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Sample records for hydrolysis oftriglyceride-rich lipoproteins

  1. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Inhibits Subsequent Hydrolysis Of Lipoprotein Cholesteryl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, W. Gray; Cox, Brian E.; Griffin, Evelyn E.; Ullery, Jody C.

    2010-01-01

    Human macrophages incubated for prolonged periods with mildly oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or cholesteryl ester-rich lipid dispersions (DISP) accumulate free and esterified cholesterol within large, swollen lysosomes similar to those in foam cells of atherosclerosis. The cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation is, in part, the result of inhibition of lysosomal hydrolysis due to increased lysosomal pH mediated by excessive lysosomal free cholesterol (FC). To determine if the inhibition of hydrolysis was long lived and further define the extent of the lysosomal defect, we incubated THP-1 macrophages with oxLDL or DISP to produce lysosome sterol engorgement and then chased with acetylated LDL (acLDL). Unlike oxLDL or DISP, CE from acLDL normally is hydrolyzed rapidly. Three days of incubation with oxLDL or DISP produced an excess of CE in lipid-engorged lysosomes, indicative of inhibition. After prolonged oxLDL or DISP pretreatment, subsequent hydrolysis of acLDL CE was inhibited. Coincident with the inhibition, the lipid-engorged lysosomes failed to maintain an acidic pH during both the initial pretreatment and subsequent acLDL incubation. This indicates that the alterations in lysosomes were general, long-lived and affected subsequent lipoprotein metabolism. This same phenomenon, occurring within atherosclerotic foam cells, could significantly affect lesion progression. PMID:18312718

  2. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  3. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL. PMID:25130461

  4. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.

  5. Hydrolysis products generated by lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase differentially impact THP-1 macrophage cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Essaji, Yasmin; Yang, Yanbo; Albert, Carolyn J; Ford, David A; Brown, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages express lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and endothelial lipase (EL) within atherosclerotic plaques; however, little is known about how lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by these lipases might affect macrophage cell signalling pathways. We hypothesized that hydrolysis products affect macrophage cell signalling pathways associated with atherosclerosis. To test our hypothesis, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with products from total lipoprotein hydrolysis by recombinant LPL or EL. Using antibody arrays, we found that the phosphorylation of six receptor tyrosine kinases and three signalling nodes--most associated with atherosclerotic processes--was increased by LPL derived hydrolysis products. EL derived hydrolysis products only increased the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase A, which is also implicated in playing a role in atherosclerosis. Using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, we identified the species of triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines that were hydrolyzed by LPL and EL, and we identified the fatty acids liberated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To determine if the total liberated fatty acids influenced signalling pathways, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with a mixture of the fatty acids that matched the concentrations of liberated fatty acids from total lipoproteins by LPL, and we subjected cell lysates to antibody array analyses. The analyses showed that only the phosphorylation of Akt was significantly increased in response to fatty acid treatment. Overall, our study shows that macrophages display potentially pro-atherogenic signalling responses following acute treatments with LPL and EL lipoprotein hydrolysis products. PMID:23794138

  6. Changes with starvation in the rat of the lipoprotein lipase activity and hydrolysis of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in adipose tissue preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Lasunción, M A; Herrera, E

    1983-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was higher in fat-pad pieces than in isolated adipocytes from the same fed rats, whereas hydrolysis of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins was similar in the two preparations when incubated either in basal conditions or in the presence of heparin. In both preparations there was a similar release of lipoprotein lipase activity into the medium during basal incubation, enhanced by the presence of heparin. In fat-pad pieces, but not in isolated adipocytes, incubation with heparin produced a decrease in the lipoprotein lipase activity measured in the tissue preparation. In fat-pad pieces from 24 h-starved rats, lipoprotein lipase activity was the same as in isolated adipocytes from the same animals and incubation with heparin did not affect the appearance of lipoprotein lipase in the medium or the utilization of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. These results support the following conclusions. (1) The effectiveness of lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissue preparations in vitro depends more on its availability to the substrate than on its total activity. (2) Heparin acts on adipose tissue preparations from fed animals both by enhancing the release of pre-existing extracellular enzyme (which is absent in isolated adipocytes) and by enhancing the transfer outside the cells of the intracellular (and mainly undetectable) enzyme that is activated in the secretion process. (3) In adipose tissue from starved animals there is not only a decrease in the active extracellular form of lipoprotein lipase activity but also a reduction in the intracellular (and mainly undetectable) pool of the enzyme. PMID:6870799

  7. [Lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Manso, C

    1991-02-01

    The problem of plasma lipid transport between several organs is reviewed. The constitution of plasma lipoproteins is described as well as the importance of enzymes related to them. The problem of lipid transfer proteins is discussed. The origin of atherosclerosis is analyzed in relation to abnormalities of cholesterol metabolism, of its transport and of free radicals generation. PMID:2059473

  8. Bile salt-stimulated carboxyl ester lipase influences lipoprotein assembly and secretion in intestine: a process mediated via ceramide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kirby, R Jason; Zheng, Shuqin; Tso, Patrick; Howles, Philip N; Hui, David Y

    2002-02-01

    Bile salt-stimulated carboxyl ester lipase (CEL), also called cholesterol esterase, is one of the major proteins secreted by the pancreas. The physiological role of CEL was originally thought to be its mediation of dietary cholesterol absorption. However, recent studies showed no difference between wild type and CEL knockout mice in the total amount of cholesterol absorbed in a single meal. The current study tests the hypothesis that CEL in the intestinal lumen may influence the type of lipoproteins produced. A lipid emulsion containing 4 mm phospholipid, 13.33 mm [(3)H]triolein, and 2.6 mm [(14)C]cholesterol in 19 mm taurocholate was infused into the duodenum of lymph fistula CEL(+/+) and CEL(-/-) mice at a rate of 0.3 ml/h. Results showed no difference between CEL(+/+) and CEL(-/-) mice in the rate of cholesterol and triglyceride transport from the intestinal lumen to the lymph. However, CEL(-/-) mice produced predominantly smaller lipoproteins, whereas the CEL(+/+) mice produced primarily large chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein. The proximal intestine of CEL(-/-) mice was also found to possess significantly less ceramide hydrolytic activity than that present in CEL(+/+) mice. By using Caco2 cells grown on Transwell membranes as a model, sphingomyelinase treatment inhibited the secretion of larger chylomicron-like lipoproteins without affecting total cholesterol secretion. In contrast, the addition of CEL to the apical medium increased the amount of large lipoproteins produced and alleviated the inhibition induced by sphingomyelinase. Taken together, this study identified a novel and physiologically significant role for CEL, namely the promotion of large chylomicron production in the intestine. The mechanism appears to be mediated through CEL hydrolysis of ceramide generated during the lipid absorption process. PMID:11733511

  9. Biosynthesis of oxidized lipid mediators via lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of extracellular cardiolipin induces endothelial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Buland, Justin R; Wasserloos, Karla J; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Amoscato, Andrew A; Mallampalli, Rama K; Chen, Bill B; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon; Kagan, Valerian E; Pitt, Bruce R

    2016-08-01

    We (66) have previously described an NSAID-insensitive intramitochondrial biosynthetic pathway involving oxidation of the polyunsaturated mitochondrial phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL), followed by hydrolysis [by calcium-independent mitochondrial calcium-independent phospholipase A2-γ (iPLA2γ)] of oxidized CL (CLox), leading to the formation of lysoCL and oxygenated octadecadienoic metabolites. We now describe a model system utilizing oxidative lipidomics/mass spectrometry and bioassays on cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAECs) to assess the impact of CLox that we show, in vivo, can be released to the extracellular space and may be hydrolyzed by lipoprotein-associated PLA2 (Lp-PLA2). Chemically oxidized liposomes containing bovine heart CL produced multiple oxygenated species. Addition of Lp-PLA2 hydrolyzed CLox and produced (oxygenated) monolysoCL and dilysoCL and oxidized octadecadienoic metabolites including 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic (HODE) acids. CLox caused BPAEC necrosis that was exacerbated by Lp-PLA2 Lower doses of nonlethal CLox increased permeability of BPAEC monolayers. This effect was exacerbated by Lp-PLA2 and partially mimicked by authentic monolysoCL or 9- or 13-HODE. Control mice plasma contained virtually no detectable CLox; in contrast, 4 h after Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection, 34 ± 8 mol% (n = 6; P < 0.02) of circulating CL was oxidized. In addition, molar percentage of monolysoCL increased twofold after P. aeruginosa in a subgroup analyzed for these changes. Collectively, these studies suggest an important role for 1) oxidation of CL in proinflammatory environments and 2) possible hydrolysis of CLox in extracellular spaces producing lysoCL and oxidized octadecadienoic acid metabolites that may lead to impairment of pulmonary endothelial barrier function and necrosis. PMID:27233995

  10. Medium-chain versus long-chain triacylglycerol emulsion hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase: Implications for the mechanisms of lipase action

    SciTech Connect

    Deckelbaum, R.J. ); Hamilton, J.A.; Butbul, E.; Gutman, A. ); Moser, A. ); Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.; Olivecrona, T. ); Carpentier, Y.A. )

    1990-02-06

    To explore how enzyme affinities and enzyme activities regulate hydrolysis of water-insoluble substrates, the authors compared hydrolysis of phospholipid-stabilized emulsions of medium-chain (MCT) versus long-chain triacylglycerols (LCT). Because substrate solubility at the emulsion surface might modulate rates of hydrolysis, the ability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine to solubilize MCT was examined by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift measurements showed that 11 mol % of ({sup 13}C)carbonyl enriched trioctanoin was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles as a surface component. Line widths of trioctanoin surface peaks were half that of LCT, and relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were also shorter for trioctanoin, showing greater mobility for MCT in phospholipid. In assessing the effects of these differences in solubility on lipolysis, they found that both purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase and human hepatic lipase hydrolyzed MCT at rates at least 2-fold higher than for LCT. Differences in affinity were also demonstrated in mixed incubations where increasing amounts of LCT emulsion resulted in decreased hydrolysis of MCT emulsions. These results suggest that despite lower enzyme affinity for MCT emulsions, shorter chain triacylglycerols are more readily hydrolyzed by lipoprotein and hepatic lipases than long-chain triacylglycerols because of greater MCT solubility and mobility at the emulsion-water interface.

  11. Selective uptake of cholesteryl esters of low-density lipoproteins is mediated by the lipoprotein-binding site in HepG2 cells and is followed by the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters.

    PubMed Central

    Brissette, L; Charest, M C; Falstrault, L

    1996-01-01

    The study described in this paper shows that 125I-labelled low-density lipoproteins (LDL) interact with high- and low-affinity binding sites on human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. The former site is the LDL receptor and the latter is the lipoprotein-binding site (LBS). The association of 125I-labelled LDL and [3H]cholesteryl ethers-LDL with HepG2 cells revealed a 4-fold selective uptake of cholesteryl esters (CE) in a 4 h incubation period, which correlated with the depletion of CE mass in LDL. This selective uptake was not observed when the cells were incubated in the presence of a 100-fold excess of high-density lipoprotein 3, conditions where only the LDL receptor is being monitored. Also, no reduction in uptake was observed in the presence of IgG-C7, an anti-(LDL receptor) monoclonal antibody. Both findings indicate that the selective uptake occurs through the LBS and that the LBS contributes more to the entry of CE from LDL into the cell than does the LDL receptor. The fates of CE entering the cell via the LDL receptor and the LBS were also followed. To achieve this, LDL were labelled with [3H]cholesteryl oleate and the hydrolysis of [3H]cholesteryl oleate was monitored. The results indicated that 45% of the CE were hydrolysed after a 4 h incubation period, irrespective of the site of entry. Chloroquine (100 microM) was shown to inhibit hydrolysis, indicating that lysosomal enzymes were responsible for the hydrolysis of LDL-CE, whichever pathway was used. Thus our results reveal, for the first time, that the mass of CE entering the cell via the LBS is substantial and that hydrolysis of CE is by lysosomal enzyme activity. Overall, this suggests that the LBS has significant physiological importance. PMID:8836127

  12. Hydrolysis of bovine and caprine milk fat globules by lipoprotein lipase. Effects of heparin and skim milk on lipase distribution and on lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1987-12-01

    Heparin can dissociate lipoprotein lipase from casein micelles, and addition of heparin enhances lipolysis in bovine but not in caprine milk. Heparin shortened the lag-time for binding of lipoprotein lipase to milk fat globules and for lipolysis. Heparin counteracted the inhibitory effects of skim milk on binding of lipase and on lipolysis. Heparin stimulated lipolysis in all bovine milk samples when added before cooling and in spontaneously lipolytic milk samples also when added after cooling. Heparin enhanced lipolysis of isolated milk fat globules. Hence, its effect is not solely due to dissociation of lipoprotein lipase from the casein micelles. Cooling of goat milk caused more marked changes in the distribution of lipase than cooling of bovine milk; the fraction of added /sup 125/I-labeled lipase that bound to cream increased from about 8 to 60%. In addition, caprine skim milk caused less inhibition of lipolysis than bovine skim milk. These observations provide an explanation for the high degree of cold storage lipolysis in goat milk. Heparin had only small effects on the distribution of lipoprotein lipase in caprine milk, which explains why heparin has so little effect on lipolysis in caprine milk. The distribution of /sup 35/S-labeled heparin in bovine milk was studied. In warm milk less than 10% bound to the cream fraction, but when milk was cooled, binding of heparin to cream increased to 45%. These results suggest that there exists in the skim fraction a relatively small amount of a heparin-binding protein, which on cooling of milk adsorbs to the milk fat, or suggests that cooling induces a conformational change in a membrane protein such that its affinity for heparin increases.

  13. [Lipoprotein lipase and diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into free fatty acids (FFA) to provide energy for cardiac tissue. During diabetes, cardiac energy supply is insufficient due to defected utilization of glucose. As a compensation of cardiac energy supply, FFAs are released through the hydrolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CM) due to activation of LPL activity. In diabetic patients, activated LPL activity and elevated FFAs result in the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and lipids in myocardium and potentially induce the diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms of myocardial LPL and the pathogenesis of DCM induced by LPL and provides novel therapeutic targets and pathways for DCM. PMID:24873138

  14. The pathophysiology of intestinal lipoprotein production

    PubMed Central

    Giammanco, Antonina; Cefalù, Angelo B.; Noto, Davide; Averna, Maurizio R.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal lipoprotein production is a multistep process, essential for the absorption of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Chylomicron assembly begins in the endoplasmic reticulum with the formation of primordial, phospholipids-rich particles that are then transported to the Golgi for secretion. Several classes of transporters play a role in the selective uptake and/or export of lipids through the villus enterocytes. Once secreted in the lymph stream, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are metabolized by Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols of very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and chylomicrons, thereby delivering free fatty acids to various tissues. Genetic mutations in the genes codifying for these proteins are responsible of different inherited disorders affecting chylomicron metabolism. This review focuses on the molecular pathways that modulate the uptake and the transport of lipoproteins of intestinal origin and it will highlight recent findings on TRLs assembly. PMID:25852563

  15. Recent advances in physiological lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Indra

    2014-12-01

    Research into lipoprotein metabolism has developed because understanding lipoprotein metabolism has important clinical indications. Lipoproteins are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Recent advances include the identification of factors in the synthesis and secretion of triglyceride rich lipoproteins, chylomicrons (CM) and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). These included the identification of microsomal transfer protein, the cotranslational targeting of apoproteinB (apoB) for degradation regulated by the availability of lipids, and the characterization of transport vesicles transporting primordial apoB containing particles to the Golgi. The lipase maturation factor 1, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein binding protein 1 and an angiopoietin-like protein play a role in lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated hydrolysis of secreted CMs and VLDL so that the right amount of fatty acid is delivered to the right tissue at the right time. Expression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has a pivotal role in the degradation of LDL receptor. Plasma remnant lipoproteins bind to specific receptors in the liver, the LDL receptor, VLDL receptor and LDL receptor-like proteins prior to removal from the plasma. Reverse cholesterol transport occurs when lipid free apoAI recruits cholesterol and phospholipid to assemble high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The discovery of ABC transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) provided further information on the biogenesis of HDL. In humans HDL-cholesterol can be returned to the liver either by direct uptake by SR-BI or through cholesteryl ester transfer protein exchange of cholesteryl ester for triglycerides in apoB lipoproteins, followed by hepatic uptake of apoB containing particles. Cholesterol content in cells is regulated by several

  16. Lipoprotein(a) metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an atherogenic lipoprotein. The metabolism of this lipoprotein is still not well understood. It has long been known that the plasma concentration of Lp(a) is highly heritable, with its genetic determinants located in the apo(a) locus and regulating the rate of hepatic apo(a...

  17. Suppression of diet-induced atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice overexpressing lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, M; Ishibashi, S; Inaba, T; Yagyu, H; Harada, K; Osuga, J I; Ohashi, K; Yazaki, Y; Yamada, N

    1996-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Conflicting results have been reported concerning its role in atherogenesis. To determine the effects of the overexpressed LPL on diet-induced atherosclerosis, we have generated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice that overexpressed human LPL transgene (LPL/LDLRKO) and compared their plasma lipoproteins and atherosclerosis with those in nonexpressing LDLR-knockout mice (LDLRKO). On a normal chow diet, LPL/LDLRKO mice showed marked suppression of mean plasma triglyceride levels (32 versus 236 mg/dl) and modest decrease in mean cholesterol levels (300 versus 386 mg/dl) as compared with LDLRKO mice. Larger lipoprotein particles of intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL)/LDL were selectively reduced in LPL/LDLRKO mice. On an atherogenic diet, both mice exhibited severe hypercholesterolemia. But, mean plasma cholesterol levels in LPL/ LDLRKO mice were still suppressed as compared with that in LDLRKO mice (1357 versus 2187 mg/dl). Marked reduction in a larger subfraction of IDL/LDL, which conceivably corresponds to remnant lipoproteins, was observed in the LPL/LDLRKO mice. LDLRKO mice developed severe fatty streak lesions in the aortic sinus after feeding with the atherogenic diet for 8 weeks. In contrast, mean lesion area in the LPL/LDLRKO mice was 18-fold smaller than that in LDLRKO mice. We suggest that the altered lipoprotein profile, in particular the reduced level of remnant lipoproteins, is mainly responsible for the protection by LPL against atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692976

  18. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Witte, L.D.; Goldberg, I.J.

    1989-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of /sup 125/I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid.

  19. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and β-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  20. Lipoproteins and lipoprotein metabolism in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Rachel; Barbour, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the incidence of atherosclerosis is increased in subjects with periodontitis – a chronic infection of the oral cavity. This article summarizes the evidence that suggests periodontitis shifts the lipoprotein profile to be more proatherogenic. LDL-C is elevated in periodontitis and most studies indicate that triglyceride levels are also increased. By contrast, antiatherogenic HDL tends to be low in periodontitis. Periodontal therapy tends to shift lipoprotein levels to a healthier profile and also reduces subclinical indices of atherosclerosis. In summary, periodontal disease alters lipoprotein metabolism in ways that could promote atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20835400

  1. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  2. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. PMID:26193433

  3. Lipoprotein ApoC-II activation of lipoprotein lipase. Modulation by apolipoprotein A-IV.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, I J; Scheraldi, C A; Yacoub, L K; Saxena, U; Bisgaier, C L

    1990-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) contained in chylomicrons requires the presence of a cofactor, apolipoprotein (apo) C-II. The physiological mechanism by which chylomicrons gain apoC-II necessary for LPL activation in whole plasma is not known. Using a gum arabic stabilized TG emulsion, activation of LPL by lipoprotein apoC-II was studied. Hydrolysis of TG by LPL was greater in the presence of serum than with addition of either high density lipoproteins (HDL) or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). LPL activation by either VLDL or HDL increased with addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction of plasma. A similar increase in LPL activity by addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction together with HDL or VLDL was observed when another TG emulsion (Intralipid) or TG-rich lipoproteins from an apoC-II deficient subject were used as a substrate. Human apoA-IV, apoA-I, apoE, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein were assessed for their ability to increase LPL activity in the presence of VLDL. At and below physiological concentrations, only apoA-IV increased LPL activity. One hundred percent of LPL activity measured in the presence of serum was achieved using VLDL plus apoA-IV. In the absence of an apoC-II source, apoA-IV had no effect on LPL activity. Removal of greater than 80% of the apoA-IV from the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma by incubation with Intralipid markedly reduced its ability to activate LPL in the presence of VLDL or HDL. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that incubation of the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma with HDL and the TG emulsion caused increased transfer of apoC-II to the emulsion and association of apoA-IV with HDL. Our studies demonstrate that apoA-IV increases LPL activation in the presence of lipoproteins. We hypothesize that apoA-IV is required for efficient release of apoC-II from either HDL or VLDL, which then allows for LPL-mediated hydrolysis of TG in nascent

  4. Lipoproteins of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, A; Titball, R W; Michell, S L

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  5. Arachnid lipoproteins: comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mónica; Garcia, Fernando; Pollero, Ricardo J

    2007-01-01

    Findings on hemolymph lipoproteins in the class Arachnida are reviewed in relation to their lipid and protein compositions, hydrated densities, the capacity of apoproteins to bind lipids, and the influence of xenobiotics on their structures and functionality. The occurrence of hemolymphatic lipoproteins in arachnids has been reported in species belonging to the orders Araneida, Scorpionida, Solpugida and Acarina. However, lipoproteins were properly characterized in only three species, Eurypelma californicum, Polybetes pythagoricus and Latrodectus mirabilis. Like insect and crustaceans the arachnids examined contain high density lipoproteins (HDLs) as predominant circulating lipoproteins. Although in most arachnids these particles resemble those of insect HDLs called "lipophorins", in two arachnid species they differ from lipophorins in their apoproteins, total mass and lipid composition. The hemolymph of P. pythagoricus and L. mirabilis contains another HDL of higher density, while P. pythagoricus and E. californicum hemolymph contain a third lipoprotein of very high density (VHDL). Composition of arachnid lipoproteins regarding apoprotein classes as well as lipid classes differ among species. Hemocyanin, in addition to the classical role of this protein as respiratory pigment, is presented here performing the function of apolipoprotein in some arachnid species. Reports on experiments demonstrating the capacity of hemocyanin to bind neutral and polar lipid classes, including ecdysteroids, are commented. Recent works about the changes evoked by a phosphorous pesticide on the structures and functionality of spider lipoproteins are also reviewed. PMID:16887396

  6. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  7. The role of ANGPTL3 in controlling lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Anna; Jauhiainen, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a secretory protein regulating plasma lipid levels via affecting lipoprotein lipase- and endothelial lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides and phospholipids. ANGPTL3-deficiency due to loss-of-function mutations in the ANGPTL3 gene causes familial combined hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL2, OMIM # 605019), a phenotype characterized by low concentration of all major lipoprotein classes in circulation. ANGPTL3 is therefore a potential therapeutic target to treat combined hyperlipidemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. This review focuses on the mechanisms behind ANGPTL3-deficiency induced FHBL2. PMID:26754661

  8. Lipoprotein Metabolism during Acute Inhibition of Hepatic Triglyceride Lipase in the Cynomolgus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Paterniti, James R.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Lindgren, Frank T.; Brown, W. Virgil

    1982-01-01

    lipoproteins. Concomitantly, the rise in low density lipoprotein apoprotein-B specific activity was markedly delayed. None of these changes were observed during infusion of preimmune immunoglobulin G. Hepatic triglyceride lipase participates with lipoprotein lipase in the hydrolysis of the lipid in very low density lipoproteins, intermediate density lipoproteins, and the larger low density lipoproteins (Sf 9-12). Thus, hepatic triglyceride lipase appears to function in a parallel role with lipoprotein lipase in the conversion of very low density and intermediate density lipoproteins to low density lipoproteins (Sf 0-9). PMID:7174789

  9. [Low density lipoprotein apheresis].

    PubMed

    Zaliūnas, Remigijus; Slapikas, Rimvydas; Gustiene, Olivija; Siurkus, Jonas; Vaitkus, Eduardas

    2003-01-01

    Increased blood cholesterol concentration is one of the main factors in ischemic heart disease, development of which is determined by atherosclerotic changes in coronary vessels. Diet and treatment with 3-hydroxi-3-metilglutaril coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors helps to reduce low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-Ch) blood concentration up to recommended level of 3.0 mmol/l in most patients but in some patients particularly with familial dyslipidemias cholesterol concentration remains increased even after treatment with maximal doses of lipid-regulating agents or their combinations. The most frequently used mechanical methods of cholesterol removal from blood include the procedures of extracorporeal apheresis. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis not only significantly reduces the blood concentrations of total cholesterol (TCh), and LDL-Ch, lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a) and fibrinogen but also stops the progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels. PMID:14704503

  10. Inhibition of endothelial lipase activity by sphingomyelin in the lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Belikova, Natalia A; Billheimer, Jeff; Rader, Daniel J; Hill, John S; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major determinant of plasma HDL concentration, its activity being inversely proportional to HDL levels. Although it is known that it preferentially acts on HDL compared to LDL and VLDL, the basis for this specificity is not known. Here we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in lipoproteins is a physiological inhibitor of EL, and that the preference of the enzyme for HDL may be due to low sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) ratio in HDL, compared to other lipoproteins. Using recombinant human EL, we showed that sphingomyelin inhibits the hydrolysis of PtdCho in the liposomes in a concentration-dependent manner. While the enzyme showed lower hydrolysis of LDL PtdCho, compared to HDL PtdCho, this difference disappeared after the degradation of lipoprotein sphingomyelin by bacterial sphingomyelinase. Analysis of molecular species of PtdCho hydrolyzed by EL in the lipoproteins showed that the enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PtdCho containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as 22:6, 20:5, 20:4 at the sn-2 position, generating the corresponding PUFA-lyso PtdCho. This specificity for PUFA-PtdCho species was not observed after depletion of sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinase. These results show that sphingomyelin not only plays a role in regulating EL activity, but also influences its specificity towards PtdCho species. PMID:25167836

  11. Hepatic Lipase: a Comprehensive View of its Role on Plasma Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junji; Miyashita, Kazuya; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Mabuchi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is a key enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) and phospholipids (PLs) in several lipoproteins. It is generally recognized that HL is involved in the remodeling of remnant, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and the production of small, dense low-density lipoproteins (sd-LDLs).On the other hand, it is unclear whether HL accelerates or retards atherosclerosis. From the clinical point of view, HL deficiency may provide useful information on answering this question, but the rarity of this disease makes it impossible to conduct epidemiological study.In this review, we describe a comprehensive and updated view of the clinical significance of HL on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:26194979

  12. The hydrolysis of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoagland, P. D.; Fox, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal polymerization of aspartic acid produces a polysuccinimide (I), a chain of aspartoyl residues. An investigation was made of the alkaline hydrolysis of the imide rings of (I) which converts the polyimide to a polypeptide. The alkaline hydrolysis of polyimides can be expected to be kinetically complex due to increasing negative charge generated by carboxylate groups. For this reason, a diimide, phthaloyl-DL-aspartoyl-beta-alanine (IIA) was synthesized for a progressive study of the hydrolysis of polyimides. In addition, this diimide (IIA) can be related to thalidomide and might be expected to exhibit similar reactivity during hydrolysis of the phthalimide ring.

  13. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies. PMID:26837747

  14. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  15. Lipoprotein lipase variants interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to modulate obesity traits in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a candidate gene for obesity based on its role in triglyceride hydrolysis and the partitioning of fatty acids towards storage or oxidation. Whether dietary fatty acids modify LPL associated obesity risk is unknown. We examined five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (...

  16. Specificity and localisation of lipoprotein lipase in the flight muscles of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, C H; Goldsworthy, G J

    1985-12-01

    Using natural lipoproteins as substrates, lipase activity has been measured in leg muscle, fat body, midgut and flight muscles of Locusta migratoria. The enzymic activity in the flight muscles is higher than in those other tissues tested, confirming the potential of the flight muscles to utilise lipids at high rates. In addition, a membrane-bound lipoprotein lipase can be extracted from flight muscle. The flight muscle enzyme activity shows a marked substrate specificity; at lipoprotein concentrations equivalent to those found normally in flown or resting locusts respectively, the enzyme hydrolyses diacylglycerols associated with lipoprotein A+ (present in the haemolymph of flown or adipokinetic hormone-injected locusts) at about 4 times the rate of those associated with lipoprotein Ayellow (which is the major lipoprotein in resting locusts). In addition, the hydrolysis of lipids carried by lipoprotein Ayellow is dramatically reduced in the presence of lipoprotein A+. These observations indicate that the enzyme plays a specific role in the uptake of lipids at the flight muscles to ensure a smooth transition from carbohydrate to lipid based metabolism during flight. PMID:4091966

  17. Enzymatic hydrolysis of haloperidol decanoate and its inhibition by proteins.

    PubMed

    Nambu, K; Miyazaki, H; Nakanishi, Y; Oh-e, Y; Matsunaga, Y; Hashimoto, M

    1987-05-15

    When [14C]haloperidol decanoate, a long-acting neuroleptic and an ester of haloperidol and decanoic acid, was incubated in human whole blood and plasma and in rat plasma and homogenates of rat brain, lung, liver, kidney, pancreas and muscle, no hydrolysis of the ester was seen. Although the decanoate was hydrolyzed by partially purified carboxylesterase, addition of rat plasma or liver homogenate to the enzymic reaction mixture resulted in marked inhibition of hydrolysis, whereas addition of the defatted residues of plasma or liver produced only partial inhibition. The enzymic hydrolysis was inhibited also by beta-lipoprotein and albumin, depending on their concentrations. The assumption that interaction between haloperidol decanoate and protein resulted in inhibition of the hydrolytic reaction mediated by the enzyme was validated by kinetic models and experimental data. The kinetics were apparently competitive. Based on the kinetic analysis, the interaction between the decanoate and albumin or beta-lipoprotein was investigated by measuring their equilibrium constants and extent of protein binding. Haloperidol decanoate appeared to interact with several proteins; this was exemplified by other measures of protein binding, an increasing effect of proteins on the solubility, and the partition ratio of the ester. The interaction between haloperidol decanoate and proteins caused marked stabilization of this ester against enzymatic hydrolysis and, thereby, influenced its metabolism. PMID:3593395

  18. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  19. Transfer of fatty acids from the 1-position of phosphatidyl-ethanolamine to the major outer membrane lipoprotein of E coli

    SciTech Connect

    Jackowski, S.; Rock, C.O.

    1986-05-01

    The fatty acids esterified to Braun's lipoprotein are derived from the phospholipid pool in E. coli. Mutants lacking acyl-CoA synthetase activity (fadD) incorporated extracellular fatty acids specifically into the 1-position of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn). This pathway was blocked by chloramphenicol and was depressed by preventing the acylation of the amino terminus of the lipoprotein with globomycin. Transfer of fatty acids to lipoprotein was investigated in fadD mutants harboring hybrid plasmids containing either the lipoprotein gene or a lipoprotein-..beta..-lactamase gene fusion under control of the lactose promoter. Labeling of the 1-position of the PtdEtn pool prior to induction of lipoprotein biosynthesis resulted in the transfer of fatty acids from PtdEtn to the lipoproteins. Induction of lipoprotein synthesis in the presence of exogenous (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate increased the amount of radioactivity entering the PtdEtn pool and efficiently labeled lipoprotein acyl moieties. Lipoprotein fatty acids derived from the 1-position of PtdEtn were resistant to hydroxylamine hydrolysis, and globomycin reduced the incorporation of exogenous (1-/sup 14/C)palmitic acid into lipoproteins by 80% suggesting that the fatty acid is attached to the amino terminus. These data illustrate the metabolic relationship between turnover of fatty acids in the 1-position of PtdEtn and the maturation of the major outer membrane lipoprotein.

  20. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  1. Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    Activities in this project are aimed at overcoming barriers associated with high capital and operating costs and sub-optimal sugar yields resulting from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

  2. Central Nervous System Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is primarily responsible for lipid transport and cholesterol homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS). Normally produced mostly by astrocytes, apoE is also produced under neuropathologic conditions by neurons. ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is critical in redistributing cholesterol and phospholipids for membrane repair and remodeling. The 3 main structural isoforms differ in their effectiveness. Unlike apoE2 and apoE3, apoE4 has markedly altered CNS metabolism, is associated with Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, and is expressed at lower levels in brain and cerebrospinal fluid. ApoE4-expressing cultured astrocytes and neurons have reduced cholesterol and phospholipid secretion, decreased lipid-binding capacity, and increased intracellular degradation. Two structural features are responsible for apoE4 dysfunction: domain interaction, in which arginine-61 interacts ionically with glutamic acid-255, and a less stable conformation than apoE3 and apoE2. Blocking domain interaction by gene targeting (replacing arginine-61 with threonine) or by small-molecule structure correctors increases CNS apoE4 levels and lipid-binding capacity and decreases intracellular degradation. Small molecules (drugs) that disrupt domain interaction, so-called structure correctors, could prevent the apoE4-associated neuropathology by blocking the formation of neurotoxic fragments. Understanding how to modulate CNS cholesterol transport and metabolism is providing important insights into CNS health and disease. PMID:27174096

  3. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice. PMID:24493834

  4. Lipoprotein (a), lipids, and lipoproteins in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S; Wållberg-Jonsson, S; Dahlén, G

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a), (Lp(a)), an independent atherogenic factor, was significantly increased in 93 patients with classical, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis of median disease activity. In the patients with Lp(a) concentrations above the upper reference value of 480 mg/l there was a significant correlation between Lp(a) and the concentration of orosomucoid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the platelet count. The plasma concentrations of cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol in both male and female patients were significantly lower than in controls. Apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein AI in the patients correlated significantly with total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol respectively. PMID:1829348

  5. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  6. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gylling, Helena; Simonen, Piia

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%–10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a) or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein particles will be

  7. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  8. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  9. Intestinal Lipid Absorption and Lipoprotein Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence for the presence of two pathways of lipid absorption and their regulation. Recent findings Lipid absorption involves hydrolysis of dietary fat in the lumen of the intestine followed by the uptake of hydrolyzed products by enterocytes. Lipids are re-synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and are either secreted with chylomicrons and high density lipoproteins or stored as cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Lipids in the droplets are hydrolyzed and are secreted at a later time. Secretion of lipids by the chylomicron and HDL pathways are critically dependent on MTP and ABCA1, respectively, and are regulated independently. Gene ablation studies showed that MTP function and chylomicron assembly is essential for the absorption of triglyceride and retinyl esters. Ablation of MTP abolishes triglyceride absorption and results in massive triglyceride accumulation in enterocytes. Although majority of phospholipid, cholesterol and vitamin E are absorbed through the chylomicron pathway, a significant amount of these lipids are also absorbed via the HDL pathway. Chylomicron assembly and secretion is increased by the enhanced availability of fatty acids, whereas HDL pathway is upregulated by LXR agonists. Intestinal insulin resistance increases chylomicron and might reduce HDL production. Summary Triglycerides are exclusively transported via the chylomicron pathway and this process is critically dependent on MTP. Besides chylomicrons, absorption of phospholipids, free cholesterol, retinol, and vitamin E also involves high density lipoproteins. These two pathways are complementary and are regulated independently. They may be targeted to lower lipid absorption in order to control hyperlipidemia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, steatosis, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and other disorders. PMID:24751933

  10. Metabolism and Modification of Apolipoprotein B-Containing Lipoproteins Involved in Dyslipidemia and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shin-ya

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins, such as low density lipoproteins (LDL) and chylomicron remnants, are associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Chylomicrons containing apoB-48 are secreted from the intestine during the postprandial state, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) containing apoB-100 are constitutively formed in the liver. Chylomicron remnants and VLDL remnants are produced by the lipoprotein lipase-mediated lipolysis of triglycerides, which is activated by apolipoprotein C-II bound on the particle surfaces. The hepatic uptake of these remnants is facilitated by apolipoprotein E (apoE), but is inhibited by apolipoproteins C-I, C-II and C-III. In the plasma, VLDL remnants are further converted into LDL by the hydrolysis of triglycerides. ApoB-100 is responsible for the hepatic uptake of LDL. LDL receptor, LDL receptor-related protein and heparan sulfate proteoglycans are involved in the hepatic clearance of lipoproteins containing apoB-100 and/or apoE. The subendothelial retention and modification of apoB-containing lipoproteins are crucial events in the initiation of atherosclerosis. In the subendothelium, the uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages leads to the formation of foam cells storing excess amounts of cholesteryl esters and subsequently to apoptosis. This review describes the current knowledge about the metabolism and modification of apoB-containing lipoproteins involved in dyslipidemia and atherogenesis. In particular, I focus on the effects of apolipoproteins, lipid composition and particle size on lipoprotein metabolism and on the roles of cholesterol, sphingomyelinase and apoB denaturation in macrophage foam cell formation and apoptosis. A detailed understanding of these mechanisms will help to develop new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26725424

  11. Lipoproteins: When size really matters.

    PubMed

    German, J Bruce; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Zivkovic, Angela M

    2006-06-01

    The field of nanoscience is extending the applications of physics, chemistry and biology into previously unapproached infinitesimal length scales. Understanding the behavior and manipulating the positions and properties of single atoms and molecules hold great potential to improve areas of science as disparate as medicine and computation, and communication and orbiting satellites. Yet, in the race to develop novel, previously unavailable nanoparticles, there is an opportunity for scientists in this field to digress and to apply their growing understanding of nanoscience and the tools of nanotechnology to one of the most pressing problems in all of human biology-diseases related to lipoproteins. Although not appreciated outside the field of lipoprotein biology, variations in the compositions, structures and properties of these nanoscale-sized, blood-borne particles are responsible for most of the variations in health, morbidity and mortality in the Western world. If the lipoproteins could be understood at the nanometer length scale with precise details of their structures and functions, scientists could understand a wide range of perplexing physiological processes and also address the dysfunctions in normal lipoprotein biology that lead to such diseases as hypercholesterolemia, heart disease, stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, if the capabilities of nanoscience to assemble and manipulate nanometer-sized particles could be recruited to studies of lipoproteins, these biological particles would provide a new dimension to therapeutic agents, and these natural particles could be designed to carry out many specialized beneficial tasks. PMID:20592953

  12. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  13. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M; Blanche, Patricia J

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue. This enzyme helps break down fats called triglycerides, which are carried by molecules called lipoproteins . Mutations ... which prevents the enzyme from effectively breaking down triglycerides. As a result, triglycerides attached to lipoproteins build ...

  15. Thermal stability of human plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein: A paradoxical behavior of low-density lipoprotein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rull, Anna; Jayaraman, Shobini; Gantz, Donald L; Rivas-Urbina, Andrea; Pérez-Cuellar, Montserrat; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Gursky, Olga

    2016-09-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) aggregation is central in triggering atherogenesis. A minor fraction of electronegative plasma LDL, termed LDL(-), plays a special role in atherogenesis. To better understand this role, we analyzed the kinetics of aggregation, fusion and disintegration of human LDL and its fractions, LDL(+) and LDL(-). Thermal denaturation of LDL was monitored by spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Initially, LDL(-) aggregated and fused faster than LDL(+), but later the order reversed. Most LDL(+) disintegrated and precipitated upon prolonged heating. In contrast, LDL(-) partially retained lipoprotein morphology and formed soluble aggregates. Biochemical analysis of all fractions showed no significant degradation of major lipids, mild phospholipid oxidation, and an increase in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) upon thermal denaturation. The main baseline difference between LDL subfractions was higher content of NEFA in LDL(-). Since NEFA promote lipoprotein fusion, increased NEFA content can explain rapid initial aggregation and fusion of LDL(-) but not its resistance to extensive disintegration. Partial hydrolysis of apoB upon heating was similar in LDL subfractions, suggesting that minor proteins importantly modulate LDL disintegration. Unlike LDL(+), LDL(-) contains small amounts of apoA-I and apoJ. Addition of exogenous apoA-I to LDL(+) hampered lipoprotein aggregation, fusion and precipitation, while depletion of endogenous apoJ had an opposite effect. Therefore, the initial rapid aggregation of LDL(-) is apparently counterbalanced by the stabilizing effects of minor proteins such as apoA-I and apoJ. These results help identify key determinants for LDL aggregation, fusion and coalescence into lipid droplets in vivo. PMID:27233433

  16. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  17. [Lipoproteins, free radicals and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Manso, C

    1990-10-01

    The Author reviews vascular, lipidic and oxidative factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis. He admits the possibility that an alteration in the arterial wall, an increase in circulating lipids or an oxidative stress may influence the precocity of atherosclerosis. The transport of lipoperoxides or of oxidized cholesterol by lipoproteins renders them toxic and susceptible to aggravate atherosclerosis. PMID:2291852

  18. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  19. Regulation of Plasma Cholesterol by Lipoprotein Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael S.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1981-05-01

    The lipoprotein transport system holds the key to understanding the mechanisms by which genes, diet, and hormones interact to regulate the plasma cholesterol level in man. Crucial components of this system are lipoprotein receptors in the liver and extrahepatic tissues that mediate the uptake and degradation of cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins. The number of lipoprotein receptors, and hence the efficiency of disposal of plasma cholesterol, can be increased by cholesterol-lowering drugs. Regulation of lipoprotein receptors can be exploited pharmacologically in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in man.

  20. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  1. Lipoprotein Lipase releases esterified oxylipins from Very Low Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Gregory C.; Newman, John W.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the distribution of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in lipoprotein particles. If these oxidation products are released by lipoprotein lipase (LpL), then their delivery to peripheral tissues with bulk lipids could influence cellular function. Using 26 week old normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic Zucker rats, we measured PUFA alcohols, epoxides, diols, ketones and triols (i.e. oxylipins) in esterified and non-esterified fractions of whole plasma, VLDL, and LpL-generated VLDL-lipolysates. Whole plasma, VLDL, and lipolysate oxylipin profiles were distinct and altered by hyperlipidemia. While >90% of the whole plasma oxylipins were esterified, the fraction of each oxylipin class in the VLDL varied: 46% of alcohols, 30% of epoxides, 19% of diols, <10% of ketones, <1% triols. Whole plasma was dominated by arachidonate alcohols, while the linoleate alcohols, epoxides and ketones showed an increased prevalence in VLDL. LpL-mediated VLDL lipolysis of PUFA alcohols, diols and ketones was detected and the relative abundance of oxygenated linoleates was enhanced in the lipolysates, relative to their corresponding VLDL. In summary esterified oxylipins were seen to be LpL substrates with heterogeneous distributions among lipoprotein classes. Moreover, oxylipin distributions are changes within the context of obesity-associated dyslipidemia. These results support the notion that the VLDL-LpL axis may facilitate the delivery of plasma oxylipins to the periphery. The physiological implication of these findings are yet to be elucidated, however these molecules are plausible indicators of systemic oxidative stress, and could report this status to the peripheral tissues. PMID:19042114

  2. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  3. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism. PMID:26443779

  4. Prothrombotic lipoprotein patterns in stroke.

    PubMed

    Podrez, Eugene A; Byzova, Tatiana V

    2016-03-10

    The importance of research focused on the final events of atherothrombosis cannot be overestimated. Platelet hyperreactivity leading to thrombosis is the main reason for mortality and morbidity in patients with cardiovascular disease and stroke, which together remain a leading cause of death in developed countries. In this issue of Blood, Shen et al1 establish another functional link between proatherogenic lipoproteins and platelet-mediated thrombus formation with a specific focus on stroke. In their model, the initiating component is L5, the electronegative subfraction of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), which was shown to be substantially elevated in patients with ischemic stroke. L5 was shown to activate platelets via its receptor, lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), and αβ amyloid peptide, which together contribute to platelet hyperreactivity and stroke complications. PMID:26965920

  5. Lipoproteins, nutrition, and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Ernst J

    2002-02-01

    This article reviews the current status of our knowledge of lipoproteins, nutrition, and coronary heart disease (CHD). Special emphasis is placed on CHD risk assessment, dietary intervention studies, diet-gene interactions, and current dietary guidelines and the contributions of my laboratory to these areas. CHD remains a major cause of death and disability, and risk factors include age, sex, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, elevated serum LDL cholesterol, and low HDL cholesterol. Emerging independent risk factors include elevated serum concentrations of lipoprotein(a), remnant lipoproteins, and homocysteine. The cornerstone of CHD prevention is lifestyle modification. Dietary intervention studies support the concepts that restricting saturated fat and cholesterol and increasing the intake of essential fatty acids, especially n - 3 fatty acids, reduces CHD risk. The variability in LDL-cholesterol response to diet is large, related in part to APOE and APOA4 genotype. The use of antioxidants in intervention studies has not been shown to reduce CHD risk. Compliance with dietary recommendations remains a major problem, and directly altering the food supply may be the most effective way to ensure compliance. The available data indicate that the recommendation to use fats, oils, and sugars sparingly for CHD prevention should be modified to a recommendation to use animal, dairy, and hydrogenated fats; tropical oils; egg yolks; and sugars sparingly and to increase the use of vegetables, fruit, and whole grains. PMID:11815309

  6. Metabolic Characterization of a Rare Genetic Variation Within APOC3 and Its Lipoprotein Lipase–Independent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Davey Smith, George; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Würtz, Peter; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Dale, Caroline; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Casas, Juan-Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background— Plasma triglyceride levels have been implicated in atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Apolipoprotein C-III (APOC3) plays a key role in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to remnant particles by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and their uptake by the liver. A rare variant in APOC3(rs138326449) has been associated with triglyceride, very low–density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein levels, as well as risk of coronary heart disease. We aimed to characterize the impact of this locus across a broad set of mainly lipids-focused metabolic measures. Methods and Results— A high-throughput serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics platform was used to quantify 225 metabolic measures in 13 285 participants from 2 European population cohorts. We analyzed the effect of the APOC3 variant on the metabolic measures and used the common LPL(rs12678919) polymorphism to test for LPL-independent effects. Eighty-one metabolic measures showed evidence of association with APOC3(rs138326449). In addition to previously reported triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein associations, the variant was also associated with very low–density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein composition measures, other cholesterol measures, and fatty acids. Comparison of the APOC3 and LPL associations revealed that APOC3 association results for medium and very large very low–density lipoprotein composition are unlikely to be solely predictable by the action of APOC3 through LPL. Conclusions— We characterized the effects of the rare APOC3(rs138326449) loss of function mutation in lipoprotein metabolism, as well as the effects of LPL(rs12678919). Our results improve our understanding of the role of APOC3 in triglyceride metabolism, its LPL independent action, and the complex and correlated nature of human metabolites. PMID:27114411

  7. Advanced glycation endproduct changes to Bruch's membrane promotes lipoprotein retention by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Marisol; Fijalkowski, Natalia; Kondo, Naoshi; Dike, Sonny; Handa, James

    2011-08-01

    Lipoprotein particles accumulate in Bruch's membrane before the development of basal deposits and drusen, two histopathologic lesions that define age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We therefore, sought to determine which molecules could participate in lipoprotein retention. Wild-type or lipoprotein lipase-deficient mice were injected with low-dose D-galactose or PBS subcutaneously for 8 weeks to induce advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation. Some mice were also injected with the AGE breaker phenacylphiazolium bromide and D-galactose. Rhodamine-labeled low-density lipoproteins were injected into mice, and the fluorescence was measured up to 72 hours later. AGEs, proteoglycans, and other lipid-retaining molecules were evaluated by IHC. Lipoprotein lipase distribution was assessed in AMD samples by IHC. D-galactose-treated mice retained lipoproteins in the retinal pigment epithelial and Bruch's membrane to a greater extent than either PBS- or phenacylphiazolium bromide/D-galactose-treated mice at 24 and 72 hours after injection (P ≤ 0.04). Immunolabeling for carboxymethyllysine, biglycan, and lipoprotein lipase was found in D-galactose-treated mice only. Mice deficient for lipoprotein lipase treated with D-galactose did not retain lipoproteins to any measureable extent. Human AMD samples had lipoprotein lipase labeling within drusen, basal deposits, and the choroid. Mice treated with D-galactose to induce AGE formation in Bruch's membrane retain intravenously injected lipoproteins. Our results suggest that lipoprotein retention in Bruch's membrane is mediated by lipoprotein lipase. PMID:21801873

  8. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  9. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  10. A more flexible lipoprotein sorting pathway.

    PubMed

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G

    2015-05-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria occurs by a conserved pathway, each step of which is considered essential. In contrast to this model, LoVullo and colleagues demonstrate that the N-acyl transferase Lnt is not required in Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This suggests the existence of a more flexible lipoprotein pathway, likely due to a modified Lol transporter complex, and raises the possibility that pathogens may regulate lipoprotein processing to modulate interactions with the host. PMID:25755190

  11. LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE RELEASES ESTERIFIED OXYLIPINS FROM VERY LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the lipoprotein distribution of oxidized PUFAs, and we speculate that lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a determinant in the release of VLDL-associated oxylipins. Here, using 12 wk old normolipidemic (lean) and hyperlipidemic (obese) Zucker-rats, we measured PUFA al...

  12. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  13. Historical perspectives on lipoprotein research and methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, F.T.

