems can help address such issues by providing numerical modelling investigations of field conditions. This contribution presents results from a recent project dedicated to develop an open-source, interactive, visual numerical modelling tool for teaching/learning hydrogeology, based on current pedagogical understanding of learning in higher education. It provides physically-based groundwater flow solutions within an intuitive user-friendly interface, which does not require advanced technical skills to operate. The aim is to be able to improve student's learning by providing immediate and visual feedback on groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems. The development and implementation of the tool as part of a teaching framework to address subsurface flow concepts and phenomena is presented, discussed and evaluated. By linking theoretical problem-solving exercises with modelling tasks in a learn-by-doing approach, we further discuss how student's learning experiences can be enhanced.

  8. Aquifer sensitivity to pesticide leaching: Testing a soils and hydrogeologic index method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, E.; Keefer, D.A.; Dey, W.S.; Wehrmann, H.A.; Wilson, S.D.; Ray, C.

    2005-01-01

    For years, researchers have sought index and other methods to predict aquifer sensitivity and vulnerability to nonpoint pesticide contamination. In 1995, an index method and map were developed to define aquifer sensitivity to pesticide leaching based on a combination of soil and hydrogeologic factors. The soil factor incorporated three soil properties: hydraulic conductivity, amount of organic matter within individual soil layers, and drainage class. These properties were obtained from a digital soil association map. The hydrogeologic factor was depth to uppermost aquifer material. To test this index method, a shallow ground water monitoring well network was designed, installed, and sampled in Illinois. The monitoring wells had a median depth of 7.6 m and were located adjacent to corn and soybean fields where the only known sources of pesticides were those used in normal agricultural production. From September 1998 through February 2001, 159 monitoring wells were sampled for 14 pesticides but no pesticide metabolites. Samples were collected and analyzed to assess the distribution of pesticide occurrence across three units of aquifer sensitivity. Pesticides were detected in 18% of all samples and nearly uniformly from samples from the three units of aquifer sensitivity. The new index method did not predict pesticide occurrence because occurrence was not dependent on the combined soil and hydrogeologic factors. However, pesticide occurrence was dependent on the tested hydrogeologic factor and was three times higher in areas where the depth to the uppermost aquifer was <6 m than in areas where the depth to the uppermost aquifer was 6 to <15 m. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  9. Hydrogeology and groundwater flow in a basalt-capped Mesozoic sedimentary series of the Ethiopian highlands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ine Vandecasteele; Jan Nyssen; Wim Clymans; Jan Moeyersons; Kristine Martens; Marc Van Camp; Tesfamichael Gebreyohannes; Florimond Desmedt; Jozef Deckers; Kristine Walraevens

    2011-01-01

    A hydrogeological study was undertaken in the Zenako-Argaka catchment, near Hagere Selam in Tigray, northern Ethiopia, during\\u000a the rainy season of 2006. A geological map was produced through geophysical measurements and field observations, and a fracture\\u000a zone identified in the north west of the catchment. A perched water table was found within the Trap Basalt series above the\\u000a laterized upper

  10. Hydrogeological characteristics and groundwater quality assessment in some selected communities of Abeokuta, Southwest Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. Ufoegbune; K. I. Lamidi; J. A. Awomeso; A. O. Eruola; O. A. Idowu

    This study examined the hydro-geological characteristics and groundwater quality of four communities in Abeokuta, South-Western Nigeria. Water samples were collected from 18 sampling points, comprising of shallow wells and boreholes in the four communities, with four geophysical surveys done each community. Tests were carried out in the water samples for heavy metals (zinc, cadmium, arsenic, iron and lead) and physico-chemical

  11. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, T.A.; Hanson, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    All of the hydrogeologic subdivisions within the Edwards aquifer outcrop in Comal County have some porosity and permeability. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided; and hydro- geologic subdivision II, the cyclic and marine members, undivided, of the Person Formation. The two types of porosity in the Edwards aquifer outcrop are fabric selective, which is related to depositional or diagenetic elements and typically exists in specific stratigraphic horizons; and not fabric selective, which can exist in any litho- stratigraphic horizon. Two faults, Comal Springs and Hueco Springs, completely, or almost completely, offset the Edwards aquifer along much of their respective traces across Comal County. Porous and permeable Edwards aquifer limestones are juxtaposed against impermeable upper confining beds along all, or most of their traces across Comal County. These faults could be barriers, or partial barriers, to ground-water flow where the aquifer is offset. In Comal County, the Edwards aquifer is probably most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Possible contamination can result from spills, leakage of hazardous materials, or runoff onto the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristics of the recharge zone.

  12. The hydrogeological role of an aquitard in preventing drinkable water well contamination: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Ponzini, G; Crosta, G; Giudici, M

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater pollution has become a worrisome phenomenon, mainly for aquifers underlying industrialized areas. In order to evaluate the risk of pollution, a model of the aquifer is needed. Herewith, we describe a quasi-tridimensional model, which we applied to a multilayered aquifer where a phreatic aquifer was coupled to a confined one by means of an aquitard. This hydrogeological scheme is often met in practice and, therefore, models a number of situations. Moreover, aquitards play and important role in the management of natural resources of this kind. The model we adopted contains some approximations: the flow within the aquifers is assumed to be horizontal, whereas leakage is assumed vertical. The effect of some wells drilled in these aquifers is also taken into account. In order to evaluate the leakage fluxes that correspond to different exploitation conditions, we numerically solve a system of quasilinear and time-dependent partial differential equations. This model has been calibrated by the hydrogeological data from a water supply station of the Milan Water Works, where water is polluted by some halocarbons. Our simulations account for several experimental facts, both from the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical viewpoints. Maxima of computed downward leakage rates are found to correspond with measured pollutant concentration maxima. Other results show how the aquitard can help in minimizing the contamination of drinkable water. PMID:2620670

  13. Conceptual hydrogeological model of volcanic Easter Island (Chile) after chemical and isotopic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio

    2008-11-01

    Most human activities and hydrogeological information on small young volcanic islands are near the coastal area. There are almost no hydrological data from inland areas, where permanent springs and/or boreholes may be rare or nonexistent. A major concern is the excessive salinity of near-the-coast wells. Obtaining a conceptual hydrogeological model is crucial for groundwater resources development and management. Surveys of water seepages and rain for chemical and environmental isotope contents may provide information on the whole island groundwater flow conditions, in spite of remaining geological and hydrogeological uncertainties. New data from Easter Island (Isla de Pascua), in the Pacific Ocean, are considered. Whether Easter Island has a central low permeability volcanic “core” sustaining an elevated water table remains unknown. Average recharge is estimated at 300-400 mm/year, with a low salinity of 15-50 mg/L Cl. There is an apron of highly permeable volcanics that extends to the coast. The salinity of near-the-coast wells, >1,000 mg/L Cl, is marine in origin. This is the result of a thick mixing zone of island groundwater and encroached seawater, locally enhanced by upconings below pumping wells. This conceptual model explains what is observed, in the absence of inland boreholes and springs.

  14. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  15. Environmental assessment of a uranium experimental rock blasting in Portugal, using geophysical and hydrogeological methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, E. C.; Midões, C.; Lourenço, M. C.; Costa, A.; Monteiro Santos, F. A.

    2012-10-01

    The Nisa uranium deposit, located in Central Portugal, has been known since the late 1960s. Some areas were explored at that time. Today, a few open pits and dumps remain in place and are a concern to local authorities. To assess the geoenvironmental problems caused by the main mining exploration composed of an experimental rock blasting, 3D electrical conductivity and resistivity models were made to develop a hydrogeological model to understand the possibility of contaminants transportation, such as uranium, from the dumps towards a dam located nearby. These 3D models were the support to show alteration layer thickness variations and fault zones at depths controlling groundwater circulation. Spectrometric surveys were also carried out and correlated with geology and geoelectrical structure. All this information was used in the construction of the 3D steady state hydrogeological model of the experimental rock blasting of Nisa. In this model, groundwater flow and the contaminant pathways were simulated. Some areas have very high radioactive values resulting from the geological formation characteristics and old dumps. However, results of the environmental assessment using geophysical and hydrogeological methods point to a critical situation restricted only to the area of the experimental rock blasting of the Nisa uranium deposit and its dumps.

  16. A review of the hydrogeologic-geochemical model for Cerro Prieto

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lippmann, M.J.; Truesdell, A.H.; Halfman-Dooley, S. E.; Mañónm, A.

    1991-01-01

    With continued exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman and co-workers presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. In mid-1987 the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto reached 620 MWc, requiring a large rate of fluid production (more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture; August 1988). This significant mass extraction has led to changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. Pressure drawdown has caused an increase in cold water recharge in the southern and western edges of the field, and local and general reservoir boiling in parts of the geothermal system. After reviewing the hydrogeologic and geochemical models of Cerro Prieto, the exploitation-induced cold water recharge and reservoir boiling (and plugging) observed in different areas of the field, are discussed and interpreted on the basis of these models and schematic flow models that describe the hydrogeology. ?? 1991.

  17. Geologic Setting and Hydrogeologic Units of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, Sue C.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Morgan, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers approximately 44,000 square miles of northeastern Oregon, southeastern Washington, and western Idaho. The area supports a $6 billion per year agricultural industry, leading the Nation in production of apples and nine other commodities (State of Washington Office of Financial Management, 2007; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2007). Groundwater availability in the aquifers of the area is a critical water-resource management issue because the water demand for agriculture, economic development, and ecological needs is high. The primary aquifers of the CPRAS are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying basin-fill sediments. Water-resources issues that have implications for future groundwater availability in the region include (1) widespread water-level declines associated with development of groundwater resources for irrigation and other uses, (2) reduction in base flow to rivers and associated effects on temperature and water quality, and (3) current and anticipated effects of global climate change on recharge, base flow, and ultimately, groundwater availability. As part of a National Groundwater Resources Program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the CPRAS in 2007 with the broad goals of (1) characterizing the hydrologic status of the system, (2) identifying trends in groundwater storage and use, and (3) quantifying groundwater availability. The study approach includes documenting changes in the status of the system, quantifying the hydrologic budget for the system, updating the regional hydrogeologic framework, and developing a groundwater-flow simulation model for the system. The simulation model will be used to evaluate and test the conceptual model of the system and later to evaluate groundwater availability under alternative development and climate scenarios. The objectives of this study were to update the hydrogeologic framework for the CPRAS using the available geologic mapping and well information and to develop a digital, three-dimensional hydrogeologic model that could be used as the basis of a groundwater-flow model. This report describes the principal geologic and hydrogeologic units of the CPRAS and geologic map and well data that were compiled as part of the study. The report also describes simplified regional hydrogeologic sections and unit extent maps that were used to conceptualize the framework prior to development of the digital 3-dimensional framework model.

  18. Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the explosive experimental area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, E.C.; Bell, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic and water-quality data were collected at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site at Dahlgren, Virginia, as part of a hydrogeologic assessment of the shallow aquifer system begun in 1993. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted this study to provide the U.S. Navy with hydrogeologic data to aid in the evaluation of the effects from remediation of contaminated sites and to protect against additional contamination. This report describes the ground-water observation- well network, hydrogeologic, and water-quality data collected between October 1993 and April 1995. The report includes a description of the locations and construction of 28 observation wells on the Explosive Experimental Area. Hydrogeologic data include lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements of selected core intervals. Hydrologic data include synoptic and hourly measurements of ground-water levels, and observation-well slug tests to determine horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Water-quality data include analyses of major dissolved constituents in ground water and surface water.

  19. Hydrogeological characterization on surface-based investigation phase in the Mizunami underground research laboratory project, in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Onoe, Hironori; Takeuchi, Shinji; Takeuchi, Ryuji; Ohyama, Takuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project is being carried out by Japan Atomic Energy Agency in the Cretaceous Toki granite in the Tono area, central Japan. The MIU project is a purpose-built generic underground research laboratory project that is planned for a broad scientific study of the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of nuclear wastes. One of the main goals of the MIU project is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment. The MIU project has three overlapping phases: Surface-based Investigation (Phase I), Construction (Phase II) and Operation (Phase III). Hydrogeological investigations using a stepwise process in Phase I have been carried out in order to obtain information on important properties such as, location of water conducting features, hydraulic conductivity and so on. Hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow simulations in Phase I have been carried out in order to synthesize these investigation results, to evaluate the uncertainty of the hydrogeological model and to identify the main issues for further investigations. Using the stepwise hydrogeological characterization approach and combining the investigation with modeling and simulation, understanding of the hydrogeological environment has been progressively improved. (authors)

  20. Hydrogeologic framework and sampling design for an assessment of agricultural pesticides in ground water in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Bickford, Tammy M.

    1999-01-01

    State agencies responsible for regulating pesticides are required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop state management plans for specific pesticides. A key part of these management plans includes assessing the potential for contamination of ground water by pesticides throughout the state. As an example of how a statewide assessment could be implemented, a plan is presented for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to illustrate how a hydrogeologic framework can be used as a basis for sampling areas within a state with the highest likelihood of having elevated pesticide concentrations in ground water. The framework was created by subdividing the state into 20 areas on the basis of physiography and aquifer type. Each of these 20 hydrogeologic settings is relatively homogeneous with respect to aquifer susceptibility and pesticide use?factors that would be likely to affect pesticide concentrations in ground water. Existing data on atrazine occurrence in ground water was analyzed to determine (1) which areas of the state already have suffi- cient samples collected to make statistical comparisons among hydrogeologic settings, and (2) the effect of factors such as land use and aquifer characteristics on pesticide occurrence. The theoretical vulnerability and the results of the data analysis were used to rank each of the 20 hydrogeologic settings on the basis of vulnerability of ground water to contamination by pesticides. Example sampling plans are presented for nine of the hydrogeologic settings that lack sufficient data to assess vulnerability to contamination. Of the highest priority areas of the state, two out of four have been adequately sampled, one of the three areas of moderate to high priority has been adequately sampled, four of the nine areas of moderate to low priority have been adequately sampled, and none of the three low priority areas have been sampled. Sampling to date has shown that, even in the most vulnerable hydrogeologic settings, pesticide concentrations in ground water rarely exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Standards or Health Advisory Levels. Analyses of samples from 1,159 private water supplies reveal only 3 sites for which samples with concentrations of pesticides exceeded drinking-water standards. In most cases, samples with elevated concentrations could be traced to point sources at pesticide loading or mixing areas. These analyses included data from some of the most vulnerable areas of the state, indicating that it is highly unlikely that pesticide concentrations in water from wells in other areas of the state would exceed the drinking-water standards unless a point source of contamination were present. Analysis of existing data showed that water from wells in areas of the state underlain by carbonate (limestone and dolomite) bedrock, which commonly have a high percentage of corn production, was much more likely to have pesticides detected. Application of pesticides to the land surface generally has not caused concentrations of the five state priority pesticides in ground water to exceed health standards; however, this study has not evaluated the potential human health effects of mixtures of pesticides or pesticide degradation products in drinking water. This study also has not determined whether concentrations in ground water are stable, increasing, or decreasing.

  1. The KINDRA H2020 Project: a knowledge inventory for hydrogeology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitta, Marco; Bodo, Balazs; Caschetto, Mariachiara; Correia, Victor; Cseko, Adrienn; Fernandez, Isabel; Hartai, Eva; Hinsby, Klaus; Madarasz, Tamas; Garcia Padilla, Mercedes; Szucs, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogeology-related research activities cover a wide spectrum of research areas at EU and national levels. This fact is due to the intrinsic nature of the "water" topic, representing a key-aspect of the modern society: water is not only necessary for human, biological and environmental requirements, but it is one basic "engine" of several interconnected research topics, including energy, health, climate, food, security and others as exemplified by the water-food-energy-climate nexus described by e.g. the World Economic Forum. With respect to the water cycle, the management of groundwater brings additional challenges to the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and climate change adaptation (such as integrated transboundary management of groundwater resources). This fact is related to the nature of groundwater, which represents the "hidden" part of the water cycle, difficult to evaluate, communicate and appreciate, although it sustains the health of both humans and ecosystems as well as industrial and agricultural production. In general, groundwater has been considered mainly for its relationships with surface waters, influencing river flow, e-flows, GDE (groundwater-dependent ecosystems), pollutant fate, agricultural practices, water scarcity and others. In this framework, the importance of groundwater inside the WFD has been reinforced by the daughter directive on groundwater. In the last years, particular insights have been developed on surface waters/groundwater interactions and several related research projects have been carried out. Nevertheless, a specific focus on hydrogeology, the science branch studying groundwater, has not looked into until now, despite of its utmost importance as renewable, high-quality, naturally protected (but still vulnerable) resource. At the same time the European knowledge-base that has been acquired on this important topic is widespread into several projects, plans, actions, realized at national and fragmented into wider programs generally related to water, environment or ecology. In order to have a comprehensive understanding on the groundwater theme, it is necessary to create a "snapshot" of our scientific knowledge as of 2015/2016 covering as many European countries as possible. Such comprehensive coverage will result in an accurate assessment of the state of the art in hydrogeology research in various geographical and geo-environmental settings, allowing for direct comparison and the exploitation of synergies. The KINDRA project (Knowledge Inventory for hydrogeology research, Grant Agreement No. 642047, www.kindraproject.eu) seeks to create a critical mass for scientific knowledge exchange of hydrogeology research, to ensure wide applicability of research results, including support of innovation and development, and to reduce unnecessary duplication of efforts. KINDRA is funded by the European Commission's HORIZON2020 Framework Programme. The project started on 1 January 2015 with the overall objective to take stock of our contemporary knowledge of hydrogeology with the help of an inventory of research results, activities, projects and programmes, and then use the inventory to identify critical research challenges and gaps, with a view to avoiding overlaps. This approach takes into account the implementation of the WFD and new innovation areas within integrated water resources management, allowing at EU scale the future correct management and policy development of groundwater.

  2. A discussion of issues related to hydrogeology of deep geologic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, C. F.; Niemi, A.

    2012-04-01

    The state of the deep hydrogeological system, including its hydraulic structures and flow patterns, distribution of permeability and porosity, and distribution of hydraulic head values, is very much an open research field. Much work needs to be done to obtain such data and to understand the current conditions at depth. Deep drilling projects worldwide have often been dominated by studies concerning the geological and geophysical processes, as well as the geochemical composition of the deep underground. Hydrogeological processes, on the other hand, have received relatively less attention. Yet many of the important chemical, thermal and mechanical processes of the deep underground are closely linked and cannot be properly addressed without an adequate understanding of fluid flow and solute migration. Hydrologic condition and its evolution may also play a significant role in long term geologic processes, such as orogenesis. Presently, intended to be part of the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), a deep drilling project is under preparation on the Swedish Caledonides (www.sddp.se/cosc), with the objective to address, among other things, issues related to fluid flow and solute migration. Partly prompted by this project, and partly by the desire to compile the existing knowledge, a workshop was convened in September 2011 in Uppsala, Sweden, to review the state-of-the-art of hydrogeological studies of deep systems, both from the point of view of available observations and data, and from the point of view of modeling and generic conceptual considerations. The discussions and presentations were structured around the following topics: (1) Spatial Extent and Dynamics of the Fluid Flow in the Deep Subsurface; (2) Fluid Flow in Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Processes occurring at depth; and (3) Monitoring and Modeling Methods. The present talk will aim to present the main outcomes and recommendations from this workshop.

  3. Flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: Effects of multiscale heterogeneity of hydrogeologic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2002-07-09

    The heterogeneity of hydrogeologic properties at different scales may have different effects on flow and transport processes in a subsurface system. A model for the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is developed to represent complex heterogeneity at two different scales: (1) layer scale corresponding to geologic layering and (2) local scale. The layer-scale hydrogeologic properties are obtained using inverse modeling, based on the available measurements collected from the Yucca Mountain site. Calibration results show a significant lateral and vertical variability in matrix and fracture properties. Hydrogeologic property distributions in a two-dimensional, vertical cross section of the site are generated by combining the average layer-scale matrix and fracture properties with local-scale perturbations generated using a stochastic simulation method. The unsaturated water flow and conservative (nonsorbing) tracer transport through the cross section are simulated for different sets of matrix and fracture property fields. Comparison of simulation results indicates that the local-scale heterogeneity of matrix and fracture properties has a considerable effect on unsaturated flow processes, leading to fast flow paths in fractures and the matrix. These paths shorten the travel time of a conservative tracer from the source (repository) horizon in the unsaturated zone to the water table for small fractions of total released tracer mass. As a result, the local-scale heterogeneity also has a noticeable effect on global tracer transport processes, characterized by an average breakthrough curve at the water table, especially at the early arrival time of tracer mass. However, the effect is not significant at the later time after 20 percent tracer mass reaches the water table. The simulation results also verify that matrix diffusion plays an important role in overall solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain.

  4. Hydrogeologic facies characterization of an alluvial fan near Fresno, California, using geophysical techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Weissmann, G.S.; Miller, R.D.; Placzek, Gary

    1997-01-01

    DBCP (1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane) contamination in the sole source aquifer near Fresno, California, has significantly affected drinking-water supplies. Borehole and surface geophysical data were integrated with borehole textural data to characterize the Kings River alluvial fan sediments and to provide a framework for computer modeling of pesticide transport in ground water. Primary hydrogeologic facies units, such as gravel, coarse sand or gravel, fine sand, and silt and clay, were identified in cores collected from three borings located on a 4.6-kilometer transect of multilevel monitoring wells. Borehole geophysical logs collected from seven wells and surface geophysical surveys were used to extrapolate hydrogeologic facies to depths of about 82meters and to correlate the facies units with neighboring drilling sites. Thickness ranged from 0.3to 13 meters for sand and gravel units, and from 0.3 to 17 meters for silt and clay. The lateral extent of distinct silt and clay layers was mapped using shallow seismic reflection and ground-penetrating radar techniques. About 3.6 kilometers of seismic reflection data were collected; at least three distinct fine-grained layers were mapped. The depth of investigation of the seismic survey ranged from 34 to 107 meters below land surface, and vertical resolution was about 3.5 meters. The ground-penetrating radar survey covered 3.6kilometers and imaged a 1.5-meters thick, continuous fine-grained layer located at a depth of about 8 meters. Integrated results from the borehole sediment descriptions and geophysical surveys provided a detailed characterization over a larger areal extent than traditional hydrogeologic methods alone.

  5. Hydrogeology of closed basins and deserts of South America, ERTS-1 interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoertz, G. E.; Carter, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    Images from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) contain data useful in studies of hydrogeology, geomorphology, and paleoclimatology. Sixteen Return Beam Vidicon (RBV) images and 15 Multi-Spectral Scanner (MSS) images were studied. These covered deserts and semidesert areas in southwestern Bolivia, northwestern Argentina, northern Chile, and southeastern Peru from July 30 to November 17, 1972. During the first 3 months after launching, high-quality cloud-free imagery was obtained over approximately 90 percent of the region of interior drainage, or an area of 170,000 square miles.

  6. Hydrogeology of an ancient arid closed basin: implications for tabular sandstone-hosted uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogeologic modeling shows that tabular-type uranium deposits in the Grants uranium region of the San Juan basin, New Mexico, formed in zones of ascending and discharging regional ground-water flow. The association of either lacustrine mudstone or actively subsiding structures and uranium deposits can best be explained by the occurrence of lakes at topographic depressions where ground water having different sources and compositions is likely to converge, mix, and discharge. Ascending and discharging flow also explains the association of uranium deposits with underlying evaporites and suggests a brine interface. The simulations contradict previous suggestions that ground water moved downward in the mudflat. -Author

  7. Substantiation of hydrogeological models of groundwater reservoirs of multiple aquifier systems under complex hydrodynamic and hydrochemical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Borevskii, B.V.; Nechaev, Yu.V.; Palkin, S.V.; Plugina, T.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors maintain that as a result of investigations performed during groundwater exploration, all necessary information for substantiating the hydrogeological model of the reservoir should be obtained, and that the most diverse complex of works should be carried out on reservoirs confined to multiple aquifer systems under conditions of an intercommunication of ground- and surface waters in a complex hydrochemical setting. The methods and results of substantiating a model of the Shadrinsk groundwater reservoir confined to a typical multiple aquifer system and characterized simultaneously by quite complex hydrochemical conditions are examined in this paper. The hydrogeochemical conditions are characterized by complex horizontal and vertical hydrochemical zonation. A preliminary assessment of the conditions of interaction of the aquifers was made from the hydrochemical and isotope data. It is shown that the complex of hydrogeological investigations made it possible to obtain the necessary data for making hydrochemical and hydrodynamic forecasts on the basis of a substantiated and sufficiently reliable hydrogeological model.

  8. MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model -- Three additions to the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package: Alternative storage for the uppermost active cells, Flows in hydrogeologic units, and the Hydraulic-coductivity depth-dependence (KDEP) capability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary C.

    2003-01-01

    The Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package is an internal flow package for MODFLOW-2000 that allows the vertical geometry of the system hydrogeology to be defined differently than the definition of model layers. Effective hydraulic properties for the model layers are calculated using the hydraulic properties of the hydrogeologic units. The HUF Package can be used instead of the Block-Centered Flow (BCF) or the Layer Property Flow (LPF) Packages. This report documents three additions to the HUF Package.

  9. Hydrogeology and soil gas at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, W.B.

    1993-01-01

    Disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, has contaminated soil, groundwater and surface water. Seven exploratory borings and 38 observation wells were drilled to define the hydrogeologic framework at J-Field and to determine the type, extent, and movement of contaminants. The geologic units beneath J-Field consist of Coastal Plain sediments of the Cretaceous Patapsco Formation and Pleistocene Talbot Formation. The Patapsco Formation contains several laterally discontinuous aquifers and confining units. The Pleistocene deposits were divided into 3 hydrogeologic units--a surficial aquifer, a confining unit, and a confined aquifer. Water in the surficial aquifer flows laterally from topographically high areas to discharge areas in marshes and streams, and vertically to the underlying confined aquifer. In offshore areas, water flows from the deeper confined aquifers upward toward discharge areas in the Gunpowder River and Chesapeake Bay. Analyses of soil-gas samples showed high relative-flux values of chlorinated solvents, phthalates, and hydrocarbons at the toxic-materials disposal area, white-phosphorus disposal area, and riot-control-agent disposal area. The highest flux values were located downgradient of the toxic materials and white phosphorus disposal areas, indicating that groundwater contaminants are moving from source areas beneath the disposal pits toward discharge points in the marshes and estuaries. Elevated relative-flux values were measured upgradient and downgradient of the riot-control agent disposal area, and possibly result from soil and (or) groundwater contamination.

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for application to PAH contaminated areas and hydrogeological research

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzick, R.; Haaszio, S.; Niessner, R. [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany). Institute for Hydrochemistry

    1995-12-31

    A mobile fiber-optical sensor system for the on-line and in situ detection of aquatic fluorophores has been developed. By the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy the determination of contaminants i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or fluorescence tracers in various environments is possible. In both cases attempts to detect these substances in water by means of fluorescence spectroscopy are complicated by the low concentrations and the overlapping and featureless fluorescence spectroscopy are complicated by the low concentrations and the overlapping and featureless fluorescence spectra in combination with background fluorescence caused by further compounds e.g. humic material. By collecting the fluorescence decay time as an additional independent dimension, the analytical information is significantly increased, and to certain extent the determination of the desired analyte in complex natural matrices is possible. At a first application, the detection of pyrene (PYR) in real samples from a contaminated former coking plant site has been realized. The system is also best suitable for hydrogeological research. Here applications spread from the investigation of the fluorescence tracer migration in an artificial aquifer system to the determination of hydrogeological parameters at a domestic waste disposal.

  11. Strategic groundwater resources in the Tagliamento River basin (northern Italy): hydrogeological investigation integrated with geophysical exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapti-Caputo, Dimitra; Bratus, Antonio; Santarato, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    The western sector of the Tagliamento River basin (Friuli Venezia-Giulia Region; northern Italy) is characterized by important water resources, both superficial and underground. In particular, in the Quaternary deposits of the plain, up to a depth of 500 m, six artesian aquifer systems exist. A large amount of lithological, geomorphological, and hydrogeological data is presented, allowing for definition of (a) the principal aquifer system of the area to a depth of about 500 m; (b) geometrical characteristics of the aquifers (thickness, lateral extension, etc); (c) the hydraulic parameters (hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity); (d) chemico-physical characteristics of the water; and (e) vulnerability to pollution of the aquifer systems. In a test area, where many boreholes were drilled for fresh water supply, the conceptual hydrogeological model was integrated by a detailed and repeated three-dimensional (3D) resistivity survey using combined electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings. ERT investigation was mainly used to get detailed information about geometry and porosity of the overburden and to calibrate the shallowest TDEM information.

  12. Environmental and hydrogeological problems in karstic terrains crossed by tunnels: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisbert, J.; Vallejos, A.; González, A.; Pulido-Bosch, A.

    2009-07-01

    The construction of one of the high-speed railway tunnels between Malaga and Córdoba (South Spain) beneath the Abdalajís mountains occasioned a series of hydrogeological problems with geotechnical and environmental impacts. The double tunnel, 7,300 m in length, runs south to north across several lines of small, calcareous mountains that have a highly complex structure. Beneath the Jurassic limestones lie Triassic clays and evaporites. Overlying the limestones is an essentially marly and limestone-marl Cretaceous series, which culminates with Miocene marls containing some organic matter. These mountains have generated springs that are used for urban water supply and irrigation, as well as drinking fountains in the surrounding villages. The initial water level in the aquifer series varied from 400 to 650 m above sea level. After drilling approximately 2,900 m, and intercepting a fracture zone within the carbonate rocks, a sudden water eruption occurred that reached a peak flow of 800 L/s. After a short while, spring discharges dried up, leading to a public protest. In this paper, we describe the geological and hydrogeological settings, the development of the aquifer as the drilling operation proceeded, the measures adopted and the responses subsequent to completion of the tunnel, including the effect of rainfall on the recovery of water levels. Lastly, a generalized estimate is made of how the system functions, and a forecast is made for recovery of its equilibrium.

  13. Hydrogeological research on intensively exploited deep aquifers in the `Loma de Úbeda' area (Jaén, southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Ramón, Antonio; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Javier; Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Gollonet, Javier

    2013-06-01

    The intensive use of groundwater for irrigation in the area of Úbeda (`Loma de Úbeda', Jaén, southern Spain) has transformed an area of traditionally rain-fed dry farmland into fields with some of the highest olive oil productivity in the world. Early hydrogeological research studies, initiated just after the beginning of the groundwater exploitation, revealed that the water was collected from three different overlapping aquifers occupying an area of over 1,100 km2, with the lower aquifers located at depths from 300 to over 700 m in an area of 440 km2. Multidisciplinary research, based on geological characterization, and piezometric, hydrochemical and isotopic data, has led to a conceptual model of functioning in this complex hydrogeological system. The proposed model allows for the identification of the recharge areas, and the discharge, which is at present mainly associated with the groundwater pumping. Areas of mixing of waters from the different aquifers and the main hydrogeochemical processes affecting groundwater quality are described.

  14. Tritium/3He measurements in young groundwater: Progress in applications to complex hydrogeological systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlosser, P.; Shapiro, S.D.; Stute, M.; Plummer, N.

    2000-01-01

    Tritium/3He dating has been applied to many problems in groundwater hydrology including, for example, determination of circulation patterns, mean residence times, recharge rates, or bank infiltration. Here, we discuss recent progress in the application of the tritium/3He dating method to sites with complex hydrogeological settings. Specifically, we report on tritium/3He dating at sites with (a) river infiltration into the basaltic fractured rock aquifer of the Eastern Snake River Plain, and (b) river infiltration through sinkholes into the karstic limestone Upper Floridian aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia.Tritium/3He dating has been applied to many problems in groundwater hydrology including, for example, determination of circulation patterns, mean residence times, recharge rates, or bank infiltration. Here, we discuss recent progress in the application of the tritium/3He dating method to sites with complex hydrogeological settings. Specifically, we report on tritium/3He dating at sites with (a) river infiltration into the basaltic fractured rock aquifer of the Eastern Snake River Plain, and (b) river infiltration through sinkholes into the karstic limestone Upper Floridian aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia.

  15. Characterisation of the hydrogeology of the Augustus River catchment, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Shane M.; Clement, T. Prabhakar; Otto, Claus J.

    Understanding the hydrogeology of weathered rock catchments is integral for the management of various problems related to increased salinity within the many towns of Western Australia. This paper presents the results of site characterisation investigations aimed at improving the overall understanding of the hydrogeology of the southern portion of the Augustus River catchment, an example of a weathered rock catchment. Site data have highlighted the presence of both porous media aquifers within the weathered profile and fractured rock aquifers within the basement rocks. Geophysical airborne surveys and other drilling data have identified a large number of dolerite dykes which crosscut the site. Fractured quartz veins have been found along the margins of these dolerite dykes. Detailed groundwater-level measurements and barometric efficiency estimates indicate that these dolerite dykes and fractured quartz veins are affecting groundwater flow directions, promoting a strong hydraulic connection between all aquifers, and also influencing recharge mechanisms. The hydrogeological significance of the dolerite dykes and fractured quartz veins has been assessed using a combination of high-frequency groundwater-level measurements (30-min sampling interval), rainfall measurements (5-min sampling interval) and barometric pressure fluctuations (30-min sampling interval). A conceptual model was developed for describing various hydrogeological features of the study area. The model indicates that fractured quartz veins along the margins of dolerite dykes are an important component of the hydrogeology of the weathered rock catchments. Comprendre l'hydrogéologie des bassins en roches altérées est essentiel pour la gestion de différents problèmes liés à l'augmentation de la salinité dans de nombreuses villes d'Australie occidentale. Cet article présente les résultats d'études de caractérisation de sites conduites pour améliorer la compréhension de l'hydrogéologie de la partie sud du bassin de la rivière Augustus, exemple de bassin en roches altérées. Les données concernant le site ont mis en évidence la présence simultanée d'aquifères poreux dans le profil d'altération et d'aquifères de roches fracturées dans le socle. Des campagnes de géophysique aéroportée et d'autres données de forages ont identifié de très nombreux dykes de dolérite traversant le site. Des veines de quartz fracturées ont été trouvées aux marges de ces dykes de dolérite. Des mesures détaillées de niveau des nappes et des estimations des effets barométriques indiquent que ces dykes de dolérite et les veines de quartz fracturées affectent les directions d'écoulement souterrain, favorisant une forte connexion hydraulique entre tous ces aquifères, et influençant également les mécanismes de recharge. La signification hydrogéologique des dykes de dolérite et des veines de quartz fracturées a été analysée en combinant des mesures à haute fréquence du niveau des nappes (toutes les 30 min), de la pluie (toutes les 5 min) et des variations de la pression barométrique (toutes les 30 min). Un modèle conceptuel a été établi pour décrire les différents phénomènes hydrogéologiques de la région étudiée. Ce modèle indique que les veines de quartz aux marges des dykes de dolérite sont une importante composante de l'hydrogéologie des bassins en roches altérées. Entender la hidrogeología de cuencas con rocas meteorizadas es esencial para gestionar diversos problemas relacionados con el incremento de salinidad en muchas ciudades de Australia Occidental. Este artículo presenta los resultados obtenidos en la caracterización de varios emplazamientos con el fin de mejorar el conocimiento general de la hidrogeología en la zona sur de la cuenca del Río Augustus, que sirve como ejemplo de cuenca en rocas meteorizadas. Los datos de campo resaltan la presencia tanto de medios acuíferos porosos dentro del perfil meteorizado como de acuíferos en rocas fracturadas dentro de la roca fresca. Los registros geofísicos aéreos y

  16. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget of the Kitsap Peninsula, west-central Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Wendy B.; Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater-flow system on the Kitsap Peninsula, and includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework, groundwater recharge and discharge, groundwater levels and flow directions, seasonal groundwater-level fluctuations, interactions between aquifers and the surface?water system, and a water budget. The Kitsap Peninsula is in the Puget Sound lowland of west-central Washington, is bounded by Puget Sound on the east and by Hood Canal on the west, and covers an area of about 575 square miles. The peninsula encompasses all of Kitsap County, the part of Mason County north of Hood Canal, and part of Pierce County west of Puget Sound. The peninsula is surrounded by saltwater and the hydrologic setting is similar to that of an island. The study area is underlain by a thick sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and volcanic bedrock units that crop out in the central part of the study area. Geologic units were grouped into 12 hydrogeologic units consisting of aquifers, confining units, and an underlying bedrock unit. A surficial hydrogeologic unit map was developed and used with well information from 2,116 drillers’ logs to construct 6 hydrogeologic sections and unit extent and thickness maps. Unconsolidated aquifers typically consist of moderately to well-sorted alluvial and glacial outwash deposits of sand, gravel, and cobbles, with minor lenses of silt and clay. These units often are discontinuous or isolated bodies and are of highly variable thickness. Unconfined conditions occur in areas where aquifer units are at land surface; however, much of the study area is mantled by glacial till, and confined aquifer conditions are common. Groundwater in the unconsolidated aquifers generally flows radially off the peninsula in the direction of Puget Sound and Hood Canal. These generalized flow patterns likely are complicated by the presence of low-permeability confining units that separate discontinuous bodies of aquifer material and act as local groundwater-flow barriers. Groundwater-level fluctuations observed during the monitoring period (2011–12) in wells completed in unconsolidated hydrogeologic units indicated seasonal variations ranging from 1 to about 20 feet. The largest fluctuation of 33 feet occurred in a well that was completed in the bedrock unit. Streamgage discharge measurements made during 2012 indicate that groundwater discharge to creeks in the area ranged from about 0.41 to 33.3 cubic feet per second. During 2012, which was an above-average year of precipitation, the groundwater system received an average of about 664,610 acre-feet of recharge from precipitation and 22,122 acre-feet of recharge from return flows. Most of this annual recharge (66 percent) discharged to streams, and only about 4 percent was withdrawn from wells. The remaining groundwater recharge (30 percent) left the groundwater system as discharge to Hood Canal and Puget Sound.

  17. Hydrogeological analysis of factors that influence pitcher plant bog viability at the Joseph Pine Preserve,Sussex, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Darby, Dennis

    Hydrogeological analysis of factors that influence pitcher plant bog viability at the Joseph Pine hydrological regime that support rare pitcher plant bog habitats. STRATIGRAPHY Nutrient-poor saturated bogs. Bogs supporting yellow pitcher plants historically occurred in eight counties in Virginia but surveys

  18. Substantiation of hydrogeological models of groundwater reservoirs of multiple aquifier systems under complex hydrodynamic and hydrochemical conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. V. Borevskii; Yu. V. Nechaev; S. V. Palkin; T. A. Plugina

    1986-01-01

    The authors maintain that as a result of investigations performed during groundwater exploration, all necessary information for substantiating the hydrogeological model of the reservoir should be obtained, and that the most diverse complex of works should be carried out on reservoirs confined to multiple aquifer systems under conditions of an intercommunication of ground- and surface waters in a complex hydrochemical

  19. conference on limestone hydrogeology, 2011, Besanon, France 91 Infiltration processes in karst using an event-based conceptual

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    9th conference on limestone hydrogeology, 2011, Besançon, France 91 Infiltration processes in karst The aim of this study is to characterize karst infiltration processes during flood events using a rainfall on a classical karst devoted model with three connected reservoirs: SOIL (and epikarst) that feeds the aquifer

  20. The role of meteorological and climatic conditions in the occurrence of damaging hydrogeologic events in Southern Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Petrucci; M. Polemio

    2009-01-01

    Damaging Hydro-geologic Events (DHEs), defined as landslides and floods caused by heavy or prolonged rainfall, represent an important source of economic damages. We propose an approach to classify DHEs, considering 1) meteorological antecedent conditions, 2) the season during which the event occurs, 3) the return period of maximum daily rainfall triggering the event, 4) geographic sectors hit, 5) types of

  1. Identification of Groundwater Contamination Causes Around Subway Tunnels at a Coastal Area in Korea, Using Hydrogeological and Geostatistical Analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Kim; T. Kim; S. Chung; S. Yang

    2009-01-01

    The cause for the deterioration of groundwater quality was identified by hydrogeological investigations and geostatisitical analyses at a coastal area in Busan, Korea. The city has many tunnels for three subway lines, for communication cables and for electrical cables under the ground. The groundwater levels of 135 wells were measured during the dry and wet seasons. The average groundwater level

  2. Geochemical, multi-isotopic and hydrogeological characterization of the mineralized groundwater body of the Entre-deux-Mers area, Gironde

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    body of the Entre-deux-Mers area, Gironde (South-West of France). Malcuit E.a,b , Négrel Ph.a , Petelet on the Entre-deux-Mers region, between the Garonne and the Dordogne rivers, where the groundwaters show strong-isotopic and hydrogeological characterization of this mineralized groundwater sector of the Entre-deux- Mers area. The main

  3. Characterizing aquifer hydrogeology and anthropogenic chemical influences on groundwater near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fromm

    1995-01-01

    A conceptual model of the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of monitoring well USGS-44, downgradient of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), was developed by synthesis and comparison of previous work (40 years) and new investigations into local natural hydrogeological conditions and anthropogenic influences. Quantitative tests of the model, and

  4. Geologic and Hydrogeologic Information for a Geodatabase for the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2007-01-01

    During July-October 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), developed geologic and hydrogeologic information for a geodatabase for use in development of a Groundwater Availability Model (GAM) of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer along the Brazos River from Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The report provides geologic and hydrogeologic information for a study area that encompasses the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, a 1/2-mile-wide lateral buffer surrounding the aquifer, and the rocks immediately underlying the aquifer. The geodatabase involves use of a thematic approach to create layers of feature data using a geographic information system. Feature classes represent the various types of data that are keyed to spatial location and related to one another within the geodatabase. The 1/2-mile-wide buffer surrounding the aquifer was applied to include data from wells constructed primarily in alluvium but outside the boundary of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer. A 1/2- by 1/2-mile grid was generated on the study area to facilitate uniform distribution of data for eventual input into the GAM. Data were compiled primarily from drillers and borehole geophysical logs from government agencies and universities, hydrogeologic sections and maps from published reports, and agency files. The geodatabase contains 450 points with geologic data and 280 points with hydrogeologic data.

  5. Hydrogeology of a coal-seam gas exploration area, southeastern British Columbia, Canada: Part 2. Modeling potential hydrogeological impacts associated with depressurizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S.; Molson, J.; Abercrombie, H.; Barker, J.

    2000-12-01

    A three-dimensional, finite-element flow model was used to assess the hydrogeological effects of depressurizing coalbeds lying in the Weary Creek exploration block, Elk River valley, southeastern British Columbia, Canada. The simulation results permit, at an early stage, assessment of the environmental and economic implications of how the flow system may respond to depressurization. Estimated reservoir conditions for the coal-seam gas targets lying within the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Mist Mountain Formation indicate that the coalbeds must be depressurized by up to 350 m to attain the critical gas desorption pressure. The simulations suggest that depressurizing has little effect on groundwater flux to the Elk River. Simulated water production for three depressurizing wells operating under steady-state, single-phase flow for initial reservoir conditions of 13 and 16.5 cm3/g is 645 m3/d (4,057 barrels/d) and 355 m3/d (2,233 barrels/d), respectively. Groundwaters collected from monitoring wells have relatively low salinity, ranging from about 250-1,300 mg/L. The groundwater is supersaturated with respect to Ca-Mg-Fe carbonates (calcite, dolomite, and siderite) and Al-bearing silicates, including kaolinite and illite. Dissolved trace-metal concentrations are low; only Fe, Cd, Cr, and Zn exceed Canadian water-quality guidelines for aquatic life. Groundwaters were devoid of the more soluble monocyclic aromatic organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and polycyclic aromatic compounds, including naphthalene.

  6. Hydrogeologic framework and groundwater/surface-water interactions of the Chehalis River basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.

    2011-01-01

    The Chehalis River has the largest drainage basin of any river entirely contained within the State of Washington with a watershed of approximately 2,700 mi2 and has correspondingly diverse geology and land use. Demands for water resources have prompted the local citizens and governments of the Chehalis River basin to coordinate with Federal, State and Tribal agencies through the Chehalis Basin Partnership to develop a long-term watershed management plan. The recognition of the interdependence of groundwater and surface-water resources of the Chehalis River basin became the impetus for this study, the purpose of which is to describe the hydrogeologic framework and groundwater/surface-water interactions of the Chehalis River basin. Surficial geologic maps and 372 drillers' lithostratigraphic logs were used to generalize the basin-wide hydrogeologic framework. Five hydrogeologic units that include aquifers within unconsolidated glacial and alluvial sediments separated by discontinuous confining units were identified. These five units are bounded by a low permeability unit comprised of Tertiary bedrock. A water table map, and generalized groundwater-flow directions in the surficial aquifers, were delineated from water levels measured in wells between July and September 2009. Groundwater generally follows landsurface-topography from the uplands to the alluvial valley of the Chehalis River. Groundwater gradients are highest in tributary valleys such as the Newaukum River valley (approximately 23 cubic feet per mile), relatively flat in the central Chehalis River valley (approximately 6 cubic feet per mile), and become tidally influenced near the outlet of the Chehalis River to Grays Harbor. The dynamic interaction between groundwater and surface-water was observed through the synoptic streamflow measurements, termed a seepage run, made during August 2010, and monitoring of water levels in wells during the 2010 Water Year. The seepage run revealed an overall gain of 56.8 ± 23.7 cubic feet per second over 32.8 river miles (1.7 cubic feet per second per mile), and alternating gains and losses of streamflow ranging from -48.3 to 30.9 cubic feet per second per mile, which became more pronounced on the Chehalis River downstream of Grand Mound. However, most gains and losses were within measurement error. Groundwater levels measured in wells in unconsolidated sediments fluctuated with changes in stream stage, often within several hours. These fluctuations were set by precipitation events in the upper Chehalis River basin and tides of the Pacific Ocean in the lower Chehalis River basin.±

  7. Overview of the Hydrogeologic Systems of the Former Homestake Mine, Lead, SD (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggenthen, B.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrogeology of the former Homestake Gold Mine is an important consideration, both from a scientific as well as an operational standpoint, because the facility is being converted into an operating underground research laboratory. The long history of mining provided much information about the sources and amounts of the water, as did studies performed during mine closure and subsequent evaluations for the construction of the laboratory. Over 600 km of drifts and shafts were excavated during the 135 year life of the facility, but the water inflow averages only ~44 l/s. All of this water must be either captured at high levels in the facility or pumped from the deeper sumps. Hydrogeologic systems operate on several scales in the Homestake underground. The Precambrian phyllites, schists, quartzites, and amphibolites of the subsurface have nearly no matrix permeability. Water flow is confined to fractures, most of which are quite small, but larger fractures and shear zones have been encountered at depth that produced significant amounts of water. In general, fractures tend to be vertical with few horizontal connections in the areas studied during more recent times. Much of the water inflow in the upper part of the facility originates from surface waters that are introduced into the underground through runoff into an adjacent and overlying open pit. At the 4850 Level, which is the location of the current laboratory (depth of 1.5 km), water chemistry suggests that most of the water is part of a ground water system and impact from surface waters is less. Although deeper portions of the facility are not currently accessible, previous reports indicated that water chemistry in these areas was substantially different from that found at the 4850 Level or from the surface waters. Within the flooded portion of the underground it appears that a circulation system was established involving the mine waters themselves and resulted from geothermal heating in the deeper parts of the workings (up to 2.4 km depth). During the time when the underground workings were filled with water prior to the development of the current laboratory, a logging and sampling program was conducted via the #6 Winze that allowed access to the deeper, flooded areas. This study suggested that the water in the #6 Winze was downcast (moving downward) implying that the water in the underground was being heated and moving upwards by convection through other winzes and passages. Therefore, the water in the underground at Homestake has multiple sources, movement directions, and geochemical/hydrogeologic systems.

  8. The hydrological and the hydrogeological framework of the Lottenbachtal, Bochum, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamed, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the hydrological and the hydrogeological framework of the Lottenbachtal, Germany. Long-term climatic data were statistically analyzed, water and soil samples were collected and analyzed, stream flow discharge was measured and separated, the hydrological balance of this catchment was calculated and a hydrological and hydrogeological conceptual model was constructed. The study area is characterized mainly by the precipitation value ranged between 0.1 and 5 mm/day. The actual evapotranspiration constitutes 31.90 % of the total precipitation, the direct surface runoff constitutes 61.04 %, the soil storage constitutes 3 % and the groundwater recharge of the Lottenbachtal constitutes only 4 % of the total precipitation. The Lottenbachtal has largely affected the diversity of the land use, which includes forests, arable areas, abandoned coal mines and settlement areas. The soil of the forested area is represented by relatively high acidic conditions and relatively high sulfate concentrations, while the soil of the arable areas is represented by near-neutral conditions associated with relatively high concentrations of nutrients and other chemical elements (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, nitrate). The settlement areas are characterized by huge blocks of concrete and backfills, which are rich in calcium and magnesium carbonates. The effects of this diversity in the land use on groundwater and surface water quality resulting by leaching the chemical elements from the soil covers and the other materials. These effects are represented by the following complex water types of Ca-Na-Mg-Cl-SO4-HCO3, Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4, Ca-Na-Mg-Cl-SO4, Ca-Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 and Ca-HCO3, which represent the diversity of the flow paths of the water as well as to mixing processes. The diversity of the land use also affected the physical hydrological-hydrogeological characteristics of the study area by increasing the direct surface runoff and decreasing the groundwater recharge. The impervious surfaces of the settlement areas and the low hydraulic conductivities of the soil covers are responsible for these conditions.

  9. Numerical Groundwater-Flow Model of the Minnelusa and Madison Hydrogeologic Units in the Rapid City Area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, Larry D.; Long, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    The city of Rapid City and other water users in the Rapid City area obtain water supplies from the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers, which are contained in the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units. A numerical groundwater-flow model of the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units in the Rapid City area was developed to synthesize estimates of water-budget components and hydraulic properties, and to provide a tool to analyze the effect of additional stress on water-level altitudes within the aquifers and on discharge to springs. This report, prepared in cooperation with the city of Rapid City, documents a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units for the 1,000-square-mile study area that includes Rapid City and the surrounding area. Water-table conditions generally exist in outcrop areas of the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units, which form generally concentric rings that surround the Precambrian core of the uplifted Black Hills. Confined conditions exist east of the water-table areas in the study area. The Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit is 375 to 800 feet (ft) thick in the study area with the more permeable upper part containing predominantly sandstone and the less permeable lower part containing more shale and limestone than the upper part. Shale units in the lower part generally impede flow between the Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit and the underlying Madison hydrogeologic unit; however, fracturing and weathering may result in hydraulic connections in some areas. The Madison hydrogeologic unit is composed of limestone and dolomite that is about 250 to 610 ft thick in the study area, and the upper part contains substantial secondary permeability from solution openings and fractures. Recharge to the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units is from streamflow loss where streams cross the outcrop and from infiltration of precipitation on the outcrops (areal recharge). MODFLOW-2000, a finite-difference groundwater-flow model, was used to simulate flow in the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units with five layers. Layer 1 represented the fractured sandstone layers in the upper 250 ft of the Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit, and layer 2 represented the lower part of the Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit. Layer 3 represented the upper 150 ft of the Madison hydrogeologic unit, and layer 4 represented the less permeable lower part. Layer 5 represented an approximation of the underlying Deadwood aquifer to simulate upward flow to the Madison hydrogeologic unit. The finite-difference grid, oriented 23 degrees counterclockwise, included 221 rows and 169 columns with a square cell size of 492.1 ft in the detailed study area that surrounded Rapid City. The northern and southern boundaries for layers 1-4 were represented as no-flow boundaries, and the boundary on the east was represented with head-dependent flow cells. Streamflow recharge was represented with specified-flow cells, and areal recharge to layers 1-4 was represented with a specified-flux boundary. Calibration of the model was accomplished by two simulations: (1) steady-state simulation of average conditions for water years 1988-97 and (2) transient simulations of water years 1988-97 divided into twenty 6-month stress periods. Flow-system components represented in the model include recharge, discharge, and hydraulic properties. The steady-state streamflow recharge rate was 42.2 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and transient streamflow recharge rates ranged from 14.1 to 102.2 ft3/s. The steady-state areal recharge rate was 20.9 ft3/s, and transient areal recharge rates ranged from 1.1 to 98.4 ft3/s. The upward flow rate from the Deadwood aquifer to the Madison hydrogeologic unit was 6.3 ft3/s. Discharge included springflow, water use, flow to overlying units, and regional outflow. The estimated steady-state springflow of 32.8 ft3/s from seven springs was similar to the simulated springflow of 31.6 ft3/s, which included 20.5 ft3

  10. Hydrogeology and soil gas at J-field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, W.B.

    1993-12-31

    Disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, has contaminated soil, ground water, and surface water. Seven exploratory borings and 38 observation wells were drilled to define the hydrogeologic framework at J-Field and to determine the type, extent, and movement of ground-water contaminants. Water in the surficial aquifer flows laterally from topographically high areas to discharge areas in marshes and streams, and vertically to the underlying confined aquifer. Analyses of soil-gas samples indicated high relative-flux values of chlorinated solvents, phthalates, and hydrocarbons at the toxic-materials disposal area, white-phosphorus disposal area, and riot-control-agent disposal area.

  11. Using hydrogeologic data to evaluate geothermal potential in the eastern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Brooks, Lynette E.

    2012-01-01

    In support of a larger study to evaluate geothermal resource development of high-permeability stratigraphic units in sedimentary basins, this paper integrates groundwater and thermal data to evaluate heat and fluid flow within the eastern Great Basin. Previously published information from a hydrogeologic framework, a potentiometric-surface map, and groundwater budgets was compared to a surficial heat-flow map. Comparisons between regional groundwater flow patterns and surficial heat flow indicate a strong spatial relation between regional groundwater movement and surficial heat distribution. Combining aquifer geometry and heat-flow maps, a selected group of subareas within the eastern Great Basin are identified that have high surficial heat flow and are underlain by a sequence of thick basin-fill deposits and permeable carbonate aquifers. These regions may have potential for future geothermal resources development.

  12. Hydrogeologic data from a shallow flooding demonstration project, Twitchell Island, California, 1997-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamble, James M.; Burow, Karen R.; Wheeler, Gail A.; Hilditch, Robert; Drexler, Judy Z.

    2003-01-01

    Data were collected during a study to determine the effects of continuous shallow flooding on ground-water discharge to an agricultural drainage ditch on Twitchell Island, California. The conceptual model of the hydrogeologic setting was detailed with soil coring and borehole-geophysical logs. Twenty-two monitoring wells were installed to observe hydraulic head. Ten aquifer slug tests were done in peat and mineral sediments. Ground-water and surface-water temperature was monitored at 14 locations. Flow to and from the pond was monitored through direct measurement of flows and through the calculation of a water budget. These data were gathered to support the development of a two-dimensional ground-water flow model. The model will be used to estimate subsurface discharge to the drainage ditch as a result of the pond. The estimated discharge will be used to estimate the concentrations of DOC that can be expected in the ditch.

  13. East Chestnut Ridge hydrogeologic characterization: A geophysical study of two karst features

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Permitting and site selection activities for the proposed East Chestnut Ridge landfill, located on the Oak Ridge Reservation, have required additional hydrogeologic studies of two karst features. Geophysical testing methods were utilized for investigating these karst features. The objectives of the geophysical testing was to determine the feasibility of geophysical techniques for locating subsurface karst features and to determine if subsurface anomalies exist at the proposed landfill site. Two karst features, one lacking surface expression (sinkhole) but with a known solution cavity at depth (from previous hydrologic studies), and the other with surface expression were tested with surface geophysical methods. Four geophysical profiles, two crossing and centered over each karst feature were collected using both gravimetric and electrical resistivity techniques.

  14. Hydrogeology of Puerto Rico and the outlying islands of Vieques, Culebra, and Mona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gómez-Gómez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús; Santiago, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    The availability of hydrogeologic maps for Puerto Rico and the outlying islands of Vieques, Culebra, and Mona are important to hydrogeologists, groundwater specialists, and water resource managers and planners. These maps, in combination with the report, serve as a source of information to all users by providing basic hydrogeologic and hydrologic knowledge in a concise illustrated format. Puerto Rico and the outlying islands cover a total area of 8,927 square kilometers (km2). Of this total area, about 3,500 km2 are underlain by hydrogeologic units that are classified as intergranular or fissured. These hydrogeologic units form the principal aquifer systems throughout Puerto Rico and the outlying islands. In Puerto Rico, the most extensive and intensely developed aquifers are the North Coast Limestone aquifer system and the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer system. Withdrawals from these two aquifer systems constitute nearly 70 percent of the total groundwater withdrawn in Puerto Rico. The spatial extent of the North Coast Limestone aquifer system is about 2,000 km2. Within this aquifer system, groundwater development is greatest in the 800-km2 area between the Río Grande de Arecibo and the Río de la Plata. This also is the area for which concern is the highest regarding the future use of groundwater as a primary source of water for domestic and industrial use. With an estimated withdrawal of 280,000 cubic meters per day (m3/d), groundwater constituted the principal source of water within this area providing 100 percent of the water for self-supplied industries and about 85 percent for public water supplies in 1985. By 2005, groundwater withdrawals decreased to 150,000 m3/d. The spatial extent of the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer system is about 470 km2. The estimated consumptive groundwater withdrawal from the aquifer system was 190,000 m3/d in 1980 and 170,000 m3/d in 2005. About 60 percent and 40 percent of the groundwater withdrawal from the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer system was used for public water supply and irrigation, respectively. In the outlying islands of Vieques, Culebra, and Mona, only Vieques is underlain by aquifers of any local importance. The Resolución and Esperanza aquifers underlie an area covering 16 km2 on the island of Vieques. Prior to 1978 when an underwater public water-supply pipeline connecting Vieques to the main island of Puerto Rico was completed, groundwater withdrawal from the two aquifers was as much as 2,500 m3/d. Groundwater withdrawals in Vieques island in 2005 were estimated at less than 100 m3/d. The potential development of relatively untapped groundwater resources in Puerto Rico is limited to the Río Grande de Añasco valley and the Río Culebrinas valley in the western part of the island and to the Río Grande de Arecibo part of the North Coast Limestone aquifer system. In general, the North Coast Limestone and the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer systems, which are the two principal groundwater-flow systems in Puerto Rico, show evidence of aquifer overdraft as indicated by regional increases in concentrations of dissolved solids. Optimization of withdrawals through conjunctive use of both surface-water and groundwater sources and by instituting water conservation measures has the greatest potential to ensure the continued use of groundwater resources. In support of these efforts, programs also could be implemented to improve database information regarding groundwater withdrawals and the contribution of surface-water diversions to surface-water flow, especially within the southern coastal plain of Puerto Rico.

  15. Combined geophysical and petrophysical characterization to support a hydrogeological model of a coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, Thomas; Wiederhold, Helga; Scheer, Wolfgang; Kirsch, Reinhard; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Global warming affects the water cycle by changing precipitation/evaporation and raising sea level. Especially groundwater systems in sensitive environments, such as coastal areas or barrier islands, have to be evaluated with respect to the potential reduction of water quality, e.g. salinization by saltwater intrusion (Hinsby et al., 2012). To assess these hazards using groundwater modeling we need a strong base of hydraulic and hydrogeological information. The use of integrated geophysical methods, in combination with a petrophysical characterization, provides a reliable architecture for groundwater modeling. Within the EU-project CLIWAT, we investigated the hydrogeological situation of the North Sea island of Föhr in Schleswig-Holstein (Germany). The island was mainly formed during glaciations in Pleistocene Series, especially Saalian and Weichselian Stages. These deposits remain as a Geest core in the southern central part, and house a freshwater lens that is used for the local water supply. To investigate the architecture of the fresh water lens, we carried out several surveys with airborne electromagnetic (AEM), seismic reflection, and borehole methods. To enhance the AEM resistivity model we inverted the data with a-priori constraints from seismic reflections (Burschil et al., 2012a). This constrained inversion leads to, among other things, a separation of two aquifers by resistivity data. Additionally, from borehole logs, vertical seismic profiles (VSP), and nearby AEM inversion point models we are able to petrophysically characterize different lithological categories regarding resistivity and seismic velocity. Subsurface glacial structures, e.g. buried valleys and a push moraine complex, are mapped down to 150 m below sea level. Below this rather horizontal features indicate Tertiary layers. Geophysically determined petrophysical values were correlated with lithological categories to enhance the interpretation of geophysical data. In this way, we expose the complex disorder of Pleistocene till and sand, as well as Pliocene sand and Miocene clay, in the uppermost 150 m. All results are implemented in a hydrogeological 3D model as base for groundwater modeling and to forecast climate change effects (Burschil et al., 2012b). References Burschil, T., H. Wiederhold & E. Auken (2012a): Seismic results as a-priori knowledge for airborneTEM data inversion - a case study. J. Appl. Geophys., 80, 121-128, doi: 10.1016/j.jappgeo.2012.02.003. Burschil, T., W. Scheer, R. Kirsch & H. Wiederhold (2012b): Hydrogeological characterisation of a glacially affected barrier island - the North Frisian Island of Föhr. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 3485-3498. Hinsby, K., E., Auken, G.H.P. Oude Essink, P. de Louw, F. Jørgensen, B. Siemon, T.O. Sonnenborg, A. Vandenbohede, H. Wiederhold, A. Guadagnini & J. Carrera (Eds.) (2012): Assessing the impact of climate change for adaptive water management in coastal regions. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17, http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/specialissue149.html.

  16. A hydrogeological conceptual approach to study urban groundwater flow in Bucharest city, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhemacha, Mohamed Amine; Gogu, Constantin Radu; Serpescu, Irina; Gaitanaru, Dragos; Bica, Ioan

    2015-05-01

    Management of groundwater systems in urban areas is necessary and can be reliably performed by means of mathematical modeling combined with geospatial analysis. A conceptual approach for the study of urban hydrogeological systems is presented. The proposed approach is based on the features of Bucharest city (Romania) and can be adapted to other urban areas showing similar characteristics. It takes into account the interaction between groundwater and significant urban infrastructure elements that can be encountered in modern cities such as subway tunnels and water-supply networks, and gives special attention to the sewer system. In this respect, an adaptation of the leakage factor approach is proposed, which uses a sewer-system zoning function related to the conduits' location in the aquifer system and a sewer-conduits classification function related to their structural and/or hydraulic properties. The approach was used to elaborate a single-layered steady state groundwater flow model for a pilot zone of Bucharest city.

  17. Geophysical Interpretations of the Southern Espanola Basin, New Mexico, That Contribute to Understanding Its Hydrogeologic Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Koning, Daniel J.; Johnson, Peggy S.; Bankey, Viki

    2009-01-01

    The southern Espanola basin consists of a westward- and northward-thickening wedge of rift fill, composed primarily of Santa Fe Group sediments, that serves as an important aquifer for the city of Santa Fe and surrounding areas. Detailed aeromagnetic surveys were flown to better understand ground-water resources in this aquifer. This report presents a synthesis of these data with gravity data and other constraints. The interpretations were accomplished using qualitative interpretation, state-of-art data analysis techniques, and two- and three-dimensional modeling. The results depict the presence of and depth to many geologic features that have hydrogeologic significance, including shallow faults, different types of igneous units, and basement rocks. The results are presented as map interpretations, geophysical profile models, and a digital surface that represents the base and thickness of Santa Fe Group sediments, as well as vector files of some volcanic features and faults.

  18. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-10-31

    This study of the hydrogeology of Chicken Creek Canyon wasconducted by the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This canyon extends downhill fromBuilding 31 at LBNL to Centennial Road below. The leading edge of agroundwater tritium plume at LBNL is located at the top of the canyon.Tritium activities measured in this portion of the plume during thisstudy were approximately 3,000 picocuries/liter (pCi/L), which issignificantly less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinkingwaterof 20,000 pCi/L established by the Environmental ProtectionAgency.There are three main pathways for tritium migration beyond theLaboratory s boundary: air, surface water and groundwater flow. Thepurpose of this report is to evaluate the groundwater pathway.Hydrogeologic investigation commenced with review of historicalgeotechnical reports including 35 bore logs and 27 test pit/trench logsas well as existing ERP information from 9 bore logs. This was followedby field mapping of bedrock outcrops along Chicken Creek as well asbedrock exposures in road cuts on the north and east walls of the canyon.Water levels and tritium activities from 6 wells were also considered.Electrical-resistivity profiles and cone penetration test (CPT) data werecollected to investigate the extent of an interpreted alluvial sandencountered in one of the wells drilled in this area. Subsequent loggingof 7 additional borings indicated that this sand was actually anunusually well-sorted and typically deeply weathered sandstone of theOrinda Formation. Wells were installed in 6 of the new borings to allowwater level measurement and analysis of groundwater tritium activity. Aslug test and pumping tests were also performed in the wellfield.

  19. Methods for assessing hydrogeological similarity and for classification of groundwater systems on the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaf, Ezra; Barthel, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Conducting groundwater modelling and resource analysis on the regional scale is often complicated by the scarcity and uneven distribution of observations over space and time, the uncertainty of structures, inputs and processes as well as the inherent heterogeneity and variability of hydrogeological conditions. In order to improve modelling and prediction of poorly-observed groundwater systems, information could be transferred from similar, but more well-explored and better understood systems analogous to PUB (Prediction in ungauged catchments). To achieve this, the overarching goal of this study is to develop an approach to statistically extract relevant information on structure and state from observed and well characterized locations in order to derive a classification scheme of functionally similar groups. At the core of the approach will be the classification of (i) static hydrogeological characteristics (such as aquifer geometry and hydraulic properties) (ii) dynamic changes of the boundary conditions (such as recharge) and (iii) dynamic groundwater system responses (groundwater head and chemical parameters) as well as the systematic use of the dependencies of system responses on explanatory factors. With a classification framework in place, insight can be gained into the behavior of less well-observed groundwater systems and underlying processes can be better understood. Furthermore, it is expected that regional conceptual models can be checked without the need of numerical groundwater models as well as that missing values in time series can be filled. Apart from illustrating the general approach and the main ideas of groundwater systems classification, we show a number of promising methods that can be used to establish a classification framework for groundwater systems assessment. The focus at the current stage is on finding relevant statistical methods that can be used for identifying and quantifying similarities/dissimilarities of groundwater hydrographs. Furthermore, the methods are compared to a visual classification as a reference. The presented methods can be seen as a starting point to develop the above mentioned comprehensive framework for groundwater assessment on the regional scale based on similarity.

  20. Hydrogeologic unit map of the Piedmont and Blue Ridge provinces of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel, Charles C., III; Payne, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The numerous geologic formations and rock types in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge provinces of North Carolina have been grouped into 21 hydrogeologic units on the basis of their water-bearing potential as determined from rock origin, composition, and texture. All major classes of rocks--metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary--are present, although metamorphic rocks are the most abundant. The origin of the hydrogeologic units is indicated by the rock class or subclass (metaigneous, metavolanic, or metasedimentary). The composition of the igneous, metaigneous, and metavolcanic rocks is designated as felsic, intermediate, or mafic except for the addition in the metavolcanic group of epiclastic rocks and compositionally undifferentiated rocks. Composition is the controlling attribute in the classification of the metasedimentary units of gneiss (mafic or felsic), marble, quartzite. The other metasediments are designated primarily on the basis of texture (grain size, degree of metamorphism, and development of foliation). Sedimentary rocks occur in the Piedmont in several downfaulted basins. A computerized data file containing records from more than 6,200 wells was analyzed to determine average well yields in each of the 21 units. The well yields were adjusted to an average well depth of 154 feet and an average diameter of 6 inches, the average of all wells in the data set, to remove the variation in well yield attributed to differences in depth and diameter. Average yields range from a high of 23.6 gallons per minute for schist to a low 11.6 gallons per minute for sedimentary rocks of Triassic age.

  1. Bringing Together Co-located Geological, Geophysical and Hydrogeologic Observations of Cemented Fault-Zone Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. L.; Spinelli, G. A.; Mozley, P.

    2014-12-01

    We examine co-located outcrop and subsurface geological, geophysical, and hydrogeological observations of a cemented fault in the Rio Grande rift. The partially cemented Loma Blanca fault offsets poorly consolidated piedmont slope and alluvial sediments; along parts of its exposure the fault consists of a 2- to 5-m-wide calcium carbonate cemented zone. The degree of cementation of the fault, which varies along its >4 km long surface exposure, is closely related to host-sediment grain size; coarser grained sections of the fault are more strongly cemented than finer grained portions. We hypothesize that the spatially variable degree and thickness of cementation is a key control on the ability of the Loma Blanca fault to act as a barrier to fault-normal fluid flow. We use geologically-validated geophysical observations to map variations in fault-zone parameters in the subsurface, collecting co-located GPR, DC-resistivity, and audio-magnetotellurics data along a transect across the fault. Differences in the electrical properties between strata offset by the fault allow us to constrain fault orientation and throw. Future investigations of the relationships between the degree of fault-zone cementation and normalized chargeability may allow us to map the estimated degree of cementation in the sub-surface. Using mathematical modeling we test alternative designs for future pumping and injection well tests that will be used to update estimates of the location, orientation, and properties of the fault, especially fault-normal permeability. The goal is a novel fault-zone permeability model based on the integration of geological, geophysical, and hydrogeological observations and models.

  2. Open-Source Semantic and Schematic Mediation in Hydrogeologic Spatial Data Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, E.; Brodaric, B.

    2008-12-01

    A common task in cyber-based data environments, hydrogeologic or otherwise, is an initial search for data amongst distributed heterogeneous sources, followed by amalgamation of the multiple results into a single file organized using a common structure and perhaps standard content. For example, querying water well databases to obtain a list of the rock materials that occur beyond a certain ground depth, represented in some specific XML dialect. This task is often achieved with the aid of open geospatial technologies (OGC), which conveniently enable interoperability at the system and syntax levels by providing standard web service interfaces (WMS, WFS, WCS) and a standard data transfer language (GML). However, at present such technologies, which are mainly non-open source, provide minimal support for interoperating at the schematic and semantic levels, meaning it is difficult to query the data sources and obtain results in a common data structure populated with standard content. Classical data integration systems provide mediator and wrapper middleware to address this issue: mediators dispatch queries to distributed data repositories and integrate query results, while wrappers perform translation to common standards for both queries and results, and these actions are typically supported by ontologies. Under this classical scenario existing open geospatial services can be considered wrappers with minimal translation capacity, thus requiring a mediator to both integrate and translate. Consequently, we have used open source components to develop a re-usable mediator that operates as a virtual open geospatial web service (WFS), one that integrates and translates both query requests and results from OGC-wrapped data sources to common standards. The mediator is designed as a customizable XML processing pipeline that operates on declarative descriptions that support schematic and semantic translation. It is being implemented in virtual environments for hydrogeology to enhance knowledge of Canada's watersheds, as well as in environments aimed at the delivery of geologic information. Discussed will be the role and design of the mediator and its implementation in a distributed groundwater information context.

  3. Hydrogeology and analysis of aquifer characteristics in west-central Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broska, J.C.; Barnette, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County, Florida, conducted an investigation to describe the hydrogeology and analyze the aquifer characteristics in west-central Pinellas County. A production test well and four monitor wells were constructed in Pinellas County at Walsingham Park during 1996-97. Water-quality sampling, static and dynamic borehole geophysical surveys, and hydraulic tests were conducted at the wells to delineate the hydrogeology at Walsingham Park. A 9-day aquifer test was conducted to determine the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer system and observe the changes in water quality due to pumping. A numerical model was constructed to simulate the aquifer test and calculate values for hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient for permeable zones and confining units at Walsingham Park. Final calibrated values for hydraulic conductivity for the different permeable zones and confining units at the test site were 18 feet per day for Upper Zone A, 750 feet per day for Lower Zone A, 1 foot per day for Zone B, 1x10-4 feet per day for the intermediate confining unit, and 10 feet per day for the semiconfining unit separating Upper Zone A and Lower Zone A. Final calibrated values for storage coefficient were 3.1x10-4 for Upper Zone A, 8.6x10-5 for Lower Zone A, 2.6x10-5 for Zone B, 3.1x10-4 for the intermediate confining unit, and 4.3x10-5 for the semiconfining unit separating Upper Zone A and Lower Zone A. Estimates of transmissivity for Upper Zone A and Lower Zone A were about 2,500 and 37,500 feet squared per day, respectively.

  4. An analysis platform for multiscale hydrogeologic modeling with emphasis on hybrid multiscale methods.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, Timothy D; Murphy, Ellyn M; Chen, Xingyuan; Rice, Amy K; Carroll, Kenneth C; Palmer, Bruce J; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M; Battiato, Ilenia; Wood, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges faced by hydrogeologic modelers is the disparity between the spatial and temporal scales at which fundamental flow, transport, and reaction processes can best be understood and quantified (e.g., microscopic to pore scales and seconds to days) and at which practical model predictions are needed (e.g., plume to aquifer scales and years to centuries). While the multiscale nature of hydrogeologic problems is widely recognized, technological limitations in computation and characterization restrict most practical modeling efforts to fairly coarse representations of heterogeneous properties and processes. For some modern problems, the necessary level of simplification is such that model parameters may lose physical meaning and model predictive ability is questionable for any conditions other than those to which the model was calibrated. Recently, there has been broad interest across a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines in simulation approaches that more rigorously account for the multiscale nature of systems of interest. In this article, we review a number of such approaches and propose a classification scheme for defining different types of multiscale simulation methods and those classes of problems to which they are most applicable. Our classification scheme is presented in terms of a flowchart (Multiscale Analysis Platform), and defines several different motifs of multiscale simulation. Within each motif, the member methods are reviewed and example applications are discussed. We focus attention on hybrid multiscale methods, in which two or more models with different physics described at fundamentally different scales are directly coupled within a single simulation. Very recently these methods have begun to be applied to groundwater flow and transport simulations, and we discuss these applications in the context of our classification scheme. As computational and characterization capabilities continue to improve, we envision that hybrid multiscale modeling will become more common and also a viable alternative to conventional single-scale models in the near future. PMID:24628122

  5. UNDERSTANDING HARD ROCK HYDROGEOLOGY THROUGH AN EXPERIMENTAL HYDROGEOLOGICAL PARK IN SOUTH INDIA: Site development and investigations on the major role of the fractured zone in crystalline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Guiheneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Marechal, J.; Chandra, S.; Dewandel, B.; Perrin, J.

    2012-12-01

    In water stressed south India most of the groundwater used for irrigation is pumped from crystalline rocks aquifers. In those structures groundwater flow dominantly occur in a shallow higher-permeability zone that overlies a deeper lower-permeability zone hosting little flow. The fractured zone of the weathering profile plays an important role for groundwater. In order to understand clearly this impact on water availability and quality changes the Experimental Hydrogeological Park at Choutuppal, Andhra Pradesh, India is developed in the framework of the SORE H+ network. Several hydraulic tests (injection, flowmeter profiles, single-packer tests…) and geophysical measurements (ERT, Borehole logging…) are carried out on the site in order to characterize the depth-dependence of hydrodynamic parameters in the Indian Archean granite. Specific investigation on a borewell through packer tests demonstrate that the most conductive part of the aquifer corresponds to the upper part of the fractured layer, located just below the saprolite bottom, between 15 meters and 20 meters depth. There is no highly conductive fracture beyond 20 meters depth and no indication for any conductive fracture beyond 25 meters depth. Packer tests show that the upper part of the fractured layer (15-20 m depth) is characterized by a good vertical connectivity. On the contrary, the tests carried out below 20 m depth show no vertical connectivity at all. The geometry of the fracture network and associated hydrodynamic parameters are in agreement with the conceptual model of hard-rock aquifers that derive its properties from weathering processes. The general existence of such a highly conductive structure at the top of the fractured zone has a great impact on water prospection and exploitation in such crystalline aquifers.

  6. Hydrogeologic framework and geologic structure of the Floridan aquifer system and intermediate confining unit in the Lake Okeechobee area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    The successful implementation of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) as a water-management tool requires detailed information on the hydrologic and hydraulic properties of the potential water storage zones. This report presents stratigraphic and hydrogeologic sections of the upper part of the Floridan aquifer system and the overlying confining unit or aquifer system in the Lake Okeechobee area, and contour maps of the upper contacts of the Ocala Limestone and the Arcadia Formation, which are represented in the sections. The sections and maps illustrate hydrogeologic factors such as confinement of potential storage zones, the distribution of permeability within the zones, and geologic features that may control the efficiency of injection, storage, and recovery of water, and thus may influence decisions on ASR activities in areas of interest to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

  7. Hydrogeology and extent of saltwater intrusion on Manhasset Neck, Nassau County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick; Lange, A.D.; Candela, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Manhasset Neck, a peninsula on the northern shore of Long Island, N.Y., is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that form a sequence of aquifers and confning units. Ground water at several public-supply wells has been affected by the intrusion of saltwater from the surrounding embayments (Manhasset Bay, Long Island Sound, Hempstead Harbor). Twenty-two boreholes were drilled during 1992-96 for the collection of hydrogeologic, geochemical, and geophysical data to delineate the subsurface geology and the extent of saltwater intrusion within the peninsula. A series of continuous high-resolution seismic- reflection surveys was completed in 1993 and 1994 to delineate the character and extent of the hydrogeologic deposits beneath the embayments surrounding Manhasset Neck. The new drill-core data indicate two hydrogeologic units--the North Shore aquifer and the North Shore confining unit--where the Lloyd aquifer, Raritan confining unit, and the Magothy aquifer have been completely removed by glacial erosion. Water levels at selected observation wells were measured quarterly throughout the study. These data, and continuous water-level records, indicate that (1) the upper glacial (water-table) and Magothy aquifers are hydraulically connected and that their water levels do not respond to tidal fluctuations, and (2) the Lloyd and North Shore aquifers also are hydraulically connected, but their water levels do respond to pumping and tidal fluctuations. Offshore seismic-reflection surveys in the surrounding embayments, and drill-core samples, indicate at least four glacially eroded buried valleys with subhorizontal, parallel reflectors indicative of draped bedding that is interpreted as infilling by silt and clay. The buried valleys (1) truncate the surrounding coarse-grained deposits, (2) are asymmetrical and steep sided, (3) trend northwest-southeast, (4) are 2 to 4 miles long and about 1 mile wide, and (5) extend to more than 400 feet below sea level. Water from 12 public-supply wells screened in the Magothy and upper glacial aquifers contained volatile organic compounds in concentrations above the New York State Department of Health Drinking Water maximum contaminant levels, as did water from one public- supply well screened in the Lloyd aquifer and from two observation wells screened in the upper glacial aquifer. Five distinct areas of saltwater intrusion have been delineated in Manhasset Neck; three extend into the Lloyd and North Shore aquifers, and two extend into the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers. Borehole-geophysical-logging data indicate that several of these saltwater wedges range from a few feet to more than 125 feet in thickness and have sharp freshwater-saltwater interfaces, and that chloride concentrations within these wedges in 1997 ranged from 102 to 9,750 milligrams per liter. Several public-supply wells have either been shut down or are currently being affected by these saltwater wedges. Data show active saltwater intrusion in at least two of the wedges.

  8. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow related vugs, or irregular vugs. Flow zones with a mean hydraulic conductivity of 2,600 feet per day are present within the middle semiconfining unit, but none of the flow zones are continuous across the study area. The lower Biscayne aquifer flow unit comprises a group of flow zones in the lower part of the aquifer. These flow zones are present in the lower part of the Fort Thompson Formation and in some cases within the limestone or sandstone or both in the uppermost part of the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The mean hydraulic conductivity of major flow zones within the lower Biscayne aquifer flow unit is 5,900 feet per day, and the mean value for minor flow zones is 2,900 feet per day. A semiconfining unit is present beneath the Biscayne aquifer. The boundary between the two hydrologic units is at the top or near the top of the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The lower semiconfining unit has a hydraulic conductivity of less than 350 feet per day. The most productive zones of groundwater flow within the two Biscayne aquifer flow units have a characteristic pore system dominated by stratiform megaporosity related to selective dissolution of an Ophiomorpha-dominated ichnofabric. In the upper flow unit, decimeter-scale vertical solution pipes that are common in some areas of the SCWF study area contribute to high vertical permeability compared to that in areas without the pipes. Cross-hole flowmeter data collected from the SCWF test coreholes show that the distribution of vuggy porosity, matrix porosity, and permeability within the Biscayne aquifer of the SCWF is highly heterogeneous and anisotropic. Groundwater withdrawals from production well fields in southeastern Florida may be inducing recharge of the Biscayne aquifer from canals near the well fields that are used for water-management functions, such as flood control and well-field pumping. The SCWF was chosen as a location within Miami-Dade County to study the potential for such recharge to the Biscayne aquifer from the C–2 (Snapper Creek) canal that roughly divides the

  9. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget in the Chimacum Creek basin and vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Welch, Wendy B.; Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater flow system in the Chimacum Creek basin. It includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework; groundwater recharge and discharge; groundwater levels and flow directions; seasonal fluctuations in groundwater level; interactions between aquifers and the surface-water system; and a groundwater budget. The study area covers 124 square miles in northeastern Jefferson County, Washington, and includes the Chimacum Creek basin, which drains an area of about 37 square miles. The area is underlain by a north-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and igneous bedrock units that crop out along the margins and western interior of the study area. Six hydrogeologic units consisting of unconsolidated aquifers and confining units, along with an underlying bedrock unit, were identified. A surficial hydrogeologic map was developed and used with well information from 187 drillers' logs to construct 4 hydrogeologic sections, and maps showing the extent and thickness of the units. Natural recharge was estimated using precipitation-recharge relation regression equations developed for western Washington, and estimates were calculated for return flow from data on domestic indoor and outdoor use and irrigated agriculture. Results from synoptic streamflow measurements and water table elevations determined from monthly measurements at monitoring wells are presented and compared with those from a study conducted during 2002-03. A water budget was calculated comprising long-term average recharge, domestic public-supply withdrawals and return flow, self-supplied domestic withdrawals and return flow, and irrigated agricultural withdrawals and return flow.

  10. Review and reconnaissance of the hydrogeology of Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the vicinity of Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Prothro, L.B.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Work is currently underway within the Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Program to develop corrective action plans in support of the overall corrective action strategy for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as established in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A closure plan is currently being developed for Frenchman Flat, which has been identified in the FFACO as a Corrective Action Unit (CAU). Part of this effort requires that hydrogeologic data be compiled for inclusion in a CAU-specific hydrologic flow and transport model that will be used to predict contaminant boundaries. Hydrogeologic maps and cross sections are currently being prepared for use in the model to define the nature and extent of aquifers and confining units that might influence the flow of contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear tests conducted in Frenchman Flat. During this effort, it has been found that older Tertiary-age sediments might be hydrogeologically important in the Frenchman Flat model area. Although the character and extent of these units are poorly known, there is reason to believe that in some parts of Frenchman Flat they may lie between the regional Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the younger Tertiary saturated alluvium and volcanic units in which several underground nuclear tests were conducted. It was not possible to quickly determine their extent, or ascertain whether or not these units might act as confining units or aquifers. The work described in this report was done to gain a better understanding of the hydrogeology of these rocks.

  11. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Luttrell; D. R. Newcomer; S. S. Teel; V. R. Vermeul

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river\\/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify

  12. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  13. Karst connections between unconfined aquifers and the Upper Floridan aquifer in south Georgia: geophysical evidence and hydrogeological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieme, D. M.; Denizman, C.

    2011-12-01

    Buried karst features in sedimentary rocks of the south Georgia Coastal Plain present a challenge for hydrogeological models of recharge and confined flow within the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The Withlacoochee River, the trunk stream for the area, frequently disappears into subsurface caverns as it makes its way south to join the Suwannee River in northern Florida. The Withlacoochee also receives inputs from small ponds and bays which in turn receive spring and seep groundwater inputs. We have mapped karst topography at the "top of rock" using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Up to seven meters of relief is indicated for the paleotopography on Miocene to Pliocene rocks, contrasting with the more subdued relief of the modern landscape. Current stratigraphic and hydrogeological reconstructions do not incorporate this amount of relief or lateral variation in the confining beds. One "pipe" which is approximately four meters in diameter is being mapped in detail. We have field evidence at this location for rapid movement of surficial pond and river water with a meteoric signature through several separate strata of sedimentary rock into an aquifer in the Hawthorn formation. We use our geophysical and hydrological field evidence to constrain quantitative hydrogeological models for the flow rates into and out of both this upper aquifer and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer, which is generally considered to be confined by the clays of the Hawthorn.

  14. Hydrogeological settings of a volcanic island (San Cristóbal, Galapagos) from joint interpretation of airborne electromagnetics and geomorphological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryet, A.; d'Ozouville, N.; Violette, S.; Deffontaines, B.; Auken, E.

    2012-08-01

    Many volcanic islands face freshwater stress and the situation may worsen with climate change and sea level rise. In this context, an optimum management of freshwater resources becomes crucial, but is often impeded by the lack of data. With the aim of investigating the hydrogeological settings of Southern San Cristóbal Island (Galapagos), we conducted an helicopter-borne, transient electromagnetic survey with the SkyTEM system. It provided unprecedented insights in the 3-D resistivity structure of this extinct basaltic shield. Combined with remote sensing and fieldwork, it allowed the definition of the first hydrogeological conceptual model of the island. Springs are fed by a series of perched aquifers overlying a regional basal aquifer subject to seawater intrusion. Dykes, evidenced by alignments of eruptive cones at the surface, correspond to sharp sub-vertical contrasts in resistivity in the subsurface, and impound groundwater in a summit channel. Combined with geomorphological observations, airborne electromagnetics is shown to be a useful tool for hydrogeological exploratory studies in complex, poorly known environments. It allows optimal development of land-based geophysical surveys and drilling campaigns.

  15. Hydrogeological settings of a volcanic island (San Cristóbal, Galapagos) from joint interpretation of airborne electromagnetics and geomorphological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryet, A.; d'Ozouville, N.; Violette, S.; Deffontaines, B.; Auken, E.

    2012-12-01

    Many volcanic islands face freshwater stress and the situation may worsen with climate change and sea level rise. In this context, an optimum management of freshwater resources becomes crucial, but is often impeded by the lack of data. With the aim of investigating the hydrogeological settings of southern San Cristóbal Island (Galapagos), we conducted a helicopter-borne, transient electromagnetic survey with the SkyTEM system. It provided unprecedented insights into the 3-D resistivity structure of this extinct basaltic shield. Combined with remote sensing and fieldwork, it allowed the definition of the first hydrogeological conceptual model of the island. Springs are fed by a series of perched aquifers overlying a regional basal aquifer subject to seawater intrusion. Dykes, evidenced by alignments of eruptive cones at the surface, correspond to sharp sub-vertical contrasts in resistivity in the subsurface, and impound groundwater in a summit channel. Combined with geomorphological observations, airborne electromagnetics are shown to be a useful for hydrogeological exploratory studies in complex, poorly known environments. They allow optimal development of land-based geophysical surveys and drilling campaigns.

  16. Geophysical borehole logging for control of driller's records: hydrogeological case study from Voltaian sedimentary rocks in northern Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agyekum, William; Klitten, Kurt; Armah, Thomas; Banoeng-Yakubo, Bruce; Amartey, Edmund Okoe

    2013-06-01

    The low borehole yielding potential and the high drilling failure rate of the Voltaian sedimentary rocks of Northern Ghana have been of concern to many local hydrogeologists and international donors. Consequently, several donor-supported projects have been instituted within the last few years with the view to study the hydrogeological characteristics of this `difficult' rock system. One such project is the geophysical borehole logging of 13 boreholes drilled into the Voltaian sedimentary rocks of Northern Ghana to enhance detailed hydrogeological assessment. Natural gamma detectors embedded in the five exploratory logging tools employed for the study ensured depth control by comparing their individual gamma log signatures. The combined gamma and formation resistivity/conductivity response logs provided more detailed lithological information than were shown in the driller's/geologist's logs. Significant discrepancies between the logging results and the reported drilled depths, construction depths, and screen settings were observed in seven of the thirteen investigated boreholes. Thus, the reliability of driller's borehole records seems questionable, which will hamper hydrogeological studies and the mapping of groundwater resources. Further, it may be supposed that the productivity of most wells in Ghana is compromised by poor depth control of screen placement.

  17. Zone Management of Multi-Purpose Use of Groundwater Via Spatial Variability Analysis of Water Quality and Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C. P.; Chen, C. F.; Jang, C. S.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is comprehensively used for irrigation, aquaculture and public water supply in Pingtung plain. Establishing a sound management plan of multi-purpose groundwater utilization in Pingtung plain is imperial for water resources sustainability. When extracting groundwater for such multi-purpose use, the major concerns are to assure the meets for the different water quality standards for various water use sectors demand and minimizing the pumping impacts on aquifers. The groundwater quality and hydrogeological conditions play important roles in multi-purpose groundwater utilization. Management and effective use of groundwater typically face great challenges, due to the spatial variability of groundwater quality and hydrogeological condition. This study combines the variability of groundwater quality and hydrological condition to propose zonal management of multi-purpose use of groundwater in Pingtung plain. Based on the water quality standards for various groundwater utilization sectors, the integration of hydrochemical parameters are used to delineate most appropriate zones of various groundwater utilization sectors. For evaluation of hydrogeological condition, transmissivity which represents the ability of water transmitted in aquifer is adopted to determine the most suitable zones of groundwater extraction. Based on the analytical results of the water quality parameters and transmissivity in combination with actual groundwater utilization, a zonal management plan of multi-purpose groundwater utilization is established. The framework in this project can provide an effective tool for government administrator establishing a zonal management of multi-purpose groundwater utilization in Pingtung plain.

  18. Hydrogeologic framework and salinity distribution of the Floridan aquifer system of Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns about water-level decline and seawater intrusion in the surficial Biscayne aquifer, currently the principal source of water supply to Broward County, prompted a study to refine the hydrogeologic framework of the underlying Floridan aquifer system to evaluate its potential as an alternative source of supply. This report presents cross sections that illustrate the stratigraphy and hydrogeology in eastern Broward County; maps of the upper surfaces and thicknesses of several geologic formations or units within the Floridan aquifer system; and maps of two of the potentially productive water-bearing zones within the system, the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Avon Park permeable zone. An analysis of data on rock depositional textures, associated pore networks, and flow zones in the Floridan aquifer system shows that groundwater moves through the system in two ways. These data support a conceptual, dual-porosity model of the system wherein groundwater moves either as concentrated flow in discrete, thin bedding-plane vugs or zones of vuggy megaporosity, or as diffuse flow through rocks with primarily interparticle and moldic-particle porosity. Because considerable exchange of groundwater may occur between the zones of vuggy and matrix-dominated porosity, understanding the distribution of that porosity and flow zone types is important to evaluating the suitability of the several units within the Floridan aquifer system for managing the water through practices such as aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). The salinity of the water in the Floridan aquifer system is highest in the central part of the study area, and lower toward the north and south. Although salinity generally increases with depth, in the western part of the study area a zone of relatively high saline water is perched above water of lower salinity in the underlying Avon Park permeable zone. Overall, the areas of highest salinity in the aquifer system coincide with those with the lowest estimated transmissivity, so that the occurrence of perched saline water in the system may be the consequence of incompletely flushed connate water or intruded seawater. A seismic reflection profile along the Hillsboro Canal, at the northern edge of the study area, shows seven seismic-sag structures that are interpreted as downward deformation of overlying strata into collapsed deep cave systems. These structures may compromise the integrity of the confinement created by the underlying strata by allowing upconing of saline water from depth, which has implications for successful application of ASR and use of the Floridan aquifer system as an alternative water supply.

  19. Seismicity Induced by Groundwater Recharge at Mt. Hood, Oregon, and its Implications for Hydrogeologic Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, M. O.; Manga, M.

    2002-12-01

    Earthquakes induced by human-caused changes in fluid pressure have been documented for many years. Examples include seismicity induced by filling reservoirs and by fluid injection or extraction. Less well-documented are seismic events that potentially are triggered by natural variations in groundwater recharge rates (e.g., Wolf et al., BSSA, 1997; Jimenez and Garcia-Fernandez, JVGR, 2000; Audin et al., GRL, 2002). Large groundwater recharge rates can occur in Volcanic Arcs such as the Oregon Cascades where annual precipitation is > 2 m of which > 50 % infiltrates the ground mostly during snowmelt in spring. As a result, infiltration rates of > 1 m per year concentrated during a few months can occur. Near-surface porosities are about 5-10 %. Thus, groundwater levels may fluctuate annually by about 10-20 m resulting in seasonal pore fluid pressure variations of about 1-2 x 105 Pa. Such large-amplitude, narrow-duration fluid pressure signals may allow investigation of seismicity induced by pore fluid pressure diffusion without the influence of engineered systems such as reservoirs. This kind of in-situ study of natural systems over large representative elementary volumes may allow determination of hydrologic parameters at spatial and temporal scales that are relevant for regional hydrogeology. Furthermore, natural hydrologic triggering of earthquakes that persist for decades provides insight into the state of stress in the crust and suggest long-term near-critical failure conditions. Here, we approximate the temporal variations in groundwater recharge with discharge in runoff-dominated streams at high elevations that show a peak in discharge during snow melt. Seismicity is evaluated as time series of daily number of earthquakes and seismic moments. Both stream discharge and seismicity are compared at equivalent frequency bands by applying segmented least-squares polynomial fits to the data. We find statistically significant correlation between groundwater recharge and seismicity at Mt. Hood, Oregon. We can use the time lag of about 120 days between the two records to estimate the regional hydraulic diffusivity (1 m2/s) and other hydrogeologic parameters (permeability ? 10-13 m2, vertical matrix compressibility ? 10-10 m2/N). These values are comparable with our results from coupled heat and groundwater flow studies that are based on bore hole temperature data at Mt. Hood.

  20. Hydrogeologic controls on baseflow temperature distributions: Implications for stream temperature response to climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutt, D. F.; Smith, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Ground water temperature distributions in the near surface are not uniform and are the complex result of a variety of near- and sub-surface processes. Heat from the atmosphere is input into the ground via conduction at the ground surface and advection of infiltrating water. These processes produce predictable distributions of temperature that have been used to investigate current and past climatic conditions, determine ground water velocities, and assess basin-scale heat transport in sedimentary systems. The purpose of this investigation is to test a hypothesis that timing and nature of ground water recharge (advection of heat into the subsurface) is a significant control on the temporal and spatial distribution of heat in the shallow subsurface. The advective movement of heat imposes a dominant control on the 3-dimensional subsurface temperature distribution and strongly affects stream baseflow temperatures. We present observational data supporting a strong hydrogeologic control on subsurface water temperatures. These temperature distributions are modified by advection and are significantly different than theoretical distributions in a conduction-dominated environment. The temperature distributions with depth and space are controlled by the aquifers internal hydrogeologic structure and connections to recharge areas. Synthetic modeling is used to address the following questions: (1) how quickly do ground water temperatures respond to a changing climate, and how quickly do they reach a new equilibrium following perturbation; (2) what is the role of recharge water temperature and timing on subsurface temperature distributions; and (3) how do these factors influence baseflow temperatures in stream systems of varying size. Two-dimensional numerical models are developed using Comsol Multiphysics to perform a sensitivity analysis of basin-scale temperature response and coupling to surface water. In nested ground water flow systems, discharge areas farther down the regional hydraulic gradient receive groundwater from increasingly longer flow paths. As such, temperatures in upper portions of the flow system respond sooner to temperature changes than those in lower portions of the system. The upper portions of the model achieved equilibrium with temperature forcing within a few years, while downstream portions required more than 10 years to achieve equilibrium. The results reiterate the importance of advection-driven heat flow to the thermal response of shallow ground water systems and nested basins. Seasonal temperature signatures penetrate deeper and farther down the regional gradient in highly advective systems versus moderately advective systems. Models illustrate the persistence of the seasonal increased heat signature in the subsurface and propagation of that signature with the regional gradient. Upstream discharge locations respond quickly to increased temperatures and receive higher temperature baseflow than under the baseline conditions. Downstream discharge locations are somewhat buffered from increased temperatures due to longer flow paths.

  1. Hydrogeological studies in high mountains karst environment: the example of Picos de Europa (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, Mónica; Ballesteros, Daniel; Jiménez-Sanchez, Montserrat; García-Sansegundo, Joaquín

    2015-04-01

    Karst aquifers are very vulnerable to contamination due their high infiltration coefficient, elevated hydraulic conductivity, high speed of circulation, and very low self-purification capacities. The functioning of that type of aquifer is quite complicated by the high heterogeneity and anisotropy of the karst and the presence of three different types of porosity. It is necessary to understand the functioning of a karst aquifer in order to protect and manage them properly. Therefore, it is necessary to develop working methods to establish the aquifer hydrodynamics, especially in high mountain areas with many methodological constrains (e. g. difficulty to access). The Picos de Europa karst aquifer, located in theNational Park of Picos de Europa (North Spain), presents a high environmental, geomorphological and hydrogeological value; it is included in the "Spanish geological contexts with global relevance" by the Law of Natural Heritage and Biodiversity of Spain, being considered as a Global Geosite by the Geological and Mining Institute of Spain. In addition, the karst massif is included in several figures of environmental protection, both at global and national levels. Hydrogeological and geomorphological research is developed together in this area under the GEOCAVE project (MAGRAMA-580/12 OAPN) and the "Investigación hidrogeológica en las masas de agua subterránea 012.014 Picos de Europa-Panes y 012.018 Alto Deva-Alto Cares. (IGME-73.3.00.41.00/2013)". The aim of this study is to characterize the hydrodynamics of the karst aquifer, considering the snow as an important component of the aquifer recharge. The proposed methodology includes the installation of an integrated pressure sensor and data logger for level and temperature measurement in two karst spring related to two groundwater bodies (GWB) with 86 and 14 km2 extension. The store of data to regular intervals with punctual values of discharge measures has provided, at least, an annual series of data in which level water differences varies from 4.5 m in the largest GWB to 1 m in the smallest one. The comparison of this data series with precipitation data allows to study the aquifer response to precipitation and to stablish the importance of the snow melting in the recharge of the aquifer.

  2. Analysis of damaging hydrogeological events: the case of the Calabria Region (Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Petrucci, O; Polemio, M; Pasqua, A A

    2009-03-01

    A period of bad weather conditions due to prolonged intense rainfall and strong winds can trigger landslides, floods, secondary floods (accumulation of rain on surfaces with low permeability), and sea storms, causing damage to humans and infrastructure. As a whole, these periods of bad weather and triggered phenomena can be defined as damaging hydrogeological events (DHEs). We define a methodological approach based on seven simple indexes to analyze such events. The indexes describe the return period (T) and trend of rainfall, the extent of hit areas, and the level of damages; they can be considered attributes of georeferenced features and analyzed with GIS techniques. We tested our method in an Italian region frequently hit by DHEs. In a period of 10 years, 747 damaging phenomena (landslides, 43%; floods, 38%) and 94 DHEs have been classified. The road network and housing areas are the most frequently damaged elements, threatened by all types of damaging phenomena. T classes are almost in accordance with the level of damage. These results can be used to outline warning levels for civil protection purposes, to forecast the areas most likely to be hit and the potential ensuing damage, to disseminate information concerning vulnerable areas, and to increase people's awareness of risk. PMID:19034561

  3. Water balance in the Guarani Aquifer outcrop zone based on hydrogeologic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendland, E.; Barreto, C.; Gomes, L. H.

    2007-09-01

    SummaryMain objective of this work was the study of the infiltration and recharge mechanisms in the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) outcrop zone. The study was based on hydrogeologic monitoring, evapotranspiration and water balance in a pilot watershed. The pilot watershed (Ribeirão da Onça) is situated in the outcrop zone of the Guarani Aquifer between parallels 22°10' and 22°15' (south latitude) and meridians 47°55' and 48°00' (west longitude). For the execution of the research project, a monitoring network (wells, rain gauge and linigraph) was installed in the watershed. Data have been systematically collected during the period of a hydrological year. Water level fluctuation has been used to estimate deep recharge and subsurface storage variation. The method used to estimate the direct recharge adopted the hypothesis that the recession of the groundwater level obeys a function of power law type. Direct recharge is obtained through the difference between the actual level of an unconfined aquifer and the level indicated by extrapolation of the recession curve, in a given period. Base outflow is estimated through a mixed function (linear and exponential). Outflow in the creek has been measured with current meter and monitored continuously with a linigraph. The annual infiltration in 2005 was estimated to be 350 mm, while the deep recharge, based on water balance, appears to be 3.5% of the precipitation (1410 mm). These results indicate that the estimated long term water availability of the Guarani Aquifer System should be studied more carefully.

  4. Hydrogeological relationships of sandy deposits: modeling of two-dimensional unsaturated water and pesticide transport.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Bo V; van der Keur, Peter; Vosgerau, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of the movement of water and solutes in the vadose zone requires information on the distribution of spatial trends and heterogeneities in porous media. The present study describes different lithofacies origination mainly from glaciofluvial deposits. Among different lithofacies, hydrological relationships were investigated. By means of a two-dimensional hydrological model it was evaluated how the flow of water and leaching of metribuzin (4-amino-6-tert-butyl-4,5-dihydro-3-methylthio-1,2,4-triazin-5-one) was affected. Two selected large outcrop sections consisting of glacial outwash deposits were used in the modeling study. Eleven different lithofacies were distinguished and described in terms of texture distribution, sorting, bedding style, and external boundaries based on excavated soil profiles from 27 locations representing seven predominantly sandy landforms in Denmark. Undisturbed soil columns were sampled from each of the lithofacies and brought to the laboratory to be analyzed. With respect to their soil hydraulic properties, the different lithofacies formed four different hydrofacies having relatively homogeneous, hydrogeological properties. Two large outcrop sections from one of the locations (a gravel pit) located near the terminal moraine of the former Weichsel glacier were used for the HYDRUS-2D modeling. Modeling results revealed that the spatial distribution of sedimentary bodies affected water flow and the leaching of metribuzin. PMID:18689752

  5. Hydrogeological studies for radiological monitoring of shallow groundwater in the Eurex plant of Saluggia (Vercelli, Italy).

    PubMed

    Iezzi, S; Imperi, M; Rosati, M; Ventura, G

    2009-12-01

    In 2004, contaminated water was found inside the safety interspace around the spent fuel pool; therefore, an ample monitoring programme of the structure, soils and shallow groundwater was started in order to detect any radioactive leakage into the environment. A first group of piezometers was installed. In the one nearest to the pool, an anomalous activity of (90)Sr ( approximately 10(-2) Bq l(-1)) was found, calling for the following actions: gradual enlarging of the monitoring network, implementation of in situ permeability tests and groundwater tracer test and study of groundwater mobility of the main radionuclides contained in the pool water: (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (241)Am and (239/240)Pu. Because (90)Sr is the only artificial radionuclide detected in groundwater, this study mainly focused on this one. All the investigations demonstrated that (90)Sr coming from the pool is not detectable any longer just some tens of metres from the building and allow the correlation of (90)Sr concentration to flow and water-table fluctuations. Moreover, such a wide mass of hydrogeological and radiological data allows the estimation of an environmental value for environmental radiological significance. PMID:19889799

  6. Reliability, sensitivity, and uncertainty of reservoir performance under climate variability in basins with different hydrogeologic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, C.; Tullos, D.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated how reservoir performance varied across different hydrogeologic settings and under plausible future climate scenarios. The study was conducted in the Santiam River basin, OR, USA, comparing the North Santiam basin (NSB), with high permeability and extensive groundwater storage, and the South Santiam basin (SSB), with low permeability, little groundwater storage, and rapid runoff response. We applied projections of future temperature and precipitation from global climate models to a rainfall-runoff model, coupled with a formal Bayesian uncertainty analysis, to project future inflow hydrographs as inputs to a reservoir operations model. The performance of reservoir operations was evaluated as the reliability in meeting flood management, spring and summer environmental flows, and hydropower generation objectives. Despite projected increases in winter flows and decreases in summer flows, results suggested little evidence of a response in reservoir operation performance to a warming climate, with the exception of summer flow targets in the SSB. Independent of climate impacts, historical prioritization of reservoir operations appeared to impact reliability, suggesting areas where operation performance may be improved. Results also highlighted how hydrologic uncertainty is likely to complicate planning for climate change in basins with substantial groundwater interactions.

  7. Numerical Modeling of the Soil Cover System Performance from Hydrogeological Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, D.; Cheong, Y.; Yim, G.; Baek, H.

    2008-05-01

    Decline of mining industry is drastic in production and consumption in Korea, and the number of operating mines has been reduced by more than 90 percent in last two decades. Environmental concern and the collapse of commercial viability has necessitated the government to close down uneconomical mines, and reclamation of mine waste dumps and the proper treatment of the mine drainage constitute the most important factors for regional rehabilitation programs. A dry soil cover system for mine waste is steadily increasing in Korea, to minimize the influx of water and oxygen into the waste dump. Traditional cover design procedures based on empirical or semi-quantitative analyses can be improved by implementing environmental and hydrological parameters including total precipitation, evapotranspiration, surface runoff, and infiltration associated with different cover configurations. The main objective of this study is to develop a standardized design procedure for dry cover systems to minimize environmental impacts in mine lands, securing both efficiency and long-term structural stability. A numerical analysis technique was adopted for selecting governing parameters which dictate hydrogeologic characteristics of the unsaturated zone in soil cover system. Variables included the soil water characteristic curve, hydraulic conductivity function, and water balance of the study area. A commercial finite element analysis software was applied for performance analysis of three soil cover systems including a simple growth medium, sand layer, and sand-clay-sand complex layer.

  8. Hydrogeologic data for the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkle, D.L.; Bergman, D.L.; Fabian, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    This report is a compilation of hydrogeologic data collected for an areal ground-water investigation of the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. The study area includes parts of Greer, Harmon, and Jackson counties in Oklahoma and parts of Childress, Collingsworth, Hall, Hardeman, and Wilbarger counties in Texas. The Blaine aquifer consists of cavernous gypsum and dolomite beds. Water from the Blaine aquifer supports a local agriculture based mainly on irrigated cotton and wheat. The purpose of the study was to determine the availability, quantity, and quality of ground water from the Blaine aquifer and associated units. This report provides a reference for some of the data that was used as input into a computer ground-water flow model that simulates ground-water flow in the Blaine aquifer. The data in this report consists of: (1) Monthly or periodic water-level measurements in 134 wells; (2) daily mean water-level measurements for 11 wells equipped with water-level recorders; (3) daily total precipitation measurements from five precipitation gages; (4) low-flow stream-discharge measurements for 89 stream sites; (5) miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements at seven stream sites; (6) chemical analyses of surface water from 78 stream sites during low-flow periods; (7) chemical analyses of ground water from 41 wells; and (8) chemical analyses of runoff water collected at five sites.