    1990-03-01

    Since the early history of lipoprotein isolation and characterization dates back more than 60 years, it would be helpful to describe some of the landmarks occurring before about 1965. This document contains historical perspectives and information on lipoprotein research and methodology. 35 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Computational studies of plasma lipoprotein lipids.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lurong; Segrest, Jere P

    2016-10-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are macromolecular assemblies of proteins and lipids found in the blood. The lipid components of lipoproteins are amphipathic lipids such as phospholipids (PLs), and unesterified cholesterols (UCs) and hydrophobic lipids such as cholesteryl esters (CEs) and triglycerides (TGs). Since lipoproteins are soft matter supramolecular assemblies easily deformable by thermal fluctuations and they also exist in varying densities and protein/lipid components, a detailed understanding of their structure/function is experimentally difficult. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has emerged as a particularly promising way to explore the structure and dynamics of lipoproteins. The purpose of this review is to survey the current status of computational studies of the lipid components of the lipoproteins. Computational studies aim to explore three levels of complexity for the 3-dimensional structural dynamics of lipoproteins at various metabolic stages: (i) lipoprotein particles consist of protein with minimal lipid; (ii) lipoprotein particles consist of PL-rich discoidal bilayer-like lipid particles; (iii) mature circulating lipoprotein particles consist of CE-rich or TG-rich spheroidal lipid-droplet-like particles. Due to energy barriers involved in conversion between these species, other biomolecules also participate in lipoprotein biological assembly. For example: (i) lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) interacts with ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) to produce nascent discoidal high density lipoprotein (dHDL) particles; (ii) lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) mediates the conversion of UC to CE in dHDL, driving spheroidal HDL (sHDL) formation; (iii) transfer proteins, cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), transfer both CE and TG and PL, respectively, between lipoprotein particles. Computational studies have the potential to explore different lipoprotein particles at each metabolic stage in

  15. The iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Jessica R.; Heinrichs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Lipoproteins fulfill diverse roles in antibiotic resistance, adhesion, protein secretion, signaling and sensing, and many also serve as the substrate binding protein (SBP) partner to ABC transporters for the acquisition of a diverse array of nutrients including peptides, sugars, and scarcely abundant metals. In the staphylococci, the iron-regulated SBPs are significantly upregulated during iron starvation and function to sequester and deliver iron into the bacterial cell, enabling staphylococci to circumvent iron restriction imposed by the host environment. Accordingly, this subset of lipoproteins has been implicated in staphylococcal pathogenesis and virulence. Lipoproteins also activate the host innate immune response, triggered through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) and, notably, the iron-regulated subset of lipoproteins are particularly immunogenic. In this review, we discuss the iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins with regard to their biogenesis, substrate specificity, and impact on the host innate immune response. PMID:22919632

  16. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 inhibition of lipoprotein lipase: evidence for reversible complex formation.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Michael J; Bradford, Kira C; Erie, Dorothy A; Neher, Saskia B

    2013-10-01

    Elevated triglycerides are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triglycerides from circulating lipoproteins. The N-terminal domain of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) inhibits LPL activity. ANGPTL4 was previously described as an unfolding molecular chaperone of LPL that catalytically converts active LPL dimers into inactive monomers. Our studies show that ANGPTL4 is more accurately described as a reversible, noncompetitive inhibitor of LPL. We find that inhibited LPL is in a complex with ANGPTL4, and upon dissociation, LPL regains lipase activity. Furthermore, we have generated a variant of ANGPTL4 that is dependent on divalent cations for its ability to inhibit LPL. We show that LPL inactivation by this regulatable variant of ANGPTL4 is fully reversible after treatment with a chelator. PMID:23960078

  17. Raising highly desirable lipoprotein versus lowering deleterious lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Bernard My; Kumana, Cyrus R

    2010-03-01

    Evaluation of: Taylor AJ, Villines TC, Stanek EJ et al. Extended-release niacin or ezetimibe and carotid intima-media thickness. N. Engl. J. Med. 361(22), 2113-2122 (2009). Epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are both factors causing coronary heart disease. These authors compared extended-release niacin, which raises HDL-C, with ezetimibe, which lowers LDL-C, in a study named Arterial Biology for the Investigation of the Treatment Effects of Reducing Cholesterol 6-HDL and LDL Treatment Strategies (ARBITER 6-HALTS). The study was terminated early and only 208 patients were included in the analysis. Ezetimibe decreased LDL-C by 19.2%, to 66 mg/dl (1.7 mmol/l), whereas niacin increased HDL-C by 18.4%. Ezetimibe did not reduce carotid intima-media thickness, whereas niacin decreased it significantly. Moreover, major adverse cardiovascular events occurred in 5% of the ezetimibe group but only 1% of the niacin group (p = 0.04). The study suggests that niacin may be more effective than ezetimibe as an adjunct to statin in regressing atherosclerosis and in preventing cardiovascular events. This small study of short duration reported a very large treatment effect, so the findings need to be confirmed in a larger longer trial. Nevertheless, it provides the evidence that we now have an additional class of drugs besides statins that can reduce atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. PMID:22111565

  18. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  19. [THE EFFECT OF SATINS: ACTIVATION OF LIPOLYSIS AND ABSORPTION BY INSULIN-DEPENDED CELLS LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY, INCREASING OF BIO-AVAILABILITY OF POLYENOIC FATTY ACIDS AND DECREASING OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Malyshev, P P; Amelyushkina, V A; Aripovsky, A V; Smirnov, G P; Polevaya, T Yu; Kabo, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-10-01

    The Russian cardiologic R&D production complex of Minzdrav of Russia, 121552 Moscow, Russia The statins are synthetic xenobiotics alien to animal cells. They are unlikely capable to manifest pleiotropic effect. It is feasible to evaluate effect of statins by stages: a) initially a specific inhibition of synthesis of cholesterol alcohol; b) further indirect activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in lipoproteins of very low density; c) nonspecific activation of cells' receptor absorption of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density and then d) linoleic and linolenic lipoproteins of low density with all polyenoic fatty acids. On balance, statins activate absorption ofpolyenoic fatty acids by cells. Just they manifest physiological, specific pleiotropic effect. The statins inhibit synthesis of pool of cholesterol alcohol-lipoproteins of very low density condensed between phosphatidylcholines in polar mono-layer phosphatidylcholines+cholesterol alcohol on surface oftriglycerides. The low permeability of mono-layer separates substrate-triglycerides in lipoproteins of very low density and post-heparin lipoprotein lipase in hydrophilic blood plasma. The higher is ratio cholesterol alcohol/phosphatidylcholines in mono-layer of lipoproteins of very low density the slower is lipolysis, formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells under apoB-100-endocytosis. The statins normalize hyperlipemia by force of a) activation of absorption oflipoproteins of very low density by insulin-depended cells and b) activation of absorption of lipoproteins of low density by all cells, increasing of bio-availability of polyenoic fatty acids, activation of apoB-100-endocytosis. The limitation in food of content of palmitic saturated fatty acid and increasing of content of ω-3 polyenoic fatty acids improve "bio-availability" of polyenoic fatty acids and their absorption by cells and also decreases cholesterol alcohol/phosphatidylcholines and

  20. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  1. Lipoprotein lipase enhances binding of lipoproteins to heparan sulfate on cell surfaces and extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, S; Sehayek, E; Olivecrona, T; Vlodavsky, I

    1992-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase enhances binding at 4 degrees C of human plasma lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL, intermediate density lipoprotein, LDL, and HDL3) to cultured fibroblasts and hepG-2 cells and to extracellular matrix. Heparinase treatment of cells and matrix reduces the lipoprotein lipase enhanced binding by 90-95%. Lipoprotein lipase causes only a minimal effect on the binding of lipoproteins to heparan sulfate deficient mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells while it promotes binding to wild type cells that is abolished after heparinase treatment. With 125I-LDL, lipoprotein lipase also enhances uptake and proteolytic degradation at 37 degrees C by normal human skin fibroblasts but has no effect in heparinase-treated normal cells or in LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. These observations prove that lipoprotein lipase causes, predominantly, binding of lipoproteins to heparan sulfate at cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix rather than to receptors. This interaction brings the lipoproteins into close proximity with cell surfaces and may promote metabolic events that occur at the cell surface, including facilitated transfer to cellular receptors. Images PMID:1430223

  2. HYDROLYSIS OF CHLOROSTILBENE OXIDE: I. HYDROLYSIS IN HOMOGENEOUS SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrolysis kinetics of 4-chlorostilbene oxide (CSO) in buffered distilled water, in natural waters, and in sediment associated water are reported. he disappearance of CSO followed pseudo-first-order kinetics in buffered water over the experimental pH range of 3 to 11. elow pH...

  3. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  4. Economics of enzymatic hydrolysis processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.D.

    1988-02-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis processes have the ability to produce high yields of sugars for fermentation to fuel ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. However, these systems have been plagued with yields, product concentrations, and reactions rates far below those that are theoretically possible. Engineering and economic analyses are presented on several fungal enzyme hydrolysis processes to illustrate the effects of the important process parameters, to quantify the progress that has been made to date, and to estimate the cost reductions that can be made through research improvements. All enzymatic hydrolysis processes require pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, and enzyme production. The key effect of pretreatment is to allow access of the enzymes to the substrate. Pretreatments have been devised that make the biomass completely digestible that increase the xylose yield and concentration, and that integrate pretreatment with lignin utilization. Major improvements in enzyme activity and use of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) have greatly reduced the inhibition of the enzymes. It now appears that ethanol inhibition of the yeast is the limiting factor. Enzyme production costs have been dramatically reduced because use of SSF has reduced enzyme loading. However, further improvements may be possible by using soluble carbon sources for production. Over the past decade, the predicted cost of ethanol from such processes has dropped from more than $4.00/gallon to approximately $1.60. Research is currently under way in the United States and has the potential to reduce the projected cost to less than $1.00/gallon. 65 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Enzymatic hydrolysis of organic phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orthophosphate-releasing enzymatic hydrolysis is an alternative means for characterizing organic phosphorus (Po) in animal manure. The approach is not only simple and fast, but can also provide information difficult to obtain by other methods. Currently, commercially available phosphatases are mainl...

  6. Excessive centrifugal fields damage high density lipoprotein[S

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, William H.; Phillips, Martin L.; Schumaker, Verne N.

    2015-01-01

    HDL is typically isolated ultracentrifugally at 40,000 rpm or greater, however, such high centrifugal forces are responsible for altering the recovered HDL particle. We demonstrate that this damage to HDL begins at approximately 30,000 rpm and the magnitude of loss increases in a rotor speed-dependent manner. The HDL is affected by elevated ultracentrifugal fields resulting in a lower particle density due to the shedding of associated proteins. To circumvent the alteration of the recovered HDL, we utilize a KBr-containing density gradient and a lowered rotor speed of 15,000 rpm to separate the lipoproteins using a single 96 h centrifugation step. This recovers the HDL at two density ranges; the bulk of the material has a density of about 1.115 g/ml, while lessor amounts of material are recovered at >1.2 g/ml. Thus, demonstrating the isolation of intact HDL is possible utilizing lower centrifuge rotor speeds. PMID:25910941

  7. The antigenic similarity of human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    LEVINE, L; KAUFFMAN, D L; BROWN, R K

    1955-08-01

    THE FOLLOWING HUMAN LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS WERE PREPARED: beta-lipoproteins of densities greater than 1.040 (A, B,C) a beta-lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 5 (D), a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 19 (E), and a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 70 (F). Data are presented which show the immunochemical homogeneity of the D lipoprotein rabbit-anti-D lipoprotein system. Cross-reactions between antibody to A and D lipoproteins and the above lipoproteins have been demonstrated by quantitative precipitation, quanitative complement fixation, and single and double diffusion in agar. The antigenic similarities appear to be associated with the protein portions of the molecule. The antisera produced did not differentiate the low density lipoprotein classes. PMID:13242737

  8. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  9. Contribution of lipoproteins and lipoprotein processing to endocarditis virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Kanamoto, Taisei; Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L; Kitten, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Previous studies have identified lipoproteins as virulence determinants in other streptococcal species. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified 52 putative lipoprotein genes in S. sanguinis strain SK36 as well as genes encoding the lipoprotein-processing enzymes prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (lgt) and signal peptidase II (lspA). We employed a directed signature-tagged mutagenesis approach to systematically disrupt these genes and screen each mutant for the loss of virulence in an animal model of endocarditis. All mutants were viable. In competitive index assays, mutation of a putative phosphate transporter reduced in vivo competitiveness by 14-fold but also reduced in vitro viability by more than 20-fold. Mutations in lgt, lspA, or an uncharacterized lipoprotein gene reduced competitiveness by two- to threefold in the animal model and in broth culture. Mutation of ssaB, encoding a putative metal transporter, produced a similar effect in culture but reduced in vivo competiveness by >1,000-fold. [(3)H]palmitate labeling and Western blot analysis confirmed that the lgt mutant failed to acylate lipoproteins, that the lspA mutant had a general defect in lipoprotein cleavage, and that SsaB was processed differently in both mutants. These results indicate that the loss of a single lipoprotein, SsaB, dramatically reduces endocarditis virulence, whereas the loss of most other lipoproteins or of normal lipoprotein processing has no more than a minor effect on virulence. PMID:19395487

  10. Cholesterol in serum lipoprotein fractions after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.; Krauhs, Jane M.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are reported from blood-lipid measurements obtained from 125 Space Shuttle crew members before and after space flight. The data are presented in tables and discussed in detail. The main differences noted between preflight and postflight values are a 12.8-percent decrease in high-density lipoproteins on postflight day 1 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and both high- and low-density lipoproteins later in the 23-day postflight period.

  11. [Possibility of New Circulating Atherosclerosis-Related Lipid Markers Measurement in Medical and Complete Medical Checkups: Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Lipase].

    PubMed

    Sumino, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-03-01

    Small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDL-C) concentrations correlate more strongly with cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other LDL-C and large LDL particle concentrations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein particles and is a useful biomarker in diagnosing Type I, Type IV, and Type V hyperlipidemia. Therefore, the measurement of circulating sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations contributes to the assessment of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers. However, the measurement of these lipids has not been fully adopted in medical and complete medical checkups. Recently, novel automated homogenous assay for measuring sdLDL-C and latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (LTIA) for measuring LPL have been developed, respectively. Using these new assays, sdLDL-C values showed excellent agreement with those obtained by isolation of the d = 1.044 - 1.063 g/mL plasma fraction by sequential ultracentrifugation, and LPL values measured with and without heparin injection were highly correlated with the values measured by the LPL-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These assays may be superior to the previous assays for the measurement of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations due their simplicity and reproducibility. The measurements of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations may be useful as lipid markers in the assessment of the development and progression of atherosclerosis and the detection of pathological conditions and diseases if these markers are measured in medical and complete medical checkups. We have introduced the possibility of the novel measurement of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers such as sdLDL-C and LPL in medical and complete medical checkups. Further studies are needed to clarify whether sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations are related to the development and progression of

  12. Revisiting the Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    LoVullo, Eric D.; Wright, Lori F.; Isabella, Vincent; Huntley, Jason F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processing of lipoproteins (Lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted by the Lol system, with most Lpps inserted into the outer membrane (OM). We demonstrate here that the lnt gene is not essential to the Gram-negative pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu or to the live vaccine strain LVS. An LVS Δlnt mutant has a small-colony phenotype on sucrose medium and increased susceptibility to globomycin and rifampin. We provide data indicating that the OM lipoprotein Tul4A (LpnA) is diacylated but that it, and its paralog Tul4B (LpnB), still sort to the OM in the Δlnt mutant. We present a model in which the Lol sorting pathway of Francisella has a modified ABC transporter system that is capable of recognizing and sorting both triacylated and diacylated lipoproteins, and we show that this modified system is present in many other Gram-negative bacteria. We examined this model using Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which has the same Lol architecture as that of Francisella, and found that the lnt gene is not essential in this organism. This work suggests that Gram-negative bacteria fall into two groups, one in which full lipoprotein processing is essential and one in which the final acylation step is not essential, potentially due to the ability of the Lol sorting pathway in these bacteria to sort immature apolipoproteins to the OM. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the novel finding that the final stage in lipoprotein processing (normally considered an essential process) is not required by Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The paper provides a potential reason for this and shows that it may be widespread in other Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25755189

  13. [Position of lipoprotein apheresis in present].

    PubMed

    Bláha, Vladimír; Bláha, Milan; Lánská, Miriam; Havel, Eduard; Vyroubal, Pavel; Zadák, Zdeněk; Vrablík, Michal; Piťha, Jan; Žák, Pavel; Sobotka, Luboš

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein apheresis (LA) is an effective treatment method the patients with severe hypercholesterolemia, resistant to the standard therapy. LA is an extracorporeal elimination technique, which specifically removes low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from the circulation. At present, lipoprotein apheresis, combined with high-dose statin and ezetimibe therapy, is the best available means of treating patients with homozygous and statin refractory heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). However, the extent of cholesterol-lowering achieved is often insufficient to meet the targets set by current guidelines. The recent advent of new classes of lipid-lowering agents provides new hope that the latter objective may now be achievable. These compounds act either by reducing low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol production by inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis with an antisense oligonucleotide (mipomersen), or by inhibiting microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (lomitapid), or by enhancing LDL catabolism via monoclonal antibody-mediated inhibition of the activity of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9-alirocumab, evolocumab etc). The promising is the combination of LDL-apheresis with new drugs, namely for its potential to further decrease of LDL-cholesterol between apheresis. Depending on the outcome of current trials, it seems likely that these compounds, used alone or combined with lipoprotein apheresis, will markedly improve the management of refractory FH. PMID:26652784

  14. HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrolytic processes provide the baseline loss rate for any chemical in an aqueous envi- ronment. Although various hydrolytic pathways account for significant degradation of certain classes of organic chemicals, other organic structures are completely inert. Strictly speaking, hy...

  15. Utilization of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins by the working rat heart: routes of uptake and metabolic fates

    PubMed Central

    Niu, You-Guo; Hauton, David; Evans, Rhys D

    2004-01-01

    Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CMs) transport triacylglycerol (TAG) to peripheral tissues. Lipoprotein-TAG may gain access to target cells by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolysis or via receptor-mediated uptake; the principal routes of entry of VLDL and CM into heart are unknown, and different routes of entry may result in different metabolic fates. To examine this, isolated working rat hearts were perfused with rat VLDL and CMs, dual-labelled with [3H]TAG and [14C]cholesterol. Uptake and utilization of CM-TAG were significantly greater than VLDL-TAG, but both were decreased significantly (more than halved) by tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase). By contrast, uptake of VLDL-cholesterol was much higher than CM-cholesterol (P < 0.01), and suramin (a lipoprotein receptor antagonist) decreased cholesterol uptake of both forms. CM-TAG oxidation rate was more than 4-fold higher than VLDL-TAG oxidation. However, suramin decreased TAG oxidation from both VLDL and CM without affecting TAG uptake or total utilization, suggesting that the TAG gaining access through receptor-mediated pathways is preferentially ‘channelled’ towards oxidation. Most (79%) CM-TAG was oxidized whilst the proportion of VLDL-TAG oxidized was only about half (49%). In the presence of suramin, there was a significant increase in esterification (incorporation of assimilated [3H]TAG into myocardial tissue [3H]lipids, mainly TAG) of assimilated TAG from both VLDL and CMs, again suggesting that receptor-mediated TAG uptake is directed towards oxidation rather than esterification. The importance of this relatively small pool of TAG is indicated by the fact that cardiac mechanical function declined markedly when lipoprotein receptors were inhibited. These results suggest that CMs, most fatty acids of which gain access into cardiomyocytes through LPL-mediated hydrolysis, are the major supplier of TAG for hearts to oxidize; however, the metabolic fate of VLDL

  16. Lipids and lipoproteins in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J L; Chamberlain, S; Robinson, N

    1980-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessively inherited disease affecting the nervous system with a high incidence of heart involvement. Abnormalities of lipid metabolism are known to be associated with several progressive ataxic conditions. In this study of 46 Friedreich's ataxia patients, serum lipids, fatty acids and lipoproteins were assayed and compared with some earlier findings on Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders. Abnormalities of low and high density lipoproteins suggestive of a major defect have been reported; in the present study the level and chemical composition of high density lipoprotein has been assessed in 20 Friedreich's ataxia patients but previous abnormalities could not be substantiated. Lipid compositional analysis of Friedreich's ataxia central nervous tissue and heart, which has not been previously reported, did not markedly differ from control tissue. PMID:7359148

  17. Analysis of individual lipoproteins and liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.L.; Keller, R.A.; Nolan, J.P.

    1997-08-01

    We describe the application of single molecule detection (SMD) technologies for the analysis of natural (serum lipoproteins) and synthetic (liposomes) transport systems. The need for advanced analytical procedures of these complex and important systems is presented with the specific enhancements afforded by SMD with flowing sample streams. In contrast to bulk measurements which yield only average values, measurement of individual species allows creation of population histograms from heterogeneous samples. The data are acquired in minutes and the analysis requires relatively small sample quantities. Preliminary data are presented from the analysis of low density lipoprotein, and multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles.

  18. Binding of temoporfin to the lipoprotein fractions of human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Michael-Titus, A T; Whelpton, R; Yaqub, Z

    1995-01-01

    The binding of a new photosensitizer, temoporfin, to human serum lipoproteins was investigated. [14C]-Temoporfin (0.1-10 micrograms ml-1) was incubated with human serum for 30 min at room temperature or for 20 h at 4 degrees C, prior to stepwise density flotation to separate the lipoprotein fractions. The distribution of the drug was independent of the initial concentration or time and temperature of the incubation. The proportion of temoporfin in each fraction was: very low density lipoprotein 6%, low density lipoprotein 22%, lipoprotein(a) 17%, high density lipoprotein 39% and lipoprotein deficient serum 16%. Autoradiography of agarose gels showed that the drug was associated with the lipoprotein in the fractions. Fractionation of plasma samples collected from a patient after an intravenous infusion of temoporfin revealed a binding profile similar to that obtained in the in vitro study. Images Figure 1 PMID:8703668

  19. Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the effectiveness and safety of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis performed with the heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation (HELP) system for the treatment of patients with refractory homozygous (HMZ) and heterozygous (HTZ) familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Background on Familial Hypercholesterolemia Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder that is caused by several mutations in the LDL-receptor gene. The reduced number or absence of functional LDL receptors results in impaired hepatic clearance of circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) particles, which results in extremely high levels of LDL-C in the bloodstream. Familial hypercholesterolemia is characterized by excess LDL-C deposits in tendons and arterial walls, early onset of atherosclerotic disease, and premature cardiac death. Familial hypercholesterolemia occurs in both HTZ and HMZ forms. Heterozygous FH is one of the most common monogenic metabolic disorders in the general population, occurring in approximately 1 in 500 individuals1. Nevertheless, HTZ FH is largely undiagnosed and an accurate diagnosis occurs in only about 15% of affected patients in Canada. Thus, it is estimated that there are approximately 3,800 diagnosed and 21,680 undiagnosed cases of HTZ FH in Ontario. In HTZ FH patients, half of the LDL receptors do not work properly or are absent, resulting in plasma LDL-C levels 2- to 3-fold higher than normal (range 7-15mmol/L or 300-500mg/dL). Most HTZ FH patients are not diagnosed until middle age when either they or one of their siblings present with symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). Without lipid-lowering treatment, 50% of males die before the age of 50 and 25% of females die before the age of 60, from myocardial infarction or sudden death. In contrast to the HTZ form, HMZ FH is rare (occurring in 1 case per million persons) and more severe, with a 6- to 8-fold elevation in plasma LDL

  20. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  1. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  2. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  3. A computational model for the analysis of lipoprotein distributions in the mouse: translating FPLC profiles to lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sips, Fianne L P; Tiemann, Christian A; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Groen, Albert K; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Riel, Natal A W

    2014-05-01

    Disturbances of lipoprotein metabolism are recognized as indicators of cardiometabolic disease risk. Lipoprotein size and composition, measured in a lipoprotein profile, are considered to be disease risk markers. However, the measured profile is a collective result of complex metabolic interactions, which complicates the identification of changes in metabolism. In this study we aim to develop a method which quantitatively relates murine lipoprotein size, composition and concentration to the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein metabolism. We introduce a computational framework which incorporates a novel kinetic model of murine lipoprotein metabolism. The model is applied to compute a distribution of plasma lipoproteins, which is then related to experimental lipoprotein profiles through the generation of an in silico lipoprotein profile. The model was first applied to profiles obtained from wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. The results provided insight into the interplay of lipoprotein production, remodelling and catabolism. Moreover, the concentration and metabolism of unmeasured lipoprotein components could be determined. The model was validated through the prediction of lipoprotein profiles of several transgenic mouse models commonly used in cardiovascular research. Finally, the framework was employed for longitudinal analysis of the profiles of C57Bl/6J mice following a pharmaceutical intervention with a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. The multifaceted regulatory response to the administration of the compound is incompletely understood. The results explain the characteristic changes of the observed lipoprotein profile in terms of the underlying metabolic perturbation and resultant modifications of lipid fluxes in the body. The Murine Lipoprotein Profiler (MuLiP) presented here is thus a valuable tool to assess the metabolic origin of altered murine lipoprotein profiles and can be applied in preclinical research performed in mice for analysis of lipid fluxes and

  4. Metabolomic analysis of polar metabolites in lipoprotein fractions identifies lipoprotein-specific metabolic profiles and their association with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Mattila, Ismo; Wiedmer, Susanne K; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Orešič, Matej

    2012-10-01

    While the molecular lipid composition of lipoproteins has been investigated in detail, little is known about associations of small polar metabolites with specific lipoproteins. The aim of the present study was to investigate the profiles of polar metabolites in different lipoprotein fractions, i.e., very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and two sub-fractions of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The VLDL, IDL, LDL, HDL(2), and HDL(3) fractions were isolated from serum of sixteen individuals having a broad range of insulin sensitivity and characterized using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). The lipoprotein fractions had clearly different metabolite profiles, which correlated with the particle size and surface charge. Lipoprotein-specific associations of individual metabolites with insulin resistance were identified, particularly in VLDL and IDL fractions, even in the absence of such associations in serum. The results indicate that the polar molecules are strongly attached to the surface of the lipoproteins. Furthermore, strong lipoprotein-specific associations of metabolites with insulin resistance, as compared to their serum profiles, indicate that lipoproteins may be a rich source of tissue-specific metabolic biomarkers. PMID:22722885

  5. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  6. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lipoprotein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Yoshio; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Nagano, Tomohisa; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotrophic virus and a major cause of chronic liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma, worldwide. The life cycle of HCV is closely associated with the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins. The main function of lipoproteins is transporting lipids throughout the body. Triglycerides, free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipids are the major components of the transported lipids. The pathway of HCV assembly and secretion is closely linked to lipoprotein production and secretion, and the infectivity of HCV particles largely depends on the interaction of lipoproteins. Moreover, HCV entry into hepatocytes is strongly influenced by lipoproteins. The key lipoprotein molecules mediating these interactions are apolipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are amphipathic proteins on the surface of a lipoprotein particle, which help stabilize lipoprotein structure. They perform a key role in lipoprotein metabolism by serving as receptor ligands, enzyme co-factors, and lipid transport carriers. Understanding the association between the life cycle of HCV and lipoprotein metabolism is important because each step of the life cycle of HCV that is associated with lipoprotein metabolism is a potential target for anti-HCV therapy. In this article, we first concisely review the nature of lipoprotein and its metabolism to better understand the complicated interaction of HCV with lipoprotein. Then, we review the outline of the processes of HCV assembly, secretion, and entry into hepatocytes, focusing on the association with lipoproteins. Finally, we discuss the clinical aspects of disturbed lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and the significance of dyslipoproteinemia in chronic HCV infection with regard to abnormal apolipoproteins. PMID:26420957

  7. Rate of Hydrolysis of Tertiary Halogeno Alkanes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to measure the relative rate of hydrolysis of the 2-x-2 methylpropanes, where x is bromo, chloro or iodo. The results are plotted on a graph from which the relative rate of hydrolysis can be deduced. (Author/GA)

  8. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  9. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella.

    PubMed

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  10. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  11. Serum and urinary lipoproteins in the human nephrotic syndrome: evidence for renal catabolism of lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.G.; Forte, T.; Licht, H.; Lewis, S.B.

    1982-03-01

    The urinary excretion of lipoproteins and the possibility of catabolic alterations on glomerular filtration were investigated in four nephrotic subjects difering in etiology, serum lipoprotein profile, and 24 hr urinary output of protein and lipids. The apolipoproteins and lipoproteins of urine were compared with those of serum with respect to distribution profile, physical properties, and composition. As expected from molecular sieving effects during glomerular filtration, the urinary HDL were more abundant than the lower density lipoproteins even when the plasma LDL was elevated markedly. Intact apolipoproteins were not found in the concentrated urinary fraction isolated by ultrafiltration between the limits of 10/sup 4/ and 5 x 10/sup 4/ daltons. On the basis of immunoreactivity, gel electrophoresis, and amino acid composition, apolipoproteins B and AI are the major and minor proteins, respectively, of urinary LDL, and apo B is the major protein of the urinary IDL and VLDL. Apolipoproteins AI, AII, CI, CIII, and possibly AIV were isolated from the urinary HDL. As much as 20% of the protein moiety of the urinary HDL appeared to be large apolipoprotien fragments with molecular weights and isoelectric points similar to those of apo CII and apo CIII. The lower density classes of urinary lipoproteins also appeared to have lost apo E and apo C's and to have undergone partial proteolysis.

  12. Endogenously produced glycosaminoglycans affecting the release of lipoprotein lipase from macrophages and the interaction with lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, R; Sartipy, P; Winkler, R; Zechner, R; Hurt-Camejo, E; Kostner, G M

    2000-04-12

    Macrophages are intimately involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases. A key feature of this process is their uptake of various lipoproteins and subsequent transformation to foam cells. Since lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is believed to play a role in foam cell formation, we investigated if endogenously produced proteoglycans (PGs) affect the release of this enzyme from macrophages. The human leukaemic cell line THP-1 which differentiates into macrophages by treatment with phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) served as a model. The differentiation of THP-1 macrophages promoted the release of PGs into the cell medium which caused the detachment of LPL activity from the cell surface, and prevented LPL re-uptake and inactivation. These PGs were mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate type and exerted a heparin-like effect on LPL release. LPL is known to increase the cell association of lipoproteins by the well known bridging function. Exogenous bovine LPL at a concentration of 1 microg/ml enhanced low density lipoprotein (LDL)-binding 10-fold. Endogenously produced PGs reduced LPL-mediated binding of LDL. It is proposed that the differentiation-dependent increase in the release of PGs interferes with binding of LPL and reduces lipoprotein-binding to macrophages. PMID:10760480

  13. Abnormal high density lipoproteins in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.; Salen, G.; Cheng, F.W.; Forte, T.; Shefer, S.; Tint, G.S.

    1981-11-01

    The plasma lipoprotein profiles and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were characterized in patients with the genetic disease cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). The mean HDL-cholesterol concentration in the CTX plasmas was 14.5 +/- 3.2 mg/dl, about one-third the normal value. The low HDL-cholesterol reflects a low concentration and an abnormal lipid composition of the plasma HDL. Relative to normal HDL, the cholesteryl esters are low, free cholesterol and phospholipids essentially normal, and triglycerides increased. The ratio of apoprotein (apo) to total cholesterol in the HDL of CTX was two to three times greater than normal. In the CTX HDL, the ratio of apoAI to apoAII was high, the proportion of apoC low, and a normally minor form of apoAI increased relative to other forms. The HDL in electron micrographs appeared normal morphologically and in particle size. The adnormalities in lipoprotein distribution profiles and composition of the plasma HDL result from metabolic defects that are not understood but may be linked to the genetic defect in bile acid synthesis in CTX. As a consequence, it is probable that the normal functions of the HDL, possibly including modulation of LDL-cholesterol uptake and the removal of excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues, are perturbed significantly in this disease.

  14. Lipoprotein-induced phenoloxidase-activity in tarantula hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Sven; Schmidt, Juliane; Hoeger, Ulrich; Decker, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    Phenoloxidases play vital roles in invertebrate innate immune reactions, wound closure and sclerotization processes in arthropods. In chelicerates, where phenoloxidases are lacking, phenoloxidase-activity can be induced in the oxygen carrier hemocyanin in vitro by proteolytic cleavage, incubation with the artificial inducer SDS, or lipids. The role of protein-protein interaction has up to now received little attention. This is remarkable, as lipoproteins - complexes of proteins and lipids - are present at high concentrations in arthropod hemolymph. We characterized the three lipoproteins present in tarantula hemolymph, two high-density lipoproteins and one very high-density lipoprotein, and show that the two high-density lipoproteins have distinct structures: the more abundant high-density lipoprotein is an ellipsoid particle with axes of ~22.5 nm and ~16.8 nm, respectively. The second high-density lipoprotein, present only in trace amount, is a large discoidal lipoprotein with a diameter of ~38.4 nm and an on-edge thickness of ~7.1 nm. We further demonstrate that the interaction between lipoproteins and hemocyanin induces phenoloxidase activity in hemocyanin, and propose that this activation is due to protein-protein interaction rather than protein-lipid interaction, as neither lipid micelles nor lipid monomers were found to be activating. Activation was strongest in the presence of high-density lipoproteins; very high-density lipoproteins were found to be non-activating. This is the first time that the ability of lipoproteins to induce phenoloxidase activity of hemocyanin has been demonstrated, thus adding novel aspects to the function of lipoproteins apart from their known role in nutrient supply. PMID:25817204

  15. Low-density lipoprotein apheresis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bambauer, Rolf; Schiel, Ralf; Latza, Reinhard

    2003-08-01

    Atherosclerosis with myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral cellular disease still maintains its position at the top of morbidity and mortality statistics in industrialized nations. Established risk factors widely accepted are smoking, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and central obesity. Furthermore, there is a strong correlation between hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The prognosis of patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia, sometimes combined with elevated lipoprotein (a) (Lpa) levels, and coronary heart disease (CHD) refractory to diet and lipid-lowering drugs is poor. For such patients, regular treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis is the therapeutic option. Today, there are four different LDL apheresis systems available: immunoadsorption, heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL/fibrinogen precipitation, dextran sulfate LDL adsorption and LDL hemoperfusion. Regarding the different LDL apheresis systems used, there is no significant difference with respect to the clinical outcome or concerning total cholesterol, LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or triglyceride concentrations. With respect to elevated Lpa levels, however, the immunoadsorption method seems to be the most effective. In 45 patients (25 women, 20 men) suffering from familial hypercholesterolemia resistant to diet and lipid lowering drugs, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis was performed over 95.6 +/- 44.7 months. Four different systems (Liposorber, 32 of 45, Kaneka, Osaka, Japan; Therasorb, 6 of 45, Baxter, Munich, Germany; Lipopak, 2 of 45, Pocard, Moscow, Russia; and Dali, 5 of 45, Fresenius, St. Wendel, Germany) were used. With all methods, average reductions of 57% for total cholesterol, 55.9% for LDL, 75.8% for lipoprotein a (Lpa), and 45.9% for triglycerides, and an average increase of 14.3% for HDL were reached. Severe side-effects such as shock or allergic reactions were very rare (0.3%) in all methods. In the course of treatment, an improvement

  16. Identification of a small molecule that stabilizes lipoprotein lipase in vitro and lowers triglycerides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Caraballo, Rémi; Ericsson, Madelene; Lookene, Aivar; Enquist, Per-Anders; Elofsson, Mikael; Nilsson, Stefan K; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2014-07-25

    Patients at increased cardiovascular risk commonly display high levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs), elevated LDL cholesterol, small dense LDL particles and low levels of HDL-cholesterol. Many remain at high risk even after successful statin therapy, presumably because TG levels remain high. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) maintains TG homeostasis in blood by hydrolysis of TG-rich lipoproteins. Efficient clearance of TGs is accompanied by increased levels of HDL-cholesterol and decreased levels of small dense LDL. Given the central role of LPL in lipid metabolism we sought to find small molecules that could increase LPL activity and serve as starting points for drug development efforts against cardiovascular disease. Using a small molecule screening approach we have identified small molecules that can protect LPL from inactivation by the controller protein angiopoietin-like protein 4 during incubations in vitro. One of the selected compounds, 50F10, was directly shown to preserve the active homodimer structure of LPL, as demonstrated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. On injection to hypertriglyceridemic apolipoprotein A-V deficient mice the compound ameliorated the postprandial response after an olive oil gavage. This is a potential lead compound for the development of drugs that could reduce the residual risk associated with elevated plasma TGs in dyslipidemia. PMID:24984153

  17. Myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of high-density lipoproteins: fingerprints of newly recognized potential proatherogenic lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Malle, Ernst; Marsche, Gunther; Panzenboeck, Ute; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2006-01-15

    Substantial evidence supports the notion that oxidative processes participate in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic heart disease. Major evidence for myeloperoxidase (MPO) as enzymatic catalyst for oxidative modification of lipoproteins in the artery wall has been suggested in numerous studies performed with low-density lipoprotein. In contrast to low-density lipoprotein, plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and apoAI, the major apolipoprotein of HDL, inversely correlate with the risk of developing coronary artery disease. These antiatherosclerotic effects are attributed mainly to HDL's capacity to transport excess cholesterol from arterial wall cells to the liver during 'reverse cholesterol transport'. There is now strong evidence that HDL is a selective in vivo target for MPO-catalyzed oxidation impairing the cardioprotective and antiinflammatory capacity of this antiatherogenic lipoprotein. MPO is enzymatically active in human lesion material and was found to be associated with HDL extracted from human atheroma. MPO-catalyzed oxidation products are highly enriched in circulating HDL from individuals with cardiovascular disease where MPO concentrations are also increased. The oxidative potential of MPO involves an array of intermediate-generated reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species and the ability of MPO to generate chlorinating oxidants-in particular hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite-under physiological conditions is a unique and defining activity for this enzyme. All these MPO-generated reactive products may affect structure and function of HDL as well as the activity of HDL-associated enzymes involved in conversion and remodeling of the lipoprotein particle, and represent clinically useful markers for atherosclerosis. PMID:16171772

  18. An insect lipoprotein hybrid helps to define the role of apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Van der Horst, D J; Ryan, R O; Van Heusden, M C; Schulz, T K; Van Doorn, J M; Law, J H; Beenakkers, A M

    1988-02-01

    Insects transport lipid for flight in the form of diacylglycerol-rich low density lipoproteins (low density lipophorin (LDLp)). A hybrid LDLp has been produced in vitro by using Locusta migratoria fat body, locust high density lipophorin, locust adipokinetic hormone, and Manduca sexta apolipophorin III (apoLp-III). The hybrid is similar in size and density to locust LDLp, contains several molecules of M. sexta apoLp-III, and lacks locust apoLp-III, as shown by immunochemical methods. Under the same conditions an apoLp-III from Thasus acutangulus is poorly incorporated into the locust lipoprotein. The role of apoLp-III as a recognition signal/activator of flight muscle lipoprotein lipase was assayed with labeled hybrid LDLp produced in vitro using M. sexta apoLp-III radiolabeled with 35S. In addition, hydrolysis of diacylglycerol was determined with lipid-labeled hybrid LDLp produced in vitro using [U-14C]glycerol incorporated into the diacylglycerol moiety. In vitro incubations of the labeled hybrid LDLp with L. migratoria flight muscles show that the lipase efficiently utilizes hybrid LDLp as a substrate and demonstrate that the carbohydrate moiety of locust apoLp-III (which is lacking in the M. sexta protein) is not required for interaction with the lipase. It also suggests that specific antigenic determinants of L. migratoria apoLp-III are not required for lipase activation since M. sexta apoLp-III lacks immunological cross-reactivity with L. migratoria apoLp-III. PMID:2448303

  19. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.A.; Roberts, R.S.; Faass, G.S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Colcord, A.R.; Bery, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous hydrolysis of poplar chips by steam at 300-350 psi resulted in the separation of hemicellulose (I) cellulose and lignin components. The I fraction was readily depolymerised by steam to acetic acid, furfural, methanol, and xylose.

  20. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  8. Fish plasma lipoproteins--comparative observations in serranides and sparides.

    PubMed

    Santulli, A; Cusenza, L; Modica, A; Curatolo, A; D'Amelio, V

    1991-01-01

    1. Diet, time from last feeding, temperature, season and sexual stage are some of the factors influencing the lipoprotein pattern. 2. Keeping these factors constant species-specific differences observed among lipoprotein patterns of Sparus aurata, Puntazzo puntazzo, Diplodus sargus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax are discussed. 3. Feeding habits and therefore lipid absorption and the rate of lipoprotein maturation process are the factors determining the observed differences. PMID:1764905

  9. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  10. Regulation of high density lipoprotein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1982-03-01

    An increasing awareness of the physiologic and pathologic importance of serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) has led to a large number of observations regarding factors which influence their concentrations. HDL consists of a heterogeneous collection of macromolecules with diverse physical properties and chemical constituents. While laboratory techniques have made it possible to measure HDL and their individual components, there are as yet large gaps in our knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms and clinical significance of changes in these laboratory parameters. In this review, current concepts of the structure and metabolism of HDL will be briefly summarized, and the factors influencing their levels in humans will be surveyed. 313 references.

  11. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV. PMID:27152966

  12. Methylation at CPT1A locus is associated with lipoprotein subfraction profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein subfractions help discriminate cardiometabolic disease risk. Genetic loci validated as associating with lipoprotein measures do not account for a large proportion of the individual variation in lipoprotein measures. We hypothesized that DNA methylation levels across the genome contribute...

  13. Regulation of high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rye, Kerry-Anne; Barter, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    There is compelling evidence from human population studies that plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol correlate inversely with cardiovascular risk. Identification of this relationship has stimulated research designed to understand how HDL metabolism is regulated. The ultimate goal of these studies has been to develop HDL-raising therapies that have the potential to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the situation has turned out to be much more complex than originally envisaged. This is partly because the HDL fraction consists of multiple subpopulations of particles that vary in terms of shape, size, composition, and surface charge, as well as in their potential cardioprotective properties. This heterogeneity is a consequence of the continual remodeling and interconversion of HDL subpopulations by multiple plasma factors. Evidence that the remodeling of HDLs may impact on their cardioprotective properties is beginning to emerge. This serves to highlight the importance of understanding not only how the remodeling and interconversion of HDL subpopulations is regulated but also how these processes are affected by agents that increase HDL levels. This review provides an overview of what is currently understood about HDL metabolism and how the subpopulation distribution of these lipoproteins is regulated. PMID:24385508

  14. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Shatwan, Israa M.; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Jackson, Kim G.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene–gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  15. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Shatwan, Israa M; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Jackson, Kim G; Vimaleswaran, Karani S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene-gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  16. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lipoprotein test system. 862.1475 Section 862.1475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1475 Lipoprotein test system....

  18. Study of soluble lipoprotein in rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Koppikar, S. V.; Fatterpaker, P.; Sreenivasan, A.

    1971-01-01

    1. A water-soluble lipoprotein was isolated and purified from osmotically shocked preparations of rat liver mitochondria by using a technique of Sephadex-sandwich disc electrophoresis. 2. The purified lipoprotein migrates as a distinct sharp zone in high-resolution electrophoretic systems, indicating high degree of purity. 3. The lipoprotein resembles mitochondrial membranes with respect to lipid composition and lipid/protein ratio. 4. The lipoprotein and its apoprotein fraction obtained by delipidization at −18°C to −20°C have common properties with respect to their fluorescence spectra, instability to storage and electrophoretic mobility. 5. The purified lipoprotein has an excitation maximum at 325nm and a fluorescence maximum at 418nm. 6. Storage at 4°C for 4 days or repeated freezing and thawing results in 15–30% decrease in electrophoretic mobility. 7. The patterns of incorporation in vitro of [1-14C]leucine into proteins of the soluble lipoprotein and of mitochondrial membrane of isolated rat liver mitochondria suggest a probable precursor role for the apoprotein in the formation of mitochondrial membrane protein. 8. Lipoprotein preparations isolated from mitochondrial fractions of rat kidney, brain and heart and of chicken and mouse liver resemble closely that obtained from rat liver mitochondria, suggesting that the soluble lipoprotein could be a distinct entity of mitochondrial origin. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:5114976

  19. Differential activation of the Toll-like receptor 2/6 complex by lipoproteins of Streptococcus suis serotypes 2 and 9.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Rebel, Johanna M J; Smits, Mari A; van Putten, Jos P M; Smith, Hilde E

    2010-07-14

    Streptococcus suis causes invasive infections in pigs and occasionally in humans. Worldwide, S. suis serotype 2 is most frequently isolated from diseased piglets, but the less virulent serotype 9 is emerging, at least in Europe. We compared the activation of human Toll-like receptors (hTLRs) by S. suis serotype 2 and 9 strains to better understand the role of the innate immune response in fighting S. suis infections. Neither live nor heat-killed log phase grown S. suis activated the hTLR1/2, hTLR2/6 and hTLR4/MD-2 complexes. However, the hTLR2/6 complex was specifically activated by both serotypes after disruption of the cell wall synthesis using penicillin. Activation levels of the hTLR2/6 complex were higher for serotype 9 strains compared to serotype 2 strains suggesting intrinsic differences in cell wall composition between both serotypes. The hTLR2/6 activating fractions decreased in molecular size after digestion with proteinase K and were sensitive for lipoprotein lipase digestion and NaOH hydrolysis, indicating lipoprotein(s) as active component(s). Overall, our results indicate that S. suis lipoproteins activate TLR2/6 but not TLR1/2 and that the clinically different serotypes 2 and 9 display differential release of TLR ligand when cell wall integrity is compromised. PMID:20044219

  20. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  1. Effect of serum lipoproteins on the adenylate cyclase activity of rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, G; Sirtori, C R; Nicosia, S

    1981-01-01

    Four rat lipoprotein classes [lymph chylomicrons, VLD (very-low-density), LD (low-density) and HD (high-density) lipoproteins] were tested for their ability to affect basal adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity of rat liver plasma membranes. All the lipoproteins, with the exception of lymph chylomicrons, effectively increase the enzyme activity. VLD lipoproteins are the most active class (67% maximal increase), followed by HD lipoproteins (33%) and LD lipoproteins (23%). The effect of VLD lipoproteins is additive to that elicited by GTP or GTP plus glucagon (at least within a certain concentration range). VLD lipoproteins affect only the Vmax. of the enzyme, not the Km. PMID:7317023

  2. Lipoprotein effects of incretin analogs and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jixin; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Elevated post-prandial lipoprotein levels are common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Post-prandial lipoprotein alterations in type 2 diabetics are widely believed to drive inflammation and are considered a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. The incretins glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose insulinotropic peptide (GIP) modulate post-prandial lipoproteins through a multitude of pathways that are independent of insulin and weight loss. Evidence from both animal models and humans seems to suggest an important effect on triglyceride rich lipoproteins (Apo48 containing) with little to no effects on other lipoproteins at least in humans. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitors also appear to share these effects suggesting an important role for incretins in these effects. In this review, we will summarize lipid modulating effects of incretin analogs and DPP-4 inhibitors in both animal models and human studies and provide an overview of mechanisms responsible for these effects. PMID:26005496

  3. Lipoprotein ratios: Physiological significance and clinical usefulness in cardiovascular prevention

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Anna; Zúñiga, Manuel; Rubiés-Prat, Joan; Pallardo, Luis Felipe; Masana, Luis; Mangas, Alipio; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; González-Santos, Pedro; Ascaso, Juan F; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration has been the prime index of cardiovascular disease risk and the main target for therapy. However, several lipoprotein ratios or “atherogenic indices” have been defined in an attempt to optimize the predictive capacity of the lipid profile. In this review, we summarize their pathophysiological aspects, and highlight the rationale for using these lipoprotein ratios as cardiovascular risk factors in clinical practice, specifying their cut-off risk levels and a target for lipid-lowering therapy. Total/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and LDL/HDL cholesterol ratios are risk indicators with greater predictive value than isolated parameters used independently, particularly LDL. Future recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia, including instruments for calculating cardiovascular risk or action guidelines, should include the lipoprotein ratios with greater predictive power which, in view of the evidence-based results, are none other than those which include HDL cholesterol. PMID:19774217

  4. The fibrate drug gemfibrozil disrupts lipoprotein metabolism in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Prindiville, John S. Mennigen, Jan A.; Zamora, Jake M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-15

    Gemfibrozil (GEM) is a fibrate drug consistently found in effluents from sewage treatment plants. This study characterizes the pharmacological effects of GEM on the plasma lipoproteins of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our goals were to quantify the impact of the drug on: 1) lipid constituents of lipoproteins (phospholipids (PL), triacylglycerol (TAG), and cholesterol), 2) lipoprotein classes (high, low and very low density lipoproteins), and 3) fatty acid composition of lipoproteins. Potential mechanisms of GEM action were investigated by measuring lipoprotein lipase activity (LPL) and the hepatic gene expression of LPL and of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} isoforms. GEM treatment resulted in decreased plasma lipoprotein levels (- 29%) and a reduced size of all lipoprotein classes (lower PL:TAG ratios). However, the increase in HDL-cholesterol elicited by GEM in humans failed to be observed in trout. Therefore, HDL-cholesterol cannot be used to assess the impact of the drug on fish. GEM also modified lipoprotein composition by reducing the abundance of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, thereby potentially reducing the nutritional quality of exposed fish. The relative gene expression of LPL was increased, but the activity of the enzyme was not, and we found no evidence for the activation of PPAR pathways. The depressing effects of GEM on fish lipoproteins demonstrated here may be a concern in view of the widespread presence of fibrates in aquatic environments. Work is needed to test whether exposure to environmental concentrations of these drugs jeopardizes the capacity of fish for reproduction, temperature acclimation or migratory behaviors.

  5. Analytical capillary isotachophoresis: a routine technique for the analysis of lipoproteins and lipoprotein subfractions in whole serum.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, G; Borgmann, U; Assmann, G

    1985-02-22

    A capillary isotachophoretic separation technique was developed for lipoproteins in native serum which, compared with previous electrophoretic techniques, has negligible molecular sieve effects, does not need gel casting, is suitable for whole serum and has a high discriminative power for lipoprotein subfractions. The technique is based on pre-staining whole serum lipoproteins for 30 min at 4 degrees C before separation of 0.5 microliter of the sample in a free-flow capillary system (0.5 mm I.D.) with discontinuous buffer system. In normolipidaemic sera, high-density (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) are separated into two major subpopulations according to their net electric mobility. The identification of these fractions was confirmed by substitution with ultracentrifugally isolated lipoproteins and by their complete absence from Tangier and abetalipoproteinaemic serum. Triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) revealed a defined zone between the HDL and LDL subpopulations. Our preliminary results indicate that the separation of human whole serum lipoproteins by capillary isotachophoresis is a promising method for the determination of lipoprotein subfractions. PMID:4030932

  6. Camptothecin-catalyzed phospholipid hydrolysis in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Saetern, Ann Mari; Skar, Merete; Braaten, Asmund; Brandl, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phospholipid (PL) within camptothecin (CPT)-containing liposomes was studied systematically, after elevated lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC)-concentrations in pH 5, CPT-containing liposomes (22.1+/-0.9 mol%) relative to control-liposomes (7.3+/-0.5 mol%) occasionally had been observed after four months storage in fridge. Liposomes were prepared by dispersing freeze-dried PL/CPT mixtures in 25 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of varying pH (5.0-7.8) and CPT concentrations (0, 3 and 6 mM). PL-hydrolysis was monitored by HPTLC, quantifying LPC. In an accelerated stability study (60 degrees C), a catalytic effect of CPT on PL-hydrolysis was observed after 40 h, but not up to 30 h of incubation. The pH profile of the hydrolysis indicated a stability optimum at pH 6.0 for the liposomes independent of CPT. The equilibrium point between the more active lactone- and the carboxylate-form of CPT was found to be pH 6.8. As a compromise, pH 6.0 was chosen, assuring >85% CPT to be present in the lactone form. At this pH, both control- and CPT-liposomes showed only minor hydrolysis after autoclaving (121 degrees C, 15 min). Storage at room temperature and in fridge (2 months), as well as accelerated ageing (70 degrees C, 25 h), gave a significant elevation of LPC content in CPT-liposomes relative to control-liposomes. This study demonstrates a catalytic effect of CPT on PL-hydrolysis, the onset of which seems to require a certain threshold level of hydrolytic degradation. PMID:15607259

  7. Softness of atherogenic lipoproteins: a comparison of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS).

    PubMed

    Mikl, Christian; Peters, Judith; Trapp, Marcus; Kornmueller, Karin; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Prassl, Ruth

    2011-08-31

    Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100)-containing plasma lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL) supply tissues and cells with cholesterol and fat. During lipolytic conversion from VLDL to LDL the size and chemical composition of the particles change, but the apoB100 molecule remains bound to the lipids and regulates the receptor mediated uptake. The molecular physical parameters which control lipoprotein remodeling and enable particle stabilization by apoB100 are largely unknown. Here, we have compared the molecular dynamics and elasticities of VLDL and LDL derived by elastic neutron scattering temperature scans. We have determined thermal motions, dynamical transitions, and molecular fluctuations, which reflect the temperature-dependent motional coupling between lipid and protein. Our results revealed that lipoprotein particles are extremely soft and flexible. We found substantial differences in the molecular resiliences of lipoproteins, especially at higher temperatures. These discrepancies not only can be explained in terms of lipid composition and mobility but also suggest that apoB100 displays different dynamics dependent on the lipoprotein it is bound to. Hence, we suppose that the inherent conformational flexibility of apoB100 permits particle stabilization upon lipid exchange, whereas the dynamic coupling between protein and lipids might be a key determinant for lipoprotein conversion and atherogenicity. PMID:21790144

  8. Clinical relevance of the biochemical, metabolic, and genetic factors that influence low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kwiterovich, Peter O

    2002-10-17

    Traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) predict about 50% of the risk of developing CAD. The Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III has defined emerging risk factors for CAD, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Small, dense LDL is often accompanied by increased triglycerides (TGs) and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An increased number of small, dense LDL particles is often missed when the LDL cholesterol level is normal or borderline elevated. Small, dense LDL particles are present in families with premature CAD and hyperapobetalipoproteinemia, familial combined hyperlipidemia, LDL subclass pattern B, familial dyslipidemic hypertension, and syndrome X. The metabolic syndrome, as defined by ATP III, incorporates a number of the components of these syndromes, including insulin resistance and intra-abdominal fat. Subclinical inflammation and elevated procoagulants also appear to be part of this atherogenic syndrome. Overproduction of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) by the liver and increased secretion of large, apolipoprotein (apo) B-100-containing VLDL is the primary metabolic characteristic of most of these patients. The TG in VLDL is hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) which produces intermediate-density lipoprotein. The TG in intermediate-density lipoprotein is hydrolyzed further, resulting in the generation of LDL. The cholesterol esters in LDL are exchanged for TG in VLDL by the cholesterol ester tranfer proteins, followed by hydrolysis of TG in LDL by hepatic lipase which produces small, dense LDL. Cholesterol ester transfer protein mediates a similar lipid exchange between VLDL and HDL, producing a cholesterol ester-poor HDL. In adipocytes, reduced fatty acid trapping and retention by adipose tissue may result from a primary defect in the incorporation of free fatty acids into TGs. Alternatively, insulin resistance may promote reduced retention of free fatty acids by adipocytes. Both these abnormalities lead to

  9. Structure, function, and genetics of lipoprotein (a).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Konrad; Noureen, Asma; Kronenberg, Florian; Utermann, Gerd

    2016-08-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] has attracted the interest of researchers and physicians due to its intriguing properties, including an intragenic multiallelic copy number variation in the LPA gene and the strong association with coronary heart disease (CHD). This review summarizes present knowledge of the structure, function, and genetics of Lp(a) with emphasis on the molecular and population genetics of the Lp(a)/LPA trait, as well as aspects of genetic epidemiology. It highlights the role of genetics in establishing Lp(a) as a risk factor for CHD, but also discusses uncertainties, controversies, and lack of knowledge on several aspects of the genetic Lp(a) trait, not least its function. PMID:27074913

  10. Comparative studies of vertebrate lipoprotein lipase: a key enzyme of very low density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Vandeberg, John L; Cox, Laura A

    2011-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LIPL or LPL; E.C.3.1.1.34) serves a dual function as a triglyceride lipase of circulating chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and facilitates receptor-mediated lipoprotein uptake into heart, muscle and adipose tissue. Comparative LPL amino acid sequences and protein structures and LPL gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Mammalian LPL genes usually contained 9 coding exons on the positive strand. Vertebrate LPL sequences shared 58-99% identity as compared with 33-49% sequence identities with other vascular triglyceride lipases, hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL). Two human LPL N-glycosylation sites were conserved among seven predicted sites for the vertebrate LPL sequences examined. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and conserved predicted secondary and tertiary structures were also studied. A CpG island was identified within the 5'-untranslated region of the human LPL gene which may contribute to the higher than average (×4.5 times) level of expression reported. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of vertebrate lipase genes, LPL, LIPG (encoding EL) and LIPC (encoding HL) which suggested that these have been derived from gene duplication events of an ancestral neutral lipase gene, prior to the appearance of fish during vertebrate evolution. Comparative divergence rates for these vertebrate sequences indicated that LPL is evolving more slowly (2-3 times) than for LIPC and LIPG genes and proteins. PMID:21561822

  11. The role of lipoprotein(a) in clotting reactions during lipoprotein apheresis-A case report.

    PubMed

    Matney, Kathryn; Berg, Mary; Falko, James M; Draper, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    In individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) who are unable to reach a target low-density lipoprotein level on a drug regimen, lipoprotein apheresis (LA) may be the treatment of choice. Severe reactions involving clotting during LA are not well described in the literature. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with FH and markedly elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) levels who experienced such a reaction while undergoing LA with a dextran-sulfate cellulose column on the Kaneka MA-01 Liposorber system. Owing to the clotting as well as a blood pressure drop to <100 mm Hg systolic, the procedure was stopped early. Before her second procedure, she was given an increased loading dose of unfractionated heparin. She did not develop clotting during this second procedure. A growing body of literature on the role of Lp(a) in atherothrombotic complications and hemostasis supports a possible mechanism by which clotting in the instrument could occur during apheresis. Our patient's initial pretreatment Lp(a) was 3.5 times greater than the mean Lp(a) levels in patients with FH. This theory is consistent with our case in that the patient's Lp(a) levels progressively declined with each procedure, and she had no subsequent clotting. PMID:27055976

  12. Membrane topology of Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J D; Bourell, K W; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D

    1995-01-01

    A critical issue regarding the molecular architectures of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi, the agents of venereal syphilis and Lyme disease, respectively, concerns the membrane topologies of their major lipoprotein immunogens. A related question is whether these lipid-modified membrane proteins form intramembranous particles during freeze fracture electron microscopy. To address these issues, native borrelial and treponemal lipoproteins were reconstituted into liposomes of diverse composition. The importance of the covalently associated lipids for membrane association of lipoproteins was revealed by the observation that nonlipidated recombinant forms of both B. burgdorferi OspA and the T. pallidum 47-kDa immunogen (Tpp47) showed very weak or no binding to model bilayer vesicles. In contrast to control liposomes reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin or bovine rhodopsin, two well-characterized transmembrane proteins, none of the lipoprotein-liposomes contained particles when examined by freeze fracture electron microscopy. To extend these findings to prokaryotic lipoproteins with relatively amphiphilic polypeptides, similar experiments were conducted with a recombinant nonlipidated form of Escherichia coli TraT, a lipoprotein which has putative transmembrane domains. The nonlipidated TraT oligomers bound vesicles derived from E. coli lipids but, surprisingly, did not form particles in the freeze-fractured liposomes. These findings support (i) a proposed topology of spirochetal lipoproteins in which the polypeptide is extrinsic to the membrane surface and (ii) the contention that particles visualized in freeze-fractured spirochetal membranes represent poorly characterized transmembrane proteins. PMID:7790053

  13. Phosphatase Hydrolysis of Soil Organic Phosphorus Fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant available inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is usually limited in highly weathered Ultisols. The high Fe, Al, and Mn contents in these soils enhance Pi retention and fixation. The metals are also known to form complexes with organic phosphorus (Po) compounds. Hydrolysis of Po compounds is needed for P...

  14. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  15. Thioglycoside hydrolysis catalyzed by {beta}-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hong; Byers, Larry D.

    2007-10-26

    Sweet almond {beta}-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) has been shown to have significant thioglycohydrolase activity. While the K{sub m} values for the S- and O-glycosides are similar, the k{sub cat} values are about 1000-times lower for the S-glycosides. Remarkably, the pH-profile for k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl thioglucoside (pNPSG) shows the identical dependence on a deprotonated carboxylate (pK{sub a} 4.5) and a protonated group (pK{sub a} 6.7) as does the pH-profile for hydrolysis of the corresponding O-glycoside. Not surprisingly, in spite of the requirement for the presence of this protonated group in catalytically active {beta}-glucosidase, thioglucoside hydrolysis does not involve general acid catalysis. There is no solvent kinetic isotope effect on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of pNPSG.

  16. Optimization of dilute acid hydrolysis of Enteromorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Haiyan; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    Acid hydrolysis is a simple and direct way to hydrolyze polysaccharides in biomass into fermentable sugars. To produce fermentable sugars effectively and economically for fuel ethanol, we have investigated the hydrolysis of Enteromorpha using acids that are typically used to hydrolyze biomass: H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4 and C4H4O4 (maleic acid). 5%(w/w) Enteromorpha biomass was treated for different times (30, 60, and 90 min) and with different acid concentrations (0.6, 1.0, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2%, w/w) at 121°C. H2SO4 was the most effective acid in this experiment. We then analyzed the hydrolysis process in H2SO4 in detail using high performance liquid chromatography. At a sulfuric acid concentration of 1.8% and treatment time of 60 min, the yield of ethanol fermentable sugars (glucose and xylose) was high, (230.5 mg/g dry biomass, comprising 175.2 mg/g glucose and 55.3 mg/g xylose), with 48.6% of total reducing sugars being ethanol fermentable. Therefore, Enteromorpha could be a good candidate for production of fuel ethanol. In future work, the effects of temperature and biomass concentration on hydrolysis, and also the fermentation of the hydrolysates to ethanol fuel should be focused on.

  17. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems. PMID:11563378

  18. Mechanisms of lactone hydrolysis in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2013-07-19

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of linear esters and lactones was studied using a hybrid supermolecule-polarizable continuum model (PCM) approach including up to six water molecules. The compounds studied included two linear esters, four β-lactones, two γ-lactones, and one δ-lactone: ethyl acetate, methyl formate, β-propiolactone, β-butyrolactone, β-isovalerolactone, diketene (4-methyleneoxetan-2-one), γ-butyrolactone, 2(5H)-furanone, and δ-valerolactone. The theoretical results are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements reported in the literature and also in excellent qualitative agreement with long-held views regarding the nature of the hydrolysis mechanisms at molecular level. The present results help to understand the balance between the unimolecular (A(AC)1) and bimolecular (A(AC)2) reaction pathways. In contrast to the experimental setting, where one of the two branches is often occluded by the requirement of rather extreme experimental conditions, we have been able to estimate both contributions for all the compounds studied and found that a transition from A(AC)2 to A(AC)1 hydrolysis takes place as acidity increases. A parallel work addresses the neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of lactones. PMID:23731203

  19. Fatty acids of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Belisle, J T; Brandt, M E; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1994-01-01

    A fundamental ultrastructural feature shared by the spirochetal pathogens Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum) and Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agents of venereal syphilis and Lyme disease, respectively, is that their most abundant membrane proteins contain covalently attached fatty acids. In this study, we identified the fatty acids covalently bound to lipoproteins of B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum and examined potential acyl donors to these molecules. Palmitate was the predominant fatty acid of both B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum lipoproteins. T. pallidum lipoproteins also contained substantial amounts of stearate, a fatty acid not typically prevalent in prokaryotic lipoproteins. In both spirochetes, the fatty acids of cellular lipids differed from those of their respective lipoproteins. To characterize phospholipids in these organisms, spirochetes were metabolically labeled with [3H]palmitate or [3H]oleate; B. burgdorferi contained only phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine, while T. pallidum contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, and cardiolipin. Although palmitate predominated in the lipoproteins, there were no apparent differences in the incorporation of these two fatty acids into phospholipids (putative acyl donors). Phospholipase A1 and A2 digestion of phosphatidylcholine from B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum labeled with either [3H]palmitate or [3H]oleate also revealed that neither fatty acid was incorporated preferentially into the 1 and 2 positions (potential acyl donor sites) of the glycerol backbone. The combined findings suggest that fatty acid utilization during lipoprotein synthesis is determined largely by the fatty acid specificities of the lipoprotein acyl transferases. These findings also provide the basis for ongoing efforts to elucidate the relationship between lipoprotein acylation and the physiological functions and inflammatory

  20. Lipoprotein particle distribution and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase activity after acute exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many of the metabolic effects of exercise are due to the most recent exercise session. With recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS), it is possible to gain insight about which lipoprotein particles are responsible for mediating exercise effects. Methods Using a randomized cross-over design, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) responses were evaluated in eight men on the morning after i) an inactive control trial (CON), ii) exercising vigorously on the prior evening for 100 min followed by fasting overnight to maintain an energy and carbohydrate deficit (EX-DEF), and iii) after the same exercise session followed by carbohydrate intake to restore muscle glycogen and carbohydrate balance (EX-BAL). Results The intermediate, low and high density lipoprotein particle concentrations did not differ between trials. Fasting triglyceride (TG) determined biochemically, and mean VLDL size were lower in EX-DEF but not in EX-BAL compared to CON, primarily due to a reduction in VLDL-TG in the 70–120 nm (large) particle range. In contrast, VLDL-TG was lower in both EX-DEF and EX-BAL compared to CON in the 43–55 nm (medium) particle range. VLDL-TG in smaller particles (29–43 nm) was unaffected by exercise. Because the majority of VLDL particles were in this smallest size range and resistant to change, total VLDL particle concentration was not different between any of these conditions. Skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was also not different across these 3 trials. However, in CON only, the inter-individual differences in LPL activity were inversely correlated with fasting TG, VLDL-TG, total, large and small VLDL particle concentration and VLDL size, indicating a regulatory role for LPL in the non-exercised state. Conclusions These findings reveal a high level of differential regulation between different sized triglyceride-rich lipoproteins following exercise and feeding, in the absence of changes in LPL activity. PMID

  1. Hepatitis C virus relies on lipoproteins for its life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Germana; Di Caprio, Giorgia; Fimia, Gian Maria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Marco; Alonzi, Tonino

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 150 million people worldwide. In most cases, HCV infection becomes chronic causing liver disease ranging from fibrosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral persistence and pathogenesis are due to the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, mainly lipid metabolism and innate immunity. In particular, HCV exploits the lipoprotein machineries for almost all steps of its life cycle. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge concerning the interplay between HCV and lipoprotein metabolism. We discuss the role played by members of lipoproteins in HCV entry, replication and virion production. PMID:26877603

  2. Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis of fats

    SciTech Connect

    Deibert, M.C.

    1992-08-28

    Hydrolysis of fats and oils produces fatty acid and glycerol. The catalyzed, liquid phase Colgate-Emry process, state-of-the-art, produces impure products that require extensive energy investment for their purification to commercial grade. Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis may produce products more easily purified. A bench-scale hydrolyzer was designed and constructed to contact descending liquid fat or oil with rising superheated steam. Each of the five stages in the reactor was designed similar to a distillation column stage to promote intimate liquid-gas contact. Degree of hydrolysis achieved in continuous tests using tallow feed were 15% at 280C and 35% at 300C at a tallow-to-steam mass feed ratio of 4.2. At a feed ratio of 9.2, the degree of hydrolysis was 21% at 300C. Decomposition was strongly evident at 325C but not at lower temperatures. Soybean oil rapidly polymerized under reaction conditions. Batch tests at 320C produced degrees of hydrolyses of between 44% and 63% using tallow and palm oil feeds. Over 95% fatty acids were present in a clean, readily separated organic portion of the overhead product from most tests. The test reactor had serious hydraulic resistance to liquid down-flow which limited operation to very long liquid residence times. These times are in excess of those that tallow and palm oil are stable at the reaction temperature. Little glycerol and extensive light organics were produced indicating that unexplained competing reactions to hydrolysis occurred in the experimental system. Further tests using an improved reactor will be required.

  3. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a...

  4. Effect of lithocholic acid feeding on plasma lipoproteins and binding of radioiodinated human lipoproteins to hepatic membranes in rats.

    PubMed

    Loo, G; Kessie, G; Berlin, E; Nair, P P

    1992-06-01

    1. Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed diets containing 0.25% lithocholic acid for 6 weeks exhibited elevated serum cholesterol. 2. The rats were fed diets containing 5 or 20% fat with and without the lithocholate and/or oxytetracycline-HCl. 3. The cholesterol elevation was associated with high density lipoprotein (HDL) and not very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) or low density lipoprotein (LDL). 4. Specific binding of human [125I]HDL to hepatic membranes was lowered in lithocholate-fed rats, but binding of human [125I]LDL to these membranes was not affected. PMID:1354585

  5. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  6. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. PMID:23769508

  7. Hypochlorite, oxidative modification of plasma lipoproteins, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Panasenko, O M; Sergienko, V I

    2001-05-01

    Hypochlorite produced in vivo by activated neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages modifies blood lipoproteins and intensifies free radical lipid peroxidation, which probably plays a key role in the early stages of atherosclerotic vascular damages. PMID:11550040

  8. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  9. Isolation and characterization of the haemolymph lipoproteins of Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Fichera, L E; Brenner, R R

    1982-01-01

    1. Three lipoproteins differing in hydrated densities were isolated by ultracentrifugal procedures from the haemolymph of adult and fasted Triatoma infestans. 2. They are the high density lipoprotein HDL (d = 1.115-1.152) and the two very high density lipoproteins VHDL-I (d = 1.190-1.231) and VHDL-II (d = 1.245-1.260). HDL was the predominant lipoprotein. 3. The total lipid content expressed as % of lipoprotein weight in HDL, VHDL-I an VHDL-II was 30.1, 7.8 ad 2.9% respectively. Diacylglycerols are the predominant lipids of HDL (38.7%) and VHDL-I (27.0%) but only amount of 6.2% in VHDL-II. 4. Triacylglycerols are minor components (about 6.0%) of all fractions. 5. The phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine), sterols, sterol esters and hydrocarbons were present in all lipoprotein fractions. 6. Phospholipids and hydrocarbons were the most abundant lipids of VHDL-II. PMID:7049559

  10. A study of the abnormal lipoproteins in abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Scanu, A M; Aggerbeck, L P; Kruski, A W; Lim, C T; Kayden, H J

    1974-01-01

    The serum lipoproteins of five patients with abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) were separated by ultracentrifugation and then analyzed either intact or after delipidation. In accord with previous findings, all of the patients lacked serum particles with the characteristics of normal low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and of the LDL apoprotein as assessed by immunochemical methods. Each patient exhibited on every examination an abnormal particle, "LDL", which had the flotational properties of LDL, the polypeptide makeup of high-density lipoproteins HDL, the spectral and morphological characteristics of neither LDL nor HDL, and a relatively low content of cholesteryl esters. The HDL were abnormal in having a marked decrease in their total plasma content, an altered proportion of the subclasses HDL2 and HDL3, and a peculiar polypeptide distribution, comprising both normal and additional components, usually not seen in normal controls. The patients also exhibited a decrease of plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) activity which probably accounted for the low content of cholesteryl esters in both "LDL" and HDL, and in turn for the unusual appearance of "LDL" on electron microscopy. It is concluded that ABL is a disorder affecting all serum lipoprotein classes. Whether the abetalipoproteinemia previously described and noted in the current studies is related to or independent of the abnormalities observed in the other lipoproteins was not established. How the deficiency of LCAT activity, observed in all patients studied, contributed to some of the observed structural lipoprotein abnormalities also remained undetermined. Images PMID:11344558

  11. The Cross-Talk between Spirochetal Lipoproteins and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Spirochetal diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, and leptospirosis are major threats to public health. However, the immunopathogenesis of these diseases has not been fully elucidated. Spirochetes interact with the host through various structural components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), surface lipoproteins, and glycolipids. Although spirochetal antigens such as LPS and glycolipids may contribute to the inflammatory response during spirochetal infections, spirochetes such as Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lack LPS. Lipoproteins are most abundant proteins that are expressed in all spirochetes and often determine how spirochetes interact with their environment. Lipoproteins are pro-inflammatory, may regulate responses from both innate and adaptive immunity and enable the spirochetes to adhere to the host or the tick midgut or to evade the immune system. However, most of the spirochetal lipoproteins have unknown function. Herein, the immunomodulatory effects of spirochetal lipoproteins are reviewed and are grouped into two main categories: effects related to immune evasion and effects related to immune activation. Understanding lipoprotein-induced immunomodulation will aid in elucidating innate immunopathogenesis processes and subsequent adaptive mechanisms potentially relevant to spirochetal disease vaccine development and to inflammatory events associated with spirochetal diseases. PMID:25071771

  12. The Cross-Talk between Spirochetal Lipoproteins and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Spirochetal diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, and leptospirosis are major threats to public health. However, the immunopathogenesis of these diseases has not been fully elucidated. Spirochetes interact with the host through various structural components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), surface lipoproteins, and glycolipids. Although spirochetal antigens such as LPS and glycolipids may contribute to the inflammatory response during spirochetal infections, spirochetes such as Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lack LPS. Lipoproteins are most abundant proteins that are expressed in all spirochetes and often determine how spirochetes interact with their environment. Lipoproteins are pro-inflammatory, may regulate responses from both innate and adaptive immunity and enable the spirochetes to adhere to the host or the tick midgut or to evade the immune system. However, most of the spirochetal lipoproteins have unknown function. Herein, the immunomodulatory effects of spirochetal lipoproteins are reviewed and are grouped into two main categories: effects related to immune evasion and effects related to immune activation. Understanding lipoprotein-induced immunomodulation will aid in elucidating innate immunopathogenesis processes and subsequent adaptive mechanisms potentially relevant to spirochetal disease vaccine development and to inflammatory events associated with spirochetal diseases. PMID:25071771

  13. Lipoprotein (a) measurements for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Albers, John J

    2016-04-01

    The high degree of size heterogeneity of apo(a), the distinct protein component of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], renders the development and selection of specific antibodies directed to apo(a) more difficult and poses significant challenges to the development of immunoassays to measure its concentration in plasma or serum samples. Apo(a) is extremely variable in size not only between but also within individuals because of the presence of two different, genetically determined apo(a) isoform sizes. Therefore, the antigenic determinants per particle available to interact with the antibodies will vary in the samples and the calibrators, thus contributing to apo(a) size-dependent inaccuracy of different methods. The lack of rigorous validation of the immunoassays and common means of expressing Lp(a) concentrations hinder the harmonization of results obtained by different studies and contribute to the lack of common cut points for identification of individuals at risk for coronary artery disease or for interventions aimed at reducing Lp(a) levels. The aim of our review is to present and critically evaluate the issues surrounding the measurements of Lp(a), their impact on the clinical interpretation of the data, and the obstacles we need to overcome to achieve the standardization of Lp(a) measurements. PMID:26637278

  14. Lipoprotein(a) in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Michele; Vacante, Marco; Russo, Cristina; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Antic, Tijana; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Bella, Rita; Pennisi, Giovanni; Galvano, Fabio; Frigiola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is an LDL-like molecule consisting of an apolipoprotein B-100 (apo(B-100)) particle attached by a disulphide bridge to apo(a). Many observations have pointed out that Lp(a) levels may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Lp(a) inhibits the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF) and contributes to the growth of arterial atherosclerotic lesions by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the migration of smooth muscle cells to endothelial cells. Moreover Lp(a) inhibits plasminogen binding to the surfaces of endothelial cells and decreases the activity of fibrin-dependent tissue-type plasminogen activator. Lp(a) may act as a proinflammatory mediator that augments the lesion formation in atherosclerotic plaques. Elevated serum Lp(a) is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, Lp(a) levels should be a marker of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, saphenous vein bypass graft atherosclerosis, and accelerated coronary atherosclerosis of cardiac transplantation. Finally, the possibility that Lp(a) may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke has been assessed in several studies. Recent findings suggest that Lp(a)-lowering therapy might be beneficial in patients with high Lp(a) levels. A future therapeutic approach could include apheresis in high-risk patients in order to reduce major coronary events. PMID:23484137

  15. Effects of lipoprotein(a) on thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    von Hodenberg, E; Pestel, E; Kreuzer, J; Freitag, M; Bode, C

    1994-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) and plasminogen share a high degree of structural homology. Therefore it has been suggested that elevated levels of Lp(a) may inhibit the profibrinolytic activity at the cell surface and increase the risk of thrombosis by competitive inhibition of plasminogen. In the present study we evaluated whether high levels of Lp(a) affect thrombolytic therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Forty-one patients with acute myocardial infarction were treated with a combination of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator and human single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Coronary patency was assessed angiographically 90 min after initiation of treatment. Thrombolysis was successful in 30 and unsuccessful in 11 patients. Patients with high Lp(a) levels (> 25 mg/dl) (n = 9) responded equally well to thrombolytic therapy (8 of 9, patency 89%) as did patients with normal or low levels of Lp(a) (22 of 32, patency 70%, difference P > 0.1). The results demonstrate that high levels of Lp(a) do not influence thrombolysis in patients with acute myocardial infarction when low-dose pharmacologic concentrations of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator and human single chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator are applied in combination. PMID:8187238

  16. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.; Colcord, A.R.; Faass, S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Roberts, R.S.

    1982-08-01

    To produce ethanol from hardwood it is desirable to fractionate the hardwood in order to produce a relatively pure cellulosic pulp for dilute acid hydrolysis. An experimental investigation of continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar wood chips indicates that over 90% of the lignin present can be extracted by 0.1N sodium hydroxide, resulting in a cellulose pulp containing over 90% hexosan. The study was performed using a Stake Technology, Ltd., continuous digester rated at one oven dry ton per hour of wood chips. The yields of hexosans, hexoses, xylan, xylose, lignin, furfural, acetic acid and methanol were determined as a function of residence time and steam pressure in the digester. The information provides a basis for establishing a material and energy balance for a hardwood to ethanol plant.

  17. Pretreatment of sallow prior to enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Galbe, M.; Zacchi, G.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    Pretreatment of fast-growing sallow by steam explosion prior to enzymic hydrolysis was investigated to find optimum conditions regarding pretreatment temperature and time. Some preliminary experiments with impregnation of the material with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ were performed to reduce the byproduct formation and to increase the xylose yield. A temperature of 220 degrees for 15 minutes gave the highest yield, approximately 80% of the glucose available based on raw material. The xylose recovered was equal to or less than 20% when no chemicals were added. Impregnation with Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ gave an improvement compared with the unimpregnated material. About 30% of the xylose content could thus be recovered after the enzymic hydrolysis. The results are promising. (Refs. 5).

  18. Pathway of processive ATP hydrolysis by kinesin

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susan P.; Webb, Martin R.; Brune, Martin; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct measurement of the kinetics of kinesin dissociation from microtubules, the release of phosphate and ADP from kinesin, and rebinding of kinesin to the microtubule have defined the mechanism for the kinesin ATPase cycle. The processivity of ATP hydrolysis is ten molecules per site at low salt concentration but is reduced to one ATP per site at higher salt concentration. Kinesin dissociates from the microtubule after ATP hydrolysis. This step is rate-limiting. The subsequent rebinding of kinesin · ADP to the microtubule is fast, so kinesin spends only a small fraction of its duty cycle in the dissociated state. These results provide an explanation for the motility differences between skeletal myosin and kinesin. PMID:7854446

  19. [THE SPIRIT CHOLESTEROL, BIOLOGICA L ROLE AT STAGES OF PHYLOGENESIS, MECHANISMS OF INHIBITION OF SYNTHESIS OF STEROL BY STATINS, FACTORS OF PHARMACOGENOMICS AND DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Kotlovskii, M Yu; Pokrovskii, A A; Kotlovskaia, O S; Osedko, A V; Titova, N M; Kotlovskii, Yu V; Digaii, A M

    2015-04-01

    The hypolipidemic effect of statins is realized by inhibition of synthesis of local pool of cholesterol spirit in endoplasmic net of hepatocytes. The cholesterol spirit covers all hydrophobic medium of triglycerides with polar mono layer of phosphatidylcholines and cholesterol spirit prior to secretion of lipoproteins of very low density into hydrophilic medium. The lesser mono layer between lipase enzyme and triglycerides substrate contains of cholesterol spirit the higher are the parameters of hydrolysis of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density. The sequence of effect of statins is as follows: blocking of synthesis in hepatocytes and decreasing of content of unesterified cholesterol spirit in blood plasma; activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density; formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells by force of apoB-100 endocytosis; decreasing in blood of content of polyenoic fatty acids, equimolar esterified by cholesterol spirit, polyethers of cholesterol spirit and decreasing of level of cholesterol spirit-lipoproteins of very low density. There is no way to eliminate aphysiological effect of disordered biological function of trophology (nutrition) on metabolism of fatty acids in population by means of pharmaceuticals intake. It is necessary to eliminate aphysiological effect of environment. To decrease rate of diseases of cardiovascular system one has to decrease in food content of saturated fatty acids and in the first instance palmitic saturated fatty acid, trans-form fatty acid, palmitoleic fatty acids up to physiological values and increase to the same degree the content of polyenoic fatty acids. The saturated fatty acids block absorption of polyenoic fatty acids by cells. The atherosclerosis is a deficiency of polyenoic fatty acids under surplus of palmitic saturated fatty acid. PMID:26189285

  20. PLA recycling by hydrolysis at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristina, Annesini Maria; Rosaria, Augelletti; Sara, Frattari; Fausto, Gironi

    2016-05-01

    In this work the process of PLA hydrolysis at high temperature was studied, in order to evaluate the possibility of chemical recycling of this polymer bio-based. In particular, the possibility to obtain the monomer of lactic acid from PLA degradation was investigated. The results of some preliminary tests, performed in a laboratory batch reactor at high temperature, are presented: the experimental results show that the complete degradation of PLA can be obtained in relatively low reaction times.

  1. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes-all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  2. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes—all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  3. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g–1 protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1–17.5 mg g–1 SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load. PMID:24677771

  4. Palm Date Fibers: Analysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Marzieh; Karimi, Keikhosro; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2010-01-01

    Waste palm dates were subjected to analysis for composition and enzymatic hydrolysis of their flesh fibers. The fruit contained 32% glucose and 30% fructose, while the water-insoluble fibers of its flesh consisted of 49.9% lignin and 20.9% polysaccharides. Water-insoluble fibers were settled to 55% of its initial volume in 12 h. The presence of skin and flesh colloidal fibers results in high viscosity and clogging problems during industrial processes. The settling velocity of the fibers was improved by enzymatic hydrolysis. Hydrolysis resulted in 84.3% conversion of the cellulosic part of the fibers as well as reducing the settling time to 10 minutes and the final settled volume to 4% of the initial volume. It implies easier separation of the fibers and facilitates fermentation processes in the corresponding industries. Two kinds of high- and low-lignin fibers were identified from the water-insoluble fibers. The high-lignin fibers (75% lignin) settled easily, while the low-lignin fibers (41.4% lignin) formed a slurry suspension which settled very slowly. The hydrophilicity of these low-lignin fibers is the major challenge of the industrial processes. PMID:21151438

  5. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-04-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g(-1) protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1-17.5 mg g(-1) SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load. PMID:24677771

  6. Initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is unaffected but endocytosis is delayed in mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herz, J; Qiu, S Q; Oesterle, A; DeSilva, H V; Shafi, S; Havel, R J

    1995-01-01

    Two endocytic receptors, the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein (LRP), are thought to act in concert in the hepatic uptake of partially metabolized dietary lipoproteins, the chylomicron remnants. We have evaluated the role of these two receptors in the hepatic metabolism of chylomicron remnants in normal mice and in LDLR-deficient [LDLR (-/-)] mice. The rate of chylomicron remnant removal by the liver was normal up to 30 min after intravenous injection of chylomicrons into LDLR (-/-) mice and was unaffected by receptor-associated protein (RAP), a potent inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP. In contrast, endocytosis of the remnants by the hepatocytes, measured by their accumulation in the endosomal fraction and by the rate of hydrolysis of component cholesteryl esters, was dramatically reduced in the absence of the LDLR. Coadministration of RAP prevented the continuing hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants in LDL (-/-) mice after 30 min, consistent with blockade of the slow endocytosis by a RAP-sensitive process. Taken together with previous studies, our results are consistent with a model in which the initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is primarily mediated by mechanisms that do not include LDLR or LRP, possibly involving glycosaminoglycan-bound hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein E. After the remnants bind to these alternative sites on the hepatocyte surface, endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the LDLR and also by a slower and less efficient backup process that is RAP sensitive and therefore most likely involves LRP. PMID:7753850

  7. Physical inactivity amplifies the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to the lipid-induced downregulation of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Zderic, Theodore W; Hamilton, Marc T

    2006-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for lipoprotein disorders and the metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity has a powerful effect on suppressing lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in skeletal muscle, the rate-limiting enzyme for hydrolysis of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins. We tested the ability of several compounds to prevent the decrease in LPL. The present study minimized standing and ordinary light nonexercise movements in rats to compare the effects of inactivity and nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) on LPL activity. The key new insight was that the typically quick decrease in LPL activity of oxidative muscle caused by physical inactivity was prevented by nicotinic acid (NA), whereas inhibitors of TNF-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and NF-kappaB had no such effect. NA was administered at a dose known to acutely impede the appearance of plasma TG from the liver and free fatty acids from adipose tissue, and it was effective at intentionally lowering plasma lipid concentrations to the same level in active and inactive groups. As measured from heparin-releasable LPL activity, LPL in the microvasculature of the most oxidative muscles was approximately 90% lower in the inactive group compared with controls, and this suppression was completely blocked by NA. In contrast to inactivity, NA did not raise muscle LPL in ambulatory controls, whereas a large exogenous fat delivery did decrease LPL activity. In vitro control studies revealed that NA did not have a direct effect on skeletal muscle LPL activity. In conclusion, physical inactivity amplifies the ability of plasma lipids to suppress muscle LPL activity. The light ambulatory contractions responsible for NEAT are sufficient for mitigating these deleterious effects. PMID:16195388

  8. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  9. Characterization of lipoproteins in human and canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Pitas, R.E.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Boyles, J.K.; Lee, S.; Mahley, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that rat brain astrocytes in vitro synthesize and secrete apo-E and possess apo-B,E(LDL) receptors. The apo-E secreted by astrocytes and apo-E in rat brain extracts differed from serum apo-E in two respects. Brain apo-E had a higher apparent molecular weight and a higher percentage of more acidic isoforms. To characterize further the apo-E within the central nervous system, apo-E in human and canine CSF was investigated. Compared to plasma apo-E, CSF apo-E had a higher apparent M/sub r/ and a higher percentage of acidic isoforms which were sialylated, as shown by neuraminidase digestion. The apo-E in human CSF was approx.5-10% of the plasma level. In CSF 60-80% of the apo-E was in lipoproteins with d = 1.09-1.15. The remainder of the apo-E was in the d > 1.21 fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins were primarily spherical (110-190 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) and spheres (100-150 A). The CSF also contained apo-AI in the d = 1.09-1.15 g/ml fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins containing both apo-E and apo-AI were isolated on an anti-apo-E affinity column, suggesting that apo-E and AI occurred in the same particles. The CSF apo-E-containing lipoproteins competed for binding of /sup 125/I-LDL to the apo-B,E(LDL) receptor. There was no detectable apo-B in CSF. These data suggest that CSF lipoproteins might transport lipid and regulate lipid homeostasis within the brain.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Stable α-Synuclein Lipoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, Cédric; Campioni, Silvia; Kowal, Julia; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Gerez, Juan; Liu, Xiaoxia; Verasdonck, Joeri; Nespovitaya, Nadezhda; Choe, Senyon; Meier, Beat H; Picotti, Paola; Rizo, Josep; Stahlberg, Henning; Riek, Roland

    2016-04-15

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the aggregation of the human α-Synuclein (α-Syn) protein. α-Syn possesses high structural plasticity and the capability of interacting with membranes. Both features are not only essential for its physiological function but also play a role in the aggregation process. Recently it has been proposed that α-Syn is able to form lipid-protein particles reminiscent of high-density lipoproteins. Here, we present a method to obtain a stable and homogeneous population of nanometer-sized particles composed of α-Syn and anionic phospholipids. These particles are called α-Syn lipoprotein (nano)particles to indicate their relationship to high-density lipoproteins formed by human apolipoproteins in vivo and of in vitro self-assembling phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. Structural investigations of the α-Syn lipoprotein particles by circular dichroism (CD) and magic angle solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS SS-NMR) spectroscopy establish that α-Syn adopts a helical secondary structure within these particles. Based on cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) α-Syn lipoprotein particles have a defined size with a diameter of ∼23 nm. Chemical cross-linking in combination with solution-state NMR and multiangle static light scattering (MALS) of α-Syn particles reveal a high-order protein-lipid entity composed of ∼8-10 α-Syn molecules. The close resemblance in size between cross-linked in vitro-derived α-Syn lipoprotein particles and a cross-linked species of endogenous α-Syn from SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells indicates a potential functional relevance of α-Syn lipoprotein nanoparticles. PMID:26846854

  11. Role of caveolin-1 in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Philippe G.; Pavlides, Stephanos; Cheung, Michelle W.-C.; Daumer, Kristin; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Lipoprotein metabolism plays an important role in the development of several human diseases, including coronary artery disease and the metabolic syndrome. A good comprehension of the factors that regulate the metabolism of the various lipoproteins is therefore key to better understanding the variables associated with the development of these diseases. Among the players identified are regulators such as caveolins and caveolae. Caveolae are small plasma membrane invaginations that are observed in terminally differentiated cells. Their most important protein marker, caveolin-1, has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of several cellular signaling pathways and in the regulation of plasma lipoprotein metabolism. In the present paper, we have examined the role of caveolin-1 in lipoprotein metabolism using caveolin-1-deficient (Cav-1−/−) mice. Our data show that, while Cav-1−/− mice show increased plasma triglyceride levels, they also display reduced hepatic very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion. Additionally, we also found that a caveolin-1 deficiency is associated with an increase in high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and these HDL particles are enriched in cholesteryl ester in Cav-1−/− mice when compared with HDL obtained from wild-type mice. Finally, our data suggest that a caveolin-1 deficiency prevents the transcytosis of LDL across endothelial cells, and therefore, that caveolin-1 may be implicated in the regulation of plasma LDL levels. Taken together, our studies suggest that caveolin-1 plays an important role in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism by controlling their plasma levels as well as their lipid composition. Thus caveolin-1 may also play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:18508910

  12. Expression of the Serratia marcescens lipoproteins gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, N; Nakamura, K; Inouye, M

    1981-01-01

    The lipoprotein gene (lpp) of Serratia marcescens was cloned in a lambda phage vector (K. Nakamura and M. Inouye, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77: 1369-1373, 1980). This lpp gene was recloned in plasmid vectors pBR322 and pSC101. When a lipoprotein-deficient (lpp) mutant of Escherichia coli was transformed with pBR322 carrying the S. marcescens lpp gene, cells became nonleaky for ribonuclease, resistant to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and sensitive to globomycin. The lipoprotein was found exclusively in the outer membrane fraction. These results indicate that the S. marcescens lipoprotein was normally secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane, modified, and assembled in the E. coli outer membrane. The amount of the free-form lipoprotein produced in this system was three times higher than that produced in lpp + C. coli cells, whereas there was no difference in the amount of the bound-form lipoprotein. On the other hand, lpp E. coli cells which harbored pSC101 carrying the S. marcescens lpp gene produced only one-third of the free-form lipoprotein produced in lpp E. coli cells which harbored pSC101 carrying the E. coli lpp gene. One of the major factors causing this difference in efficiency of gene expression between the lpp genes of S. marcescens and E. coli appears to be a deletion mutation at the transcription termination region found in the cloned S. marcescens lpp gene. The functional half-life of the S. marcescens lpp messenger ribonucleic acid in E. coli was found to be found half that of the E. coli lpp messenger ribonucleic acid. Images PMID:7016834

  13. A lipidomic analysis approach in patients undergoing lipoprotein apheresis.

    PubMed

    Schmöcker, C; Kassner, U; Kiesler, S; Bismarck, M; Rothe, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Weylandt, K H

    2016-06-01

    Lipoprotein apheresis such as heparin-induced extracorporal LowDensityLipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol precipitation (HELP) reduces apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, most importantly low-density-lipoprotein (LDL), and lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)]. It is used in patients with atherosclerotic disease and therapy-refractory hypercholesterolemia or progressive atherosclerotic disease in patients with elevated Lp(a). While lipid-lowering effects of lipoprotein apheresis are well-established, there are only sparse data regarding the effect of apheresis on individual omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFA and n-3 PUFA), such as arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which could increase (AA) or decrease (EPA and DHA) cardiovascular risk. Here we analyzed different omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the blood of patients undergoing a single HELP apheresis procedure using gas chromatography (GC). Furthermore, we assessed the effect of HELP treatment on formation of lipid metabolites and mediators arising from these polyunsaturated fatty acids in the plasma by LC/ESI-MS/MS. Lipoprotein apheresis reduced the concentrations of fatty acids analyzed in the plasma by 40-50%. This was similar for AA, EPA and DHA. The reduction in fatty acid plasma levels was similar to the reduction of total triglycerides. However there was a trend towards an increase of PUFA metabolites associated with platelet activation, such as 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) and 14-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (14-HDHA). These data indicate that HELP apheresis could interfere with achieving higher levels of n-3 PUFA in the plasma. Lipid apheresis treatment might also increase the formation of potentially pro- as well as anti-inflammatory lipid mediators derived from AA or EPA and DHA. PMID:27062407

  14. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  15. New and emerging regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2014-04-01

    Overproduction of hepatic apoB100-containing VLDL particles has been well documented in animal models and in humans with insulin resistance such as the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and contributes to the typical dyslipidemia of these conditions. In addition, postprandial hyperlipidemia and elevated plasma concentrations of intestinal apoB48-containing chylomicron and chylomicron remnant particles have been demonstrated in insulin resistant states. Intestinal lipoprotein production is primarily determined by the amount of fat ingested and absorbed. Until approximately 10 years ago, however, relatively little attention was paid to the role of the intestine itself in regulating the production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) and its dysregulation in pathological states such as insulin resistance. We and others have shown that insulin resistant animal models and humans are characterized by overproduction of intestinal apoB48-containing lipoproteins. Whereas various factors are known to regulate hepatic lipoprotein particle production, less is known about factors that regulate the production of intestinal lipoprotein particles. Monosacharides, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), resveratrol, intestinal peptides (e.g. GLP-1 and GLP-2), and pancreatic hormones (e.g. insulin) have recently been shown to be important regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion. Available evidence in humans and animal models strongly supports the concept that the small intestine is not merely an absorptive organ but rather plays an active role in regulating the rate of production of chylomicrons in fed and fasting states. Metabolic signals in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and in some cases an aberrant intestinal response to these factors contribute to the enhanced formation and secretion of TRL. Understanding the regulation of intestinal lipoprotein production is imperative for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of

  16. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particle assembly: Lipid capacity of the nascent lipoprotein particle

    SciTech Connect

    Manchekar, Medha; Forte, Trudy M.; Datta, Geeta; Richardson, Paul E.; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2003-12-01

    We previously proposed that the N-terminal 1000 residue {beta}{alpha}{sub 1} domain of apolipoprotein B (apoB) forms a bulk lipid pocket homologous to that of lamprey lipovitellin (LV). In support of this ''lipid pocket'' hypothesis, apoB:1000 (residues 1-1000) was shown to be secreted by a stable transformant of McA-RH7777 cells as a monodisperse particle with HDL{sub 3} density and Stokes diameter of 112 {angstrom}. In contrast, apoB:931 (residues 1-931), missing only 69 residues of the sequence homologous to LV, was secreted as a particle considerably more dense than HDL with Stokes diameter of 110 {angstrom}. The purpose of the present study was to determine the stoichiometry of the lipid component of the apoB:931 and apoB:1000 particles. This was accomplished by metabolic labeling of cells with either [{sup 14}C]oleic acid or [{sup 3}H]glycerol followed by immunoprecipitation (IP) or nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (NDGGE) of secreted lipoproteins and by immunoaffinity chromatography of secreted unlabeled lipoproteins. The [{sup 3}H]-labeled apoB:1000-containing particles, isolated by NDGGE, contained 50 phospholipids (PL) and 11 triacylglycerols (TAG) molecules per particle. In contrast, apoB:931-containing particles contained only a few molecules of PL and were devoid of TAG. The unlabeled apoB:1000-containing particles isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography and analyzed for lipid mass, contained 56 PL, 8 TAG, and 7 cholesteryl ester molecules per particle. The surface:core lipid ratio of apoB:1000-containing particles was approximately 4:1 and was not affected by incubation of cells with oleate. Although small amounts of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) were associated with apoB:1000-containing particles, it never approached a 1:1 molar ratio of MTP to apoB. These results support a model in which: (1) the first 1000 amino acid residues of apoB are competent to complete the ''lipid pocket'' without a structural requirement for MTP

  17. Metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins during alimentary lipemia.

    PubMed Central

    Karpe, F; Steiner, G; Olivecrona, T; Carlson, L A; Hamsten, A

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of chylomicron remnants and VLDL was studied in healthy controls and normo- (NTG) and hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) patients with coronary artery disease after intake of an oral fat load. Specific determination of apo B-48 and B-100 enabled separation of the respective contribution of the two lipoprotein species. The postprandial plasma levels of small (Sf 20-60) and large (Sf 60-400) chylomicron remnants increased in controls and NTG patients. In contrast, only large chylomicron remnants increased in the HTG patients. An increase of large VLDL was seen in response to the oral fat load in all groups, whereas small VLDL were either unchanged in the controls and the NTG patients, or decreased in the HTG patient group. The whole plasma concentration of C apolipoproteins was essentially uninfluenced by the oral fat load, whereas the content in large triglyceride-rich lipoproteins paralleled the apo B elevations in controls and NTG patients. An even more prominent increase of apo B in large triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the HTG group was not accompanied by an increase of C apolipoproteins. These findings indicate that chylomicrons compete with VLDL for removal of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase and that the postprandial metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins is severely defective in hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:8450056

  18. Learning from Biology: Synthetic Lipoproteins for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Cruz, William; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lipoproteins represent a relevant tool for targeted delivery of biological/chemical agents (chemotherapeutics, siRNAs, photosensitizers and imaging contrast agents) into various cell types. These nanoparticles offer a number of advantages on drugs delivery over their native counterparts while retaining their natural characteristics and biological functions. Their ultra-small size (<30nm), high biocompatibility, favorable circulation half-life and natural ability to bind specific lipoprotein receptors i.e. low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SRB1) that are found in a number of pathological conditions (e.g. cancer, atherosclerosis), make them superior delivery strategies when compared to other nanoparticle systems. We review the various approaches that have been developed for the generation of synthetic lipoproteins and their respective applications in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, we summarize the way to address the limitation on use of reconstituted lipoproteins by means of natural or recombinant apolipoproteins, as well as apolipoprotein mimetic molecules. Finally, we provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and discuss future perspectives for clinical translation of these nanoparticles. PMID:25346461

  19. Structural stability and functional remodeling of high-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Gursky, Olga

    2015-09-14

    Lipoproteins are protein-lipid nanoparticles that transport lipids in circulation and are central in atherosclerosis and other disorders of lipid metabolism. Apolipoproteins form flexible structural scaffolds and important functional ligands on the particle surface and direct lipoprotein metabolism. Lipoproteins undergo multiple rounds of metabolic remodeling that is crucial to lipid transport. Important aspects of this remodeling, including apolipoprotein dissociation and particle fusion, are mimicked in thermal or chemical denaturation and are modulated by free energy barriers. Here we review the biophysical studies that revealed the kinetic mechanism of lipoprotein stabilization and unraveled its structural basis. The main focus is on high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An inverse correlation between stability and functions of various HDLs in cholesterol transport suggests the functional role of structural disorder. A mechanism for the conformational adaptation of the major HDL proteins, apoA-I and apoA-II, to the increasing lipid load is proposed. Together, these studies help understand why HDL forms discrete subclasses separated by kinetic barriers, which have distinct composition, conformation and functional properties. Understanding these properties may help improve HDL quality and develop novel therapies for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25749369

  20. Characterization of chick serum lipoproteins isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vico, F; Lopez, J M; Castillo, M; Zafra, M F; Garcia-Peregrin, E

    1992-01-01

    Serum lipoproteins from 12h fasted male chicks (15-day-old) were separated into 20 fractions by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation. A new procedure was described by collecting the different fractions from the bottom of tube instead of by aspiration from the meniscus of each tube. Analyses of chemical composition of serum lipoproteins have permitted to reevaluate the density limits of major classes: VHDL, d greater than 1.132 g/ml; HDL, d 1.132-1.084 g/ml; LDL, d 1.084-1.038; IDL, d 1.038-1.022; and VLDL d less than 1.022. HDL fractions clearly predominated (approx. 77% of total lipoproteins) while IDL and VLDL were present at low percentage. LDL was the fraction richest in cholesterol; triacylglycerol content clearly increased from HDL to VLDL, while protein content decreased. All the chemical components of chick serum lipoproteins were accumulated in HDL, although triacylglycerol was relatively distributed in all the lipoprotein classes. PMID:1380327

  1. The Vascular Implications of Post-prandial Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David R; Celermajer, David S; Le Couteur, David G; Lam, Christopher W K

    2004-01-01

    Impaired lipoprotein metabolism is one of the major aetiological factors for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Assessment is usually made in the fasting state, and particular attention is directed towards the measurement of the cholesterol content of both the low and high-density lipoprotein fractions. By comparison, a massive amount of lipid fluxes through the intra-vascular compartment during the post-prandial period. This has led to the hypothesis that atherosclerosis could be partially, or even predominantly, due to the pathological effects of this flux of post-prandial lipoproteins on the vessel wall. This justifies efforts to systematically study the relationship between the lipoprotein responses to food (particularly fat) ingestion and cardiovascular disease or its surrogate markers. This review will consider the mechanisms by which post-prandial metabolism might affect the risk of CVD. It will examine the evidence for and against such an association. It will also consider the practical and methodological issues that are likely to determine the future utility of post-prandial lipoprotein assessment. PMID:18516208

  2. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  3. Improved method for detection of starch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohawale, M.R.; Wilson, J.J.; Khachatourians, G.G.; Ingledew, W.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new starch hydrolysis detection method which does not rely on iodine staining or the use of color-complexed starch is described. A linear relationship was obtained with agar-starch plates when net clearing zones around colonies of yeasts were plotted against enzyme levels (semilogarithm scale) produced by the same yeast strains in liquid medium. A similar relationship between starch clearing zones and alpha-amylase levels from three different sources was observed. These observations suggest that the method is useful in mutant isolations, strain improvement programs, and the prediction of alpha-amylase activities in culture filtrates or column effluents. (Refs. 18).