  9. Hydrogeology and leachate movement near two chemical-waste sites in Oswego County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, H.R.; Miller, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Forty-five observation wells and test holes were installed at two chemical waste disposal sites in Oswego County, New York, to evaluate the hydrogeologic conditions and the rate and direction of leachate migration. At the site near Oswego groundwater moves northward at an average velocity of 0.4 ft/day through unconsolidated glacial deposits and discharges into White Creek and Wine Creek, which border the site and discharge to Lake Ontario. Leaking barrels by chemical wastes have contaminated the groundwater within the site, as evidenced by detection of 10 ' priority pollutant ' organic compounds, and elevated values of specific conductance, chloride, arsenic, lead, and mercury. At the site near Fulton, where 8,000 barrels of chemical wastes are buried, groundwater in the sandy surficial aquifer bordering the landfill on the south and east moves southward and eastward at an average velocity of 2.8 ft/day and discharges to Bell Creek, which discharges to the Oswego River, or moves beneath the landfill. Leachate is migrating eastward, southeastward, and southwestward, as evidenced by elevated values of specific conductance, temperature, and concentrations of several trace metals at wells east, southeast, and southwest of the site. (USGS)

  10. The Geologic and Hydrogeologic Setting of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, P.N.; Corbet, T.F.

    1999-03-04

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a mined repository constructed by the US Department of Energy for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes generated since 1970 by activities related to national defense. The WIPP is located 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in bedded salt (primarily halite) of the Late Permian (approximately 255 million years old) Salado Formation 655 m below the land surface. Characterization of the site began in the mid-1970s. Construction of the underground disposal facilities began in the early 1980s, and the facility received final certification from the US Environmental Protection Agency in May 1998. Disposal operations are planned to begin following receipt of a final permit from the State of New Mexico and resolution of legal issues. Like other proposed geologic repositories for radioactive waste, the WIPP relies on a combination of engineered and natural barriers to isolate the waste from the biosphere. Engineered barriers at the WIPP, including the seals that will be emplaced in the access shafts when the facility is decommissioned, are discussed in the context of facility design elsewhere in this volume. Physical properties of the natural barriers that contribute to the isolation of radionuclides are discussed here in the context of the physiographic, geologic, and hydrogeologic setting of the site.

  11. Borehole Fluid Logging Methods for Hydrogeologic Characterization: What Have We Learned in Twenty-Five Years?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedler, W. H.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, several methods have been developed and enhanced to improve the capability to characterize hydraulically conductive intervals in wellbores. The principal, and most commonly employed, methods include the heat pulse flow meter, the electromagnetic flow meter, and hydrophysical (or FEC) logging. The primary objective of each of these methods is to identify the depth of the water bearing (conductive) intervals and estimate the volumetric flow rate of each conductive interval under one or more pressure conditions. The pressure conditions under which measurements are taken include ambient (native), pumping or injection of the subject well and/or pumping a well proximate to the subject (cross-hole testing). During this period, these methods have been applied in effectively all of the hydrogeologic systems including fractured bedrock, fractured sandstones, porous alluvium, massive and fractured clays, karst, and volcanics. Project applications range from contaminant fate and transport, geotechnical, mining and water supply. These methods evaluate flow in the wellbore fluid column by applying either stationary and/or profile-type logging measurements. Each of these methods evaluates flow in a distinct and unique way and, as such, there are limitations associated with each measurement method. The analytical methods to reduce the field data to the stated objectives also vary in complexity between the different methods. Numerous field and laboratory comparative studies have been conducted to evaluate, compare and verify the results of these methods. This poster will present a summary of these methods, recent updates, variety of applications and associated limitations.

  12. Numerical analysis of the hydrogeologic controls in a layered coastal aquifer system, Oahu, Hawaii, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, D.S.; Souza, W.R.; Bolke, E.L.; Bauer, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    The coastal aquifer system of southern Oahu, Hawaii, USA, consists of highly permeable volcanic aquifers overlain by weathered volcanic rocks and interbedded marine and terrestrial sediments of both high and low permeability. The weathered volcanic rocks and sediments are collectively known as caprock, because they impede the free discharge of groundwater from the underlying volcanic aquifers. A cross-sectional groundwater flow and transport model was used to evaluate the hydrogeologic controls on the regional flow system in southwestern Oahu. Controls considered were: (a) overall caprock hydraulic conductivity; and (b) stratigraphic variations of hydraulic conductivity in the caprock. Within the caprock, variations in hydraulic conductivity, caused by stratigraphy or discontinuities of the stratigraphic units, are a major control on the direction of groundwater flow and the distribution of water levels and salinity. Results of cross-sectional modeling confirm the general groundwater flow pattern that would be expected in a layered coastal system. Ground-water flow is: (a) predominantly upward in the low-permeability sedimentary units; and (b) predominantly horizontal in the high-permeability sedimentary units.

  13. Review: Some low-frequency electrical methods for subsurface characterization and monitoring in hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2012-02-10

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization techniques, which have potential inmany environmental and hydrogeological applications. They provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of electrical current due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redoxactive species. Under some conditions, this method can be used to visualize groundwater flow, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Time-lapse resistivity can be used to assess the permeability and dispersivity distributions and to monitor contaminant plumes. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to reversibly store electrical energy. It can be used to image permeability and to monitor chemistry of the pore water-minerals interface. These geophysical methods, reviewed in this paper, should always be used in concert with additional in-situ measurements (e.g. in-situ pumping tests, chemical measurements of the pore water), for instance through joint inversion schemes, which is an area of fertile on-going research.

  14. Hydrogeology of the Little Spokane River Basin, Spokane, Stevens, and Pend Oreille Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, Sue C.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.

    2013-01-01

    A study of the hydrogeologic framework of the Little Spokane River Basin was conducted to identify and describe the principal hydrogeologic units in the study area, their hydraulic characteristics, and general directions of groundwater movement. The Little Spokane River Basin includes an area of 679 square miles in northeastern Washington State covering parts of Spokane, Stevens, and Pend Oreille Counties. The groundwater system consists of unconsolidated sedimentary deposits and isolated, remnant basalt layers overlying crystalline bedrock. In 1976, a water resources program for the Little Spokane River was adopted into rule by the State of Washington, setting instream flows for the river and closing its tributaries to further uses. Spokane County representatives are concerned about the effects that additional groundwater development within the basin might have on the Little Spokane River and on existing groundwater resources. Information provided by this study will be used in future investigations to evaluate the effects of potential increases in groundwater withdrawals on groundwater and surface-water resources in the basin. The hydrogeologic framework consists of eight hydrogeologic units: the Upper aquifer, Upper confining unit, Lower aquifers, Lower confining unit, Wanapum basalt unit, Latah unit, Grande Ronde basalt unit, and Bedrock. The Upper aquifer is composed mostly of sand and gravel and varies in thickness from 4 to 360 ft, with an average thickness of 70 ft. The aquifer is generally finer grained in areas farther from main outwash channels. The estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 4.4 to 410,000 feet per day (ft/d), with a median hydraulic conductivity of 900 ft/d. The Upper confining unit is a low-permeability unit consisting mostly of silt and clay, and varies in thickness from 5 to 400 ft, with an average thickness of 100 ft. The estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.5 to 5,600 ft/d, with a median hydraulic conductivity of 8.2 ft/d. The Lower aquifers unit consists of localized confined aquifers or lenses consisting mostly of sand that occur at depth in various places in the basin; thickness of the unit ranges from 8 to 150 ft, with an average thickness of 50 ft. The Lower confining unit is a low-permeability unit consisting mostly of silt and clay; thickness of the unit ranges from 35 to 310 ft, with an average thickness of 130 ft. The Wanapum basalt unit includes the Wanapum Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group, thin sedimentary interbeds, and, in some places, overlying loess. The unit occurs as isolated remnants on the basalt bluffs in the study area and ranges in thickness from 7 to 140 ft, with an average thickness of 60 ft. The Latah unit is a mostly low-permeability unit consisting of silt, clay, and sand that underlies and is interbedded with the basalt units. The Latah unit ranges in thickness from 10 to 700 ft, with an average thickness of 250 ft. The estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.19 to 15 ft/d, with a median hydraulic conductivity of 0.56 ft/d. The Grande Ronde unit includes the Grande Ronde Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group and sedimentary interbeds. Unit thickness ranges from 30 to 260 ft, with an average thickness of 140 ft. The estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.03 to 13 ft/d, with a median hydraulic conductivity of 2.9 ft/d. The Bedrock unit is the only available source of groundwater where overlying sediments are absent or insufficiently saturated. The estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.01 to 5,000 ft/d, with a median hydraulic conductivity of 1.4 ft/d. The altitude of the buried bedrock surface ranges from about 2,200 ft to about 1,200 ft. Groundwater movement in the Little Spokane River Basin mimics the surface-water drainage pattern of the basin, moving from the topographically high tributary-basin areas toward the topographically lower valley floors. Water-level altitudes range from more than 2,700 ft to about 1,500 ft near the basin’s outlet.

  15. Hydrogeologic controls on lake level: a case study at Mountain Lake, Virginia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roningen, Jeanne M.; Burbey, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    Mountain Lake in Giles County, Virginia, USA, has a documented history of severe natural lake-level changes involving groundwater seepage that extends over the past 4,200 years. The natural lake was full during a large part of the twentieth century but dried up completely in September 2008 and levels have yet to recover. The objective of the study was to understand the hydrogeologic factors that influence lake-level changes using a daily water balance, electrical resistivity, water sampling and geochemical analysis, and well logging. Results from the water balance demonstrate the seasonal response to precipitation of a forested first-order drainage system in fractured rock. The resistivity surveys suggest discrete high-permeability areas may provide pathways for lake drainage. Imagery, well logs, and field observations appear to confirm the presence of a fault which crosses the Eastern Continental Divide to the east of the lake that had not previously been discussed in literature on the lake; the position of the lake within local and intermediate groundwater flow systems is considered. Historical data suggest that either significant precipitation or artificial intervention to mitigate seepage would be required for lake-level recovery in the near future.

  16. Review: Some Low-Frequency Electrical Methods for Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring in Hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization. These methods are commonly used to solve hydrogeological problems in the shallow subsurface and provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of current mainly due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redox-active species. It can be used to visualize groundwater flow patterns, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to store electrical energy in terms of ion accumulations in the pore water. Electrical resistivity, time-domain and frequency-domain induced polarization methods can be used to image the permeability and the distribution of contaminants in the ground.

  17. Regional groundwater flow in mountainous terrain: Three-dimensional simulations of topographic and hydrogeologic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.

    2008-10-01

    This study uses numerical simulations to define the salient controls on regional groundwater flow in 3-D mountainous terrain by systematically varying topographic and hydrogeologic variables. Topography for idealized multiple-basin mountainous terrain is derived from geomatic data and literature values. Water table elevation, controlled by the ratio of recharge to hydraulic conductivity, largely controls the distribution of recharged water into local, regional, and perpendicular flow systems, perpendicular flow being perpendicular to the regional topographic gradient. Both the relative (%) and absolute (m3/d) values of regional flow and perpendicular flow are examined. The relationship between regional flow and water table elevation is highly nonlinear. With lower water table elevations, relative and absolute regional flow dramatically increase and decrease, respectively, as the water table is lowered further. However, for higher water table elevations above the top of the headwater stream, changes in water table elevation have little effect on regional flow. Local flow predominates in high water table configurations, with regional and perpendicular flow <15% and <10%, respectively, of total recharge in the models tested. Both the relative and the maximum absolute regional flow are directly controlled by the degree of incision of the mountain drainage network; the elevation of mountain ridges is considerably less important. The percentage of the headwater stream with perennial streamflow is a potentially powerful indicator of regional flow in all water table configurations and may be a good indicator of the susceptibility of mountain groundwater systems to increased aridity.

  18. Hydrogeologic factors that influence ground water movement in the desert southwest United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chuang, Frank C.; McKee, Edwin H.; Howard, Keith A.

    2003-01-01

    A project to study ground-water and surface-water interactions in the desert southwestern United States was initiated in 2001 by the Tucson, Arizona office of the Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). One of the goals of the Southwest Ground-water Resources Project was to develop a regional synthesis that includes the use of available digital geologic data, which is growing rapidly due to the increasing use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Included in this report are the digital maps and databases of geologic information that should have a direct impact on the studies of ground-water flow and surface-water interaction. Ground-water flow is governed by many geologic factors or elements including rock and soil permeability, stratigraphy and structural features. These elements directly influence ground-water flow, which is key to understanding the possible inter-connectivity of aquifer systems in desert basins of the southwestern United States. We derive these elements from the evaluation of regional geology and localized studies of hydrogeologic basins. These elements can then be applied to other unstudied areas throughout the desert southwest. This report presents a regional perspective of the geologic elements controlling ground-water systems in the desert southwest that may eventually lead to greater focus on smaller sub-regions and ultimately, to individual ground-water basins.

  19. Hydrogeological model and hydraulic behaviour of a large landslide in the Italian Western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisani, G.; Castelli, M.; Scavia, C.

    2010-11-01

    A study of the large, deep-seated Rosone landslide (Italian Western Alps) is presented. A large amount of geological and geomechanical data has been collected in this area, due to the presence of various villages and man-made structures, and an automatic monitoring system was installed in December 2000. Since its installation, this system has been showing a continuous slow movement with periodical accelerations that can be correlated to heavy rainfall events. A hydrogeological model has been developed to study the influence of rainfall events on the pore pressure variations inside the rock slope. The structural characteristics, inclinometric and piezometric measurements, statigraphic and seismic profiles, geomorphologic information, water balance and chemical analyses of the main springs in the slope have been taken into account to consider this problem. A numerical hydraulic investigation, based on a continuum equivalent model of the landslide, has then been carried out using the FLAC3D computer code. Some preliminary results, which highlight the role of permeability and the porosity values of the rock mass on the pore pressure variations during heavy rainfall, are shown in the paper.

  20. Structural and hydrogeological features of a Lias carbonate aquifer in the Triffa Plain, NE Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardinha, J.; Carneiro, J. F.; Zarhloule, Y.; Barkaoui, A.; Correia, A.; Boughriba, M.; Rimi, A.; El Houadi, B.

    2012-09-01

    The rising demand for water and the contamination of shallow water table aquifers has led authorities in NE Morocco to look for deeper groundwater resources in the Triffa Plain, namely in Lower Jurassic (Lias) dolomitic limestones. The liassic aquifer is of strategic importance for the development of the region, however, its hydrodynamic behaviour is poorly understood due to lack of hydrogeological data and block structure. This article presents a first effort towards understanding the structure and hydraulic behaviour of the aquifer. Exploration borehole data and results from geophysical campaigns were integrated into a GIS environment to build a preliminary model of the aquifer structure. The aquifer behaves as an unconfined aquifer in the northern part of the Béni Snassen Mountains (the recharge area), but as it dips to the north, it becomes confined by marls and shales of the Middle/Upper Jurassic. Even though piezometric level data are scarce, a tentative piezometric map was produced. Three blocks separated by NW-SE trending faults in a horst and graben structure, with distinct flow behaviours were identified: Berkane, Fezouane and Sidi Rahmoun blocks. Those blocks also show differences in hydraulic conductivity distribution. As a result of the reaction with the dolomitic limestones, the groundwater is of calcium-magnesium bicarbonate type. Groundwater temperature as measured in springs ranges from 29 °C to 37 °C in springs and constitutes a potential low enthalpy geothermal resource.

  1. Modeling of nitrogen cycle and nitrate transfer in regional hydrogeologic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Q.Z. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Pairs, Fontainebleau (France). Centre d`Informatique Geologique]|[Sinotech Engineering Consultants, Inc., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Geotechnical Dept.; Girard, G.; Ledoux, E. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau (France). Centre d`Informatique Geologique

    1996-03-01

    A model of the nitrogen cycle and nitrate leaching in soil, called MORELN, was developed to calculate the nitrate flux percolating from soils into aquifers. It uses a ``coupled model,`` which simulates both surface and subsurface flows. A third model, NEWSAM, is linked to the above models to simulate nitrate migration in an aquifer system. This methodology gives a quantitative global description of nitrate transfer, taking into account both leaching in soils and migration in aquifers. Three examples of application tested this methodology (especially the nitrate leaching code, MORELN) at different scales and with different emphases: (1) in a soil plot of several square meters; (2) in a small experimental basin of several square kilometers; and (3) in a regional hydrogeologic system of several hundred square kilometers. Satisfactory results were obtained for the simulation of nitrate leaching at the small scale. Major differences between the measured and simulated nitrate concentrations were observed in a regional aquifer, where the measured concentration does not spatially correlate and the larger spatial variability of the input data were averaged in the model.

  2. Reconnaissance hydrogeologic investigation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility and vicinity, Savannah River Plant, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennehy, K.F.; Prowell, D.C.; McMahon, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the area around the Savannah River Plant, South Carolina consists of 2 to 3 separate water bearing units. In the northern half of the study area, the Barnwell and underlying McBean aquifers are considered one aquifer owing to the absence of the tan clay-confining unit between them. In the southern half of the study area they are separated by the tan clay into two aquifers. Underlying these aquifers, and separated from them by the green clay-confining unit, is the Congaree aquifer. Hydraulic conductivities of the aquifers range from 0.00000001 to 0.0001 ft/sec. Directions of groundwater flow in the Barnwell and McBean aquifers are to the north, with a component of flow directed downward across the green clay and into the Congaree aquifer. The direction of flow in the Congaree aquifer is to the northwest. Water in these aquifers evolves from an acidic (pH < 6.5) mixed-cation type in the Barnwell aquifer to an alkaline (pH > 8) calcium bicarbonate water in the Congaree aquifer. Laboratory experiments indicate that reactions between sediments of the Barnwell aquifer and a salt-solution waste to be stored at the study area would significantly reduce the permeability of the sediment, thereby limiting the movement of the waste in groundwater at the site. (USGS)

  3. Geophysical Evidence for Lithologic and Hydrogeological Controls on Vegetation Communities in a Large Northern Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, L. D.; Reeve, A.; Utne, I. J.; Comas, X.; Ulrich, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Recent conceptual models invoke hydrogeologic processes as a controlling factor in the development of the striking vegetation patterns observed in northern peatlands. These processes regulate the supply of solutes to the peat surface, controlling the surface-water chemistry and the supply of nutrients to plants. Geophysical studies in Caribou Bog, a 2200-hectare peatland in central Maine, indicate a close correlation between lithology of the underlying mineral soil and dominant vegetation. Electrical resistivity imaging along a 1 km transect across the central unit of Caribou Bog resolves underlying glaciomarine clay thickness. Ground penetrating radar precisely defines the glaciomarine interface where peat thickness is less than 10 m. Direct verification of peatland thickness and sampling at the mineral soil contact constrains the geophysical interpretation. Wooded heath interspersed with sphagnum/leatherleaf lawn occurs where glaciomarine clay accumulation is thickest (estimated to exceed 10 m in parts). Abrupt thinning of the glaciomarine clay, such that peat rests directly on bedrock in parts, correlates with a sharp transition to shrub heath dominated vegetation. The location of open pools within the wooded heath of Caribou Bog coincides with localized thinning of the glaciomarine clay and exposure of bedrock at the base of the bog. Groundwater flow cells recorded over two years suggest that the glaciomarine clay acts as a confining layer and impacts nutrient supply from the mineral soil, and hence vegetation patterns, at the bog surface.

  4. Coupled semivariogram uncertainty of hydrogeological and geophysical data on capture zone uncertainty analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahman, A.; Tsai, F.T.-C.; White, C.D.; Willson, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates capture zone uncertainty that relates to the coupled semivariogram uncertainty of hydrogeological and geophysical data. Semivariogram uncertainty is represented by the uncertainty in structural parameters (range, sill, and nugget). We used the beta distribution function to derive the prior distributions of structural parameters. The probability distributions of structural parameters were further updated through the Bayesian approach with the Gaussian likelihood functions. Cokriging of noncollocated pumping test data and electrical resistivity data was conducted to better estimate hydraulic conductivity through autosemivariograms and pseudo-cross-semivariogram. Sensitivities of capture zone variability with respect to the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, porosity and aquifer thickness were analyzed using ANOVA. The proposed methodology was applied to the analysis of capture zone uncertainty at the Chicot aquifer in Southwestern Louisiana, where a regional groundwater flow model was developed. MODFLOW-MODPATH was adopted to delineate the capture zone. The ANOVA results showed that both capture zone area and compactness were sensitive to hydraulic conductivity variation. We concluded that the capture zone uncertainty due to the semivariogram uncertainty is much higher than that due to the kriging uncertainty for given semivariograms. In other words, the sole use of conditional variances of kriging may greatly underestimate the flow response uncertainty. Semivariogram uncertainty should also be taken into account in the uncertainty analysis. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  5. Hydrogeology and groundwater flow in a basalt-capped Mesozoic sedimentary series of the Ethiopian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Ine; Nyssen, Jan; Clymans, Wim; Moeyersons, Jan; Martens, Kristine; van Camp, Marc; Gebreyohannes, Tesfamichael; Desmedt, Florimond; Deckers, Jozef; Walraevens, Kristine

    2011-05-01

    A hydrogeological study was undertaken in the Zenako-Argaka catchment, near Hagere Selam in Tigray, northern Ethiopia, during the rainy season of 2006. A geological map was produced through geophysical measurements and field observations, and a fracture zone identified in the north west of the catchment. A perched water table was found within the Trap Basalt series above the laterized upper Aram Aradam Sandstones. A map of this water table was compiled. Water-level variation during the measurement period was at least 4.5 m. Variation in basal flow for the whole catchment for the measurement period was between 12 and 276 m3/day. A groundwater flow model was produced using Visual MODFLOW, indicating the general direction of flow to be towards the south, and illustrating that the waterways have only a limited influence on groundwater flow. The soil water budget was calculated for the period 1995-2006, which showed the important influence of the distribution of rainfall in time. Although Hagere Selam received some 724 mm of rainfall per year over this period, the strong seasonal variation in rainfall meant there was a water deficit for on average 10 months per year.

  6. MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model -Documentation of the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, E.R.; Hill, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package for the groundwater modeling computer program MODFLOW-2000. The HUF Package is an alternative internal flow package that allows the vertical geometry of the system hydrogeology to be defined explicitly within the model using hydrogeologic units that can be different than the definition of the model layers. The HUF Package works with all the processes of MODFLOW-2000. For the Ground-Water Flow Process, the HUF Package calculates effective hydraulic properties for the model layers based on the hydraulic properties of the hydrogeologic units, which are defined by the user using parameters. The hydraulic properties are used to calculate the conductance coefficients and other terms needed to solve the ground-water flow equation. The sensitivity of the model to the parameters defined within the HUF Package input file can be calculated using the Sensitivity Process, using observations defined with the Observation Process. Optimal values of the parameters can be estimated by using the Parameter-Estimation Process. The HUF Package is nearly identical to the Layer-Property Flow (LPF) Package, the major difference being the definition of the vertical geometry of the system hydrogeology. Use of the HUF Package is illustrated in two test cases, which also serve to verify the performance of the package by showing that the Parameter-Estimation Process produces the true parameter values when exact observations are used.

  7. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Elliott, Peggy E.

    2002-01-01

    The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologically complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence hydraulic conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  9. Hydrogeological and isotope mapping of the karstic Savica River (NW Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bren?i?, Mihael; Vre?a, Polona

    2015-04-01

    Mapping is important part of the hydrogeological terrain investigations, especially when spatial and temporal relations are not known precisely. There are many different methods available; among them not least important is careful visual inspection of the stream and its stream bed at regular intervals with the aim to detect phenomena which reflect surface water groundwater interactions. In parallel with the inspection various measurements can be performed. Together with usual water electro conductivity and water temperature we tested complimentary information which can be obtained with the concomitant regular sampling for ?18O determination in the river water course. Combination of all these information proved to be very useful in obtaining spatial trends in river characteristics and to determine relations between its water balance components. Testing of the methodology of hydrogeological mapping with the means of isotopes on the karstic Savica River during low flow period where water balance relations between its tributaries were not known before demonstrate the usefulness of the applied approach. Savica River is positioned in the north-west part of Slovenia in the centre of Triglav national Park which covers large part of East Julian Alps. River represents the main recharge of the Bohinj Lake, largest Slovenian natural lake. Savica River is short with the length of only 4.0 km and consists of two tributaries in the upper part; Mala Savica coming from the west and Velika Savica coming from the north-west. The first is recharged from several water caves of various lengths in which water level depends on hydrological conditions, consequently terminal end of the water in its riverbed part changes during the year. The second tributary is recharged from the 510 m long karstic cave with the entrance at 836 m a.s.l. where water disappears over 75 m high famous and picturesque waterfall. Geology of the catchment is predominantly formed by Dachstein limestone of Upper Triassic age subordinated by small number of dolomite beds. In the period between years 1954 and 2012 was average discharge at the gauging station Savica Ukanc 5.08 m3/s. At the gauging profile riverbed is occasionally reported as dry and maximum measured discharge was 138 m3/s. Based on the three sampling campaigns performed at low water conditions when each time between 35 and 40 samples were taken, we were able to estimate relations between various Savica River components. During low water period Mala Savica defined presents between 12 % and 17 % of the total outflow from the total Savica recharge area. Velika Savica in its complete water course represents between 78 % and 82 % of the total outflow. There is also small part recharging in the area between the confluence of Velika Savica and Mala Savica and confluence of Savica with Bohinj Lake; this part represents from 3 % to 5 %, however estimations are very rough and probably prone to large error. Estimated relations are based on the rough calculations but represent important step forward in the understanding of complex Savica River system. Until now no data was available on the amount and share of Velika Savica and Mala Savica to the total outflow from the vast karstic recharge area on high mountainous plateau. Mapping campaigns along the whole river were performed at low to moderate hydrological conditions; therefore results cannot be transferred to the all possible hydrological conditions. However, similar results obtained during three seasons with slightly different discharge regimes indicate that the spatial relations are relatively stable. Results are important for further investigations of Savica River system. Such information can help to discern hydrogeologicaly important points along the river course and based on them we can focus on more detailed observations at particular sites. In the future they will help us in better understanding of hydrograph components and better understanding of the functioning of karstic aquifer draining through Savica springs and direct inflows of groundwater into the rive

  10. Hydrogeology of the West Branch Delaware River basin, Delaware County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, began a study of the hydrogeology of the West Branch Delaware River (Cannonsville Reservoir) watershed. There has been recent interest by energy companies in developing the natural gas reserves that are trapped within the Marcellus Shale, which is part of the Hamilton Group of Devonian age that underlies all the West Branch Delaware River Basin. Knowing the extent and thickness of stratified-drift (sand and gravel) aquifers within this basin can help State and Federal regulatory agencies evaluate any effects on these aquifers that gas-well drilling might produce. This report describes the hydrogeology of the 455-square-mile basin in the southwestern Catskill Mountain region of southeastern New York and includes a detailed surficial geologic map of the basin. Analysis of surficial geologic data indicates that the most widespread surficial geologic unit within the basin is till, which is present as deposits of ablation till in major stream valleys and as thick deposits of lodgment till that fill upland basins. Till and colluvium (remobilized till) cover about 89 percent of the West Branch Delaware River Basin, whereas stratified drift (outwash and ice-contact deposits) and alluvium account for 8.9 percent. The Cannonsville Reservoir occupies about 1.9 percent of the basin area. Large areas of outwash and ice-contact deposits occupy the West Branch Delaware River valley along its entire length. These deposits form a stratified-drift aquifer that ranges in thickness from 40 to 50 feet (ft) in the upper West Branch Delaware River valley, from 70 to 140 ft in the middle West Branch Delaware River valley, and from 60 to 70 ft in the lower West Branch Delaware River valley. The gas-bearing Marcellus Shale underlies the entire West Branch Delaware River Basin and ranges in thickness from 600 to 650 ft along the northern divide of the basin to 750 ft thick along the southern divide. The depth to the top of the Marcellus Shale ranges from 3,240 ft along the northern basin divide to 4,150 ft along the southern basin divide. Yields of wells completed in the aquifer are as high as 500 gallons per minute (gal/min). Springs from fractured sandstone bedrock are an important source of domestic and small municipal water supplies in the West Branch Delaware River Basin and elsewhere in Delaware County. The average yield of 178 springs in Delaware County is 8.5 gal/min with a median yield of 3 gal/min. An analysis of two low-flow statistics indicates that groundwater contributions from fractured bedrock compose a significant part of the base flow of the West Branch Delaware River and its tributaries.

  11. Hydrogeology of the Beaver Kill basin in Sullivan, Delaware, and Ulster Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the 299-square-mile Beaver Kill basin in the southwestern Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York is depicted in a surficial geologic map and five geologic sections, and is summarized through an analysis of low-flow statistics for the Beaver Kill and its major tributary, Willowemoc Creek. Surficial geologic data indicate that the most widespread geologic units within the basin are ablation and lodgment till. Large masses of ablation till as much as 450 feet thick were deposited as lateral embankments within the narrow Beaver Kill and Willowemoc Creek valleys and have displaced the modern stream courses by as much as 1,000 feet from the preglacial bedrock-valley axis. Low-flow statistics for the Beaver Kill and Willowemoc Creeks indicate that the base flows (discharges that are exceeded 90 percent of the time) of these two streams--0.36 and 0.39 cubic feet per square mile,respectively--are the highest of 13 Catskill Mountain streams studied. High base flows elsewhere in the glaciated northeastern United States are generally associated with large stratified-drift aquifers, however, stratified drift in these two basins accounts for only about 5 percent and 4.4 percent of their respective surface areas, respectively. The high base flows in these two basins appear to correlate with an equally high percentage of massive sandstone members of the Catskill Formation, which underlies the entire region. Ground-water seepage from these sandstone members may be responsible for the high base flows of these two streams.

  12. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  13. Transport and fate of nitrate and pesticides: hydrogeology and riparian zone processes.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Larry J; Hughes, W Brian

    2005-01-01

    There is continuing concern over potential impacts of widespread application of nutrients and pesticides on ground- and surface-water quality. Transport and fate of nitrate and pesticides were investigated in a shallow aquifer and adjacent stream, Cow Castle Creek, in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. Pesticide and pesticide degradate concentrations were detected in ground water with greatest frequency and largest concentrations directly beneath and downgradient from the corn (Zea mays L.) field where they were applied. In almost all samples in which they were detected, concentrations of pesticide degradates greatly exceeded those of parent compounds, and were still present in ground waters that were recharged during the previous 18 yr. The absence of both parent and degradate compounds in samples collected from deeper in the aquifer suggests that this persistence is limited or that the ground water had recharged before use of the pesticide. Concentrations of NO(-)(3) in ground water decreased with increasing depth and age, but denitrification was not a dominant controlling factor. Hydrologic and chemical data indicated that ground water discharges to the creek and chemical exchange takes place within the upper 0.7 m of the streambed. Ground water had its greatest influence on surface-water chemistry during low-flow periods, causing a decrease in concentrations of Cl(-), NO(-)(3), pesticides, and pesticide degradates. Conversely, shallow subsurface drainage dominates stream chemistry during high-flow periods, increasing stream concentrations of Cl(-), NO(-)(3), pesticides, and pesticide degradates. These results point out the importance of understanding the hydrogeologic setting when investigating transport and fate of contaminants in ground water and surface water. PMID:16275729

  14. Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, B.J. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. (Univ. of Arkansas , Fayetteville, AR (United States). Geological Survey)

    1993-02-01

    Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

  15. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the East Bear Creek Unit, San LuisNational Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-07-15

    San Luis National Wildlife Refuge Complex to meetReclamation s obligations for Level 4 water supply under the CentralValley Project Improvement Act. Hydrogeological assessment of the EastBear Creek Unit of the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge was conductedusing a combination of field investigations and a survey of availableliterature from past US Geological Survey Reports and reports by localgeological consultants. Conservative safe yield estimates made using theavailable data show that the East Bear Creek Unit may have sufficientgroundwater resources in the shallow groundwater aquifer to meet aboutbetween 25 percent and 52 percent of its current Level II and between 17percent and 35 percent of its level IV water supply needs. The rate ofsurface and lateral recharge to the Unit and the design of the well fieldand the layout and capacity of pumped wells will decide both thepercentage of annual needs that the shallow aquifer can supply andwhether this yield is sustainable without affecting long-term aquiferquality. In order to further investigate the merits of pumping the nearsurface aquifer, which appears to have reasonable water quality for usewithin the East Bear Creek Unit -- monitoring of the potential sources ofaquifer recharge and the installation of a pilot shallow well would bewarranted. Simple monitoring stations could be installed both upstreamand downstream of both the San Joaquin River and Bear Creek and beinstrumented to measureriver stage, flow and electrical conductivity.Ideally this would be done in conjunction with a shallow pilot well,pumped to supply a portion of the Unit's needs for the wetland inundationperiod.

  16. Comprehensive principles of quantitative hydrogeology established by Darcy (1856) and Dupuit (1857)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzi, Robert W.; Bobeck, Patricia

    2008-10-01

    Henry Darcy and Jules Dupuit were born 1 year apart, were classmates during their undergraduate and graduate education in civil engineering, and were colleagues in the French corps of civil engineers, with overlapping appointments as inspector general in the early 1850s. At that time Darcy turned over, to Dupuit, his position as Director of Water and Bridges in Paris and the research on pipe flow he had begun there in 1849. In these pipe flow experiments, Darcy discovered what he referred to as a "law" of fluid mechanics, which is that above a certain velocity threshold, the head loss is proportional to velocity squared, and below that threshold, the head loss is linearly proportional to velocity. During the remainder of their careers, Darcy and Dupuit applied this law with their collective, extensive, prior knowledge of fluid mechanics, geology, aquifers, wells, and springs to quantitative studies of fluid flow in the subsurface (and also in pipes, aqueducts, rivers, and sand filters). Two monographs by Darcy (1856) and Dupuit (1857) are mutually cited retrospectives on much of this research, submitted at nearly the same time, to the same Corps des Ponts et Chaussées publisher, near the end of their careers. Between these two monographs, many of the fundamentals of quantitative hydrogeology were established, including the equation for groundwater motion, average linear velocity, average travel time, effective hydraulic conductivity for layered heterogeneity, conservation of mass in confined and unconfined flow, the nature of the regional pieziometric surface, porous flow versus flow through discrete fractures and karst conduits, the equation for a cone of depression around flowing wells, superposition of the effects of multiple wells, and capture zone geometries of wells within a regional flow field.

  17. Correlation of Miocene sequences and hydrogeologic units, New Jersey Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sugarman, P.J.; Miller, K.G.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a Miocene sequence stratigraphic framework using data from recently drilled boreholes in the New Jersey Coastal Plain. Sequences are shallowing upward, unconformity-bounded units; fine-grained shelf and prodelta sediments grade upward to delta front and shallow-marine sands, corresponding to confining bed-aquifer couplets. By dating Miocene sequences using Sr-isotope stratigraphy, and mapping with borehole data and geophysical logs, we can predict the continuity and effectiveness of the confining beds and aquifers. The following are illustrated on a 90-km basinward dip section: (1) the composite confining bed is comprised of the KwO and lower Kw1a (ca. 23.8-20.5 Ma) sequences downdip at Atlantic City, and the Kw1b, Kw1a and older sequences updip (ca. 69.3-20.6 Ma), and is continuous throughout most of the coastal plain; (2) the major confined aquifer, the Atlantic City 800-foot sand, is comprised of the upper Kw1a and Kw1b sequences (ca. 20.5-20.2 Ma) and is an areally continuous sand that is interconnected with the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system updip of Mays Landing; (3) the confining bed above the Atlantic City 800-foot sand is comprised of the Kw2a, Kw2b, and Kw3 sequences (18.1-13.3 Ma) and is an extensive confining bed that pinches out updip. These sequences and aquifer-confining bed couplets are linked to global sea-level changes evinced by the ??18O record. We conclude that sequence stratigraphy is a powerful tool when applied to regional hydrogeologic problems, although basinal tectonic differences and localized variations in sediment supply can affect aquifer thickness and permeability.

  18. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Emporia- Lyon County Landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, N.C.; Bigsby, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogeology and water-quality conditions at the Emporia-Lyon County Landfill, eastern Kansas, were investigated from April 1988 through April 1989. Potentiometric-surface maps indicated groundwater movement from the northeast and northwest towards the landfill and then south through the landfill to the Cottonwood River. The maps indicate that during periods of low groundwater levels, groundwater flows northward in the north-west part of the landfill, which may have been induced by water withdrawal from wells north of the landfill or by water ponded in waste lagoons south and west of the landfill. Chemical analysis of water samples from monitoring wells upgradient and downgradient of the landfill indicate calcium bicarbonate to be the dominant water type. No inorganic or organic chemical concentrations exceeded Kansas or Federal primary drinking-water standards. Kansas secondary drinking-water standards were equaled or exceeded, however, in water from some or all wells for total hardness, dissolved solids, iron, and manganese. Water from one upgradient well contained larger concentrations of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, and smaller concentrations of bicarbonate, alkalinity, ammonia, arsenic, iron, and manganese as compared to all other monitoring wells. Results of this investigation indicate that groundwater quality downgradient of well MW-2 has increased concentrations of some inorganic and organic compounds. Due to the industrial nature of the area and the changing directions of groundwater flow, it is not clear what the source of these compounds might be. Long-term monitoring, additional wells, and access to nearby waste lagoons and waste-lagoon monitoring wells would help define the sources of increased inorganic and organic compounds. (USGS)

  19. Faulting and groundwater in a desert environment: constraining hydrogeology using time-domain electromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedrosian, Paul A.; Burgess, Matthew K.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Within the south-western Mojave Desert, the Joshua Basin Water District is considering applying imported water into infiltration ponds in the Joshua Tree groundwater sub-basin in an attempt to artificially recharge the underlying aquifer. Scarce subsurface hydrogeological data are available near the proposed recharge site; therefore, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were collected and analysed to characterize the subsurface. TDEM soundings were acquired to estimate the depth to water on either side of the Pinto Mountain Fault, a major east-west trending strike-slip fault that transects the proposed recharge site. While TDEM is a standard technique for groundwater investigations, special care must be taken when acquiring and interpreting TDEM data in a twodimensional (2D) faulted environment. A subset of the TDEM data consistent with a layered-earth interpretation was identified through a combination of three-dimensional (3D) forward modelling and diffusion time-distance estimates. Inverse modelling indicates an offset in water table elevation of nearly 40 m across the fault. These findings imply that the fault acts as a low-permeability barrier to groundwater flow in the vicinity of the proposed recharge site. Existing production wells on the south side of the fault, together with a thick unsaturated zone and permeable near-surface deposits, suggest the southern half of the study area is suitable for artificial recharge. These results illustrate the effectiveness of targeted TDEM in support of hydrological studies in a heavily faulted desert environment where data are scarce and the cost of obtaining these data by conventional drilling techniques is prohibitive.

  20. The relationship between hydrogeologic properties and sedimentary facies: An example from Pennsylvanian bedrock aquifers, southwestern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.T.; Revenaugh, J. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Dept.; Barnhill, M.

    1998-11-01

    Aquifer characterization is frequently based on incomplete information, particularly in complex, sedimentary environments. Knowledge is incomplete because aquifer properties tend to vary directionally and over a range of spatial scales, leading to enormous differences in ground water flow and transport characteristics. The relationship between the hydrogeologic properties and sedimentary facies of shallow Pennsylvanian bedrock aquifers was examined using detailed sedimentologic descriptions, aquifer (slug) tests, and gamma ray logs. The main goal of the study was to determine if it was possible to reliably estimate near-well hydraulic conductivities using core descriptions and logging data at a complex field site, based on assignment of consistent conductivity indicators to individual facies. Lithologic information was gathered from three sources: core descriptions, simplified lithologic columns derived from the core descriptions, and drillers` logs. Gamma ray data were collected with a conventional logging instrument. Slug tests were conducted in all wells containing screened zones entirely within the Pennsylvanian facies of interest. Simplified subsets of sedimentologic facies were assembled for classification of subsurface geology, and all rocks within the screened intervals of test wells were assigned to individual facies based on visual descriptions. Slug tests were conducted to determine the bulk hydraulic conductivity in the immediate vicinity of the wells, with measured values varying from 10{sup {minus}4} m/s to 10{sup {minus}8} m/s. Gamma ray logs from these wells revealed variations in raw counts above about 1.5 orders of magnitude. Data were combined using simple linear and nonlinear inverse techniques to derive relations between sedimentologic facies, gamma ray signals, and bulk hydraulic conductivities.

  1. A hydrogeological study of the Nhandugue River, Mozambique - A major groundwater recharge zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidsson, K.; Stenberg, L.; Chirindja, F.; Dahlin, T.; Owen, R.; Steinbruch, F.

    The Nhandugue River flows over the western margin of the Urema Rift, the southernmost extension of the East African Rift System, and marks the north-western border of Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique. It constitutes one of the major indispensable water resources for the ecosystem that the park protects. Our study focused on the hydrogeological conditions at the western rift margin by resistivity measurements, soil sampling and discharge measurements. The resistivity results suggest that the area is heavily faulted and constitutes a major groundwater recharge zone. East of the rift margin the resistivity indicate that solid gneiss is fractured and weathered, and is overlain by sandstone and alluvial sediments. The top 10-15 m of the alluvial sequence is interpreted as sand. The sand layer extends back to the rift margin thus also covering the gneiss. The sandstone outcrops a few kilometers from the rift margin and dips towards east/south-east. Further into the rift valley, the sand is underlain by lenses of silt and clay on top of sand mixed with finer matter. In the lower end of the investigated area the lenses of silt and clay appears as a more or less continuous layer between the two sand units. The topmost alluvial sand constitutes an unconfined aquifer under which the solid gneiss forms a hydraulic boundary and the fractured gneiss an unconfined aquifer. The sandstone is an unconfined aquifer in the west, becoming semi-confined down dip. The lenses of silt and clay forms an aquitard and the underlying sand mixed with finer matter a semi-confined aquifer. The surface runoff decreases downstream and it is therefore concluded that surface water infiltrates as recharge to the aquifers and moves as groundwater in an east/south-eastward direction.

  2. Palaeo-hydrogeology of the Cretaceous Sediments of the Williston Basin using Stable Isotopes of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Michael J.; Barbour, S. Lee; Novakowski, Kent; Wassenaar, Len I.

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic and isotopic data collected from aquifers are typically used to characterize hydrogeological conditions within sedimentary basins. Similar data from confining units are generally not collected despite their ability to provide insights into important water/solute transport controls. In this study, we characterized palaeo-groundwater flow and solute transport mechanisms across 384 m of a Cretaceous shale aquitard in the Williston Basin, Canada, using high-resolution depth profiles of water isotopes (?18O and ?2H). Water samples were also collected from wells installed in the underlying regional aquifer (Mannville Fm; 93 m thick) and from seepage inflows into potash mine shafts (to 825 m below ground). 1-D numerical transport modeling of isotopic profiles yielded insight into large-scale/long-term solute transport in both Cretaceous sediments and the Basin. Molecular diffusion was determined to be the dominant solute transport mechanism through the aquitard. Transport model simulations suggest average vertical groundwater velocities of <0.05 m/10 ka and an average excess hydraulic head of <10 m. These values are less than anticipated by successive glaciations. The dominant palaeo-event reflected in present-day profiles is introduction during the Pleistocene of glaciogenic meteoric water to the aquifer underlying the aquitard, likely along an aquifer outcrop area east of the site or through local vertical conduits in the aquitard. Simulations suggest these recharge events occurred during one or more glacial periods. The isotopic profile over the upper 25 m of Pleistocene till and shale is consistent with glacial deposition and transport processes within these units during the Holocene (past 10 ka).

  3. Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

  4. Progress Toward Understanding of Coupled Microbiology, Biogeochemistry, and Hydrogeology Controls on Subsurface Mobility of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, P. E.; Williams, K. H.; Davis, J. A.; Banfield, J. F.; Bargar, J.; Lovley, D. R.; Hatfield, K.; Wilkins, M. J.; Yabusaki, S.; Murray, C. J.; Jaffe, P. R.; Science Team, R.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium as an anthropogenic environmental contaminant stems from nuclear weapons production and the nuclear fuel cycle for nuclear power generation over the last 65 years. Progress in research, monitoring, and clean up at such sites has resulted in both long-term monitoring and field scale manipulation experimental data that are enabling in-depth understanding of coupling among microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology subsurface processes controlling mobility of U. One such site, the U.S. Department of Energy's IFRC at Rifle, CO, has hosted several acetate electron donor amendment and non-biostimulated desorption tracer tests culminating in an experiment in 2010 in which bicarbonate promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Enzymatic U reduction rates were not impacted by the increased abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonate aqueous complexes in the bicarbonate part of the experiment. However, the importance of changes in bicarbonate on U desorption is clear. Bicarbonate increases during acetate-only field experiments due to microbial activity promote U desorption and this must be accounted for in estimating field-scale reduction rates for U. The Rifle site also has more than a decade of monitoring data that show the plume is attenuating much slower than predicted. Naturally reduced zones at the site indicate that microbially-mediated natural reducing conditions have partially reduced U(VI) to U(IV) and this contributes to plume persistence. However, we are just beginning to explore the full range of biogeochemical processes that will enable us to more accurately predict plume attenuation and that will be needed to either enhance or decrease mobility of U as remedial strategies.

  5. Data requirements for simulation of hydrogeologic effects of liquid waste injection, Harrison and Jackson Counties, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Available literature and data were reviewed to quantify data requirements for computer simulation of hydrogeologic effects of liquid waste injection in southeastern Mississippi. Emphasis of each review was placed on quantifying physical properties of current Class I injection zones in Harrison and Jackson Counties. Class I injection zones are zones that are used for injection of hazardous or non-hazardous liquid waste below a formation containing the lowermost underground source of drinking water located within one-quarter of a mile of the injection well. Several mathematical models have been developed to simulate injection effects. The Basic Plume Method was selected because it is commonly used in permit applications, and the Intercomp model was selected because it is generally accepted and used in injection-related research. The input data requirements of the two models were combined into a single data requirement list inclusive of physical properties of injection zones only; injected waste and well properties are not included because such information is site-specific by industry, which is beyond the scope of this report. Results of the reviews of available literature and data indicated that Class I permit applications and standard-reference chemistry and physics texts were the primary sources of information to quantify physical properties of injection zones in Harrison and Jackson Counties. With the exception of a few reports and supplementary data for one injection zone in Jackson County, very little additional information pertaining to physical properties of the injection zones was available in sources other than permit applications and standard-reference texts.

  6. Numerical versus statistical modelling of natural response of a karst hydrogeological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenlohr, Laurent; Bouzelboudjen, Mahmoud; Király, László; Rossier, Yvan

    1997-12-01

    Structural and hydrodynamic characteristics of karst aquifers are mostly deduced from studies of global responses of karst springs (hydrographs, chemical or isotopic composition). In this case, global response is often used to make inferences with respect to infiltration and ground water flow processes as well as on the hydrodynamic parameters. Obviously, the direct verification of these inferences is very difficult. We have used an indirect method of verification, introducing well defined theoretical karst structures into a finite element model and then analysing the simulated global response according to the currently accepted interpretation schemes. As we know what we are introducing into the numeric model, the consistency of the interpretation may be checked immediately. The results obtained in the hydrogeological study of two karst basins in the Swiss Jura and from 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations show the difficulty of finding structural parameters and hydrodynamic behaviour from statistical methods alone, i.e. correlation analyses discharge-discharge and precipitation-discharge. In effect, our first results show that the form of the correlograms depends on several factors besides the structure of the karst aquifer: (i) on the form of the floods, in other words the contrast between quick flow and base flow, (ii) on the frequency of hydrological events during the period analysed and (iii) on the type of infiltration processes, in other words the ratio of diffuse infiltration to concentrated infiltration. Obviously, the variability of a karst hydrograph is a result of a combination of these factors. Distinction between them is not always possible on hydrographs, and therefore on correlations (discharge-discharge and precipitation-discharge).

  7. Hydrogeologic Testing During Drilling of COSC-1 Borehole: Application of FFEC Logging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Sharma, Prabhakar; Niemi, Auli; Juhlin, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Drilling of a deep borehole does not normally allow for hydrogeologic testing during the drilling period. The only time hydraulic testing is done during the drilling operations is when drilling experiences a large loss (or high return) of drilling fluid representing encountering of a large-transmissivity zone. Then, either the zone is cemented for drilling to continue or drilling is stopped for conducting, for example, a drill-stem test (DST), which involves installation of a packer above the drilling depth and performing a pressure or flow transient test. The first alternative means loss of critical information on in-situ hydraulic transmissivities and the second option enables the study of only the one high-transmissivity zone, with a significant delay of the drilling schedule. The drilling of the COSC-1 borehole at Åre, Northern Sweden, presented an opportunity of conducting a particular hydraulic testing with negligible impact on drilling schedule, yet providing important and accurate information on in-situ hydraulic conductivities on both high- and low-transmissivity zones, already during the drilling period. This information can be used to guide downhole fluid sampling programs and future detailed borehole testing. The particular testing method used is the Flowing Fluid Electric Conductivity (FFEC) Logging Method, which has the capability of identifying large and small hydraulically active zones and providing data for estimating their transmissivity values and local formation water salinity. In this paper, the method will be described and its application to the drilling of COSC-1 borehole presented. Results show that from 300 m to the borehole bottom at 2500 m, there are eight hydraulic active zones in COSC-1, with very low transmissivity values which range over one order of magnitude.

  8. Providing a Connection between a Bayesian Inverse Modeling Tool and a Coupled Hydrogeological Processes Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frystacky, H.; Osorio-Murillo, C. A.; Over, M. W.; Kalbacher, T.; Gunnell, D.; Kolditz, O.; Ames, D.; Rubin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Method of Anchored Distributions (MAD) is a Bayesian technique for characterizing the uncertainty in geostatistical model parameters. Open-source software has been developed in a modular framework such that this technique can be applied to any forward model software via a driver. This presentation is about the driver that has been developed for OpenGeoSys (OGS), open-source software that can simulate many hydrogeological processes, including couple processes. MAD allows the use of multiple data types for conditioning the spatially random fields and assessing model parameter likelihood. For example, if simulating flow and mass transport, the inversion target variable could be hydraulic conductivity and the inversion data types could be head, concentration, or both. The driver detects from the OGS files which processes and variables are being used in a given project and allows MAD to prompt the user to choose those that are to be modeled or to be treated deterministically. In this way, any combination of processes allowed by OGS can have MAD applied. As for the software, there are two versions, each with its own OGS driver. A Windows desktop version is available as a graphical user interface and is ideal for the learning and teaching environment. High-throughput computing can even be achieved with this version via HTCondor if large projects want to be pursued in a computer lab. In addition to this desktop application, a Linux version is available equipped with MPI such that it can be run in parallel on a computer cluster. All releases can be downloaded from the MAD Codeplex site given below.

  9. Hydrogeological study for improved nature restoration in dune ecosystems--Kleyne Vlakte case study, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vandenbohede, A; Lebbe, L; Adams, R; Cosyns, E; Durinck, P; Zwaenepoel, A

    2010-11-01

    In dune slacks a close coupling exists between changes in the hydrology and changes in species composition and vegetation structure. Consequently, there is a need to underpin nature restoration projects not only with ecologically relevant knowledge but also with scientifically sound hydrogeological data. In this paper, this necessity is illustrated through a study of the Flemish Nature Reserve 'The Zwindunes and Zwinpolders' (Belgian coastal plain) as an example. The management plan for the nature reserve suggests rewetting part of it to enhance its ecological value. The groundwater aspect was studied by means of field observations and mathematical modelling. First, fresh water head observation showed a mean groundwater flow from the nature reserve to the adjacent polder. Secondly, groundwater quality was studied with borehole measurements and water samples, resulting in a map of the fresh-salt water distribution and of water types. All available information was then put together in a density dependent groundwater flow model. The aim of this model was the description of current flow and fresh-salt water distribution and to simulate the impact of three possible rewetting scenarios. Rewetting will be accomplished by the infiltration of water in a depression, different lay-outs for which are considered. A zoomed in flow model based on a regional model was used to incorporate both local scale, which is of importance to ecology, and the larger scale, which determines general groundwater flow and fresh-salt water distribution. This modelling indicated differences between scenarios and was used to decide on the best rewetting strategy. PMID:20655140

  10. Hydrogeology and effects of tailings basins on the hydrology of Sands Plain, Marquette County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grannemann, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrogeological study of Sands Plain, a sandy outwash area in the north-central part of Michigan 's Upper Peninsula, was conducted during 1979-82. Parts of the area are being considered as possible sites for construction and operation of iron mining tailings basins. Gribben Basin, an existing tailings basin in the western part of Sands Plains, covers 2.5 square miles; hypothetical tailings basins may cover as much as 11 square miles. Glacial deposits are the area 's principal aquifer. The general direction of ground-water flow is from the outwash area toward Lake Superior. Before reaching Lake Superior, however, most ground water is discharged in a series of nearly parallel streams. Ground water accounts for 95 percent of the discharge of these streams. Precipitation collected at two sites had average pH values of 4.0. Dissolved solids concentrations in water from wells ranged from 41 to 246 milligrams per liter; in water from streams, they ranged from 82 to 143 milligrams per liter. Calcium and bicarbonate were the principal dissolved ions. A two-dimensional digital model of ground-water flow was used to simulate ground-water levels and runoff. The predictive computer simulations indicate that construction and operation of Gribben tailings basin, located in the western part of the study area, decreased ground-water flow to Goose Lake Outlet by 0.9 to 1.6 cubic feet per second. Construction and operation of four hypothetical tailings basins covering a total of 11 square miles is estimated to reduce ground-water flow to the area 's streams by 7 to 18 cubic feet per second depending on the hydraulic properties of material comprising the basin boundaries. Leakage from all of the basins is estimated to range from 0.7 to 7 cubic feet per second. (USGS)

  11. Hydrogeologic characterization of a proposed landfill expansion in Pickens County near Easley, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stringfield, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a hydrogeologic study in the Piedmont physiographic province of South Carolina to obtain geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data from the site of a proposed landfill expansion in Pickens County near Easley, South Carolina. The geology of the study area is typical of the Piedmont region. The unconsolidated regolith on the site is soil and saprolite, which is a product of the weathered parent rock. The soil ranges in thickness from about 5 to 20 feet. The saprolite ranges in thickness from about 5 to 134 feet. The most abundant parent rock type in the area is a biotite gneiss. Ground- and surface-water data were collected at the site. Slug tests on the saprolite indicate a mean hydraulic conductivity of 3 x 0.000003 feet per second. Transmissivity ranges from 12 to 27 cubic feet per day per feet (squared per day). The ground-water velocity for the site ranges from 3 to 6 feet per year. The closest major stream to the site is Golden Creek. Based on low-flow data for Golden Creek, the estimated minimum 7 consecutive day flow that has a recurrence interval of 10 years (7Q10) at station 02186102 is 2.4 cubic feet per second. Water samples were collected from five monitoring wells at the proposed landfill expansion site and from one stream adjacent to the expansion site. Measured pH units ranged from 5.5 to 8.1, and alkalinity concentrations ranged from 5.1 to 73 milligrams per liter as CaCO3. Other water- quality data obtained included temperature and specific conductance, and 5-day BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), bicarbonate, ammonia-nitrogen, nitrite-nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate, organic carbon, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, fluoride, and selected trace metal concentrations.

  12. Plan of study to define hydrogeologic characteristics of the Madera Limestone in the east mountain area of central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The east mountain area of central New Mexico includes the eastern one-third of Bernalillo County and portions of Sandoval, Santa Fe, and Torrance Counties. The area covers about 320 square miles. The Madera Limestone, the principal aquifer in the east mountain area, is the sole source of water for domestic, municipal, industrial, and agricultural uses for many residents. Some water is imported from wells near Edgewood by the Entranosa Water Cooperative, which serves a population of approximately 3,300. The remaining population is served by small water systems that derive supplies locally or by individually owned domestic wells. The population of the east mountain area has increased dramatically over the past 20 years. In 1970, the population of the east mountain area was about 4,000. Demographic projections suggest that approximately 1,000 people per year are moving into the area, and with a growth rate of 3.0 percent the population will be 16,700 in 2000. Consequently, ground-water withdrawals have increased substantially over the past 20 years, and will continue to increase. Little is known about the flow characteristics and hydrogeologic properties of the Madera Limestone. This report describes existing information about the geologic and hydrologic framework and flow characteristics of the Madera Limestone, and presents a plan of study for data-collection activities and interpretive studies that could be conducted to better define the hydrogeologic characteristics of the Madera Limestone. Data-collection activities and interpretive studies related to the hydrogeologic components of the Madera Limestone are prioritized. Activities that are necessary to improve the quantification of a component are prioritized as essential. Activities that could add additional understanding of a component, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of a component, are prioritized as useful.

  13. Hydrogeologic data from selected wells and test holes in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York, 1972-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krulikas, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    The population of Suffolk County, New York, an area of 922 square miles, has increased rapidly, from less than 200,000 in 1940 to about 1.3 million in 1978. Ground-water pumpage has increased from an average of 42 million gallons per day in 1950 to about 257 million gallons per day in 1978. To help supply the hydrologic information needed to anticipate and prevent shortages, this report presents hydrogeologic and well-completion data on over 700 wells and test holes. (USGS)

  14. Selected hydrogeologic data for the southwest Glendive Preliminary Logical Mining Unit and adjacent areas, Dawson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data were collected from a coal area in Dawson County, Montana, to provide a basis for identifying and characterizing the groundwater resources. Inventory records for 72 domestic, stock, irrigation, unused, and observation wells are tabulated in the report; the data were collected principally from 1977 through 1981. The location of each well is shown on a map. Natural-gamma geophysical logs, and water level measurements are also included for selection wells. Twenty-six analyses of groundwater identify the chemical-constituent concentrations and physical properties of water from sampled wells. (USGS)

  15. Hydrogeological conditions of heavy high-viscous oil distribution in northeast Ural-Povolzhye (Udmurtia, Perm, and Kirov Region)

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsova, T.A. [All-Russia Petroleum Scientific-Research Geological-Exploration Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The major question while investigating the origin of subsurface oilfield waters is the development of regional and local hydrogeological oil exploration indices. For determination of the influence of subsurface water on oil pools it is necessary to study paleohydrogeological interrelations and regularities, and the interaction of sub-surface waters and oils. While considering these problems, paleohydrogeological cycles, which include crustal elevation and sea level regression are identified. Nine or ten paleohydrogeological cycles are marked in the Udmurtia, Permian, and Kirov territories, depending on regional paleotectonical history. Mesozoic-Cainozoic tectonic movements are the important cause of generation of heavy high-viscous oil pools.

  16. Extracting Hydrogeology from Heliborne Dual Moment Transient Electromagnetic Investigation in Geologically Divergent Terrenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Chandra, S.; Auken, E.; Verma, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of aquifer system is an important requisite for its effective management in India. Geological formations are complex and variable, punctual and scarce information are not adequate to understand, asses and manage them. Continuous data acquisition, their interpretation and integration with available geological/geophysical information is the solution. Heliborne dual moment transient electromagnetic (HeliTEM) and magnetic (HeliMAG) measurements have been carried out in divergent geological terrenes in India comprising Gangetic alluvium, Tertiary sediments underlying the Thar desert, Deccan basalts and Gondwana sediments, weathered and fractured granite gneisses and schists and the coastal alluvium with Tertiary sediments. The survey was carried out using state of the art equipment SkyTEM. The paper presents a synopsis of the results of the HeliTEM surveys that have helped in obtaining continuous information on the geoelectrical nature of sub-surface. HeliTEM data were supported by a number of ground geophysical surveys. The results provide the 3D subsurface structures controlling the groundwater conditions, the regional continuity of probable aquifers, the variations in lithological character and the quality of water in terms of salinity. Specialized features pertaining to hydrogeological characteristics obtained from this study are as follows: ? A clear delineation of clay beds and their spatial distribution providing the multi-layered aquifer setup in the Gangetic plains. ? Delineation of low resistivity zones in the quartzite below the over exploited aquifers indicating the possibility of new aquifers. ? Presence of freshwater zones underneath the saline water aquifers in the thick and dry sands in deserts. ? Clear demarcation of different lava flows, mapping the structural controls and highly porous zones in the contact of basalts and Gondwanas. ? A complete and continuous mapping of weathered zone in crystalline hard rock areas providing information on the recharge zones. ? The setting of multi-layered aquifer and different zones of salt water intrusion in the coastal sedimentary formations. The study has helped in establishing an appropriate cost-effective strategy for 3D mapping of aquifers on a regional scale providing valuable inputs to perform aquifer modeling

  17. Hydrogeology of the eastern part of the Salt River Valley area, Maricopa and Pinal Counties, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.; Hahn, Mary Ellen

    1986-01-01

    The Salt River Valley is a major agricultural and metropolitan area in semiarid south-central Arizona. Groundwater in the permeable sedimentary deposits underlying the area is a major water supply for agricultural, municipal, and industrial users. Groundwater levels have declined as much as 400 ft in recent years. Management of the remaining groundwater resources and their protection from contamination will require knowledge of the hydrogeologic framework and the water-bearing characteristics of the sedimentary units in the groundwater system. The rocks in the eastern part of the Salt River Valley are divided into six units--crystalline rocks, extrusive rocks, red units, lower unit, middle unit, and upper unit. The crystalline and extrusive rocks underlie the basin and form virtually impermeable hydrologic boundaries. The red, lower, middle and upper sedimentary units contain most of the groundwater. The red unit contains usable quantities of ground water, principally near Scottsdale, where it yields as much as 1 ,000 gallons/min (gpm) of water to wells. The lower unit, which makes up the largest volume of sedimentary deposits, consists mostly of mudstone, clay, silt, and evaporite deposits that may be as much as 10,000 ft thick in the central part of the basin. Wells tapping the mudstone, clay, silt yield 50 (gpm) or less but the conglomerate and the sand and gravel may yield as much as 3,500 gpm. The middle unit is the principal water-bearing unit in the basin and consists mostly of silt, siltstone, and silty sand and gravel. The unit is as much as 1,000 ft thick in the central part of the basin and as much as 700 ft is saturated. The unit will yield as much as 1,000 gpm where the saturated thickness is at least 500 ft. Locally, north of Mesa, the unit yields as much as 4,000 gpm. The upper unit is gravel, sand, and silt and is saturated only in a small area in the southwestern part of the basin. Where saturated, the unit may yield as much as 4,500 gpm. The upper unit transmits recharge derived from sheet flow, from flood flow in ephemeral streams, and from irrigation to the water table. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Hydrogeology, ground-water movement, and subsurface storage in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system of southern Florida is composed chiefly of carbonate rocks that range in age from early Miocene to Paleocene. The top of the aquifer system in southern Florida generally is at depths ranging from 500 to 1,000 feet, and the average thickness is about 3,000 feet. It is divided into three general hydrogeologic units: (1) the Upper Floridan aquifer, (2) the middle confining unit, and (3) the Lower Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer contains brackish ground water, and the Lower Floridan aquifer contains salty ground water that compares chemically to modern seawater. Zones of high permeability are present in the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. A thick, cavernous dolostone in the Lower Floridan aquifer, called the Boulder Zone, is one of the most permeable carbonate units in the world (transmissivity of about 2.5 x 107 feet squared per day). Ground-water movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer is generally southward from the area of highest head in central Florida, eastward to the Straits of Florida, and westward to the Gulf of Mexico. Distributions of natural isotopes of carbon and uranium generally confirm hydraulic gradients in the Lower Floridan aquifer. Groundwater movement in the Lower Floridan aquifer is inland from the Straits of Florida. The concentration gradients of the carbon and uranium isotopes indicate that the source of cold saltwater in the Lower Floridan aquifer is seawater that has entered through the karat features on the submarine Miami Terrace near Fort Lauderdale. The relative ages of the saltwater suggest that the rate of inland movement is related in part to rising sea level during the Holocene transgression. Isotope, temperature, and salinity anomalies in waters from the Upper Floridan aquifer of southern Florida suggest upwelling of saltwater from the Lower Floridan aquifer. The results of the study support the hypothesis of circulating relatively modern seawater and cast doubt on the theory that the saltwater in the Floridan aquifer system probably is connate or unflushed seawater from high stands of sea level. The principal use of the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida is for subsurface storage of liquid waste. The Boulder Zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer is extensively used as a receptacle for injected treated municipal wastewater, oil field brine, and, to a lesser extent, industrial wastewater. Pilot studies indicate a potential for cyclic storage of freshwater in the Upper Floridan aquifer in southern Florida.

  19. Hydrogeology and leachate plume delineation at a closed municipal landfill, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.

    2002-01-01

    The City of Norman operated a solid-waste municipal landfill at two sites on the Canadian River alluvium in Cleveland County, Oklahoma from 1970 to 1985. The sites, referred to as the west and east cells of the landfill, were originally excavations in the unconsolidated alluvial deposits and were not lined. Analysis of ground-water samples indicate that leachate from the west cell is discharging into an adjacent abandoned river channel, referred to as the slough, and is migrating downgradient in ground water toward the Canadian River. The report describes the hydrogeologic features at the landfill, including the topography of the bedrock, water-level changes in the alluvial aquifer, and delineates the leachate plume using specific conductance data. The leading edge of the leachate plume along the 35-80 transect extended over 250 meters downgradient of the west cell. The leading edge of the leachate plume along the 40-SOUTH transect had moved about 60 meters from the west cell in a south-southwesterly direction and had not moved past the slough as of 1997. Specific conductance measurements exceeding 7,000 microsiemens per centimeter at site 40 indicate the most concentrated part of the plume remained in the upper half of the alluvial aquifer adjacent to the west cell. The direction of ground-water flow in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the landfill was generally north-northeast to south-southwest toward the river. However, between the west cell and the slough along the 40-SOUTH transect, head measurements indicate a directional change to the east and southeast toward a channel referred to as the sewage outfall. Near the 35-80 transect, at 0.5 meter below the water table and at the base of the aquifer, the direction of ground-water flow was south-southeast with a gradient of about 30 centimeters per 100 meters. Generally, ground-water levels in the alluvial aquifer were higher during the winter months and lower during summer months, due to a normal decrease in precipitation and increased evapotranspiration in the summer. Hydrographs show temporal water-level changes in ground water and the slough, indicating a hydrologic connection between the alluvial aquifer and the slough.

  20. Geodetic component of the monitoring of tectonic and hydrogeological activities in Kopacki Rit Nature Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapo, Almin; Pribicevic, Bosko

    2013-04-01

    Based on the European and global experience, the amplitude change in the structural arrangement caused by recent tectonic movements, can be most accurately determined by repeated precise GPS measurements on specially stabilized geodetic and geodynamic points. Because of these reasons, the GPS method to determine the movements on specially stabilized points in the Nature park Kopacki rit is also applied in this project. Kopacki rit Nature Park is the biggest preserved natural flooded area on the Danube. It is spread over 23 000 hectares between the rivers Danube and Drava and is one of the biggest fluvial wetland valleys in Europe. In 1993 it was listed as one of internationally valuable wetlands according to the Ramsar Convention. By now in Kopacki rit there have been sights of about 295 bird species, more than 400 species of invertebrates and 44 types of fish. Many of them are globally endangered species like, white tailed eagle, black stork and prairie hawk. It's not rare to come across some deer herds, wild boars or others. Today's geological and geomorphological relations in the Nature park Kopacki rit are largely the result of climate, sedimentary, tectonic and anthropogenic activity in the last 10,000 years. Unfortunately the phenomenon of the Kopacki rit Nature park is in danger to be over in the near future due to those and of course man made activities on the Danube river. It is trough scientific investigations of tectonic and hydrogeological activities that scientist from University of Zagreb are trying to contribute to wider knowledge and possible solutions to this problem. In the year 2009 the first GPS campaign was conducted, and the first set of coordinates of stabilized points was determined which can be considered zero-series measurements. In 2010 a second GPS campaign was conducted and the first set of movements on the Geodynamic Network of Kopacki Rit Nature Park was determined. Processing GPS measurements from 2009 and 2010 was carried out in a scientific software with multipoint solutions GAMIT / GLOBK, using Kalman filter to determine the velocity from discrete campaigns. This paper presents the performed measurements, processing and analysis of the results, which indicate that there are geodynamicaly significant developments.

  1. Evaluating Traditional Hydrogeologic Characterization Approaches in a Highly Heterogeneous Glaciofluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M.; Berg, S. J.; Illman, W.

    2009-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss) estimates are two of the most essential parameters when designing transient groundwater flow models which are commonly used in contaminant transport and water resource investigations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of traditional hydrogeologic characterization approaches in a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial aquifer at the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) situated on the University of Waterloo campus. The site is instrumented with four Continuous Multichannel Tubing (CMT) wells containing a total of 28 monitoring points and a multi-screen well used for pumping at different elevations. Continuous soil cores to a depth of approximately 18 m were collected during the installation of the CMTs and the multi-screen well. The cores were subsequently characterized using the Unified Soil Classification System and grain size analysis. Samples were obtained from the core at approximately 10 cm increments and a falling head permeameter was used to make 471 K estimates. The estimates from the falling head permeameter showed K to vary from 10-4 - 10-10 m/s illustrating the highly heterogeneous nature of the aquifer at the NCRS. A geostatistical analysis performed on the core K dataset yielded a strongly heterogeneous K field for the site. K and Ss estimates were also obtained via slug tests in the CMT ports through type curve analysis. Cross-hole pumping tests were conducted using the center multi-screened well and the 4 CMTs installed in a 5-spot pattern. Pumping was conducted in 7 zones using a straddle packer system and the corresponding drawdown responses were recorded in 28 zones in the CMTs and 3 zones in the center well using pressure transducers. The various K and Ss estimates were then evaluated by simulating the transient drawdown data using a 3D forward numerical model constructed using Hydrogeosphere (Therrien et al., 2005). Simulation was conducted using 3 separate K and Ss fields: 1) a homogeneous case with K and Ss estimates obtained by averaging equivalent K and Ss values from the cross-hole pumping tests, 2) a layered heterogeneous case with K and Ss estimates from the slug tests and 3) a heterogeneous case with the kriged K from the permeameter tests and equivalent Ss from the slug tests. Results showed that, while drawdown predictions, in general, improved as more complexity was introduced into the model, the ability to make accurate drawdown predictions at all of the CMT ports was inconsistent. These results suggest that new techniques may be required to accurately capture subsurface heterogeneity for improved predictions of drawdown responses. Accurate predictions of drawdown responses should lead to improved modeling of contaminant transport and remediation designs.

  2. Arsenic in midwestern glacial deposits? Occurrence and relation to selected hydrogeologic and geochemical factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    Ground-water-quality data collected as part of 12 U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment studies during 1996-2001 were analyzed to (1) document arsenic occurrence in four types of gla-cial deposits that occur in large areas of the Midwest, (2) identify hydrogeologic or geochemical factors asso-ciated with elevated arsenic concentrations, and (3) search for clues as to arsenic source(s) or mechanism(s) of mobilization that could be useful for designing future studies. Arsenic and other water-quality constituents were sampled in 342 monitor and domestic wells in parts of Illinois Indiana Ohio Michigan and Wisconsin. Arsenic was detected (at a concentration >1 ?g/L) in one-third of the samples. The maximum concentration was 84 ?g/L, and the median was less than 1 ?g/L. Eight percent of samples had arsenic concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10?g/L. Samples were from four aquifer types?confined valley fill, unconfined valley fill, outwash plain, and till with sand lenses. Highest arsenic concentrations were found in reducing waters from valley-fill depos-its. In confined valley fill, all waters were reducing and old (recharged before 1953), and almost half of sam-ples had arsenic concentrations greater than the MCL. In unconfined valley fill, redox conditions and ages were varied, and elevated arsenic concentrations were sporadic. In both types of valley fill, elevated arsenic concentrations are linked to the underlying bedrock on the basis of spatial relations and geochemical correla-tions. In shallow (150 ft), all deep wells were from a distinctive aquifer type (confined valley fill). It is not known whether wells at similar depths in other aquifer types would produce waters with simi-larly high arsenic concentrations. Correlations of arsenic with fluoride, strontium, and barium suggest that arsenic might be related to epi-genetic (Mississippi Valley-type) sulfide deposits in Paleozoic bedrock. Arsenic is typically released from sulfides by oxidation, but in the current study, the highest arsenic concentrations in glacial deposits were detected in reducing waters. Therefore, a link between epigenetic sulfides and elevated arsenic concentrations in glacial deposits would probably require a multi-step process.

  3. Optimization of electrical geophysical survey design for hydrogeological applications and subsurface target discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, Tomas Charles

    Geophysical imaging methods significantly enhance our knowledge of subsurface characteristics and their use has become prevalent over a range of subsurface investigations. These methods facilitate the detection and characterization of both metallic and nonmetallic subsurface targets, and can provide spatially extensive information on subsurface structure and characteristics that is often impractical to obtain using standard drilling and sampling procedures alone. Electrical imaging methods such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) have proven to be particularly useful in hydrogeologic and geotechnical investigations because of the strong dependence of the electrical properties of soils to water saturation, soil texture, and solute concentration. Given the available geophysical tools as well as their applications, the selection of the appropriate geophysical survey design is an essential part of every subsurface geophysical investigation. Where investigations are located in an area with subsurface information already available, this information may be used as a guide for the design of a geophysical survey. In some instances, no subsurface information is available and a survey must be designed to cover a range of possible circumstances. Yet, in other instances, there may be significant subsurface information available, but because of subsurface complexities, a geophysical survey must still be designed to cover a broad range of possibilities. Demonstrating the application and limitations of ERT in a specific field application, the first investigation presented in this document provides guidance for developing methods to improve the design and implementation of ERT surveys in a complex subsurface environment. The two investigations that follow present the development of a relatively simple optimization approach based on limited forward modeling of the geophysical response for both static and mobile surveys. This process is demonstrated through examples of selecting a limited number of ERT surveys to identify and discriminate subsurface target tunnels (with a simple cylindrical geometry). These examples provide insights into the practical application of the optimization process for improved ERT survey design for subsurface target detection. Because of their relative simplicity, the optimization procedures developed here may be used to rapidly identify optimal array configurations without the need for computationally expensive inversion techniques.

  4. Hydrogeological impact of fault zones on a fractured carbonate aquifer, Semmering (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayaud, Cyril; Winkler, Gerfried; Reichl, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Fault zones are the result of tectonic processes and are geometrical features frequently encountered in carbonate aquifer systems. They can hamper the fluid migration (hydrogeological barriers), propagate the movement of fluid (draining conduits) or be a combination of both processes. Numerical modelling of fractured carbonate aquifer systems is strongly bound on the knowledge of a profound conceptual model including geological and tectonic settings such as fault zones. In further consequence, numerical models can be used to evaluate the conceptual model and its introduced approximations. The study was conducted in a fractured carbonate aquifer built up by permomesozoic dolo/limestones of the Semmering-Wechsel complex in the Eastern Alps (Austria). The aquifer has an assumed thickness of about 200 m and dips to the north. It is covered by a thin quartzite layer and a very low permeable layer of quartz-phyllite having a thickness of up to several hundred meters. The carbonate layer crops out only in the southern part of the investigation area, where it receives autogenic recharge. The geological complexity affects some uncertainties related to the extent of the model area, which was determined to be about 15 km². Three vertical fault zones cross the area approximately in a N-S direction. The test site includes an infrastructural pilot tunnel gallery of 4.3 km length with two pumping stations, respectively active since August 1997 and June 1998. The total pumping rate is about 90 l/s and the drawdown data were analysed analytically, providing a hydraulic conductivity of about 5E-05 m/s for the carbonate layer. About 120 m drawdown between the initial situation and situation with pumping is reported by piezometers. This led to the drying up of one spring located at the southern border of the carbonates. A continuum approach using MODFLOW-2005 was applied to reproduce numerically the observed aquifer behaviour and investigate the impact of the three fault zones. First simulations were done under laminar flow conditions, an attempt allowing nonlinear flow with a new released package was implemented later. Preliminary results show that the implementation of the three faults zones with a much lower hydraulic conductivity compared to the aquifer is essential to reproduce properly both situations with and without pumping. This approves the high impact of fault zones on groundwater flow in fractured aquifer systems. Finally, this example shows that numerical modelling can help to reduce the uncertainties of conceptual models.

  5. Hydrogeologic subdivision of the Wolfcamp Series and Pennsylvanian System of the Deaf Smith study area, Texas: Revision 1, Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Siminitz, P.C.; Warman, E.A.

    1987-07-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section in the Palo Duro Basin includes brine aquifers that are considered to be the most important ground-water flow paths in the deep-basin system. This particular study area comprises eight counties in Texas, centered in Potter County (and including Deaf Smith County). Underground patterns of rock distribution are delineated from a hydrologic perspective and at a level of detail appropriate for numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow. In this study, hydrogeologic units have been defined as mappable, physically continuous rock bodies that function in bulk as water-transmitting or water-retarding units relative to adjacent rocks. Interpretations are made primarily from geophysical logs. Hydrologic characteristics are assessed on the basis of properties typically associated with certain lithologies (e.g., sandstones are more pervious than shales) and on the basis of gross variations in effective porosity (particularly in carbonate sequences). In this report, the Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section is subdivided into 41 hydrogeologic units. These units do not constitute a classical or definitive breakdown of the Pennyslvanian-Wolfcamp section. 12 refs., 87 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Preliminary interpretations of hydrogeologic data from boreholes and springs in the vicinity of Davis and Lavender Canyons, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Thackston, J.W.

    1987-09-01

    This information is presented in tabular form and includes station locations, potentiometric levels, permeabilities, transmissibilities, total dissolved solids, depths, locations, data sources, a fracture log of the Gibson Dome No. 1 (GD-1) borehole, and other useful information. Three different ranking scales were used to evaluate available drill-stem test (DST) data. A preliminary detailed hydrogeologic column was prepared using the DST data and GD-1 borehole information. A series of preliminary potentiometric maps was interpreted from these data for the different hydrogeologic units. Preliminary potentiometric surface maps for the Lower Paleozoic Aquifer, Pennsylvanian Aquitard, Permian Aquifer/Aquitard, and Mesozoic (Jurassic) Aquifer were constructed. These maps show a general southwest flow direction in the Lower Paleozoic Aquifer, extremely low permeabilities in the Pennsylvanian, northerly ground-water flow in the Permian, and westward flow direction in the Mesozoic unit. The few data points in the Pennsylvanian tend to indicate that ground water in the upper Paradox Formation may be flowing toward the west and southwest in the area southeast of Six-Shooter Peaks.

  7. Hydrogeological and geophysical study for deeper groundwater resource in quartzitic hard rock ridge region from 2D resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dewashish; Rao, V. Ananda; Sarma, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity method is a versatile and economical technique for groundwater prospecting in different geological settings due to wide spectrum of resistivity compared to other geophysical parameters. Exploration and exploitation of groundwater, a vital and precious resource, is a challenging task in hard rock, which exhibits inherent heterogeneity. In the present study, two-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography (2D-ERT) technique using two different arrays, viz., pole-dipole and pole-pole, were deployed to look into high signal strength data in a tectonically disturbed hard rock ridge region for groundwater. Four selected sites were investigated. 2D subsurface resistivity tomography data were collected using Syscal Pro Switch-10 channel system and covered a 2 km long profile in a tough terrain. The hydrogeological interpretation based on resistivity models reveal the water horizons trap within the clayey sand and weathered/fractured quartzite formations. Aquifer resistivity lies between ˜3-35 and 100-200 ?m. The results of the resistivity models decipher potential aquifer lying between 40 and 88 m depth, nevertheless, it corroborates with the static water level measurements in the area of study. The advantage of using pole-pole in conjunction with the pole-dipole array is well appreciated and proved worth which gives clear insight of the aquifer extent, variability and their dimension from shallow to deeper strata from the hydrogeological perspective in the present geological context.

  8. A Hydrogeologic Field Area Encourages Learning of Isotope Hydrology, Geologic Imprint on Water Quality, and Trace Element Hydrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Santa Monica Mountains of Southern California affords an excellent opportunity for training students on geologic imprints on stream and groundwater quality. With salinity varying from 500 mg/L TDS in streams fed from groundwater in low solubility sandstones, to 4000 mg/L TDS in streams fed from high solubility and gypsum bearing siltstones and mudstones, the role of geology on natural stream and groundwater chemistry is profound. Use of imported water from Northern California on urban landscapes that is isotopically distinct from locally sourced "native" waters provides an opportunity for students to trace and quantify the percentage of imported versus native water sources in the Santa Monica Mountains streams using stable water isotopes. Furthermore, the presence of natural selenium and uranium in certain types of strata and higher oxidation potential created by anthropogenic nitrate in groundwater provides students with opportunities to learn of trace element hydrochemistry and redox potential in natural and nutrient-contaminated strata. Teams of students have evaluated these processes in this exceptional natural hydrogeological laboratory in our Watershed Analysis, Field Methods, and Water Quality courses. The opportunities for learning hydrogeological processes in this natural field laboratory prepare students for careers in water resources in Southern California and elsewhere.

  9. Hydrogeologic Framework, Groundwater Movement, and Water Budget in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed and Vicinity, Pierce County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Welch, Wendy B.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Lane, R.C.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater-flow system in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed and vicinity, and includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework; groundwater recharge and discharge; groundwater levels and flow directions; seasonal groundwater level fluctuations; interactions between aquifers and the surface-water system; and a water budget. The study area covers about 706 square miles in western Pierce County, Washington, and extends north to the Puyallup River, southwest to the Nisqually River, and is bounded on the south and east by foothills of the Cascade Range and on the west by Puget Sound. The area is underlain by a northwest-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits which overlie sedimentary and volcanic bedrock units that crop out in the foothills along the southern and southeastern margin of the study area. Geologic units were grouped into 11 hydrogeologic units consisting of aquifers, confining units, and an underlying bedrock unit. A surficial hydrogeologic unit map was developed and used with well information from 450 drillers' logs to construct 6 hydrogeologic sections, and unit extent and thickness maps. Groundwater in unconsolidated glacial and interglacial aquifers generally flows to the northwest towards Puget Sound, and to the north and northeast towards the Puyallup River. These generalized flow patterns likely are complicated by the presence of low permeability confining units that separate discontinuous bodies of aquifer material and act as local groundwater-flow barriers. Water levels in wells completed in the unconsolidated hydrogeologic units show seasonal variations ranging from less than 1 to about 50 feet. The largest groundwater-level fluctuation (78 feet) observed during the monitoring period (March 2007-September 2008) was in a well completed in the bedrock unit. Synoptic streamflow measurements made in September 2007 and July 2008 indicated a total groundwater discharge to streams in the study area of 87,310 and 92,160 acre-feet per year, respectively. The synoptic streamflow measurements show a complex pattern of gains and losses to streamflows that varies throughout the study area, and appears to be influenced in places by local topography. Groundwater discharge occurs at numerous springs in the area and the total previously reported discharge of springs in the area is approximately 80,000 acre-feet per year. There are, in addition, many unmeasured springs and the total spring discharge in the area is unknown. The water-budget area (432 mi2 located within the larger study area) received an annual average (September1, 2006, to August 31, 2008) of about 1,025,000 acre-ft or about 45 inches of precipitation a year. About 44 percent of precipitation enters the groundwater system as recharge. Almost one-half of this recharge (49 percent) discharges to the Puyallup and Nisqually Rivers and leaves the groundwater system as submarine groundwater discharge to Puget Sound. The remaining groundwater recharge discharges to streams (20 percent) and springs (18 percent) or is withdrawn from wells (13 percent)

  10. Hydrogeologic framework of the North Fork and surrounding areas, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schubert, Christopher E.; Bova, Richard G.; Misut, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    Ground water on the North Fork of Long Island is the sole source of drinking water, but the supply is vulnerable to saltwater intrusion and upconing in response to heavy pumping. Information on the area?s hydrogeologic framework is needed to analyze the effects of pumping and drought on ground-water levels and the position of the freshwater-saltwater interface. This will enable water-resource managers and water-supply purveyors to evaluate a wide range of water-supply scenarios to safely meet water-use demands. The extent and thickness of hydrogeologic units and position of the freshwater-saltwater interface were interpreted from previous work and from exploratory drilling during this study. The fresh ground-water reservoir on the North Fork consists of four principal freshwater flow systems (referred to as Long Island mainland, Cutchogue, Greenport, and Orient) within a sequence of unconsolidated Pleistocene and Late Cretaceous deposits. A thick glacial-lake-clay unit appears to truncate underlying deposits in three buried valleys beneath the northern shore of the North Fork. Similar glacial-lake deposits beneath eastern and east-central Long Island Sound previously were inferred to be younger than the surficial glacial deposits exposed along the northern shore of Long Island. Close similarities in thickness and upper-surface altitude between the glacial-lake-clay unit on the North Fork and the glacial-lake deposits in Long Island Sound indicate, however, that the two are correlated at least along the North Fork shore. The Matawan Group and Magothy Formation, undifferentiated, is the uppermost Cretaceous unit on the North Fork and constitutes the Magothy aquifer. The upper surface of this unit contains a series of prominent erosional features that can be traced beneath Long Island Sound and the North Fork. Northwest-trending buried ridges extend several miles offshore from areas southeast of Rocky Point and Horton Point. A promontory in the irregular, north-facing cuesta slope extends offshore from an area southwest of Mattituck Creek and James Creek. Buried valleys that trend generally southeastward beneath Long Island Sound extend onshore northeast of Hashamomuck Pond and east of Goldsmith Inlet. An undifferentiated Pleistocene confining layer, the lower confining unit, consists of apparently contiguous units of glacial-lake, marine, and nonmarine clay. This unit is more than 200 feet thick in buried valleys filled with glacial-lake clay along the northern shore, but elsewhere on the North Fork, it is generally less than 50 feet thick and presumably represents an erosional remnant of marine clay. Its upper surface is generally 75 feet or more below sea level where it overlies buried valleys, and is generally 100 feet or less below sea level in areas where marine clay has been identified. A younger unit of glacial-lake deposits, the upper confining unit, is a local confining layer and underlies a sequence of late Pleistocene moraine and outwash deposits. This unit is thickest (more than 45 feet thick) beneath two lowland areas--near Mattituck Creek and James Creek, and near Hashamomuck Pond--but pinches out close to the northern and southern shores and is locally absent in inland areas of the North Fork. Its upper-surface altitude generally rises to near sea level toward the southern shore. Freshwater in the Orient flow system is limited to the upper glacial aquifer above the top of the lower confining unit. The upper confining unit substantially impedes the downward flow of freshwater in inland parts of the Greenport flow system. Deep freshwater within the lower confining unit in the east-central part of the Cutchogue flow system probably is residual from an interval of lower sea level. The upper confining unit is absent or only a few feet thick in the west-central part of the Cutchogue flow system and does not substantially impede the downward flow of freshwater, but the lower confining unit probably im

  11. Hydrogeology of a fractured shale (Opalinus Clay): Implications for deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautschi, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Swiss programme for high-level radioactive-waste disposal, a Jurassic shale (Opalinus Clay) is being investigated as a potential host rock. Observations in clay pits and the results of a German research programme focusing on hazardous waste disposal have demonstrated that, at depths of 10-30 m, the permeability of the Opalinus Clay decreases by several orders of magnitude. Hydraulic tests in deeper boreholes (test intervals below 300 m) yielded hydraulic conductivities <10-12 m/s, even though joints and faults were included in some of the test intervals. These measurements are consistent with hydrogeological data from Opalinus Clay sections in ten tunnels in the Folded Jura of northern Switzerland. Despite extensive faulting, only a few indications of minor water inflow were encountered in more than 6,600 m of tunnel. All inflows were in tunnel sections where the overburden is less than 200 m. The hydraulic data are consistent with clay pore-water hydrochemical and isotopic data. The extensive hydrogeological data base - part of which derives from particularly unfavourable geological environments - provides arguments that advective transport through faults and joints is not a critical issue for the suitability of Opalinus Clay as a host rock for deep geological waste disposal. Résumé. Dans le cadre du programme suisse de stockage de déchets hautement radioactifs, une formation argileuse du Jurassique, l'argile à Opalinus, a été étudiée en tant que roche hôte potentielle. Des observations dans des cavités dans l'argile et les résultats du programme de recherche allemand consacré au stockage de déchets à risques ont démontré que, à des profondeur de 10 à 30 m, la perméabilité des argiles à Opalinus décroît de plusieurs ordres de grandeur. Des essais hydrauliques dans des forages plus profonds (intervalles de test á une profondeur de plus de 300 m) ont donné des conductivités hydrauliques inférieures à 10-12 m/s, même lorsque des fractures et des failles existaient dans certains des intervalles d'essais. Ces mesures sont conformes aux données hydrogéologiques tirées du recoupement des argiles à Opalinus par dix tunnels du Jura plissé du nord de la Suisse. Malgré une tectonique intense, peu de manifestations de faibles venues d'eau ont été rencontrées dans plus de 6600 m de tunnel. Toutes les venues d'eau se sont produites dans des sections de tunnel où le recouvrement est inférieur à 200 m. Les données hydrauliques sont en bon accord avec les données hydrochimiques et isotopiques de l'eau porale des argiles. En se basant sur le grand nombre de données hydrogéologiques, qui portent en partie sur les environnements géologiques particulièrement peu propices, on peut avancer que le transport advectif le long des failles et des fractures n'est pas un facteur susceptible de remettre en question le choix de l'argile à Opalinus comme roche hôte pour le stockage de déchets radioactifs en formation géologique profonde. Resúmen. Dentro del programa suizo de eliminación de residuos radiactivos de alta actividad, se está investigando la posibilidad de utilizar unos esquistos Jurásicos (Arcilla Opalina) como depósito geológico. Las observaciones efectuadas en pozos en arcilla y los resultados de un programa de estudio alemán sobre eliminación de residuos peligrosos han demostrado que, a profundidades de entre 10 y 30 m, la permeabilidad de la Arcilla Opalina decrece en varios órdenes de magnitud. Los ensayos hidráulicos realizados en sondeos más profundos (en intervalos situados a más de 300 m) proporcionaron conductividades hidráulicas inferiores a 10-12 m/s, pese a que algunos de los intervalos interceptaban juntas y fallas. Estas medidas son coherentes con los datos hidrogeológicos de las secciones de Arcilla Opalina existentes en 10 túneles del Jurásico Plegado, al norte de Suiza. A pesar de las fallas extensivas, apenas se hallaron indicios de entrada de agua en los más de 6.600 m de túnel. Todos los flujos tenían lugar en secciones del túnel q

  12. Statistical classification of hydrogeologic regions in the fractured rock area of Maryland and parts of the District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Brandon J.; LaMotte, Andrew E.; Sekellick, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogeologic regions in the fractured rock area of Maryland were classified using geographic information system tools with principal components and cluster analyses. A study area consisting of the 8-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) watersheds with rivers that flow through the fractured rock area of Maryland and bounded by the Fall Line was further subdivided into 21,431 catchments from the National Hydrography Dataset Plus. The catchments were then used as a common hydrologic unit to compile relevant climatic, topographic, and geologic variables. A principal components analysis was performed on 10 input variables, and 4 principal components that accounted for 83 percent of the variability in the original data were identified. A subsequent cluster analysis grouped the catchments based on four principal component scores into six hydrogeologic regions. Two crystalline rock hydrogeologic regions, including large parts of the Washington, D.C. and Baltimore metropolitan regions that represent over 50 percent of the fractured rock area of Maryland, are distinguished by differences in recharge, Precipitation minus Potential Evapotranspiration, sand content in soils, and groundwater contributions to streams. This classification system will provide a georeferenced digital hydrogeologic framework for future investigations of groundwater availability in the fractured rock area of Maryland.

  13. Study of radium-226 and radon-222 concentrations in ground water near a phosphate mining and manufacturing facility with emphasis on the hydrogeologic characteristics of the area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. F. Mitsch; J. E. Jr. Watson; J. A. Hayes

    1984-01-01

    Samples of water from wells located near a phosphate mining and manufacturing facility were collected and analyzed for radium-226 and radon-222. Chemical separation and emanation techniques were used in the analyses. Results indicated that mining and manufacturing were not having a detrimental effect on the radionuclide concentrations in the ground water of the area. Natural hydrogeologic factors can account for

  14. The contribution of geographic information systems and remote sensing in determining priority areas for hydrogeological development, Darb el-Arbain area, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elewa, Hossam H.; Fathy, Rafik G.; Qaddah, Atef A.

    2010-08-01

    The Darb el-Arbain study area is in the southern Western Desert of Egypt and has been attracting increasing developmental interest in the last few decades, especially since agricultural development of the southern Baris area, where the groundwater resources of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) have been utilized for the cultivation of valuable lands. Due to the proven high potential of both groundwater and land resources, determining the priority areas for sustainable hydrogeological development becomes a necessity. A geographic information system, as a platform for geospatial modeling techniques, has been built, which depends on the recently collected data about the NSAS, in addition to the published databases. Certain criteria of practical value, like depth to groundwater, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater salinity, sodium adsorption ratio, and the safe yield of wells, were selected as decisive parameters for hydrogeological prioritization. The model pinpoints areas characterized by favorable hydrogeological conditions, which could be used for future development and implementation of an artificial storage and recovery (ASR) program. The designated priority areas for hydrogeological development occur at the southern, middle southern and some localized northern parts of the Darb el-Arbain area. The newly formed Tushka Lakes represent a suitable and excellent natural source of freshwater for implementing an ASR program.

  15. Digital surfaces and hydrogeologic data for the Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain in parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Debra M.; Bellino, Jason C.; Williams, Lester J.

    2012-01-01

    A digital dataset of hydrogeologic data for Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain was developed using data from five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports published between 1951 and 1996. These reports contain maps and data depicting the extent and elevation of the Southeast Coastal Plain stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units in Florida and parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. The reports are: Professional Paper 1410-B (Renken, 1996), Professional Paper 1088 (Brown and others, 1979), Professional Paper 524-G (Applin and Applin, 1967), Professional Paper 447 (Applin and Applin, 1965), and Circular 91 (Applin, 1951). The digital dataset provides hydrogeologic data for the USGS Energy Resources Program assessment of potential reservoirs for carbon sequestration and for the USGS Groundwater Resource Program assessment of saline aquifers in the southeastern United States. A Geographic Information System (ArcGIS 9.3.1) was used to construct 33 digital (raster) surfaces representing the top or base of key stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. In addition, the Geographic Information System was used to generate 102 geo-referenced scanned maps from the five reports and a geo-database containing structural and thickness contours, faults, extent polygons, and common features. The dataset also includes point data of well construction and stratigraphic elevations and scanned images of two geologic cross sections and a nomenclature chart.

  16. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics in the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area, northern Bexar County, Texas, 2008-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Morris, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    The area designated by the city of San Antonio as the Rancho Diana Natural Area is in northern Bexar County, near San Antonio, Texas. During 2008-10, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of San Antonio, documented the geologic framework and mapped the hydrogeologic characteristics for the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area. The geologic framework of the study area and its hydrogeologic characteristics were documented using field observations and information from previously published reports. Many of the geologic and hydrogeologic features were found by making field observations through the dense vegetation along gridlines spaced approximately 25 feet apart and documenting the features as they were located. Surface geologic features were identified and hydrogeologic features such as caves, sinkholes, and areas of solutionally enlarged porosity were located using hand-held Global Positioning System units. The location data were used to create a map of the hydrogeologic subdivisions and the location of karst features. The outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifer recharge zones were mapped by using hydrogeologic subdivisions modified from previous reports. All rocks exposed within the study area are of sedimentary origin and Lower Cretaceous in age. The valley floor is formed in the cavernous member of the upper Glen Rose Limestone of the Trinity Group. The hills are composed of the basal nodular member, dolomitic member, Kirschberg evaporite member, and grainstone member of the Kainer Formation of the Edwards Group. Field observations made during this study of the exposed formations and members indicate that the formations and members typically are composed of mudstones, wackestones, packstones, grainstones, and argillaceous limestones, along with marls. The upper Glen Rose Limestone is approximately 410 to 450 feet thick but only the upper 70 feet is exposed in the study area. The Kainer Formation is approximately 255 feet thick in the study area and is composed of, in ascending order, the basal nodular member, dolomitic member, Kirschberg evaporite member, and grainstone member. The Edwards and Trinity aquifers contain a combination of fabric-selective and not-fabric-selective porosities. Porosity types observed in the study area that can increase the effective porosity and increase permeability include solutionally enlarged caves, sinkholes, fractures, bedding planes, channels, molds and vugs. Caves found during hydrogeologic mapping might have been spring discharge points, but sufficient downcutting over geologic time in the rocks has occurred so that springs discharge at lower elevations near the creek channel. The mapped caves, sinkholes, and other areas of solutionally enlarged porosity might facilitate recharge during large storm events when runoff occurs on the hillsides; additional areally distributed recharge in the study area occurs as a result of infiltration.

  17. Geodatabase compilation of hydrogeologic, remote sensing, and water-budget-component data for the High Plains aquifer, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Natalie A.; Gonzales-Bradford, Sophia L.; Flynn, Amanda T.; Qi, Sharon L.; Peterson, Steven M.; Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Sohl, Terry L.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2013-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies almost 112 million acres in the central United States. It is one of the largest aquifers in the Nation in terms of annual groundwater withdrawals and provides drinking water for 2.3 million people. The High Plains aquifer has gained national and international attention as a highly stressed groundwater supply primarily because it has been appreciably depleted in some areas. The U.S. Geological Survey has an active program to monitor the changes in groundwater levels for the High Plains aquifer and has documented substantial water-level changes since predevelopment: the High Plains Groundwater Availability Study is part of a series of regional groundwater availability studies conducted to evaluate the availability and sustainability of major aquifers across the Nation. The goals of the regional groundwater studies are to quantify current groundwater resources in an aquifer system, evaluate how these resources have changed over time, and provide tools to better understand a systems response to future demands and environmental stresses. The purpose of this report is to present selected data developed and synthesized for the High Plains aquifer as part of the High Plains Groundwater Availability Study. The High Plains Groundwater Availability Study includes the development of a water-budget-component analysis for the High Plains completed in 2011 and development of a groundwater-flow model for the northern High Plains aquifer. Both of these tasks require large amounts of data about the High Plains aquifer. Data pertaining to the High Plains aquifer were collected, synthesized, and then organized into digital data containers called geodatabases. There are 8 geodatabases, 1 file geodatabase and 7 personal geodatabases, that have been grouped in three categories: hydrogeologic data, remote sensing data, and water-budget-component data. The hydrogeologic data pertaining to the northern High Plains aquifer is included in three separate geodatabases: (1) base data from a groundwater-flow model; (2) hydrogeology and hydraulic properties data; and (3) groundwater-flow model data to be used as calibration targets. The remote sensing data for this study were developed by the U. S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center and include historical and predicted land-use/land-cover data and actual evapotranspiration data by using remotely sensed temperature data. The water-budget-component data contains selected raster data from maps in the “Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 Through 1949 and 2000 Through 2009” report completed in 2011 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5183/). Federal Geographic Data Committee compliant metadata were created for each spatial and tabular data layer in the geodatabase.

  18. Impact of Acid Mine Drainage on the hydrogeological system at Sia, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen; Malpas, John

    2013-04-01

    Discontinued mining of the volcanogenic massive sulphide ore bodies of Cyprus has left significant environmental concerns including Acid Mine Drainage. Remnant sulphide ore and tailings in waste dumps react with oxygenated rainwater to produce sulphuric acid, a process which is multiplied when metal-loving acidophilic bacteria are present. Given that Cyprus has a Mediterranean climate, characterized by its warm and dry summers and cool and wet winters, the low pH effluent with high levels of trace elements, particularly metals, is leached out of the waste tips particularly during the wet season. The Sia site includes an open mine-pit lake, waste rock and tailings dumps, a river leading to a downstream dam-lake, and a localised groundwater system. The study intends to: identify the point source and nature of contamination; analyze the mechanism and results of local acid generation; and understand how the hydrogeological system responds to seasonal variations. During two sampling campaigns, in the wet and dry seasons of 2011, water samples were collected from the mine pit lake, from upstream of the adjacent river down to the dam catchment, and from various boreholes close to the sulphide mine. The concentration of ions in waters varies between wet and dry seasons but, in both, relative amounts are directly related to pH. In the mine-pit lake, Fe, Mn, Mg, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co and Cd are found in higher concentrations in the dry season, as a result of substantial evaporation of water. The Sia River runs continuously in the wet season, and waters collected close to the waste tips have pH as low as 2.5 and higher concentrations of Al, Cu, Fe and Zn. Further downstream there is a significant decrease in trace metal contents with a concomitant rise of pH. Al and Fe dominate total cation content when pH is lower than 4. Al is derived from the weathering of clay minerals, especially during the wet season. Fe is derived from the oxidation of pyrite. Once pH's exceed 4, a white precipitate of gibbsite (Al(OH)3) settles to the stream bed removing Al from the water. This is finely laminated together with orange-brown layers of similarly precipitated Fe(OH)3. During the dry season the Sia River dries up and the mine-pit lake is greatly reduced in surface area leading to the crystallisation of a variety of multi-coloured salts, which form on the muddy substrate through capillary action. These include large amounts of gypsum and hexahydrite, and lesser amounts of chalcanthite, jarosite, wupatkiite, halotrichite, malachite, etc. These are ephemeral in nature being quickly dissolved by early rains of the wet season that, in the stream waters, produces short-lived toxic concentrations of metals. Groundwaters sampled directly at the mine site show the influence of drainage from the waste tips. Elsewhere, apart from sporadic high Boron concentrations, there is no evidence of contamination from the mine workings. The origin of Boron is a problem that arises at a number of sites throughout Cyprus, especially on the Mesaoria Plain and in the Troodos Complex.

  19. Hydrogeology and Simulation of Regional Ground-Water-Level Declines in Monroe County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Howard W.; Wright, Kirsten V.; Nicholas, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Observed ground-water-level declines from 1991 to 2003 in northern Monroe County, Michigan, are consistent with increased ground-water demands in the region. In 1991, the estimated ground-water use in the county was 20 million gallons per day, and 80 percent of this total was from quarry dewatering. In 2001, the estimated ground-water use in the county was 30 million gallons per day, and 75 percent of this total was from quarry dewatering. Prior to approximately 1990, the ground-water demands were met by capturing natural discharge from the area and by inducing leakage through glacial deposits that cover the bedrock aquifer. Increased ground-water demand after 1990 led to declines in ground-water level as the system moves toward a new steady-state. Much of the available natural discharge from the bedrock aquifer had been captured by the 1991 conditions, and the response to additional withdrawals resulted in the observed widespread decline in water levels. The causes of the observed declines were explored through the use of a regional ground-water-flow model. The model area includes portions of Lenawee, Monroe, Washtenaw, and Wayne Counties in Michigan, and portions of Fulton, Henry, and Lucas Counties in Ohio. Factors, including lowered water-table elevations because of below average precipitation during the time period (1991 - 2001) and reduction in water supply to the bedrock aquifer because of land-use changes, were found to affect the regional system, but these factors did not explain the regional decline. Potential ground-water capture for the bedrock aquifer in Monroe County is limited by the low hydraulic conductivity of the overlying glacial deposits and shales and the presence of dense saline water within the bedrock as it dips into the Michigan Basin to the west and north of the county. Hydrogeologic features of the bedrock and the overlying glacial deposits were included in the model design. An important step of characterizing the bedrock aquifer was the determination of inputs and outputs of water-leakage from glacial deposits and flows across model boundaries. The imposed demands on the groundwater system create additional discharge from the bedrock aquifer, and this discharge is documented by records and estimates of water use including: residential and industrial use, irrigation, and quarry dewatering. Hydrologic characterization of Monroe County and surrounding areas was used to determine the model boundaries and inputs within the ground-water model. MODFLOW-2000 was the computer model used to simulate ground-water flow. Predevelopment, 1991, and 2001 conditions were simulated with the model. The predevelopment model did not include modern water use and was compared to information from early settlement of the county. The 1991 steady-state model included modern demands on the ground-water system and was based on a significant amount of data collected for this and previous studies. The predevelopment and 1991 simulations were used to calibrate the numerical model. The simulation of 2001 conditions was based on recent data and explored the potential ground-water levels if the current conditions persist. Model results indicate that the ground-water level will stabilize in the county near current levels if the demands imposed during 2001 are held constant.

  20. Hydrogeology and the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, R.S.; Memberg, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The virtually untapped Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a supplemental source of water for public use in the highly populated coastal area of Palm Beach County. A recent study was conducted to delineate the distribution of salinity in relation to the local hydrogeology and assess the potential processes that might control (or have affected) the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system in the study area consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer and ranges in age from Paleocene to Oligocene. Included at its top is part of a lowermost Hawthorn Group unit referred to as the basal Hawthorn unit. The thickness of this basal unit is variable, ranging from about 30 to 355 feet; areas where this unit is thick were paleotopographic lows during deposition of the unit. The uppermost permeable zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer occur in close association with an unconformity at the base of the Hawthorn Group; however, the highest of these zones can be up in the basal unit. A dolomite unit of Eocene age generally marks the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer, but the top of this dolomite unit has a considerable altitude range: from about 1,200 to 2,300 feet below sea level. Additionally, where the dolomite unit is thick, its top is high and the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system, as normally defined, probably is not present. An upper zone of brackish water and a lower zone of water with salinity similar to that of seawater (saline-water zone) are present in the Floridan aquifer system. The brackish-water and saline-water zones are separated by a transition zone (typically 100 to 200 feet thick) in which salinity rapidly increases with depth. The transition zone was defined by using a salinity of 10,000 mg/L (milligrams per liter) of dissolved-solids concentration (about 5,240 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its top and 35,000 mg/L of dissolved-solids concentration (about 18,900 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its base. The base of the brackish-water zone and the top of the saline-water zone were approximately determined mostly by means of resistivity geophysical logs. The base of the brackish-water zone in the study area ranges from about 1,600 feet below sea level near the coast to almost 2,200 feet below sea level in extreme southwestern Palm Beach County. In an area that is peripheral to Lake Okeechobee, the boundary unexpectedly rises to perhaps as shallow as 1,800 feet below sea level. In an upper interval of the brackish-water zone within the Upper Floridan aquifer, chloride concentration of water ranges from 490 to 8,000 mg/L. Chloride concentration correlates with the altitude of the basal contact of the Hawthorn Group, with concentration increasing as the altitude of this contact decreases. Several areas of anomalous salinity where chloride concentration in this upper interval is greater than 3,000 mg/L occur near the coast. In most of these areas, salinity was found to decrease with depth from the upper interval to a lower interval within the brackish-water zone: a reversal of the normal salinity trend within the zone. These areas are also characterized by an anomalously low altitude of the base of the brackish-water zone, and a much greater thickness of the transition zone than normal. These anomalies could be the result of seawater preferentially invading zones of higher permeability in the Upper Floridan aquifer during Pleistocene high stands of sea level and incomplete flushing of this high salinity water by the present-day flow system.

  1. Development of a summer field-based hydrogeology research experience for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, K.