  4. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  5. The effects of chemically modifying serum apolipoproteins on their ability to activate lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, P F; Lopez-Johnston, A; Welch, V A; Gurr, M I

    1987-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured in an acetone-dried-powder preparation from rat epididymal adipose tissue using pig serum or pig serum lipoprotein, which had been chemically modified, as activator. Modification of acidic amino acids of lipoproteins with NN-dimethyl-1,3-diamine resulted in a complete loss of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Modification of 34% of lipoprotein arginine groups with cyclohexanedione resulted in the loss of 75% of the activation of lipoprotein lipase; approx. 42% of the original activity was recovered after reversal of the modification. This effect was dependent on the cyclohexanedione concentration. Modification of 48% of lipoprotein lysine groups with malonaldehyde decreased the maximum activation by 20%, but three times as much lipoprotein was required to achieve this. Non-enzymic glycosylation of lipoprotein with glucose, under a variety of conditions resulting in up to 28 nmol of glucose/mg of protein, had no effect upon the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. In contrast non-enzymic sialylation resulted in a time-dependent loss of up to 60% of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Reductive methylation and acetoacetylation of serum did not affect the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. The results are compared to the effects of similar modifications to low density lipoproteins on receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:3593262

  6. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  7. Serum lipid & lipoprotein profiles of obese Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Ho, T F; Paramsothy, S; Aw, T C; Yip, W C

    1996-03-01

    The serum lipid and lipoprotein levels of 59 obese Chinese children with a mean age of 13.0 years and mean relative weight of 164.2% were analysed. Between 40% to 54% of these children had elevated lipid and lipoprotein levels and about 78% had reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) level when compared to healthy American and Japanese children. The obese children also had higher mean levels of total cholesterol (TC) and lower HDL compared to male adults in the local population. Those with elevated TC had higher mean relative weight (170% vs 159%, p < 0.05). In view of the close association between hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis, obese children should be carefully screened and managed to prevent long term morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease. PMID:10967982

  8. Brucella outer membrane lipoprotein shares antigenic determinants with Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein and is exposed on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; López, J

    1987-01-01

    In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), purified Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins gave a strong cross-reaction with sera from rabbits hyperimmunized with the heterologous lipoprotein. When smooth E. coli cells were used as ELISA antigens, the immunological cross-reaction was not observed unless the cells were treated to remove lipopolysaccharide and other outer membrane components. In contrast, intact cells from smooth strains of B. abortus and Brucella melitensis bound anti-lipoprotein immunoglobulin G, and the controls performed by ELISA showed that this reaction was not due to antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide, group 3 outer membrane proteins, or porins. Electron microscopy of cells labeled with antilipoprotein serum and protein A-colloidal gold showed specific labeling of smooth cells from both B. abortus and B. melitensis, even though unspecific labeling by nonimmune serum was observed with rough B. abortus. These results confirm the close similarity between E. coli and Brucella peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins and show that, in contrast to E. coli, the lipoprotein of B. abortus and B. melitensis is partially exposed on the surface of smooth cells. Images PMID:2432014

  9. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  10. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  11. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  12. Simulation of continuous and batch hydrolysis of willow

    SciTech Connect

    Zacchi, G.; Dahlbom, J.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of product and enzyme concentrations on the kinetics of the enzymic hydrolysis of alkali-pretreated willow is studied. The hydrolysis was performed in a UF-membrane reactor in which the product concentration was kept constant. An empirical 4-parameter rate equation that gives a good correlation to both continuous and batch hydrolysis data is presented. The model comprises the effects of enzyme concentration and product inhibition. (Refs. 11).

  13. Apolipoprotein E isoform-specific effects on lipoprotein receptor processing

    PubMed Central

    Bachmeier, Corbin; Shackleton, Ben; Ojo, Joseph; Paris, Daniel; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an isoform-specific role for apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the elimination of beta-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain. ApoE is closely associated with various lipoprotein receptors, which contribute to Aβ brain removal via metabolic clearance or transit across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These receptors are subject to ectodomain shedding at the cell surface, which alters endocytic transport and mitigates Aβ elimination. To further understand the manner in which apoE influences Aβ brain clearance, these studies investigated the effect of apoE on lipoprotein receptor shedding. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increased shedding of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1) following Aβ exposure in human brain endothelial cells. When Aβ was co-treated with each apoE isoform, there was a reduction in Aβ-induced shedding with apoE2 and apoE3, while lipoprotein receptor shedding in the presence of apoE4 remained elevated. Likewise, intracranial administration of Aβ to apoE targeted replacement mice (expressing the human apoE isoforms) resulted in an isoform-dependent effect on lipoprotein receptor shedding in the brain (apoE4>apoE3>apoE2). Moreover, these results show a strong inverse correlation with our prior work in apoE transgenic mice in which apoE4 animals showed reduced Aβ clearance across the BBB compared to apoE3 animals. Based on these results, apoE4 appears less efficient than other apoE isoforms in regulating lipoprotein receptor shedding, which may explain the differential effects of these isoforms in removing Aβ from the brain. PMID:25015123

  14. Muscarinic receptor activation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis. Relationship to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and diacylglycerol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, E.A.; Goldstein, D.; Brown, J.H. )

    1989-09-05

    We examined the relationship between phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and diacylglycerol (DAG) formation in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) stimulation in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Carbachol increases the release of (3H)choline and (3H)phosphorylcholine ((3H)Pchol) from cells containing (3H)choline-labeled PC. The production of Pchol is rapid and transient, while choline production continues for at least 30 min. mAChR-stimulated release of Pchol is reduced in cells that have been depleted of intracellular Ca2+ stores by ionomycin pretreatment, whereas choline release is unaffected by this pretreatment. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increases the release of choline, but not Pchol, from 1321N1 cells, and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the ability of carbachol to stimulate choline production. Taken together, these results suggest that Ca2+ mobilization is involved in mAChR-mediated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase C, whereas protein kinase C activation is required for mAChR-stimulated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase D. Both carbachol and PMA rapidly increase the formation of (3H)phosphatidic acid ((3H)PA) in cells containing (3H)myristate-labeled PC. (3H)Diacylglycerol ((3H)DAG) levels increase more slowly, suggesting that the predominant pathway for PC hydrolysis is via phospholipase D. When cells are labeled with (3H)myristate and (14C)arachidonate such that there is a much greater 3H/14C ratio in PC compared with the phosphoinositides, the 3H/14C ratio in DAG and PA increases with PMA treatment but decreases in response to carbachol.

  15. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  16. JCL Roundtable: Hypertriglyceridemia due to defects in lipoprotein lipase function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W. Virgil; Goldberg, Ira J.; Young, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In this Roundtable, our intent is to discuss those rare genetic disorders that impair the function of lipoprotein lipase. These cause severe hypertriglyceridemia that appears in early childhood with Mendelian inheritance and usually with full penetrance in a recessive pattern. Dr Ira Goldberg from New York University School of Medicine and Dr Stephen Young from the University of California, Los Angeles have agreed to answer my questions about this topic. Both have done fundamental work in recent years that has markedly altered our views on lipoprotein lipase function. I am going to start by asking them to give us a brief history of this enzyme system as a clinical entity. PMID:26073384

  17. Intercellular transport of lysosomal acid lipase mediates lipoprotein cholesteryl ester metabolism in a human vascular endothelial cell-fibroblast coculture system.

    PubMed Central

    Sando, G N; Ma, G P; Lindsley, K A; Wei, Y P

    1990-01-01

    We present results from studies of human cell culture models to support the premise that the extracellular transport of lysosomal acid lipase has a function in lipoprotein cholesteryl ester metabolism in vascular tissue. Vascular endothelial cells secreted a higher fraction of cellular acid lipase than did smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Acid lipase and lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase were secreted at approximately the same rate from the apical and basolateral surface of an endothelial cell monolayer. Stimulation of secretion with NH4Cl did not affect the polarity. We tested for the ability of secreted endothelial lipase to interact with connective tissue cells and influence lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism in a coculture system in which endothelial cells on a micropore filter were suspended above a monolayer of acid lipase-deficient (Wolman disease) fibroblasts. After 5-7 d, acid lipase activity in the fibroblasts reached 10%-20% of the level in normal cells; cholesteryl esters that had accumulated from growth in serum were cleared. Addition of mannose 6-phosphate to the coculture medium blocked acid lipase uptake and cholesterol clearance, indicating that lipase released from endothelial cells was packaged into fibroblast lysosomes by a phosphomannosyl receptor-mediated pathway. Supplementation of the coculture medium with serum was not required for lipase uptake and cholesteryl ester hydrolysis by the fibroblasts, but was necessary for cholesterol clearance. Results from our coculture model suggest that acid lipase may be transported from intact endothelium to cells in the lumen or the wall of a blood vessel. We postulate that delivery of acid hydrolases and lipoproteins to a common endocytic compartment may occur and have an impact on cellular lipoprotein processing. PMID:2150334

  18. The removal of partially metabolized very-low-density lipoproteins by the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Suri, B S; Targ, M E; Robinson, D S

    1981-01-01

    1. Donor perfused rat livers were used to prepare VLD (very-low-density) lipoproteins, labelled in their triacylglycerol and protein components with [1-14C]oleic acid and L-[4,5-3H]leucine respectively. Partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins, similarly labelled, were obtained from supradiaphragmatic rats injected with the parent VLD lipoproteins. 2. The triacylglycerol and protein components of the partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins were removed by recipient perfused rat livers at rates much higher than those of the parent VLD lipoproteins. No degradation of the partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins to LD (low-density) lipoproteins occurred during the perfusions. 3. Removal of hepatic lipase from the livers did not significantly affect the rate of removal of the partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins. PMID:7317016

  19. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hailong; Zhang, Qinghai; Zeng, Jia

    2016-06-01

    The defect of low density lipoprotein receptor disturbs cholesterol metabolism and causes familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). In this study, we directly delivered exogenous Ldlr gene into the liver of FH model mice (Ldlr(-/-)) by lentiviral gene transfer system. The results showed that the Ldlr gene controlled by hepatocyte-specific human thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) promoter successfully and exclusively expressed in livers.We found that, although, the content of high density lipoprotein in serum was not significantly affected by the Ldlr gene expression, the serum low density lipoprotein level was reduced by 46%, associated with a 30% and 28% decrease in triglyceride and total cholesterol, respectively, compared to uninjected Ldlr(-/-) mice. Moreover, the TBG directed expression of Ldlr significantly decreased the lipid accumulation in liver and reduced plaque burden in aorta (32%). Our results indicated that the hepatocyte-specific expression of Ldlr gene strikingly lowered serum lipid levels and resulted in amelioration of hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:27350674

  20. Modified low-density lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins. From investigation tools to real in vivo players.

    PubMed

    Koller, Elisabeth; Volf, Ivo; Gurvitz, Aner; Koller, Franz

    2006-01-01

    It has long been known that the oxidative state of the various plasma lipoproteins modulates platelet aggregability, thereby contributing to atherogenesis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), occurring in vivo both in the native and oxidised forms, interacts directly with platelets, by binding to specific receptors. While the identity of the receptors for native LDL and some subfractions of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) remains disputed, apoE-containing HDL(2) binds to LRP8. The nature of these interactions as well as the distinction between candidate receptor proteins was elucidated using covalently modified apolipoproteins, which pointed to the participation of apolipoproteins in high affinity binding. However, the platelet effects initiated by binding of native lipoproteins remain controversial. Some of this ambiguity can be traced to the fact that native LDL inevitably undergoes substantial oxidisation upon modification, including by radiolabelling. The platelet-activating effects provoked by oxidised LDL are irrefutable, but many details remain unknown. The role of CD36 in platelet binding by oxidised LDL is well established, although additional receptors may exist. Much less is known about the interaction of oxidised HDL with platelets, since platelet activation was observed in some, but not all studies. Various frequently applied in vitro oxidation methods produce modified lipoprotein species that may not be relevant in vivo. Based on the reported modifications obtained by in vitro oxidation of LDL, early investigations focused mainly on the formation and the eventual effects of oxidised lipids. More recently, alterations to lipoproteins performed using hypochloric acid and myeloperoxidase redirected the attention to the role of modified apoproteins in triggering platelet responses. PMID:16877881

  1. [THE BECOMING IN PHYLOGENESIS OF TRANSFER IN INTERCELLULAR MEDIUM AND ACTIVE ABSORPTION OF POLYENOIC FATTY ACIDS BY CELLS SEQUENTIALLY OF HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS, LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS AND HIGH DENSITY APOE-LIPOPROTEINS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2015-06-01

    After more than half-century of different conceptions, the theory of general pathology was used to substantiate that all lipoproteins are bi-layer:lipid by their structure. The main function of high density lipoproteins as of all lipoproteins is transfer of fatty acids to cells and only in second turn taking away of spirit cholesterol from cells. At the stages of phylogenesis high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins and very low density lipoproteins began to function in a subsequent way. The fatty acids were transferred by low density lipoproteins in polar lipids at passive absorption by cells. Later on, lipoproteins transfer fatty acids in non-polar ethers with spirits glycerin and spirit cholesterol. The cells absorb them by receptor endocytosis. The hepatocytes secret in blood palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linoleic very low density lipoproteins. The palmitic and oleic very low density lipoproteins absorb physiologically insulin-dependent cells apoE/B-100 = endocytosis. The linoleic and linoleic very low density lipoproteins after transition of polyethers cholesterol from high density lipoproteins turn into low density lipoproteins. The cells absorb them by apoB-100 = endocytosis. The formation of chylomicrons occurs in blood and hepatocytes absorb them by the way of apoB/E-48 = endocytosis. The absorption of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by cells with apoB-100 = endocytosis form sensitivity of animals to exogenous hyper spirit cholesterol and absorption of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by apoE/A-I = receptors form corresponding resistance. The ApoE in lipoproteins form cooperative ligands--apoE/B-48 for chylomicrons, apoE/B-100 for very low density lipoproteins and apoE/A-I for high density lipoproteins. The chylomicrons in blood form apoB-48 from complexes of triglycerides secreted by enterocytes. These views change conceptions of pathogenesis and prevention of atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome and resistance to insulin whose pathogenesis is unified

  2. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  3. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non–hig...

  4. Metabolism of apoprotein B of plasma very low density lipoproteins in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Faergeman, O; Sata, T; Kane, J P; Havel, R J

    1975-01-01

    As an extension of metabolic studies of the cholesteryl ester component of rat very low density lipoproteins, we have studied the metabolism of the B apoprotein component labeled by intravenous injection of [3H]lysine. The B apoprotein separated from other apoproteins by delipidation and selective precipitation with tetramethylurea could not be distinguished from B apoprotein prepared by the conventional gel filtration technique. After injection of [3H]lysine, specific activity of B apoprotein was maximal in very low density and low density lipoproteins 1 and 11/2-h later, respectively, in a manner consistent with a precursor-product relationship. When protein-labeled very low density lipoproteins were injected into rats, the relationships of specific activity again indicated that B apoprotein of very low density lipoproteins may be the sole precursor of that of low density lipoproteins. However, less than 10% of the B apoprotein that disappeared from very low density lipoproteins appeared in density lipoproteins. To evaluate the sites of removal of B aproprotein of very low density lipoproteins from plasma, protein-labeled very low density lipoproteins were incubated with unlabeled high density lipoproteins to reduce radioactivity in non-B apoproteins selectively by molecular exchange. Most of the B apoprotein was rapidly removed by the liver. The extensive hepatic uptake of both the cholesteryl ester and B apoprotein components of rat very low density lipoproteins may explain the characteristically low concentrations of plasma low density lipoproteins in the rat. PMID:172530

  5. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis...

  9. Structure of human serum lipoproteins inferred from compositional analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, B W; Scanu, A M; Kézdy, F J

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of the correlations between size and chemical composition of lipoproteins of normolipidemic human plasma shows that the structure of all circulating lipoproteins is consistent with a spherical model of radius r in which a spherical liquid core of cholesterol esters and triglycerides of radius = r --20.2 A is surrounded by a monolayer of cholesterol and phospholipids with closely hydrophobic ends on the surface of the core. The average molecular areas at this inner surface are Spl = 68.5 A2/molecule for phospholipids and Sc= 39.1 A2/molecule for cholesterol. The proteins are closely packed with the hydrophilic head groups of phospholipids at the outer surface of the particle, with S' pl = 62.7 A2/molecule for phospholipids and Saa = 15.6 A2/amino acid for proteins. The polar head group of free cholesterol does not participate in the packing of the outer layer and thus must be masked by proteins. Free cholesterol is distributed among the circulating lipoproteins--with the exception of very high density lipoprotein and perhaps chylomicrons--according to a thermodynamic equilibrium governed by the curvature of the surface of the particle. PMID:265578

  10. PCSK9 and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Druce, Irena; Abujrad, Hussein; Ooi, Teik Chye

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pro-protein convertase subtilisin-kexin 9 (PCSK9) is known to affect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, but there are indications from several lines of research that it may also influence the metabolism of other lipoproteins, especially triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). This review summarizes the current data on this possible role of PCSK9. A link between PCSK9 and TRL has been suggested through the demonstration of (1) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and triglyceride (TG) levels in health and disease, (2) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and markers of carbohydrate metabolism, which is closely related to TG metabolism, (3) an effect of TG-lowering fibrate therapy on plasma PCSK9 levels, (4) an effect of PCSK9 on postprandial lipemia, (5) an effect of PCSK9 on adipose tissue biology, (6) an effect of PCSK9 on apolipoprotein B production from the liver and intestines, (7) an effect of PCSK9 on receptors other than low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) that are involved in TRL metabolism, and (8) an effect of anti-PCSK9 therapy on serum TG levels. The underlying mechanisms are unclear but starting to emerge. PMID:26320603

  11. Macrophage Infiltration into the Glomeruli in Lipoprotein Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Satoshi; Maeda, Kunihiko; Joh, Kensuke; Yamakage, Shu; Fukase, Sachiko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsunaga, Akira; Saito, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG) is characterized by histopathological features showing intra-glomerular lipoprotein thrombi and type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP), with heterozygote mutation of apolipoprotein (apo) E gene. On the other hand, as another renal lipidosis with type III HLP, apoE2 homozygote-related glomerulopathy (apoE2-GN) showing foamy macrophages has been reported. The case of a 25-year-old man who had LPG by clinical behavior and gene analysis, but demonstrated atypical histopathological features with a substantial amount of foamy macrophage infiltration in the glomeruli, is presented. The combination of alleles for apoE Tokyo/Maebashi and classical apoE2 (Arg158Cys) was inferred to be the leading cause of the unique renal pathology with lipoprotein thrombi and foamy macrophages. In addition, foamy macrophages infiltrated some part of the apoE-positive region within the glomerulus, but did not exist in lipoprotein thrombi despite apoE positivity, suggesting that properties of apoE are crucial in the development of LPG rather than macrophage function. This case provides important information related to the pathogenesis of LPG and apoE2-GN. PMID:26955632

  12. Lifecycle of a Lipoprotein from a Biophysical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas; Voss, John; Chan, James; Parikh, Atul

    The goal of our project was to understand how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes. This chapter will present the five major areas in which we have focused our attention on understanding how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes (Fig. 11.1): (1) triglycerides and vascular injury, (2) single lipoprotein analysis, (3) apolipoprotein E (apoE) conformation changes in the postprandial state, (4) triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) and endothelial cell inflammation, and (5) TGRL lipolysis products and monocyte activation. For over a hundred years, Western civilization has questioned how the food we eat translates into disease, and specifically atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although most information indicates that this basic pathophysiological process is mediated through consumption of excess saturated fats, much remains unknown. After humans eat a meal, there is an elevation of triglycerides in the blood in the postprandial state. In normal individuals, triglycerides can rise after a meal by 50 to 100%. This has been documented many times in the past, including a paper by Hyson et al, (1998) [1]. In that study, normal healthy individuals were given a 40%-fat meal. Plasma triglycerides, which were modestly elevated initially, rose about 60% higher three to four hours after ingestion of the meal. Subsequently plasma triglycerides fell to baseline levels six hours after the meal. Even in these healthy individuals, a significant elevation of triglycerides was noted after ingestion of a moder ately high-fat meal.

  13. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.; Bao, Clare; Swaim, AnneMarie F.; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC). Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis. PMID:26680360

  14. [Residual risk: The roles of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Grammer, Tanja; Kleber, Marcus; Silbernagel, Günther; Scharnagl, Hubert; März, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    In clinical trials, the reduction of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins reduces the incidence rate of cardiovascular events by approximately one third. This means, that a sizeable "residual risk" remains. Besides high lipoprotein (a), disorders in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density liproteins have been implicated as effectors of the residual risk. Both lipoprotein parameters correlate inversely with each other. Therefore, the etiological contributions of triglycerides and / or of HDL for developing cardiovascular disease can hardly be estimated from either observational studies or from intervention studies. The largely disappointing results of intervention studies with inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein and in particular the available set of genetically-epidemiological studies suggest that in the last decade, the importance of HDL cholesterol has been overvalued, while the importance of triglycerides has been underestimated. High triglycerides not always atherogenic, but only if they are associated with the accumulation relatively cholesterol-enriched, incompletely catabolized remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (familial type III hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus). The normalization of the concentration of triglycerides and remnants by inhibiting the expression of apolipoprotein C3 is hence a new, promising therapeutic target. PMID:27305303

  15. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Scott J; Morrell, Craig N; Bao, Clare; Swaim, AnneMarie F; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC). Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis. PMID:26680360

  16. Enzymatic hydrolysis of PTT polymers and oligomers.

    PubMed

    Eberl, A; Heumann, S; Kotek, R; Kaufmann, F; Mitsche, S; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Gübitz, G M

    2008-05-20

    Oligomers and polymers (film, fabrics) of the linear aromatic polyester poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) were treated with polyesterases from Thermomyces lanuginosus, Penicillium citrinum, Thermobifida fusca and Fusarium solani pisi. The cutinase from T. fusca was found to release the highest amounts of hydrolysis products from PTT materials and was able to open and hydrolyse a cyclic PTT dimer according to RP-HPLC-UV detection. In contrast, the lipase from T. lanuginosus also showed activity on the PTT fibres and on bis(3-hydroxypropyl) terephthalate (BHPT) but was not able to hydrolyse the polymer film, mono(3-hydroxypropyl) terephthalate (MHPT) nor the cyclic dimer of PTT. As control enzymes inhibited with mercury chloride were used. Surface hydrophilicity changes were investigated with contact angle measurements and the degree of crystallinity changes were determined with DSC. PMID:18405994

  17. Catalytic Zinc Complexes for Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis**

    PubMed Central

    Tirel, Emmanuel Y; Bellamy, Zoë; Adams, Harry; Lebrun, Vincent; Duarte, Fernanda; Williams, Nicholas H

    2014-01-01

    Creating efficient artificial catalysts that can compete with biocatalysis has been an enduring challenge which has yet to be met. Reported herein is the synthesis and characterization of a series of zinc complexes designed to catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters. By introducing a hydrated aldehyde into the ligand we achieve turnover for DNA-like substrates which, combined with ligand methylation, increases reactivity by two orders of magnitude. In contrast to current orthodoxy and mechanistic explanations, we propose a mechanism where the nucleophile is not coordinated to the metal ion, but involves a tautomer with a more effective Lewis acid and more reactive nucleophile. This data suggests a new strategy for creating more efficient metal ion based catalysts, and highlights a possible mode of action for metalloenzymes. PMID:24919567

  18. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Bothast, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet milling industry which is usually marketed as a low value animal feed ingredient. Approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 6} dry tons of this material are produced annually in the United States. The fiber is composed of kernel cell wall fractions and a residual starch which can all be potentially hydrolyzed to a mixture of glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. We have investigated a sequential saccharification of polysaccharides in corn fiber by a treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 100 to 160{degrees}C followed by partial neutralization and enzymatic hydrolysis with mixed cellulose and amyloglucosidase enzymes at 45{degrees}C. The sequential treatment achieved a high (approximately 85%) conversion of all polysaccharides in the corn fiber to monomeric sugars, which were in most cases fermentable to ethanol by the recombinant bacterium Escherichia coli KOll.

  19. Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Joseph B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Abundant plant biomass has the potential to become a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Realizing this potential requires the economical conversion of recalcitrant lignocellulose into useful intermediates, such as sugars. We report a high-yielding chemical process for the hydrolysis of biomass into monosaccharides. Adding water gradually to a chloride ionic liquid-containing catalytic acid leads to a nearly 90% yield of glucose from cellulose and 70–80% yield of sugars from untreated corn stover. Ion-exclusion chromatography allows recovery of the ionic liquid and delivers sugar feedstocks that support the vigorous growth of ethanologenic microbes. This simple chemical process, which requires neither an edible plant nor a cellulase, could enable crude biomass to be the sole source of carbon for a scalable biorefinery. PMID:20194793

  20. Reaction Dynamics of ATP Hydrolysis Catalyzed by P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ABC transporter family that confers drug resistance to many tumors by catalyzing their efflux, and it is a major component of drug–drug interactions. P-gp couples drug efflux with ATP hydrolysis by coordinating conformational changes in the drug binding sites with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of ADP. To understand the relative rates of the chemical step for hydrolysis and the conformational changes that follow it, we exploited isotope exchange methods to determine the extent to which the ATP hydrolysis step is reversible. With γ18O4-labeled ATP, no positional isotope exchange is detectable at the bridging β-phosphorus–O−γ-phosphorus bond. Furthermore, the phosphate derived from hydrolysis includes a constant ratio of three 18O/two 18O/one 18O that reflects the isotopic composition of the starting ATP in multiple experiments. Thus, H2O-exchange with HPO42– (Pi) was negligible, suggesting that a [P-gp·ADP·Pi] is not long-lived. This further demonstrates that the hydrolysis is essentially irreversible in the active site. These mechanistic details of ATP hydrolysis are consistent with a very fast conformational change immediately following, or concomitant with, hydrolysis of the γ-phosphate linkage that ensures a high commitment to catalysis in both drug-free and drug-bound states. PMID:24506763

  1. Bioabatement with hemicellulase supplementation to reduce enzymatic hydrolysis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of inhibitory compounds by bioabatement, combined with xylan hydrolysis, enables effective cellulose hydrolysis of pretreated corn stover, for fermentation of the sugars to fuel ethanol or other products. The fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 eliminates most enzyme and fermentation inhi...

  2. Ultrasound Enhancement of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Plant Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The work reported here is based on acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass substrate by introduction of low intensity, uniform ultrasound field into a reaction chamber (bio-reactor). This method may serve as improvement of rates in the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials to sugars, whi...

  3. Class Projects in Physical Organic Chemistry: The Hydrolysis of Aspirin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise that provides a hands-on demonstration of the hydrolysis of aspirin is presented. The key to understanding the hydrolysis is recognizing that all six process may occur simultaneously and that the observed rate constant is the sum of the rate constants that one rate constant dominates the overall process.

  4. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  5. The relationship among brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), cholesterol and lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hidekazu; Sata, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship among brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), cholesterol and lipoprotein. Design A retrospective, cross-sectional study. Setting Tokushima University Hospital area. Patients A retrospective study of 46 patients (nine inpatients and 37 outpatients) with angina pectoris or arrhythmias who were seen at Tokushima University Hospital Cardiovascular Division and had measurements of their BNP, fatty acid and lipid profile. The average age of patients was 57±17 years, and 39% were male subjects. Main outcome measures BNP, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), apolipoproteinA1, apolipoprotein A2 (ApoA2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), apolipoprotein C2, apolipoprotein C3, apolipoprotein E, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results The baseline characteristics of the patients were shown in table 1 and the data of lipoprotein were shown in table 2. Table 3 shows the relationship among BNP, cholesterol and lipoprotein. The authors found significant negative correlation between serum levels of BNP and ApoA2 (figure 1; r=−0.458, p=0.001), serum levels of BNP and ApoB (figure 2; r=−0.328, p=0.026) and serum levels of BNP and TC (figure 3; r=-0.383, p=0.010). There is a possibility that dietary EPA and DHA may modulate cardiac mitochondrial and autonomic nervous system dysfunction via fatty-acids-PPARs-PTEN-PI3K/Akt-SREBPs system and affect serum BNP levels indirectly. Conclusion BNP had significant negative correlation with ApoA2, ApoB and TC. The findings suggest that increasing serum levels of ApoA2, ApoB and TC may have an effect on improving heart function. But the mechanism is presently unclear. PMID:27326018

  6. Endotoxin suppresses rat hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor expression.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, W; Rudling, M; Angelin, B

    1996-01-01

    Endotoxin induces hyperlipidaemia in experimental animals. In the current study, we investigated whether endotoxin alters hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in rats. Endotoxin treatment suppressed hepatic LDL receptor expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Eighteen hours after intraperitoneal injection of increasing amounts of endotoxin, LDL receptor and its mRNA levels were determined by ligand blot and solution hybridization respectively. LDL receptor expression was inhibited by about 70% at a dose of 500 micrograms/100 g body weight. However, LDL receptor mRNA levels were markedly increased in all endotoxin-treated groups at this time point (by 83-136%; P < 0.001). Time-course experiments showed that LDL receptor expression was already reduced by 48% 4 h after endotoxin injection and was maximally reduced (by 63-65%) between 8 and 18 h. Changes in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA showed a different pattern. By 4 h after endotoxin injection, LDL receptor mRNA had decreased by 78% (P < 0.001). However, by 8 h after endotoxin injection, LDL receptor mRNA had returned to levels similar to controls, and 18 and 24 h after endotoxin injection, they were increased by about 60% (P < 0.05). Separation of plasma lipoproteins by FPLC demonstrated that endotoxin-induced changes in plasma triacylglycerols and cholesterol were due to accumulation of plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins among very-low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoprotein and LDL. It is concluded that endotoxin suppresses hepatic LDL receptor expression in vivo in rats. PMID:8611169

  7. Lipoprotein products of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase and cholesteryl ester transfer.

    PubMed

    Rose, H G; Ellerbe, P

    1982-09-14

    High-density lipoprotein substrates and products of human plasma lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase have been labelled with radioisotopic cholesteryl esters in order to facilitate identification. [3H]Cholesteryl esters were formed by endogenous HDL3/VHDL enzyme (d greater than 1.125 g/ml) following incubation with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine, unesterified cholesterol and 3H-labelled unesterified cholesterol. Transfer of labelled esters to acceptor lipoproteins (VLDL+LDL, d less than 1.063 g/ml) was employed to distinguish a hypothetical transfer complex. Separation of labelled HDL3/VHDL was by gel-permeation chromatography. The results indicate that a subpopulation of labelled HDL3/VHDL cholesteryl esters (43-61% of total) were removed by VLDL/LDL during a 3 h transfer period and these derive from the smaller lipoproteins of the spectrum. HDL carrying non-transferable [3H]cholesteryl esters localize to the larger HDL3. Transfer rates were proportional to ratios of acceptor to donor lipoproteins. Net transfer of cholesteryl esters from the smaller HDL3 also occurred, but was smaller in magnitude (about 10.5% of total). Acyltransferase assays indicated that enzyme distribution is skewed to larger-sized HDL3, suggesting that the non-transferable components might be lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-containing parent complexes, while the smaller transfer products contain little acyltransferase. The results fit the hypothesis that a parent HDL3-lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase complex generates a smaller-sized lipoprotein product which is active in cholesteryl ester transport. PMID:7126623

  8. High-density lipoprotein that supports Ureaplasma urealyticum growth.

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, I A; Sweat, F W

    1982-01-01

    A high-density lipoprotein with growth-promoting activity for Ureaplasma urealyticum was purified in high yield from equine serum by ammonium sulfate fractionation and molecular filtration. Fractions enriched in growth-promoting activity represented 5% of the total serum protein, and 30 micrograms of the purified protein per ml gave an activity equivalent to that from 100 micrograms of whole serum per ml. The serum was totally replaced by purified lipoprotein when tested in a soy peptone-yeast dialysate or when added to a chemically defined synthetic medium. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that one major protein with growth-promoting activity is present. A total of 10 proteins were distinguished by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with 75% of the total contributed by two proteins with molecular weights of 160,000 and 170,000. A total of 90% of the lipoprotein was an alpha-protein with a mobility of 0.67 in two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis (albumin = 1.0). The active component was further characterized as high-density lipoprotein by density ultracentrifugation. Two components with S = 6.4 and S = 15.8 were distinguished by velocity sedimentation. The lipid was removed from lipoprotein during its precipitation with acetone. The growth-promoting activity of delipidized protein was dependent upon the addition of exogenous cholesterol, and [14C]cholesterol was transferred to urea-plasmic cells in cultures containing the delipidized protein. A major portion of the [14C]cholesterol remained associated with the protein during filtration on Sepharose 4B columns. Images PMID:7201468

  9. Hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides: influence of sequence and length.

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, R

    1992-01-01

    The chemical stability of phosphodiester bonds of some oligoribonucleotides in the presence of a cofactor like polyvinylpyrolidine (PVP) is sequence dependent. It was found that pyrimidine-A (YA) and pyrimidine-C (YC) are especially susceptible to hydrolysis. The hydrolyzability of this same phosphodiester bond is dependent on its position in the oligomer. The presence of 3' and 5'-adjacent nucleotides enhances hydrolysis of the UA phosphodiester bond. The acceleration of the hydrolysis of UA by a 5'-adjacent nucleotide is not base dependent. However, a 3'-adjacent purine increases hydrolysis of a UA phosphodiester bond more than a 3'-pyrimidine. The presence of the exoamino group on the 3'-side base (on 6 and 4 position for adenosine and cytidine, respectively) of YA or YZ phosphodiester bond is required for hydrolysis. Images PMID:1408823

  10. Lipoprotein receptors in copper-deficient rats: high density lipoprotein binding to liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hassel, C.A.; Lei, K.Y.; Marchello, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    In copper-deficient rats, the observed hyperlipoproteinemia was mainly due to the elevation in high density lipoproteins (HDL). This study was designed to determine whether an impairment in the binding of HDL to liver membrane is responsible for the hyperlipoproteinemia. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 treatments, namely copper (Cu) deficient and adequate (less than 1 and 8 mg Cu/kg of diet). After 8 weeks, plasma, heart and liver tissues were obtained. Reduction in liver Cu content and elevation in heart to body weight ratio and plasma cholesterol confirmed that rats fed the test diet were Cu-deficient. Plasma HDL isolated from both Cu-deficient and control rats were iodinated and bound to liver membranes prepared from rats of each treatment. Binding of /sup 125/I-HDL was competitively inhibited by unlabelled rat HDL from both treatments, but not by human LDL. Scatchard analysis of specific binding data showed that maximal /sup 125/I-HDL binding (per mg membrane protein) to membranes prepared from Cu-deficient rats was not lower than controls. Furthermore, the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from deficient rats specifically bound to liver membranes prepared from either treatment was not less than the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from control rats bound to the same membranes. The data suggest that the hyperlipoproteinemia in Cu-deficient rats may not have resulted from a decrease in the number of hepatic HDL binding sites.

  11. Lipoprotein binding and endosomal itinerary of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, H; Takahashi, K; Hamilton, R L; Havel, R J

    1989-01-01

    The high affinity of 45Ca binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and the LDL-R-related protein (LRP) was utilized to study the subcellular distribution of these two proteins in rat liver. Like the LDL-R, LRP was manyfold enriched in rat liver endosomal membranes with a relative distribution in early and late endosomal compartments consistent with recycling between endosomes and the cell surface. The high concentration of LRP in hepatic endosomal membranes greatly facilitated demonstration of Ca-dependent binding of apolipoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins in ligand blots. LRP was severalfold more abundant than the LDL-R in hepatic parenchymal cells, showed extensive degradation in hepatic endosomes, and was found in high concentrations in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a high rate of synthesis of LRP that appeared to be unaffected by treatment of rats with estradiol. The repeating cysteine-rich A-motif found in the ligand-binding domain of LRP appeared to be responsible for Ca binding by LRP, LDL-R, and complement factor C9 and accounted for immunological cross-reactivity among these proteins. Weaker ligand-blotting properties and an extraordinary susceptibility to proteolysis most likely contribute to the difficulty of detecting LRP in conventional assays for lipoprotein receptors. Our data suggest an extensive proteolytic processing of this protein and are consistent with a functional role of LRP in lipoprotein metabolism. Images PMID:2594771

  12. Trihalomethane hydrolysis in drinking water at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Karanfil, Tanju; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-07-01

    Hydrolysis could contribute to the loss of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the drinking water at elevated temperatures. This study was aimed at investigating THM hydrolysis pertaining to the storage of hot boiled water in enclosed containers. The water pH value was in the range of 6.1-8.2 and the water temperature was varied from 65 to 95 °C. The effects of halide ions, natural organic matter, and drinking water matrix were investigated. Results showed that the hydrolysis rates declined in the order following CHBrCl2 > CHBr2Cl > CHBr3 > CHCl3. THM hydrolysis was primarily through the alkaline pathway, except for CHCl3 in water at relatively low pH value. The activation energies for the alkaline hydrolysis of CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl and CHBr3 were 109, 113, 115 and 116 kJ/mol, respectively. No hydrolysis intermediates could accumulate in the water. The natural organic matter, and probably other constituents, in drinking water could substantially decrease THM hydrolysis rates by more than 50%. When a drinking water was at 90 °C or above, the first order rate constants for THM hydrolysis were in the magnitude of 10(-2)‒10(-1) 1/h. When the boiled real tap water was stored in an enclosed container, THMs continued increasing during the first few hours and then kept decreasing later on due to the competition between hydrolysis and further formation. The removal of THMs, especially brominated THMs, by hydrolysis would greatly reduce one's exposure to disinfection by-products by consuming the boiled water stored in enclosed containers. PMID:25898249

  13. Kinetic Studies to Elucidate Impaired Metabolism of Triglyceride-rich Lipoproteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Adiels, Martin; Mardinoglu, Adil; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Borén, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To develop novel strategies for prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, it is essential to understand the pathophysiology of dyslipoproteinemia in humans. Lipoprotein metabolism is a complex system in which abnormal concentrations of various lipoprotein particles can result from alterations in their rates of production, conversion, and/or catabolism. Traditional methods that measure plasma lipoprotein concentrations only provide static estimates of lipoprotein metabolism and hence limited mechanistic information. By contrast, the use of tracers labeled with stable isotopes and mathematical modeling, provides us with a powerful tool for probing lipid and lipoprotein kinetics in vivo and furthering our understanding of the pathogenesis of dyslipoproteinemia. PMID:26635628

  14. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane. PMID:20419407

  15. The isolation and partial characterization of the serum lipoproteins and apolipoproteins of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, E R; Rogie, A

    1978-01-01

    1. VLD (very-low-density), LD (low-density) and HD (high-density) lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of trout (Salmo gairdneri Richardson). 2. Each lipoprotein class resembled that of the human in immunological reactivity, electrophoretic behaviour and appearance in the electron microscope. Trout LD lipoprotein, however, was of greater density than human LD lipoprotein. 3. The trout lipoproteins have lipid compositions which are similar to those of the corresponding human components, except for their high contents of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids. 4. HD and LD lipoproteins were immunologically non-identical, whereas LD lipoproteins possessed antigenic determinants in common with VLD lipoproteins. 5. VLD and HD lipoproteins each contained at least seven different apoproteins, whereas LD liprotein was composed largely of a single apoprotein which resembled human apolipoprotein B. 6. At least one, and possibly three, apoprotein of trout HD lipoprotein showed features which resemble human apoprotein A-1.7. The broad similarity between the trout and human lipoprotein systems suggests that both arose from common ancestral genes early in evolutionary history. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PLATE 1 Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:100102

  16. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  17. Ultrafast hydrolysis of a Lewis photoacid.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Joseph D; Suchyta, Scott; Kohler, Bern

    2015-02-12

    This study explores the concept that electronic excitation can dramatically enhance Lewis acidity. Specifically, it is shown that photoexcitation transforms an electron-deficient organic compound of negligible Lewis acidity in its electronic ground state into a potent excited-state Lewis acid that releases a proton from a nearby water molecule in 3.1 ps. It was shown previously (Peon et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 5768) that the excited state of methyl viologen (MV(2+)) is quenched rapidly in aqueous solution with the formation of an unidentified photoproduct. In this study, the quenching mechanism and the identity of the photoproduct were investigated by the femtosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion techniques. Transient absorption signals at UV probe wavelengths reveal a long-lived species with a pH-dependent lifetime due to reaction with hydronium ions at a bimolecular rate of 3.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). This species is revealed to be a charge-transfer complex consisting of a ground-state MV(2+) ion and a hydroxide ion formed when a water molecule transfers a proton to the bulk solvent. Formation of a contact ion pair between MV(2+) and hydroxide shifts the absorption spectrum of the former ion by a few nm to longer wavelengths, yielding a transient absorption spectrum with a distinctive triangle wave appearance. The slight shift of this spectrum, which is in excellent agreement with steady-state difference spectra recorded for MV(2+) at high pH, is consistent with an ion pair but not with a covalent adduct (pseudobase). The long lifetime of the ion pair at neutral pH indicates that dissociation occurs many orders of magnitude more slowly than predicted by the Smoluchowski-Debye equation. Remarkably, there is no evidence of geminate recombination, suggesting that the proton that is transferred to the solvent is conducted at least several water shells away. Although the hydrolysis mechanism has yet to be fully established, evidence suggests

  18. Angiopoietin-like 4 Modifies the Interactions between Lipoprotein Lipase and Its Endothelial Cell Transporter GPIHBP1.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xun; Shetty, Shwetha K; Shows, Hannah W; Hjelmaas, Alexander J; Malcolm, Emily K; Davies, Brandon S J

    2015-05-01

    The release of fatty acids from plasma triglycerides for tissue uptake is critically dependent on the enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hydrolysis of plasma triglycerides by LPL can be disrupted by the protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), and ANGPTL4 has been shown to inactivate LPL in vitro. However, in vivo LPL is often complexed to glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) on the surface of capillary endothelial cells. GPIHBP1 is responsible for trafficking LPL across capillary endothelial cells and anchors LPL to the capillary wall during lipolysis. How ANGPTL4 interacts with LPL in this context is not known. In this study, we investigated the interactions of ANGPTL4 with LPL-GPIHBP1 complexes on the surface of endothelial cells. We show that ANGPTL4 was capable of binding and inactivating LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 on the surface of endothelial cells. Once inactivated, LPL dissociated from GPIHBP1. We also show that ANGPTL4-inactivated LPL was incapable of binding GPIHBP1. ANGPTL4 was capable of binding, but not inactivating, LPL at 4 °C, suggesting that binding alone was not sufficient for ANGPTL4's inhibitory activity. We observed that although the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of ANGPTL4 by itself and full-length ANGPTL4 both bound with similar affinities to LPL, the N-terminal fragment was more potent in inactivating both free and GPIHBP1-bound LPL. These results led us to conclude that ANGPTL4 can both bind and inactivate LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 and that inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 greatly reduces the affinity of LPL for GPIHBP1. PMID:25809481

  19. Lipoprotein LprI of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Acts as a Lysozyme Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Deepti; Mahajan, Sahil; Singh, Chaahat; Lama, Amrita; Hade, Mangesh Dattu; Gupta, Pawan; Dikshit, Kanak L

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis executes numerous defense strategies for the successful establishment of infection under a diverse array of challenges inside the host. One such strategy that has been delineated in this study is the abrogation of lytic activity of lysozyme by a novel glycosylated and surface-localized lipoprotein, LprI, which is exclusively present in M. tuberculosis complex. The lprI gene co-transcribes with the glbN gene (encoding hemoglobin (HbN)) and both are synchronously up-regulated in M. tuberculosis during macrophage infection. Recombinant LprI, expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibited strong binding (Kd ≤ 2 nm) with lysozyme and abrogated its lytic activity completely, thereby conferring protection to fluorescein-labeled Micrococcus lysodeikticus from lysozyme-mediated hydrolysis. Expression of the lprI gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis (8-10-fold) protected its growth from lysozyme inhibition in vitro and enhanced its phagocytosis and survival during intracellular infection of peritoneal and monocyte-derived macrophages, known to secrete lysozyme, and in the presence of exogenously added lysozyme in secondary cell lines where lysozyme levels are low. In contrast, the presence of HbN enhanced phagocytosis and intracellular survival of M. smegmatis only in the absence of lysozyme but not under lysozyme stress. Interestingly, co-expression of the glbN-lprI gene pair elevated the invasion and survival of M. smegmatis 2-3-fold in secondary cell lines in the presence of lysozyme in comparison with isogenic cells expressing these genes individually. Thus, specific advantage against macrophage-generated lysozyme, conferred by the combination of LprI-HbN during invasion of M. tuberculosis, may have vital implications on the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:26589796

  20. Enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass from wood.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Consolación; Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel; Díez, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Current research and development in cellulosic ethanol production has been focused mainly on agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops such as corn stover and switchgrass; however, woody biomass remains a very important feedstock for ethanol production. The precise composition of hemicellulose in the wood is strongly dependent on the plant species, therefore different types of enzymes are needed based on hemicellulose complexity and type of pretreatment. In general, hardwood species have much lower recalcitrance to enzymes than softwood. For hardwood, xylanases, beta-xylosidases and xyloglucanases are the main hemicellulases involved in degradation of the hemicellulose backbone, while for softwood the effect of mannanases and beta-mannosidases is more relevant. Furthermore, there are different key accessory enzymes involved in removing the hemicellulosic fraction and increasing accessibility of cellulases to the cellulose fibres improving the hydrolysis process. A diversity of enzymatic cocktails has been tested using from low to high densities of biomass (2-20% total solids) and a broad range of results has been obtained. The performance of recently developed commercial cocktails on hardwoods and softwoods will enable a further step for the commercialization of fuel ethanol from wood. PMID:26833542

  1. Synthesis, hydrolysis and stability of psilocin glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rafaela; Schürenkamp, Jennifer; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Lehr, Matthias; Köhler, Helga

    2014-04-01

    A two-step synthesis of psilocin glucuronide (PCG), the main metabolite of psilocin, with methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-isobutyryl-1-O-trichloroacetimidoyl-α-d-glucopyranuronate is reported. With the synthesized PCG, hydrolysis conditions in serum and urine were optimized. Escherichia coli proved to be a better enzyme source for β-glucuronidase than Helix pomatia. It was essential to add ascorbic acid to serum samples to protect psilocin during incubation. Furthermore the stability of PCG and psilocin was compared as stability data are the basis for forensic interpretation of measurements. PCG showed a greater long-term stability after six months in deep frozen serum and urine samples than psilocin. The short-term stability of PCG for one week in whole blood at room temperature and in deep frozen samples was also better than that of psilocin. Therefore, PCG can be considered to be more stable than the labile psilocin and should always be included if psilocin is analyzed in samples. PMID:24513688

  2. Dot-blot assay for the low density lipoprotein receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, F.M.; Catapano, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a new method for detecting the interaction of low density lipoprotein with its receptor using unmodified nitrocellulose as support for membrane protein. The method is specific and sensitive down to 3 micrograms of membrane protein. Unlabeled LDL, but not HDL, competes with /sup 125/I-labeled LDL for binding, and binding is abolished by pretreatment of the membranes with pronase and is dependent upon the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, modification of arginine or lysine residues on LDL abolishes the lipoprotein interaction with the receptor protein supported on the nitrocellulose. When the membranes are solubilized with octyl glucoside, purification steps of the receptor can be directly followed with no interference of the detergent, therefore eliminating the need for its removal. The increased expression of LDL receptors on liver membranes from estradiol-treated rats was also demonstrated. We suggest, therefore, that this method can be used to detect the presence of LDL receptors on minute amounts of membrane protein.