    2011-12-01

    A critical problem in motivating and training the next generation of environmental scientists is providing them with an integrated scientific experience that fosters a depth of understanding and helps them build a network of colleagues for their future. As the education part of an NSF-funded CAREER proposal, I have developed a three-week summer research experience for undergraduate students that links their classroom education with field campaigns aiming to make partial differential equations come "alive" in a practical, applied setting focused on hydrogeologic processes. This course has been offered to freshman- to junior-level undergraduate students from Penn State and also the three co-operating Historically Black Universities (HBUs)--Jackson State University, Fort Valley State University, and Elizabeth City State University-since 2009. Broad learning objectives include applying their knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to flow and transport processes in the field and communicating science effectively in poster and oral format. In conjunction with ongoing research about solute transport, students collected field data in the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory in Central Pennsylvania, including slug and pumping tests, ground-penetrating radar, electrical resistivity imaging, wireline logging, and optical televiewers, among other instruments. Students conducted tracer tests, where conservative solutes are introduced into a local stream and monitored. Students also constructed numerical models using COMSOL Multiphysics, a research-grade code that can be used to model any physical system; with COMSOL, students create models without needing to be trained in computer coding. With guidance, students built basic models of fluid flow and transport to visualize how heterogeneity of hydraulic and transport properties or variations in forcing functions impact their results. The development of numerical models promoted confidence in predicting flow and transport in the field. For most of the students, this was their first opportunity to work in the field, and also their first time working with numerical models. The capstone of the class is a final poster presentation with a short oral introduction. Most students commented that this session, attended by graduate students and faculty at Penn State, was an inspiring experience. Feedback for the course has been uniformly positive, with one student noting on post-course feedback that "The best way of learning is by doing it". One benefit of CAREER funding is the ability to develop innovative pedagogy and bring it into the classroom with ease, due to financial support. In my case, the diverse backgrounds of the students in the course has required all of the students to work with students from other demographics, and that alone has been a valuable experience. One difficulty will be continuing this field program once the grant has ended; numerous students commented that they felt lucky to be part of the program during its 5-year existence and lamented that other students wouldn't have the same opportunity. The students' data and model runs will be published and used for my long-term research agenda in discriminating transport processes in situ, as well, making a positive feedback loop between research and education.

  2. Assessment of the hydrogeology and water quality in a near-shore well field, Sarasota, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broska, J.C.; Knochenmus, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The city of Sarasota, Florida, operates a downtown well field that pumps mineralized water from ground water sources to supply a reverse osmosis plant. Because of the close proximity of the well field to Sarasota Bay and the high sulfate and chloride concentrations of ground-water supplies, a growing concern exists about the possibility of lateral movement of saltwater in a landward direction (intrusion) and vertical movement of relict sea water (upconing). In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 3-year study to evaluate the hydraulic characteristics and water quality of ground-water resources within the downtown well field and the surrounding 235-square-mile study area. Delineation of the hydrogeology of the study area was based on water- quality data, aquifer test data, and extensive borehole geophysical surveys (including gamma, caliper, temperature, electrical resistivity, and flow meter logs) from the six existing production wells and from a corehole drilled as part of the study, as well as from published and unpublished reports on file at the U.S. Geological Survey, the Southwest Florida Water Management District, and consultant's reports. Water-quality data were examined for spatial and temporal trends that might relate to the mechanism for observed water-quality changes. Water quality in the study area appears to be dependent upon several mechanisms, including upconing of higher salinity water from deeper zones within the aquifer system, interbore-hole flow between zones of varying water quality through improperly cased and corroded wells, migration of highly mineralized waters through structural deformities, and the presence of unflushed relict seawater. A numerical ground-water flow model was developed as an interpretative tool where field-derived hydrologic characteristics could be tested. The conceptual model consisted of seven layers to represent the multilayered aquifer systems underlying the study area. Particle tracking was utilized to delineate the travel path of water as it enters the model area under a set of given conditions. Within the model area, simulated flow in the intermediate aquifer system originates primarily from the northwestern boundary. Simulated flow in the Upper Floridan aquifer originates in lower model layers (deeper flow zones) and ultimately can be traced to the southeastern and northwestern boundaries. Volumetric budgets calculated from numerical simulation of a hypothetical well field indicate that the area of contribution to the well field changes seasonally. Although ground-water flow patterns change with wet and dry seasons, most water enters the well-field flow system through lower parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer from a southeastern direction. Moreover, particle tracking indicated that ground-water flow paths with strictly lateral pathlines in model layers correspond to the intermediate aquifer system, whereas particles traced through model layers corresponding to the Upper Floridan aquifer had components of vertical and lateral flow.

  3. Hydrogeologic uncertainties and policy implications: The Water Consumer Protection Act of Tucson, Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. G.; Matlock, W. G.; Jacobs, K. L.

    The 1995 Water Consumer Protection Act of Tucson, Arizona, USA (hereafter known as the Act) was passed following complaints from Tucson Water customers receiving treated Central Arizona Project (CAP) water. Consequences of the Act demonstrate the uncertainties and difficulties that arise when the public is asked to vote on a highly technical issue. The recharge requirements of the Act neglect hydrogeological uncertainties because of confusion between "infiltration" and "recharge." Thus, the Act implies that infiltration in stream channels along the Central Wellfield will promote recharge in the Central Wellfield. In fact, permeability differences between channel alluvium and underlying basin-fill deposits may lead to subjacent outflow. Additionally, even if recharge of Colorado River water occurs in the Central Wellfield, groundwater will become gradually salinized. The Act's restrictions on the use of CAP water affect the four regulatory mechanisms in Arizona's 1980 Groundwater Code as they relate to the Tucson Active Management Area: (a) supply augmentation; (b) requirements for groundwater withdrawals and permitting; (c) Management Plan requirements, particularly mandatory conservation and water-quality issues; and (d) the requirement that all new subdivisions use renewable water supplies in lieu of groundwater. Political fallout includes disruption of normal governmental activities because of the demands in implementing the Act. Résumé La loi de 1995 sur la protection des consommateurs d'eau de Tucson (Arizona, États-Unis) a été promulguée à la suite des réclamations des consommateurs d'eau de Tucson alimentés en eau traitée à partir à la station centrale d'Arizona (CAP). Les conséquences de cette loi montrent les incertitudes et les difficultés qui apparaissent lorsque le public est appeléà voter sur un problème très technique. Les exigences de la loi en matière de recharge négligent les incertitudes hydrogéologiques du fait de la confusion entre "infiltration" et "recharge". C'est ainsi que la loi laisse entendre que l'infiltration à partir des lits de rivières le long du champ captant central favorise la recharge de cette zone. En réalité, les différences de perméabilité entre les alluvions du lit et les dépôts sous-jacents remplissant le bassin peuvent provoquer un écoulement sous-jacent. En outre, même si une recharge par l'eau de la rivière Colorado se produit dans cette zone, la nappe sera progressivement salifiée. Les restrictions imposées par la loi quant à l'utilisation de l'eau de la station centrale d'Arizona affectent les quatre outils réglementaires du Code des eaux souterraines de l'Arizona de 1980, en ce qu'ils concernent la zone de gestion active de Tucson: (a) l'augmentation de l'approvisionnement (b) les conditions requises pour les prélèvements d'eau souterraine et les autorisations; (c) les conditions requises pour le plan de gestion, en particulier la pérennité du concessionnaire et les résultats en matière de qualité de l'eau et (d) la condition que tous les nouveaux districts aient recours à des ressources en eau renouvelables à la place de l'eau souterraine. Les demandes concernant la mise en oeuvre de la loi ont conduit jusqu'à l'arrêt des activités normales des instances politiques. Resumen El Acta de Protección de los Usuarios de Agua de Tucson, Arizona (EE.UU.) de 1995 (el Acta) se aprobó a raíz de las quejas de los usuarios de agua de Tucson que recibían agua tratada por el Proyecto de Arizona Central (CAP). Las consecuencias del Acta demuestran las incertidumbres y dificultades que se producen cuando se le pide al público que vote sobre temas muy técnicos. Los requerimientos de recarga del Acta desprecian incertidumbres hidrogeológicas al confundir entre "infiltración" y "recarga". Así, el Acta dice que la infiltración en los canales de los arroyos a lo largo del Campo de Producción Central aumentará la recarga a dicho campo. De hecho, la diferencia de permeabilidad e

  4. Development, Calibration and Deployment of an Electromagnetic Flowmeter for Cross-Hole Hydrogeologic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovacek, A. E.; Fisher, A. T.; Kirkwood, W.; Wheat, C. G.; Maughan, T.; Gomes, K.

    2011-12-01

    We developed an autonomous electromagnetic flowmeter as part of a cross-hole hydrogeologic experiment using subseafloor borehole observatories (CORKs) that penetrate into the volcanic ocean crust. The cylindrical flowmeter is adapted from a conventional industrial tool and hardened for use at water depths up to 6000 m. In addition, the electronics were modified with a new power controller, and a data logger and communication board was added to enable data storage and long-term, autonomous use for up to eight years. The flowmeter generates a magnetic field and measures a voltage gradient that is created across the orifice as water moves through it. This kind of tool is ideally suited for use in the deep sea, particularly for measuring hydrothermal fluids emanating from the ocean crust, because it requires no moving parts, places no obstructions along the flow path, gives total flow volume as well as instantaneous flow rate, and is highly accurate across a large dynamic range, including bi-directional flow. This flowmeter was deployed on a CORK wellhead using an adapter and ring clamp system located above a 4-inch ball valve. The ball valve can be opened to permit flow (from an overpressured formation) out of the CORK and into the overlying ocean. A polyvinyl chloride "chimney" positioned vertically above the flowmeter is instrumented with autonomous temperature loggers to permit an additional estimate of fluid flow rates with time, based on heat loss during fluid ascent, and to facilitate fluid sampling. Calibration of the new flowmeter was completed in two stages: tank testing using a pump at flow rates of 0.5 to 1.2 L/s, and by lowering the flowmeter on a wireline at sea at rates equivalent to 0.5 to 5.2 L/s. A cross plot of apparent and reference flow rates obtained during calibration indicates a highly linear instrument response. Comparison of instantaneous (once per minute) and integrated (total flow) data collected during calibration indicates good agreement, although the instantaneous data tended to be noisy because of irregularity of flow (turbulence). The flowmeter was deployed in Summer 2011 on a CORK installed in IODP Hole 1362B, on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Once the flowmeter was attached to the wellhead, the underlying ball valve was opened, which allowed overpressured fluids from the permeable ocean crust to flow upward and out of the seafloor at 5 to 10 L/s (estimated rate). Changes in formation fluid pressure resulting from this flow are being monitored in four additional CORKs located 310 to 2320 m away from Hole 1362B, which will allow large-scale, directional assessment of formation properties. The flowmeter is recording data for instantaneous flow rate and total flow once per hour, and will be recovered to permit collection and analysis of experimental data during a servicing visit in Summer 2012.

  5. Hydrogeological response to tele-seismic events with underground water level precision monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunova, Ella; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Besedina, Alina; Kabychenko, Nikolay; Svintsov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Underground water level precision monitoring has been being carried out in the IDG RAS experimental area "Mikhnevo" in step with barometric pressure measuring since February of 2008. Seismic events registration is being realized with small aperture seismic array "Mikhnevo" and STS-2 seismometer. Complex processing of original hydrological and seismic data allows to mark out hydrological responses to large earthquakes (Mw>7.5) seismic waves propagation throw aseismic region - central area of Russian Plate. GPO "Mikhnevo" is located within South part of Moscow artesian basin in the North-East part of Prioksko-Terrasny biosphere reserve out of intensive anthropogenic impact zone. Wellbore unseals index aquifer in the interval of 91-115 m. An aquifer is characterized with season level variations. Water containing rocks are presented with nonuniform fractured limestones. In IDG RAS step-by-step methodic of experimental data handling was devised. First preliminary comparison of 1 Hz frequency seismic and hydrological data is being carried out for hydrogeological response to large earthquakes (Mw>7.5) seismic waves propagation marking out. On basis of these data main types and parameters of waves registered in seismic and hydrological data are being identified and representative periods for geological medium response to tele-seismic events analysis are being selected. In the area of GPO "Mikhnevo" we traced geological response to disastrous earthquakes that took place 02/27/2011 near Central Chile Coast and 03/11/11 near Honshu Island east coast that is presented being smoothed in underground water level. Tele-seismic events differs in intensity, signal duration and post-seismic effect. Significant water level harmonic oscillations are coupled with surface and S-waves arrival, where vertical component prevails First hydrological responses were registered in the time of S-wave propagation 28 minutes after Honshu earthquake beginning and 39 minutes after Chile earthquake beginning with low-grade amplitude 19 mm and 5 mm accordingly. Surface wave propagation presented on a plot is coupled with water level variations with peak amplitude 24 mm and 15.8 mm accordingly. On the whole hydrological response corresponds to ground displacement. After disastrous earthquakes post-seismic underground water level response was registered. 2.5 hours after Chile earthquake 4 mm stepwise level increase was registered that is believed to be connected to next wave train arrival. Over a 6 hours after Honshu earthquake 12-13 mm level rise is traced and than smooth level fall is registered 6-8 mm less than initial level. Before earthquakes water level was stable that is why we suppose that seismic waves propagation impact did led to traced post-seismic effects. Water level and ground velocity precision monitoring results were used for background parameters observation and signal distortion periods marking out. This periods can be connected to geological medium response to disastrous earthquakes. Post-seismic underground water level variations were observed 02/27/2010 and 03/11/2011 that is supposed to be evidence of probable altering of filtration links structure on microlevel.

  6. Groundwater denitrification in two agricultural river catchments: influence of hydro-geological setting and aquifer geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleer, Eoin; Mellander, Per-Erik; Coxon, Catherine; Richards, Karl G.; Jahangir, Mohammad M. R.

    2015-04-01

    Identifying subsurface environments with a natural capacity for denitrification is important for improving agricultural management. At the catchment scale, a complex hierarchy of landscape, hydro-geological and physico-chemical characteristics combine to affect the distribution of groundwater nitrate (NO3-). This study was conducted along four instrumented hillslopes in two ca. 10km2 agricultural river catchments in Ireland, one dominated by arable and one by grassland agriculture. Both catchments are characterised by well drained soils, but have differing aquifer characteristics. The arable catchment is underlain by weathered Ordovician slate bedrock which is extensively fractured with depth. The grassland catchment is characterised by Devonian sandstone bedrock, exhibiting both lateral (from upslope to near stream) and vertical variations in permeability along each hillslope. The capacity for groundwater denitrification was assessed by examining the concentration and distribution patterns of N species (total nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved oxygen (DO) and redox potential (Eh) in monthly samples from shallow and deep groundwater piezometers (n=37). Additionally, the gaseous products of denitrification: nitrous oxide (N2O) and excess dinitrogen (excess N2) were measured seasonally using gas chromatography and membrane inlet mass spectroscopy, respectively. The slate catchment was characterised by uniformity, both laterally and vertically, in aquifer geochemistry and gaseous denitrification products. The four year spatial mean groundwater NO3--N concentration was 6.89 mg/l and exhibited low spatial and temporal variability (temporal SD: 1.19 mg/l, spatial SD: 1.185 mg/l). Elevated DO concentrations (mean: 9.75 mg/l) and positive Eh (mean: +176.5mV) at all sample horizons indicated a setting with little denitrification potential. This non-reducing environment was reflected in a low accumulation of denitrification products (excess N2 mean: 1.57 mg/l, N2O mean: 1.61µg/l). Groundwater in the sandstone catchment had a comparable mean NO3--N concentration to that of the slate site (6.24mg/l) and while temporal variation was low (SD: 0.9 mg/l), spatial variation was substantially greater (SD: 3.63 mg/l). The accumulation of denitrification products in the sandstone catchment showed a large contrast to that of the slate with excess N2 ranging from 0.16-8.77 mg/l and N2O from 0.07-66.42 µg/l. Mean dissolved oxygen concentration and redox potential were 5.6mg/l and 67.5mV respectively. The near stream zones in particular were marked by favourable denitrifying conditions: hydraulic conductivity (<2m/day), Eh (<50mV) and DO (<5mg/l). Winter recharge had a diluting effect, increasing the concentration of DO and Eh with a concurrent decrease in excess N2 and N2O. The evolution of groundwater geochemistry along a subsurface flow path is a function of residence time. While both catchments are characterised as permeable, the slate catchment exhibits greater hydraulic conductivity values, particularly at depth, with groundwater geochemistry in all horizons reflective of recently recharged water. The deeper groundwater pathways and near stream zones in the sandstone catchment have a lower hydraulic conductivity. As such, dissolved oxygen and redox gradients occur with depth, causing the development of NO3- reducing zones.

  7. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Nutmeg Valley area, Wolcott and Waterbury, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullaney, J.R.; Mondazzi, R.A.; Stone, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogeologic investigations in an industrial area in Wolcott and Waterbury, Connecticut, have provided information on the geology, ground-water flow, and water quality of the area. Ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds was discovered in the 1980?s in the Nutmeg Valley area, where approximately 43 industries and 25 residences use ground water for industrial and domestic supply. Unconsolidated surficial deposits, including glacial stratified deposits and till, are more than 85 feet thick and are interconnected with the underlying bedrock. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the stratified deposits ranges from 0.8 to 21 feet per day. Water in the surficial aquifer generally flows toward discharge points along Old Tannery Brook and the Mad River. Water in the bedrock aquifer flows through low-angle unroofing joints, high-angle fractures, and foliation-parallel fractures. Most high-angle water-bearing fractures strike north with an easterly dip. Most of the water pumped from bedrock wells in the study area comes from shallow fractures that are probably in hydraulic connection with the surficial aquifer. Short-circuit flow between fracture zones in wells is a likely pathway for contaminant transport. During periods of low streamflow, only a small amount of ground water discharges directly to Old Tannery Brook or to the Mad River. The amount of discharge is on the same order of magnitude as the estimated ground-water withdrawals. In northern parts of the valley bottom within the study area, downward vertical hydraulic gradients were present between wells in the surficial and bedrock aquifers. In southern parts of the valley, however, vertical gradients were upward from the bedrock to the surficial aquifer. Vertical gradients can change seasonally in response to different amounts of ground-water recharge and to stresses caused by ground-water withdrawals, which can in turn facilitate the spread of contamination. Vapor-diffusion samplers were installed in streambeds to identify zones where water containing volatile organic compounds was discharging to streams in the study area. Three areas with high vapor concentrations of trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene were identified. Concentrations of trichloroethene as high as 30,000 parts per billion by volume were detected. Three of 44 wells sampled contained concentrations of volatile organic compounds, including trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, above primary drinking water standards. Based on the findings of this and previous investigations, water in the bedrock aquifer in the southern part of the study area is likely to contain trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Volatile organic compounds also were detected in stream samples from the downstream end of Old Tannery Brook and the Mad River. Concentrations of major ions and trace elements (with one exception) did not exceed primary drinking water standards in any ground-water or surface-water samples collected. Ground-water samples collected downgradient from the Waterbury North End Disposal Area contained ethyl ether, chlorobenzene, and elevated concentrations of dissolved solids, similar to samples of landfill leachate and groundwater samples collected from springs and wells adjacent to the landfill.

  8. Hydrogeologic, water-quality, streamflow, bottom-sediment analyses, and biological data near the Wayne County landfill, Wayne County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, F.; Bradfield, Arthur D.; Wescott, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the data collected as part of a hydrogeologic investigation to determine the effects of the Wayne County landfill on local water quality. The investigation was conducted from 1988 through 1989 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Superfund. The landfill was closed in November 1984 after allegations that contaminants from the landfill were affecting the quality of water from domestic wells in the Banjo Branch-Hardin Hollow valley. Test well construction data; water-quality data for selected wells, seeps, and surface-water sites: streamflow data from Banjo Branch; analyses of bottom-sediment samples: and biological data for the study area are documented in this report.

  9. Lacustrine flow (divers, side scan sonar, hydrogeology, water penetrating radar) used to understand the location of a drowned person

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffell, Alastair

    2014-05-01

    An unusual application of hydrological understanding to a police search is described. The lacustrine search for a missing person provided reports of bottom-water currents in the lake and contradictory indications from cadaver dogs. A hydrological model of the area was developed using pre-existing information from side scan sonar, a desktop hydrogeological study and deployment of water penetrating radar (WPR). These provided a hydrological theory for the initial search involving subaqueous groundwater flow, focused on an area of bedrock surrounded by sediment, on the lake floor. The work shows the value a hydrological explanation has to a police search operation (equally to search and rescue). With hindsight, the desktop study should have preceded the search, allowing better understanding of water conditions. The ultimate reason for lacustrine flow in this location is still not proven, but the hydrological model explained the problems encountered in the initial search.

  10. Hydrogeology of the upper Floridan Aquifer in the vicinity of the Marine Corps Logistics Base near Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski

    1999-01-01

    In 1995, the U.S. Navy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey conduct an investigation to describe the hydrogeology of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of the Marine Corps Logistics Base, southeast and adjacent to Albany, Georgia. The study area encompasses about 90 square miles in the Dougherty Plain District of the Coastal Plain physiographic province, in Dougherty and Worth Counties-the Marine Corps Logistics Base encompasses about 3,600 acres in the central part of the study area. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the shallowest, most widely used source of drinking water for domestic use in the Albany area. The hydrogeologic framework of this aquifer was delineated by description of the geologic and hydrogeologic units that compose the aquifer; evaluation of the lithologic and hydrologic heterogeneity of the aquifer; comparison of the geologic and hydrogeologic setting beneath the base with those of the surrounding area; and determination of ground-water-flow directions, and vertical hydraulic conductivities and gradients in the aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is composed of the Suwannee Limestone and Ocala Limestone and is divided into an upper and lower water-bearing zone. The aquifer is confined below by the Lisbon Formation and is semi-confined above by a low-permeability clay layer in the undifferentiated overburden. The thickness of the aquifer ranges from about 165 feet in the northeastern part of the study area, to about 325 feet in the southeastern part of the study area. Based on slug tests conducted by a U.S. Navy contractor, the upper water-bearing zone has low horizontal hydraulic conductivity (0.0224 to 2.07 feet per day) and a low vertical hydraulic conductivity (0.0000227 to 0.510 feet per day); the lower water-bearing zone has a horizontal hydraulic conductivity that ranges from 0.0134 to 2.95 feet per day. Water-level hydrographs of continuously monitored wells on the Marine Corps Logistics Base show excellent correlation between ground-water level and stage of the Flint River. Ground-water-flow direction in the southwestern part of the base generally is southeast to northwest; whereas, in the northeastern part of the base, flow directions generally are east to west, as well as from west to east, thus creating a ground-water low. Ground-water flow in the larger study area generally is east to west towards the Flint River, with a major ground-water-flow path existing from the Pelham Escarpment to the Flint River and a seasonal cone of depression the size of which is dependent upon the magnitude of irrigation pumping during the summer months. Calculated vertical hydraulic gradients (based upon data from 11 well-cluster sites on the Marine Corps Logistics Base) range from 0.0016 to 0.1770 foot per foot, and generally are highest in the central and eastern parts of the base. The vertical gradient is downward at all well-cluster sites.

  11. Description and hydrogeologic implications of cored sedimentary material from the 1975 drilling program at the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rightmire, C.T.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of sedimentary material from interbeds between basalt flows and from fractures in the flows, taken from two drill cores at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were analyzed for (1) particle-size dribution, (2) bulk mineralogy, (3) clay mineralogy, (4) cation-exchange capacity, and (5) carbonate content. Thin sections of selected sediment material were made for petrographic examination. Preliminary interpretations indicate that (1) it may be possible to distinguish the various sediment interbeds on the basis of their mineralogy, (2) the presence of carbonate horizons in sedimentary interbeds may be utilized to approximate the time of exposure and the climate while the surface was exposed (which affected the hydrogeologic character of the sediment), and the type and orientation of fracture-filling material may be utilized to determine the mechanism by which fractures were filled. (USGS)

  12. Delineation of subsurface structures using resistivity, VLF and radiometric measurement around a U-tailings pond and its hydrogeological implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, K. S.; Sharma, S. P.; Sarangi, A. K.; Sengupta, D.

    The hydrogeological characteristics of the uranium mill tailings pond in the vicinity of Jaduguda (Jharkhand, India) were investigated to examine possible contamination and suggest suitable remedial measures, if required. As the hydrogeological characteristics of subsurface geology are closely related to the electrical properties of the subsurface, geophysical measurements using electrical resistivity coupled with Very Low Frequency electromagnetic method and radiation study were used to investigate the geophysical and geological condition of mill tailings in order to characterize the subsurface structures of the tailings pond. The resistivity interpretation depicted the thickness of the soil cover and thickness of tailings in the pond, as well as the depth to the basement. It also suggested the possible flow direction of leachate. It was observed that the resistivity of the top layer decreases in the direction opposite to the dam axis, which in turn, indicated that the groundwater movement occurs in the opposite direction of the dam axis (in the northwest direction). The VLF method depicted the fractures through which groundwater moves, and also showed the current density alignment in the northwest direction at 10 m depth. The radiation measurement showed relatively higher counts in the northwest direction. This correlated well with the resistivity measurement. The current density at a depth of 20 m showed a closed contour suggesting no groundwater movement in the area at this depth, and that high conductivity material was confined to the tailings area only. It was concluded that groundwater moves in opposite direction of the dam axis at shallower depth only. It was found that continuation of fractures do not extend to deeper depths, which suggested that the tailings storage facility at Jaduguda was reasonably safe from any downward contamination.

  13. Hydrogeology of the south-eastern Yucatan Peninsula: New insights from water level measurements, geochemistry, geophysics and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondwe, Bibi R. N.; Lerer, Sara; Stisen, Simon; Marín, Luis; Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Merediz-Alonso, Gonzalo; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2010-07-01

    SummaryThe Yucatan Peninsula is one of the world's largest karstic aquifer systems. It is the sole freshwater source for human users and ecosystems. The region hosts internationally important groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) in the 5280 km 2 Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve. The GDEs are threatened by increasing groundwater abstractions and risks of pollution. Hydrogeological exploration work is needed as basis for sound groundwater management. A multidisciplinary approach was used to study this data-scarce region. Geochemical data and phreatic surface measurements showed distinct hydrogeological units in the groundwater catchment of Sian Ka'an. The hilly southwestern areas had a low hydraulic permeability, likely caused by a geology containing gypsum, whereas the transition zone and flat areas in the east and north had a high permeability. In the latter areas, the fresh groundwater could be described by a Dupuit-Ghyben-Herzberg lens. Geophysical borehole logging and time-domain electromagnetic soundings identified a shallow, low-resistive and high-gamma-radiation layer present throughout the hilly area and transition zone. Its thickness was 3-8 m, apparent conductivity was 200-800 mS/m and natural gamma-radiation about 80 counts pr. second. The layer is proposed to be ejecta from the Chicxulub impact (Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary). Spatial estimates of recharge were calculated from MODIS imagery using the 'triangle method'. Average recharge constituted 17% of mean annual precipitation in the study area. Recharge was greatest in the hilly area and towards Valladolid. Near the coast, average actual evapotranspiration exceeded annual precipitation. The multidisciplinary approach used in this study is applicable to other catchment-scale studies.

  14. Investigating the Hydrogeologic Controls on Memory and Feedbacks to Climate Change in Mountain Groundwater Systems: An Integrated Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovich, K. H.; Fogg, G. E.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rising global temperatures are profoundly impacting alpine environments by shifting the precipitation type and the timing of peak snowmelt runoff. Uncertainty in the magnitude of these shifts translates to uncertainty in how climate change affects timing of snowmelt runoff, and hence availability of surface water during the remainder of the year. Integrated hydrologic models are useful tools for capturing these feedbacks by closing the loop between atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface dynamics. Recent integrated models have been used to predict streamflow response to climate change in mountain basins, however these models assume that shallow, local flow paths comprise the majority of recharge and baseflow to streams. Several studies have challenged this assumption with discordant groundwater ages and hysteresis loops, suggesting that deep, regional flow paths may play a more substantial role even at the local stream scale. This would have considerable implications for predicted responses to climate change in alpine basins, as deep, regional groundwater would initially buffer perturbations, but exhibit greater memory over the long-term. The goal of this study is to understand how various hydrogeological settings will control the relative feedbacks to climate change. This research uses three simplified, conceptual hillslope models: a "fast" draining, low storage, granodiorite similar to that of of the Sierra Nevada or Himalayan mountain range, a "slow" draining, high storage basalt of the Cascade or Andes Range, and a vertically homogeneous "base" case. The relative response of these hillslopes to three future climate scenarios: warm, warm and dry, and warm and wet are tested using ParFlow, an integrated surface water-groundwater model, coupled with CLM, a land surface model. These models will help quantify the relative feedbacks of deep groundwater in various hydrogeologic settings and will ultimately be scaled up to assess the 3-D, transient response of deep groundwater to climate change in a regional alpine system.

  15. High-resolution, Global Hydrogeology Maps (GHyM) of near-surface permeability, porosity and water table type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, T. P.; Moosdorf, N.; Hartmann, J.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2013-12-01

    The lack of robust, spatially-distributed subsurface data is key obstacle limiting the implementation of complex and realistic groundwater dynamics into global land surface, hydrologic and climate models. We map and analyze permeability, porosity and water table ratio globally and at high-resolution for the first time. Permeability and porosity are crucial hydrogeologic parameters while the water table ratio is a dimensionless ratio that predicts how the water table functions, either as topography-controlled or recharge-controlled. The new permeability and porosity maps are based on a recently completed high-resolution global lithology map with important refinements in regions of weathered tropical soils and permafrost regions. We use the high-resolution global permeability map as well as other data sets to compute the high resolution water table ratio globally. The spatially-distributed mean logarithmic permeabilities for the globe (assuming permafrost regions have negligible permeability) is -13.55 × 1.9 m2 which is consistent with previous estimates of shallow crustal permeability. The water-table type is generally contiguous over large regions rather than fragmented across the landscape and that much of the globe is topography-controlled water tables. Therefore the water table is a subdued replica of topography in many more regions than the water table is recharge controlled and disconnected from topography. We hope the new, freely-available maps of permeability, porosity and water table type, called the Global Hydrogeology Maps (GHyM), will enable further integration of groundwater dynamics into land surface, hydrologic and climate models.

  16. Hydrogeology and hydrology of the Punta Cabullones wetland area, Ponce, southern Puerto Rico, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús; Soler-López, Luis R.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Municipio Autónomo de Ponce and the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, conducted a study of the hydrogeology and hydrology of the Punta Cabullones area in Ponce, southern Puerto Rico. (Punta Cabullones is also referred to as Punta Cabullón.) The Punta Cabullones area is about 9 square miles and is an ecological system made up of a wetland, tidal flats, saltflats, mangrove forests, and a small fringing reef located a short distance offshore. The swales or depressions between successive beach ridges became development avenues for saline to hypersaline wetlands. The Punta Cabullones area was designated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a coastal barrier in the 1980s because of its capacity to act as a buffer zone to ameliorate the impacts of natural phenomenon such as storm surges. Since 2003, Punta Cabullones has been set aside for preservation as part of the mitigation effort mandated by Federal and State laws to compensate for the potential environmental effects that might be caused by the construction of the Las Américas Transshipment Port. Total rainfall measured during 2008 within the Punta Cabullones area was 36 inches, which is slightly greater than the long-term annual average of 32 inches for the coastal plain near Ponce. Two evapotranspiration estimates, 29 and 37 inches, were obtained for the subarea of the Punta Cabullones area that is underlain by fan-delta and alluvial deposits by using two variants of the Penman semi-empirical equation. The long-term water stage and chemical character of the wetland in Punta Cabullones are highly dependent on the seasonal and annual variations of both rainfall and sea-wave activity. Also, unseasonal short-term above-normal rainfall and sea-wave events resulting from passing storms may induce substantial changes in the water stage and the chemical character of the wetland. In general, tidal fluctuations exert a minor role in modifying the water quality and stage of the wetland in Punta Cabullones. The role of the tidal fluctuations becomes important during those times when the outlets/inlets to the sea are not blocked by a sand bar and is allowed to freely flow into the wetland interior. The salinity of the wetland varies from brackish to hypersaline. The hypersaline conditions, including the occurrence of saltflats, within the Punta Cabullones wetland area result from a high evapotranspiration rate. The hypersaline conditions are further enhanced by a sand bar that blocks the inlet/outlet of the wetland’s easternmost channel, particularly during the dry season. Groundwater in Punta Cabullones mostly is present within beds of silisiclastic sand and gravel. During the study period, the depth to groundwater did not exceed 4 feet below land surface. The movement and direction of the groundwater flow in Punta Cabullones are driven by density variations that in turn result from the wide range of salinities in the groundwater. The salinity of the groundwater decreases within the first 60 to 100 feet of depth and decreases outward from a mound of hypersaline groundwater centered on piezometer nest PN2. The main groundwater types within the Punta Cabullones area vary from calcium-bicarbonate type in the northernmost part of the study area to a predominantly sodium-potassium-chloride groundwater type southward. According to stable-isotope data, groundwater within the study area is both modern meteoric water and seawater highly affected by evaporation. The chemical and stable-isotopic character of local groundwater is highly influenced by evapotranspiration because of its shallow depth. Equivalent freshwater heads indicate groundwater moves away from a mound centered on piezometer nest PN2, in a pattern similar to the spatial distribution of groundwater salinity. Vertical groundwater flow occurs in Punta Cabullones due to local differences in density. In the wetland subarea of Punta Cabullones, groundwater and surface water are hydraulically coupled. Locally, surface-hypersaline water sinks into

  17. Hydrogeologic evaluation of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    A cooperative study by the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission and the U.S. Geological Survey was conducted to evaluate the hydrogeology of the Upper Floridan aquifer in an area southwest of Albany and west of the Flint River in Dougherty County, Ga. The study area lies in the Dougherty Plain district of the Coastal Plain physiographic province. In this area, the Upper Floridan aquifer is comprised of the upper Eocene Ocala Limestone, confined below by the middle Eocene Lisbon Formation, and semiconfined above by the undifferentiated Quaternary overburden. The overburden ranges in thickness from about 30 to 50 feet and consists of fine to coarse quartz sand, clayey sand, sandy clay, and clay. The Upper Floridan aquifer has been subdivided into an upper water-bearing zone and a lower water-bearing zone based on differences in lithology and yield. In the study area, the upper water-bearing zone generally consists of dense, highly weathered limestone of low permeability and ranges in thickness from 40 to 80 feet. The lower water-bearing zone consists of hard, slightly weathered limestone that exhibits a high degree of secondary permeability that has developed along fractures and joints, and ranges in thickness from about 60 to 80 feet. Borehole geophysical logs and borehole video surveys indicate two areas of high permeability in the lower water-bearing zone-one near the top and one near the base of the zone. A wellfield consisting of one production well and five observation-well clusters (one deep, intermediate, and shallow well in each cluster) was constructed for this study. Spinner flowmeter tests were conducted in the production well between the depths of 110 and 140 feet below land surface to determine the relative percentages of water contributed by selected vertical intervals of the lower water-bearing zone. Pumping rates during these tests were 1,080, 2,200, and 3,400 gallons per minute. The results of these pumping tests show that the interval between 118 and 124 feet below land surface contributes a significant percentage of the total yield to the well. An aquifer test was conducted by pumping the production well at a constant rate of 3,300 gallons per minute for about 49 hours. Time-dependent water-level data were collected throughout the pumping and recovery phases of the test in the pumped well and the observation wells. The maximum measured drawdown in the observation wells was about 2.6 ft. At about 0.5 mile from the pumped well, there was little measurable effect from pumping. Water levels increased during the test in wells located within about 3.75 miles of the Flint River (about 0.5 miles east of the pumping well). This water-level increase correlated with a 3.5-feet increase in the stage of the Flint River. The hydraulic characteristics of the Upper Floridan aquifer were evaluated using the Hantush-Jacob curve-matching and Jacob straight-line methods. Using the Hantush-Jacob method, values for transmissivity ranged from about 120,000 to 506,000 feet squared per day; values for storage coefficient ranged from 1.4 x 10-4 to 6.3 x 10-4; and values for vertical hydraulic conductivity of the overlying sediments ranged from 4.9 to 6.8 feet per day. Geometric averages for these values of transmissivity, storage coefficient, and vertical hydraulic conductivity were calculated to be 248,000 feet squared per day, 2.7 x 10-4, and 5.5 feet per day, respectively. If a dual porosity aquifer model (fracture flow plus matrix flow) is assumed instead of leakage, and the Jacob straight-line method is used with late time-drawdown data, the calculated transmissivity of the fractures ranged from about 233,000 to 466,000 feet squared per day; and storage coefficient of the fractures plus the matrix ranged from 5.1 x 10-4 to 2.9 x 10-2.

  18. Hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Adkins, Candice B.

    2012-01-01

    The Wood River Valley contains most of the population of Blaine County and the cities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, Hailey, and Bellevue. This mountain valley is underlain by the alluvial Wood River Valley aquifer system, which consists primarily of a single unconfined aquifer that underlies the entire valley, an underlying confined aquifer that is present only in the southernmost valley, and the confining unit that separates them. The entire population of the area depends on groundwater for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, and rapid population growth since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the groundwater resource. As part of an ongoing U.S. Geological Survey effort to characterize the groundwater resources of the Wood River Valley, this report describes the hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system. Although most of the Wood River Valley aquifer system is composed of Quaternary-age sediments and basalts of the Wood River Valley and its tributaries, older igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic rocks that underlie these Quaternary deposits also are used for water supply. It is unclear to what extent these rocks are hydraulically connected to the main part of Wood River Valley aquifer system and thus whether they constitute separate aquifers. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in and near the study area that produce water to wells and springs are the Phi Kappa and Trail Creek Formations (Ordovician and Silurian), the Milligen Formation (Devonian), and the Sun Valley Group including the Wood River Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) and the Dollarhide Formation (Permian). These sedimentary rocks are intruded by granitic rocks of the Late Cretaceous Idaho batholith. Eocene Challis Volcanic Group rocks overlie all of the older rocks (except where removed by erosion). Miocene Idavada Volcanics are found in the southern part of the study area. Most of these rocks have been folded, faulted, and metamorphosed to some degree, thus rock types and their relationships vary over distance. Quaternary-age sediment and basalt compose the primary source of groundwater in the Wood River Valley aquifer system. These Quaternary deposits can be divided into three units: a coarse-grained sand and gravel unit, a fine-grained silt and clay unit, and a single basalt unit. The fine- and coarse-grained units were primarily deposited as alluvium derived from glaciation in the surrounding mountains and upper reaches of tributary canyons. The basalt unit is found in the southeastern Bellevue fan area and is composed of two flows of different ages. Most of the groundwater produced from the Wood River Valley aquifer system is from the coarse-grained deposits. The altitude of the pre-Quaternary bedrock surface in the Wood River Valley was compiled from about 1,000 well-driller reports for boreholes drilled to bedrock and about 70 Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) ambient-noise measurements. The bedrock surface generally mimics the land surface by decreasing down tributary canyons and the main valley from north to south; it ranges from more than 6,700 feet in Baker Creek to less than 4,600 feet in the central Bellevue fan. Most of the south-central portion of the Bellevue fan is underlain by an apparent topographically closed area on the bedrock surface that appears to drain to the southwest towards Stanton Crossing. Quaternary sediment thickness ranges from less than a foot on main and tributary valley margins to about 350 feet in the central Bellevue fan. Hydraulic conductivity for 81 wells in the study area was estimated from well-performance tests reported on well-driller reports. Estimated hydraulic conductivity for 79 wells completed in alluvium ranges from 1,900 feet per day (ft/d) along Warm Springs Creek to less than 1 ft/d in upper Croy Canyon. A well completed in bedrock had an estimated hydraulic conductivity value of 10 ft/d, one well completed in basalt had a value of 50 ft/d, and three wells completed in the confined system had values ranging from 32 to 52 ft/

  19. Non-traditional and under-represented students in hydrogeology: Learning by discovery in an urban environment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Laura Rademacher

    Background: In my experience, I have discovered many common roadblocks to non-traditional and under-represented student participation in hydrogeology: Time constraintsâmany students have complicated schedules and demands on their time that a traditional undergraduate does not have. For example, many of these students are working full time, and required experiences outside of the classroom often pose scheduling conflicts for students. Communication skillsâmany under-represented students arrive in the classroom with communication skills that are not fully developed. Students are often learning English as they are learning the complex vocabulary of hydrogeology. Math skillsâmany students are under prepared in math and/or have math phobias Fundingâmany students are unable to pay laboratory and field trip fees. I currently teach at minority serving institution. Here, I find that hands-on practice is the most successful learning experience for students. Students grasp concepts such as discharge, flux, and residence time more effectively when they are active participants in the learning process. The most effective method I have found for addressing these issues and encouraging under represented student participation in hydrogeology is to create student-designed group research projects. I used this strategy three quarters in a row, and the same students (as well as new students they recruit) continue to sign up for these courses. This trend, in addition to students' growing confidence in engaging in the scientific method, is my primary evidence for success. Resources are very limited at my institution, so here are a couple of suggestions that work well. Borrow equipmentâfrom other universities, from consulting companies, from colleagues. Simplify analysesâmany interesting conclusions can be drawn from simply pH, conductivity, and temperature data. But, there are also relatively inexpensive test kits on the market that are sufficient for class purposes (ex. LaMotte urban water test kit ~$30). Description Everyone will have different class sizes, student preparation levels, and goals when attempting an exercise like this, so I will provide general information, which others can modify to meet their needs. Below I briefly outline the steps I take the students through during the project and highlight ideas for improving success for the targeted groups. Form groupsâdepending on class size, 2-4 students per group (I try to ensure the groups are balanced based on skills and student interests) Choose topicâI usually provide a list of possible topics and have students adapt a topic from the list that interests them. Students require a lot of guidance at this stage to assure selection of a manageable topic for a quarter-long project. This is the most important step - guiding students into a topic they are passionate about and where they can be successful is key. Students usually have no shortage of questions they want to answer about water in an urban environment! Since most of the students have spent their whole lives in an urban situation, they are deeply passionate about these issues. Research literatureâstudents perform a background search for previous work on their topic to help guide them. I provide a laboratory session on how to search the library and databases for related information, as well as provide a list of recommended journals and websites. In addition, students locate supporting data (discharge, well levels, precipitation) Plan studyâwe discuss study design, sample types, sampling location, frequency. During this phase, students use maps, study weather patterns, and determine site accessibility. Collect dataâwe set aside lab periods for collecting data together. These are the sessions where you should be prepared to answer all sort of questions. Once the students begin implementing their study, many new questions come up. Analyze and interpret resultsâmultiple lab periods are used to analyze data; student data are the basis of the remainder of labs. Techniques discussed are applied to their group projects. Prese

  20. Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California-Hydrogeologic framework and transient groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R., (Edited By); Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the groundwater flow system and previous less extensive groundwater flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect groundwater flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the groundwater flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural groundwater discharge occurring through evapotranspiration (ET) and spring flow; the history of groundwater pumping from 1913 through 1998; groundwater recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were provided by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional groundwater flow system. Groundwater flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex groundwater flow systems. Groundwater flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional groundwater flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and ET are the dominant natural groundwater discharge processes. Groundwater also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Groundwater flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey 3D finitedifference modular groundwater flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 meters (m) on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins simulated by constant-head boundaries. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient mode

  1. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R., (Edited By)

    2004-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were provided by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional ground-water flow system. Ground-water flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex ground-water flow systems. Ground-water flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional ground-water flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and evapotranspiration (ET) are the dominant natural ground-water discharge processes. Ground water also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Ground-water flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, a 3D finite-difference modular ground-water flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 m on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins, also simulated by drains. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient model gener

  2. A little island with significant groundwater resources: hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical features of the Pianosa aquifer (Tuscan Archipelago, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannecchini, R.; Doveri, M.; Mussi, M.; Nicotra, I.; Puccinelli, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Pianosa Island is one of the seven islands of the Tuscan Archipelago, particularly known for its typical flat morphological structure. It is formed by Neogenic-Quaternary sedimentary rocks, mainly represented by superficial calcarenite and underlying marl and clayey marl. Despite the small extension of the island (just 10,2 km2 wide, coastal perimeter of approximately 18 km, maximum altitude of 29 m a.s.l.) and poor rainfall amount (the annual average is 480,7 mm in 1951-2002 period), the Pianosa aquifer is characterized by significant groundwater resources, which supported the presence of approximately 2,000 people at the end of Eighties. Nevertheless, the groundwater overexploitation and the land use (agricultural activity and cattle-breeding, associated to the local penal settlement activity) caused important sea-water intrusion and pollution phenomena. An improvement of such situation occurs since 1998, owing to the closing of the penal settlement and its activities. This pilot research intends to describe the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical features of the Pianosa Island aquifer system and the groundwater quality several years after the penal settlement closing. The results of a multidisciplinary approach (hydrogeological, geochemical, isotopic) show that the groundwater recharge and circulation are substantially controlled by the hydro-structural conditions. The flat and permeable superficial calcarenite allows a high infiltration rate. The water table flow direction is generally W-E, in accordance with the dip direction of the stratigraphic contact between the calcarenite and the underlying impermeable marly-clayey rocks. However, the latter present conglomerate and sandstone intercalations, sometimes in contact (by angular unconformity) with the calcarenite, determining a general continuity in groundwater circulation, which is phreatic in the calcarenite, and confined in the conglomerate and sandstone horizons. A piezometric depression with values below the sea level has been identified in the eastern part of the island. The electric conductivity (EC) map confirms this hydrogeological structure. EC values above 1.000 ?S/cm are common in almost all the groundwater analyzed. An increase in groundwater salinity is observable in the eastern part of Pianosa, where the water table depression has been recognized. In agreement with the hydro-structural and water table conditions, the hydrogeochemical analyses confirm the recharge of the confined horizons (conglomerate and sandstone) by the superficial calcarenite. The isotopic data indicate that the aquifer system is recharged by the rainfall direct infiltration and there are not connections with the close Elba Island. Finally, the chemical analyses of most groundwater samples suggest an intermediate facies Na-Cl/Ca-HCO3, produced by the combination of the sea spray and the circulation in a prevalently carbonate aquifer (calcarenite). Clearly Na-Cl groundwater prevails in the eastern portion of the island, evidencing the seawater intrusion in the calcarenite, also confirmed by water table conditions and isotopic data.

  3. Hydrogeologic productivity in response to a conjugate compressive strike-slip relay: example of Sidi Bou Krime-Jalta area (northern Tunisia)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zouhaïr Mejri; Nouri Hatira; Chedhly Ben Hamza

    2011-01-01

    Bore holes were drilled in the Senonian limestone of the Hedils-Jalta area (northern Tunisia) in order to determine their\\u000a potential as an aquifer. Structural, tectonic and hydrogeologic data compilation shows the discrimination of productive and\\u000a not productive zones. Differential hydraulic productivity was recognised with four distinct productive geological zones separated\\u000a by a sterile corridor trending NW–SE. The structure consists of

  4. Integrating Hydrogeological, Microbiological, and Geochemical Data Using a MultiComponent Reactive Transport Model: Quantifying the Biogeochemical Evolution of Redox Zones in a Contaminated Aquifer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. T. McGuire; M. S. Phanikumar; D. T. Long; D. W. Hyndman

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogeological, microbiological, and geochemical processes operating in a shallow sandy aquifer contaminated by waste fuels and chlorinated solvents were integrated using high-resolution mechanistic models. A 3-D, transient, reactive transport model was developed to quantitatively describe coupled processes via thermodynamic and kinetic arguments. The model was created by linking the hydrodynamic model MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988), with advection, dispersion and

  5. Hydrogeologic data from selected wells and test holes in and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, through 1986

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. E. Arteaga; C. S. Savard; M. E. Johnson; C. J. Stone

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data collected from selected wells and test holes in the Nevada Test Site area show that the measured depth to water in the area ranged from 92 to 2,467 feet below land surface. The measured altitude of the ground-water surface ranged from 2,289 to 5,913 feet above sea level. Ground water in the Nevada Test Site area is present

  6. Hydrogeologic and water-quality reconnaissance of the artesian aquifer under the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation and Tokeland Peninsula, Pacific County, Washington, 1998-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.; Ebbert, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and compiled hydrogeologic and water quality data from September 1998 through September 1999 to describe the hydrogeologic setting and to assess the quality of the water in the artesian aquifer under the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation and the adjacent Tokeland Peninsula area of Pacific County, Washington. Hydrogeologic data include descriptions of 38 wells, lithologic data for 27 wells, and water-level data for 17 wells and 1 tidal station. Water-quality data include field measurements for temperature, specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, bicarbonate, carbonate, dissolved oxygen, and laboratory analyses for major inorganic ions, metals, nutrients, methylene blue-active substances, and pesticides. None of the 93 field measurements or chemicals analyzed for exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) primary standards for drinking water and only 2 constituents (iron and manganese) exceeded the USEPA secondary standards. Sixty-six of the constituents (including all 53 pesticides) were at or below the reporting or detection levels established by the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory.

  7. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

  8. Application of statistical approaches to analyze geological, geotechnical and hydrogeological data at a fractured-rock mine site in Northern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, J. M.; Allen, D. M.; Gibson, H. D.; Mackie, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Mine site characterization often results in the acquisition of geological, geotechnical and hydrogeological data sets that are used in the mine design process but are rarely co-evaluated. For a study site in northern Canada, bivariate and multivariate (hierarchical) statistical techniques are used to evaluate empirical hydraulic conductivity estimation methods based on traditional rock mass characterisation schemes, as well as to assess the regional hydrogeological conceptual model. Bivariate techniques demonstrate that standard geotechnical measures of fracturing are poor indicators of the hydraulic potential of a rock mass at the study site. Additionally, rock-mass-permeability schemes which rely on these measures are shown to be poor predictors of hydraulic conductivity in untested areas. Multivariate techniques employing hierarchical cluster analysis of both geotechnical and geological data sets are able to identify general trends in the data. Specifically, the geological cluster analysis demonstrated spatial relationship between intrusive contacts and increased hydraulic conductivity. This suggests promise in the use of clustering methods in identifying new trends during the early stages of hydrogeological characterization.

  9. The hydrogeology of the Tully Valley, Onondaga County, New York: an overview of research, 1992-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kappel, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Onondaga Creek begins approximately 15 miles south of Syracuse, New York, and flows north through the Onondaga Indian Nation, then through Syracuse, and finally into Onondaga Lake in central New York. Tully Valley is in the upper part of the Onondaga Creek watershed between U.S. Route 20 and the Valley Heads end moraine near Tully, N.Y. Tully Valley has a history of several unusual hydrogeologic phenomena that affected past land use and the water quality of Onondaga Creek; the phenomena are still present and continue to affect the area today (2014). These phenomena include mud volcanoes or mudboils, landslides, and land-surface subsidence; all are considered to be naturally occurring but may also have been influenced by human activity. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Onondaga Lake Partnership, began a study of the Tully Valley mudboils beginning in October 1991 in hopes of understanding (1) what drives mudboil activity in order to remediate mudboil influence on the water quality of Onondaga Creek, and (2) land-surface subsidence issues that have caused a road bridge to collapse, a major pipeline to be rerouted, and threatened nearby homes. Two years into this study, the 1993 Tully Valley landslide occurred just over 1 mile northwest of the mudboils. This earth slump-mud flow was the largest landslide in New York in more than 70 years (Fickies, 1993); this event provided additional insight into the geology and hydrology of the valley. As the study of the Tully Valley mudboils progressed, other unusual hydrogeologic phenomena were found within the Tully Valley and provided the opportunity to perform short-term, small-scale studies, some of which became graduate student theses—Burgmeier (1998), Curran (1999), Morales-Muniz (2000), Baldauf (2003), Epp (2005), Hackett, (2007), Tamulonis (2010), and Sinclair (2013). The unusual geology and hydrology of the Tully Valley, having been investigated for more than two decades, provides the basis for this report.

  10. Hydrogeology and its effect on reactivation of saline groundwater by pumping wells in a dinosaur track site, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, H.; Yeo, I.

    2011-12-01

    A dinosaur track fossil site in Korea is located near the lake that used to be part of the ocean before a seawall was built. It was excavated as deep as 3.2 m below the ground surface, which causes the site to submerge with heavy rainfall in the summer. Water in the excavated site is slightly salty, which accelerates the deterioration of dinosaur tracks. The pumping wells and facilities have been operating to lower the water level when the water level rises in the rainy season. Hydrogeological investigation was undertaken to characterize the hydrogeology, a source of saline water, and further its possible reactivation by groundwater pumping. Slug tests revealed that hydraulic conductivity (K) ranged in the order of 10-5 to 10-7 m/s, which indicated that the site is very heterogeneous and groundwater flow takes place predominantly through a limited number of permeable sedimentary layers. The vertical EC (electrical conductivity) profiles also confirmed that the wells with a higher K have more transition zones at which EC sharply changes due to the existence of groundwater flow. The vertical EC profiles at the monitoring wells showed that groundwater, the EC of which is as high as that of nearby sea water (30 mS/cm), is located as deep as about 20 m below the surface. The high saline water is thought to have intruded into the site when the lake with EC of about 3 mS/cm used to be part of the ocean. At the well with a high K, saline water higher than 10 mS/cm is found within even less than 10 m below the surface. The EC monitoring over one year showed that shallow groundwater becomes more saline with time. To investigate the effect of the groundwater extraction on the rise of salinity, pumping tests were conducted, while groundwater level and the vertical EC profile were monitored. An increase of EC was observed at both the pumping well and the wells with a high K, which confirmed that the pumping facility in the site causes groundwater with high salinity to rise up into a shallow aquifer through a limited number of permeable sedimentary layers.