  3. Lipoprotein Metabolism and Inflammation in Patients With Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ehrin J; Krueger, James G

    2016-08-15

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with a variety of co-morbid conditions, including cardiovascular disease. Advancements in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of psoriasis have led to a better understanding regarding its pathogenesis, which in turn has stimulated ongoing research to identify the underlying pathophysiology responsible for the increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with psoriasis. Although not yet fully elucidated, emerging evidence points to immune-mediated inflammation as a process that contributes to endothelial cell dysfunction, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerosis as key processes influencing cardiovascular disease in psoriasis. In particular, the dyslipidemia present in psoriasis may be associated with altered lipoprotein function and increased atherogenicity. Here, we review how the cytokine networks involved in lipoprotein metabolism and inflammation could impact on the cardiovascular disease risk for patients with psoriasis. PMID:27392508

  4. Cell wall sorting of lipoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Navarre, W W; Daefler, S; Schneewind, O

    1996-01-01

    Many surface proteins are thought to be anchored to the cell wall of gram-positive organisms via their C termini, while the N-terminal domains of these molecules are displayed on the bacterial surface. Cell wall anchoring of surface proteins in Staphylococcus aureus requires both an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. By fusing the cell wall sorting of protein A to the C terminus of staphylococcal beta-lactamase, we demonstrate here that lipoproteins can also be anchored to the cell wall of S. aureus. The topology of cell wall-anchored beta-lactamase is reminiscent of that described for Braun's murein lipoprotein in that the N terminus of the polypeptide chain is membrane anchored whereas the C-terminal end is tethered to the bacterial cell wall. PMID:8550464

  5. Modified lipoproteins as biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José Luis; Pérez, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Prevention of high incidence of cardiovascular disease in diabetes is one of the challenges of endocrinology. Validation of new biomarkers that may contribute to a better assessment of cardiovascular risk and help implement treatment strategies is one of the promising approaches in research on prevention and reduction of cardiovascular risk. Modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key element in development of atherosclerotic lesions. Several pathophysiological characteristics of diabetes are crucial for the LDL of these patients to have higher modification rates as compared to the healthy population. Diabetic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidative stress synergistically promote the occurrence of lipoperoxidation, glycosylation and glycoxidation processes, which will generate modified lipoproteins that stimulate development of atherosclerosis. This article reviews the role of different types of modified LDL in development of atherosclerosis in diabetes, as well as the possibility of using its quantification in cardiovascular risk prediction. PMID:23545115

  6. Characterization of sheep lung lymph lipoproteins: chemical and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Cross, C.E.; Gunther, R.A.; Kramer, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have determined the composition and distribution of plasma and lung lymph lipoproteins from unanesthetized ewes. Cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels in lung lymph were 45%, 50%, and 50%, respectively, of those in plasma. Lipoproteins from both lymph and plasma were separated into two major fractions: d < 1.063 g/ml or LDL, and d 1.063-1.21 g/ml or HDL. HDL was the major lipoprotein species in the plasma and lymph. Gradients gel electrophoresis of HDL on 4-30% gels showed that, in lymph, HDL particles were shifted to larger sizes; in addition to a peak at 8.5 nm, which was similar to plasma HDL, there were two additional components of larger size, one at 9.2 nm and the other at 12 nm. Electron microscopy revealed that lymph HDL contained two new particles not seen in plasma: large, round particles, 13.6 nm diameter, and discoidal particles, 18.7 by 4.9 nm, long and short axis, respectively. Compositional analysis of lymph HDL revealed a relative enrichment in free cholesterol as well as an enrichment in apolipoprotein E. Lymph LDL on gradient gel electrophoresis was extremely heterogeneous. Several peaks were evident in the 23-30 nm size range (similar to plasma LDL), but a supplementary component at approximately 15-16 nm was also present. Whereas plasma LDL on electron microscopy contained only round particles 26 nm in diameter, lymph contained an additional, unusual particle which was close-packed, with square geometry, and was 15 nm in diameter. Changes in the physical and chemical properties of lung lymph lipoproteins suggest that these particles are metabolically modified.

  7. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  8. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Schmit, V.; Weinstein, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with /sup 125/I-lipoproteins (human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)). The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly /sup 125/I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin (mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)). In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production.

  9. Hydrophobic surface patches on LolA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are essential for lipoprotein binding.

    PubMed

    Remans, Kim; Pauwels, Kris; van Ulsen, Peter; Buts, Lieven; Cornelis, Pierre; Tommassen, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Decanniere, Klaas; Van Gelder, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Many lipoproteins reside in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their biogenesis is dependent on the Lol (localization of lipoproteins) system. The periplasmic chaperone LolA accepts OM-destined lipoproteins that are released from the inner membrane by the LolCDE complex and transfers them to the OM receptor LolB. The exact nature of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is still unknown. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli LolA features an open beta-barrel covered by alpha helices that together constitute a hydrophobic cavity, which would allow the binding of one acyl chain. However, OM lipoproteins contain three acyl chains, and the stoichiometry of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is 1:1. Here we present the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LolA that projects clear hydrophobic surface patches. Since these patches are large enough to accommodate acyl chains, their role in lipoprotein binding was investigated. Several LolA mutant proteins were created, and their functionality was assessed by studying their capacity to release lipoproteins produced in sphaeroplasts. Interruption of the largest hydrophobic patch completely destroyed the lipoprotein-releasing capacity of LolA, while interruption of smaller patches apparently reduced efficiency. Thus, the results show a new lipoprotein transport model that places (some of) the acyl chains on the hydrophobic surface patches. PMID:20620146

  10. Quantitative fluorescence imaging reveals point of release for lipoproteins during LDLR-dependent uptake[S

    PubMed Central

    Pompey, Shanica; Zhao, Zhenze; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Michaely, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) supports efficient uptake of both LDL and VLDL remnants by binding lipoprotein at the cell surface, internalizing lipoprotein through coated pits, and releasing lipoprotein in endocytic compartments before returning to the surface for further rounds of uptake. While many aspects of lipoprotein binding and receptor entry are well understood, it is less clear where, when, and how the LDLR releases lipoprotein. To address these questions, the current study employed quantitative fluorescence imaging to visualize the uptake and endosomal processing of LDL and the VLDL remnant β-VLDL. We find that lipoprotein release is rapid, with most release occurring prior to entry of lipoprotein into early endosomes. Published biochemical studies have identified two mechanisms of lipoprotein release: one that involves the β-propeller module of the LDLR and a second that is independent of this module. Quantitative imaging comparing uptake supported by the normal LDLR or by an LDLR variant incapable of β-propeller-dependent release shows that the β-propeller-independent process is sufficient for release for both lipoproteins but that the β-propeller process accelerates both LDL and β-VLDL release. Together these findings define where, when, and how lipoprotein release occurs and provide a generalizable methodology for visualizing endocytic handling in situ. PMID:23296879

  11. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  12. Effects of obeticholic acid on lipoprotein metabolism in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pencek, R; Marmon, T; Roth, J D; Liberman, A; Hooshmand-Rad, R; Young, M A

    2016-09-01

    The bile acid analogue obeticholic acid (OCA) is a selective farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist in development for treatment of several chronic liver diseases. FXR activation regulates lipoprotein homeostasis. The effects of OCA on cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in healthy individuals were assessed. Two phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of repeated oral doses of 5, 10 or 25 mg OCA on lipid variables after 14 or 20 days of consecutive administration in 68 healthy adults. Changes in HDL and LDL cholesterol levels were examined, in addition to nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of particle sizes and sub-fraction concentrations. OCA elicited changes in circulating cholesterol and particle size of LDL and HDL. OCA decreased HDL cholesterol and increased LDL cholesterol, independently of dose. HDL particle concentrations declined as a result of a reduction in medium and small HDL. Total LDL particle concentrations increased because of an increase in large LDL particles. Changes in lipoprotein metabolism attributable to OCA in healthy individuals were found to be consistent with previously reported changes in patients receiving OCA with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:27109453

  13. Acrolein consumption induces systemic dyslipidemia and lipoprotein modification

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-02-15

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage-fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk.

  14. Recombinant lipoproteins reinforce cytotoxicity of doxorubicin to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baolong; Yuan, Yuan; Han, Lei; Ye, Li; Shi, Xunlong; Feng, Meiqing

    2014-01-01

    Cancer nanotherapeutics are changing the landscape of tumor treatment and used to circumvent limitations of conventional chemotherapy, such as non-specificity and low bioavailability. Reconstituted high density lipoproteins (rHDL) system is one of the most promising targeting delivery systems of chemotherapeutic drugs toward tumors. Here, we developed recombined high-density lipoprotein which can be functionalized to deliver doxorubicin intracellular with a higher efficiency. The cellular viability assay showed that the rHDL/Dox nanovectors had an enhanced efficiency in inhibiting the cell viability of hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721. FACS and confocal microscopy was used to observe the doxorubicin delivery into cancer cells. Intracellular drug accumulation analysis confirmed that treatment of rHDL/Dox nanovectors resulted in higher intracellular doxorubicin concentration to the levels exceeding that of free drug. On the premise of efficient drug delivery, rHDL/Dox nanovectors have been preliminarily demonstrated effective inducing of cytotoxic effect and cell apoptosis to both of the cell lines in vitro. Tissue distribution experiment showed that rHDL/Dox nanovectors could also deliver doxorubicin to liver effectively. So, we proposed that this lipoprotein-based strategy holds promise for a safer and more efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24093636

  15. Autophagy-mediated longevity is modulated by lipoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Nicole E.; de Magalhaes Filho, C. Daniel; Petrashen, Anna P.; Henderson, Hope R.; Laguer, Jade; Gonzalez, Julissa; Dillin, Andrew; Hansen, Malene; Lapierre, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy-dependent longevity models in C. elegans display altered lipid storage profiles, but the contribution of lipid distribution to life-span extension is not fully understood. Here we report that lipoprotein production, autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis are linked to modulate life span in a conserved fashion. We find that overexpression of the yolk lipoprotein VIT/vitellogenin reduces the life span of long-lived animals by impairing the induction of autophagy-related and lysosomal genes necessary for longevity. Accordingly, reducing vitellogenesis increases life span via induction of autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. Life-span extension due to reduced vitellogenesis or enhanced lysosomal lipolysis requires nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) NHR-49 and NHR-80, highlighting novel roles for these NHRs in lysosomal lipid signaling. In dietary-restricted worms and mice, expression of VIT and hepatic APOB (apolipoprotein B), respectively, are significantly reduced, suggesting a conserved longevity mechanism. Altogether, our study demonstrates that lipoprotein biogenesis is an important mechanism that modulates aging by impairing autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. PMID:26671266

  16. Acrolein Consumption Induces Systemic Dyslipidemia and Lipoprotein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-01-01

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, BUN, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:20034506

  17. Low-Density Lipoprotein Sensor Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymer.

    PubMed

    Chunta, Suticha; Suedee, Roongnapa; Lieberzeit, Peter A

    2016-01-19

    Increased level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) strongly correlates with incidence of coronary heart disease. We synthesized novel molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) as biomimetic specific receptors to establish rapid analysis of LDL levels. For that purpose the ratios of monomers acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MAA), and N-vinylpyrrolidone (VP), respectively, were screened on 10 MHz dual-electrode quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Mixing MAA and VP in the ratio 3:2 (m/m) revealed linear sensor characteristic to LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) from 4 to 400 mg/dL or 0.10-10.34 mmol/L in 100 mM phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) without significant interference: high-density lipoprotein (HDL) yields 4-6% of the LDL signal, very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) yields 1-3%, and human serum albumin (HSA) yields 0-2%. The LDL-MIP sensor reveals analytical accuracy of 95-96% at the 95% confidence interval with precision at 6-15%, respectively. Human serum diluted 1:2 with PBS buffer was analyzed by LDL-MIP sensors to demonstrate applicability to real-life samples. The sensor responses are excellently correlated to the results of the standard technique, namely, a homogeneous enzymatic assay (R(2) = 0.97). This demonstrates that the system can be successfully applied to human serum samples for determining LDL concentrations. PMID:26643785

  18. Inactivation of Staphylococcal Phenol Soluble Modulins by Serum Lipoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Surewaard, Bas G. J.; Nijland, Reindert; Spaan, András N.; Kruijtzer, John A. W.; de Haas, Carla J. C.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus virulence has been associated with the production of phenol soluble modulins (PSM). PSM are known to activate, attract and lyse neutrophils. However, the functional characterizations were generally performed in the absence of human serum. Here, we demonstrate that human serum can inhibit all the previously-described activities of PSM. We observed that serum can fully block both the cell lysis and FPR2 activation of neutrophils. We show a direct interaction between PSM and serum lipoproteins in human serum and whole blood. Subsequent analysis using purified high, low, and very low density lipoproteins (HDL, LDL, and VLDL) revealed that they indeed neutralize PSM. The lipoprotein HDL showed highest binding and antagonizing capacity for PSM. Furthermore, we show potential intracellular production of PSM by S. aureus upon phagocytosis by neutrophils, which opens a new area for exploration of the intracellular lytic capacity of PSM. Collectively, our data show that in a serum environment the function of PSM as important extracellular toxins should be reconsidered. PMID:22457627

  19. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Remnants: Targets for Therapy?

    PubMed

    Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Kroon, Jeffrey; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M John

    2016-07-01

    It is now evident that elevated circulating levels of triglycerides in the non-fasting state, a marker for triglyceride (TG)-rich remnant particles, are associated with increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent findings from basic and clinical studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the atherogenicity of these apoB-containing particles. Here, we review current knowledge of the formation, intravascular remodelling and catabolism of TG-rich lipoproteins and highlight (i) the pivotal players involved in this process, including lipoprotein lipase, glycosylphosphatidylinositol HDL binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1), apolipoprotein (apo) C-II, apoC-III, angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 3, 4 and 8, apoA-V and cholesteryl ester transfer protein; (ii) key determinants of triglyceride (TG) levels and notably rates of production of very-low-density lipoprotein 1 (VLDL1) particles; and (iii) the mechanisms which underlie the atherogenicity of remnant particles. Finally, we emphasise the polygenic nature of moderate hypertriglyceridemia and briefly discuss modalities for its clinical management. Several new therapeutic strategies to attenuate hypertriglyceridemia have appeared recently, among which those targeted to apoC-III appear to hold considerable promise. PMID:27216847

  20. Lipoprotein(a) Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Gagliano, Caterina; Vacante, Marco; Malaguarnera, Michele; Leonardi, Daniela Giovanna; Motta, Massimo; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio

    2013-01-01

    Background. Atherogenic lipoproteins, such as total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and triglycerides, are associated with progression of retinopathy. Aim. To evaluate the relationship between lipoprotein(a) and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 145 diabetic consecutive patients (82 females, 63 males; mean age 66.8 ± 12 years, mean duration of diabetes 9.4 ± 6.8 years). Presence and severity of retinopathy were evaluated. Serum lipid profile, including Lp(a) level, was assessed. Results. High Lp(a) levels have been observed in 54 (78.3%) subjects and normal levels in 13 (18.85%) subjects as regards diabetic patients with retinopathy. Lp(a) levels were high in 15 subjects (21.75%) and normal in 63 subjects (91.35%) as regards patients without retinopathy. Conclusions. Lp(a) levels are increased in a significant percentage of patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy. The impact of Lp(a) levels on diabetic retinopathy needs to be further investigated. PMID:23862162

  1. Discoidal bilayer structure of nascent high density lipoproteins from perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, R L; Williams, M C; Fielding, C J; Havel, R J

    1976-01-01

    Rat livers were perfused for 6 h without added plasma proteins using washed erythrocytes and buffer in a recirculating system. An inhibitor to the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (5,5'-dithionitrobenzoic acid) was added in some experiments to prevent modification of substrate-lipids contained in secreted lipoproteins. The inhibitor did not detectably alter hepatic ultrastructure or gas exchange, but it inhibited the secreted lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase by more than 85%. Very low density lipoproteins in perfusate were unaltered but the high density lipoproteins obtained from livers perfused with the inhibitor appeared disk-shaped in negative stain by electron microscopy with a mean edge thickness of 46 +/- 5 A and a mean diameter of 190 +/- 25 A. The high density lipoproteins were composed predominantly of polar lipids and protein with only small amounts of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. The major apoprotein of these discoidal fractions had the same electrophoretic mobility as the arginine-rich apoprotein, whereas plasma high density lipoproteins contained mainly the A-I approtein. In all these respects the discoidal perfusate high density lipoproteins closely resemble those found in human plasma which is deficient in lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase. Perfusate high density lipoproteins obtained in the absence of the enzyme inhibitor more closely resembled plasma high density lipoproteins in chemical composition (content of cholesteryl esters and apoproteins) and in electron microscopic appearance. Purified lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase synthesized cholesteryl esters at a substantially faster rate from substrate lipids of perfusate high density lipoproteins than those from plasma. The discoidal high density lipoproteins were the best substrate for this reaction. Thin sections of plasma high density lipoproteins indicated a spherical particle whereas discoidal high density lipoproteins stained with the characteristic trilaminar

  2. A General Approach for Teaching Hydrolysis of Salts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Ode, Fernando

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a general approach and equation for teaching the hydrolysis of salts. This general equation covers many more sets of conditions than those currently in textbooks. The simplifying assumptions leading to the known limiting equations are straightforward. (RH)

  3. Kinetics of the hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1986-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) in aqueous buffered solutions of various pH's was studied at 75 and 37 C, using spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. The hydrolysis was found to be very slow even at low pH. At 75 C and pH at or below l.0, two kinetic processes were observed: the more rapid one was attributed to the hydrolysis of the phosphoimidazolide P-N bond; the second, much slower one, was attributed to the cleavage of the glycosidic bond. It is noted that the P-N hydrolysis in phosphoimidazolides is very slow compared to other phosphoramidates, and that this might be one of the reasons why the phosphoimidazolides showed an extraordinary ability to form long oligomers under template-directed conditions.

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis and recrystallization behavior of initially amorphous cellulose.

    PubMed

    Bertran, M S; Dale, B E

    1985-02-01

    Cellulose samples from cotton and wood pulps with varying low degrees of crystallinity (mechanically decrystallized) were studied. The influence of initial cellulose crystallinity on sugar yield after enzymatic hydrolysis was determined by two different methods. As expected, samples with low crystallinity were much more accessible to enzymatic attack and glucose yields were higher than were samples of high initial crystallinity. Hydrolysis of cellulose seems more dependent on cellulose crystallinity than on the source of cellulose. It is known that decrystallized or amorphous cellulose can recrystallize under proper conditions, e.g., during acid hydrolysis. The data reported here also reveal some recrystallization during enzymatic hydrolysis which probably occurs simulataneously with a selective enzymatic attack on the amorphous regions of cellulose. In all cases, the amorphous celluloses recrystallized in the original lattice form, that of native cellulose. PMID:18553653

  5. Energetic approach of biomass hydrolysis in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Danilo A; Vaquerizo, Luis; Mato, Fidel; Bermejo, M Dolores; Cocero, M José

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis can be performed in supercritical water with a high selectivity of soluble sugars. The process produces high-pressure steam that can be integrated, from an energy point of view, with the whole biomass treating process. This work investigates the integration of biomass hydrolysis reactors with commercial combined heat and power (CHP) schemes, with special attention to reactor outlet streams. The innovation developed in this work allows adequate energy integration possibilities for heating and compression by using high temperature of the flue gases and direct shaft work from the turbine. The integration of biomass hydrolysis with a CHP process allows the selective conversion of biomass into sugars with low heat requirements. Integrating these two processes, the CHP scheme yield is enhanced around 10% by injecting water in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the hydrolysis reactor can be held at 400°C and 23 MPa using only the gas turbine outlet streams. PMID:25536511

  6. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  7. Hydrolysis of Al3+ from constrained molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Hirata, Masaru; Kimura, Takaumi

    2006-02-21

    We investigated the hydrolysis reactions of Al(3+) in AlCl(3) aqueous solution using the constrained molecular dynamics based on the Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics method. By employing the proton-aluminum coordination number as a reaction coordinate in the constrained molecular dynamics the deprotonation as well as dehydration processes are successfully realized. From our free-energy difference of DeltaG(0) approximately 8.0 kcal mol(-1) the hydrolysis constant pK(a1) is roughly estimated as 5.8, comparable to the literature value of 5.07. We show that the free-energy difference for the hydrolysis of Al(3+) in acidic conditions is at least 4 kcal mol(-1) higher than that in neutral condition, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction is inhibited by the presence of excess protons located around the hydrated ion, in agreement with the change of the predominant species by pH. PMID:16497053

  8. Evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production from wet microalgae.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Liu, Qingling; Ji, Na; Deng, Shuai; Zhao, Jun; Li, Shuhong; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Wet microalgae hydrolysis-esterification route has the advantage to avoid the energy-intensive units (e.g. drying and lipid extraction) in the biodiesel production process. In this study, techno-economic evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production process was carried out and compared with conventional (usually including drying, lipid extraction, esterification and transesterification) biodiesel production process. Energy and material balance of the conventional and hydrolysis-esterification processes was evaluated by Aspen Plus. The simulation results indicated that drying (2.36MJ/L biodiesel) and triolein transesterification (1.89MJ/L biodiesel) are the dominant energy-intensive stages in the conventional route (5.42MJ/L biodiesel). By contrast, the total energy consumption of hydrolysis-esterification route can be reduced to 1.81MJ/L biodiesel, and approximately 3.61MJ can be saved to produce per liter biodiesel. PMID:27209457

  9. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steryl glycosides for their analysis in foods.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Nyström, Laura

    2014-11-15

    Steryl glycosides (SG) contribute significantly to the total intake of phytosterols. The standard analytical procedure involving acid hydrolysis fails to reflect the correct sterol profile of SG due to isomerization of some of the labile sterols. Therefore, various glycosylases were evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse SG under milder conditions. Using a pure SG mixture in aqueous solution, the highest glycolytic activity, as demonstrated by the decrease in SG and increase in free sterols was achieved using inulinase preparations (decrease of >95%). High glycolytic activity was also demonstrated using hemicellulase (63%). The applicability of enzymatic hydrolysis using inulinase preparations was further verified on SG extracted from foods. For example in potato peel Δ(5)-avenasteryl glucoside, a labile SG, was well preserved and contributed 26.9% of the total SG. Therefore, enzymatic hydrolysis is suitable for replacing acid hydrolysis of SG in food lipid extracts to accurately determine the sterol profile of SG. PMID:24912717

  10. Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein enhances the ability of high-density lipoprotein to inhibit low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hine, David; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutic strategies to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to treat or prevent vascular disease include the use of cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors. Here, we show, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, that addition of CETP to HDL enhances the ability of HDL to inhibit low-density lipoprotein oxidation by ∼ 30% for total HDL and HDL(2) (both P < 0.05) and 75% for HDL(3) (P < 0.01). Therefore, CETP inhibition may be detrimental to the antiatherosclerotic properties of HDL, and these findings may partly explain the failure of the CETP inhibitor, torcetrapib, treatment to retard vascular disease despite large increases in HDL, in addition to its "off target" toxicity, a property which appears not to be shared by other members of this class of CETP inhibitor currently under clinical trial. Further, detailed studies are urgently required. PMID:21815241

  11. Sub-Equimolar Hydrolysis and Condensation of Organophosphates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alam, Todd M.; Kinnan, Mark K.; Wilson, Brendan W.; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-07-16

    We characterized the in-situ hydrolysis and subsequent condensation reaction of the chemical agent simulant diethyl chlorophosphate (DECP) by high-resolution 31P NMR spectroscopy following the addition of water in sub-equimolar concentrations. Moreover, the identification and quantification of the multiple pyrophosphate and larger polyphosphate chemical species formed through a series of self-condensation reactions are reported. Finally, the DECP hydrolysis kinetics and distribution of breakdown species was strongly influenced by the water concentration and reaction temperature.

  12. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    PubMed

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane. PMID:21338419

  13. Nicosulfuron: alcoholysis, chemical hydrolysis, and degradation on various minerals.

    PubMed

    Sabadie, Jean

    2002-01-30

    Alcoholysis (methanol or ethanol) and hydrolysis (pH ranging from 4 to 11) of the herbicide nicosulfuron at 30 degrees C principally involves the breakdown of the urea part of the molecule. A high yield of the corresponding carbamate was obtained along with aminopyrimidine during alcoholysis. Hydrolysis led to both aminopyrimidine and pyridylsulfonamide. The latter compound may be easily cyclized (pH > or = 7). First-order kinetics describe the rates of alcoholysis and hydrolysis well. The rate constants (0.44 days(-1) for methanolysis) decreased from 0.50 to 0.002 days(-1) as pH increased from 4 to 8, then remained stable under alkaline conditions. In acidic or neutral solution, the hydrolysis path appeared prevalent (> or =70%), whereas in an alkaline medium it decreased when pH increased. The chemical degradation of nicosulfuron on various dry minerals (calcium bentonite, kaolinite, silica gel, H(+) bentonite, montmorillonite K10, and alumina) was investigated at 30 degrees C. The best conditions for the degradation are obtained on acidic minerals after herbicide deposition using the liquid method. Under these conditions an acceptable correlation with pseudo-first-order kinetics was observed, and the major degradation path is similar to that proposed for chemical hydrolysis. Conversely, alumina seemed to favor other unknown degradation processes. The hydrolysis paths of nicosulfuron and rimsulfuron appeared to be different. PMID:11804524

  14. [Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of excess sludge by surfactant].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Luo, Kun; Yang, Qi; Li, Xiao-Ming; Xie, Bing-Xin; Yang, Guo-Jing; Mo, Chuang-Rong

    2011-08-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of excess sludge, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was added to the system to explore the feasibility of promotion the enzyme hydrolysis. The results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of excess sludge could be greatly improved by SDS, and the mixed enzymes system was more effective than that by single enzyme system. SCOD releasing increased linearly with the increase of SDS dosage at the mixed enzymes concentration of 0.06 g/g. SCOD/TCOD increased from 1.3% to 54.3% and VSS reduction achieved to 43.2% at the SDS dosage of 0.20 g/g. Further studies indicated that SDS could improve the activity of external enzymes. At SDS dosage of 0.10 g/g, the protease activity of SDS + protease showed a 2. 3-time increase and the amylase activity of SDS + amylase showed a 1.2-time increase compared with enzymatic treatment. After 4 h hydrolysis, the concentration of protein, NH4+ -N and soluble sugar in SDS + mixed enzymes system were improved by 85.4%, 92.5% and 64.0%, respectively. Correspondingly, sludge hydrolysis within prior 4 h was consistent with first-order reaction dynamics. The reaction rate constant (K) of soluble sugar increased from 0.23 to 0.41, which indicated that the reaction rate of hydrolysis increased significantly. PMID:22619958

  15. Furfural/ethanol coproduction from biomass feedstocks using acid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barrier, J.W.; Bulls, M.M.; Broder, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has been involved in research and development to produce high-value chemicals from biomass for over 15 years. Use of biomass releases less carbon dioxide than use of fossil fuels, and thus represents a more environmentally friendly source of chemicals and fuels. Two biomass conversion processes have been developed as a result of TVA`s work--concentrated acid hydrolysis and dilute acid hydrolysis. Both processes use sulfuric acid as a catalyst. Early hydrolysis research focused on improving ethanol yields through hydrolysis and five-carbon sugar fermentation research. Both processes have been demonstrated at the pilot plant scale. Current work is focused on the development of integrated systems for producing ethanol and a variety of other chemicals and products from biomass. Production of furfural and ethanol from high hemicellulose feedstocks has been identified by TVA as an integrated system with technical and economic potential for commercial success. A system design has been developed to produce ethanol and furfural using dilute acid hydrolysis of sycamore. Furfural yields for the system are estimated at 180--240 pound/ton. Ethanol process yields are 25--38 gallon/ton. Capital and operating costs for a 4,500 ton/day facility are estimated to be $609 million and $183 million, respectively. The dilute acid hydrolysis process proposed by TVA will be described along with additional process economics and potential furfural markets.

  16. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K; Dean, Dennis R; Hoffman, Brian M; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2013-10-01

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s(-1), 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s(-1), 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s(-1), 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein-protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Fe(ox)(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein. PMID:24062462

  17. Site- and species-specific hydrolysis rates of heroin.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Levente; Orgován, Gábor; Tóth, Gergő; Kraszni, Márta; Gergó, Lajos; Hosztafi, Sándor; Noszál, Béla

    2016-06-30

    The hydroxide-catalyzed non-enzymatic, simultaneous and consecutive hydrolyses of diacetylmorphine (DAM, heroin) are quantified in terms of 10 site- and species-specific rate constants in connection with also 10 site- and species-specific acid-base equilibrium constants, comprising all the 12 coexisting species in solution. This characterization involves the major and minor decomposition pathways via 6-acetylmorphine and 3-acetylmorphine, respectively, and morphine, the final product. Hydrolysis has been found to be 18-120 times faster at site 3 than at site 6, depending on the status of the amino group and the rest of the molecule. Nitrogen protonation accelerates the hydrolysis 5-6 times at site 3 and slightly less at site 6. Hydrolysis rate constants are interpreted in terms of intramolecular inductive effects and the concomitant local electron densities. Hydrolysis fraction, a new physico-chemical parameter is introduced and determined to quantify the contribution of the individual microspecies to the overall hydrolysis. Hydrolysis fractions are depicted as a function of pH. PMID:27130543

  18. I. Lipid metabolism stimulated by altered intracellular calcium in cultured fibroblasts. II. Regulation of the activity of rat adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Wang, Huei-Hsiang Lisa.

    1988-01-01

    The cell killing process of 3T3 Swiss mouse fibroblasts stimulated by Ca{sup 2+} plus A23187, a Ca{sup 2+} ionophore has been studied. The aim of this research is to understand the biochemical mechanism of this process, i.e, to elucidate the step involved and to characterize the enzymes involved with each steps in the lipid metabolism stimulated in cultured fibroblasts undergoing a toxic death response. Parallel 3T3 cultures biosynthetically labeled with lipid precursors were examined under Ca{sup 2+}-mediated killing conditions. Labeled lipids were extracted and analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography. Evidence for activation of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C has been obtained in injured 3T3 cells labeled with ({sup 3}H)glycerol and ({sup 3}H)inositol. To simplify the system for studying the lipoprotein lipase reaction, our laboratory prepared the chromophore containing a substrate: 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-{beta}-2-furylacryloyltriacylglycerol (DPFATG). By using this artificial lipid we could readily investigate the lipoprotein lipase reactions, since the absorbance change directly represents the hydrolysis of the chromophoric side chain of the substrate.

  19. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  20. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  1. Mutations in exon 3 of the lipoprotein lipase gene segregating in a family with hypertriglyceridemia, pancreatitis, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D E; Hata, A; Kwong, L K; Lingam, A; Shuhua, J; Ridinger, D N; Yeager, C; Kaltenborn, K C; Iverius, P H; Lalouel, J M

    1993-01-01

    A proband with chylomicronemia, pancreatitis, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) bears two different mutations in exon 3 of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene: a missense mutation, 75Arg-->Ser, inherited through the paternal line and a truncation, 73Tyr-->Ter, through the maternal line. NIDDM appeared to be independently segregating. The R75S mutant was studied in extracts and media from transfected COS-1 cells. Detectable amounts of catalytically competent R75S LPL suggested destabilization of the active homodimer as with exon 5 mutants (Hata et al. 1992. J. Biol. Chem. 267:20132-20139). Hydrolysis of a short-chain fatty acid ester indicated that R75S does not directly affect activation of LPL by apoC-II. Subjects with NIDDM and wild-type LPL, and nondiabetic middle-aged carriers of the 73Tyr-->Ter truncation had moderate hypertriglyceridemia (260-521 mg/dl) and reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol. A maternal aunt with NIDDM carried the truncation. Her phenotype (triglycerides of 5,300 mg/dl, eruptive xanthomatosis, and recurrent pancreatitis) was as severe as that in homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. We conclude: (a) diabetic carriers of dysfunctional LPL alleles are at risk for severe lipemia; and (b) the physiologic defects in NIDDM may be additive or synergistic with heterozygous LPL deficiency. Images PMID:8325986

  2. Effects of high-density lipoproteins on storage at 4 degrees C of fowl spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Blesbois, E; Hermier, D

    1990-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative characterization of lipoproteins found in seminal plasma from domestic cocks was performed after isolation by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Trigyceride-rich lipoproteins (very low, intermediate- and low density lipoproteins) were not detectable in seminal plasma. High-density lipoproteins (HDL), identified on the basis of size, chemical composition and protein moiety, were present at a concentration of 66 micrograms/ml. A fraction possibly corresponding to VHDL (very high density lipoproteins, 77% protein, 23% lipid) was also detected but appeared contaminated by a protein-rich opalescent material. Since HDL contains mostly phospholipid and cholesterol, the physiological role of these lipoproteins on the storage of fowl spermatozoa was studied. Replacing seminal plasma with a solution containing chicken HDL at physiological concentration (66 micrograms/ml) had no effect on fertilizing ability of spermatozoa stored at 4 degrees C for 24 h. However, higher concentrations of HDL (560 micrograms/ml) had deleterious effects on spermatozoa stored in vitro. PMID:2250247

  3. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes.

  4. Effect of cobalt chloride on content of lipids and lipoproteins in serum and liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Shalamov, R V; Zagaiko, A L

    1997-07-01

    Lipids and the composition of lipoproteins in blood serum and liver cytosol, total lipid, and phospholipid contents in liver subcellular fractions and the spectrum of microsomal liver lipids were studied in male Wistar rats after a single injection of cobalt chloride. Virtually all lipid and lipoprotein fractions in blood and liver were increased and lipoprotein composition was changes. The lipid composition of liver microsomes did not change under these conditions. Thus, microsomal membranes are stable under developing oxidative stress. PMID:9331964

  5. Secretion of Bacterial Lipoproteins: Through the Cytoplasmic Membrane, the Periplasm and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zückert, Wolfram R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., grampositive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporterlike LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the “+2 rule”. Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  6. Impacts of microalgae pre-treatments for improved anaerobic digestion: thermal treatment, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Francesco; Quiroga, Gerardo; Pšenička, Pavel; Whitton, Rachel; Jefferson, Bruce; Villa, Raffaella

    2014-11-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of microalgae is primarily inhibited by the chemical composition of their cell walls containing biopolymers able to resist bacterial degradation. Adoption of pre-treatments such as thermal, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis have the potential to remove these inhibitory compounds and enhance biogas yields by degrading the cell wall, and releasing the intracellular algogenic organic matter (AOM). This work investigated the effect of four pre-treatments on three microalgae species, and their impact on the quantity of soluble biomass released in the media and thus on the digestion process yields. The analysis of the composition of the soluble COD released and of the TEM images of the cells showed two main degradation actions associated with the processes: (1) cell wall damage with the release of intracellular AOM (thermal, thermal hydrolysis and ultrasound) and (2) degradation of the cell wall constituents with the release of intracellular AOM and the solubilisation of the cell wall biopolymers (enzymatic hydrolysis). As a result of this, enzymatic hydrolysis showed the greatest biogas yield increments (>270%) followed by thermal hydrolysis (60-100%) and ultrasounds (30-60%). PMID:25150520

  7. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOEpatents

    Torget, Robert W.; Padukone, Nandan; Hatzis, Christos; Wyman, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4

  8. Rapid method for the isolation of lipoproteins from human serum by precipitation with polyanions.

    PubMed

    Burstein, M; Scholnick, H R; Morfin, R

    1970-11-01

    Procedures are described for the isolation of lipoproteins from human serum by precipitation with polyanions and divalent cations. A mixture of low and very low density lipoproteins can be prepared without ultracentrifugation by precipitation with heparin and either MnCl(2) alone or MgCl(2) plus sucrose. In both cases the precipitation is reversible, selective, and complete. The highly concentrated isolated lipoproteins are free of other plasma proteins as judged by immunological and electrophoretic methods. The low density and very low density lipoproteins can then be separated from each other by ultracentrifugation. The advantage of the method is that large amounts of lipoproteins can be prepared with only a single preparative ultracentrifugation. Polyanions other than heparin may also be used; when the precipitation of the low and very low density lipoproteins is achieved with dextran sulfate and MnCl(2), or sodium phosphotungstate and MgCl(2), the high density lipoproteins can subsequently be precipitated by increasing the concentrations of the reagents. These lipoproteins, containing small amounts of protein contaminants, are further purified by ultracentrifugation at d 1.22. With a single preparative ultracentrifugation, immunologically pure high density lipoproteins can be isolated from large volumes of serum. PMID:4100998

  9. The Role of Calcium in Lipoprotein Release by the LDL Receptor†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenze; Michaely, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) mediates efficient endocytosis of VLDL, VLDL remnants and LDL. As part of the uptake process, the LDLR releases lipoproteins in endosomes. Released lipoproteins are subsequently trafficked to lysosomes for degradation, while the LDLR recycles back to the cell surface for further rounds of uptake. Endosomes have at least two features that can promote lipoprotein release: an acidic pH and low concentrations of free calcium. The relative contributions of acidic pH and low free calcium to lipoprotein release are not known. Here, we generated fibroblasts that express either normal LDLR or an LDLR variant that is unable to employ the acid-dependent release mechanism to determine the relative contributions of acidic pH and low free calcium on lipoprotein release. We show that endosomal concentrations of free calcium can drive lipoprotein release at rates that are similar to those of acid-dependent release and that the calcium-dependent and acid-dependent mechanisms can cooperate during lipoprotein release. Assessment of lipoprotein uptake by these two cell lines showed that LDL uptake requires the acid-dependent mechanism, while uptake of the VLDL remnant, β-VLDL, does not. We propose that endosomes use both the acid-dependent and calcium-dependent release mechanisms to drive lipoprotein release and that the acid-dependent process is only required for LDL release. PMID:19583244

  10. Cholesterol transfer from normal and atherogenic low density lipoproteins to Mycoplasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mitschelen, J.J.; St. Clair, R.W.; Hester, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the free cholesterol of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein from cholesterol-fed nonhuman primates has a greater potential for surface transfer to cell membranes than does the free cholesterol of normal low density lipoprotein. The low density lipoproteins were isolated from normal and hypercholesterolemic rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, incubated with membranes from Acholeplasma laidlawii, a mycoplasma species devoid of cholesterol in its membranes, and the mass transfer of free cholesterol determined by measuring membrane cholesterol content. Since these membranes neither synthesize nor esterify cholesterol, nor degrade the protein or cholesterol ester moieties of low density lipoprotein, they are an ideal model with which to study differences in the cholesterol transfer potential of low density lipoprotein independent of the uptake of the intact low density lipoprotein particle. These studies indicate that, even though there are marked differences in the cholesterol composition of normal and hypercholesterolemic low density lipoproteins, this does not result in a greater chemical potential for surface transfer of free cholesterol. Consequently, if a difference in the surface transfer of free cholesterol is responsible for the enhanced ability of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein to promote cellular cholesterol accumulation and, perhaps, also atherosclerosis, it must be the result of differences in the interaction to the hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein with the more complicated mammalian cell membranes, rather than differences in the chemical potential for cholesterol transfer.

  11. Incorporation of phosphatidylglycerol into murein lipoprotein in intact cells of Salmonella typhimurium by phospholipid vesicle fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, P K; Lai, J S; Wu, H C

    1979-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the diglyceride moiety of murein lipoprotein was studied by fusion of labeled phospholipid vesicles with intact cells of Salmonella typhimurium. Phosphatidylglycerol was found to be an excellent donor for the glyceryl moiety in lipoprotein, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin were not. The incorporation of radioactivity from monoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol into lipoprotein can be attributed to its conversion to phosphatidylglycerol. The results strongly support our hypothesis that the glyceryl residue covalently linked to murein lipoprotein is derived from the nonacylated glycerol moiety of phosphatidylglycerol. PMID:368018

  12. In vitro studies on the distribution of probucol among human plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, S.; Riant, P.; Albengres, E.; Brioude, R.; Tillement, J.P.

    1984-09-01

    The role of human plasma lipoproteins as carriers in the blood transport of the cholesterol-lowering and water-insoluble drug, probucol, was investigated in in vitro studies. (/sup 14/C)Probucol was incubated in whole human blood, a serum pool, individual diluted sera, and isolated protein and lipoprotein fractions. In whole blood, about 90% partitioned in plasma. Following ultracentrifugal fractionation of the serum, it was found that less than 5% distributed in the d greater than 1.20 protein fraction (albumin-rich fraction) and more than 95% in the lipoprotein fractions. The distribution of probucol in the lipoprotein fractions correlated with the lipoprotein total lipid volume under saturation conditions (incubation of isolated lipoprotein fractions) as well as nonsaturation conditions (fractionation of serum exposed to (/sup 14/C)probucol). Incubation of the albumin-rich fraction and of apolipoproteins originating from the isolated lipoprotein fractions showed that they account for a negligible part in the interaction of probucol with blood components. The probucol uptake of individual sera was shown to be correlated to the lipid content of the serum. When probucol was incubated in erythrocyte suspensions containing variable amounts of lipoproteins, probucol partitioned less in erythrocytes as the lipoprotein concentration increased in the suspension.

  13. In vitro lipid transfer between lipoproteins and midgut-diverticula in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus.

    PubMed

    Laino, Aldana; Cunningham, Mónica L; Heras, Horacio; Garcia, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    It has been already reported that most hemolymphatic lipids in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus are transported by HDL1 and VHDL lipoproteins. We studied in vitro the lipid transfer among midgut-diverticula (M-diverticula), and either hemolymph or purified lipoproteins as well as between hemolymphatic lipoproteins. M-diverticula and hemolymph were labeled by in vivo (14)C-palmitic acid injection. In vitro incubations were performed between M-diverticula and either hemolymph or isolated lipoproteins. Hemolymph lipid uptake was associated to HDL1 (67%) and VHDL (32%). Release from hemolymph towards M-diverticula showed the opposite trend, VHDL 75% and HDL1 45%. Isolated lipoproteins showed a similar behavior to that observed with whole hemolymph. Lipid transfer between lipoproteins showed that HDL1 transfer more (14)C-lipids to VHDL than vice versa. Only 38% FFA and 18% TAG were transferred from M-diverticula to lipoproteins, while on the contrary 75% and 73% of these lipids, respectively, were taken up from hemolymph. A similar trend was observed regarding lipoprotein phospholipids. This study supports the hypothesis that HDL1 and hemocyanin-containing VHDL are involved in the uptake and release of FFA, phospholipids and triacylglycerols in the spider P. pythagoricus. The data support a directional flow of lipids from HDL1 and VHDL suggesting a mode of lipid transport between lipoproteins and M-diverticula. PMID:21889600

  14. Identification of the major lipoproteins in crayfish hemolymph as proteins involved in immune recognition and clotting.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; van Heusden, M C; Söderhäll, K

    1995-11-22

    Lipid-containing hemolymph proteins from males of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two major lipoproteins, one high density lipoprotein (HDL) and one very high density lipoprotein (VHDL), were characterized. The HDL and the VHDL were found to be identical to two proteins previously studied for their roles in immune recognition and hemolymph clotting, namely the beta-1,3-glucan binding protein and the clotting protein. These results imply that crayfish lipoproteins have dual functions, and that they are involved in immunity, hemolymph clotting, and lipid transport in these animals. Also, the oxygen-transporting protein hemocyanin was found to have a small lipid content. PMID:7488215

  15. A large discoidal lipoprotein present in only one of two closely related crayfish.

    PubMed

    Stieb, Stefanie; Hoeger, Ulrich; Schenk, Sven

    2008-08-01

    The hemolymph lipoproteins of two European freshwater crayfish, Astacus astacus and Astacus leptodactylus, were isolated and characterized. The former species possesses two sex-independent lipoproteins, which can be related to the formerly described high-density lipoprotein (HDL)/beta-glucan binding protein and very high-density lipoprotein/clotting protein from other crustaceans. The latter species, however, contains an additional third lipoprotein with a unique structure. It is a large discoidal HDL with a diameter of 42 nm, a thickness of 7 nm and a density of 1.1 g/ml. SDS-PAGE revealed two different apolipoproteins with molecular masses of 240 and 85 kDa, respectively, arranged in a 1:1 stoichiometry as judged from cross linking experiments. The lipid content of this lipoprotein was 67%, far higher than in every other crustacean lipoprotein described so far. The native molecular mass of this HDL-type lipoprotein was estimated to be about 930 kDa. The lipid content of the other lipoproteins ranged between 25 and 30% for the HDL/beta-glucan binding protein and 6-8% for the VHDL/clotting protein. PMID:18415110

  16. Effect of dietary triacylglycerol structure on lipoprotein metabolism: a comparison of the effects of dioleoylpalmitoylglycerol in which palmitate is esterified to the 2- or 1(3)-position of the glycerol.

    PubMed

    Pufal, D A; Quinlan, P T; Salter, A M

    1995-08-24

    The effect on lipoprotein metabolism of diets enriched in different isomers of dioleoylpalmitoylglycerol was studied. One diet contained fat in which palmitate was esterified to the two outer positions of the glycerol (OOP) and the other in which it was esterified to the middle carbon (OPO). The lipid composition of chylomicrons was similar in rats fed either fat blend. However, triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons from OPO fed animals was relatively enriched in palmitic acid, at the expense of stearic, oleic and linoleic acids. Silver phase HPLC and 2-positional analysis clearly demonstrated that the identity of the fatty acid in the 2-position was similar in both dietary and chylomicron TAG. No significant differences could be seen in the in vitro hydrolysis of chylomicron TAG from animals fed the two fats labelled with [14C]palmitate. As expected, following hydrolysis, palmitate was released as free fatty acid from chylomicrons isolated from OOP-fed animals but within 2-monoacylglycerol from those fed OPO. The enrichment of chylomicrons with palmitate in animals fed O[14C]PO resulted in increased delivery of [14C]palmitate to the liver. In a further series of experiments Golden Syrian hamsters were fed diets containing the fat blends and either 0.005% or 0.12% (w/w) cholesterol, for 28 days. No differences in fasting plasma lipoprotein concentrations were seen in response to the dietary fats. We conclude that, while these isometric triacylglycerols had transient effects on chylomicron metabolism, no significant longer term effect on plasma concentrations of endogenous lipoproteins could be found. PMID:7654779

  17. Hydrolysis of cisplatin--a first-principles metadynamics study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Ensing, Bernd

    2010-09-21

    Cisplatin, or cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl(2)], was the first member of a new revolutionary class of anticancer drugs that is still used today for the treatment of a wide variety of cancers. The mode of action of cisplatin starts inside the cell with the hydrolysis of Pt-Cl bonds to form a Pt-aqua complex. The solvent environment plays an essential role in many biochemical processes in general, and is expected to have a particular strong effect on the activation (hydrolysis) of cisplatin and cisplatin derivatives. To investigate these solvent effects, we have studied the explicit solvent structures during cisplatin hydrolysis by means of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Since hydrolysis is an activated process, and thus a rare event on the simulation timescale, we have applied the metadynamics sampling technique to map out the free energy landscape from which the reaction mechanism and activation free energy are obtained. Our simulations show that hydrogen bonding between solvent water molecules and metal complexes in the hydrolyzed product systems is stronger than that in the reactant cisplatin system. In addition, the free energy profiles from our metadynamics simulations for the cisplatin hydrolysis shows that the second hydrolysis of cisplatin is thermodynamically favourable, which is in good agreement with experimental results and previous static density functional theory calculations. The reactant channels for both hydrolysis steps are rather wide and flat, indicative of a continuous spectrum of allowed mechanisms with no strong preference for either concerted dissociative or concerted associative pathways. Three or five coordinated metastable intermediates do not exist in aqueous solution. PMID:20582358

  18. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein infusion modulates fatty acid metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Brian G.; Carey, Andrew L.; Natoli, Alaina K.; Formosa, Melissa F.; Vizi, Donna; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Weir, Jacquelyn M.; Barlow, Christopher K.; van Hall, Gerrit; Meikle, Peter J.; Duffy, Stephen J.; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

    2011-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) modulates glucose metabolism in humans via both AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in muscle and by increasing plasma insulin. Given the key roles of both AMPK and insulin in fatty acid metabolism, the current study investigated the effect of rHDL infusion on fatty acid oxidation and lipolysis. Thirteen patients with type 2 diabetes received separate infusions of rHDL and placebo in a randomized, cross-over study. Fatty acid metabolism was assessed using steady-state tracer methodology, and plasma lipids were measured by mass spectrometry (lipidomics). In vitro studies were undertaken in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. rHDL infusion inhibited fasting-induced lipolysis (P = 0.03), fatty acid oxidation (P < 0.01), and circulating glycerol (P = 0.04). In vitro, HDL inhibited adipocyte lipolysis in part via activation of AMPK, providing a possible mechanistic link for the apparent reductions in lipolysis observed in vivo. In contrast, circulating NEFA increased after rHDL infusion (P < 0.01). Lipidomic analyses implicated phospholipase hydrolysis of rHDL-associated phosphatidylcholine as the cause, rather than lipolysis of endogenous fat stores. rHDL infusion inhibits fasting-induced lipolysis and oxidation in patients with type 2 diabetes, potentially through both AMPK activation in adipose tissue and elevation of plasma insulin. The phospholipid component of rHDL also has the potentially undesirable effect of increasing circulating NEFA. PMID:21224289

  19. Characteristics of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl distribution among lipoproteins in vitro. [Rats and human whole blood, plasma, and lipoprotein fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Vomachka, M.S.; Vodicnik, M.J.; Lech, J.J.

    1983-09-01

    The uptake, distribution, and transfer of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (6-CB) were examined in vitro with human and rat whole blood, plasma, and lipoprotein fractions. 6-CB distribution between plasma and erythrocytes as well as among lipoproteins was determined following sedimentation of erythrocytes and ultracentrifugal fractionation of plasma. In both rat and human whole blood, 70 to 75% of 6-CB partitioned into plasma and 25 to 30% into erythrocytes. The uptake of 6-CB into plasma was extremely rapid and the rate of uptake was found to be dependent upon temperature. The distribution of 6-CB among lipoproteins was relatively homogeneous with 20 to 30% being distributed in very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL, d . 0.95-1.006 g/ml), 15 to 20% in low-density lipoproteins (LDL, d . 1.006-1.063 g/ml), and 15 to 25% in high-density lipoproteins (HDL, d . 1.063-1.21 g/ml). Over 25% of 6-CB was found in the remaining bottom fraction. In addition, each isolated fraction when incubated alone with 6-CB was shown capable of uptake. The relative proportion of 6-CB among the lipoproteins was independent of the level taken up by plasma. 6-CB was also found to transfer among lipoproteins. This exchange of 6-CB proved to be dependent upon the concentrations of both protein and triacylglycerol in the incubations. Two proteins in the bottom fraction (Bf), albumin and a steroid binding globulin, were capable of competing with the lipoproteins for 6-CB uptake.

  20. Compounds Released from Biomass Deconstruction: Understanding Their Effect on Cellulose Enzyme Hydrolysis and Their Biological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djioleu, Angele Mezindjou

    aureus growth and copper-induced peroxidation of human low-density lipoprotein, confirming antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the extract. On the other hand, bark extract inhibited cellulase cocktail activity by reducing cellulose hydrolysis by 82.32% after 48 h of incubation. Overall, phenolic compounds generated from biomass fractionation are important players in cellulolytic enzyme inhibition; removal of biomass extractives prior to pretreatment could reduce inhibitory compounds in prehydrolyzate while generating phytochemicals with societal benefits.

  1. Alterations in lipoprotein profiles in dogs with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, G K; Ford, R B; Vail, D M; Walters, L M; Salman, M D; Babineau, C; Fettman, M J

    1994-01-01

    After a 12-hour fast, blood samples were obtained from 31 dogs with previously untreated lymphoma. Blood samples were also collected from 16 of these dogs after up to 5 treatments with doxorubicin (30 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks). All 16 dogs underwent complete remission. Five dogs were re-evaluated after relapse and after overt signs of cancer cachexia had become clinically apparent. Samples were assayed for 8 quantitative parameters: total cholesterol (T-CH) and total triglyceride (T-TG) concentrations, and the concentration of cholesterol and triglyceride in each of the three major lipoprotein fractions, very-low-density lipoprotein (LDL-CH and LDL-TG), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-CH and HDL-TG). The results were compared with those from 20 healthy control dogs of similar weight and age before and 3 weeks after being given one dose of doxorubicin (30 mg/m2 intravenously). The administration of doxorubicin to control dogs resulted in a significant (P < .05) decrease in T-CH, LDL-CH, and HDL-CH, as well as a significant increase in VLDL-TG and HDL-TG. When compared with untreated controls, untreated dogs with lymphoma had significantly higher concentrations of VLDL-CH, T-TG, VLDL-TG, LDL-TG, and HDL-TG, and significantly lower concentrations of HDL-CH. HDL-TG and VLDL-TG concentrations from dogs with lymphoma were significantly increased above pretreatment values after relapse and development of overt signs of cancer cachexia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8176666

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fractionated products from oil thermally oxidated

    SciTech Connect

    Yashida, H.; Alexander, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of the acylglycerol products obtained from thermally oxidized vegetable oils was studied. Corn, sunflower and soybean oils were heated in the laboratory at 180/sup 0/C for 50, 70 and 100 hr with aeration and directly fractionated by silicic acid column chromatography. By successive elution with 20%, then 60% isopropyl ether in n-hexane, and diethyl ether, the thermally oxidized oils were separated into three fractions: the nonpolar fraction (monomeric compounds), slightly polar fraction (dimeric compounds), and polar fraction comprising oligomeric compounds. Enzymatic hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase showed that the monomers were hydrolyzed as rapidly as the corresponding unheated oils, the dimers much more slowly, and the oligomeric compounds barely at all. Overall, the hydrolysis of the dimers was less than 23% of that for the monomers, with small differences among the oils. Longer heating periods resulted in greater reductions in hydrolysis of the dimeric compounds. These results suggest that the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis of the fractionated acylglycerol compounds is related to differences in the thermal oxidative deterioration, and amounts of polar compounds in the products. (33 Refs.)

  3. Xylooligomers are strong inhibitors of cellulose hydrolysis by enzymes.

    PubMed

    Qing, Qing; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2010-12-01

    Typically, the enzymatic hydrolysis rate of lignocellulosic biomass is fast initially but then slows down more rapidly than can be explained by just consumption of substrate. Although several factors including enzyme inhibition, enzyme deactivation, a drop in substrate reactivity, or nonproductive binding of enzyme to lignin could be responsible for this loss of effectiveness, we recently reported evidence that xylose, xylan, and xylooligomers dramatically decrease conversion rates and yields, but clarification was still needed for the magnitude of their effect. Therefore, in this study, xylan and various xylooligomers were added to Avicel hydrolysis at low enzyme loadings and found to have a greater effect than adding equal amounts of xylose derived from these materials or when added separately. Furthermore, xylooligomers were more inhibitory than xylan or xylose in terms of a decreased initial hydrolysis rate and a lower final glucose yield even for a low concentration of 1.67 mg/ml. At a higher concentration of 12.5mg/ml, xylooligomers lowered initial hydrolysis rates of Avicel by 82% and the final hydrolysis yield by 38%. Mixed DP xylooligomers showed strong inhibition on cellulase enzymes but not on beta-glucosidase enzymes. By tracking the profile change of xylooligomers, a large portion of the xylooligomers was found to be hydrolyzed by Spezyme CP enzyme preparations, indicating competitive inhibition by mixed xylooligomers. A comparison among glucose sugars and xylose sugars also showed that xylooligomers were more powerful inhibitors than well-established glucose and cellobiose. PMID:20708404

  4. Improved hydrolysis process for the saccharification of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, S.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A single-step concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ hydrolysis process for the conversion of lignocellulosic material to monomeric sugars was developed. The conversion of corn stover to reducing sugars using 70% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 60 degrees for 5-10 minutes yields a maximum conversion of 70% when feeding a 10% solids feed. When the hydrolysis is carried out with a 2% stover feed the conversion of stover to monomers was 90% in just over 20 minutes. A modified single-step hydrolysis using a 10% solids feed was also developed using 70% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 50 degrees for 10-20 minutes, followed by dilution and further reaction. When the initial hydrolysis is followed by a 30-40% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ hydrolysis at 100 degrees for 20 minutes total monomeric sugar conversion results. Analysis of the hydrolyzates from both the single-step and the modified single-step process show acceptable levels of both furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural. When using the modified single-step process with equal to or less than 37% H2SO4, the furfural concentration reached only 0.027% and the hydroxymethylfurfural concentration was zero.

  5. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fructans in the tequila production process.

    PubMed

    Avila-Fernández, Angela; Rendón-Poujol, Xóchitl; Olvera, Clarita; González, Fernando; Capella, Santiago; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli; López-Munguía, Agustín

    2009-06-24

    In contrast to the hydrolysis of reserve carbohydrates in most plant-derived alcoholic beverage processes carried out with enzymes, agave fructans in tequila production have traditionally been transformed to fermentable sugars through acid thermal hydrolysis. Experiments at the bench scale demonstrated that the extraction and hydrolysis of agave fructans can be carried out continuously using commercial inulinases in a countercurrent extraction process with shredded agave fibers. Difficulties in the temperature control of large extraction diffusers did not allow the scaling up of this procedure. Nevertheless, batch enzymatic hydrolysis of agave extracts obtained in diffusers operating at 60 and 90 degrees C was studied at the laboratory and industrial levels. The effects of the enzymatic process on some tequila congeners were studied, demonstrating that although a short thermal treatment is essential for the development of tequila's organoleptic characteristics, the fructan hydrolysis can be performed with enzymes without major modifications in the flavor or aroma, as determined by a plant sensory panel and corroborated by the analysis of tequila congeners. PMID:19473003

  6. Hydrolysis of aluminum dross material to achieve zero hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2012-03-30

    A simple method with high efficiency for generating high pure hydrogen by hydrolysis in tap water of highly activated aluminum dross is established. Aluminum dross is activated by mechanically milling to particles of about 45 μm. This leads to removal of surface layer of the aluminum particles and creation of a fresh chemically active metal surface. In contact with water the hydrolysis reaction takes place and hydrogen is released. In this process a Zero Waste concept is achieved because the other product of reaction is aluminum oxide hydroxide (AlOOH), which is nature-friendly and can be used to make high quality refractory or calcium aluminate cement. For comparison we also used pure aluminum powder and alkaline tap water solution (NaOH, KOH) at a ratio similar to that of aluminum dross content. The rates of hydrogen generated in hydrolysis reaction of pure aluminum and aluminum dross have been found to be similar. As a result of the experimental setup, a hydrogen generator was designed and assembled. Hydrogen volume generated by hydrolysis reaction was measured. The experimental results obtained reveal that aluminum dross could be economically recycled by hydrolysis process with achieving zero hazardous aluminum dross waste and hydrogen generation. PMID:22326245

  7. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Hydrotropic Pulps at Different Substrate Loadings.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Marina N; Makarova, Ekaterina I; Pavlov, Igor N; Budaeva, Vera V; Sakovich, Gennady V

    2016-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic raw materials to produce nutrient broths for microbiological synthesis of ethanol and other valuable products is an important field of modern biotechnology. Biotechnological processing implies the selection of an effective pretreatment technique for raw materials. In this study, the hydrotropic treatment increased the reactivity of the obtained substrates toward enzymatic hydrolysis by 7.1 times for Miscanthus and by 7.3 times for oat hulls. The hydrotropic pulp from oat hulls was more reactive toward enzymatic hydrolysis compared to that from Miscanthus, despite that the substrates had similar compositions. As the initial substrate loadings were raised during enzymatic hydrolysis of the hydrotropic Miscanthus and oat hull pulps, the concentration of reducing sugars increased by 34 g/dm(3) and the yield of reducing sugars decreased by 31 %. The findings allow us to predict the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of hydrotropic pulps from Miscanthus and oat hulls when scaling up the process by volume. PMID:26634840

  8. Isolation and Characterization of an Abnormal High Density Lipoprotein in Tangier Disease

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, Gerd; Herbert, Peter N.; Fredrickson, Donald S.; Forte, Trudy

    1977-01-01

    The nature of the high density lipoproteins has been investigated in five patients homozygous for Tangier disease (familial high density lipoprotein deficiency). It has been established that Tangier high density lipoproteins, as isolated by ultracentrifugation, are morphologically heterogenous and contain several proteins (Apo B, albumin, and Apo A-II). An abnormal lipoprotein has been isolated from the d = 1.063-1.21 g/ml ultracentrifugal fraction by agarose-column chromatography which contains apoprotein A-II as the sole protein constituent. In negative-stain electron microscopy, these lipoproteins appeared as spherical particles 55-75 Å in diameter. By a variety of criteria (immunochemical, polyacrylamide electrophoresis, amino acid composition, and fluorescence measurements), apoprotein A-I the major apoprotein of normal high density lipoproteins and the C apoproteins were absent from this lipoprotein. As demonstrated by 125I very low density lipoprotein incubation experiments with Tangier plasma, C apoproteins did not associate with lipoproteins of d = 1.063-1.21 g/ml. Tangier apoprotein A-II, isolated to homogeneity by delipidation of the apoprotein A-II-containing lipoprotein or Sephadex G-200 guanidine-HCl chromatography of the d = 1.063-1.21 g/ml fraction, was indistinguishable from control apoprotein A-II with respect to amino acid composition and migration of tryptic peptides in urea-polyacrylamide electrophoresis. The ability of Tangier apoprotein A-II to bind phospholipid was demonstrated by in vitro reconstitution experiments and morphological and chemical analysis of lipid-protein complexes. It is concluded that normal high density lipoproteins, as defined by polypeptide composition and morphological appearance, are absent from Tangier plasma and that as a consequence, the impairment of C apoprotein metabolism contributes to the hypertriglyceridemia and fasting chylomicronemia observed in these patients. Images PMID:194920

  9. Granular starch hydrolysis for fuel ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping

    addition were evaluated in the dry grind process using GSHE (GSH process). Addition of proteases resulted in higher ethanol concentrations (15.2 to 18.0% v/v) and lower (DDGS) yields (32.9 to 45.8% db) compared to the control (no protease addition). As level of proteases and GSHE increased, ethanol concentrations increased and DDGS yields decreased. Proteases addition reduced required GSHE dose. Ethanol concentrations with protease addition alone were higher than with urea or with addition of both protease and urea. Corn endosperm consists of soft and hard endosperm. More exposed starch granules and rough surfaces produced from soft endosperm compared to hard endosperm will create more surface area which will benefit the solid phase hydrolysis as used in GSH process. In this study, the effects of protease, urea, endosperm hardness and GSHE levels on the GSH process were evaluated. Soft and hard endosperm materials were obtained by grinding and sifting flaking grits from dry milling pilot plant. Soft endosperm resulted in higher ethanol concentrations (at 72 hr) compared to ground corn or hard endosperm. Addition of urea increased ethanol concentrations (at 72 hr) for soft and hard endosperm. The effect of protease addition on increasing ethanol concentrations and fermentation rates was more predominant for soft endosperm, less for hard endosperm and least for ground corn. The GSH process with protease resulted in higher ethanol concentration than that with urea. For fermentation of soft endosperm, GSHE dose can be reduced. Ground corn fermented faster at the beginning than hard and soft endosperm due to the presence of inherent nutrients which enhanced yeast growth.

  10. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24755261

  11. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate catalyzed by ionic liquid [Bmim][Ac].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiuyan; Liu, Fusheng; Li, Lei; Yang, Xuequn; Yu, Shitao; Ge, Xiaoping

    2013-01-15

    Hydrolysis of polycarbonate (PC) was studied using ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Bmim][Ac]) as a catalyst. The influences of temperature, time, water dosage and [Bmim][Ac] dosage on the hydrolysis reaction were examined. Under the conditions of temperature 140°C, reaction time 3.0 h, m([Bmim][Ac]):m(PC)=1.5:1 and m(H(2)O):m(PC)=0.35:1, the conversion of PC was nearly 100% and the yield of bisphenol A (BPA) was over 96%. The ionic liquid could be reused up to 6 times without apparent decrease in the conversion of PC and yield of BPA. The kinetics of the reaction was also investigated. The results showed that the hydrolysis of PC in [Bmim][Ac] was a first-order kinetic reaction with an activation energy of 228 kJ/mol. PMID:23246956

  12. Comparative hydrolysis and fermentation of sugarcane and agave bagasse.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salas, J M; Villa-Ramírez, M S; Veloz-Rendón, J S; Rivera-Hernández, K N; González-César, R A; Plascencia-Espinosa, M A; Trejo-Estrada, S R

    2009-02-01

    Sugarcane and agave bagasse samples were hydrolyzed with either mineral acids (HCl), commercial glucanases or a combined treatment consisting of alkaline delignification followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. Acid hydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse yielded a higher level of reducing sugars (37.21% for depithed bagasse and 35.37% for pith bagasse), when compared to metzal or metzontete (agave pinecone and leaves, 5.02% and 9.91%, respectively). An optimized enzyme formulation was used to process sugar cane bagasse, which contained Celluclast, Novozyme and Viscozyme L. From alkaline-enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse samples, a reduced level of reducing sugar yield was obtained (11-20%) compared to agave bagasse (12-58%). Selected hydrolyzates were fermented with a non-recombinant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Maximum alcohol yield by fermentation (32.6%) was obtained from the hydrolyzate of sugarcane depithed bagasse. Hydrolyzed agave waste residues provide an increased glucose decreased xylose product useful for biotechnological conversion. PMID:19000863

  13. Complex enzyme hydrolysis releases antioxidative phenolics from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Ruifen; Wei, Zhencheng; Deng, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Juan; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, phenolic profiles and antioxidant activity of rice bran were analyzed following successive treatment by gelatinization, liquefaction and complex enzyme hydrolysis. Compared with gelatinization alone, liquefaction slightly increased the total amount of phenolics and antioxidant activity as measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays. Complex enzyme hydrolysis significantly increased the total phenolics, flavonoids, FRAP and ORAC by 46.24%, 79.13%, 159.14% and 41.98%, respectively, compared to gelatinization alone. Furthermore, ten individual phenolics present in free or soluble conjugate forms were also analyzed following enzymatic processing. Ferulic acid experienced the largest release, followed by protocatechuic acid and then quercetin. Interestingly, a major proportion of phenolics existed as soluble conjugates, rather than free form. Overall, complex enzyme hydrolysis releases phenolics, thus increasing the antioxidant activity of rice bran extract. This study provides useful information for processing rice bran into functional beverage rich in phenolics. PMID:27507440

  14. Lipoprotein (a) and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Palmeira, Ástrid Camêlo; Leal, Adriana Amorim de F.; Ramos, Nathaly de Medeiros N.; de Alencar F., José; Simões, Mônica Oliveira da S.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: This systematic review included studies from 2001 to 2011, a ten-year time period. Epidemiological studies with children and/or adolescents published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and fully available online were included. The searches were performed in Science Direct, PubMed/Medline, BVS (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases, using the following combination of key-words: "lipoprotein a" and "cardiovascular diseases" and "obesity". DATA SYNTHESIS: Overall, 672 studies were obtained but only seven were included. Some studies assessed the family history for CVD. In all of them, Lp(a) levels were increased in patients with family history for CVD. There was also a positive correlation between Lp(a) and LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels, suggesting an association between Lp(a) levels and the lipid profile. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence that CVD may originate in childhood and adolescence leads to the need for investigating the risk factors during this period in order to propose earlier and possibly more effective interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:24473960

  15. Hypertriglyceridemia and unusual lipoprotein subclass distributions associated with late pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Kretchmer, N.; Silliman, K. )

    1991-03-15

    In the human adult population elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and decreased HDL and LDL particle sizes. Late pregnancy is a hypertriglyceridemic state where little is known about LDL and HDL subpopulation distribution. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins (apo) and lipoprotein subpopulations were examined in 36 pregnant women at 36 wk pregnancy and 6 wk postpartum and correlated with HDL and LDL size. There was a significant decrease in LDL diameter at 36 wk pre, 25 {plus minus} 0.7 nm compared, with 6 wk post, 26.4 {plus minus} 0.8 nm. A total of 97% of the 36 wk pre subjects had small dense LDL which paralleled increases in apoB concentration. Unlike LDL HDL at 36 wks pre showed a significant increase in larger sized particles where HDL{sub 2b} predominated. There was a positive correlation between HDL{sub 2b} mass and apoAl and HDL-C concentrations. Late pregnancy is a metabolic state where the predominance of large, HDL{sub 2b} particles is discordant with the predominance of small LDL and elevated TG. This annual metabolic pattern may in part be due to hormonal changes occurring in late pregnancy.

  16. The lipoprotein abnormality in Tangier disease: quantitation of A apoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, G; Smootz, E; Adler, K; Capurso, A; Oette, K

    1977-01-01

    In this study we have determined by radioimmunoassay and double immunoelectrophoresis the total quantities and distributions of A apoproteins in three adult patients affected with Tangier disease (hereditary alpha-lipoprotein deficiency). Compared with normal plasma, the total quantities of apoproteins A-I and A-II in Tangier plasma were determined to be less than 1% and 5-7%, respectively. In Tangier patients, approximately 90% of the apoprotein A-I sedimented when ultracentrifugations of plasma were carried out at density 1.21 g/ml KBr. By contrast, more than 95% of the apoprotein A-II floated under those conditions. In normal plasma, approximately 90% of both apoproteins A-I and A-II is found in the 1.063-1.21-g/ml KBr density fraction. These findings suggest that complete dissociation of A apoproteins occurs in Tangier plasma. This dissociation of apoproteins was confirmed by double immunoelectrophoresis with monospecific antisera. Immunochemical and electrophoretic experiments did not provide evidence for a structural abnormality of apoprotein A-I in these patients, The results taken together strongly suggest that normal high-density lipoproteins are absent from Tangier plasma. Images PMID:190272

  17. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  18. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  19. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara; Calabresi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  20. Immunogenic integral membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi are lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Brandt, M E; Riley, B S; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1990-04-01

    The pathogenic spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi contains a set of integral membrane proteins which were selectively extracted into the detergent phase upon solubilization of intact B. burgdorferi with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114. Virtually all of these hydrophobic proteins were recognized by antibodies in pooled sera from patients with chronic Lyme arthritis, demonstrating that proteins partitioning into the detergent phase of Triton X-114 encompass the major B. burgdorferi immunogens. Furthermore, most of these immunogenic proteins, including the previously characterized OspA and OspB membrane antigens, could be biosynthetically labeled when B. burgdorferi was incubated in vitro with [3H]palmitate. The OspA and OspB antigens were radioimmunoprecipitated from [3H]palmitate-labeled detergent-phase proteins with monoclonal antibodies, and [3H]palmitate was recovered unaltered from these proteins after sequential alkaline and acid hydrolyses. The combined results provide formal confirmation that the major B. burgdorferi immunogens extracted by Triton X-114 are lipoproteins. The demonstration that B. burgdorferi integral membrane antigens are lipoproteins may explain the basis of their immunogenicity and may help to improve our understanding of the surface topology of B. burgdorferi. PMID:2318538

  1. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism enhance low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, V; Hanna, A N; Koneru, L; Newman, H A; Falko, J M

    1997-10-01

    Hypothyroidism is frequently associated with hypercholesterolemia and an increased risk for atherosclerosis, whereas hyperthyroidism is known to precipitate angina or myocardial infarction in patients with underlying coronary heart disease. We have shown previously that L-T4 functions as an antioxidant in vitro and inhibits low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in a dose-dependent fashion. The present study was designed to evaluate the changes in LDL oxidation in subjects with hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. Fasting blood samples for LDL oxidation analyses, lipoprotein determinations, and thyroid function tests were collected at baseline and after the patients were rendered euthyroid. The lag phase (mean +/- SEM hours) of the Cu+2-catalyzed LDL oxidation in the hypothyroid state and the subsequent euthyroid states were 4 +/- 0.0.65 and 14 +/- 0.68 h, respectively (P < 0.05). The lag phase during the hyperthyroid phase was 6 +/- 0.55 h, and that during the euthyroid phase was 12 +/- 0.66 h (P < 0.05). The total and LDL cholesterol levels were higher in hypothyroidism than in euthyroidism and were lower in hyperthyroidism than in the euthyroid state. We conclude that LDL has more susceptibility to oxidation in both the hypothyroid and hyperthyroid states. Thus, the enhanced LDL oxidation may play a role in the cardiac disease process in both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. PMID:9329379

  2. [New insights in regulation factors of lipoprotein lipase].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan-Zhi; Xing, Shu-Hua; Cen, Wang-Min; Chen, Jian-Ning; Li, Xue-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an essential enzyme in the lipid metabolism, and proper regulation of LPL is important for controlling the delivery of lipid nutrients to tissues. Recent studies have identified glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1(GPIHBP1) as the important regulation factor of LPL that serves as a binding platform for lipolysis on the vascular lumen and an endothelial cell transporter transporting LPL from the interstitial spaces to the capillary lumen. In addition, several other regulation factors of LPL have also been identified including microRNAs, SorLA (Sortilin-related receptor with A-type repeats), and apolipoproteins that are potentially important for regulating LPL activity. These discoveries provide new directions for understanding basic mechanisms of lipolysis and hyperlipidemia. In this update, we focused on summarizing recent progresses on GPIHBP1, the endothelial cell LPL transporter. We also highlighted the recent progresses on several other regulation factors of LPL that are relevant to the regulation of LPLactivity. PMID:23853353

  3. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data. PMID:3176021

  4. Lipid profiling of lipoprotein X: Implications for dyslipidemia in cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Heimerl, Susanne; Boettcher, Alfred; Kaul, Harald; Liebisch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Lipoprotein X (Lp-X) is an abnormal lipoprotein that may typically be formed in intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis and potentially interfere with lipid analysis in the routine lab. To gain insight into lipid class and species composition, Lp-X, LDL and HDL from cholestatic and control serum samples were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis including phospholipids (PL), sphingolipids, free cholesterol (FC), cholesteryl esters (CE) and bile acids. Our analysis of Lp-X revealed a content of 46% FC, 49% PL with 34% phosphatidylcholine (PC) as main PL component. The lipid species pattern of Lp-X showed remarkable high fractions of mono-unsaturated species including PC 32:1 and PC 34:1 and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) 32:1 and 34:1. LDL and HDL lipid composition in the same specimens strongly reflected the lipid composition of Lp-X with increased PC 32:1, PC 34:1, PE 32:1, PE 34:1 and FC accompanied by decreased CE compared to controls. Comparison of Lp-X and biliary lipid composition clearly indicates that Lp-X does not originate from a sole release of bile lipids. Moreover, these data present evidence for increased hepatic fatty acid and PL synthesis which may represent a reaction to high hepatic FC level observed during cholestasis. PMID:27112638

  5. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  6. Effects of Anabolic Steroids on Lipoprotein Profiles of Female Weight Lifters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffatt, Robert J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of resistance exercise and anabolic steroids on lipoprotein profiles of female weightlifters. The study found that women who participate in resistance training have better lipoprotein profiles than their sedentary counterparts, but these changes do not offset the deleterious effects of steroid use. (SM)

  7. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. 866.5580 Section 866.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. 866.5580 Section 866.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  9. ApoE and the role of very low density lipoproteins in adipose tissue inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was too identify the role of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoE, a major apolipoprotein in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, in adipose tissue inflammation with high-fat diet induced obesity. Male apoE-/- and C57BL/6J wild-type mice fed high fat diets for 12 weeks were assessed for metab...

  10. Human very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons can protect against endotoxin-induced death in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Rapp, J H

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxemia stimulates many physiologic responses including disturbances in lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that this lipemia may be part of a defensive mechanism by which the body combats the toxic effects of circulating endotoxin. We tested the effects of mixtures of endotoxin, lipoproteins, and lipoprotein-free plasma and determined the ability of varying concentrations of human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, as well as low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL), and of the synthetic lipid emulsion SOYACAL to prevent endotoxin-induced death in mice. This study demonstrates that the triglyceride-rich VLDL and chylomicrons, as well as cholesterol-rich LDL and HDL, and cholesterol-free SOYACAL can protect against endotoxin-induced death. Protection required small amounts of lipoprotein-free plasma, and depended on the incubation time and the concentration of lipoprotein lipid. Despite stringent techniques to prevent exogenous endotoxin contamination eight of ten duplicate VLDL preparations contained endotoxin (5,755 +/- 3,514 ng endotoxin/mg triglyceride, mean +/- SEM) making the isolation of endotoxin-free VLDL difficult. In contrast, simultaneous preparations of LDL and HDL were relatively free of endotoxin contamination (3 +/- 3 and 320 +/- 319 ng/mg total cholesterol, respectively), suggesting that the contamination of VLDL occurs in vivo and not during the isolation procedure. These observations suggest a possible role for increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the host's defense against endotoxemia and infection. Images PMID:2394827

  11. Effect of dietary Fatty acids on human lipoprotein metabolism: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Esther M M; Watts, Gerald F; Ng, Theodore W K; Barrett, P Hugh R

    2015-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dietary fatty-acid composition regulates lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and may confer CVD benefit. This review updates understanding of the effect of dietary fatty-acids on human lipoprotein metabolism. In elderly participants with hyperlipidemia, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA) consumption diminished hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) secretion and enhanced TRL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conversion. n-3 PUFA also decreased TRL-apoB-48 concentration by decreasing TRL-apoB-48 secretion. High n-6 PUFA intake decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by up-regulating VLDL lipolysis and uptake. In a study of healthy subjects, the intake of saturated fatty-acids with increased palmitic acid at the sn-2 position was associated with decreased postprandial lipemia. Low medium-chain triglyceride may not appreciably alter TRL metabolism. Replacing carbohydrate with monounsaturated fatty-acids increased TRL catabolism. Trans-fatty-acid decreased LDL and enhanced high-density lipoprotein catabolism. Interactions between APOE genotype and n-3 PUFA in regulating lipid responses were also described. The major advances in understanding the effect of dietary fatty-acids on lipoprotein metabolism has centered on n-3 PUFA. This knowledge emphasizes the importance of regulating lipoprotein metabolism as a mode to improve plasma lipids and potentially CVD risk. Additional studies are required to better characterize the cardiometabolic effects of other dietary fatty-acids. PMID:26043038

  12. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the oxylipin composition of lipoproteins in hypertriglyceridemic, statin-treated subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Oxylipins mediate many physiological processes, including inflammation and vascular function. Generally considered local and transient, we suggest their presence in lipoproteins indicates they also mediate the effects lipoproteins have on inflammation and vascular biology. To support th...

  13. The Mechanisms of Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction during Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G.; Thybring, Emil E.; Johansen, Katja S.; Felby, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry, particularly when it comes to up-scaling of processes based on insoluble feed stocks. PMID:25232741

  14. Hydrolysis of ITP generates a membrane potential in submitochondrial particles.

    PubMed

    Sorgato, M C; Galiazzo, F; Valente, M; Cavallini, L; Ferguson, S J

    1982-08-20

    ITP hydrolysis catalysed by the ATPase of submitochondrial particles from both bovine heart and rat liver is shown to be linked to the generation of a membrane potential, and therefore also to proton translocation. The magnitude of the membrane potential is similar to that observed during ATP hydrolysis at equivalent concentrations of phosphate and nucleoside tri- and diphosphates. An explanation is suggested for why in other reports ITP was found to be a poor substrate for supporting energy-linked reactions that are driven by the membrane potential. PMID:6214275

  15. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullulans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D. .

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain Y-2311-1 of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  16. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullanans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  17. Effects of the Absence of Apolipoprotein E on Lipoproteins, Neurocognitive Function, and Retinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Angel C. Y.; Pullinger, Clive R.; Tang, Ling Fung; Wong, Jinny S.; Deo, Rahul C.; Schwarz, Jean-Marc; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Movsesyan, Irina; Ishida, Brian Y.; Chu, Catherine; Poon, Annie; Kim, Phillip; Stock, Eveline O.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Asztalos, Bela F.; Castellano, Joseph M.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Duncan, Jacque L.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kane, John P.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Malloy, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The identification of a patient with a rare form of severe dysbetalipoproteinemia allowed the study of the consequences of total absence of apolipoprotein E (apoE). OBJECTIVES To discover the molecular basis of this rare disorder and to determine the effects of complete absence of apoE on neurocognitive and visual function and on lipoprotein metabolism. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the patient’s DNA. He underwent detailed neurological and visual function testing and lipoprotein analysis. Lipoprotein analysis was also performed in the Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, on blood samples from the proband’s mother, wife, 2 daughters, and normolipidemic control participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Whole-exome sequencing, lipoprotein analysis, and neurocognitive function. RESULTS The patient was homozygous for an ablative APOE frameshift mutation (c.291del, p.E97fs). No other mutations likely to contribute to the phenotype were discovered, with the possible exception of two, in ABCC2 (p.I670T) and LIPC (p.G137R). Despite complete absence of apoE, he had normal vision, exhibited normal cognitive, neurological, and retinal function, had normal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging, and had normal cerebrospinal fluid levels of β-amyloid and tau proteins. He had no significant symptoms of cardiovascular disease except a suggestion of myocardial ischemia on treadmill testing and mild atherosclerosis noted on carotid ultrasonography. He had exceptionally high cholesterol content (760 mg/dL; to convert to millimoles per liter, multiply by 0.0259) and a high cholesterol to triglycerides ratio (1.52) in very low-density lipoproteins with elevated levels of small-diameter high-density lipoproteins, including high levels of prebeta-1 high-density lipoprotein. Intermediate-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, and very low-density lipoproteins contained elevated apo

  18. [Effect of diurnal distribution of food intake on 24-h profiles of plasma lipoproteins (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Tauber, H

    1981-02-16

    The lipid infiltration theory of atherogenesis accepted, 24 h lipoprotein profiles may be more relevant than preprandial morning samples. Such profiles were performed in 12 metabolically healthy volunteers during two dietetic regimes identical in total food content but differing in the distribution over the day: form A meant an evening meal of 15% of total caloric intake, form B of 40%. After one week of each form, 24 h lipoprotein profiles differed significantly in the time course of triglyceride rich lipoproteins and in the mean values over 24 h in VLDL and LDL phospholipids and HDL cholesterol. These findings are cautiously interpreted as possible signs of differences in the catabolism of triglyceride rich lipoproteins, remnants and intermediate lipoproteins. The difference in HDL cholesterol which was higher in form A is discussed in the context of recent epidemiologic evidence. PMID:7194945

  19. Roles of lipoprotein receptors in the entry of hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Jingya; Imachi, Hitomi; Fukunaga, Kensaku; Yoshimoto, Takuo; Zhang, Huanxiang; Murao, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV), a plus-stranded RNA virus that can cause cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is one of the major health problems in the world. HCV infection is considered as a multi-step complex process and correlated with abnormal metabolism of lipoprotein. In addition, virus attacks hepatocytes by the initial attaching viral envelop glycoprotein E1/E2 to receptors of lipoproteins on host cells. With the development of HCV model system, mechanisms of HCV cell entry through lipoprotein uptake and its receptor have been extensively studied in detail. Here we summarize recent knowledge about the role of lipoprotein receptors, scavenger receptor class B type I and low-density lipoprotein receptor in the entry of HCV, providing a foundation of novel targeting therapeutic tools against HCV infection. PMID:26527170

  20. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Oliver T.; Ittrich, Harald; Peldschus, Kersten; Kaul, Michael G.; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I.; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Nikolic, Marija S.; Mollwitz, Birgit; Merkel, Martin; Bigall, Nadja C.; Sapra, Sameer; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinz; Weller, Horst; Eychmüller, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals have physical properties that are well suited for biomedical imaging. Previously, we have shown that iron oxide nanocrystals embedded within the lipid core of micelles show optimized characteristics for quantitative imaging. Here, we embed quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of lipoproteins-micelles that transport lipids and other hydrophobic substances in the blood-and show that it is possible to image and quantify the kinetics of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using fluorescence and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The lipoproteins were taken up by liver cells in wild-type mice and displayed defective clearance in knock-out mice lacking a lipoprotein receptor or its ligand, indicating that the nanocrystals did not influence the specificity of the metabolic process. Using this strategy it is possible to study the clearance of lipoproteins in metabolic disorders and to improve the contrast in clinical imaging.

  1. Genome-wide association study indicates variants associated with insulin signaling and inflammation mediate lipoprotein responses to fenofibrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A shift towards overall larger very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and smaller low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) diameters occurs in insulin resistance (IR), which reflects shifts in the distribution of the subfraction concentrations. Fenofibrate, indicated for hypertriglyc...

  2. DNA sequence of the Serratia marcescens lipoprotein gene

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kenzo; Inouye, Masayori

    1980-01-01

    The Serratia marcescens gene for the outer membrane lipoprotein (lpp) was cloned in λ phage vector Charon 14. The recombinant phage was very unstable, and the lpp gene with a 300-base-pair deletion at the transcription termination site was further cloned in pBR322. The DNA sequence of 834 base pairs encompassing the lpp gene was determined and compared with that of the Escherichia coli lpp gene. The sequence comparisons exhibit several unique features. (i) The promoter region is highly conserved (84% homology) and has an extremely high A+T content (78%) as in E. coli (80%). (ii) The 5′ nontranslated region of the lipoprotein mRNA is also highly conserved (95% homology). (iii) In the DNA sequence corresponding to the signal peptide of this secretory protein, there are three drastic changes, including addition of one base pair and deletion of four base pairs in S. marcescens as compared to E. coli. The resultant alterations in the amino acid sequence, however, do not change the basic properties of the signal peptide, which are assumed to be essential for its function in the secretory mechanism. (iv) The DNA sequence from the amino terminus to the 51st residue of the mature lipoprotein is highly conserved (95% homology) and there is no amino acid substitution. (v) The DNA sequence corresponding to the seven amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus has only 42% homology, resulting in four amino acid substitutions. (vi) Within the section of 40 base pairs beginning with the termination codon (UAA) and ending immediately before the oligo(T) transcription termination site in the E. coli lpp gene, there is about 60% homology. However, after this section, there is no obvious homology between the two sequences, probably because of a deletion of 300 base pairs at this region. (vii) Seven stable stem-and-loop structures could be formed in the mRNA region. (viii) Alterations in the third position of codons used in the lpp gene suggest that the gene has evolved somewhat

  3. Evaluation of Cation Hydrolysis Schemes with a Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Brian W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the use of two models of pocket calculators. The Hewlett-Packard HP67 and the Texas Instruments TI59, to solve problems arising in connection with ionic equilibria in solution. A three-parameter regression program is described and listed as a specific example, the hydrolysis of hexavalent uranium, is provided. (BT)

  4. Acid hydrolysis of Jerusalem artichoke for ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    An excellent substrate for ethanol production is the Jerusalem artichoke (JA) tuber (Helianthus tuberosus). This crop contains a high level of inulin that can be hydrolyzed mainly to D-fructose and has several distinct advantages as an energy source compared to others. The potential ethanol yield of ca. 4678 L/ha on good agricultural land is equivalent to that obtained from sugar beets and twice that of corn. When JA is to be used for ethanol fermentation by conventional yeast, it is first converted to fermentable sugars by enzymes or acids although various strains of yeast were used for the direct fermentation of JA extracts. Fleming and GrootWassink compared various acids (hydrochloric, sulfuric, citric, and phosphoric) and strong cation exchange resin for their effectiveness on inulin hydrolysis and reported that no differences were noted among the acids or resin in their influence on inulin hydrolysis. Undesirable side reactions were noted during acid hydrolysis leading to the formation of HMF and 2-(2-hydroxy acetyl) furan. The HMF at a level of 0.1% is known to inhibit growth and ethanol fermentation by yeast. In this study the authors established optimal conditions for complete acid-hydrolysis of JA with minimum side reactions and maximum sugar-ethanol production. A material balance for the ethanol production was also determined.

  5. Acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish optimal conditions for the acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for maximal ethanol yield. The starch contents of two sweet potato cultivars (Georgia Red and TG-4), based on fresh weight, were 21.1 +/- 0.6% and 27.5 +/- 1.6%, respectively. The results of acid hydrolysis experiments showed the following: (1) both hydrolysis rate and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration were a function of HCL concentration, temperature, and time; (2) the reducing sugars were rapidly formed with elevated concentrations of HCl and temperature, but also destroyed quickly; and (3) HMF concentration increased significantly with the concentration of HCl, temperature, and hydrolysis time. Maximum reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% HMF (based on wet weight) was achieved after heating 8% SPS for 15 min in 1N HCl at 110/sup 0/C. Degraded 8% SPS (1N HCl, 97/sup 0/C for 20 min or 110/sup 0/C for 10 min) was utilized as substrate for ethanol fermentation and 3.8% ethanol (v/v) was produced from 1400 mL fermented wort. This is equal to 41.6 g ethanol (200 proof) from 400 g of fresh sweet potato tuber (Georgia Red) or an ethanol yield potential of 431 gal of 200-proof ethanol/acre (from 500 bushel tubers/acre).

  6. REVISED TREATMENT OF N2 O5 HYDROLYSIS IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this presentation, revised treatment of homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrolysis of dinitrogen pentoxide in the Community Multiscale Air Quality model version 4.6 are described. A series of model sensitivity tests are conducted and compared with observations of total atmosphe...

  7. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Keller, Fred A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  8. Structural modifications of lignocellulosics by pretreatments to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gharpuray, M.M.; Lee, Y.F.; Fan, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    In this work an evaluation was made of a wide variety of single and multiple pretreatment methods for enhancing the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw. A multiple pretreatment consisted of a physical pretreatment followed by a chemical pretreatment. The structural features of wheat straw, including the specific surface area, crystallinity index, and lignin content, were measured to understand the mechanism of the enhancement in the hyrolysis rate upon pretreatment. It has been found that, in general, multiple pretreatments were not promising, since the hydrolysis rates rarely exceeded those achieved by single pretreatments. Ball-milling pretreatment was found to be effective in increasing the specific surface area and decreasing the crystallinity index. Treatment with ethylene glycol was highly effective in increasing the specific surface area, in addition to a high degree of delignification. Peracetic acid pretreatment was highly effective in delignifying substrate. Among multiple pretreatments, those involving peracetic acid treatment generally had lower crystallinity indices and lignin content values. The relationship between the hydrolysis rate and the set of structural features indicated that an increase in surface area and a decrease in the crystallinity and lignin content enhance the hydrolysis; the specific surface area is the most influential of the structural features, followed by the lignin content. (Refs. 23).

  9. Exploring potassium-dependent GTP hydrolysis in TEES family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Rafay, Abu; Majumdar, Soneya; Prakash, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    GTPases are important regulatory proteins that hydrolyze GTP to GDP. A novel GTP-hydrolysis mechanism is employed by MnmE, YqeH and FeoB, where a potassium ion plays a role analogous to the Arginine finger of the Ras-RasGAP system, to accelerate otherwise slow GTP hydrolysis rates. In these proteins, two conserved asparagines and a 'K-loop' present in switch-I, were suggested as attributes of GTPases employing a K(+)-mediated mechanism. Based on their conservation, a similar mechanism was suggested for TEES family GTPases. Recently, in Dynamin, Fzo1 and RbgA, which also conserve these attributes, a similar mechanism was shown to be operative. Here, we probe K(+)-activated GTP hydrolysis in TEES (TrmE-Era-EngA-YihA-Septin) GTPases - Era, EngB and the two contiguous G-domains, GD1 and GD2 of YphC (EngA homologue) - and also in HflX, another GTPase that also conserves the same attributes. While GD1-YphC and Era exhibit a K(+)-mediated activation of GTP hydrolysis, surprisingly GD2-YphC, EngB and HflX do not. Therefore, the attributes identified thus far, do not necessarily predict a K(+)-mechanism in GTPases and hence warrant extensive structural investigations. PMID:23650596

  10. Atmospheric Plasma-Enhanced Soft Hydrolysis of Southern Pine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of fermentable sugars from southern pine using atmospheric plasma (AP) was studied. AP processing in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration was coupled with acid hydrolysis in an effort to determine how AP can impact a standard conversion technique. The effects of plas...

  11. The Preparation and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Library of Esters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Traci L.

    2008-01-01

    An investigative case study involving the preparation of a library of esters using Fischer esterification and alcoholysis of acid chlorides and their subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by pig liver esterase and orange peel esterase is described. Students work collaboratively to prepare and characterize the library of esters and complete and evaluate…

  12. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  13. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  14. Designer xylanosomes: protein nanostructures for enhanced xylan hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work is the first report of the successful design, construction, and application of multi-functional, self-assembling biocatalysts for targeted xylan hydrolysis, termed xylanosomes. Using the architecture of cellulosomes found in some anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, four different xylanosomes...

  15. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.J.; Xu, Q.; Chen, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    The efficient conversion of cellulosic materials to ethanol has been hindered by the low yield of sugars, the high energy consumption in pretreatment processes, and the difficulty of recycling the pre-treatment agents. Zinc chloride may provide an alternative for pre-treating biomass prior to the hydrolysis of cellulose. The formation of a zinc-cellulose complex during the pretreatment of cellulose improves the yield of glucose in both the enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of cellulose. Low-temperature acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution is carried out in two stages, a liquefaction stage and a saccharification stage. Because of the formation of zinc-cellulose complex in the first stage, the required amount of acid in the second stage has been decreased significantly. In 67% zinc chloride solution, a 99.5% yield of soluble sugars has been obtained at 70{degrees}C and 0.5M acid concentration. The ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose has been reduced from 4.5 to 1.5, and the yield of soluble sugars is kept above 80%. The rate of hydrolysis is affected by the ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose, acid concentration, and temperature.