  11. Hydrogeology and water quality in the Snake River alluvial aquifer at Jackson Hole Airport, Jackson, Wyoming, September 2008-June 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Snake River alluvial aquifer, at the Jackson Hole Airport in northwest Wyoming, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Jackson Hole Airport Board and the Teton Conservation District during September 2008-June 2009. Hydrogeologic conditions were characterized using data collected from 14 Jackson Hole Airport wells. Groundwater levels are summarized in this report and the direction of groundwater flow, hydraulic gradients, and estimated groundwater velocity rates in the Snake River alluvial aquifer underlying the study area are presented. Analytical results of chemical, dissolved gas, and stable isotopes are presented and summarized. Seasonally, the water table at Jackson Hole Airport was lowest in early spring and reached its peak in July, with an increase of 12 to 14 feet between April and July 2009. Groundwater flow was predominantly horizontal but had the hydraulic potential for downward flow. The direction of groundwater flow was from the northeast to the west-southwest. Horizontal groundwater velocities within the Snake River alluvial aquifer at the airport were estimated to be about 26 to 66 feet per day. This indicates that the traveltime from the farthest upgradient well to the farthest downgradient well was approximately 53 to 138 days. This estimate only describes the movement of groundwater because some solutes may move at a rate much slower than groundwater flow through the aquifer. The quality of the water in the alluvial aquifer generally was considered good. The alluvial aquifer was a fresh, hard to very hard, calcium carbonate type water. No constituents were detected at concentrations exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels, and no anthropogenic compounds were detected at concentrations greater than laboratory reporting levels. The quality of groundwater in the alluvial aquifer generally was suitable for domestic and other uses; however, dissolved iron and manganese were detected at concentrations exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels for drinking water in two monitoring wells. These secondary standards are esthetic guidelines only and are nonenforceable. Iron and manganese are likely both natural components of the geologic materials in the area and may have become mobilized in the aquifer due to reduction/oxidation (redox) processes. Additionally, measurements of dissolved-oxygen concentrations and analyses of major ions and nutrients indicate reducing conditions exist at two of the seven wells sampled. Reducing conditions in an otherwise oxic aquifer system are indicative of an upgradient or in-situ source of organic carbon. The nature of the source of organic carbon at the airport could not be determined. View report for unabridged abstract.

  12. Hydrogeologic framework and groundwater/surface-water interactions of the South Fork Nooksack River Basin, northwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    A hydrogeologic framework of the South Fork (SF) Nooksack River Basin in northwestern Washington was developed and hydrologic data were collected to characterize the groundwater-flow system and its interaction with surface?water features. In addition to domestic, agricultural, and commercial uses of groundwater within the SF Nooksack River Basin, groundwater has the potential to provide ecological benefits by maintaining late-summer streamflows and buffering stream temperatures. Cold-water refugia, created and maintained in part by groundwater, have been identified by water-resource managers as key elements to restore the health and viability of threatened salmonids in the SF Nooksack River. The SF Nooksack River drains a 183-square mile area of the North Cascades and the Puget Lowland underlain by unconsolidated glacial and alluvial sediments deposited over older sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous bedrock. The primary aquifer that interacts with the SF Nooksack River was mapped within unconsolidated glacial outwash and alluvial sediment. The lower extent of this unit is bounded by bedrock and fine-grained, poorly sorted unconsolidated glaciomarine and glaciolacustrine sediments. In places, these deposits overlie and confine an aquifer within older glacial sediments. The extent and thickness of the hydrogeologic units were assembled from mapped geologic units and lithostratigraphic logs of field-inventoried wells. Generalized groundwater-flow directions within the surficial aquifer were interpreted from groundwater levels measured in August 2012; and groundwater seepage gains and losses to the SF Nooksack River were calculated from synoptic streamflow measurements made in the SF Nooksack River and its tributaries in September 2012. A subset of the field-inventoried wells was measured at a monthly interval to determine seasonal fluctuations in groundwater levels during water year 2013. Taken together, these data provide the foundation for a future groundwater-flow model of the SF Nooksack River Basin that may be used to investigate the potential effects of future climate change, land use, and groundwater pumping on water resources in the study area. Site-specific hydrologic data, including time series of longitudinal temperature profiles measured with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor and continuous monitoring of stream stage and water levels measured in wells in adjacent wetlands and aquifers, also were measured to characterize the interaction among the SF Nooksack River, surficial aquifers, and riparian wetlands.

  13. Conceptual hydrogeological model of flow and transport of dissolved organic carbon in a small Jura karst system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Catherine; Mudry, Jacques

    2012-08-01

    SummaryThis paper aims at characterizing infiltration and solute transport processes in a karst system during flood events in order to build a conceptual model of hydrogeological functioning. The study site is the small karst system of Fertans in the French Jura. Soil cover, rock matrix, and a small spring were monitored to measure hydrological and hydrochemical parameters, and particularly a continuous dissolved organic carbon (DOC) signal, which is a relevant environmental tracer of fast infiltration. We used two combined approaches. First, from hydrodynamic and hydrochemical data, we identified the system structure (consistent with a dual porosity scheme) and characterized the main processes occurring during flood events. Second, on the basis of this scheme, we built a new conceptual hydrogeological model coupled with DOC transport to numerically validate the hydrological functioning. This modelling approach is based on a rainfall-discharge model to simulate spring flow. Solute transport is modelled using mixing equations, including an empirical retardation factor, as well as a first order solute decay. The model was calibrated and validated on a set of nineteen flood events, showing its performances in simulating spring hydrographs and delayed DOC signals during flood events with various rainfall intensities. We showed that the recharge area of the karst system varied largely with low and high groundwater periods, which was attributed to the state of hydraulic connectivity in the unsaturated zone. The soil cover appeared to play an important role of mixing and transfer for the recharge water. The model simulated the contributions of pre-event and event waters during flood events and allowed a better quantification of the available resource. It showed, in particular, that total discharge of some flood events during low water periods is mainly composed of pre-event water via piston flow-type processes. Finally, this study shows that the mixing model can simulate solute transport correctly, taking into account degradation and retardation processes. It highlights the need for a quantitative approach on hydrochemical studies of karst systems in order to understand them better.

  14. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin (Arizona and Sonora) using Well Logs, Geologic Mapping, Gravity, Magnetics, and Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegary, J. B.; Page, W. R.; Megdal, S.; Gray, F.; Scott, C. A.; Berry, M.; Rangel, M.; Oroz Ramos, L.; Menges, C. M.; Jones, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Congress passed the U.S.-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Act which provides a framework for study of aquifers shared by the United States and Mexico. The aquifer of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin was chosen as one of four priority aquifers for several reasons, including water scarcity, a population greater than 300,000, groundwater as the sole source of water for human use, and a riparian corridor that is of regional significance for migratory birds and other animals. Several new mines are also being proposed for this area which may affect water quality and availability. To date, a number of studies have been carried out by a binational team composed of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Mexican National Water Commission, and the Universities of Arizona and Sonora. Construction of a cross-border hydrogeologic framework model of the basin between Amado, Arizona and its southern boundary in Sonora is currently a high priority. The relatively narrow Santa Cruz valley is a structural basin that did not experience the same degree of late Cenozoic lateral extension and consequent deepening as found in other basin-and-range alluvial basins, such as the Tucson basin, where basin depth exceeds 3000 meters. This implies that storage may be much less than that found in other basin-and-range aquifers. To investigate the geometry of the basin and facies changes within the alluvium, a database of over one thousand well logs has been developed, geologic mapping and transient electromagnetic (TEM) surveys have been carried out, and information from previous electromagnetic, magnetic, and gravity studies is being incorporated into the hydrogeologic framework. Initial geophysical surveys and analyses have focused on the portion of the basin west of Nogales, Arizona, because it supplies approximately 50% of that city's water. Previous gravity and magnetic modeling indicate that this area is a narrow, fault-controlled half graben. Preliminary modeling of airborne and ground-based transient electromagnetic surveys corroborates earlier conclusions from the gravity modeling that depth to bedrock is greater than 500 meters in some locations. Results from other portions of the study area including Mexico are still being evaluated and incorporated into the three-dimensional hydrologic framework which will ultimately be used to construct a groundwater flow model.

  15. An integrated multi-scale hydrogeological model for performance and safety assessment of French geological high level and long live radwaste disposal in clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabderrahmane, H.; Cornaton, F. J.; Kerrou, J.

    2009-12-01

    A deep geological repository of high level and long live radwaste requires sound understanding of the far field and near field groundwater flow and transport properties. Andra, French National radioactive waste management Agency is developing since last 15 years, an integrated multi-scale hydrogeological model of whole Paris basin of 200'000 Km2 area (regional scale) to produce a regional flow field associated to groundwater behavior. It includes locally the Meuse / Haute Marne clay site of about 250 Km2 area in the eastern part of Paris basin that was chosen for the emplacement of a repository. Callovo-Oxfordian as host formation is a clay layer characterized by very low permeability, a mean thickness of 130 m at about 500 m depth and is embedded by calcareous formations as aquifers (Dogger and Oxfordian). The hydrogeological conceptual model is based on stratigraphic and petrophysic modeling of the Paris basin and is accounting for the sound structural, geological, hydrogeological and geochemical data in an integrated way. At Paris basin scale, the model is a multilayer system of 27 layers (hydrogeological units) from Trias to Tertiary. A refinement at local scale of the site defines 27 hydro-geological units from Trias to Portlandian within an area of 1800 Km2. Based on sound data acquisition from borehole and seismic campaigns performed by Andra, regional faults, minor and diffuse fractures are considered. A structural and petrophysical representation of the transition zone between the Paris basin scale and site scale, as well as a better handling of surface flow boundary conditions are considered. Finite element flow and transport simulator Ground Water code (GW) is used to solve for groundwater flow at steady-state in a 1.8 Million nodes model, considering current climatic conditions. The model is calibrated against about 1250 hydraulic head measurements, and results in maximum absolute hydraulic head differences of 20 meters at the regional scale and 5 meters at the local scale. The calibrated reference model includes transmissive major faults as well as structures acting as barrier to flow. Advective-dispersive age solutions are also carried out and compared to available age dates of pore water within the two main calcareous aquifers (Dogger and Oxfordian) that embed Callovo-Oxfordian host formation, to consolidate calibration of flow and to analyze internal water mixing processes and hydraulic behavior of major faults. Lifetime expectancy solutions combined with age solutions are also used to map in the 3-D space the low- and high-speed flow zones at the local scale.

  16. Regional hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of deep formation waters in the Williston Basin (Canada-USA): implications for fluid migration in the basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostron, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    The regional groundwater flow-system in the Williston Basin (Canada-USA) is one of the best examples of a mega-scale confined aquifer-system in the world. With its well-defined recharge and discharge areas separated by approximately 1000 km horizontal and 1 km vertical distance, the basin is an ideal natural laboratory to study regional groundwater flow and hydrochemistry. Springs and shallow water wells in the recharge and discharge areas, along with deeper oil and gas wells, allow for detailed mapping of formation-pressures. Further, these wells provide access for sampling and geochemical analyses of formation waters along flow paths. Basin-scale hydrogeological and hydrochemical mapping combined with newly obtained geochemical and isotopic data from more than 2000 wells across the basin provide new insights into the present and paleohydrogeology of the basin. Results indicate: 1) the hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of the basin must be mapped on hydrogeological (not political) boundaries; 2) many aquifers have similar water chemistries, yet unique isotopic fingerprints; 3) stable isotope distributions provide insight(s) into regional fluid flow patterns; 4) analysis of bromine concentrations and stable isotopic compositions provide evidence that at least some of the brine in the basin owes its origin to evaporated seawater and not just dissolved evaporites as previously thought; 5) regional patterns of stable isotopes and halogens can be used to trace different flow "events" in the basin's history; 6) calcium-rich brines in the center of the basin may be associated with relict calcium-rich seawaters; 7) hydrocarbon migration pathways have been variably impacted by evolving hydrodynamic conditions; and 8) there is strong evidence of past glacially-driven recharge in the current discharge area of the basin. These observations show that the hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of the basin is more complex than previously thought. Portions of the basin appear to respond rapidly to changes in boundary conditions including: the recharge areas; midline areas that have experienced extensive salt dissolution; and present discharge areas that appear to show evidence of glacially-driven recharge. Other portions of the basin appear to have had little to no fluid-flow despite being continuous and highly-permeable. Mixing, and not depth, appears to control water compositions. Insights gained from regional hydrogeology and hydrochemical provide an improved understanding the present and past mega-scale fluid migration in the Williston Basin.

  17. Preliminary investigation of the hydrogeology and contamination in the area of an abandoned manufactured gas plant in Albany, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, M.J.; Gallaher, B.M.; Early, D.A. (Geological Survey, Doraville, GA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of natural gas pipelines in the 1950's, gas for lighting and heating in the US was produced from coal or oil at local manufacturing gas plants. By-products and wastes generated at these plants commonly were disposed of on site. The major wastes, which include tar and oil residues and sludges, spent oxides, and ash materials, can consist of a complex mixture of hundreds of aromatic organic compounds as well as cyanides and metals. An investigation was initiated in January 1989 in the vicinity of an abandoned manufactured gas plant in Albany, Georgia, to evaluate the hydrogeology and contamination of the area, and to test study techniques that may have application in similar situations. Geologic formations of interest to this investigation include, in descending order, unconsolidated sand and clay layers, The Ocala Limestone, and the Lisbon Formation. Surficial fill overlies the sand and clay layers throughout the study area. High concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons and various metals were detected in the unconsolidated sediments in the vicinity of the abandoned gas plant. Maximum concentrations of hydrocarbons detected sediment samples included 560,000 microg/kg naphthalene, 73,000 microg/kg ethylbenzene, 28,000 microg/kg benzene, and 24,000 microg/kg toluene. These higher concentrations of hydrocarbons were present in the vicinity of the former gas holding tanks. In that area, contamination extends at least to the depth of the contact between the unconsolidated sand and clay layers and the Ocala Limestone.

  18. Hydrogeological modeling constraints provided by geophysical and geochemical mapping of a chlorinated ethenes plume in northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafindratsima, Stephen; Guérin, Roger; Bendjoudi, Hocine; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2014-09-01

    A methodological approach is described which combines geophysical and geochemical data to delineate the extent of a chlorinated ethenes plume in northern France; the methodology was used to calibrate a hydrogeological model of the contaminants' migration and degradation. The existence of strong reducing conditions in some parts of the aquifer is first determined by measuring in situ the redox potential and dissolved oxygen, dissolved ferrous iron and chloride concentrations. Electrical resistivity imaging and electromagnetic mapping, using the Slingram method, are then used to determine the shape of the pollutant plume. A decreasing empirical exponential relation between measured chloride concentrations in the water and aquifer electrical resistivity is observed; the resistivity formation factor calculated at a few points also shows a major contribution of chloride concentration in the resistivity of the saturated porous medium. MODFLOW software and MT3D99 first-order parent-daughter chain reaction and the RT3D aerobic-anaerobic model for tetrachloroethene (PCE)/trichloroethene (TCE) dechlorination are finally used for a first attempt at modeling the degradation of the chlorinated ethenes. After calibration, the distribution of the chlorinated ethenes and their degradation products simulated with the model approximately reflects the mean measured values in the observation wells, confirming the data-derived image of the plume.

  19. Hydrogeologic framework of the uppermost principal aquifer systems in the Williston and Powder River structural basins, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, Joanna N.; LeCain, Gary D.; Ryter, Derek W.; Sando, Roy; Long, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of about 300 electric (resistivity) and lithologic logs in the Williston structural basin and numerous existing publications for the Powder River structural basin were used to develop a three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework for both basins. Interpolated thicknesses of the glacial deposits, the lower Tertiary aquifer system, and the Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Williston structural basin are less than about 750; 2,250; and 1,050 ft, respectively. Interpolated thicknesses of the lower Tertiary aquifer system and the Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River structural basin are less than about 7,180 and 5,070 ft, respectively. Interpolated horizontal hydraulic conductivity values for the Williston structural basin were as much as 25 feet per day (ft/d) in the glacial deposits and had smaller ranges in the lower Tertiary aquifer system (0.01–9.8 ft/d) and in the Upper Cretaceous aquifer system (0.06–5.5 ft/d). In the Powder River structural basin, the lower Tertiary aqu

  20. Hydrogeology and water-quality conditions at the City of Olathe Landfill, east-central Kansas, 1990-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, P.P.; Shockley, J.C.; Hargadine, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Water quality at the City of Olathe Landfill in east-central Kansas was examined in relation to hydrogeologic conditions to help determine the effects of the landfill on shallow ground water. This study focused on the Wyandotte and Plattsburg Limestones underlying the landfill. The Wyandotte Limestone underlies the entire landfill, whereas the overlying Plattsburg Limestone crops out within the landffll boundaries. Little Cedar Creek, an unnamed tributary, and a pond are located in the landfill. Water samples from seven monitoring wells and five surface-water sites in the vicinity of the City of Olathe Landfill were collected for analysis of inorganic and organic constituents. The inorganic constituents in the ground water that are most affected in the vicinity of the landfill are calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, ammonia, barium, iron, and manganese. The dissolved- organic-carbon concentration at a seep flowing from the Plattsburg Limestone was 1,400 milligrams per liter, indicating that the landfill is affecting the water quality near the seep. Benzene was detected in all of the water samples, and the largest concentration was in a sample collected upgradient of the landfill. The benzene concentration exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level (0.005 milligram per liter) for drinking-water supplies. Six of the eight specific organic compounds detected were found in a water sample collected from the Plattsburg Limestone immediately downgradient of the landfill. No organic compoands, except benzene, were detected in samples collected from the Wyandotte Limestone downgradient of the landfill.

  1. Using hydrogeology to identify the source of groundwater to Montezuma Well, a natural spring in central Arizona: part 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; DeWitt, Ed H.; Arnold, L. Rick

    2012-01-01

    Montezuma Well is a natural spring located within a “sinkhole” in the desert environment of the Verde Valley in Central Arizona. It is managed by the National Park Service as part of Montezuma Castle National Monument. Because of increasing development of groundwater in the area, this research was undertaken to better understand the sources of groundwater to Montezuma Well. The use of well logs and geophysics provides details on the geology in the area around Montezuma Well. This includes characterizing the extent and position of a basalt dike that intruded a deep fracture zone. This low permeability barrier forces groundwater to the surface at the Montezuma Well “pool” with sufficient velocity to entrain sand-sized particles from underlying bedrock. Permeable fractures along and above the basalt dike provide conduits that carry deep sourced carbon dioxide to the surface, which can dissolve carbonate minerals along the transport path in response to the added carbon dioxide. At the ground surface, CO2 degasses, depositing travertine. Geologic cross sections, rock geochemistry, and semi-quantitative groundwater flow modeling provide a hydrogeologic framework that indicates groundwater flow through a karstic limestone at depth (Redwall Limestone) as the most significant source of groundwater to Montezuma Well. Additional groundwater flow from the overlying formations (Verde Formation and Permian Sandstones) is a possibility, but significant flow from these units is not indicated.

  2. Groundwater flow modelling of multi-aquifer systems for regional resources evaluation: the Gdansk hydrogeological system, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska-Szulc, Beata

    2009-09-01

    In order to evaluate groundwater regional resources, a mathematical model of the Gdansk hydrogeological system (Poland) was developed. The research area covers about 2,800 km2. Groundwater occurs in Cretaceous, Paleogene and Neogene formations. The recharge zone is situated in the glacial upland of the Kashubian Lake District. The discharge zone spreads over the lowlands of Gdansk and beneath the Bay of Gdansk (Baltic Sea). The MODFLOW program was used to develop a three-dimensional steady-state model on the basis of data from over 1,700 boreholes. The research area was digitalized as a square network of sides 200 m in length. Simplification of groundwater occurrence allowed four aquifers to be distinguished: upper Pleistocene, Pleistocene-Miocene, Oligocene-Eocene, and Cretaceous and also four intervening aquitards. The mathematical model calculations showed that the system is recharged mainly by precipitation (infiltration recharge is 136 mm/year). The precipitation recharge amounts to 1,045,440 m3/day. The other part of the inflow constitutes lateral flows from beyond the area of research and also to some extent from losing rivers and lakes. The runoff from the system takes place mainly through gaining streams and through lateral outflow including under-sea and lake discharge.

  3. A master-slave parallel hybrid multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for groundwater remediation design under general hydrogeological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Yang, Y.; Luo, Q.; Wu, J.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a new hybrid multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, the niched Pareto tabu search combined with a genetic algorithm (NPTSGA), whereby the global search ability of niched Pareto tabu search (NPTS) is improved by the diversification of candidate solutions arose from the evolving nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) population. Also, the NPTSGA coupled with the commonly used groundwater flow and transport codes, MODFLOW and MT3DMS, is developed for multi-objective optimal design of groundwater remediation systems. The proposed methodology is then applied to a large-scale field groundwater remediation system for cleanup of large trichloroethylene (TCE) plume at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Furthermore, a master-slave (MS) parallelization scheme based on the Message Passing Interface (MPI) is incorporated into the NPTSGA to implement objective function evaluations in distributed processor environment, which can greatly improve the efficiency of the NPTSGA in finding Pareto-optimal solutions to the real-world application. This study shows that the MS parallel NPTSGA in comparison with the original NPTS and NSGA-II can balance the tradeoff between diversity and optimality of solutions during the search process and is an efficient and effective tool for optimizing the multi-objective design of groundwater remediation systems under complicated hydrogeologic conditions.

  4. Hydrogeologic framework of the diabase aquifer at the Boarhead Farms Superfund site, Bridgeton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreffler, Curtis L.

    1996-01-01

    The hydrogeologic investigation at the Boarhead Farms Superfund site was done to characterize the framework of the diabase aquifer underlying the site. The primary water-producing fracture system is less than 30 feet below land surface. Water-bearing fractures were not found deeper than 50 feet below land surface. The overburden soil is thin and ranges from 4 to 14 feet thick. The overburden soil acts as a confining unit for the underlying bedrock aquifer. Weathered bedrock consisting of broken diabase ranged from 2 to 15 feet thick, and in some areas, fractures in the weathered bedrock zone were filled with clay. Due to the clay-rich overburden soil and the thick, clay filled weathered bedrock zone, little ground-water storage is available to supply the shallow fracture systems. The diabase aquifer is low yielding with low transmissivities. Five of 15 boreholes drilled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's investigation produced no water. Estimates of transmisivity calculated from analyses of open-hole constant-discharge tests in five boreholes ranged from 3.1 to 100 square feet per day. Estimated discharge rates for these exists between boreholes. The fracture system is limited in areal extent. Dewatering of fractures supplying water to boreholes occurred during open-hole constant-discharge tests of three boreholes.

  5. Using direct current resistivity sounding and geostatistics to aid in hydrogeological studies in the Choshuichi alluvial fan, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chieh-Hou; Lee, Wei-Feng

    2002-01-01

    Ground water reservoirs in the Choshuichi alluvial fan, central western Taiwan, were investigated using direct-current (DC) resistivity soundings at 190 locations, combined with hydrogeological measurements from 37 wells. In addition, attempts were made to calculate aquifer transmissivity from both surface DC resistivity measurements and geostatistically derived predictions of aquifer properties. DC resistivity sounding data are highly correlated to the hydraulic parameters in the Choshuichi alluvial fan. By estimating the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity from the kriged well data and the cokriged thickness of the correlative aquifer from both resistivity sounding data and well information, the transmissivity of the aquifer at each location can be obtained from the product of kriged hydraulic conductivity and computed thickness of the geoelectric layer. Thus, the spatial variation of the transmissivities in the study area is obtained. Our work is more comparable to Ahmed et al. (1988) than to the work of Niwas and Singhal (1981). The first "constraint" from Niwas and Singhal's work is a result of their use of linear regression. The geostatistical approach taken here (and by Ahmed et al. [1988]) is a natural improvement on the linear regression approach. PMID:11916121

  6. Hydrogeology of and potential mining impacts on strippable lignite areas in the Denver Aquifer, east-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driver, N.E.; Williams, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    This study describes the hydrogeology of and potential impacts of mining on strippable lignite areas in the Denver aquifer in the east-central Colorado plains. Strippable lignitic coal seams , 20 to 60 ft thick, are present in the Denver Formation. The Denver aquifer, the saturated part of the Denver Formation, is likely to be affected locally by surface mining of lignite. Transmissivity of the aquifer in the study area ranges from 145 to 1,000 mg/L to the northeast in the study area as, hydraulic head decreases from 6,600 to 5,400 ft. Distance-drawdown curves show the extent of water level drawdown near a dewatered surface mine. After reclamation of the lignite mine pit, flow through the lignite spoil pile may increase the dissolved solids concentrations in the Denver aquifer. This increase could occur, because, as water from rain and overland flow percolates through the newly-exposed rock surfaces in the spoil material, minerals from the overburden can be dissolved in the water, which then joins with water from the aquifer. This increase could locally change streams, springs, and alluvial and bedrock aquifers. (USGS)

  7. The impact of groundwater on the excavation of tunnels in two different hydrogeological settings in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiocchini, Ugo; Castaldi, Fabio

    2011-05-01

    To double the capacity of the Orte-Falconara railway line (central Italy), the Santa Croce tunnel was constructed (1985-1995), which runs between the Nera Montoro and Narni stations. In the same period, to double the capacity of the Ancona-Bari railway line, the Moro, Cintioni, S. Giovanni and Diavolo tunnels were constructed between the Ortona and Casalbordino stations. The high likelihood of intercepting a significant volume of groundwater in calcareous rocks of the Santa Croce tunnel led to a shift in the layout of the tunnel, which allowed construction of the tunnel by more rapid and less expensive means. Groundwater along the Moro tunnel layout, in a sandy aquifer, has been drained by the excavation of a preliminary tunnel, which allowed a discharge of up to 0.080 m3/s. In the S. Giovanni and Diavolo tunnels, a particular hydrogeological setting was found to exist in the form of lens-shaped bodies of fine grey sand-and-silt aquitards intercalated between the bottom muddy-sandy deposits (very low permeability) and the sandy aquifer; this caused sudden groundwater inflow and tunnel collapse. The S. Giovanni tunnnel, excavation was completed using the HydroShield system, whereas in the Diavolo tunnel, a well-point system was adopted, which avoided any environmental hazards.

  8. Selected hydrogeologic data from the Cedar Rapids Area, Benton and Linn counties, Iowa, October 1992 through March 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnoebelen, D.J.; Schulmeyer, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The city of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, obtains its water supply from shallow wells screened in the alluvial aquifer along the Cedar River. A cooperative study between the city of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and the U.S. Geological Survey was started in March 1992 to assess the water quality and water quantity of the ground-water resource. This report summarizes selected hydrogeologic data collected from October 1992 through March 1996. Information collected includes water quality (major ions, nutrients, and pesticides), ground-water levels, multiprobe-instrument (water levels, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen monitored at 15-, 30-, or 60-minute intervals), well information (location, casing type, screen interval, and depth), and geophysical seismic- refraction and seismic-reflection data (estimated depth to bedrock and alluvial thickness along the Cedar River). Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected from domestic, municipal, observation, and industrial wells and the Cedar River. Well-construction data for more than 300 wells in the Cedar Rapids area in Benton and Linn Counties, Iowa, were compiled primarily from records on file with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Geologic Survey Burea (Iowa City).

  9. MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model -- Documentation of the Model-Layer Variable-Direction Horizontal Anisotropy (LVDA) capability of the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Kipp, K.L.; Hill, Mary C.; Valstar, Johan; Neupauer, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the model-layer variable-direction horizontal anisotropy (LVDA) capability of the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package of MODFLOW-2000. The LVDA capability allows the principal directions of horizontal anisotropy to be different than the model-grid row and column directions, and for the directions to vary on a cell-by-cell basis within model layers. The HUF Package calculates effective hydraulic properties for model grid cells based on hydraulic properties of hydrogeologic units with thicknesses defined independently of the model layers. These hydraulic properties include, among other characteristics, hydraulic conductivity and a horizontal anisotropy ratio. Using the LVDA capability, horizontal anisotropy direction is defined for model grid cells within which one or more hydrogeologic units may occur. For each grid cell, the HUF Package calculates the effective horizontal hydraulic conductivity along the primary direction of anisotropy using the hydrogeologic-unit hydraulic conductivities, and calculates the effective horizontal hydraulic conductivity along the orthogonal anisotropy direction using the effective primary direction hydraulic conductivities and horizontal anisotropy ratios. The direction assigned to the model layer effective primary hydraulic conductivity is specified using a new data set defined by the LVDA capability, when active, to calculate coefficients needed to solve the ground-water flow equation. Use of the LVDA capability is illustrated in four simulation examples, which also serve to verify hydraulic heads, advective-travel paths, and sensitivities calculated using the LVDA capability. This version of the LVDA capability defines variable-direction horizontal anisotropy using model layers, not the hydrogeologic units defined by the HUF Package. This difference needs to be taken into account when designing model layers and hydrogeologic units to produce simulations that accurately represent a given field problem. This might be a reason, for example, to make model layer boundaries coincide with hydrogeologic-unit boundaries in all or part of a model grid.

  10. Hydrogeology and Water Quality of the Pepacton Reservoir Watershed in Southeastern New York. Part 3. Responses of Stream Base-Flow Chemistry to Hydrogeologic Factors and Nonpoint-Sources of Contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.; Phillips, Patrick J.

    2004-01-01

    Base-flow samples were collected seasonally from 20 small streams in the 372-square-mile Pepacton Reservoir watershed to evaluate the effects of hydrogeologic factors and nonpoint sources of contamination on the chemical composition of ground-water discharge. The reservoir provides part of New York City?s water supply. The subbasins represented one of three general types of land use, each with at least 45 percent forested area (mostly on the hillsides): farmed (dairy) land, formerly farmed land with low-density residential development, or forested land with little or no development. The subbasin areas ranged from 0.38 to 10.23 square miles. All streams were sampled in December 2000 and in May, July, and October 2001. Three of the sites were designated as landuse- index sites and were sampled as many as five additional times during the study. No samples exceeded state or federal drinking-water standards for chloride, sodium, nitrate, orthophosphate, herbicides, or herbicide degradates. The chemical composition of base-flow samples was classified into major-ion water types, which were broadly defined as naturally occurring and road-salt-affected water types. About one-third of the base-flow samples were roadsalt- affected types. Natural water types were differentiated as dilute or evolved. Dilute waters have bicarbonate and sulfate as dominant anions and evolved waters have only bicarbonate as a dominant anion. Dilute water types indicate relatively short ground-water residence times or contact with unreactive aquifer material. Evolved waters have either longer ground-water residence time or contact with more reactive aquifer material than dilute ground waters. The larger subbasins with wider valley-bottom areas were more likely to have evolved water types than small subbasins with little floodplain development. Positive correlations between selected constituents and the intensity of nonpoint sources emphasize the connection between land use, shallow ground-water quality, and stream base-flow water quality. Chloride and sodium, which are relatively conservative constituents, showed strong linear relations with annual estimates of road-salt application during all four sampling periods. Nonconservative constituents, such as the nutrients nitrate and orthophosphate, showed linear relations with manure production rate among farmed basins, but only at specific times of the year because of losses through biologic activity. Nitrate showed the strongest relation in winter because losses to biological activity were at a minimum. Orthophosphate showed the strongest relation in early summer, when hydrologic and chemical conditions appear to favor release from sediments. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is an additional source of nitrogen that can be released from mature or stressed forested basins. Detections of herbicides (atrazine, metolachlor, simazine) and herbicide degradates ( Metolachlor ESA, alachlor ESA, deethylatrazine) in base flow were closely correlated with subbasins in which corn was grown during the study. Atrazine was detected at the farmed index site only in early summer, after application and two rain storms. This detection corresponded to the peak orthophosphate concentration. In contrast, metolachlor ESA was detected in nearly all farmedindex- subbasin samples and peaked in late summer, when percent base-flow contributions from farmed valley-bottom areas were likely highest. The implications of this study are that seasonal and more frequent base-flow surveys of water chemistry from small stream basins can help refine the understanding of local hydrogeologic systems and define the effects of nonpointsource contamination on base-flow water quality. The concentration of most nonpoint sources in valley-bottom or lower-hillside areas helped indicate the relative contributions of water from hillside and valley-bottom areas at different times of year. The positive correlations between the intensity of nonpoint-

  11. Hydrogeologic framework and estimates of groundwater storage for the Hualapai Valley, Detrital Valley, and Sacramento Valley basins, Mohave County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truini, Margot; Beard, L. Sue; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Anning, Dave W.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the hydrogeology of the Hualapai Valley, Detrital Valley, and Sacramento Valley basins of Mohave County in northwestern Arizona to develop a better understanding of groundwater storage within the basin fill aquifers. In our investigation we used geologic maps, well-log data, and geophysical surveys to delineate the sedimentary textures and lithology of the basin fill. We used gravity data to construct a basin geometry model that defines smaller subbasins within the larger basins, and airborne transient-electromagnetic modeled results along with well-log lithology data to infer the subsurface distribution of basin fill within the subbasins. Hydrogeologic units (HGUs) are delineated within the subbasins on the basis of the inferred lithology of saturated basin fill. We used the extent and size of HGUs to estimate groundwater storage to depths of 400 meters (m) below land surface (bls). The basin geometry model for the Hualapai Valley basin consists of three subbasins: the Kingman, Hualapai, and southern Gregg subbasins. In the Kingman subbasin, which is estimated to be 1,200 m deep, saturated basin fill consists of a mixture of fine- to coarse-grained sedimentary deposits. The Hualapai subbasin, which is the largest of the subbasins, contains a thick halite body from about 400 m to about 4,300 m bls. Saturated basin fill overlying the salt body consists predominately of fine-grained older playa deposits. In the southern Gregg subbasin, which is estimated to be 1,400 m deep, saturated basin fill is interpreted to consist primarily of fine- to coarse-grained sedimentary deposits. Groundwater storage to 400 m bls in the Hualapai Valley basin is estimated to be 14.1 cubic kilometers (km3). The basin geometry model for the Detrital Valley basin consists of three subbasins: northern Detrital, central Detrital, and southern Detrital subbasins. The northern and central Detrital subbasins are characterized by a predominance of playa evaporite and fine-grained clastic deposits; evaporite deposits in the northern Detrital subbasin include halite. The northern Detrital subbasin is estimated to be 600 m deep and the middle Detrital subbasin is estimated to be 700 m deep. The southern Detrital subbasin, which is estimated to be 1,500 m deep, is characterized by a mixture of fine- to coarse-grained basin fill deposits. Groundwater storage to 400 m bls in the Detrital Valley basin is estimated to be 9.8 km3. The basin geometry model for the Sacramento Valley basin consists of three subbasins: the Chloride, Golden Valley, and Dutch Flat subbasins. The Chloride subbasin, which is estimated to be 900 m deep, is characterized by fine- to coarse-grained basin fill deposits. In the Golden Valley subbasin, which is elongated north-south, and is estimated to be 1,300 m deep, basin fill includes fine-grained sedimentary deposits overlain by coarse-grained sedimentary deposits in much of the subbasin. The Dutch Flat subbasin is estimated to be 2,600 m deep, and well-log lithologic data suggest that the basin fill consists of interlayers of gravel, sand, and clay. Groundwater storage to 400 m bls in the Sacramento Valley basin is estimated to be 35.1 km3.

  12. Dramatic water-level fluctuations in lakes under intense human impact: modelling the effect of vegetation, climate and hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainu, M.

    2012-04-01

    Lakes form a highly important ecosystem in the glacial terrain of northern Europe and America, but their hydrology remains understudied. When the water-level of a lake drops significantly and rises again in a time span of half a century and the widespread explanation of the fluctuations seems insufficient, then it raises a question: how do different anthropogenic and natural processes actually affect the formation of a lakes' water body. The abovementioned scenario applies to three small closed-basin Estonian lakes (L. Ahnejärv, L. Kuradijärv and L. Martiska) analysed in the current study. These lakes suffered a major water-level drop (up to 3.8 m) between 1946 and 1987 and a major rise between 1987 and 2010, from 1 m (L. Ahnejärv) to 2.5 m (L. Kuradijärv). Decreasing and increasing groundwater abstraction near the lakes has been widely considered to be the only reason for the fluctuations. It is true that the most severe drop in the lake levels did occur after 1972 when groundwater abstraction for drinking water started in the vicinity of the lakes. However, the lake levels started to fall before the groundwater abstraction began and for the time being the lake levels have risen to a higher level than in the 1970s when the quantity of annually abstracted groundwater was similar to nowadays. Therefore the processes affecting the formation of the lakes' water body prove to be more complex than purely the hydrogeological change caused by groundwater abstraction. A new deterministic water balance model (where the evaporation from the lake surface was calculated by Penman equation and the catchment runoff by Thornthwaite-Mather soil-moisture model), compiled for the study, coupled with LiDAR-based GIS-modelling of the catchments was used to identify the different factors influencing the lakes' water level. The modelling results reveal that the moderate drop in lake water levels before the beginning of groundwater abstraction was probably caused by the growth of a coniferous forest on the lake catchments, due to which evapotranspiration and subsequently runoff from the catchment decreased. The forest had been destroyed by wildfires during World War II. The water-level rise that the lakes have gone through in the last 20 years has in the case of L. Ahnejärv been caused by changing meteorological conditions (precipitation, air temperature and wind speed). In the case of Lakes Kuradijärv and Martiska the change has been caused by both the raise of groundwater level (caused by the decreasing groundwater abstraction) and the change of meteorological conditions. Therefore the vegetation change on the catchment and changes in meteorological conditions have played as important or, at times, even more important role in the water-level fluctuations than changes in the hydrogeological conditions. Although concentrating on three specific lakes in a specific region, the result of the study indicate the complexity of factors influencing the amount of water stored in a lake at a certain moment. Therefore it manifests a need for improved models in order to improve lake management around the world.

  13. Hydrogeology, groundwater seepage, nitrate distribution, and flux at the Raleigh hydrologic research station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2013-01-01

    rom 2005 to 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, conducted a study to describe the geologic framework, measure groundwater quality, characterize the groundwater-flow system, and describe the groundwater/surface-water interaction at the 60-acre Raleigh hydrogeologic research station (RHRS) located at the Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant in eastern Wake County, North Carolina. Previous studies have shown that the local groundwater quality of the surficial and bedrock aquifers at the RHRS had been affected by high levels of nutrients. Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected from 3 coreholes, 12 wells, and 4 piezometers at 3 well clusters, as well as from 2 surface-water sites, 2 multiport piezometers, and 80 discrete locations in the streambed of the Neuse River. Data collected were used to evaluate the three primary zones of the Piedmont aquifer (regolith, transition zone, and fractured bedrock) and characterize the interaction of groundwater and surface water as a mechanism of nutrient transport to the Neuse River. A conceptual hydrogeologic cross section across the RHRS was constructed using new and existing data. Two previously unmapped north striking, nearly vertical diabase dikes intrude the granite beneath the site. Groundwater within the diabase dike appeared to be hydraulically isolated from the surrounding granite bedrock and regolith. A correlation exists between foliation and fracture orientation, with most fractures striking parallel to foliation. Flowmeter logging in two of the bedrock wells indicated that not all of the water-bearing fractures labeled as water bearing were hydraulically active, even when stressed by pumping. Groundwater levels measured in wells at the RHRS displayed climatic and seasonal trends, with elevated groundwater levels occurring during the late spring and declining to a low in the late fall. Vertical gradients in the groundwater discharge area near the Neuse River were complex and were affected by fluctuations in river stage, with the exception of a well completed in a diabase dike. Water-quality data from the wells and surface-water sites at the RHRS were collected continuously as well as during periodic sampling events. Surface-water samples collected from a tributary were most similar in chemical composition to groundwater found in the regolith and transition zone. Nitrate (measured as nitrite plus nitrate, as nitrogen) concentrations in the sampled wells and tributary ranged from about 5 to more than 120 milligrams per liter as nitrogen. Waterborne continuous resistivity profiling conducted on the Neuse River in the area of the RHRS measured areas of low apparent resistivity that likely represent groundwater contaminated by high concentrations of nitrate. These areas were located on either side of a diabase dike and at the outfall of two unnamed tributaries. The diabase dike preferentially directed the discharge of groundwater to the Neuse River and may isolate groundwater movement laterally. Discrete temperature measurements made within the pore water beneath the Neuse River revealed seeps of colder groundwater discharging into warmer surface water near a diabase dike. Water-quality samples collected from the pore water beneath the Neuse River indicated that nitrate was present at concentrations as high as 80 milligrams per liter as nitrogen on the RHRS side of the river. The highest concentrations of nitrate were located within pore water collected from an area near a diabase dike that was identified as a suspected seepage area. Hydraulic head was measured and pore water samples were collected from two 140-centimeter-deep (55.1-inch-deep) multiport piezometers that were installed in bed sediments on opposite sides of a diabase dike. The concentration of nitrate in pore water at a suspected seepage area ranged from 42 to 82 milligrams per liter as nitrogen with a median concentration of 79 milligrams per liter as nitrogen. On the opposite side of the dike, co

  14. Hydrogeology and extent of saltwater intrusion of the Great Neck peninsula, Great Neck, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Great Neck, a peninsula, in the northwestern part of Nassau County, N.Y., is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that form a sequence of aquifers and confining units. Seven public-supply wells have been affected by the intrusion of saltwater from the surrounding embayments (Little Neck Bay, Long Island Sound, Manhasset Bay). Fifteen observation wells were drilled in 1991-96 for the collection of hydrogeologic, geochemical, and geophysical data to delineate the subsurface geology and extent of saltwater intrusion within the peninsula. Continuous high-resolution seismic-reflection surveys in the embayments surrounding the Great Neck peninsula and the Manhasset Neck peninsula to the east were completed in 1993 and 1994. Two hydrogeologic units are newly proposed herein.the North Shore aquifer and the North Shore confining unit. The new drill-core data collected in 1991-96 indicate that the Lloyd aquifer, the Raritan confining unit, and the Magothy aquifer have been completely removed from the northern part of the peninsula by extensive glacial erosion. Water levels at selected observation wells were measured quarterly throughout the study. The results from two studies of the effects of tides on ground-water levels in 1992 and 1993 indicate that water levels at wells screened within the North Shore and Lloyd aquifers respond to tides and pumping effects, but those in the overlying upper glacial aquifer (where the water table is located) do not. Data from quarterly water-level measurements and the tidal-effect studies indicate the North Shore and Lloyd aquifers to be hydraulically connected. Offshore seismic-reflection surveys in the surrounding embayments indicate at least two glacially eroded buried valleys with subhorizontal, parallel reflectors indicative of draped bedding that is interpreted as infilling by silt and clay. The buried valleys (1) truncate the surrounding coarse-grained deposits, (2) are asymmetrical and steep sided, (3) trend northwest-southeast, (4) are 2-4 miles long and about 1 mile wide, and (5) extend to more than 200 feet below sea level. Water from six public-supply wells screened in the Magothy and upper glacial aquifers contained volatile organic compounds in concentrations above the New York State Department of Health Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Levels, as did water from one public-supply well screened in the Lloyd aquifer, and from three observation wells screened in the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers. Four distinct wedge-shaped areas of saltwater intrusion have been delineated within the aquifers in Great Neck; three areas extend into the Lloyd and North Shore aquifers, and the fourth area extends into the upper glacial aquifer. Three other areas of saltwater intrusion also have been detected. Borehole-geophysical-logging data indicate that four of these saltwater wedges range from 20 to 125 feet in thickness and have sharp freshwater-saltwater interfaces, and that maximum chloride concentrations in 1996 ranged from 141 to 13,750 milligrams per liter. Seven public-supply wells have either been shut down or are currently being affected by saltwater intrusion.

  15. Revised hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Lester J.; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework for the Floridan aquifer system has been revised throughout its extent in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina. The updated framework generally conforms to the original framework established by the U.S. Geological Survey in the 1980s, except for adjustments made to the internal boundaries of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers and the individual higher and contrasting lower permeability zones within these aquifers. The system behaves as one aquifer over much of its extent; although subdivided vertically into two aquifer units, the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. In the previous framework, discontinuous numbered middle confining units (MCUI–VII) were used to subdivide the system. In areas where less-permeable rocks do not occur within the middle part of the system, the system was previously considered one aquifer and named the Upper Floridan aquifer. In intervening years, more detailed data have been collected in local areas, resulting in some of the same lithostratigraphic units in the Floridan aquifer system being assigned to the Upper or Lower Floridan aquifer in different parts of the State of Florida. Additionally, some of the numbered middle confining units are found to have hydraulic properties within the same order of magnitude as the aquifers. A new term “composite unit” is introduced for lithostratigraphic units that cannot be defined as either a confining or aquifer unit over their entire extent. This naming convention is a departure from the previous framework, in that stratigraphy is used to consistently subdivide the aquifer system into upper and lower aquifers across the State of Florida. This lithostratigraphic mapping approach does not change the concept of flow within the system. The revised boundaries of the Floridan aquifer system were mapped by considering results from local studies and regional correlations of lithostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units or zones. Additional zones within the aquifers have been incorporated into the framework to allow finer delineation of permeability variations within the aquifer system. These additional zones can be used to progressively divide the system for assessing groundwater and surface-water interaction, saltwater intrusion, and offshore movement of groundwater at greater detail if necessary. The lateral extent of the updip boundary of the Floridan aquifer system is modified from previous work based on newer data and inclusion of parts of the updip clastic facies. The carbonate and clastic facies form a gradational sequence, generally characterized by limestone of successively younger units that extend progressively farther updip. Because of the gradational nature of the carbonate-clastic sequence, some of the updip clastic aquifers have been included in the Floridan aquifer system, the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system, or both. Thus, the revised updip limit includes some of these clastic facies. Additionally, the updip limit of the most productive part of the Floridan aquifer system was revised and indicates the approximate updip limit of the carbonate facies. The extent and altitude of the freshwater-saltwater interface in the aquifer system has been mapped to define the freshwater part of the flow system.

  16. Hydrogeology, ground-water quality, and potential for water-supply contamination near the Shelby County landfill in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parks, W.S.; Mirecki, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was conducted from 1989 to 1991 to collect and interpret hydrogeologic and ground-water-quality data specific to the Shelby County landfill in east Memphis, Tennessee. Eighteen wells were installed in the alluvial and Memphis aquifers at the landfill. Hydrogeologic data collected showed that the confining unit separating the alluvial aquifer from the Memphis aquifer was thin or absent just north of the landfill and elsewhere consists predominantly of fine sand and silt with lenses of clay. A water-table map of the landfill vicinity confirms the existence of a depression in the water table north and northeast of the landfill and indicates that ground water flows northeast from the Wolf River passing beneath the landfill toward the depression in the water table. A map of the potentiometric surface of the Memphis aquifer shows that water levels were anomalously high just north of the landfill, indicating downward leakage of water from the alluvial aquifer to the Memphis aquifer. An analysis of water-quality data for major and trace inorganic constituents and nutrients confirms that leachate from the landfill has migrated northeastward in the alluvial aquifer toward the depression in the water table and that contaminants in the alluvial aquifer have migrated downward into the Memphis aquifer. The leachate plume can be characterized by concentrations of certain major and trace inorganic constituents that are 2 to 20 times higher than samples from upgradient and background alluvial aquifer wells. The major and trace constituents that best characterize the leachate plume are total organic carbon, chloride, dissolved solids, iron, ammonia nitrogen, calcium, sodium, iodide, barium, strontium, boron, and cadmium. Several of these constituents (specifically dissolved solids, calcium, sodium, and possibly ammonia nitrogen, chloride, barium, and strontium) were detected in elevated concentrations in samples from certain Memphis aquifer wells. Elevated concentrations were detected in samples from the Memphis aquifer beneath the leachate plume where the confining unit is thin or absent. The distribution of halogenated alkanes (specifically dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane) and halogenated alkenes (specifically 1,2-trans-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride) in samples from wells screened in both the alluvial and Memphis aquifers is similar to the distribution of major and trace inorganic constituents that characterize the leachate plume. The ground-water supply most susceptible to contamination from the Shelby County landfill is the Sheahan well field of the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division. This well field is about 5 miles downgradient from the landfill in the direction of ground-water flow. Based on an estimated velocity of 0.5 to 1.5 feet per day, ground water would require about 50 to 150 years to travel from the Shelby County landfill to the Sheahan wellfield. Given the time and distance of transport, any contaminants in the ground water would not likely persistto reach this well field because of the effects of various physical, chemical, and biological processes, including dilution and adsorption.

  17. A new hydrogeological model of charging shallow and deep aquifers in the Lake Neusiedl - Seewinkel region (Northern Burgenland, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Hermann; Müllegger, Christian; Körner, Wilfried; Ottner, Franz; Prohaska, Thomas; Irrgeher, Johanna; Tchaikovsky, Anastassiya; Dober, Gregor; Gritzmann, Romana; Mykhaylyuk, Ivanna

    2014-05-01

    The hypothesis of ascending thermal groundwater in the Seewinkel was introduced by Tauber (1965), favoured by Schmid (1970), and followed up by Wurm (2000). The main idea of this hypothesis was up welling of saline waters from a deep aquifer along faults, which in the 1950s have been identified as such in seismic sections. An aquifer of marine deposits of Badenian to Sarmatian age was postulated as source, and hydrochemical composition of water should have changed during migration due to high contents of sodium carbonate and sulphate instead of potassium chloride in the shallow groundwater bodies of the Seewinkel. Häusler (2010) argued, however, that fault aquifers discharging saline waters nowhere have been identified in this region. Supposed that according to the ascendance hypothesis ion composition of up welling formation water could have undergone a change, the primary isotope signal of marine water should have not. In order to get a better insight to the groundwater cycle we compare results from geochemical analyses, clay mineralogical analyses, and leachates of source rocks of potential recharge areas with respective analyses of shallow and deep aquifers, and apply the method of stable hydroisotopes such as oxygen, deuterium, strontium and chloride for distinguishing origin of groundwaters. We evaluate the hypothesis of up welling connate waters, and eventually come up with a new conceptual hydrogeological model for the Neusiedl-Seewinkel region regarding composition, origin, flow direction and residence time of groundwater in shallow and deeper aquifers. The very low value of -12.26‰ for oxygen isotope ratio of thermal groundwater from the deepest aquifer drilled to a depth of about 1000 metres at Frauenkirchen in northern Seewinkel, which is not highly mineralised, excludes connate water as major source, which basically is characterized by high oxygen isotope ratio values. Taking into account that oxygen isotope ratio-values ranging from -12.0‰ to -10.5‰ in the catchment of Lake Neusiedl are characteristic for waters derived from the cooler period of the Pleistocene (Rank et al., 1982), we conclude that groundwater of the deepest aquifer of the Seewinkel is not of Badenian to Sarmatian age but only several tens of thousands of years old. The artesian wells of the Seewinkel region drilled down to several hundreds of metres yielded groundwater with oxygen isotope ratio-values ranging between -11.90‰ and -10.83‰, values fitting well to waters of Pleistocene age of that region. Since wells discharging the Leitha Mountains also revealed oxygen isotope ratio-values varying from -11.10‰ to -10.22‰, we conclude that the mountain chains surrounding Lake Neusiedl basically charged both shallow and deeper aquifers of the Seewinkel. From oxygen isotope ratios of these groundwater bodies we therefore conclude that first the majority of aquifers of the Lake Neusiedl region was charged from the surrounding mountain chains, and second that salinity of soils in the Seewinkel region cannot be derived from up welling connate water, as has been proofed for Lake Kelemenszék area south of Budapest (Simon et al., 2011). There is no doubt on the fact, however, that differing amounts of free carbon dioxide in several aquifers of the Seewinkel region originate from deep-seated post volcanic activity in this region. Häusler, H. (2010)(ed.): Geologische Karte der Republik Österreich 1:50.000, Erläuterungen zur Geologischen Karte 78 Rust.- 191 S., 65 Abb., 5 Tab., 2 Taf., (Geologische Bundesanstalt), Wien. Rank, D., Rajner, V., Staudner, F. and Papesch, W. (1982): Zur Altersdatierung der Grundwässer am Ostufer des Neusiedlersees.- BFB-Bericht, 43, 197-204, 2 Abb., (Biologisches Forschungsinstitut für Burgenland), Illmitz. Simon, S., Mádl-Sz?nyi, J., Müller, I. and Pogácsás, G. (2011): Conceptual model for surface salinization in an overpressured and a superimposed gravity-flow field, Lake Kelemenszék area, Hungary.- Hydrogeology Journal, 19, 701-717. Tauber, A. F. (1965): Geologische Typologie und Genese der Miner

  18. Hydrogeology and hydrologic conditions of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system from Long Island, New York, to North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Pope, Jason P.; Monti, Jack, Jr.; Nardi, Mark R.; Finkelstein, Jason S.; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2013-01-01

    The seaward-dipping sedimentary wedge that underlies the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain forms a complex groundwater system. This major source of water provides for public and domestic supply and serves as a vital source of freshwater for industrial and agricultural uses throughout the region. Population increases and land-use and climate changes, however, have led to competing demands for water. The regional response of the aquifer system to these stresses poses regional challenges for water-resources management at the State level because hydrologic effects often extend beyond State boundaries. In response to these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program began a regional assessment of the groundwater availability of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system in 2010. The initial phase of this investigation included a refinement of the hydrogeologic framework and an updated hydrologic budget of this aquifer system from the last regional aquifer system assessment completed by the U.S. Geological Survey in the 1980s. Refinements to the hydrogeologic framework include revision of the regional aquifer names to be more consistent with local names in New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, the primary States included in the study area. Other revisions to the framework include characterization of the aquifers of the regional Potomac aquifer system. The regional Potomac aquifer system is subdivided for this report into two regional aquifers. These aquifers include the single Potomac aquifer in Virginia and two aquifers in Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey, where the Potomac aquifer system thickens within the Salisbury Embayment. The two regional aquifers making up the Potomac aquifer system include the Potomac-Patapsco aquifer and the underlying Potomac-Patuxent aquifer. The Potomac-Patuxent aquifer includes the Lower Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer in southern New Jersey and the Patuxent aquifers in Delaware and Maryland. In northern New Jersey and on Long Island, New York, the Potomac-Patuxent aquifer is absent, but the Late Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic aquifer that is laterally equivalent with the upper part of the Potomac Formation now is considered part of the regional Potomac-Patapsco aquifer. This aquifer includes the Middle Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer in New Jersey and the Lloyd aquifer on Long Island. The name “Upper Potomac aquifer” has been removed as part of this regional framework revision. The local aquifer previously considered part of the Upper Potomac aquifer now are part of the regional Magothy aquifer. These units include the Upper Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer in New Jersey, the Magothy aquifers on Long Island, Delaware, and Maryland, and the Virginia Beach aquifer in Virginia. Updates to the regional hydrologic budget include revised estimates of aquifer recharge, water use and streamflow data. Inflow to the aquifer system of about 20,000 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) includes 19,600 Mgal/d from recharge from precipitation, 200 Mgal/d of recharge from wastewater via onsite domestic septic systems, and 200 Mgal/d from the release of water from aquifer storage. Outflow from the aquifer system includes groundwater discharge to streams (11,900 Mgal/d), groundwater withdrawals (1,500 Mgal/d), and groundwater discharge to coastal waters (6,600 Mgal/d). A numerical modeling analysis is required to improve this hydrologic budget calculation and to forecast future changes in water levels and aquifer storage caused by groundwater withdrawals, land-use changes, and the effects of climate variability and change.