  16. Small peptides hydrolysis in dry-cured meats.

    PubMed

    Mora, Leticia; Gallego, Marta; Escudero, Elizabeth; Reig, Milagro; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of different peptides are naturally generated in dry-cured meats as a consequence of the intense proteolysis mechanisms which take place during their processing. In fact, meat proteins are extensively hydrolysed by muscle endo-peptidases (mainly calpains and cathepsins) followed by exo-peptidases (mainly, tri- and di-peptidyl peptidases, dipeptidases, aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases). The result is a large amount of released free amino acids and a pool of numerous peptides with different sequences and lengths, some of them with interesting sequences for bioactivity. This manuscript is presenting the proteomic identification of small peptides resulting from the hydrolysis of four target proteins (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta-enolase, myozenin-1 and troponin T) and discusses the enzymatic routes for their generation during the dry-curing process. The results indicate that the hydrolysis of peptides follows similar exo-peptidase mechanisms. In the case of dry-fermented sausages, most of the observed hydrolysis is the result of the combined action of muscle and microbial exo-peptidases except for the hydrolysis of di- and tri-peptides, mostly due to microbial di- and tri-peptidases, and the release of amino acids at the C-terminal that appears to be mostly due to muscle carboxypeptidases. PMID:25944374

  17. Mechanisms of lactone hydrolysis in neutral and alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2013-07-19

    The neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of nine carboxylic acid esters was studied using a hybrid supermolecule-PCM approach including six explicit water molecules. The molecules studied included two linear esters, four β-lactones, two γ-lactones, and one δ-lactone: ethyl acetate and methyl formate, β-propiolactone, β-butyrolactone, β-isovalerolactone, diketene (4-methyleneoxetan-2-one), γ-butyrolactone, 2(5H)-furanone, and δ-valerolactone. DFT and ab initio methods were used to analyze the features of the various possible hydrolysis mechanisms. For all compounds, reasonable to very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental work was found, and evidence is provided to support long-standing hypotheses regarding the role of solvent molecule as a base catalyst. In addition, novel evidence is presented for the existence of an elimination-addition mechanism in the basic hydrolysis of diketene. A parallel work addresses the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of lactones. PMID:23758295

  18. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  19. Release of bound procyanidins from cranberry pomace by alkaline hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Procyanidins in plant products are present as extractable or unextractable/bound forms. We optimized alkaline hydrolysis conditions to liberate bound procyanidins from dried cranberry pomace. Five mL of sodium hydroxide (2, 4, or 6N) was added to 0.5 g of cranberry pomace in screw top glass tubes,...

  20. DFT STUDY OF THE HYDROLYSIS OF SOME S-TRIAZINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of atrazine and related 2-chloro-s-triazines to the corresponding 2-hydroxy-s-triazines was investigated using the B3LYP hybrid density functional theory method. Gas-phase calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G* level of ...

  1. Bioabatement with xylanase supplementation to reduce enzymatic hydrolysis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioabatement, using the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 can effectively eliminate enzyme inhibitors from pretreated biomass hydrolysis. However, our recent research suggested that bioabatement had no beneficial effect on removing xylo-oligomers which were identified as strong inhibitors to ce...

  2. [Study of plasma and hepatic hydrolysis of nitroxinil derivatives].

    PubMed

    Baziard-Mouysset, G; Alvinerie, M; Galtier, P; Ane-Margail, M; Floch, R; Payard, M

    1996-01-01

    Seven esters derivatives of Nitroxinil were prepared and their structures were assigned by IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The rate of plasma and hepatic hydrolysis were evaluated in vitro in sheep and rabbit. In view of this profile of activity, pivaloyl derivative merits evaluation, in vivo. PMID:8953797

  3. Effects of hydrolysis and carbonization reactions on hydrochar production.

    PubMed

    Fakkaew, K; Koottatep, T; Polprasert, C

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process which converts wet biomass into hydrochar. In this study, a low-energy HTC process named "Two-stage HTC" comprising of hydrolysis and carbonization stages using faecal sludge as feedstock was developed and optimized. The experimental results indicated the optimum conditions of the two-stage HTC to be; hydrolysis temperature of 170 °C, hydrolysis reaction time of 155 min, carbonization temperature of 215 °C, and carbonization reaction time of 100 min. The hydrolysis reaction time and carbonization temperature had a statistically significant effect on energy content of the produced hydrochar. Energy input of the two-stage HTC was about 25% less than conventional HTC. Energy efficiency of the two-stage HTC for treating faecal sludge was higher than that of conventional HTC and other thermal conversion processes such as pyrolysis and gasification. The two-stage HTC could be considered as a potential technology for treating FS and producing hydrochar. PMID:26051497

  4. Lipoprotein CD0873 is a novel adhesin of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, Andrea; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Kasendra, Magdalena; Minton, Nigel; Titball, Richard W; Michell, Stephen L

    2014-07-15

    Clostridium difficile is a cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis, a healthcare-associated intestinal disease. Colonization of the gut is a critical step in the course of infection. The C. difficile lipoprotein CD0873 was identified as a putative adhesin through a bioinformatics approach. Surface exposure of CD0873 was confirmed and a CD0873 mutant was generated. The CD0873 mutant showed a significant reduction in adherence to Caco-2 cells and wild-type bacteria preincubated with anti-CD0873 antibodies showed significantly decreased adherence to Caco-2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that purified recombinant CD0873 protein alone associates with Caco-2 cells. This is the first definitive identification of a C. difficile adhesin, which now allows work to devise improved measures for preventing and treating disease. PMID:24482399

  5. Hippocampal lipoprotein lipase regulates energy balance in rodents☆

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Alexandre; Rouch, Claude; Kassis, Nadim; Moullé, Valentine S.; Croizier, Sophie; Denis, Raphaël G.; Castel, Julien; Coant, Nicolas; Davis, Kathryn; Clegg, Deborah J.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Prévot, Vincent; Bouret, Sébastien; Luquet, Serge; Le Stunff, Hervé; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Brain lipid sensing is necessary to regulate energy balance. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) may play a role in this process. We tested if hippocampal LPL regulated energy homeostasis in rodents by specifically attenuating LPL activity in the hippocampus of rats and mice, either by infusing a pharmacological inhibitor (tyloxapol), or using a genetic approach (adeno-associated virus expressing Cre-GFP injected into Lpllox/lox mice). Decreased LPL activity by either method led to increased body weight gain due to decreased locomotor activity and energy expenditure, concomitant with increased parasympathetic tone (unchanged food intake). Decreased LPL activity in both models was associated with increased de novo ceramide synthesis and neurogenesis in the hippocampus, while intrahippocampal infusion of de novo ceramide synthesis inhibitor myriocin completely prevented body weight gain. We conclude that hippocampal lipid sensing might represent a core mechanism for energy homeostasis regulation through de novo ceramide synthesis. PMID:24634821

  6. Diet, lipoproteins and cholesteryl ester transfer activity in hyperlipidaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Groener, J E; Jacobs, D M; van Rozen, A J; Erkelens, D W

    1985-02-01

    In order to study the response of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) to alteration in diet in humans we carried out a longitudinal study in hyperlipidaemic patients. Five subjects, all hyperlipidaemic, were first given a low fat diet for 7 to 15 days and then a diet high in fat for 7 to 21 days. In four out of five patients both diets were low in energy. The plasma lipoprotein levels and CETA were measured daily. All patients responded on the low fat diet by a decrease in total cholesterol and total triglycerides. No response on the high fat diet was noticed except in the patient for whom the high fat diet was also high in energy. In all patients the changes in CETA ran parallel to changes in (VLDL + LDL) cholesterol. It is concluded that diet induced changes in (VLDL + LDL) cholesterol are accompanied by similar changes in CETA in hyperlipidaemic subjects. PMID:16831701

  7. A saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Frauenfeld, Jens; Löving, Robin; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Guettou, Fatma; Moberg, Per; Zhu, Lin; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Flayhan, Ali; Briggs, John A G; Garoff, Henrik; Löw, Christian; Cheng, Yifan; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-04-01

    A limiting factor in membrane protein research is the ability to solubilize and stabilize such proteins. Detergents are used most often for solubilizing membrane proteins, but they are associated with protein instability and poor compatibility with structural and biophysical studies. Here we present a saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system, Salipro, which allows for the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a lipid environment that is stabilized by a scaffold of saposin proteins. We demonstrate the applicability of the method on two purified membrane protein complexes as well as by the direct solubilization and nanoparticle incorporation of a viral membrane protein complex from the virus membrane. Our approach facilitated high-resolution structural studies of the bacterial peptide transporter PeptTSo2 by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and allowed us to stabilize the HIV envelope glycoprotein in a functional state. PMID:26950744

  8. High-density lipoprotein prevents organ damage in endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ru-Ping; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Chao, Yann-Fen Chiou; Lin, Chia-Chin; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Chen, Hsing-I

    2007-06-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) may decrease organ injury in sepsis. This study was designed using an animal model to mimic people who had a high HDL level and to test HDL effects on preventing organ damage in endotoxemia. Endotoxemia was induced by an infusion of lipopolysac-charide (LPS) after HDL or LDL administration. Levels of blood biochemical substances, nitrate/nitrite, and TNF-alpha in sera were measured. Pathological examinations were performed 72 hours after LPS infusion. HDL decreased the endotoxin-induced elevation of AST, ALT, BUN, creatinine, LDH, CPK, nitrate/nitrite, and TNF-alpha. On histological examination, neutrophil infiltration was lower in the HDL group. HDL had a significant effect in preventing endotoxin-induced organ damage. PMID:17514720

  9. Change in composition of high density lipoprotein during gemfibrozil therapy.

    PubMed

    Sorisky, A; Ooi, T C; Simo, I E; Meuffels, M; Hindmarsh, J T; Nair, R

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) response in 20 middle-aged males during a 12-week course of gemfibrozil. Three aspects of the increase in HDL-C (25%) were studied and our observations are as follows: (1) subfraction analysis showed that HDL3-C rose earlier and to a larger extent (28%) than HDL2-C (15%), (2) analysis of variance group--time interaction effect and correlation studies of HDL-C and total triglycerides suggest the increase in HDL-C was due to a direct effect of gemfibrozil on HDL metabolism, and (3) HDL-C was the only one of 4 HDL components to increase. Apoprotein A-I (apo A-I) and HDL-phospholipid (HDL-PL) did not change, and HDL-triglyceride (HDL-TG) decreased. This pattern is consistent with a change in composition of HDL, i.e. cholesterol enrichment and triglyceride depletion. PMID:3118893

  10. Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis of fats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deibert, M.C.

    1992-08-28

    Hydrolysis of fats and oils produces fatty acid and glycerol. The catalyzed, liquid phase Colgate-Emry process, state-of-the-art, produces impure products that require extensive energy investment for their purification to commercial grade. Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis may produce products more easily purified. A bench-scale hydrolyzer was designed and constructed to contact descending liquid fat or oil with rising superheated steam. Each of the five stages in the reactor was designed similar to a distillation column stage to promote intimate liquid-gas contact. Degree of hydrolysis achieved in continuous tests using tallow feed were 15% at 280C and 35% at 300C at a tallow-to-steam mass feed ratio of 4.2. At a feed ratio of 9.2, the degree of hydrolysis was 21% at 300C. Decomposition was strongly evident at 325C but not at lower temperatures. Soybean oil rapidly polymerized under reaction conditions. Batch tests at 320C produced degrees of hydrolyses of between 44% and 63% using tallow and palm oil feeds. Over 95% fatty acids were present in a clean, readily separated organic portion of the overhead product from most tests. The test reactor had serious hydraulic resistance to liquid down-flow which limited operation to very long liquid residence times. These times are in excess of those that tallow and palm oil are stable at the reaction temperature. Little glycerol and extensive light organics were produced indicating that unexplained competing reactions to hydrolysis occurred in the experimental system. Further tests using an improved reactor will be required.

  11. Hydrolysis of thorium(iv) at variable temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, P L; Di Bernardo, P; Zhang, Z; Gong, Y; Tian, G; Gibson, J K; Rao, L

    2016-08-01

    Hydrolysis of Th(iv) was studied in tetraethylammonium perchlorate (0.10 mol kg(-1)) at variable temperatures (283-358 K) by potentiometry and microcalorimetry. Three hydrolysis reactions, mTh(4+) + nH2O = Thm(OH)n((4m-n)+) + nH(+), in which (n,m) = (2,2), (8,4), and (15,6), were invoked to describe the potentiometric and calorimetric data for solutions with the [hydroxide]/[Th(iv)] ratio ≤ 2. At higher ratios, the formation of (16,5) cannot be excluded. The hydrolysis constants, *β2,2, *β8,4, and *β15,6, increased by 3, 7, and 11 orders of magnitude, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 283 to 358 K. The enhancement is mainly due to the significant increase of the degree of ionization of water as the temperature rises. All three hydrolysis reactions are endothermic at 298 K, with enthalpies of (118 ± 4) kJ mol(-1), (236 ± 7) kJ mol(-1), and (554 ± 4) kJ mol(-1) for ΔH2,2, ΔH8,4, and ΔH15,6 respectively. The hydrolysis constants at infinite dilution have been obtained with the specific ion interaction approach. The applicability of three approaches for estimating the equilibrium constants at different temperatures, including the constant enthalpy approach, the constant heat capacity approach and the DQUANT equation was evaluated with the data from this work. PMID:27460458

  12. Generation of group B soyasaponins I and III by hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Teng, Su Ping; Popovich, David G

    2009-05-13

    Soyasaponins are a group of oleanane triterpenoids found in soy and other legumes that have been associated with some of the benefits achieved by consuming plant-based diets. However, these groups of compounds are diverse and structurally complicated to chemically characterize, separate from the isoflavones, and isolate in sufficient quantities for bioactive testing. Therefore, the aim of this study was to maximize the extraction of soyasaponins from soy flour, remove isoflavones, separate group B soyasaponins from group A, and produce an extract that contained a majority of non-DDMP (2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one)-conjugated group B soyasaponins I and III. Room temperature extraction in methanol for 24 or 48 h resulted in the maximum recovery of soyasaponins, and Soxhlet extraction resulted in the least. A solid-phase extraction using methanol (45%) was found to virtually eliminate the interfering isoflavones as compared to butanol-water liquid-liquid extraction and ammonium sulfate precipitation, while maximizing saponin recovery. Alkaline hydrolysis in anhydrous methanol produced the maximum amount of soyasaponins I and III as compared to aqueous methanol and acid hydrolysis in both aqueous and anhydrous methanol. The soyasaponin I amount was increased by 175%, and soyasaponin III was increased by 211% after alkaline hydrolysis. Furthermore, after alkaline hydrolysis, a majority of DDMP-conjugated group B soyasaponins such as betag, betaa, gammag, and gammaa transformed into the non-DDMP-conjugated soyasaponins I and III without affecting the glycosidic bond at position C-3 of the ring structure. Therefore, we have developed a method that maximizes the recovery of DDMP-conjugated saponins and uses alkaline hydrolysis to produce an extract containing mainly soyasaponins I and III. PMID:19338335

  13. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  14. Distribution of High-Density Lipoprotein Subfractions and Hypertensive Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Xu, Rui-Xia; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Gao, Ying; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The exact mechanisms of hypertension contributing to atherosclerosis have not been fully elucidated. Although multiple studies have clarified the association with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions, uncertainty remains about its relationship with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions. Therefore, we aimed to comprehensively determine the relationship between distribution of HDL subfractions and hypertensive status. A total of 953 consecutive subjects without previous lipid-lowering drug treatment were enrolled and were categorized based on hypertension history (with hypertension [n = 550] or without hypertension [n = 403]). Baseline clinical and laboratory data were collected. HDL separation was performed using the Lipoprint System. Plasma large HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and large HDL percentage were dramatically lower whereas the small HDL-C and small HDL percentage were higher in patients with hypertension (all P < 0.05). The antihypertensive drug therapy was not associated with large or small HDL subfractions (on treatment vs not on treatment, P > 0.05; combination vs single drug therapy, P > 0.05). However, the blood pressure well-controlled patients have significantly lower small HDL subfraction (P < 0.05). Moreover, large HDL-C and percentage were inversely whereas small HDL percentage was positively associated with incident hypertension after adjusting potential confounders (all P < 0.05). In the multivariate model conducted in patients with and without hypertension separately, the cardio-protective value of large HDL-C was disappeared in patients with hypertension (OR 95%CI: 1.011 [0.974–1.049]). The distribution of HDL subfractions is closely associated with hypertensive status and hypertension may potentially impact the cardio-protective value of large HDL subfraction. PMID:26512616

  15. Proprotein convertases in high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seungbum; Korstanje, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexins (PCSKs) are a serine endopeptidase family. PCSK members cleave amino acid residues and modulate the activity of precursor proteins. Evidence from patients and animal models carrying genetic alterations in PCSK members show that PCSK members are involved in various metabolic processes. These studies further revealed the molecular mechanism by which genetic alteration of some PCSK members impairs normal molecular and physiological functions, which in turn lead to cardiovascular disease. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is anti-atherogenic as it removes excessive amount of cholesterol from blood and peripheral tissues. Several PCSK members are involved in HDL metabolism. PCSK3, PCSK5, and PCSK6 process two triglyceride lipase family members, endothelial lipase and lipoprotein lipase, which are important for HDL remodeling. Recent studies in our lab found evidence that PCSK1 and PCSK9 are also involved in HDL metabolism. A mouse model carrying an amino acid substitution in PCSK1 showed an increase in serum apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) level. Another mouse model lacking PCSK9 showed a decrease in APOE-containing HDL. In this review, we summarize the role of the five PCSK members in lipid, glucose, and bile acid (BA) metabolism, each of which can influence HDL metabolism. We propose an integrative model in which PCSK members regulate HDL metabolism through various molecular mechanisms and metabolic processes and genetic variation in some PCSK members may affect the efficiency of reverse cholesterol transport. PCSK members are considered as attractive therapeutic targets. A greater understanding of the molecular and physiological functions of PCSK members will improve therapeutic strategies and drug efficacy for cardiovascular disease where PCSK members play critical role, with fewer adverse effects. PMID:24252756

  16. Fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Sumiyoshi, M; Okuda, H

    1999-12-01

    The fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) was characterized using bovine milk LPL. Synthesizing activities were determined in an aqueous medium using oleic acid or trioleylglycerol as the acyl donor and equimolar amounts of long-chain alcohols as the acyl acceptor. When oleic acid and hexadecanol emulsified with gum arabic were incubated with LPL, palmityl oleate was synthesized, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apo-very low density lipoprotein (apoVLDL) stimulated LPL-catalyzed palmityl oleate synthesis. The apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/oleic acid was estimated using a high concentration of LPL and a long (20 h) incubation period. The equilibrium ratio was affected by the incubation pH and the alcohol chain length. When the incubation pH was below pH 7.0 and long chain fatty acyl alcohols were used as substrates, the fatty acid alcohol ester/free fatty acid equilibrium ratio favored ester formation, with an apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/fatty acid of about 0.9/0.1. The equilibrium ratio decreased sharply at alkaline pH (above pH 8.0). The ratio also decreased when fatty alcohols with acyl chains shorter than dodecanol were used. When a trioleoylglycerol/fatty acyl alcohol emulsion was incubated with LPL, fatty acid alcohol esters were synthesized in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Fatty acid alcohol esters were easily synthesized from trioleoylglycerol when fatty alcohols with acyl chains longer than dodecanol were used, but synthesis was decreased with fatty alcohols with acyl chain lengths shorter than decanol, and little synthesizing activity was detected with shorter-chain fatty alcohols such as butanol or ethanol. PMID:10578059

  17. High-density lipoprotein subpopulations in pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Bela F; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2003-04-01

    The role of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in coronary artery disease (CAD) and the impact of therapeutic agents on LDL cholesterol are well established. Less is known about the role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and even less about the role of the different HDL subspecies in CAD. HDL particles vary in size and density, mainly because of differences in the number of apolipoprotein (apo) particles and the amount of cholesterol ester in the core of HDL. Apo A-I is essential and, together with lipid, sufficient for the formation of HDL particles. Apo A-I-containing HDL particles play a primary role in cholesterol efflux from membranes, at least in part through interactions with the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). Patients with Tangier disease have mutations in the gene encoding ABCA1, which result in functionally impaired protein, a marked deficiency in HDL cholesterol, and a high risk of premature CAD. Our studies of apo A-I-containing HDL subpopulations in various patient populations reveal that patients homozygous for Tangier disease have only the pre-beta(1) HDL subspecies. Tangier heterozygotes are severely depleted in the larger alpha- and pre-alpha-mobility subspecies. Patients with low HDL cholesterol levels and those with CAD also show deficiencies in the alpha(1) and pre-alpha(1-3) HDL subspecies. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) increase the levels of the large alpha(1) and pre-alpha(1) subpopulations and decrease the level of the small alpha(3) subpopulation. Thus, atorvastatin, for example, significantly moves the distribution of HDL particles toward normal, followed by simvastatin, pravastatin, and lovastatin in decreasing order of efficiency. A new statin, rosuvastatin, produces greater increases in HDL cholesterol than atorvastatin, but its effect on HDL particle distribution is yet to be determined. PMID:12679198

  18. Gallium-68 chemistry for labeling platelets, proteins and lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Y.; Budinger, T.F.; Ebbe, S.N.; Mathis, C.A.; Moore, D.H.; Singh, M.; Brennan, K.; Moyer, B.R.; Nichols, A.

    1984-07-01

    Generator produced gallium-68 is a convenient useful radionuclide for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Gallium-68 labeled platelets and low density lipoproteins would be useful agents for PET studies of thrombosis and atherosclerosis in cardiovascular disease. To label these agents with Ga-68, we have studied the effects of trace metal contaminants in 1 N HCl elutions of Ga-68 from germanium-68 absorbed on a stannic oxide column. Studies were conducted on the formation and characteristics of Ga-68 complexes with the ligands 8-hydroxyquinoline, tropolone, and mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO). Various parameters such as pH, buffers, concentration of ligand, and incubation or stability with time were investigated. High performance liquid chromatography and instant thin layer chromatography were used to analyze the Ga-68 ligand preparations. Platelets separated from human, dog, and rabbit plasma were incubated with the Ga-68 complexes and the labeling yields and in vivo survival were determined. The accumulation of the platelets in the ballon catheter scraped aorta of the rabbit was determined by PET imaging studies, tissue counting in a gamma well counter, and en-face autoradiography of the arterial wall. The Ga-68 complexes of MPO gave 40 to 60% labeling efficiency of rabbit platelets which accumulated about fourfold more in the damaged aorta compared to the normal. Gallium-68 was attached to low density lipoproteins (LDL) with the bifunctional chelate of DTPA. Low pressure gel column chromatography and HPLC were used to preparatively separate and analyze the Ga-68 LDL for uptake studies in the healing endothelium of the scraped aorta rabbit model. The Ga-68 LDL labeling yield was 80 to 85% with a radiochemical purity 90 to 95%. 22 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Is the atherosclerotic phenotype of preeclamptic placentas due to altered lipoprotein concentrations and placental lipoprotein receptors? Role of a small-for-gestational-age phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Hentschke, Marta R.; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Carlos E.; Pinheiro da Costa, Bartira E.; Kurlak, Lesia O.; Williams, Paula J.; Mistry, Hiten D.

    2013-01-01

    Atherosis of spiral arteries in uteroplacental beds from preeclamptic women resemble those of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased plasma lipids and lipoproteins. We hypothesized that: 1) lipoprotein receptors/transporters in the placenta would be upregulated in preeclampsia, associated with increased maternal and fetal lipoprotein concentrations; and 2) expression of these would be reduced in preeclamptic placentae from women delivering small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. Placental biopsies and maternal and umbilical serum samples were taken from 27 normotensive and 24 preeclamptic women. Maternal/umbilical cord serum LDL, HDL, total cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured. Placental mRNA expression of lipoprotein receptors/transporters were quantified using quantitative RT-PCR. Protein localization/expression of LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) in the preeclamptic placentae with/without SGA was measured by immunohistochemistry. Placental mRNA expression of all genes except paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP), and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 2 (PDIA2) were observed. No differences for any lipoprotein receptors/transporters were found between groups; however, in the preeclamptic group placental LRP-1 expression was lower in SGA delivering mothers (n = 7; P = 0.036). LRP-1 protein was localized around fetal vessels and Hofbauer cells. This is the first detailed study of maternal/fetal lipoprotein concentrations and placental lipoprotein receptor mRNA expression in normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies. These findings do not support a role of altered lipid metabolism in preeclampsia, but may be involved in fetal growth. PMID:23898049

  20. Association between lipids, lipoproteins composition of HDL particles and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and LCAT and CETP activity in post-renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kimak, Elżbieta; Bylina, Jerzy; Solski, Janusz; Hałabiś, Magdalena; Baranowicz-Gąszczyk, Iwona; Książek, Andrzej

    2013-11-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) remodeling within the plasma compartment and the association between lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, and lipid, lipoprotein concentrations and composition were investigated. The aim was to examine the high sensitivity of C-reactive protein (hsCRP), lipid, apolipoprotein B (apoB), apoAI, total apoAII, apoAIInonB, apoB-containing apoAII (apoB:AII), total apoCIII, apoCIIInonB, apoB-containing apoCIII (apoB:CIII) concentration and LCAT and CETP activity to gain an insight into the association between them and LCAT and CETP, 57 post-renal transplant (Tx) patients with and without statin therapy and in 15 healthy subjects. Tx patients had moderate hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and dyslipoproteinemia, disturbed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and HDL composition, decreased LCAT, and slightly increased hsCRP but no CETP activity. Spearman's correlation test showed the association between lipids and lipoproteins and LCAT or CETP, and multiple ridge stepwise forward regression showed that immunosuppressive therapy in Tx patients can disturb HDL and TRLs composition. The results suggest that inhibition or activation of LCAT is due, in part, to HDL-associated lipoprotein. Lipoprotein composition of apoAI, apoAIInonB, and apoCIIInonB in HDL particle and apoB:AII TRLs can contribute to decrease LCAT mass in Tx patients. Tx patients without statin and with lower triglycerides but higher HDL cholesterol concentration and disturbed lipoprotein composition of ApoAI and apoAII in HDL particle can decrease LCAT, increase LDL cholesterol, aggravate renal graft, and accelerate atherosclerosis and chronic heart diseases. PMID:23479335

  1. A kinetic study of hydrolysis of polyester elastomer in magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, H.

    1994-01-01

    A useful method for kinetic study of the hydrolysis of polyester elastomer is established which uses the number-average molecular weight. The reasonableness of this method is confirmed and the effect of magnetic particles on hydrolysis is considered.

  2. Accelerated hydrolysis of substituted cellulose for potential biofuel production: kinetic study and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bingnan; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, kinetics of substitution accelerated cellulose hydrolysis with multiple reaction stages was investigated to lay foundation for mechanism study and molecular design of substituting compounds. High-efficiency hydrolysis of cellulose is critical for cellulose-based bioethanol production. It is known that, substitution could substantially decrease activation energy and increase reaction rate of acidic hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cellulose. However, reaction kinetics and mechanism of the accelerated hydrolysis were not fully revealed. In this research, it was proved that substitution therefore accelerated hydrolysis only occurred in amorphous regions of cellulose fibers, and was a process with multiple reaction stages. With molar ratio of substitution less than 1%, the overall hydrolysis rate could be increased for around 10 times. We also quantified the relationship between the hydrolysis rate of individual reaction stage and its major influences, including molar ratio of substitution, activation energy of acidic hydrolysis, pH and temperature. PMID:26253917

  3. Three-stage enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-exploded corn stover at high substrate concentration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2011-04-01

    The feasibility of three-stage hydrolysis of steam-exploded corn stover at high-substrate concentration was investigated. When substrate concentration was 30% and enzyme loading was 15-30 FPU/g cellulose, three-stage (9+9+12 h) hydrolysis could reach a hydrolysis yield of 59.9-81.4% in 30 h. Compared with one-stage hydrolysis for 72 h, an increase of 34-37% in hydrolysis yield could be achieved. When steam-exploded corn stover was used as the substrate for enzyme synthesis and hydrolysis was conducted at a substrate concentration of 25% with an enzyme loading of 20 FPU/g cellulose, a hydrolysis yield of 85.1% was obtained, 19% higher than that the commercial cellulase could reach under the same conditions. The removal of end products was suggested to improve the adsorption of cellulase on the substrate and enhance the productivity of enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:21300538

  4. Lipoproteins containing apoprotein B are a major regulator of neutrophil responses to monosodium urate crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Terkeltaub, R; Curtiss, L K; Tenner, A J; Ginsberg, M H

    1984-01-01

    The inflammatory response to intraarticular urate crystals is known to be variable in gouty arthritis. One source of variability may be the modulation of cellular responses by crystal-bound proteins. We have identified three apolipoproteins among the polypeptides bound to urate crystals exposed to plasma. Identification was first based on their coelectrophoresis with polypeptides from isolated lipoproteins and diminution in the protein coat of crystals exposed to lipoprotein-depleted plasma. The apoproteins were immunochemically identified by the Western blotting technique as apoprotein A-I, apoprotein B (apo B), and apoprotein E. Because neutrophils play a central role in acute gout, we investigated the potential effects of lipoproteins on neutrophil-urate crystal interactions. Plasma profoundly inhibited urate crystal-induced neutrophil luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). Lipoprotein depletion by KBr density gradient centrifugation completely abrogated the inhibitory effect of plasma on urate-induced CL. The inhibitory activity of lipoprotein-depleted plasma was restored by adding back the d less than or equal to 1.25 g/cm3 lipoprotein fraction. Plasma also inhibited urate crystal-induced neutrophil superoxide generation and cytolysis (lactic dehydrogenase loss). This inhibition was significantly diminished by lipoprotein depletion, indicating that the lipoprotein effect was not limited to CL. Lipoprotein-depleted plasma reconstituted with very low, intermediate, and low density lipoproteins (LDL) inhibited crystal-induced CL. High density lipoprotein reconstitution was without effect. Immunodepletion from plasma of all apo B lipoproteins by agarose-bound apo B-specific antibody also removed all inhibitory activity for urate-induced CL. Thus, apo B lipoproteins were shown to be the inhibitory species in plasma. Binding of apo B lipoproteins to urate crystals and inhibition of CL was also seen in the absence of other plasma proteins. In addition, the binding

  5. Analytic ultracentrifuge calibration and determination of lipoprotein-specific refractive increments

    SciTech Connect

    Talwinder, S.K.; Adamson, G.L.; Glines, L.A.; Lindgren, F.T.; Laskaris, M.A.; Shore, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate quantification of the major classes and subfractions of human serum lipoproteins is an important analytical need in the characterization and evaluation of therapy of lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities. For calibrating the analytic ultracentrifuge (AnUC), the authors routinely use a Beckman calibration wedge cell with parallel scribed lines 1 cm apart. Such a cell give a rectangular pattern in the schlieren diagram, which determines magnification and also provides an area corresponding to an invariant refractive increment. Complete calibration for AnUC analysis of lipoproteins also requires accurate determination of the specific refractive increments (SRI) of the major lipoprotein classes, namely low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). These are measured in the density in which they are analyzed, i.e., 1.061 g/ml for LDL and 1.200 g/ml for HDL. Five fresh serum samples were fractionated for total LDL and total HDL and their SRI determined. Total lipoprotein mass was determined using precise CHN elemental analysis and compositional analyses. The results yielded corrected SRI of 0.00142 and 0.00135 ..delta..n/g/100 ml for LDL and HDL. Thus, their current values using 0.00154 and 0.00149 ..delta..n/g/100 ml underestimate LDL and HDL by 9% and 11%. Corrections of all previous LDL and HDL AnUC data can be made using appropriate factors of 1.087 and 1.106.

  6. Characterization of biophysical properties of baboon lipoproteins: modulation by dietary fat and cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Babiak, J.

    1984-04-01

    The serum lipoproteins of baboons fed diets containing differing types and amounts of fat and varying amounts of cholesterol were examined by analytic ultracentrifugation, gradient gel electrophoresis, density gradient ultracentrifugation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis, electron microscopy, and standard protein and lipid composition assays. These studies characterized the lipoproteins of the baboon, observed how concentrations and physical-chemical properties of the lipoproteins are modulated by dietary fat and cholesterol and described the suitability of the baboon as an animal model of human lipoprotein metabolism. Results indicate that baboon high density lipoproteins (HDL), though higher in total serum concentration than human HDL, are remarkably similar to human HDL. The concentration of baboon HDL is increased by dietary saturated fat but decreased by the addition of cholesterol. While serum concentrations of low density lipoproteins (LDL) tend to be lower in baboons, the physical-chemical properties of the LDL of baboons and humans are comparable. The LDL of both species contains apolipoprotein B as their major apolipoprotein and exhibit considerable polydispersity in particle size. LDL of both species consists of seven discrete subpopulations. The analytical and statistical data presented in this dissertation indicate that the baboon is a good model for studying the role of lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis. 125 references, 31 figures, 28 tables.

  7. Membrane receptors for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) inhibitor of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, P.I.; Beck, G.; Zucker, S.

    1981-06-01

    Physiologic concentrations of human plasma very low density lipoproteins inhibit the DNA synthesis of lymphocytes stimulated by allogeneic cells or lectins. In this report reachers have compared the effects of isolated lipoproteins (very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL)) and lipoprotein-depleted plasma (LDP) on DNA synthesis by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes. The relative potency for the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was VLDL greater than LDL greater than HDL greater than LDP. Fifty percent inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed at a VLDL protein concentration of 1.5--2.0 microgram/ml. Researchers have further demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for VLDL on human lymphocytes. Native VLDL was more effective than LDL in competing for 125I-VLDL binding sites. Subsequent to binding to lymphocytes, 125I-VLDL was internalized and degraded to acid-soluble products. Based on a Scatchard analysis of VLDL binding at 4 degrees C, the number of VLDL receptors per lymphocyte was estimated at 28,000 +/- 1300. Based on an estimated mean binding affinity for the VLDL receptor complex at half saturation of approximately 8.8 X 10(7) liter/mole, it is estimated that 91% of lymphocyte VLDL receptors are occupied at physiologic VLDL concentrations in blood. Although the immune regulatory role of plasma lipoproteins is uncertain, researchers suggest tha VLDL and LDL-In may maintain circulating blood lymphocytes in a nonproliferative state via their respective cell receptor mechanisms.

  8. Metabolism of very low density lipoproteins--effect of sardine oil.

    PubMed

    Anil, K; Abraham, R; Kumar, G S; Sudhakaran, P R; Kurup, P A

    1992-06-01

    The effect of feeding fish oil on the metabolism of lipoproteins was studied in rats. Rats were fed diet containing 10% sardine or groundnut oil for 6 weeks. There was a significant decrease in the total cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides as well as the amount of the lipids associated with VLDL and LDL in serum in fish oil-fed rats. The synthesis and secretion of lipoproteins particularly apoB containing lipoproteins by primary cultures of hepatocytes from these rats were studied by 14(C)-acetate or 3(H)-leucine labelling. Primary cultures of hepatocytes derived from sardine oil-fed rats showed reduced incorporation of 3(H)-leucine into apoB containing lipoproteins secreted into the medium when compared to those fed groundnut oil, indicating a decreased synthesis and secretion of apoB. This was further confirmed by significantly lower incorporation of 14(C)-radioactivity into total and individual lipids of VLDL secreted into the medium, as well as that associated with different lipids in cell layer. The activity of lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissue and aorta was significantly higher in rats fed sardine oil which may cause an increased clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from circulation. These results indicate that the fish oil exerts hypolipidemic effect particularly by decreasing the synthesis and secretion of VLDL by liver and possibly by an increased clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from circulation. PMID:1506035

  9. Oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity of fed and starved rats.

    PubMed

    Kotlar, T J; Borensztajn, J

    1977-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured at short time intervals in cardiac and skeletal muscles of normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats fed ad libitum or deprived of food. In normal animals fed ad libitum, lipoprotein lipase activities of heart, diaphragm, soleus, and fast-twitch red fibers of the quadriceps muscle showed rhythmic oscillations that appeared to coincide with the nocturnal feeding habits of the animals. During the day (7 A.M. to 7 P.M.), when food consumption by the rats was greatly reduced, lipoprotein lipase activity in all muscles increased, followed by a decline to basal levels during the night. Similar oscillatory changes in lipoprotein lipase activity were observed in the muscles of diabetic rats fed ad libitum. In normal rats deprived of food, however, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were not abolished and persisted for at least 48 h. In diabetic rats starved during a 48-h period, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were markedly altered. In all animals, muscle lipoprotein lipase activities were not correlated to plasma glucagon levels. PMID:143895

  10. Automated measurement method for the determination of vitamin E in plasma lipoprotein classes

    PubMed Central

    Hirowatari, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Hideo; Manita, Daisuke; Tada, Norio

    2014-01-01

    In a subendothelial space of atherosclerotic arteries, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins are accumulated and oxidized, and the oxidized lipoproteins promote macrophage foam cell formation. Therefore, the analysis of vitamin E, a major antioxidant in lipoproteins, is important for understanding atherosclerotic pathogenesis. A new method for the automated measurement of vitamin-E (γ- and α-tocopherols) in plasma HDL, LDL, and VLDL was established by using anion-exchange-chromatography for separation of lipoproteins, reverse-phase-chromatography for separation of γ- and α-tocopherols in each of lipoproteins, and fluorescent detection. The within-day assay and between-day assay coefficients of variation for lipoprotein tocopherol levels were 4.73–12.84% and 7.00–14.73%, respectively. The γ- and α-tocopherol/cholesterol ratios of VLDL were higher in healthy plasma than in plasma of untreated patients with dyslipidemia, but the ratios of LDL and HDL were not different. This new estimated method can provide the reliable data of lipoprotein vitamin-E and would be useful for the clinical settings. PMID:24522390

  11. Characterization of high density lipoproteins in patients heterozygous for Tangier disease.

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, G; Simantke, O; Schaefer, H E; Smootz, E

    1977-01-01

    In this study a large family group affectd with Tangier disease has been investigated. Besides two homozygous propositi, several heterozygous patients have been identified on the basis of quantitative measurements of high density lipoproteins and their constitutive polypeptides. By a variety of quantitative immunological methods, such as one-dimensional Laurell eletrophoresis, two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, and double-antibody radioimmunoassay, the total amount of apoprotein A-I and apoprotein A-I contained in the serum of heterozygous patients and the distribution of these A apoproteins among serum lipoproteins have been determined. The molar ration of apoprotein A-I and apoprotein A-II contained in high density lipoproteins of heterozygous patients did not significantly differ from that of control preparations, although the total mass of high density lipoproteins was reduced by approximately 50%. The elution profile of high density lipoproteins from agarose columns and their morphological appearance, as ascertained by electron microscopy, were similar to control preparations. In addition to the quantitative alterations of serum lipoproteins, lipid storage in histiocytes of the rectal mucosa obtained from heterozygous patients has been documented. It is concluded that patients heterozygous for Tangier disease have normal high density lipoproteins in circulation, the total mass of which is reduced by approximately 50%. Images PMID:198431

  12. Crystal structure of the Campylobacter jejuni Cj0090 protein reveals a novel variant of the immunoglobulin fold among bacterial lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Seonghee; Kawai, Fumihiro; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins play an important role in bacterial pathogenesis and physiology. The genome of Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborn pathogen, is predicted to contain over 20 lipoproteins. However, the functions of the majority of C. jejuni lipoproteins remain unknown. The Cj0090 protein is encoded by a lipoprotein operon composed of cj0089, cj0090, and cj0091. Here, we report the crystal structure of Cj0090 at 1.9 Å resolution, revealing a novel variant of the immunoglobulin fold with β-sandwich architecture. The structure suggests that Cj0090 may be involved in protein-protein interactions, consistent with a possible role for bacterial lipoproteins. PMID:22987763

  13. Crystal structure of the Campylobacter jejuni Cj0090 protein reveals a novel variant of the immunoglobulin fold among bacterial lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Paek, Seonghee; Kawai, Fumihiro; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins play an important role in bacterial pathogenesis and physiology. The genome of Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborn pathogen, is predicted to contain over 20 lipoproteins. However, the functions of the majority of C. jejuni lipoproteins remain unknown. The Cj0090 protein is encoded by a lipoprotein operon composed of cj0089, cj0090, and cj0091. Here, we report the crystal structure of Cj0090 at 1.9 Å resolution, revealing a novel variant of the immunoglobulin fold with β-sandwich architecture. The structure suggests that Cj0090 may be involved in protein-protein interactions, consistent with a possible role for bacterial lipoproteins. PMID:22987763

  14. Cellular uptake of lipoproteins and persistent organic compounds-An update and new data

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian; Andreassen, Thomas Kjaergaard; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2008-10-15

    There are a number of interactions related to the transport of lipophilic xenobiotic compounds in the blood stream of mammals. This paper will focus on the interactions between lipoproteins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and how these particles are taken up by cells. A number of POPs including the pesticide p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and especially its metabolite p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), interacts with nuclear hormone receptors causing these to malfunction, which in turn results in a range of deleterious health effects in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of lipoprotein receptors in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in conjunction with uptake of DDT-lipoprotein complexes from supplemented media in vitro. Uptake of DDT by MEF cells was investigated using MEF1 cells carrying the receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) present and MEF4 cells with no LRP and LDLR expression. Cells were incubated together with the complex of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and [{sup 14}C]DDT. The receptor function was further evaluated by adding the 40 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) which blocks receptor activity. The results showed that [{sup 14}C]DDT uptake was decreasing when the LDL concentration was increasing. There was no strong evidence for a receptor-mediated uptake of the [{sup 14}C]DDT-lipoprotein complex. To conclude, DDT travels in the blood stream and can cross cell membranes while being transported as a DDT-lipoprotein complex. The lipoproteins do not need receptors to cross cell membranes since passive diffusion constitutes a major passageway.

  15. Lipidomic analysis of plasma lipoprotein fractions in myocardial infarction-prone rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Koike, Tomonari; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Takayuki; Yoshida, Masaru; Shiomi, Masashi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    Lipids play important roles in the body and are transported to various tissues via lipoproteins. It is commonly assumed that alteration of lipid levels in lipoproteins leads to dyslipidemia and serious diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD). However, lipid compositions in each lipoprotein fraction induced by lipoprotein metabolism are poorly understood. Lipidomics, which involves the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of lipids, is expected to provide valuable information regarding the pathogenic mechanism of CAD. Here, we performed a lipidomic analysis of plasma and its lipoprotein fractions in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits. In total, 172 lipids in plasma obtained from normal and WHHLMI rabbits were quantified with high throughput and accuracy using supercritical fluid chromatography hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (SFC/Q-Orbitrap-MS). Plasma levels of each lipid class (i.e., phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, ceramide, triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester, except for free fatty acids) in 21-month-old WHHLMI rabbits were significantly higher than those in normal rabbits. High levels of functional lipids, such as alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, phospholipids including ω-6 fatty acids, and plasmalogens, were also observed in WHHLMI rabbit plasma. In addition, high-resolution lipidomic analysis using very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) provided information on the specific molecular species of lipids in each lipoprotein fraction. In particular, higher levels of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens were detected in LDL than in VLDL. Our lipidomics approach for plasma lipoprotein fractions will be useful for in-depth studies on the pathogenesis of CAD. PMID:26162515

  16. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG. PMID:25757602

  17. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  18. More Than Cholesterol Transporters: Lipoprotein Receptors in CNS Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney E.; Philips, Gary T.; Herz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family have a diverse set of biological functions that transcend lipid metabolism. Lipoprotein receptors have broad effects in both the developing and adult brain and participate in synapse development, cargo trafficking, and signal transduction. In addition, several family members play key roles in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role lipoprotein receptors play in CNS function and AD pathology, with a special emphasis on amyloid-independent roles in endocytosis and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25144875

  19. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol on a roller coaster: where will the ride end?

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Bowe et al. report an association between low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and various incident chronic kidney disease end points in a cohort of almost 2 million US veterans followed for 9 years. These impressive data should be a starting point for further investigations including genetic epidemiologic investigations as well as post hoc analyses of interventional trials that target high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and, finally, studies that focus on the functionality of high-density lipoprotein particles. PMID:26994572

  20. Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein complexes from aortas of hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Part 1. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, T P; Augustyn, J M; Fritz, K E

    1978-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein complexes were isolated from rabbit aortas exhibiting nearly confluent cholesterol-induced foam cell lesions by extraction with 0.15 M NaCl. Purification and characterization was achieved by gel chromatography, non-ionic differential flotation and by cellulose polyacetate electrophoresis. Analysis showed that these complexes consisted of very low density lipoproteins, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate-C and hyaluronic acid. The demonstration that rabbit intimal foam cell lesions contain extractable glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein complexes makes this animal model an excellent tool for further studies on the role of these complexes in the atherogenic process. PMID:215171

  1. Lipoprotein(a) Catabolism Is Regulated by Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 through the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Romagnuolo, Rocco; Scipione, Corey A.; Boffa, Michael B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) have been identified as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Plasma Lp(a) levels are reduced by monoclonal antibodies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). However, the mechanism of Lp(a) catabolism in vivo and the role of PCSK9 in this process are unknown. We report that Lp(a) internalization by hepatic HepG2 cells and primary human fibroblasts was effectively reduced by PCSK9. Overexpression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) in HepG2 cells dramatically increased the internalization of Lp(a). Internalization of Lp(a) was markedly reduced following treatment of HepG2 cells with a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against the LDLR or the use of primary human fibroblasts from an individual with familial hypercholesterolemia; in both cases, Lp(a) internalization was not affected by PCSK9. Optimal Lp(a) internalization in both hepatic and primary human fibroblasts was dependent on the LDL rather than the apolipoprotein(a) component of Lp(a). Lp(a) internalization was also dependent on clathrin-coated pits, and Lp(a) was targeted for lysosomal and not proteasomal degradation. Our data provide strong evidence that the LDLR plays a role in Lp(a) catabolism and that this process can be modulated by PCSK9. These results provide a direct mechanism underlying the therapeutic potential of PCSK9 in effectively lowering Lp(a) levels. PMID:25778403

  2. 40 CFR 721.10498 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10498 Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products... chemical substances identified generically as substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10499 - Substituted silane, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted silane, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10499 Substituted silane, hydrolysis products with... substances identified generically as substituted silane, hydrolysis products with silica (PMNs P-06-278 and...

  4. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF STARCH: APPLICATION TO FUEL ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of starch in corn is an important step that determines fermentation efficiency. Corn genetics, post harvest handling and process conditions are factors that affect starch hydrolysis. There is a lack of mathematical models for starch hydrolysis in the dry grind corn process tha...

  5. Rapid and simple profiling of lipoproteins by polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis to determine the heterogeneity of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) including small, dense LDL.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Seo, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Awata, Takuya; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis (PAGE) for lipoprotein profiling in clinical practice. Blood samples were collected from 146 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid parameters were assayed by PAGE, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (n = 41), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol (n = 37). We also used a commercial kit to measure small, dense LDL (n = 41). By PAGE, we obtained the percentage of the area under the curve (AUC %) of each peaks and calculated respective AUC% x total cholesterol (AUC%xTC) values. The calculated values of LDL-AUC%xTC, small LDL-AUC%xTC, and HDL-AUC%xTC values were correlated well with values from homogeneous assay for LDL-cholesterol, small, dense LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol assays (r = 0.94, 0.81, and 0.89, respectively). PAGE combined with measurement of total cholesterol and triglycerides provides a rapid evaluation of anti- or pro-atherogenic lipoproteins and a simple profiling system for both the "quantity" and "quality" of lipoproteins, allowing a better assessment of the risk of coronary artery diseases. This article discusses several methods for simple and rapid lipid profiling and outlines some recent patents relevant to the methods. PMID:19149704

  6. Lipolytic surface remnants of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are cytotoxic to macrophages but not in the presence of high density lipoprotein. A possible mechanism of atherogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, B H; Segrest, J P; Smith, K; Griffin, F M; Brouillette, C G

    1989-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) serum, lipolyzed in vitro by purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase, was found to be cytotoxic to cultured macrophages. Surviving macrophages contained numerous lipid inclusions similar to those found in foam cells. Individual lipoprotein fractions isolated from the lipolyzed HTG serum, including HDL, were also cytotoxic. Lipolysis of isolated lipoprotein fractions (either HTG or normal) allowed localization of cytotoxicity to postlipolysis remnant VLDL and chylomicron particles. The presence of a critical concentration of HDL in either the lipolysis mixture or the culture dishes inhibited the cytotoxicity. Below this critical concentration HDL itself became cytotoxic, producing lipid inclusions in surviving macrophages. The lipid fraction of the cytotoxic remnants contained the cytotoxic factor(s); neither FFA nor lysolecithin alone could account for this cytotoxicity. Postprandial lipemic sera from subjects with a brisk chylomicron response, when lipolyzed in vitro, were cytotoxic to cultured macrophages; neither fasted sera from these subjects, nor postprandial sera from normolipidemic subjects with a normal chylomicron response, were cytotoxic. Postheparin (in vivo lipolyzed) serum and its isolated lipoprotein fractions obtained 30 min after heparin injection in subjects with HTG were shown to be cytotoxic to macrophages; by 60 min most of the cytotoxicity had disappeared. The postprandial and postheparin observations support an in vivo significance for remnant-associated cytotoxicity. We hypothesize that cytotoxic remnants of lipolyzed VLDL and chylomicrons may be one of the major atherogenic lipoproteins. Further, we suggest that inhibition of the cytotoxicity of these remnants may be one important way that HDL prevents atherosclerosis. Images PMID:2703536

  7. Switching catalysis from hydrolysis to perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase.

    PubMed

    Yin, De Lu Tyler; Bernhardt, Peter; Morley, Krista L; Jiang, Yun; Cheeseman, Jeremy D; Purpero, Vincent; Schrag, Joseph D; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2010-03-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of epsilon-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k(cat), but K(m) also increased so the specificity constant, k(cat)/K(m), remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of epsilon-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the active site blocks access

  8. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  9. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  10. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  11. Investigation of the Polymorphs and Hydrolysis of Uranium Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-04-01

    This work focuses on progress in gaining a better understanding of the polymorphic nature of the UO3-water system, one of several important materials associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the fuel cycle. Powder x-ray diffraction, Raman and fluorescence characterization was performed on polymorphic forms of UO3 and UO3 hydrolysis products for the purpose of developing some predictive capability of estimating process history and utility, e.g. for polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Specifically, we have investigated three industrially relevant production pathways of UO3 and discovered a previously unknown low temperature route to β-UO3. Pure phases of UO3, hydrolysis products and starting materials were used to establish optical spectroscopic signatures for these compounds.