  19. Application of Response Surface based Calibration and Sensitivity Analysis methods for Regional Hydrogeological Modelling in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Palombi, D.; Huff, G. F.

    2014-12-01

    A regional scale study of groundwater flow dynamics was undertaken in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), comprising parts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia. The objective of the study is to investigate basin-scale hydrogeology in WCSB and to establish boundary conditions for future local-scale groundwater management models. Earlier work in the Alberta basin has acknowledged the fact that in addition to topography controlled conditions, a substantial part of the basin exhibits sub-hydrostatic regimes. The basin-scale model (approx. 420,000 km2) includes Upper Cretaceous aquifers to Recent age sediments which collectively attain maximum thicknesses of >2600 m. Regional aquifer units considered for the numerical model are Quaternary sediments, and the sedimentary rocks of the Paskapoo, Scollard, Horseshoe Canyon formations and the Belly River Group. Regional aquitards delineated include the Battle and Bear Paw formations. The study area is bound to the west by the Brazeau-Waptiti thrust belt and to the south by the Canada-USA international border. The boundary to the north and east is delineated by the maximum extent of the Wapiti and Belly River groups and Judith River Formation. USGS MODFLOW was implemented for numerical simulation. The steady state numerical model was calibrated using a Response Surface based (Radial Basis Functions) optimization method. The calibration targets (~2000) were comprised of drill stem tests for deeper units and static water levels for shallower units. Petrophysical analyses of cores averaged K values from analyses of aquifer test results,and literature values were used to provide initial values and calibration ranges for hydraulic properties. Results indicate predominance of topography driven, local- to intermediate-scale flow systems in all hydrostratigraphic units with recharge of these units occurring in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. The Battle aquitard, where present, acts to retard regional flow. Sensitivity analysis of the steady-state model calibration was evaluated for hydraulic conductivities and recharge rates.

  20. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the alluvial aquifer and adjacent deposits of the Fountain Creek valley, El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radell, Mary Jo; Lewis, Michael E.; Watts, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer in Fountain Creek Valley between Colorado Springs and Widefield is the source for several public-supply systems. Because of the importance of this aquifer, defining aquifer boundaries, areas where underflow occurs, and where Fountain Creek is hydraulically connected to the aquifer will greatly add to the understanding of the alluvial aquifer and management of the public- supply systems. Bedrock altitude, water-table altitude for October 1991, saturated thickness for October 1991, selected hydrogeologic sections in the alluvial aquifer and adjacent deposits of the Fountain Creek Valley, and estimated underflow rates are mapped or tabulated for the area between Colorado Springs and Widefield, Colorado. Results from test drilling indicate that the bedrock surface is highly irregular and that several ridges and buried channels exist in the study area. These features affect the direction of ground-water flow on a local scale. In places, a shale ridge prevents exchange of water between Fountain Creek and the aquifer. Generally, ground water flowed toward Fountain Creek during the study (June 1991 to September 1992) in response to relatively high hydraulic heads in the aquifer and the steep gradients on the boundaries of the study area. Water levels, which were measured monthly, varied little during the study, except in areas near pumping wells or adjacent to Fountain Creek. Hydraulic-conductivity values, estimated from 30 bail tests in wells completed in the alluvial aquifer, were used to determine underflow across the saturated boundaries of the alluvial aquifer. Estimated hydraulic-conductivity values range from 1 to about 1,300 feet per day; the larger values occur in the buried channel of the alluvial aquifer and the smaller values occur near the boundaries of the saturated alluvium. Estimated underflow into the study area exceeded underflow out of the study area by about 10 times. Gain-loss investigations along Fountain Creek indicated that the creek primarily was gaining during the study.

  1. Hydrogeology of a young moraine area in NE Germany: Testing hypotheses on subsurface structures with an iterative groundwater modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Henriette; Tecklenburg, Christina; Güntner, Andreas; Blume, Theresa

    2015-04-01

    Investigating subsurface structures and properties of young moraine areas is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity of the subsurface combined with limited possibilities of outcrop characterization. To overcome this challenge we suggest a multi-method approach that merges a variety of geophysical, hydrochemical and hydrogeological monitoring data with iterative hypothesis-based modeling of groundwater dynamics. The focus area of this study is the region of Lake Fürstenseer See, which is located in a young moraine area in the terminal moraine and outwash plain area of the last glacial maximum (Pomeranian) in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, north-eastern Germany. The assumed main control on groundwater flow paths of the uppermost aquifer in this region is the depth and the "topography" of the first aquiclude. The groundwater flow model Visual MODFLOW Pro was parameterized based on average hydraulic properties determined from core samples taken during observation well drilling. In a first hypothesis the depth of the aquiclude was assumed to be uniform over the entire region. Data from a nearby climate station was used as input, while well water level dynamics in 23 observation wells and lake water level dynamics were used for validation. In a second iteration, the depth of the aquiclude which was identified at 20 of the wells was interpolated over the area. The resulting groundwater flow paths and dynamics were re-evaluated. In a final step, data from ERT investigations along several transects throughout the area was also included in the interpolation of the depth of the aquiclude. While groundwater dynamics can be evaluated directly by comparison with the observed dynamics at the observation wells, groundwater flow paths are evaluated a) based on the observed differences in water chemistry including isotopic composition at the observation wells and b) based on the observed spatial patterns of groundwater inflow into the lake, which were identified both by lake sediment temperature profiles and an extensive network of piezometers along the shore.

  2. Implementation of Similarity Based Kriging in Open Source Software and Application to Uncertainty Quantification and Reduction in Hydrogeological Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komara, R.; Ginsbourger, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the implementation of Similarity Based Kriging (SBK). This approach extends Gaussian process regression (GPR) methods, typically restricted to Euclidean spaces, to spaces that are non-Euclidean or perhaps even non-metric. SBK was inspired by problems in aquifer modeling, where inputs of numerical simulations are typically curves and parameter fields, and predicting scalar or vector outputs by Kriging with such very high-dimensional inputs may seem not feasible at first. SBK combines ideas from the distance-based set-up of Scheidt and Caers (2009) with GPR and allows calculating Kriging predictions based only on similarities between inputs rather than on their high-dimensional representation. Written in open source code, this proposed approach includes automated construction of SBK models and provides diagnostics to assess model quality both in terms of covariance fitting and internal/external prediction validation. Covariance hyperparameters can be estimated both by maximum likelihood and leave-one-out cross validation relying in both cases on efficient formulas and a hybrid genetic optimization algorithm using derivatives. The determination of the best dimension for Classical multidimensional scaling (MDS) and non-metric MDS of the data will be investigated. Application of this software to real life data examples in Euclidean and non-Euclidean (dis)similarity settings will be covered and touch on aquifer modeling, hydrogeological forecasting, and sequential inverse problem solving. In the last case, a novel approach where a variant of the expected improvement criterion is used for choosing several points at a time will be presented. This part of the method and the previous covariance hyperparameter estimation parallelize naturally and we demonstrate how to save computation time by optimally distributing function evaluations over multiple cores or processors.

  3. Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

    1987-12-01

    On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Sediment deformation and hydrogeology of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism: Synthesis of shipboard results of ODP Leg 131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, A.; Hill, I.; Firth, J.; Berner, U.; Brückmann, W.; Byrne, T.; Chabernaud, T.; Fisher, A.; Foucher, J.-P.; Gamo, T.; Gieskes, J.; Hyndman, R.; Karig, D.; Kastner, M.; Kato, Y.; Lallemant, S.; Lu, R.; Maltman, A.; Moore, G.; Moran, K.; Olaffson, G.; Owens, W.; Pickering, K.; Siena, F.; Taylor, E.; Underwood, M.; Wilkinson, C.; Yamano, M.; Zhang, J.

    1992-04-01

    The main objective of Leg 131 was to provide data on the deformational processes and associated hydrogeology of the Nankai prism toe. Drilling succeeded, for the first time in the history of ocean drilling, in penetrating the complete sedimentary sequence to basaltic basement, reaching 1327 mbsf (metres below seafloor) with good core recovery (55%). Excellent correlation of the lithology and structure, including the frontal thrust and the decollement, with seismic reflection images was also determined. Bedding dips, faults and shear bands analyzed in the cores confirm the pattern of deformation to be mainly due to NW-SE shortening, as expected from the plate tectonic convergence vector. Below the decollement, no significant deformation features were observed, indicating that the decollement is a sharp discontinuity in stress transmission. Physical properties data show major discontinuities at the decollement, notably an increase in porosity below the later. This may indicate excess pore pressure in the subducted section and decollement zone. A less marked increase in porosity below the frontal thrust may reflect the youthfulness of this feature. Attempts to make downhole measurements were severely hampered by unstable hole conditions, but useful constraints have been placed on the thermal regime, and some calibration of laboratory physical properties toin-situ conditions has been provided, andin-situ stress and pore pressure were measured in the uppermost sediments. Evidence of channelized fluid flows is inconclusive. No sharp geochemical signatures or unequivocal geochemical anomalies indicative of channelized fluid flow were found. Thermal measurements are not significantly different from those predicted by a purely conductive heat flow model. A signature of low chloride pore water near the decollement may partly be related to smectite diagenesis but may also be due to episodic fluid flow events. We conclude that dewatering probably occurred dominantly through diffuse flow throughout the accreted sediments at this site.

  5. Hydrogeology and Potentiometric Surface of the Dublin and Midville Aquifer Systems in Richmond County, Georgia, January 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Lester J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Dublin and Midville aquifer systems are part of the Cretaceous aquifer system that underlies most of Richmond County, Georgia (Gorday, 1985; Falls and others, 1997). The Cretaceous aquifer system is the second most productive aquifer in Georgia and is a major source of water in the region. About 220 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water was withdrawn from the Cretaceous aquifer system during 2000 in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). The Augusta-Richmond County Water System is the largest public water supplier in the county and withdrew 13 Mgal/d of ground water during 2000; withdrawals decreased from 2001 to 2005. The towns of Hephzibah and Blythe withdrew 0.4 and 0.03 Mgal/d, respectively. Industrial ground-water withdrawals are concentrated along the Savannah River and totaled 2.89 Mgal/d. To monitor seasonal and long-term water-level fluctuations and trends in the aquifers, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) - in cooperation with Augusta Utilities - maintains a countywide network of about 100 water-level monitoring wells in various aquifers, including a new continuous monitoring site (well 30AA33) and two existing USGS-Georgia Environmental Protection Division network sites (wells 29AA09 and 30AA04). Data compiled during this study were used to better define the hydrogeologic units and to construct an updated potentiometric-surface map for the area, which is used to better understand ground-water movement in the Cretaceous aquifer system. In addition, the potentiometric surface and related water-level data can be used for water-resource planning and to update ground-water flow models for the region (Clarke and West, 1997; Cherry, 2006).

  6. Hydrogeologic setting, hydraulic properties, and ground-water flow at the O-Field area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, W.S.; Smith, B.S.; Donnelly, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Army disposed chemical agents, laboratory materials, and unexploded ordnance at O-Field in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, from before World War II until at least the 1950's. Soil, ground water, surface water,and wetland sediments in the O-Field area were contaminated from the disposal activity. A ground-water-flow model of the O-Field area was constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1989 to simulate flow in the central and southern part of the Gunpowder Neck. The USGS began an additional study of the contamination in the O-Field area in cooperation with the U.S. Army in 1990 to (1) further define the hydrogeologic framework of the O-Field area, (2) characterize the hydraulic properties of the aquifers and confining units, and (3) define ground-water flow paths at O-Field based on the current data and simulations of ground-water flow. A water-table aquifer, an upper confining unit, and an upper confined aquifer comprise the shallow ground-water aquifer system of the O-Field area. A lower confining unit, through which ground-water movement is negligible, is considered a lower boundary to the shallow aquifer system. These units are all part of the Pleistocene Talbot Formation. The model developed in the previous study was redesigned using the data collected during this study and emphasized New O-Field. The current steady-state model was calibrated to water levels of June 1993. The rate of ground-water flow calculated by the model was approximately 0.48 feet per day (ft/d) and the rate determined from chlorofluorocarbon dates was approximately 0.39 ft/d.

  7. Hydrogeologic data for existing excavations and the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Special Projects Section of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Waste Management Division. Geologic description, in situ testing, and laboratory analyses of alluvium exposed in existing excavations are important subparts to the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the RWMS for disposal of low level waste mixed waste and transuranic waste. The primary purpose of the Existing Excavation Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important hydrologic properties of the near surface alluvium, thought to play an important role in the infiltration and redistribution of water and solutes through the upper unsaturated zone at the Area 5 RWMS; and second, to provide guidance for the design of future sampling and testing programs. The justification for this work comes from the state of Nevada review of the original DOE/NV Part B Permit application submitted in 1988 for disposal of mixed wastes at the RWMS. The state of Nevada determined that the permit was deficient in characterization data concerning the hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone. DOE/NV agreed with the state and proposed the study of alluvium exposed in existing excavations as one step toward satisfying these important site characterization data requirements. Other components of the site characterization process include the Science Trench Borehole and Pilot Well Projects.

  8. Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar for Hydrogeologic Characterization at the P Reactor Area, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. E.; Knapp, C. C.; Addison, A.; Waddell, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques were implemented at Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, in order to develop new approaches for hydrogeophysical characterization in heterogeneous environments. The study site is the P Reactor Area located within the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain, with clastic sediments ranging from Late Cretaceous to Miocene age. Lithologies consist of sand, clayey sand, and clay with minor amounts of calcareous minerals. Increasing interest in the P Reactor Area in recent years is the result of the presence of several contaminant plumes including trichloroethylene (TCE) that originates from the northwest section of the reactor facility and discharges into nearby Steel Creek. Here, we present the results from subsurface characterization using the GPR technique involving the PulseEKKO 100 GPR system with 50, 100, and 200 MHz antennas. Data acquisition included (1) several regional 2D common-offset GPR transects for general stratigraphic characterization, (2) a series of common-mid point (CMP) profiles for velocity estimation, (3) a set of vertical radar profiles (VRP) at an existing borehole in the vicinity of the study area, and (4) a 3D GPR survey for detailed subsurface lithostratigraphic characterization collected with the 50 MHz antenna. The ongoing GPR processing will map key dielectric interfaces from the ground surface to ~20 meters, and will be integrated with co-located surface and vertical seismic reflection data as well as with lithologic information obtained from Cone Penetrometer Technology (CPT) tests performed at the study area. This lithosptratigraphic zonation will provide the framework for subsequent hydrological parameter estimation, which will be performed using borehole hydrogeological and crosshole seismic and GPR methods. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER64210.

  9. A multidisciplinary geological and geophysical approach to define structural and hydrogeological implications of the Molinaccio spring (Spello, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Forte, Emanuele; Di Matteo, Lucio; Mazzocca, Massimiliano; Frigeri, Alessandro; Federico, Costanzo

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a multidisciplinary geological and geophysical approach has been applied in the complex area of Molinaccio spring (Spello, Umbria, Central Italy) to: 1) understand the large-scale geologic and tectonic structure of the area; 2) define the hydrogeological behavior of the various formations in relationship with the identified structural elements; 3) highlight at small-scale the tectonic structures and their relationships with the water caption tunnel, which is the draining structure of a still working, ancient Roman aqueduct giving water to the village of Spello and to the surrounding plain. Our approach includes different techniques like Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), direct geological investigations, archaeological studies, GIS data collection and integration. The GPR data revealed, in the area of the water-caption tunnel, two main tectonic structures, both also confirmed by ERT data: the presence of a zone (maximum 2 m wide), interpreted as a normal fault area and an overthrust that puts in contact the permeable Scaglia Rossa limestone (Early Turonian-Middle Eocene), and the Scaglia Variegata-Cinerea marly limestones (Middle Eocene-Upper Oligocene) on the footwall, characterized by lower hydraulic permeability. Using some rough information available on the sub-surface path of the tunnel, that shows a sharp bend after a long straight course, together with the geophysical images, was possible to describe how Romans built the tunnel: they probably followed the wet outcropping rock during the excavation, and changed abruptly the dig direction when they intercepted the normal fault area, aligning then the excavation along its strike. This latter result is important also because recently a multidisciplinary project has been developed to restore and exploit the entire water supply structure, which is not only a well-preserved example of Roman remains with high archaeological value, but also a vital infrastructure for a zone with great tourist potential.

  10. Oil-field disposal practices in hydrogeologic setting of Midway Sunset and Buena Vista oil fields; review of past effects, current activities, and future scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sengebush, R.M.; Kiser, S.C.; Greenwood, E.J.; Crozier, R.N.; Crewdson, R.A.; Wilson, M.J.; Rycerski, B.A.

    1988-03-01

    Class 2 water disposal in the Midway Sunset and Buena Vista oil fields of Kern County, California, has been by injection and infiltration from spreading ponds into the unsaturated zone, which is typically hundreds of feet thick. Water collection is mostly through an extensive tributary network of collection ditches radiating from several disposal facility locations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the subsurface movement of fluid in the hydrogeological environment and to determine the fate of the disposed water and its long-term impact on the area.

  11. Groundwater quality assessment for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant. 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste- management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR), which is one of the three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring and remediation (Figure 2). The Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Division of the Y-12 Plant Environmental Management Department manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP).

  12. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCIU) post- closure permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), and as otherwise required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. In July 1997, the Temessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved several modifications to the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements specified in the PCP. This report has been prepared in accordimce with these modified requirements.

  13. Groundwater quality assessment for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The report contains groundwater and surface water quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several hazardous and non- hazardous waste management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). These sites are southwest of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring and remediation (Figure 2). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Division manages the monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP).

  14. Impact of hydrogeological and geomechanical properties on surface uplift at a CO2 injection site: Parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P.; Yoon, H.; Martinez, M. J.; Bishop, J. E.; Arnold, B. W.; Bryant, S.

    2013-12-01

    It is essential to couple multiphase flow and geomechanical response in order to predict a consequence of geological storage of CO2. In this study, we estimate key hydrogeologic features to govern the geomechanical response (i.e., surface uplift) at a large-scale CO2 injection project at In Salah, Algeria using the Sierra Toolkit - a multi-physics simulation code developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Importantly, a jointed rock model is used to study the effect of postulated fractures in the injection zone on the surface uplift. The In Salah Gas Project includes an industrial-scale demonstration of CO2 storage in an active gas field where CO2 from natural gas production is being re-injected into a brine-filled portion of the structure downdip of the gas accumulation. The observed data include millimeter scale surface deformations (e.g., uplift) reported in the literature and injection well locations and rate histories provided by the operators. Our preliminary results show that the intrinsic permeability and Biot coefficient of the injection zone are important. Moreover pre-existing fractures within the injection zone affect the uplift significantly. Estimation of additional (i.e., anisotropy ratio) and coupled parameters will help us to develop models, which account for the complex relationship between mechanical integrity and CO2 injection-induced pressure changes. Uncertainty quantification of model predictions will be also performed using various algorithms including null-space Monte Carlo and polynomial-chaos expansion methods. This work will highlight that our coupled reservoir and geomechanical simulations associated with parameter estimation can provide a practical solution for designing operating conditions and understanding subsurface processes associated with the CO2 injection. This work is supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Hydrogeologic inferences from drillers' logs and from gravity and resistivity surveys in the Amargosa Desert, southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oatfield, W.J.; Czarnecki, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada, in the Basin and Range province, is hydraulically downgradient from Yucca Mountain, the potential site of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. Groundwater flow paths and flow rates beneath the Amargosa Desert are controlled in part by the total saturated thickness and the hydraulic properties of basin-fill alluvial sediments. Drillers' logs of water wells completed in alluvium were analyzed to help characterize the hydrogeologic framework underlying the Amargosa Desert. Fractions of coarse-grained sediments, calculated from each of these logs, were contoured using a universal-kriging routine to interpolate values. Results from a previous electrical sounding survey also were contoured, including the estimated depth to Paleozoic (?) basement rocks. The vertical electric sounding results were obtained from individual depth-to-resistivity profiles, from which the average resistivity of the total profile and the resistivity of the upper 75 m were calculated. The distribution and variations in average resistivity of the total depth correlated reasonably well with the distribution of variations in regional gravity. Patterns of contours of the resistivity of the upper 75 m of alluvium were similar to patterns of regional contours of the predominant cation (sodium) in ground water. Gravity lows correspond in some places to the presence of lacustrine, eolian, or marsh surface deposits, which may function as barriers to groundwater flow. Gravity lows also correspond to areas with thick basin-fill sediments, which was corroborated by depth-to-basement data determined from vertical electric soundings. Depths to Paleozoic (?) basement rocks may be as much as 1600 m based on data from the resistivity survey, which were corroborated in part by seismic-refraction survey data. Small variations exist in the percentage of the basin fill that is saturated. The unsaturated zone is always < 15% of the alluvial column. Analysis of depth-to-water and hydrochemical data, in conjunction with average resistivity data for the upper 75 m of alluvium, suggest a hydrologic barrier near the center of the Amargosa Desert. ?? 1991.

  16. Characterizing the Hydrogeology and Surface Waters of a Select Portion of the Permian Basin Using an Arc Hydro Groundwater Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J. T.; McPhearson, B. J.; Land, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Atmospheric levels of anthropogenic CO2 have increased from a pre industrial level of 280 parts per million to a 1999 concentration of over 365 parts per million, largely due to expanding use of fossil fuels for human energy needs. Current levels are the highest observed in over 350,000 years. The desire to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 supports research on and development of technologies that will achieve this end. Sequestration of carbon in geologic formations is one such technology that is actively being pursued. Of particular interest is the Permian Basin of eastern Texas and southeastern New Mexico, a basin with substantial saline and brine aquifers that might be very suitable for carbon sequestration, and also a basin that has been producing oil and gas for well over 100 years, a process which utilizes CO2 injection for enhanced recovery. Understanding the interactions between those portions of the Permian Basin proposed for CO2 sequestration and those portions currently utilized as a water supply (i.e., Pecos River and freshwater aquifers) is a critical component of the R&D in this area because of the reliance of a large agricultural community and other delicate legal and environmental balances prevailing in this region. The main purpose of this study is to create a detailed hydrological model with emphasis on hydrogeology and surface waters of a select portion of the Permian Basin, delineated by the Sacramento Mountains to the west and the Delaware Basin to the east, with the long term goal that this study will be one component of a total basin characterization and evaluation. Arc Hydro groundwater data model framework is used to create a database of the study area. The construction of this database is an initial step in the integration of the plethora of oil, gas, and water databases (e.g., IHS Database, New Mexico Subsurface and Core Libraries, and WATERS Database), and provides a platform for the addition of hydrological and geological data (e.g., from the New Mexico Bureau of Geology's Sacramento Mountains Project). The database is then coupled with a numerical model used to explore groundwater surface water interactions and aquifer connectedness at both the regional and site scale, with particular emphasis placed on those phenomena elucidating the interdependencies between the Pecos Slope and the Delaware Basin. This application of the Arc Hydro groundwater data model will be expanded upon and its predictive capabilities further developed such that the effects of CO2 sequestration in the Capitan Reef aquifer can be evaluated.

  17. Terracing and hydrogeological risk. A study of the environmental disaster of 25 October 2011 in Cinque Terre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnoletti, Mauro; Emanueli, Francesca; Errico, Alessandro; Maggiari, Giacomo; Santoro, Antonio; Preti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    The 25th October 2011, an extremely intense rainfall event occurred in the Cinque Terre area. The major damages have been registered in Monterosso and Vernazza basins, that have been affected by hundreds of landslides, mud flows and erosions. The main feature of this area is the steepness of the slopes combined with the presence of wide terraced portions. This work aimed to analyze the landslide distribution in reference of land use, focusing on the effect of land abandonment on hydrogeological risk. In fact, during the last 40 years agriculture in such difficult lands decreased constantly, leading to a progressive abandonment of terraces and consequent re-colonization by spontaneous pioneer species. This phenomena seems to be the main cause of failure during heavy rainfall events. Two studies have been conducted on two different failures samples. The first analysis regarded about 100 failures surveyed by mean of a helicopter flight, randomly chosen along the whole affected area. Besides land use, an overview of the effects of other factors have been taken into account: landslide size, average landslide slope, concavity/convexity of the uphill area. The same analysis has been conducted both for landslide bodies and landslide head scarps. Some differences have been highlighted between these two studies, confirming that land use are a determinant factor for landslide occurrence. The second analysis regards a sub-sample of all the failures registered in the Vernazza catchment, selected by aerial photogrammetry interpretation. This set has been selected excluding all the failures with a size less than 100 m2. An historical aerial image (1973) was geo-referenced and overlaid on the 2011 image, in order to explore the land use before the secondary forests. The objective of this new analysis was to explore the ground under the tree cover, in order to know if the slope failures in forested areas were connected with the presence of abandoned terraces, or simply to an intrinsic instability of the rooted slope. The analysis has been conducted on landslide-size classes. In all classes the failures resulted connected mainly with the abandonment of terraces, with a decrease of instability in forested areas. According to our work, the forest seems to be a stabilizing factor for abandoned terraces. Acknowledgements Italian Research Project of Relevant Interest (PRIN2010-2011), prot. 20104ALME4, National network for monitoring, modeling, and sustainable management of erosion processes in agricultural land and hilly-mountainous area

  18. Hydrogeophysical Data Fusion and Geostatistical Approach to Characterize Hydrogeological Structure of the Baton Rouge Aquifer System in Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshall, A. S.; Tsai, F. T.; Hanor, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    The complex siliciclastic aquifer system underneath the Baton Rouge area, Louisiana is fluvial in origin and is characterized by strongly binary heterogeneity of sandy units and mudstones as pervious and impervious hydrofacies. Two distinct east-west trending geologic faults, the Baton Rouge fault and the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault, cut across East Baton Rouge Parish. Data from the USGS water wells suggest that the Baton Rouge fault is a low permeable fault that historically separates a sequence of freshwater aquifers north of the fault from brackish aquifers south of the fault. However, the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault appears to be pervious. In this study we utilize wireline geophysical data and lithologic data to characterize the Baton Rouge aquifer system and delineate flow pathways thought the faults. To avoid non-uniqueness associated with the use of a single geophysical data type particularly with the presence of salinization, we interpret the sand and shale hydrofacies for each well log based on wireline short normal electrical resistivity, single-point resistance, spontaneous-potential and gamma ray. For geological model calibration we use lithologic data from drillers logs representing the actual lithology with depth. Using geophysical data for hydrogeological structure construction and using lithologic data for model calibration, we implement a generalized parameterization indicator scheme. First, we show that this methodology can effectively analyze a binary siliciclastic aquifer by depicting the spatial extent of major water bearing units, their interconnections and preferential flow paths within each unit. Second, mapping of the binary fault stratigraphy assists in the assessment of hydraulic continuity and saltwater intrusion in the siliciclastic aquifer system, which exhibits discontinuous heterogeneity due to fault throw. By juxtaposing sand units from both sides of the fault plane, horizontal flow pathways are identified if sands connect through the faults; otherwise, horizontal flow barriers are determined. Third, we use two post-processing techniques, which utilize the spatial delineation of each aquifer unit, to validate the region-scale depositional dip as estimated by solving the inverse problem to calculate the fault throw and to quantify the volumetric spatial extent of individual aquifer units. Results of detailed binary architecture of the Baton Rouge fault implies that the fault acts as a conduit-barrier. Saltwater may intrude the freshwater aquifers through various leaky areas along the fault plane. It was believed that hydraulic continuity through the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault is due to insignificant sediment offset. However, the study quantitatively shows that there is a considerable fault throw and that the hydraulic continuity occurs due to connection of offset water bearing units.

  19. Hydrogeologic and geospatial data for the assesment of focused recharge to the Carbonate-Rock Aquifer in Genesee County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, James E.; Kappel, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Existing hydrogeologic and geospatial data useful for the assessment of focused recharge to the carbonate-rock aquifer in the central part of Genesee County, NY, were compiled from numerous local, State, and Federal agency sources. Data sources utilized in this pilot study include available geospatial datasets from Federal and State agencies, interviews with local highway departments and the Genesee County Soil and Water Conservation District, and an initial assessment of karst features through the analysis of ortho-photographs, with minimal field verification. The compiled information is presented in a series of county-wide and quadrangle maps. The county-wide maps present generalized hydrogeologic conditions including distribution of geologic units, major faults, and karst features, and bedrock-surface and water-table configurations. Ten sets of quadrangle maps of the area that overlies the carbonate-rock aquifer present more detailed and additional information including distribution of bedrock outcrops, thin and (or) permeable soils, and karst features such as sinkholes and swallets. Water-resource managers can utilize the information summarized in this report as a guide to their assessment of focused recharge to, and the potential for surface contaminants to reach the carbonate-rock aquifer.

  20. The fault pattern in the northern Negev and southern Coastal Plain of Israel and its hydrogeological implications for groundwater flow in the Judea Group aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, G.; Rosenthal, E.

    1994-03-01

    On the basis of a broadly expanding data base, the hydrogeological properties of the Judea Group sequence in the northern Negev and southern Coastal Plain of Israel have been reassessed. The updated subsurface model is based on data derived from water- and oil-wells and on recent large-scale geophysical investigations. A new regional pattern of the reassessed geological through the subsurface of the study area has been revealed. In view of the reassessed geological and hydrological subsurface setting, it appears that the Judea Group aquifer should not be regarded as one continuous and undisturbed hydrological unit; owing to the occurrence of regional faults, its subaquifers are locally interconnected. These subaquifers, which contain mainly high-quality water, are juxtaposed, as a result of faulting, against Kurnub Group sandstones containing brackish paleowater. The latter Group is faulted against late Jurassic formations containing highly saline groundwater. In the Beer Sheva area, the Judea Group aquifer is vertically displaced against the Senonian and Eocene Mt. Scopus and Avdat Groups, which also contain brackish and saline water. In the southern Coastal Plain, major faults locally dissect also the Pleistocene Kurkar Group, facilitating inflow of Mg-rich groundwater deriving from Judea Group dolomites. The new geological evidence and its hydrogeological implications provide new solutions for previously unexplained salinization phenomena.

  1. Application of a resistivity survey and geographical information system (GIS) analysis for hydrogeological zoning of a piedmont area, Himalayan foothill region, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israil, M.; Al-Hadithi, Mufid; Singhal, D. C.

    2006-06-01

    A Geographical Information System (GIS) has been used for the integration of the results of 70 vertical electrical soundings and hydrogeological data in the piedmont zone of the Himalayan foothills region of Uttaranchal, India. Indian remote sensing (IRS) LISS-III data has been used to prepare thematic maps for the geomorphology and slope maps of the area. The ranges of electrical resistivity values have been assigned to the different formations by calibrating electrical resistivity values with the borehole data. Electrical resistivity, groundwater level monitoring, and borehole and remote sensing data have been integrated in the GIS analysis to delineate the hydrogeological zoning in the study area. Suitable weights were assigned to the different features affecting the groundwater potential. The total score for a particular location is translated in terms of groundwater potential of the area. The results indicate that the southern part of the study area has a very good groundwater potential for meeting the demand of water for irrigation and domestic purposes whereas the steeply sloping area in the northern part, having high relief, has a poor groundwater potential. The resulting delineation of groundwater potential zones are in general agreement with the available yield data of the tube wells.

  2. Hydrogeologic, water-quality and biogeochemical data collected at a septage-treatment facility, Orleans, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, October 1988 through December 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, Leslie A.; Howes, Brian Louis

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic, water-quality, and biogeochemical data were collected at the site of a septage- treatment facility in Orleans, Massachusetts, from October 1988 through December 1992, where a nitrogen-rich effluent is discharged to the underlying glacial aquifer. The data were collected as part of a study done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Watershed Management, to investigate the effect of effluent discharge on ground-water quality and the transport of effluent nitrogen through the aquifer. Hydrogeologic data include lithologic logs and ground-water levels. Water-quality data include chemical analyses of the treated septage effluent, of ground water at the water table beneath the infiltration beds, and of ground water throughout the aquifer. Dissolved concentrations of dinitrogen gas, nitrous oxide, and dissolved inorganic carbon also were measured. Biogeochemical data include concentrations of total ammonium and solid-phase carbon and nitrogen in aquifer sediments and sediments from the effluent-infiltration beds.

  3. Calandar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a portion of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (unless otherwise noted, directions are in reference to the Y-12 Plant administrative grid) that contains several sites used for management of hazardous and nonhazardous wastes associated with plant operations. Groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in the Bear Creek Regime is performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). This report contains the information and monitoring data required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (post-closure permit), as modified and issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in September 1995 (permit no. TNHW-087). In addition to the signed certification statement and the RCRA facility information summarized below, permit condition II.C.6 requires the annual monitoring report to address groundwater monitoring activities at the three RCRA Hazardous Waste Disposal Units (HWDUs) in the Bear Creek Regime that are in post-closure corrective action status (the S-3 Site, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits).

  4. Hydrogeologic data from a study of the freshwater zone/salinewater zone interface in the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlicek, Dianne; Small, T.A.; Rettman, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A test-drilling program to assess the potential for saline water intrusion into the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region was undertaken from June 1985 through May 1986. This report presents hydrogeologic data collected during the drilling and initial testing of seven test holes located at three sites in San Antonio along the interface of the freshwater zone and saline water zone of the Edwards aquifer. Wells A-1, A-2, and A-3 (site A) are located in the saline water zone, wells C-1 and C-2 (site C) are considered to be transition zone locations, and wells D-1 and D-2 (site D) are considered to be freshwater zone locations. Wells were completed with screens or open intervals at several zones within the Edwards aquifer. Hydrogeologic data are presented for wells by site location. Information regarding flow tests, water quality, geophysical logs, and lithology are provided. Continuous water level recorders have been installed on each well to establish a record of water level fluctuations. Water samples for chemical analysis are being collected monthly to establish a record of variations in water quality. (USGS)

  5. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment of boreholes UE-25c No. 1, UE-25c No. 2, and UE-25c No. 3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Geldon, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to characterize-the hydrogeology of saturated tuffaceous rocks penetrated by boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3. These boreholes are referred to collectively in this report as the C-holes. The C-holes were drilled to perform multiwell aquifer tests and tracer tests; they comprise the only complex of closely spaced boreholes completed in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Results of lithologic and geophysical logging, fracture analyses, water-level monitoring, temperature and tracejector surveys aquifer tests, and hydrochemical sampling completed at the C-hole complex as of 1986 are assessed with respect to the regional geologic and hydrologic setting. A conceptual hydrogeological model of the Yucca Mountain area is presented to provide a context for quantitatively evaluating hydrologic tests performed at the C-hole complex as of 1985, for planning and interpreting additional hydrologic tests at the C-hole complex, and for possibly re-evaluating hydrologic tests in boreholes other than the C-holes.

  6. Review of engineering, hydrogeological and vadose zone hydrological aspects of the Lanseria Gneiss, Goudplaats-Hout River Gneiss and Nelspruit Suite Granite (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippenaar, Matthys A.; van Rooy, J. Louis

    2014-03-01

    Three major basement granites of South Africa, viz. the Lanseria Gneiss of the Johannesburg Dome Granite, the Goudplaats-Hout River Gneiss and the Nelspruit Suite, are compared in terms of existing and new geotechnical and hydrogeological data. Typical weathering profiles based on landform and climate are deduced, denoting typical engineering and hydrogeological behaviour. Finally, the vadose zone behaviour of the basement granites are described with the aim on better understanding of the behaviour of these systems under variable saturation. Ephemeral hillslope wetlands, seepage lines and catenas are specifically addressed as associated hydrological influences, as well as the associated processes of translocation forming duplex soils and pedogenesis forming ferricrete. The final summarised findings depict low plasticity and expansiveness of granites with the most notable geotechnical influences being collapsibility, dispersive behaviour, seepage and difficult excavation. Hydrologically, secondary porosity prevails and younger structures or intrusions govern groundwater occurrence. The vadose zone comprises thick fractured rock to be included in modelling with the soil zone having saturated conductivity typically in the order of 1 × 10-4 to 1 × 10-5 m/d.

  7. Hydrogeologic Framework, Groundwater Movement, and Water Budget in Tributary Subbasins and Vicinity, Lower Skagit River Basin, Skagit and Snohomish Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Sumioka, Steven S.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2009-01-01

    A study to characterize the groundwater-flow system in four tributary subbasins and vicinity of the lower Skagit River basin was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey to assist Skagit County and the Washington State Department of Ecology in evaluating the effects of potential groundwater withdrawals and consumptive use on tributary streamflows. This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater and surface-water flow system in the subbasins, and includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework of the subbasins; groundwater recharge and discharge; groundwater levels and flow directions; seasonal groundwater-level fluctuations; interactions between aquifers and the surface-water system; and a water budget for the subbasins. The study area covers about 247 mi2 along the Skagit River and its tributary subbasins (East Fork Nookachamps Creek, Nookachamps Creek, Carpenter Creek, and Fisher Creek) in southwestern Skagit County and northwestern Snohomish County, Washington. The geology of the area records a complex history of accretion along the continental margin, mountain building, deposition of terrestrial and marine sediments, igneous intrusion, and the repeated advance and retreat of continental glaciers. A simplified surficial geologic map was developed from previous mapping in the area, and geologic units were grouped into nine hydrogeologic units consisting of aquifers and confining units. A surficial hydrogeologic unit map was constructed and, with lithologic information from 296 drillers'logs, was used to produce unit extent and thickness maps and four hydrogeologic sections. Groundwater in unconsolidated aquifers generally flows towards the northwest and west in the direction of the Skagit River and Puget Sound. This generalized flow pattern is likely complicated by the presence of low-permeability confining units that separate discontinuous bodies of aquifer material and act as local groundwater-flow barriers. Groundwater-flow directions in the sedimentary aquifer likely reflect local topographic relief (radial flow from bedrock highs) and more regional westward flow from the mountains to the Puget Sound. The largest groundwater-level fluctuations observed during the monitoring period (October 2006 through September 2008) occurred in wells completed in the sedimentary aquifer, and ranged from about 3 to 27 feet. Water levels in wells completed in unconsolidated hydrogeologic units exhibited seasonal variations ranging from less than 1 to about 10 feet. Synoptic streamflow measurements made in August 2007 and June 2008 indicate a total groundwater discharge to creeks in the tributary subbasin area of about 13.15 and 129.6 cubic feet per second (9,520 and 93,830 acre-feet per year), respectively. Streamflow measurements illustrate a general pattern in which the upper reaches of creeks in the study area tended to gain flow from the groundwater system, and lower creek reaches tended to lose water. Large inflows from tributaries to major creeks in the study area suggest the presence of groundwater discharge from upland areas underlain by bedrock. The groundwater system within the subbasins received an average (September 1, 2006 to August 31, 2008) of about 92,400 acre-feet or about 18 inches of recharge from precipitation a year. Most of this recharge (65 percent) discharges to creeks, and only about 3 percent is withdrawn from wells. The remaining groundwater recharge (32 percent) leaves the subbasin groundwater system as discharge to the Skagit River and Puget Sound.

  8. California GAMA program: ground-water quality data in the San Diego drainages hydrogeologic province, California, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burton, Carmen A.

    2005-01-01

    Because of concerns over ground-water quality, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. A primary objective of the program is to provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where public supply wells are an important source of drinking water. The San Diego GAMA study unit was the first region of the state where an assessment of ground-water quality was implemented under the GAMA program. The San Diego GAMA study unit covers the entire San Diego Drainages hydrogeologic province, and is broken down into four distinct hydrogeologic study areas: the Temecula Valley study area, the Warner Valley study area, the Alluvial Basins study area, and the Hard Rock study area. A total of 58 ground-water samples were collected from public supply wells in the San Diego GAMA study unit: 19 wells were sampled in the Temecula Valley study area, 9 in the Warner Valley study area, 17 in the Alluvial Basins study area, and 13 in the Hard Rock study area. Over 350 chemical and microbial constituents and water-quality indicators were analyzed for in this study. However, only select wells were measured for all constituents and water-quality indicators. Results of analyses were calculated as detection frequencies by constituent classification and by individual constituents for the entire San Diego GAMA study unit and for the individual study areas. Additionally, concentrations of constituents that are routinely monitored were compared to maximum contaminant levels (MCL) and secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL). Concentrations of constituents classified as 'unregulated chemicals for which monitoring is required' (UCMR) were compared to the 'detection level for the purposes of reporting' (DLR). Eighteen of the 88 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and gasoline oxygenates analyzed for were detected in ground-water samples. Twenty-eight wells sampled in the San Diego GAMA study had at least a single detection of VOCs or gasoline oxygenates. These constituents were most frequently detected in the Alluvial Basin study area (11 of 17 wells), and least frequently detected in the Warner Valley study area (one of nine wells). Trihalomethanes (THMs) were the most frequently detected class of VOCs (18 of 58 wells). The most frequently detected VOCs were chloroform (18 of 58 wells), bromodichloromethane (8 of 58 wells), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (7 of 58 wells). Three VOCs were detected at concentrations greater than their MCLs. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were detected in one well in the Hard Rock study area at concentrations of 9.75 and 7.27 micrograms per liter (?g/L), respectively; the MCL for these compounds is 5 ?g/L. MTBE was detected in one well in the Alluvial Basins study area at a concentration of 28.3 ?g/L; the MCL for MTBE is 13 ?g/L. Twenty-one of the 122 pesticides and pesticide degradates analyzed for were detected in ground-water samples. Pesticide or pesticide degradates were detected in 33 of 58 wells sampled, and were most frequently detected in the Temecula Valley study area wells (9 of 14 wells), and least frequently in the Warner Valley study area wells (3 of 9 wells). Herbicides were the most frequently detected class of pesticides (31 of 58 wells), and simazine was the most frequently detected compound (27 of 58 wells), followed by deethylatrazine (14 of 58 wells), prometon (10 of 58 wells), and atrazine (9 of 58 wells). None of the pesticides detected in ground-water samples had concentrations that exceeded MCLs. Eight waste-water indicator compounds were detected in ground-water samples. Twenty-one of 47 wells sampled for waste-water indicator compounds had at least a single detection. Waste-water indicator compounds were detected most frequently in the Allu

  9. Assessment of hydrogeologic conditions with emphasis on water quality and wastewater injection, southwest Sarasota and West Charlotte counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    The 250-square-mile area of southwest Sarasota and west Charlotte Counties is underlain by a complex hydrogeologic system having diverse ground-water quality. The surficial and intermediate aquifer systems and the Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system contain six separate aquifers, or permeable zones, and have a total thickness of about 2,000 feet. Water in the clastic surficial aquifer system is potable and is tapped by hundreds of shallow, low-yielding supply wells. Water in the mixed clastic and carbonate intermediate aquifer system is potable in the upper part, but in the lower part, because of increasing salinity, it is used primarily for reverse-osmosis desalinization feed water and irrigation. Within the Upper Floridan aquifer, limestone and dolomite of the Suwannee permeable zone are tapped by irrigation and reverse-osmosis supply wells. The underlying, less permeable limestone of the Suwannee-Ocala semiconfining unit generally encompasses the transition zone between freshwater and very saline water. Interbedded limestone and dolomite of the Ocala-Avon Park moderately permeable zone and Avon Park highly permeable zone compose the deep, very saline injection zone. Potential ground-water contamination problems include flooding by storm tides, upward movement of saline water toward pumping centers by natural and induced leakage or through improperly constructed and abandoned wells, and lateral and vertical movement of treated sewage and reverse-osmosis wastewater injected into deep zones. Effects of flooding are evident in coastal areas where vertical layering of fresh and saline waters is observed. Approximately 100 uncontrolled flowing artesian wells that have interaquifer flow rates as high as 350 gallons per minute have been located and scheduled for plugging by the Southwest Florida Water Management District--in an attempt to improve ground-water quality of the shallow aquifers. Because each aquifer or permeable zone has unique head and water-quality characteristics, construction of single-zone wells would eliminate cross-contamination and borehole interflow. Such a program, when combined with the plugging of shallow-cased wells having long open-hole intervals connecting multiple zones, would safeguard ground-water resources in the study area. The study area encompasses seven wastewater injection sites that have a projected capacity for injecting 29 million gallons per day into the zone 1,100 to 2,050 feet below land surface. There are six additional sites within 20 miles. The first well began injecting reverse-osmosis wastewater in 1984, and since then, other wells have been drilled and permitted for injection of treated sewage. A numerical model was used to evaluate injection-well design and potential for movement of injected wastewater within the hydrogeologic framework. The numerical model was used to simulate injection through a representative well at a rate of 1 million gallons per day for 10 years. In this simulation, a convection cell developed around the injection well with the buoyant fresh injectant rising to form a lens within the injection zone below the lower Suwannee-Ocala semiconfining unit. Around an ideal, fully penetrating well cased 50 feet into the injection zone and open from a depth of 1,150 feet to 2,050 feet, simulations show that the injectant moves upward to a depth of 940 feet, forms a lens about 600 feet thick, and spreads radially outward to a distance of about 2,300 feet after 10 years. Comparison simulations of injection through wells having open depth intervals of 1,150 to 1,400 feet and 1,450 to 2,050 feet demonstrate that such changes in well construction have little effect on the areal spread of the injectant lens or the rate of upward movement. Simulations also indicate that reverse-osmosis wastewater injected beneath a supply well field, where water levels above the semiconfining unit are lowered 20 feet by pumping, would move upward after 10 years to a de

  10. Hydrogeologic framework refinement, ground-water flow and storage, water-chemistry analyses, and water-budget components of the Yuma area, southwestern Arizona and southeastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Land, Michael; Faunt, Claudia C.; Leake, S.A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Fleming, John B.; Pool, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    The ground-water and surface-water system in the Yuma area in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California is managed intensely to meet water-delivery requirements of customers in the United States, to manage high ground-water levels in the valleys, and to maintain treaty-mandated water-quality and quantity requirements of Mexico. The following components in this report, which were identified to be useful in the development of a ground-water management model, are: (1) refinement of the hydrogeologic framework; (2) updated water-level maps, general ground-water flow patterns, and an estimate of the amount of ground water stored in the mound under Yuma Mesa; (3) review and documentation of the ground-water budget calculated by the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior (Reclamation); and (4) water-chemistry characterization to identify the spatial distribution of water quality, information on sources and ages of ground water, and information about the productive-interval depths of the aquifer. A refined three-dimensional digital hydrogeologic framework model includes the following hydrogeologic units from bottom to top: (1) the effective hydrologic basement of the basin aquifer, which includes the Pliocene Bouse Formation, Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and pre-Tertiary metamorphic and plutonic rocks; (2) undifferentiated lower units to represent the Pliocene transition zone and wedge zone; (3) coarse-gravel unit; (4) lower, middle, and upper basin fill to represent the upper, fine-grained zone between the top of the coarse-gravel unit and the land surface; and (5) clay A and clay B. Data for the refined model includes digital elevation models, borehole lithology data, geophysical data, and structural data to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units. The top surface of the coarse-gravel unit, defined by using borehole and geophysical data, varies similarly to terraces resulting from the down cutting of the Colorado River. Clay A is nearly the same as the previous conceptual hydrogeologic model definition (Olmsted and others, 1973), except for a minor westward extension from the city of Yuma. Clay B is extended to the southerly international boundary and increased in areal extent by about two-thirds of the original extent (Olmsted and others, 1973). The other hydrogeologic units generally are the same as in the previous conceptual hydrogeologic model. Before development, the Colorado and Gila Rivers were the sources of nearly all the ground water in the Yuma area through direct infiltration of water from river channels and annual overbank flooding. After construction of upstream reservoirs and clearing and irrigation of the floodplains, the rivers now act as drains for the ground water. Ground-water levels in most of the Yuma area are higher now than they were in predevelopment time. A general gradient of ground-water flow toward the natural discharge area south of the Yuma area still exists, but many other changes in flow are evident. Ground water in Yuma Valley once flowed away from the Colorado River, but now has a component of flow towards the river and Mexicali Valley. A ground-water mound has formed under Yuma Mesa from long-term surface-water irrigation; about 600,000 to 800,000 acre-ft of water are stored in the mound. Ground-water withdrawals adjacent to the southerly international boundary have resulted in water-level declines in that area. The reviewed and documented water budget includes the following components: (1) recharge in irrigated areas, (2) evapotranspiration by irrigated crops and phreatophytes, (3) ground-water return flow to the Colorado River, and (4) ground-water withdrawals (including those in Mexicali Valley). Recharge components were calculated by subtracting the amount of water used by crops from the amount of water delivered. Evapotranspiration rates were calculated on the basis of established methods, thus were appropriate for input to the ground-wate

  11. Geophysical and hydrogeologic investigations of two primary alluvial aquifers embedded in the southern San Andreas fault system: San Bernardino basin and upper Coachella Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisely, Beth Ann

    This study of alluvial aquifer basins in southern California is centered on observations of differential surface displacement and the search for the mechanisms of deformation. The San Bernardino basin and the Upper Coachella Valley aquifers are bound by range fronts and fault segments of the southern San Andreas fault system. I have worked to quantify long-term compaction in these groundwater dependent population centers with a unique synthesis of data and methodologies using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and groundwater data. My dissertation contributes to the understanding of alluvial aquifer heterogeneity and partitioning. I model hydrogeologic and tectonic interpretations of deformation where decades of overdraft conditions and ongoing aquifer development contribute to extreme rapid subsidence. I develop the Hydrogeologic InSAR Integration (HII) method for the characterization of surface deformation in aquifer basins. The method allows for the separation of superimposed hydraulic and/or tectonic processes in operation. This formalization of InSAR and groundwater level integration provides opportunities for application in other aquifer basins where overdraft conditions may be causing permanent loss of aquifer storage capacity through compaction. Sixteen years of SAR data for the Upper Coachella Valley exhibit rapid vertical surface displacement (? 48mm/a) in sharply bound areas of the western basin margin. Using well driller logs, I categorize a generalized facies analysis of the western basin margin, describing heterogeneity of the aquifer. This allowed for assessment of the relationships between observed surface deformation and sub-surface material properties. Providing the setting and context for the hydrogeologic evolution of California's primary aquifers, the mature San Andreas transform fault is studied extensively by a broad range of geoscientists. I present a compilation of observations of creep, line integrals across the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary, and strain tensor volumes for comparison to the Working Group 2007 (UCERF 2) seismicity-based deformation model. I find that the moment accumulation across the plate boundary is consistent with the deformation model, suggesting fault displacement observations within the plate boundary zone accurately capture the strain across the plate boundary. This dissertation includes co-authored materials previously published, and also includes unpublished work currently under revisions for submission to a technical journal.

  12. Hydrogeological and hydrochemical framework of Upper Awash River basin, Ethiopia: With special emphasis on inter-basins groundwater transfer between Blue Nile and Awash Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yitbarek, Andarge; Razack, Moumtaz; Ayenew, Tenalem; Zemedagegnehu, Engida; Azagegn, Tilahun

    2012-04-01

    Integrated approach has been used to investigate the hydrogeological framework of a complex fractured volcanic aquifer system in the Upper Awash River basin located at the western shoulder of the Ethiopian Rift. The groundwater flow system and mechanism of recharge of different aquifers have been studied using conventional hydrogeological field investigations, hydrochemistry, and isotope hydrology. Litho-hydrostratigraphic relationships were constructed from lithologic logs obtained from exploratory drilling of deep boreholes. The result indicates quite complex flow pattern and hydraulic characteristics of the different volcanic aquifers. The litho-hydrostratigraphic correlation indicates that the permeable and porous scoraceous lower basaltic aquifer is extended laterally all the way from the Blue Nile Plateau to the study area. New evidences have also emerged on the inter-basin groundwater transfer. Two distinct regional basaltic aquifers (upper and lower) are identified showing distinct hydrochemical and isotopic signatures. In the southern part of the study area the upper and lower aquifers form one unconfined regional aquifer system. In the northern and central part of the basin, it appears that the two systems are separated by regional aquiclude forming confined aquifers, in places with artesian wells. The groundwater from the deep exploratory wells (>250 m) tapping the lower basaltic aquifer and wells located in the south were found to be moderately mineralized (TDS: 400-600 mg/l), with relatively depleted stable isotope composition and with almost zero tritium. In contrast, the upper shallow aquifer has lesser ionic concentration, more isotopically enriched. Evidences from the different methods clearly indicate inter-basin groundwater transfer from the Blue Nile basin to the Upper Awash basin. The evidences also converge to testify common origin of recharge, presence of hydraulic connectivity for systems tapping the lower basaltic aquifer. This has enormous practical implication in finding large groundwater reserve at a greater depth that can solve the current water supply problems of the community including the capital Addis Ababa. It will also have important role in finding more regional aquifers along the plateau-rift margins in many areas having similar hydrogeological setup as the study area.

  13. Long-term monitoring of hydrogeological activation behaviour of an active landslide system using time-lapse temperature-corrected electrical resistance geophysical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Andrew; Murphy, William; Chambers, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Paul; West, Jared; Uhlemann, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    If the effects of landslides are to be mitigated and avoided then the causes of landslide activations - and re-activations - must be better understood. The most common subsurface property change in the lead up to rainfall-triggered landslide activation is the moisture content of slope material and associated pore water pressure rises and/or consistency changes. If these characteristic subsurface physical properties can be observed in advance of activation then early warning of imminent slope activation may be possible. Recent advances in geoelectrical monitoring techniques reveal that time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a useful tool, capable of observing hillslope hydrogeological processes. However, most previous studies lasted a short time-frame and compared few tomograms. Therefore, a geophysical imaging system through which the progressive wetting of the ground in response to rainfall leading to saturation and then sliding can be observed would seem to be a sensible approach to explore the forecasting of imminent landslide movement. Presented here is the analysis and interpretation of the results of a four and a half year, long-term and high temporal resolution monitoring campaign of a periodically active inland landslide, located in the UK, by a geoelectrical monitoring system called Automated time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ALERT). Time-lapse temperature-corrected transfer resistances reveal that the system responds very well to rises and falls in piezometric level and seasonal trends of soil desiccation during warmer, drier months and crack annealing and soil moisture accumulation in response to wetter periods. The existence of threshold slope moisture contents, and hence electrical resistances, above which the slope activates are not observed in resistance/resistivity results most probably due to the complex nature of the landslide system, the monitoring system resolution and a number of physical slope processes taking place. An exciting development is our improved understanding of shallow earthflow pre-activation hydrogeological behaviour. When interpreted alongside piezometry, an apparent increase in resistance in the months preceding earthflow activation reveals subtle geomechanical processes occurring, including slip surface drainage, due to soil dilation, as strain develops. Correlation between piezometric level fall and associated temperature-corrected resistance rise highlight the sensitivity of the geophysical monitoring system to landslide hydrogeological processes.

  14. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems at Waynesboro, Burke County, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were characterized in the City of Waynesboro area in Burke County, Georgia, based on geophysical and drillers’ logs, flowmeter surveys, a 24-houraquifer test, and the collection and chemical analysis of water samples in a newly constructed well. At the test site, the Dublin aquifer system consists of interlayered sands and clays between depths of 396 and 691 feet, and the Midville aquifer system consists of a sandy clay layer overlying a sand and gravel layer between depths of 728 and 936 feet. The new well was constructed with three screened intervals in the Dublin aquifer system and four screened intervals in the Midville aquifer system. Wellbore-flowmeter testing at a pumping rate of 1,000 gallons per minute indicated that 52.2 percent of the total flow was from the shallower Dublin aquifer system with the remaining 47.8 percent from the deeper Midville aquifer system. The lower part of the lower Midville aquifer (900 to 930 feet deep), contributed only 0.1 percent of the total flow. Hydraulic properties of the two aquifer systems were estimated using data from two wellbore-flowmeter surveys and a 24-hour aquifer test. Estimated values of transmissivity for the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were 2,000 and 1,000 feet squared per day, respectively. The upper and lower Dublin aquifers have a combined thickness of about 150 feet and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Dublin aquifer system averages 10 feet per day. The upper Midville aquifer, lower Midville confining unit, and lower Midville aquifer have a combined thickness of about 210 feet, and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Midville aquifer system averages 6 feet per day. Storage coefficient of the Dublin aquifer system, computed using the Theis method on water-level data from one observation well, was estimated to be 0.0003. With a thickness of about 150 feet, the specific storage of the Dublin aquifer system averages about 2×10-6 per foot. Water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems was characterized during the aquifer test on the basis of water samples collected from composite well flow originating from five depths in the completed production well during the aquifer test. Samples were analyzed for total dissolved solids, specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, and major ions. Water-quality results from composite samples, known flow contribution from individual screens, and a mixing equation were used to calculate water-quality values for sample intervals between sample depths or below the bottom sample depth. With the exception of iron and manganese, constituent concentrations of water from each of the sampled intervals and total flow from the well were within U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary and secondary drinking-water standards. Water from the bottommost sample interval in the lower part of the lower Midville aquifer (900 to 930 feet) contained manganese and iron concentrations of 59.1 and 1,160 micrograms per liter, respectively, which exceeded secondary drinking-water standards. Because this interval contributed only 0.1 percent of the total flow to the well, water quality of this interval had little effect on the composite well water quality. Two other sample intervals from the Midville aquifer system and the total flow from both aquifer systems contained iron concentrations that slightly exceeded the secondary drinking-water standard of 300 micrograms per liter.

  15. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources within the primary aquifers of the San Diego study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The second component of this study-the understanding assessment-identified the natural and human factors that affect groundwater quality by evaluating land use, well construction, and geochemical conditions of the aquifer. Results from these evaluations were used to help explain the occurrence and distribution of selected constituents in the study unit. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by benchmark concentration) were used as the primary metric for relating concentrations of constituents in groundwater samples to water-quality benchmarks for those constituents that have Federal and (or) California benchmarks. For organic and special-interest constituents, relative-concentrations were classified as high (> 1.0), moderate (> 0.1 and ?1.0), and low (?0.1). For inorganic constituents, relative concentrations were classified as high (> 1.0), moderate (> 0.5 and ?1.0), and low (?0.5). Grid-based and spatially weighted approaches were then used to evaluate the proportion of the primary aquifers (aquifer-scale proportions) with high, moderate, and low relative-concentrations for individual compounds and classes of constituents. One or more of the inorganic constituents with health-based benchmarks were high (relative to those benchmarks) in 17.6 percent of the primary aquifers in the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and Alluvial Basins study areas (hereinafter also collectively referred to as the Alluvial Fill study areas because they are composed of alluvial fill aquifers), and in 25.0 percent of the Hard Rock study area. Inorganic constituents with health-based benchmarks that were frequently detected at high relative-concentrations included vanadium (V), arsenic (As), and boron (B). Vanadium and As concentrations were not significantly correlated to either urban or agricultural land use indicating natural sources as the primary contributors of these constituent

  16. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at the Gettysburg Elevator Plant Superfund Site, Adams County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Low, Dennis J.; Goode, Daniel J.; Risser, Dennis W.

    2000-01-01

    Ground water in Triassic-age sedimentary fractured-rock aquifers in the area of Gettysburg, Pa., is used as drinking water and for industrial and commercial supply. In 1983, ground water at the Gettysburg Elevator Plant was found by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources to be contaminated with trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and other synthetic organic compounds. As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, 1980 process, a Remedial Investigation was completed in July 1991, a method of site remediation was issued in the Record of Decision dated June 1992, and a Final Design Report was completed in May 1997. In cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the hydrogeologic assessment of the site remediation, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1997 to determine the effects of the onsite and offsite extraction wells on ground-water flow and contaminant migration from the Gettysburg Elevator Plant. This determination is based on hydrologic and geophysical data collected from 1991 to 1998 and on results of numerical model simulations of the local ground-water flow-system. The Gettysburg Elevator Site is underlain by red, green, gray, and black shales of the Heidlersburg Member of the Gettysburg Formation. Correlation of natural-gamma logs indicates the sedimentary rock strike about N. 23 degrees E. and dip about 23 degrees NW. Depth to bedrock onsite commonly is about 6 feet but offsite may be as deep as 40 feet. The ground-water system consists of two zones?a thin, shallow zone composed of soil, clay, and highly weathered bedrock and a thicker, nonweathered or fractured bedrock zone. The shallow zone overlies the bedrock zone and truncates the dipping beds parallel to land surface. Diabase dikes are barriers to ground-water flow in the bedrock zone. The ground-water system is generally confined or semi-confined, even at shallow depths. Depth to water can range from flowing at land surface to more than 71 feet below land surface. Potentiometric maps based on measured water levels at the Gettysburg Elevator Plant indicate ground water flows from west to east, towards Rock Creek. Multiple-well aquifer tests indicate the system is heterogeneous and flow is primarily in dipping beds that contain discrete secondary openings separated by less permeable beds. Water levels in wells open to the pumped bed, as projected along the dipping stratigraphy, are drawn down more than water levels in wells not open to the pumped bed. Ground-water flow was simulated for steady-state conditions prior to pumping and long-term average pumping conditions. The three-dimensional numerical flow model (MODFLOW) was calibrated by use of a parameter estimation program (MODFLOWP). Steady-state conditions were assumed for the calibration period of 1996. An effective areal recharge rate of 7 inches was used in model calibration. The calibrated flow model was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the current onsite and offsite extraction well system. The simulation results generally indicate that the extraction system effectively captures much of the ground-water recharge at the Gettysburg Elevator Plant and, hence, contaminated ground-water migrating from the site. Some of the extraction wells pump at low rates and have very small contributing areas. Results indicate some areal recharge onsite will move to offsite extraction wells.

  17. Hydrogeology, Chemical Characteristics, and Transport Processes in the Zone of Contribution of a Public-Supply Well in York, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, Matthew K.; Clark, Brian R.; McMahon, Peter B.; McGuire, Virginia L.; Turco, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, as part of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, initiated a topical study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants (TANC) to PSW (public-supply wells). Local-scale and regional-scale TANC study areas were delineated within selected NAWQA study units for intensive study of processes effecting transport of contaminants to PSWs. This report describes results from a local-scale TANC study area at York, Nebraska, within the High Plains aquifer, including the hydrogeology and geochemistry of a 108-square-kilometer study area that contains the zone of contribution to a PSW selected for study (study PSW), and describes factors controlling the transport of selected anthropogenic and natural contaminants to PSWs. Within the local-scale TANC study area, the High Plains aquifer is approximately 75 m (meter) thick, and includes an unconfined aquifer, an upper confining unit, an upper confined aquifer, and a lower confining unit with lower confined sand lenses (units below the upper confining unit are referred to as confined aquifers) in unconsolidated alluvial and glacial deposits overlain by loess and underlain by Cretaceous shale. From northwest to southeast, land use in the local-scale TANC study area changes from predominantly irrigated agricultural land to residential and commercial land in the small community of York (population approximately 8,100). For the purposes of comparing water chemistry, wells were classified by degree of aquifer confinement (unconfined and confined), depth in the unconfined aquifer (shallow and deep), land use (urban and agricultural), and extent of mixing in wells in the confined aquifer with water from the unconfined aquifer (mixed and unmixed). Oxygen (delta 18O) and hydrogen (delta D) stable isotopic values indicated a clear isotopic contrast between shallow wells in the unconfined aquifer (hereinafter, unconfined shallow wells) and most monitoring wells in the confined aquifers (hereinafter, confined unmixed wells). Delta 18O and delta D values for a minority of wells in the confined aquifers were intermediate between those for the unconfined shallow wells and those for the confined unmixed wells. These intermediate values were consistent with mixing of water from unconfined and confined aquifers (hereinafter, confined mixed wells). Oxidation-reduction conditions were primarily oxic in the unconfined aquifer and variably reducing in the confined aquifers. Trace amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were widely detected in unconfined shallow urban wells and indicated the presence of young urban recharge waters in most confined mixed wells. The presence of degradation products of agricultural pesticides (acetochlor and alachlor) in some confined mixed wells suggests that some fraction of the water in these wells also was the result of recharge in agricultural areas. In the unconfined aquifer, age-tracer data (chlorofluorocarbon and sulfur hexafluoride data, and tritium to helium-3 ratios) fit a piston-flow model, with apparent recharge ages ranging from 7 to 48 years and generally increasing with depth. Age-tracer data for the confined aquifers were consistent with mixing of 'old' water, not containing modern tracers recharged in the last 60 years, and exponentially-mixed 'young' water with modern tracers. Confined unmixed wells contained less than (=) 97% of old water. Confined mixed wells contained >30% young water and mean ages ranged from 12 to 14 years. Median concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen, hereinafter, nitrate-N) were 17.3 and 16.0 mg/L (milligram per liter) in unconfined shallow urban and agricultural wells, respectively, indicating a range of likely nitrate sources. Septic systems are most numerous near the edge of the urban area and appear to be

  18. Hydrogeology of, and simulation of ground-water flow in a mantled carbonate-rock system, Cumberland Valley, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chichester, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in a highly productive and complex regolith-mantled carbonate valley in the northeastern part of the Cumberland Valley, Pa., as part of its Appalachian Valleys and Piedmont Regional Aquifer-system Analysis program. The study was designed to quantify the hydrogeologic characteristics and understand the ground-water flow system of a highly productive and complex thickly mantled carbonate valley. The Cumberland Valley is characterized by complexly folded and faulted carbonate bedrock in the valley bottom, by shale and graywacke to the north, and by red-sedimentary and diabase rocks in the east-southeast. Near the southern valley hillslope, the carbonate rock is overlain by wedge-shaped deposit of regolith, up to 450 feet thick, that is composed of residual material, alluvium, and colluvium. Locally, saturated regolith is greater than 200 feet thick. Seepage-run data indicate that stream reaches, near valley walls, are losing water from the stream, through the regolith, to the ground-water system. Results of hydrograph-separation analyses indicate that base flow in stream basins dominated by regolith-mantled carbonate rock, carbonate rock, and carbonate rock and shale are 81.6, 93.0, and 67.7 percent of total streamflow, respectively. The relative high percentage for the regolith-mantled carbonate-rock basin indicates that the regolith stores precipitation and slowly, steadily releases this water to the carbonate-rock aquifer and to streams as base flow. Anomalies in water-table gradients and configuration are a result of topography and differences in the character and distribution of overburden material, permeability, rock type, and geologic structure. Most ground-water flow is local, and ground water discharges to nearby springs and streams. Regional flow is northeastward to the Susquehanna River. Average-annual water budgets were calculated for the period of record from two continuous streamflow-gaging stations. Average-annual precipitation range from 39.0 to 40.5 inches, and averages about 40 inches for the model area. Average-annual recharge, which was assumed equal to the average-annual base flow, ranged from 12 inches for the Conodoguinet Creek, and 15 inches for the Yellow Breeches Creek. The thickly-mantled carbonate system was modeled as a three- dimensional water-table aquifer. Recharge to, ground-water flow through, and discharge from the Cumberland Valley were simulated. The model was calibrated for steady-state conditions using average recharge and discharge data. Aquifer horizontal hydraulic conductivity was calculated from specific-capacity data for each geologic unit in the area. Particle-tracking analyses indicate that interbasin and intrabasin flows of groundwater occur within the Yellow Breeches Creek Basin and between the Yellow Breeches and Conodoguinet Creek Basins.

  19. Health Risk Assessment for Uranium in Groundwater - An Integrated Case Study Based on Hydrogeological Characterization and Dose Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, M. R.; Veiga, L. H.; Py, D. A., Jr.; Fernandes, H. M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium mining and milling facilities of Caetité (URA) is the only active uranium production center in Brazil. Operations take place at a very sensitive semi-arid region in the country where water resources are very scarce. Therefore, any contamination of the existing water bodies may trigger critical consequences to local communities because their sustainability is closely related to the availability of the groundwater resources. Due to the existence of several uranium anomalies in the region, groundwater can present radionuclide concentrations above the world average. The radiological risk associated to the ingestion of these waters have been questioned by members of the local communities, NGO’s and even regulatory bodies that suspected that the observed levels of radionuclide concentrations (specially Unat) could be related to the uranium mining and milling operations. Regardless the origin of these concentrations the fear that undesired health effects were taking place (e.g. increase in cancer incidence) remain despite the fact that no evidence - based on epidemiological studies - is available. This paper intends to present the connections between the local hydrogeology and the radiological characterization of groundwater in the neighboring areas of the uranium production center to understand the implications to the human health risk due to the ingestion of groundwater. The risk assessment was performed, taking into account the radiological and the toxicological risks. Samples from 12 wells have been collected and determinations of Unat, Thnat, 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb were performed. The radiation-related risks were estimated for adults and children by the calculation of the annual effective doses. The potential non-carcinogenic effects due to the ingestion of uranium were evaluated by the estimation of the hazard index (HI). Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the uncertainty associated with these estimates, i.e. the 95% confidence interval for Hazard Index and Effective dose estimation. No significant radiological related health effect could be attributed to the ingestion of this water by members of the local community. The calculated doses, for example, were below the internationally recommended limit of 1mSv/y to members of the public to be adopted in the regulation of planned exposures. This limit corresponds to an excess lifetime cancer risk of 4.0 x 10-3. However, if the non-carcinogenic effects of uranium are to be taken into account, it was observed that the ingestion of water from some of the investigated wells would be associated with a hazard index above unity indicating a potential risk for an adverse health effect. In the case of uranium these effects would be mainly associated with primarily damage to kidney, although it is also dependent on several factors, including physicochemical form and solubility. The regulatory implications of these findings will also be discussed in the paper.

  20. Hydrogeologic Evaluation of a Ground-Source Cooling System at the BSF/CSF on the Battelle Campus: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; DeSmet, Darrell J.; Lindsey, K. A.; Porcello, J. J.

    2010-05-12

    This report documents both the field characterization activities and the numerical modeling effort at the BSF/CSF site to determine the viability of an open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP). The primary purpose of the integrated field and modeling study was to determine far-field impacts related to a non-consumptive use water right for the well field containing four extraction and four injection wells. In the field, boreholes were logged and used to develop the geologic conceptual model. Hydraulic testing was performed to identify hydraulic properties and determine sustainable pumping rates. Estimates of the Ringold hydraulic conductivity (60-150 m/d) at the BSF/CSF site were consistent with the local and regional hydrogeology as well as estimates previously published by other investigators. Sustainable pumping rates at the extraction wells were variable (100 – 700 gpm), and confirmed field observations of aquifer heterogeneity. Field data were used to develop a numerical model of the site. Simulations assessed the potential of the well field to impact nearby contaminant plumes, neighboring water rights, and the thermal regime of nearby surface water bodies. Using steady-state flow scenarios in conjunction with particle tracking, a radius of influence of 400–600 m was identified around the well field. This distance was considerably shorter than the distance to the closest contaminant plume (~1.2 km northwest to the DOE Horn Rapids Landfill) and the nearest water right holder (~1.2 km southeast to the City of Richland Well Field). Results demonstrated that current trajectories for nearby contaminant plumes will not be impacted by the operation of the GSHP well field. The objective of the energy transport analysis was to identify potential thermal impacts to the Columbia River under likely operational scenarios for the BSF/CSF well field. Estimated pumping rates and injection temperatures were used to simulate heat transport for a range of hydraulic conductivity estimates for the Ringold Formation. Two different operational scenarios were simulated using conservative assumptions, such as the absence of river water intrusion in the near shore groundwater. When seasonal injection of warm and cool water occurred, temperature impacts were insignificant at the Columbia River (< +0.2ºC), irrespective of the hydraulic conductivity estimate. The second operational scenario simulated continuous heat rejection, a condition anticipated once the BSF/CSF is fully loaded with laboratory and computer equipment. For the continuous heat rejection case, where hourly peak conditions were simulated as month-long peaks, the maximum change in temperature along the shoreline was ~1ºC. If this were to be interpreted as an absolute change in a static river temperature, it could be considered significant. However, the warmer-than-ambient groundwater flux that would potentially discharge to the Columbia River is very small relative to the flow in the river. For temperatures greater than 17.0ºC, the flow relative to a low-flow condition in the river is only 0.012%. Moreover, field data has shown that diurnal fluctuations in temperature are as high as 5ºC along the shoreline.

  1. Spatial variation of groundwater arsenic distribution in the Chianan Plain, SW Taiwan: Role of local hydrogeological factors and geothermal sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S.; Sracek, O.; Jean, J.-S.; Lu, H.-Y.; Wang, C.-H.; Palcsu, L.; Liu, C.-C.; Jen, C.-H.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-10-01

    We present here major ion, trace element, stable and radioisotope data based on forty-six groundwater samples collected from various locations along few selected profiles across the Chianan Plain, southwestern Taiwan including the area affected by well known Blackfoot disease manifested by peripheral vascular gangrene. The objective of the study was to understand the role of local hydrogeology in terms of spatial variation of arsenic concentration in groundwater wells of the entire Chianan Plain and the foothill belt of the Central Mountain Range. An attempt has also been made to assess the contribution of nearby geothermal sources to the arsenic budget in groundwater of the Chianan Plain. Our study shows a gradual increase in all major and trace ion concentrations including total arsenic from foothill belt (arsenic: median = 4 ?g/L, range = 0-667.6 ?g/L, sample number n = 16) to coastal zones (arsenic: median = 42.74 ?g/L, range = 0.14-348.6 ?g/L, n = 15) of the plain. Inverse geochemical modeling shows that Ca may be exchanged on clays, and that the degree of the exchange increases from the foothill to the coastal zones. Inverse geochemical modeling further suggests that the oxidation of organic matter (CH2O) required in various east-west profiles across the plain to balance the total bicarbonate concentration and CO2 input from organic matters significantly increases from the foothill to the coastal zones with transfer coefficients ranging from 1.55 × 10-2 to 1.69 × 10-5 mol/L. High concentrations of tritium (mean = 1.33 ± 0.11 TU; n = 4) in foothill groundwater and low concentration of tritium in groundwater of central zone suggest gradually increasing water-rock interaction from the foothill to the coastal part. Few elevated arsenic (median = 171.8 ?g/L, maximum = 667.60 ?g/L, minimum = 24 ?g/L; n = 6) hotspots are identified in the foothill belt. Available lithologs and aquifer test data suggest that the presence of impermeable clay around those pockets possibly inhibits vertical and lateral flushing of the aquifer and aids strong water-rock interactions subsequently leading to release of arsenic into groundwater. Using oxygen isotope and chloride mass balance method, we estimated that geothermal sources can recharge a maximum of 4% of groundwater in proximal aquifers and contribute <2% of average As concentration in the groundwater of Chianan Plain. Our preliminary observations thus show some arsenic enrichment in foothill aquifers, providing a necessity of detailed study of the aquifer systems in these understudied regions. Moreover, our research indicates that the contribution of arsenic from geothermal sources is insignificant, which stands in contrast to earlier studies suggesting that mud volcanoes and thermal springs in the Western Foothill Belt of the Central Mountain Range were potential sources of groundwater arsenic in the Chianan Plain aquifers.

  2. Characterization of the hydrogeology and water quality at the Management Systems Evaluation Area near Princeton, Minnesota, 1991-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.; Lamb, J.A.; Anderson, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Management Systems Evaluation Area (MSEA) program is part of a multi-scale, inter-agency initiative to evaluate the effects of agricultural management systems on water quality in the midwest corn belt. The Minnesota MSEA project is one of five projects selected to represent the principal hydrogeologic settings and geographic diversity of prevailing management systems in the midwest corn belt. The Minnesota MSEA research area is located in the Anoka Sand Plain about 5 kilometers southwest of Princeton, Minnesota. The water-quality monitoring network within the 65-hectare research area consists of 29 observation wells and 22 multiport wells. Thirteen observation wells also are located outside the research area. Anthropogenic effects of previous land use were detected in water samples collected during April 1991, prior to implementation of the MSEA farming systems. Concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate-N) in the surficial aquifer equaled or exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in 4 of the 7 wells in the research area. The maxinxum concentration of nitrate-N in ground water from these wells was 23 mg/L with a median of 10 mg/L. The median concentration of nitrate-N for these wells exceeded the median in wells located upgradient from the research area (2.1 mg/L). Similarly, the median concentration of chloride from wells in the research area (11 mg/L) exceeded the median in upgradient wells (3.8 mg/L). On-site soun:es of the elevated nitrate-N include decomposition of alfalfa, grown on-site during 1981-89, and application of nitrogen fertilizer to corn during 1990. A likely on-site source of the elevated chloride is application of potassium-chloride fertilizer to crops prior to 1991. Atrazine was detected by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy in 2 of the 7 wells in the research area at concentrations of 0.04 and 0.17 micrograms per liter (ug/L), well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended maximum contaminant level of 3 ug/L. The median concentration in these Wells was less than the qualitative detection limit of 0.01 ug/L. Atrazine metabolite de-ethylatrazine was the most frequently detected herbicicle or herbicide metabolite. De-ethylatrazine was detected in 5 of the 7 wells in the research area at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 0.32 ug/L with a median concentration of 0.14 ug/L. Atrazine metabolite de-isopropylatrazine was not detected above the qualitative detection limit of 0.06 ug/L. The most likely sources of atrazine are applications to the research area during 1990 or from precipitation.

  3. Bibliography of selected references on the hydrogeologic and chemical properties of the Galena-Platteville bedrock unit in Illinois and Wisconsin, 1877-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Timothy A.; Dunning, Charles P.; Batten, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents selected references concerning the Galena-Platteville deposits in Illinois and Wisconsin published from 1877 to 1997. Sources of the bibliographic information are the Universities of Illinois and Wisconsin Library Computer Systems; Illinet Online; the Illinois and Wisconsin District Libraries of the U.S. Geological Survey; U.S. Geological Survey Selected Water Resources Abstracts; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports; and Federal, State, and local agencies, corporations, and consultants. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically, by county, in Illinois and Wisconsin. The references available for each county are arranged alphabetically by author. In addition, one or more selected hydrogeologic key words describing the content of the reference follow each listing. These key words are geophysical properties, hydraulic properties, inorganic geochemistry, lithology, organic geochemistry, physical properties, and water use. Included in the bibliography are 186 references obtained for 15 counties in Illinois and 21 counties in Wisconsin.

  4. The role of regional groundwater flow in the hydrogeology of the Culebra member of the Rustler formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Corbet, T.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knupp, P.M. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Numerical simulation has been used to enhance conceptual understanding, of the hydrogeology of the Culebra Dolomite in the context of regional groundwater flow. The hydrogeology is of interest because this unit is a possible pathway for offsite migration of radionuclides from a proposed repository for defense-generated transuranic wastes (the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). The numerical model used is three-dimensional, extends laterally to topographic features that form the actual boundaries of a regional groundwater system, and uses a free-surface upper boundary condition to simulate the effect of change in the rate of recharge on groundwater flow. Steady-state simulations were performed to examine the sensitivity of simulation results to assumed values for hydraulic conductivity and recharge rate. Transient simulations, covering the time period from 14,000 years in the past to 10,000 years in the future, provided insight into how patterns of groundwater flow respond to changes in climate. Simulation results suggest that rates and directions of Groundwater flow in the Culebra change with time due to interaction between recharge, movement of the water table, and the topography of the land surface. The gentle east-to-west slope of the land surface in the vicinity of the WIPP caused groundwater in the Culebra to flow toward and discharge into Nash Draw, a topographic depression. Modern-day flow directions in the Culebra reflect regional rather than local features of the topography. Changes in Groundwater flow, however, lagged behind changes in the rate of recharge. The present-day position of the water table is still adjusting to the decrease in recharge that ended 8,000 years ago. Contaminants introduced into the Culebra will travel toward the accessible environment along the Culebra rather than by leaking upward or downward into other units. Natural changes in flow over the next 10,000 years will be small and will mainly reflect future short-term wet periods.

  5. Calendar year 1994 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1994 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1994 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y- 12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The GWQR for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts: Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference containing the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline (March 1 of the following CY). Part 2 of the annual groundwater report, to be issued mid-year, will contain a regime-wide evaluation of groundwater quality, present the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describe changes in monitoring priorities, and present planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis activities.

  6. Hydrogeologic framework and hydrologic budget components of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, S.C.; Morgan, D.S.; Welch, W.B.; Ely, D.M.; Hinkle, S.R.; Vaccaro, J.J.; Orzol, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers an area of about 44,000 square miles in a structural and topographic basin within the drainage of the Columbia River in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The primary aquifers are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying sediment. Eighty percent of the groundwater use in the study area is for irrigation, in support of a $6 billion per year agricultural economy. Water-resources issues in the Columbia Plateau include competing agricultural, domestic, and environmental demands. Groundwater levels were measured in 470 wells in 1984 and 2009; water levels declined in 83 percent of the wells, and declines greater than 25 feet were measured in 29 percent of the wells. Conceptually, the system is a series of productive basalt aquifers consisting of permeable interflow zones separated by less permeable flow interiors; in places, sedimentary aquifers overly the basalts. The aquifer system of the CPRAS includes seven hydrogeologic units-the overburden aquifer, three aquifer units in the permeable basalt rock, two confining units, and a basement confining unit. The overburden aquifer includes alluvial and colluvial valley-fill deposits; the three basalt units are the Saddle Mountains, Wanapum, and Grande Ronde Basalts and their intercalated sediments. The confining units are equivalent to the Saddle Mountains-Wanapum and Wanapum-Grande Ronde interbeds, referred to in this study as the Mabton and Vantage Interbeds, respectively. The basement confining unit, referred to as Older Bedrock, consists of pre-CRBG rocks that generally have much lower permeabilities than the basalts and are considered the base of the regional flow system. Based on specific-capacity data, median horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh) values for the overburden, basalt units, and bedrock are 161, 70, and 6 feet per day, respectively. Analysis of oxygen isotopes in water and carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon from groundwater samples indicates that groundwater in the CPRAS ranges in age from modern (10,000 years). The oldest groundwater resides in deep, downgradient locations indicating that groundwater movement and replenishment in parts of this regional aquifer system have operated on long timescales under past natural conditions, which is consistent with the length and depth of long flow paths in the system. The mean annual recharge from infiltration of precipitation for the 23-year period 1985-2007 was estimated to be 4.6 inches per year (14,980 cubic feet per second) using a polynomial regression equation based on annual precipitation and the results of recharge modeling done in the 1980s. A regional-scale hydrologic budget was developed using a monthly SOil WATer (SOWAT) Balance model to estimate irrigation-water demand, groundwater flux (recharge or discharge), direct runoff, and soil moisture within irrigated areas. Mean monthly irrigation throughout the study area peaks in July at 1.6 million acre-feet (MAF), of which 0.45 and 1.15 MAF are from groundwater and surface-water sources, respectively. Annual irrigation water use in the study area averaged 5.3 MAF during the period 1985-2007, with 1.4 MAF (or 26 percent) supplied from groundwater and 3.9 MAF supplied from surface water. Mean annual recharge from irrigation return flow in the study area was 4.2 MAF (1985-2007) with 2.1 MAF (50 percent) occurring within the predominately surface-water irrigated regions of the study area. Annual groundwater-use estimates were made for public supply, self-supplied domestic, industrial, and other uses for the period 1984 through 2009. Public supply groundwater use within the study area increased from 200,600 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr) in 1984 to 269,100 acre-ft/yr in 2009. Domestic self-supplied groundwater use increased from 54,580 acre-ft/yr in 1984 to 71,160 acre-ft/yr in 2009. Industrial groundwater use decreased from 53,390 acre-ft/yr in 1984 t

  7. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater and surface-water systems, land use, pumpage, and water budget of the Chamokane Creek basin, Stevens County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, Sue C.; Taylor, William A.; Lin, Sonja; Sumioka, Steven S.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the water resources of the unconsolidated groundwater system of the Chamokane Creek basin was conducted to determine the hydrogeologic framework, interactions of shallow and deep parts of the groundwater system with each other and the surface-water system, changes in land use and land cover, and water-use estimates. Chamokane Creek basin is a 179 mi2 area that borders and partially overlaps the Spokane Indian Reservation in southern Stevens County in northeastern Washington State. Aquifers within the Chamokane Creek basin are part of a sequence of glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediment that may reach total thicknesses of about 600 ft. In 1979, most of the water rights in the Chamokane Creek basin were adjudicated by the United States District Court requiring regulation in favor of the Spokane Tribe of Indians' senior water right. The Spokane Tribe, the State of Washington, and the United States are concerned about the effects of additional groundwater development within the basin on Chamokane Creek. Information provided by this study will be used to evaluate the effects of potential increases in groundwater withdrawals on groundwater and surface-water resources within the basin. The hydrogeologic framework consists of six hydrogeologic units: The Upper outwash aquifer, the Landslide Unit, the Valley Confining Unit, the Lower Aquifer, the Basalt Unit, and the Bedrock Unit. The Upper outwash aquifer occurs along the valley floors of the study area and consists of sand, gravel, cobbles, boulders, with minor silt and (or) clay interbeds in places. The Lower aquifer is a confined aquifer consisting of sand and gravel that occurs at depth below the Valley confining unit. Median horizontal hydraulic conductivity values for the Upper outwash aquifer, Valley confining unit, Lower aquifer, and Basalt unit were estimated to be 540, 10, 19, and 3.7 ft/d, respectively. Many low-flow stream discharge measurements at sites on Chamokane Creek and its tributaries were at or near zero flow. The most notable exception is where Chamokane Creek is supported by discharge of large springs from the Upper outwash aquifer in the southern part of the basin. Most high-flow measurements indicated gains in streamflow (groundwater discharging to the stream). Large streamflow losses, however, were recorded near the north end of Walkers Prairie where streamflow directly recharges the Upper outwash aquifer. The similarity in seasonal water-level fluctuations in the Upper outwash aquifer and the Lower aquifer indicate that these systems may be fairly well connected. Land use and land cover change analysis indicates that Chamokane Creek basin has been dominated by forests with some pasture and agricultural lands with sparse residential development from the 1980s to present. Loss in forest cover represents the largest change in land cover in the basin between 1987 and 2009. This appears to be mostly due to forestry activities, especially in the northern part of the basin. Since 1987, more than 18,000 acres of evergreen forest have been logged and are at various stages of regrowth. Estimated average annual total groundwater pumpage in the basin increased from 224 million gallons per year (Mgal/yr) in 1980 to 1,330 Mgal/yr in 2007. The largest withdrawals during 2007 were to supply two fish hatcheries, with a combined total annual pumpage of about 1,150 Mgal. Annual groundwater pumpage values from 1980 through 2007 for the study area ranged from 21.1 to 28.9 Mgal/yr for domestic wells and 0.38 to 23.7 Mgal/yr for public supply. An approximate water budget for a typical year in the Chamokane Creek basin indicates that 19.6 in. of precipitation are balanced by 4.7 in. of streamflow discharge from the basin, and 14.9 in. of evapotranspiration.

  8. Hydrogeology, hydraulic characteristics, and water-quality conditions in the surficial, Castle Hayne and Peedee aquifers of the greater New Hanover County area, North Carolina, 2012-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Gurley, Laura N.; Antolino, Dominick J.

    2014-01-01

    A major issue facing the greater New Hanover County, North Carolina, area is the increased demand for drinking water resources as a result of rapid growth. The principal sources of freshwater supply in the greater New Hanover County area are withdrawals of surface water from the Cape Fear River and groundwater from the underlying Castle Hayne and Peedee aquifers. Industrial, mining, irrigation, and aquaculture groundwater withdrawals increasingly compete with public-supply utilities for freshwater resources. Future population growth and economic expansion will require increased dependence on high-quality sources of fresh groundwater. An evaluation of the hydrogeology and water-quality conditions in the surficial, Castle Hayne, and Peedee aquifers was conducted in New Hanover, eastern Brunswick, and southern Pender Counties, North Carolina. A hydrogeologic framework was delineated by using a description of the geologic and hydrogeologic units that compose aquifers and their confining units. Current and historic water-level, water-quality, and water-isotope data were used to approximate the present boundary between freshwater and brackish water in the study area. Water-level data collected during August–September 2012 and March 2013 in the Castle Hayne aquifer show that recharge areas with the highest groundwater altitudes are located in central New Hanover County, and the lowest are located in a discharge area along the Atlantic Ocean. Between 1964 and 2012, groundwater levels in the Castle Hayne aquifer in central New Hanover County have rebounded by about 10 feet, but in the Pages Creek area groundwater levels declined in excess of 20 feet. In the Peedee aquifer, the August–September 2012 groundwater levels were affected by industrial withdrawals in north-central New Hanover County. Groundwater levels in the Peedee aquifer declined more than 20 feet between 1964 and 2012 in northeastern New Hanover County because of increased withdrawals. Vertical gradients calculated between the Castle Hayne and Peedee aquifers at six well cluster sites were downward in August–September 2012 and March 2013 with the exception of one well pair that had a slight upward gradient in March 2013. Major ion chemistry results from samples collected in August–September 2012 from 97 well sites suggest that seawater is mixing with groundwater in both the Castle Hayne and Peedee aquifers in several locations in Brunswick, New Hanover, and Pender Counties. The 250 milligram per liter line of equal chloride concentration has moved inland in both aquifers since 1965, with the area between Futch and Pages Creeks in northeastern New Hanover County experiencing the greatest increase. Groundwater from the surficial, Castle Hayne, and Peedee aquifers had a stable isotope of water composition similar to that of modern precipitation. A comparison of chloride concentration data collected from public-supply wells in the 1960s with that collected in 2012 shows marked increases in chloride concentrations in the Peedee aquifer near the town of Carolina Beach at the southern end of New Hanover County.

  9. Hydrogeology, water quality, and saltwater intrusion in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the offshore area near Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, and Tybee Island, Georgia, 1999-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Ransom, Camille; Landmeyer, James E.; Reuber, Eric J.; Edwards, Lucy E.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the hydrogeology, water quality, and the potential for saltwater intrusion in the offshore Upper Floridan aquifer, a scientific investigation was conducted near Tybee Island, Georgia, and Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Four temporary wells were drilled at 7, 8, 10, and 15 miles to the northeast of Tybee Island, and one temporary well was drilled in Calibogue Sound west of Hilton Head Island. The Upper Floridan aquifer at the offshore and Calibogue sites includes the unconsolidated calcareous quartz sand, calcareous quartz sandstone, and sandy limestone of the Oligocene Lazaretto Creek and Tiger Leap Formations, and the limestone of the late Eocene Ocala Limestone and middle Avon Park Formation. At the 7-, 10-, and 15-mile sites, the upper confining unit between the Upper Floridan and surficial aquifers correlates to the Miocene Marks Head Formation. Paleochannel incisions have completely removed the upper confining unit at the Calibogue site and all but a 0.8-foot-thick interval of the confining unit at the 8-mile site, raising concern about the potential for saltwater intrusion through the paleochannel-fill sediments at these two sites. The paleochannel incisions at the Calibogue and 8-mile sites are filled with fine- and coarse-grained sediments, respectively. The hydrogeologic setting and the vertical hydraulic gradients at the 7- and 10-mile sites favored the absence of saltwater intrusion during predevelopment. After decades of onshore water use in Georgia and South Carolina, the 0-foot contour in the regional cone of depression of the Upper Floridan aquifer is estimated to have been at the general location of the 7- and 10-mile sites by the mid-1950s and at or past the 15-mile site by the 1980s. The upward vertical hydraulic gradient reversed, but the presence of more than 17 feet of upper confining unit impeded the downward movement of saltwater from the surficial aquifer to the Upper Floridan aquifer at the 7- and 10-mile sites. At the 10-mile site, the chloride concentration in the Upper Floridan borehole-water sample and the pore-water samples from the Oligocene and Eocene strata support the conclusion of no noticeable modern saltwater intrusion in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The chloride concentration of 370 milligrams per liter in the borehole-water sample at the 7-mile site from the Upper Floridan aquifer at 78 to 135 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988 is considerably higher than the chloride concentration of 25 milligrams per liter measured at the 10-mile site. The higher concentration probably is the result of downward leakage of saltwater through the confining unit at the 7-mile site or could reflect downward leakage of saltwater through an even thinner layer of the upper confining unit beneath the paleochannel to the northeast and lateral movement (encroachment) from the paleochannel to the 7-mile site. Carbon-14 concentrations at both sites, however, are low and indicate that most of the water is relict fresh ground water. The hydrogeology at the 15-mile site includes 17 feet of the upper confining unit. The chloride concentration in the Upper Floridan aquifer is 6,800 milligrams per liter. The setting for the Upper Floridan aquifer beneath the 15-mile site is interpreted as a transitional mixing zone between relict freshwater and relict saltwater. At the Calibogue site, 35 feet of fine-grained paleochannel-fill sediments overlies the Oligocene strata of the Upper Floridan aquifer. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the paleochannel fill at this site is similar to the upper confining unit and effectively replaces the missing upper confining unit. Chloride concentrations and low carbon-14 and tritium concentrations in borehole water from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and low chloride concentrations in pore water from the upper confining unit indicate relict freshwater confined in the Upper Floridan aquifer at the Calibogue site. The coarse-grained paleochannel-f

  10. Hydrogeology and water quality of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia, which is located on the Potomac River in the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. The study provides a description of the hydrogeologic units, directions of ground-water flow, and back-ground water quality in the study area to a depth of about 100 feet. Lithologic, geophysical, and hydrologic data were collected from 28 wells drilled for this study, from 3 existing wells, and from outcrops. The shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area consists of two fining-upward sequences of Pleistocene fluvial-estuarine deposits that overlie Paleocene-Eocene marine deposits of the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. The surficial hydrogeologic unit is the Columbia aquifer. Horizontal linear flow of water in this aquifer generally responds to the surface topography, discharging to tidal creeks, marshes, and the Potomac River, and rates of flow in this aquifer range from 0.003 to 0.70 foot per day. The Columbia aquifer unconformably overlies the upper confining unit 12-an organic-rich clay that is 0 to 55 feet thick. The upper confining unit conformably overlies the upper confined aquifer, a 0- to 35-feet thick unit that consists of interbedded fine-grained to medium-grained sands and clay. The upper confined aquifer probably receives most of its recharge from the adjacent and underlying Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. Water in the upper confined aquifer generally flows eastward, northward, and northeastward at about 0.03 foot per day toward the Potomac River and Machodoc Creek. The Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit consists of glauconitic, fossiliferous silty fine-grained sands of the Nanjemoy Formation. Where the upper confined system is absent, the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit is directly overlain by the Columbia aquifer. In some parts of the Explosive Experimental Area, horizontal hydraulic conductivities of the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit and the Columbia aquifer are similar (from 10-4 to 10-2 foot per day), and these units effectively combine to form a thick (greater than 50 feet) aquifer. The background water quality of the shallow aquifer system is characteristic of ground waters in the Virginia Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. Water in the Columbia aquifer is a mixed ionic type, has a median pH of 5.9, and a median total dissolved solids of 106 milligrams per liter. Water in the upper confined aquifer and Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit is a sodium- calcium-bicarbonate type, and generally has higher pH, dissolved solids, and alkalinity than water in the Columbia aquifer. Water in the upper confined aquifer and some parts of the Columbia aquifer is anoxic, and it has high concentrations of dissolved iron, manganese, and sulfide.

  11. Hydrogeologic Framework and Ground-Water Flow in Quaternary Deposits at the U.S. Army Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center near Edinburgh, Indiana, 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Bret A.; Risch, Martin R.

    2006-01-01

    A hydrogeologic framework was developed for unconsolidated Quaternary deposits at the U.S. Army Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center. The framework describes the potential for the occurrence of ground water on the basis of physiography and the distribution of geologic materials within the study area. Four geologic units-the Jessup, Trafalgar, Atherton, and Martinsville Formations-were identified, and their distribution was mapped as four hydrogeologic regions. The Jessup and Trafalgar Formations are fine-grained, poorly sorted tills. At least two facies of the Atherton Formation, the lacustrine and outwash facies, are in the study area. The Martinsville Formation includes materials deposited or reworked since the glacial period. With the exception of the Atherton Formation outwash facies, the Quaternary deposits are primarily fine-grained, silt- and clay-rich sediments that function as confining layers or aquitards. The Atherton Formation out-wash facies includes sand and gravel deposits that constitute the primary aquifers in the study area. The four hydrogeologic regions mapped in this investigation are designated as the Bedrock, Jessup Till, Trafalgar Till, and Atherton Outwash Regions. Each region represents an area with a distinctive physiographic expression and vertical sequence of Quaternary deposits. The Bedrock Region in the western and southwestern part of the study area commonly is underlain by 0 to 15 feet of Martinsville Formation resting directly on bedrock. Potential ground-water yields are limited. The Jessup Till Region in the southeastern part of the study area includes the uplands on either side of the stream valleys. Sediments commonly range from 30 to 90 feet in thickness. This region includes clay-rich till of the Jessup Formation and sand and gravel deposits of the Atherton Formation outwash facies; the Atherton Formation outwash facies tends to be thin, and ground-water yields will be moderate. The Trafalgar Till Region in the north and northwest-central part of the study area commonly is underlain by 10 to 30 feet of Trafalgar till or Trafalgar till over 25 to 50 feet of Jessup till. Within, separating, and beneath these tills are deposits of the Atherton Formation outwash facies-the sand and gravel deposits with the best potential to support a water-supply well. Generally, the outwash facies in this region are thin sand and gravel lenses, except in a few locations that are in excess of 30 feet thick. The Atherton Outwash Region is the lowland area associated with the major valleys in all but the far southwestern part of the study area. This region has the greatest thickness of outwash facies sands and gravels (often in excess of 20 feet), which are the primary aquifers. In the Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, the combined Atherton Outwash Region and the Trafalgar Till Region have the greatest potential as infiltration areas because of low topographic relief and(or) sandy soils. From water-level data collected in July and August 2003, horizontal ground-water flow was determined generally to be toward the Atherton Outwash Region and the valley of the Drift-wood River to the east. Vertical hydraulic gradients were documented at nested well pairs. At two sites, upwardly directed gradients are reflected by flowing wells. Ground-water discharge to surface water is likely in some eastern reaches of the valleys of Nineveh and Lick Creeks. In the valley of Nineveh Creek, potential for ground-water discharge is indicated by the presence of a flowing well, upwardly directed vertical hydraulic gradients, and ground-water heads that were higher than surface-water elevations. In the valley of Lick Creek, ground-water discharge also is indicated by the presence of flowing wells and ground-water heads that were higher than surface-water elevations.

  12. Tackling the Issues of Landscape Characterisation for Natural Resource Management in Urban and Peri-urban Western Sydney, Australia: Application of the Hydro-Geologic Landscapes Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. L.; Harvey, K.

    2009-04-01

    Dryland salinity is a natural resource management issue and a planning hazard in urban/peri-urban Western Sydney, where there is enormous development pressure. The level of detail available on local geological, hydrogeologic and soils maps commonly does not provide sufficient detail for sub-catchment scale urban development planning and natural resource management (NRM) decision-making. The dominant lithologies for the area are relatively thick (up to 300m), flat-lying, Triassic fluvial and shallow marine siliciclastic sediments of the Sydney Basin. Localised areas of Cainozoic gravels cover the palaeo-landscapes developed on older rocks, and modern fluvial processes along the Hawkesbury River and tributaries continue to modify the landscape. Salt is concentrated in this landscape through aeolian accession and deposition from oceanic aerosols, but almost never as fossil (connate) salts. The redistribution of salts by the process of aeolian accession typically takes place when the salts are coupled with windblown dust known as parna. For south-eastern NSW, this dust originates from areas which are more arid, such as the western regions of the NSW and Victorian states. Aerosols from the ocean can be responsible for the deposition of salts up to a few hundred kilometres from their source. This process is responsible for a significant contribution of salt in the Sydney area. Field observations have shown that salt outbreaks are more dominant on some Sydney Basin units, specifically the Wianamatta Group sediments, some Cainozoic units, and along many active drainage systems. The Wianamatta Group sediments comprise three sub-groups; the Bringelly Shale, Minchinbury Sandstone and Ashfield Shale. The Cainozoic sediments comprise at least three units; the Saint Mary's Formation, Rickaby's Creek Gravels and Londonderry Clay. In Western Sydney these successions form an east-west oriented, tear-drop-shaped sub-basin, the Cumberland Basin, that narrows and thins to the east. In the field, it has proven difficult to consistently discriminate between the Wianamatta Group sequence and the Cainozoic sediments without precise geomorphological characterisation of the landscape coupled with stratigraphic profiling. Further, terraces in the Recent fluvial deposits contribute to the development of a complex "stepped" landscape structure. Detailed biophysical typing of landscapes in this area using Hydro-Geologic Landscape characterisation, a scaled and modified Groundwater Flow System approach, allows constraint of salt storage and distribution, and development of conceptual models for saline fluid flow, and hence informs urban planning and NRM decision-making and provides evidence for implementation of preferred land use practices. Strategic planning for dryland salinity, with respect to urban development, must address two principal concerns: the manifestation of land salinisation, and salinisation of waterways in this landscape; and, the impact of a high runoff, high recharge, low perenniality, low groundwater-consumption land use model (e.g. high density suburban housing). Land salinisation impacts on engineering structures, roads, and built infrastructure, and stresses vegetation. Water quality is an issue, especially if development occurs in a drinking water catchment. In order to minimise these impacts on future urban developments, a well-structured decision support system that underpins planning is required. Biophysical characterisation of the landscapes, using the Hydro-Geologic Landscapes (HGL) technique, is complimented by careful studies of the stratigraphy of the Wianamatta Group sediments, the overlying Cainozoic sediments and the Quaternary-Recent deposits in this area. In addition a preliminary groundwater study has been undertaken. Understanding of the detailed regolith geology, hydrology, geomorphology and geological structures allows for appropriate management in a delicate landscape and underpins development planning in outer urban Sydney.

  13. Bedrock geology of snyderville basin: Structural geology techniques applied to understanding the hydrogeology of a rapidly developing region, Summit County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keighley, K.E.; Yonkee, W.A.; Ashland, F.X.; Evans, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The availability of ground water is a problem for many communities throughout the west. As these communities continue to experience growth, the initial allocation of ground water supplies proves inadequate and may force restrictions on existing, and future, development plans. Much of this new growth relies on ground water supplies extracted from fractured bedrock aquifers. An example of a community faced with this problem is western Summit County, near Park City, Utah, This area has experienced significant water shortages coupled with a 50% growth rate in the past 10-15 years. Recent housing development rests directly on complexly deformed Triassic to Jurassic sedimentary rocks in the hanging wall of the Mount Raymond-Absaroka thrust system. The primary fractured bedrock aquifers are the Nugget Sandstone, and limestones in the Thaynes and Twin Creek Formations. Ground water production and management strategies can be improved if the geometry of the structures and the flow properties of the fractured and folded bedrock can be established. We characterize the structures that may influence ground water flow at two sites: the Pinebrook and Summit Park subdivisions, which demonstrate abrupt changes (less than 1 mi/1.6 km) within the hydrogeologic systems. Geologic mapping at scales of 1:4500 (Pinebrook) and 1:9600 (Summit Park), scanline fracture mapping at the outcrop scale, geologic cross sections, water well data, and structural analysis, provides a clearer picture of the hydrogeologic setting of the aquifers in this region, and has been used to successfully site wells. In the Pinebrook area, the dominate map-scale structures of the area is the Twomile Canyon anticline, a faulted box-like to conical anticline. Widely variable bedding orientations suggest that the fold is segmented and is non-cylindrical and conical on the western limb with a fold axis that plunges to the northwest and also to the southeast, and forms a box-type fold between the middle and eastern limbs with a fold axis that plunges to the northeast. The fold is cut by several faults including the Toll Canyon fault, which we interpret as a west-directed folded hanging-wall splay off the east-directed Mt. Raymond thrust. These complex geometries may be due to at least two phases of deformation. Results from outcrop analyses show that the fractured bedrock aquifers are lithologically heterogeneous, anisotropic, and compartmentalized. Two exposures of the Toll Canyon fault show that even though the fault cores may be thin, extensive damage zones develop in the Nugget Sandstone and Thaynes Limestone, and shale smears form in the Triassic shales. The damaged zones may be regions of enhanced fracture permeability, whereas the shale smears act as flow barriers. The orientation, density, and hydrogeologic characteristics for predominate fracture sets vary within meters. In the Summit Park area, chronic water shortages required new wells to be sited in the northeast-plunging Summit Park anticline. The anticline experienced two phases of folding and at least one episode of faulting. Structural analysis of the fold defined the geometry of the structure, and a down plunge projection along the fold hinge was used to estimate the location of the Nugget Sandstone at a depth of 700 ft (213 m). The crestal region of the anticline was drilled in order to intercept regions of higher fracture density in the fold. The test well penetrated the Nugget Sandstone at 698 ft depth, and two production wells with long-term yields of 120 and 180 gpm completed. One well in the Sliderock Member (Twin Creek Formation) experiences seasonal fluctuations whereas production in the Nugget sandstone has only subdued seasonal variations, suggesting the Nugget may have great storage. Complex structures work against the typical basin yield approach for water budgets, therefore, water supply estimates may benefit from detailed studies within local areas. The results of this study demonstrate how tradition

  14. Evaluation Of Calendar Year 1997 Groundwater and surface Water Quality Data For the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1997. The monitoring data were obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, and are

  15. Study of the impact of land use and hydrogeological settings on the shallow groundwater quality in a peri-urban area of Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kulabako, N R; Nalubega, M; Thunvik, R

    2007-08-01

    A study to assess the impacts of land use and hydrogeological characteristics on the shallow groundwater in one of Kampala's peri-urban areas (Bwaise III Parish) was undertaken for a period of 19 months. Water quality monitoring was carried out for 16 installed wells and one operational protected spring to ascertain the seasonal variation. The aspects of hydrogeological setting investigated in the study were the subsurface unconsolidated material characteristics (stratigraphy, lithology, hydraul