  12. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-06-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline /beta/-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymatic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. THe immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato /beta/-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcoholic fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%. 17 refs.

  13. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline beta-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. The immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato beta-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcohol fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%.

  14. Comprehensive screening study of pesticide degradation via oxidation and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Evelyn; Shi, Honglan; Wang, Tongwen; Ma, Yinfa; Fulmer, Alice; Adams, Craig

    2012-01-11

    This comprehensive study focused on the reactivity of a set of 62 pesticides via oxidization by free chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and permanganate; photodegradation with UV(254); and hydrolysis at pH 2, 7, and 12. Samples were analyzed using direct injection liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection or gas chromatography-electron capture detection after liquid-liquid extraction. Many pesticides were reactive via hydrolysis and/or chlorination and ozonation mechanisms under typical drinking water treatment conditions, with less reactivity exhibited on average for chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, hydrogen peroxide, and UV(254). The pyrazole and organophosphorous pesticides were most reactive in general, whereas carbamates and others were less reactive. The screening study provides guidance for the pesticide/oxidation systems that are most likely to lead to degradates in water treatment and the environment. PMID:22141915

  15. Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Stefano; Anighoro, Andrew; Quartieri, Andrea; Amaretti, Alberto; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Rastelli, Giulio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. Bifidobacterium strains belonging to eight species occurring in the human gut were screened. The hydrolysis seemed peculiar of Bifidobacterium animalis, whereas the other species failed to release CA. Intracellular feruloyl esterase activity capable of hydrolyzing chlorogenic acid was detected only in B. animalis. In silico research among bifidobacteria esterases identified Balat_0669 as the cytosolic enzyme likely responsible of CA release in B. animalis. Comparative modeling of Balat_0669 and molecular docking studies support its role in chlorogenic acid hydrolysis. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of Balat_0669 in Escherichia coli were obtained as further validation. A possible role of B. animalis in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds. PMID:25515139

  16. Simultaneous pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of forage biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, L.; Linden, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sweet sorghum is an attractive fermentation feedstock because as much as 40% of the dry weight consists of readily femented sugars such as sucrose, glucose and frutose. Cellulose and hemicellulose comprise another 50%. However, if this material is to be used a year-round feedstock for ethanol production, a stable method of storage must be developed to maintain the sugar content. A modified version of the traditional ensiling process is made effective by the addition of cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic enzymes and lactic acid bacteria to freshly chopped sweet sorghum prior to the production of silage. In situ hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose occurs concurrently with the acidic ensiling fementation. By hydolyzing the acetyl groups using acetyl xylan esterase and 3-0-methyl glucuronyl side chains using pectinase from hemicellulose, cellulose becomes accessible to hydrolysis by cellulase, both during in situ ensiling with enzymes and in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol.

  17. Novel agents for enzymatic and fungal hydrolysis of stevioside

    PubMed Central

    Milagre, H.M.S.; Martins, L.R.; Takahashi, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study on the potential of some biological agents to perform the hydrolysis of stevioside was carried out, aiming at establishing an alternative methodology to achieve the aglycon steviol or its rearranged derivative isosteviol, in high yields to be used in the preparation of novel bioactive compounds. Hydrolysis reactions were performed by using filamentous fungi (Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer and Rhizopus arrhizus), a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and enzymes (pancreatin and lipases PL250 and VFL 8000). Pancreatin showed the best hydrolytic activity, furnishing isosteviol at 93.9% of yield, at pH 4.0, using toluene as a co-solvent. Steviol was produced using both pancreatin at pH 7.0 (20.2% yield) and A. niger at pH 7 (20.8% yield). PMID:24031374

  18. [Enhancement of sewage sludge anaerobic digestibility by thermal hydrolysis pretreatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-jun; Wang, Wei

    2005-01-01

    Biochemical methane potential (BMP) experiments of thermo-hydrolyzed sewage sludge are carried out to investigate the effects of thermal hydrolysis on the digestibility of sewage sludge. The results show that thermal hydrolysis pretreatment can facilitate the dissolving of organic solid in sludge, and soluble organics hydrolyzed into low molecular organics, in which volatile fat acids accounted for 30% - 40 % of soluble COD, so the digestibility of sewage sludge remarkably improved. The optimum pretreatment temperature and holding time were 170 degrees C and 30 minutes, under which the total COD removal rate enhanced from original 38.11% to 56.78%, and biogas production rate of COD in feeding sludge from 160mL/g to 250mL/g. PMID:15859411

  19. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of agricultural residues to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Mes-Hartree, M.; Hogan, C.M.; Saddler, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    A combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation process was used to convert steam-treated wheat and barley straw to ethanol. Maximum conversion efficiencies were obtained when the substrates were steamed for 90 s. These substrates could yield over 0.4 g ethanol/g cellulose following a combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation process procedure using culture filtrates derived from Trichoderma harzianum E58. When culture filtrates from Trichoderma reesei C30 and T. reesei QM9414 were used, the ethanol yields obtained were 0.32 and 0.12 g ethanol/g cellulose utilized, respectively. The lower ethanol yields obtained with these strains were attributed to the lower amounts of ..beta..-glucosidase detected in the T. reesei culture filtrates.

  20. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  1. Hydrolysis kinetics of lead silicate glass in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Rafi Ali; Sadrnezhaad, Sayed Khatibuleslam; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hamidi, Amir

    2009-06-01

    Hydrolysis kinetics of the lead silicate glass (LSG) with 40 mol% PbO in 0.5 N HNO 3 aqueous acid solution was investigated. The surface morphology and the gel layer thickness were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) were used to determine the composition of the gel layer and the aqueous solution, respectively. The silicon content of the dissolution products was determined by using weight-loss data and compositions of the gel layer and the solution. The kinetic parameters were determined using the shrinking-core-model (SCM) for rate controlling step. The activation energy obtained for hydrolysis reaction was Qche = 56.07 kJ/mole. The diffusion coefficient of the Pb ions from the gel layer was determined by using its concentration in solution and in LSG. The shrinkage of the sample and the gel layer thickness during dissolution process were determined.

  2. Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Stefano; Anighoro, Andrew; Quartieri, Andrea; Amaretti, Alberto; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Rastelli, Giulio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. Bifidobacterium strains belonging to eight species occurring in the human gut were screened. The hydrolysis seemed peculiar of Bifidobacterium animalis, whereas the other species failed to release CA. Intracellular feruloyl esterase activity capable of hydrolyzing chlorogenic acid was detected only in B. animalis. In silico research among bifidobacteria esterases identified Balat_0669 as the cytosolic enzyme likely responsible of CA release in B. animalis. Comparative modeling of Balat_0669 and molecular docking studies support its role in chlorogenic acid hydrolysis. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of Balat_0669 in Escherichia coli were obtained as further validation. A possible role of B. animalis in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds. PMID:25515139

  3. Modeling and analysis of CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Lottes, S. A.; Lyczkowski, R. W.; Energy Systems

    2006-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is the modeling, simulation, and analysis of the CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis reactor stage in the Calcium-Bromine thermochemical water splitting cycle for nuclear hydrogen production. One concept is to use a spray reactor of CaBr{sub 2} into steam. Droplet models were built up in a series of steps that consider various physical phenomena separately, including droplet flow, heat transfer, phase change, and reaction. Given the large heat reservoir contained in a pool of liquid CaBr{sub 2} that allows bubbles to rise easily, using a bubble column for the hydrolysis reaction appears to be a feasible and promising alternative to the spray reactor concept. The two limiting cases of bubble geometry, spherical and spherical-cap, are considered in the modeling. Results for both droplet and bubble modeling with COMSOL are presented together with recommendations for the path forward.

  4. Catalysis of a Flavoenzyme-Mediated Amide Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2010-09-13

    A new pyrimidine catabolic pathway (the Rut pathway) was recently discovered in Escherichia coli K12. In this pathway, uracil is converted to 3-hydroxypropionate, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. The seven-gene Rut operon is required for this conversion. Here we demonstrate that the flavoenzyme RutA catalyzes the initial uracil ring-opening reaction to give 3-ureidoacrylate. This reaction, while formally a hydrolysis reaction, proceeds by an oxidative mechanism initiated by the addition of a flavin hydroperoxide to the C4 carbonyl. While peroxide-catalyzed amide hydrolysis has chemical precedent, we are not aware of a prior example of analogous chemistry catalyzed by flavin hydroperoxides. This study further illustrates the extraordinary catalytic versatility of the flavin cofactor.

  5. Enantioselective hydrolysis of naproxen ethyl ester catalyzed by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen-Dan; Yang, Bing-Hui; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Wu, Yu-Lin; Ji, Yong-Yong; Yeh, Ming

    2002-07-01

    This report described that a hapten of racemic phosphonate 3 designed as the mimic of the transition state of hydrolysis of naproxen ethyl ester was successfully synthesized from easily available 2-acetyl-6-methoxy-naphthalene 5. Then BALB/C mice were immunized and one of the monoclonal catalytic antibodies, N116-27, which enantioselectively accelerated the hydrolysis of the R-(-)-naproxen ethyl ester was given. The Michaelis-Menton parameter for the catalyzed reaction was K(M)=6.67 mM and k(cat)/k(uncat)=5.8 x 10(4). This enantioselective result was explained by the fact that the R-isomer of rac-hapten was more immunogenic than the S-isomer. PMID:11983513

  6. Optimal extraction and hydrolysis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xuewu

    2012-12-01

    In this study, for the first time, the applications of two new methods, ionic liquid and low-temperature high-pressure cell breakage methods, to the extraction of whole proteins in Chlorella pyrenoidosa cells were explored. Meanwhile, the comparison with three traditional methods was also made. The results indicated that the extraction rate for ionic liquid is only at moderate level, but the new low-temperature high-pressure cell breakage method can obviously increase the protein extraction rate up to 2- to 15-fold. Subsequently, the hydrolysis of the extracted proteins was conducted with three enzymes (papain, trypsin and alcalase). The data presented that the degree of hydrolysis for each enzyme under the optimal conditions is in the order of: alcalase (18.31%)>papain (14.33%)>trypsin (8.47%), demonstrating the potential of C. pyrenoidosa protein hydrolysates obtained here in nutritional supplement and medical foods. PMID:23117187

  7. Effect of medium- and long-chain triglyceride infusion on lipoprotein and hepatic lipase in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Nordenström, J; Neeser, G; Olivecrona, T; Wahren, J

    1991-12-01

    Plasma lipolytic activity and hydrolysis of intravenous fat were studied in six healthy subjects during infusion of a long-chain triglyceride (LCT) fat emulsion (Intralipid 20%) or of a medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)/LCT emulsion (Lipofundin MCT 20%). The fat emulsions were infused continuously at a rate of 0.17 g triglyceride kg-1 body weight (BW)h-1 for 6 h in random order at 7-day intervals. A continuous infusion of glucose (0.18 g kg-1 BW h-1) was administered for a period of 7 h and was started 1 h before the lipid infusion. Infusions of both types of fat increased plasma triglyceride (TG), free fatty acid (FFA) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) levels and steady-state values were present during the 3rd to 5th h of infusion. MCT/LCT infusion resulted in higher plasma levels at steady-state of TG (3.63 +/- 0.45 [SEM] vs 2.73 +/- 0.45 mmol l-1; P less than 0.05), FFA (1.05 +/- 0.08 vs 0.54 +/- 0.04 mmol l-1; P less than 0.01) and LPL (4.6 +/- 0.6 vs 2.6 +/- 0.5 mU ml-1; P less than 0.05) in comparison with LCT administration. There was a positive correlation between plasma LPL activity and TG concentration (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) when data for the two infusions were combined. Although the same amount of fat was infused on a weight basis, the molar infusion rate was 40% higher with MCT/LCT than with LCT infusion, due to differences in molecular weights (634 vs 885 Da).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1778219

  8. Lipoprotein Lipase, Tissue Expression and Effects on Genes Related to Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wang-Sheng; Hu, Shi-Liang; Yu, Kang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Loor, Juan; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) serves as a central factor in hydrolysis of triacylglycerol and uptake of free fatty acids from the plasma. However, there are limited data concerning the action of LPL on the regulation of milk fat synthesis in goat mammary gland. In this investigation, we describe the cloning and sequencing of the LPL gene from Xinong Saanen dairy goat mammary gland, along with a study of its phylogenetic relationships. Sequence analysis showed that goat LPL shares similarities with other species including sheep, bovine, human and mouse. LPL mRNA expression in various tissues determined by RT-qPCR revealed the highest expression in white adipose tissue, with lower expression in heart, lung, spleen, rumen, small intestine, mammary gland, and kidney. Expression was almost undetectable in liver and muscle. The expression profiles of LPL gene in mammary gland at early, peak, mid, late lactation, and the dry period were also measured. Compared with the dry period, LPL mRNA expression was markedly greater at early lactation. However, compared with early lactation, the expression was lower at peak lactation and mid lactation. Despite those differences, LPL mRNA expression was still greater at peak, mid, and late lactation compared with the dry period. Using goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC), the in vitro knockdown of LPL via shRNA or with Orlistat resulted in a similar degree of down-regulation of LPL (respectively). Furthermore, knockdown of LPL was associated with reduced mRNA expression of SREBF1, FASN, LIPE and PPARG but greater expression of FFAR3. There was no effect on ACACA expression. Orlistat decreased expression of LIPE, FASN, ACACA, and PPARG, and increased FFAR3 and SREBF1 expression. The pattern of LPL expression was similar to the changes in milk fat percentage in lactating goats. Taken together, results suggest that LPL may play a crucial role in fatty acid synthesis. PMID:25501331

  9. Altered Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Male and Female Power Lifters Ingesting Anabolic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Serum lipoprotein profiles were measured in nine male and three female weightlifters who were taking anabolic steroids. The profiles suggest that steriod users may face an increased risk of coronary artery disease. (Author/MT)

  10. Behavioral versus genetic determination of lipoproteins andidentical twins discordant for exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein and weight differences between vigorously active and sedentary MZ twins are used to: (1) estimate the effects of training while controlling for genotype; (2) estimate genetic concordance in the presence of divergent lifestyles.

  11. Diet and the role of lipoproteins, lipases, and thyroid hormones in coronary lesion growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Jacques D.; Jansen, Hans; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Birkenhager, Jan C.; Kromhout, Daan

    1987-01-01

    The relationships between the coronary lesion growth and the blood contents of lipoprotein fractions, thyroic hormones, and the lipoprotein lipase activity were investigated in male patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis, who participated in a lipid-lowering dietary intervention program. A quantitative computer-assisted image-processing technique was used to assess the severity of coronary obstructions at the beginning of the program and at its termination two years later. Based on absolute coronary scores, patients were divided into a no-lesion growth group (14 patients) and a progression group (21 paients). At the end of the trial, the very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were found to be significantly higher, while the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hepatic lipase (HL) were lower in the progression group. Multivariate regression analysis showed HL to be the most important determinant of changes in coronary atherosclerotic lesions.

  12. Quantitative Lipoproteomics in Clostridium difficile Reveals a Role for Lipoproteins in Sporulation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Thomas M; Kovacs-Simon, Andrea; Michell, Stephen L; Fairweather, Neil F; Tate, Edward W

    2015-11-19

    Bacterial lipoproteins are surface exposed, anchored to the membrane by S-diacylglyceryl modification of the N-terminal cysteine thiol. They play important roles in many essential cellular processes and in bacterial pathogenesis. For example, Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive anaerobe that causes severe gastrointestinal disease; however, its lipoproteome remains poorly characterized. Here we describe the application of metabolic tagging with alkyne-tagged lipid analogs, in combination with quantitative proteomics, to profile protein lipidation across diverse C. difficile strains and on inactivation of specific components of the lipoprotein biogenesis pathway. These studies provide the first comprehensive map of the C. difficile lipoproteome, demonstrate the existence of two active lipoprotein signal peptidases, and provide insights into lipoprotein function, implicating the lipoproteome in transmission of this pathogen. PMID:26584780

  13. Severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with lipoprotein lipase deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, L A; de Klerk, J B C; Postema, R R

    2003-09-01

    An 11-year-old girl with lipoprotein lipase deficiency experienced recurring episodes of abdominal pain. She initially underwent appendectomy for suspected appendicitis; however, the appendix was normal. Pancreatitis was subsequently identified as the cause of her pain. PMID:14523833

  14. Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Human Fibroblasts by Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael S.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1973-01-01

    The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34), the rate-limiting enzyme of hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis, is suppressed in human fibroblasts cultured in the presence of serum. This enzyme activity increases by more than 10-fold after the removal of serum from the medium. The rise in enzyme activity requires de novo protein synthesis and is not accompanied by changes in the activities of several other cellular enzymes. The factor responsible for the suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in cultured fibroblasts is present in the sera of at least four mammalian species, and in human serum it is found in the low-density lipoproteins. Human high-density lipoproteins, very low-density lipoproteins from chicken egg yolk, and the fraction of human serum containing no lipoproteins do not suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. PMID:4352976

  15. A brief history of lipid and lipoprotein measurements and their contribution to clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Judith R; Warnick, G Russell; Cooper, Gerald R

    2006-07-23

    The study of modern lipid chemistry began in the 17th and 18th centuries with early observations by Robert Boyle, Poulletier de la Salle, Antoine François de Fourcroy and others. The 19th century chemist, Chevreul, identified several fatty acids, suggested the name 'cholesterine' for the fatty substance in gallstones, coined the word 'glycerine', and showed that fats were comprised of glycerol and fatty acids. The 20th century brought many advances in the understanding of lipoprotein structure and function, and explored relationships between lipoproteins and disease states. The development of the ultracentrifuge and other lipoprotein separation techniques, and reagents for accurate, standardized quantitative measurement have steadily increased our understanding of the important role of lipoprotein metabolism in both healthy and disease states. PMID:16740255

  16. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites. PMID:27296627

  17. Allergenicity of Peanut Proteins is Retained Following Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rationale: Hydrolysis of peanut proteins by food-grade enzymes may reduce allergenicity and could lead to safer forms of immunotherapy. Methods: Light roasted peanut flour extracts were digested with pepsin (37°C, pH 2), Alcalase (60°C pH 8), or Flavourzyme (50°C, pH 7) up to 1 hr, or sequentially w...

  18. Fructan Hydrolysis Drives Petal Expansion in the Ephemeral Daylily Flower.

    PubMed Central

    Bieleski, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Dry weight, water content, soluble carbohydrate content, and carbohydrate composition of daylily (Hemerocallis hybrid cv Cradle Song) flower petals were monitored in the 3 d leading up to full opening and in the first day of senescence. Timing of events was related to the time (hour 0) when flower expansion was 60% complete. Petal dry weight increased linearly from hour -62 (tight bud) to hour 10 (fully developed flower), then fell rapidly to hour 34 as senescence advanced. Increase in water content was proportional to dry weight increase from hour -62 to hour -14, but was more rapid as the bud cracked and the flower opened, giving an increase in fresh weight/dry weight ratio. Soluble carbohydrate was 50% of petal dry weight up to hour 10, then decreased during senescence to reach 4% by hour 34. Up until hour -14, fructan accounted for 80% of the soluble carbohydrate in the petals, whereas hexose accounted for only 2%. Fructan hydrolysis started just prior to bud crack at hour -14, reaching completion by hour 10 when no detectable fructan remained, and fructose plus glucose accounted for more than 80% of the total soluble carbohydrate. The proportion of sucrose remained constant throughout development. Osmolality of petal cell sap increased significantly during fructan hydrolysis, from 0.300 to 0.340 osmolal. Cycloheximide applied to excised buds between hour -38 and hour -14 halted both fructan hydrolysis and flower expansion. The findings suggest that onset of fructan hydrolysis, with the concomitant large increase in osmoticum, is an important event driving flower expansion in daylily. PMID:12231928

  19. β-cyclodextrin assistant flavonoid glycosides enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Sun, E.; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background: The content of icaritin and genistein in herba is very low, preparation with relatively large quantities is an important issue for extensive pharmacological studies. Objective: This study focuses on preparing and enzymic hydrolysis of flavonoid glycosides /β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex to increase the hydrolysis rate. Materials and Methods: The physical property of newly prepared inclusion complex was tested by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The conditions of enzymatic hydrolysis were optimized for the bioconversion of flavonoid glycosides /β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex by mono-factor experimental design. The experiments are using the icariin and genistein as the model drugs. Results: The solubility of icariin and genistein were increased almost 17 times from 29.2 μg/ml to 513.5 μg/ml at 60°C and 28 times from 7.78 μg/ml to 221.46 μg/ml at 50°C, respectively, demonstrating that the inclusion complex could significantly increase the solubility of flavonoid glycosides. Under the optimal conditions, the reaction time of icariin and genistin decreased by 68% and 145%, when compared with that without β-CD inclusion. By using this enzymatic condition, 473 mg icaritin (with the purity of 99.34%) and 567 mg genistein(with the purity of 99.46%), which was finally determined by melt point, ESI-MS, UV, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR, was obtained eventually by transforming the inclusion complex(contains 1.0 g substrates). Conclusion: This study can clearly indicate a new attempt to improve the speed of enzyme-hydrolysis of poorly water-soluble flavonoid glycosides and find a more superior condition which is used to prepare icaritin and genistein. PMID:24143039

  20. The enzymatic hydrolysis of leather waste with chromium recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.S.; Clesceri, L.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work of Taylor et al. (1990) has shown the potential for alkaline hydrolase enzymes for the solubilization of waste from the tanning industry. The authors have carried this work further to examine the mechanism whereby enzymes release chromium from leather waste. An alkaline digest of waste leather was used in this work. Treatment with strong alkali produced a thick slurry that contained 7,000 ppm chromium. The objective of this work is to optimize a closed cycle system for the recycling of chromium salts for tanning as well as a chrome-free product for use as a fertilizer. The authors are able to track the progress of the leather protein hydrolysis with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). By means of PAGE, it is possible to determine the relationship between chromium release and the extent of protein hydrolysis. Rate constant for hydrolysis and chromium release have been developed for various hydrolysis conditions. Chemical precipitation of chromium from the hydrolysate results in a purified product for reuse in tanning. The chrome-free hydrolysate can be applied as a fertilizer either directly or as a dried product. There are more than 56,000 metric tons of tannery waste produced annually in the US. The majority of the organic solids can be converted into high quality fertilizers. Since the nitrogen is organic rather than inorganic, release is at a controlled rate since the microbody in the soil must make the nitrogen available for plant growth. Leather manufacturing is a world-wide industry. Conversion of leather waste to fertilizers can improve global productivity as well as solve a waste problem.

  1. Ultrasound-enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Gamerith, Caroline; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Ortner, Andreas; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-01

    The application of ultrasound was found to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). After a short activation phase up to 6.6times increase in the amount of released products was found. PET powder with lower crystallinity of 8% was hydrolyzed faster when compared to PET with 28% crystallinity. Ultrasound activation was found to be around three times more effective on powders vs. films most likely due to a larger surface area accessible to the enzyme. PMID:27481467

  2. microRNAs in lipoprotein metabolism and cardiometabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Rotllan, Noemi; Price, Nathan; Pati, Paramita; Goedeke, Leigh; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Circulating levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) are two of the most important risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death worldwide. Recently, miRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of cholesterol metabolism and promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of CVD. A great deal of work has established numerous miRNAs as important regulators of HDL metabolism. This includes miRNAs that target ABCA1, a critical factor for HDL biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the process through which cells, including arterial macrophages, efflux cellular cholesterol for transport to and removal by the liver. The most well studied of these miRNAs, miR-33, has been demonstrated to target ABCA1, as well as numerous other genes involved in metabolic function and RCT, and therapeutic inhibition of miR-33 was found to increase HDL levels in mice and non-human primates. Moreover, numerous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of miR-33 inhibition or knockout on reducing atherosclerotic plaque burden. Even more recent work has identified miRNAs that regulate LDL cholesterol levels, including direct modulation of LDL uptake in the liver through targeting of the LDL receptor. Among these, inhibition of miR-128-1, miR-148a, or miR-185 was found to reduce plasma LDL levels, and inhibition of miR-185 was further demonstrated to reduce atherosclerotic plaque size in ApoE(-/-) mice. Due to their ability to target many different genes, miRNAs have the ability to mediate complex physiologic changes through simultaneous regulation of multiple interrelated pathways. Of particular importance for CVD, inhibition of miR-148a may prove an important therapeutic approach for combating dyslipidemia, as this has been demonstrated to both raise plasma HDL levels and lower LDL levels in mice by targeting both ABCA1 and LDLR, respectively. In this review we highlight

  3. Lipoprotein-associated lysolipids are differentially involved in high-density lipoprotein- and its oxidized form-induced neurite remodeling in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koichi; Tobo, Masayuki; Mogi, Chihiro; Murata, Naoya; Kotake, Mie; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Im, Dong-Soon; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2014-03-01

    Oxidatively damaged proteins and lipid peroxidation products have been shown to accumulate in the brain of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, and oxidized lipoprotein is considered to be toxic and neurodegenerative. However, the role of lipoprotein and its oxidized form in neurite remodeling has not been well understood. In the present study, we have aimed to clarify whether and, if so, how high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and oxidized HDL (oxHDL) affect neuritogenesis. In the presence of nerve growth factor, exposure of PC12 cells to either HDL or oxHDL induces a rapid neurite retraction, which is followed by re-outgrowth of neurites in either case; however, oxHDL-treated cells exhibit much longer outgrowths than do basal and HDL-treated cells. Thus, processes in the morphological changes of neuronal cells after lipoprotein treatment are composed of two phases: the reversible retraction phase and the extension phase. Characterization of the active fractions of lipids and experiments with desensitization and knockdown of receptors have indicated that the reversible retraction phase involves mainly sphingosine 1-phosphate for HDL and lysophosphatidic acid for oxHDL. The change in the components responsible for the retraction response is comparable with the change in sphingosine 1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid contents by the oxidation of HDL. In the extension phase, lysophosphatidylcholine, which is increased by the oxidation of HDL, may play a stimulatory role in neurite outgrowth. We conclude that lipoprotein and its oxidized form differentially regulate neuritogenesis through lipoprotein-associated lysolipid molecules. PMID:24589770

  4. The two-receptor model of lipoprotein clearance: tests of the hypothesis in "knockout" mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor, apolipoprotein E, or both proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, S; Herz, J; Maeda, N; Goldstein, J L; Brown, M S

    1994-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is hypothesized to mediate lipoprotein clearance by binding to two receptors: (i) the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and (ii) a chylomicron remnant receptor. To test this hypothesis, we have compared plasma lipoproteins in mice that are homozygous for targeted disruptions of the genes for apoE [apoE(-/-)], the LDLR [LDLR(-/-)], and both molecules [poE(-/-); LDLR(-/-)]. On a normal chow diet, apoE(-/-) mice had higher mean plasma cholesterol levels than LDLR(-/-) mice (579 vs. 268 mg/dl). Cholesterol levels in the apoE(-/-); LDLR(-/-) mice were not significantly different from those in the apoE(-/-) mice. LDLR(-/-) mice had a relatively isolated elevation in plasma LDL, whereas apoE(-/-) mice had a marked increase in larger lipoproteins corresponding to very low density lipoproteins and chylomicron remnants. The lipoprotein pattern in apoE(-/-); LDLR(-/-) mice resembled that of apoE(-/-) mice. The LDLR(-/-) mice had a marked elevation in apoB-100 and a modest increase in apoB-48. In contrast, the apoE(-/-) mice had a marked elevation in apoB-48 but not in apoB-100. The LDLR(-/-); apoE(-/-) double homozygotes had marked elevations of both apolipoproteins. The observation that apoB-48 increases more dramatically with apoE deficiency than with LDLR deficiency supports the notion that apoE binds to a second receptor in addition to the LDLR. This conclusion is also supported by the observation that superimposition of a LDLR deficiency onto an apoE deficiency [apoE(-/-); LDLR(-/-) double homozygotes] does not increase hypercholesterolemia beyond the level observed with apoE deficiency alone. Images PMID:8183926

  5. Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein with hypochlorite causes transformation of the lipoprotein into a high-uptake form for macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hazell, L J; Stocker, R

    1993-02-15

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lipid is thought to represent the initial step in a series of oxidative modification reactions that ultimately transform this lipoprotein into an atherogenic high-uptake form that can cause lipid accumulation in cells. We have studied the effects of hypochlorite, a powerful oxidant released by activated monocytes and neutrophils, on isolated LDL. Exposure of LDL to reagent hypochlorite (NaOCl) at 4 degrees C resulted in immediate and preferential oxidation of amino acid residues of apoprotein B-100, the single protein associated with LDL. Neither lipoprotein lipid nor LDL-associated antioxidants, except ubiquinol-10, represented major targets for this oxidant. Even when high concentrations of NaOCl were used, only low levels of lipid hydroperoxides could be detected with the highly sensitive h.p.l.c. post-column chemiluminescence detection method. Lysine residues of apoprotein B-100 quantitatively represented the major target, scavenging some 68% of the NaOCl added, with tryptophan and cysteine together accounting for an additional 10% of the oxidant. Concomitant with the loss of LDL's amino groups, chloramines were formed and the anionic surface charge of the lipoprotein particle increased, indicated by a 3-4-fold increase in electrophoretic mobility above that of native LDL on agarose gels. While both these changes could be initially reversed by physiological reductants such as ascorbic acid and methionine, incubation of the NaOCl-modified LDL at 37 degrees C resulted in increasing resistance of the modified lysine residues against reductive reversal. Exposure of mouse peritoneal macrophages to NaOCl-oxidized LDL resulted in increased intracellular concentrations of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters. These findings suggest that lipid-soluble antioxidants associated with LDL do not efficiently protect the lipoprotein against oxidative damage mediated by hypochlorite, and that extensive lipid oxidation is not a necessary

  6. Regiospecific Ester Hydrolysis by Orange Peel Esterase - An Undergraduate Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Lewin, Andrew M.; Catlin, Eric R.

    1997-01-01

    A simple but effective experiment has been developed to demonstrate the regiospecificity of enzyme catalysis using an esterase activity easily isolated from orange peel. The experiment involves the preparation of diester derivatives of para-, meta- and ortho-hydroxybenzoic acid (e.g. methyl 4-acetoxy-benzoic acid). The derivatives are incubated with orange peel esterase, as a crude extract, and with commercially available pig liver esterase and porcine pancreatic lipase. The enzymatic hydrolysis reactions are monitored by thin layer chromatography, revealing which of the two ester groups is hydrolysed, and the rate of the enzyme-catalysed reaction. The results of a group experiment revealed that in all cases hydrolysis was observed with at least one enzyme, and in most cases the enzymatic hydrolysis was specific for production of either the hydroxy-ester or acyl-acid product. Specificity towards the ortho-substituted series was markedly different to that of the para-substituted series, which could be rationalised in the case of pig liver esterase by a published active site model.

  7. The Competing Mechanisms of Phosphate Monoester Dianion Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical studies on phosphate monoester hydrolysis, significant questions remain concerning the mechanistic details of these biologically critical reactions. In the present work we construct a linear free energy relationship for phosphate monoester hydrolysis to explore the effect of modulating leaving group pKa on the competition between solvent- and substrate-assisted pathways for the hydrolysis of these compounds. Through detailed comparative electronic-structure studies of methyl phosphate and a series of substituted aryl phosphate monoesters, we demonstrate that the preferred mechanism is dependent on the nature of the leaving group. For good leaving groups, a strong preference is observed for a more dissociative solvent-assisted pathway. However, the energy difference between the two pathways gradually reduces as the leaving group pKa increases and creates mechanistic ambiguity for reactions involving relatively poor alkoxy leaving groups. Our calculations show that the transition-state structures vary smoothly across the range of pKas studied and that the pathways remain discrete mechanistic alternatives. Therefore, while not impossible, a biological catalyst would have to surmount a significantly higher activation barrier to facilitate a substrate-assisted pathway than for the solvent-assisted pathway when phosphate is bonded to good leaving groups. For poor leaving groups, this intrinsic preference disappears. PMID:27471914

  8. Hydrogen generation by means of catalyzed Mg-Al hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehne, K.; Jaeger, P.

    Based on considerations of reactivity, costs, and the volume of hydrogen which can be expected per mass fraction of metal, Al and Mg offer good possibilities in metal hydrolysis. Since these metals hardly react with water, however, a catalyst is used to accelerate the Mg-Al hydrolysis process. Experiments show that a mixture of Mg and Al reacts strongly with water in the presence of CO3O4, MoO3, and Cl-ions; with an optimum combination of all the participants in the reaction, the H2 yield can amount to 100%. Various methods are discussed for constructing a hydrogen generator using this new method of metal hydrolysis. A hydrogen generator plant is described, in which pressed powder pellets are used. An aluminum-magnesium-cobalt oxide powder mixture is introduced into the reactor in the form of cylindrical pellets, which are pulverized in the reactor chamber. The powder falls into the salt water in the reactor and is converted. The hydrogen produced has a purity potentially greater than 99.9%.

  9. A new route to improved glucose yields in cellulose hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Holladay, John E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2007-08-01

    An unusual inverse temperature-dependent pathway was discovered for cellulose decrystallization in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Cellulose was completely decrystallized by TFA at 0 °C in less than 2 hours, a result not achieved in 48 hours at 25°C in the same medium. The majority of TFA used in cellulose decrystallization was recycled via a vacuum process. The small remaining amount of TFA was diluted with water to make a 0.5% TFA solution and used as a catalyst in dilute acid hydrolysis. After one minute, under batch conditions at 185 °C, the glucose yield reached 63.5% without production of levulinic acid. In comparison, only 15.0% glucose yield was achieved in the hydrolysis of untreated cellulose by 0.5% H2SO4 under the same condition. Further improvement of glucose yield is possible by optimizing reaction conditions. Alternatively, the remaining TFA can be completely removed by water while keeping the regenerated cellulose in a highly amorphous state. This regenerated cellulose is much more reactive than untreated cellulose in hydrolysis reactions, but still less reactive than corn starch. The lower temperatures and shorter reaction times with this activated cellulose makes it possible to reduce operating costs and decrease byproduct yields such as HMF and levulinic acid.

  10. Fatty acid hydrolysis of acyl marinobactin siderophores by Marinobacter acylases.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Naka, Hiroaki; Iinishi, Akira; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2015-01-27

    The marine bacteria Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and Marinobacter nanhaiticus D15-8W produce a suite of acyl peptidic marinobactin siderophores to acquire iron under iron-limiting conditions. During late-log phase growth, the marinobactins are hydrolyzed to form the marinobactin headgroup with release of the corresponding fatty acid tail. The bntA gene, a homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyoverdine acylase gene, pvdQ, was identified from Marinobacter sp. DS40M6. A bntA knockout mutant of Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produced the suite of acyl marinobactins A-E, without the usual formation of the marinobactin headgroup. Another marinobactin-producing species, M. nanhaiticus D15-8W, is predicted to have two pvdQ homologues, mhtA and mhtB. MhtA and MhtB have 67% identical amino acid sequences. MhtA catalyzes hydrolysis of the apo-marinobactin siderophores as well as the quorum sensing signaling molecule, dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone. In contrast to hydrolysis of the suite of apo-marinobactins by MhtA, hydrolysis of the iron(III)-bound marinobactins was not observed. PMID:25588131

  11. Hydrolysis of cellulose catalyzed by novel acidic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Kelei; Du, Quanzhou; Bai, Guangyue; Wang, Congyue; Chen, Yujuan; Wang, Jianji

    2015-01-22

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass directly into valuable chemicals becomes a hot subject. Six novel acidic ionic liquids (ILs) based on 2-phenyl-2-imidazoline were synthesized and characterized by UV-VIS, TGA, and NMR. The novel acidic ionic liquids were investigated as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl). The acidic ionic liquids with anions HSO4(-) and Cl(-) showed better catalytic performance for the hydrolysis of cellulose than those with H2PO4(-). The temperature and dosage of water affect significantly the yield of total reducing sugar (TRS). When the hydrolysis of cellulose was catalyzed by 1-propyl sulfonic acid-2-phenyl imidazoline hydrogensulfate (IL-1) and the dosage of water was 0.2g, the TRS yield was up to 85.1% within 60 min at 100°C. These new acidic ionic liquids catalysts are expected to have a wide application in the conversion of cellulose into valuable chemicals. PMID:25439867

  12. Pretreatment for cellulose hydrolysis by carbon dioxide explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.; Lin, H.M.; Tsao, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Cellulosic materials were treated with supercritical carbon dioxide to increase the reactivity of cellulose, thereby to enhance the rate and the extent of cellulose hydrolysis. In this pretreatment process, the cellulosic materials such as Avicel, recycled paper mix, sugarcane bagasse and the repulping waste of recycled paper are placed in a reactor under pressurized carbon dioxide at 35 C for a controlled time period. Upon an explosive release of the carbon dioxide pressure, the disruption of the cellulosic structure increases the accessible surface area of the cellulosic substrate to enzymatic hydrolysis. Results indicate that supercritical carbon dioxide is effective for pretreatment of cellulose. An increase in pressure facilitates the faster penetration of carbon dioxide molecules into the crystalline structures, thus more glucose is produced from cellulosic materials after the explosion as compared to those without the pretreatment. This explosion pretreatment enhances the rate of cellulosic material hydrolysis as well as increases glucose yield by as much as 50%. Results from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation tests also show the increase in the available carbon source from the cellulosic materials for fermentation to produce ethanol. As an alternative method, this supercritical carbon dioxide explosion has a possibility to reduce expense compared with ammonia explosion, and since it is operated at the low temperature, it will not cause degradation of sugars such as those treated with steam explosion due to the high-temperature involved.

  13. Obtaining antimicrobial peptides by controlled peptic hydrolysis of bovine hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Adje, Estelle Yaba; Balti, Rafik; Kouach, Mostafa; Dhulster, Pascal; Guillochon, Didier; Nedjar-Arroume, Naïma

    2011-08-01

    Under standard conditions, the peptides and specially the active peptides were obtained from either the denatured hemoglobin that all structures are completely modified or either the native hemoglobin where all structures are intact. In these conditions, antibacterial peptides were isolated from a very complex peptidic hydrolysate which contains more than one hundred peptides having various sizes and characteristics, involving a complex purification process. The new hydrolysis conditions were obtained by using 40% methanol, 30% ethanol, 20% propanol or 10% butanol. These conditions, where only the secondary structure of hemoglobin retains intact, were followed in order to enrich the hydrolyzed hemoglobin by active peptides or obtain new antibacterial peptides. In these controlled peptic hydrolysis of hemoglobin, a selective and restrictive hydrolysate contained only 29 peptides was obtained. 26 peptides have an antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus, Listeria innocua, and Escherichia coli with MIC from 187.1 to 1 μM. Among these peptides, 13 new antibacterial peptides are obtained only in these new hydrolysis conditions. PMID:21510973

  14. Hydrolysis of acyloxy nitroso compounds yields nitroxyl (HNO).

    PubMed

    Sha, Xin; Isbell, T Scott; Patel, Rakesh P; Day, Cynthia S; King, S Bruce

    2006-08-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO/NO(-)), the reduced form of nitric oxide, has gained attention based on its separate chemistry and biology from nitric oxide. The inherent reactivity of HNO requires new and mechanistically unique donors for the detailed study of HNO chemistry and biology. Oxidation of cyclohexanone oxime with lead tetraacetate yields 1-nitrosocyclohexyl acetate, whereas oxidation of oximes in the presence of excess carboxylic acid gives various acyloxy nitroso compounds. These bright blue compounds exist as monomers as indicated by their infrared, proton, and carbon NMR spectra, and X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals the nitroso groups possess a "nitroxyl-like" bent configuration. Hydrolysis of these compounds produces nitrous oxide, the dimerization and dehydration product of HNO, and provides evidence for the intermediacy of HNO. Both thiols and oxidative metal complexes inhibit nitrous oxide formation. Hydrolysis of these compounds in the presence of ferric heme complexes forms ferrous nitrosyl complexes providing further evidence for the intermediacy of HNO. Kinetic analysis shows that the rate of hydrolysis depends on pH and the structure of the acyl group of the acyloxy nitroso compound. These compounds relax pre-constricted rat aortic rings similar to known HNO donors. Together, these results identify acyloxy nitroso compounds as a new class of HNO donors. PMID:16866522

  15. A single molecule study of cellulase hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-San; Luo, Yonghua; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Smith, Steve; Ding, Shi-You

    2010-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I), a processive exoglucanase secreted by Trichoderma reesei, is one of the key enzyme components in a commercial cellulase mixture currently used for processing biomass to biofuels. CBH I contains a family 7 glycoside hydrolase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), and a highlyglycosylated linker peptide. It has been proposed that the CBH I cellulase initiates the hydrolysis from the reducing end of one cellulose chain and successively cleaves alternate β-1,4-glycosidic bonds to release cellobiose as its principal end product. The role each module of CBH I plays in the processive hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose has yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, we use a single-molecule approach that combines optical (Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy, or TIRF-M) and non-optical (Atomic Force Microscopy, or AFM) imaging techniques to analyze the molecular motion of CBM tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBM and CBH I. The preliminary results have revealed a confined nanometer-scale movement of the TrCBM1-GFP bound to cellulose, and decreases in cellulose crystal size as well as increases in surface roughness during CBH I hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  16. Acetic acid oxidation and hydrolysis in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.C.; Marrone, P.A.; Tester, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) hydrolysis and oxidation in supercritical water were examined from 425--600 C and 246 bar at reactor residence times of 4.4 to 9.8 s. Over the range of conditions studied, acetic acid oxidation was globally 0.72 {+-} 0.15 order in acetic acid and 0.27 {+-} 0.15 order in oxygen to a 95% confidence level, with an activation energy of 168 {+-} 21 kJ/mol, a preexponential factor of 10{sup 9.9{+-}1.7}, and an induction time of about 1.5 s at 525 C. Isothermal kinetic measurements at 550 C over the range 160 to 263 bar indicated that pressure or density did not affect the rate of acetic acid oxidation as much as was previously observed in the oxidation of hydrogen or carbon monoxide in supercritical water. Major products of acetic acid oxidation in supercritical water are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen. Trace amounts of propenoic acid were occasionally detected. Hydrolysis or hydrothermolysis in the absence of oxygen resulted in approximately 35% conversion of acetic acid at 600 C, 246 bar, and 8-s reactor residence time. Regression of the limited hydrolysis runs assuming a reaction rate first-order in organic gave a global rate expression with a preexponential factor of 10{sup 4.4{+-}1.1} and an activation energy of 94 {+-} 17 kJ/mol.

  17. Enzymatic hydrolysis of defatted mackerel protein with low bitter taste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Hu; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction was confirmed as a novel, effective method for separating lipid from mackerel protein, resulting in a degreasing rate (DR) of 95% and a nitrogen recovery (NR) of 88.6%. To obtain protein hydrolysates with high nitrogen recovery and low bitter taste, enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using eight commercially available proteases. It turned out that the optimum enzyme was the `Mixed enzymes for animal proteolysis'. An enzyme dosage of 4%, a temperature of 50°, and a hydrolysis time of 300 min were found to be the optimum conditions to obtain high NR (84.28%) and degree of hydrolysis (DH, 16.18%) by orthogonal experiments. Glutamic acid was the most abundant amino acid of MDP (defatted mackerel protein) and MDPH (defatted mackerel protein hydrolysates). Compared with the FAO/WHO reference protein, the essential amino acid chemical scores (CS) were greater than 1.0 (1.0-1.7) in MDPH, which is reflective of high nutritional value. This, coupled with the light color and slight fishy odor, indicates that MDPH would potentially have a wide range of applications such as nutritional additives, functional ingredients, and so on.

  18. Hydrolysis of iron and chromium fluorides: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, José L; Dufour, Javier; Negro, Carlos; López-Mateos, Federico

    2008-06-15

    Fluoride complexes of metallic ions are one of the main problems when processing industrial effluents with high content of fluoride anion. The most important case is derived from pickling treatment of stainless steel, which is performed with HNO3/HF mixtures to remove oxides scale formed over the metal surface. Waste from this process, spent pickling liquor, must be treated for recovering metallic and acid content. Conventional treatments produce a final effluent with high quantity of fluoride complexes of iron and chromium. This work proposes a hydrolysis treatment of these solid metal fluorides by reacting them with a basic agent. Metal oxides are obtained, while fluoride is released to solution as a solved salt, which can be easily recovered as hydrofluoric acid. Solid iron and chromium fluorides, mainly K2FeF5(s) and CrF3(s), obtained in the UCM treatment process, were employed in this work. Optimal hydrolysis operating conditions were obtained by means of a factorial design: media must be basic but pH cannot be higher than 9.5, temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C and alkali concentration (potassium hydroxide) below 1.1 mol L(-1). Secondary reactions have been detected, which are probably due to fluoride adsorption onto obtained oxides surface. Mechanism of reaction consists of several stages, involving solid fluoride dissolution and complexes decomposition. Hydrolysis kinetics has been modeled with classical crystal dissolution kinetics, based on mass transfer phenomena. PMID:17988794

  19. Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2012-10-19

    Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

  20. A DFT Approach to the Mechanistic Study of Hydrozone Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ibrahim

    2016-05-26

    Hydrazone chemistry is widely utilized in biomedical field as a means of bioconjugation protocol, especially in drug delivery field due to pH labile nature of this linkage. In the light of kinetics studies, the generally accepted mechanism for the hydrolysis of hydrazones involves two main steps, namely, nucleophilic addition of water molecule to the hydrazone molecule to form carbinolamine intermediate and subsequent decomposition of this intermediate into the hydrazine and aldehyde/ketone moieties. Hydrolysis of hydrazones is catalyzed in the acidic environments and is thought to proceed through several proton transfer steps. To the best of our knowledge, in the literature no detailed theoretical study has been reported related to the mechanism of hydrolysis. In this study, we evaluated the proposed mechanism with DFT calculations with M06-2X functional at the 6-311+g(d,p) level including conductor-like polarizable continuum model solvation model. We also analyzed possible proton transfer pathways and assessed energetics of each step. PMID:27136330

  1. Lipoprotein Kinetics in the Metabolic Syndrome: Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Lessons from Stable Isotope Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Dick C; Barrett, P Hugh R; Watts, Gerald F

    2004-01-01

    Dyslipoproteinaemia is a cardinal feature of the metabolic syndrome that accelerates atherosclerosis. It is usually characterised by high plasma concentrations of triglyceride-rich and apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins, with depressed concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Dysregulation of lipoprotein metabolism in these subjects may be due to a combination of overproduction of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) apoB-100, decreased catabolism of apoB-containing particles, and increased catabolism of HDL apoA-I particles. These abnormalities may be consequent on a global metabolic effect of insulin resistance that increases the flux of fatty acids from adipose tissue to the liver, the accumulation of fat in the liver, the increased hepatic secretion of VLDL-triglycerides and the remodelling of both low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL particles in the circulation; perturbations in lipolytic enzymes and lipid transfer proteins contribute to the dyslipidaemia. Our in vivo understanding of the kinetic defects in lipoprotein metabolism in the metabolic syndrome has been chiefly achieved by ongoing developments in the use of stable isotope tracers and mathematical modelling. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of lipoprotein metabolism in the metabolic syndrome is well complemented by extensive cell biological data. Nutritional modifications and increased physical exercise may favourably alter lipoprotein transport in the metabolic syndrome by collectively decreasing the hepatic secretion of VLDL-apoB and the catabolism of HDL apoA-I, as well as by increasing the clearance of LDL-apoB. Pharmacological treatments, such as statins, fibrates or fish oils, can also correct the dyslipidaemia by several mechanisms of action including decreased secretion and increased catabolism of apoB, as well as increased secretion and decreased catabolism of apoA-I. The complementary mechanisms of action of lifestyle and drug therapies support the use of combination

  2. Construction and evaluation of a plasmid vector for the expression of recombinant lipoproteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Paul A; Lo, Miranda; Bulach, Dieter M; Cordwell, Stuart J; Adler, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Outer membrane lipoproteins are emerging as key targets for protective immunity to many bacterial pathogens. Heterologous expression of lipoproteins in Escherichia coli does not always result in high level expression of acylated recombinant protein. Thus, these proteins do not take up their correct membrane topology and are lacking the immunostimulatory properties endowed by the lipid. To this end, we have designed a lipoprotein expression vector (pDUMP) that results in the production of fusion proteins containing the E. coli major outer membrane lipoprotein (Lpp) signal sequence, lipoprotein signal peptidase recognition site, and the +2 outer membrane sorting signal at their N termini. To test the ability of pDUMP to express lipoproteins from heterologous hosts, the surface lipoprotein PsaA from the Gram-positive organism Streptococcus pneumoniae and the outer membrane lipoproteins MlpA from the Gram-negative Pasteurella multocida and BlpA from the spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae were cloned into both hexahistidine fusion vectors and pDUMP. High level expression of antigenically active protein from both the hexahistidine fusion vectors and pDUMP resulted in abundant bands of the predicted molecular masses when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. When grown in the presence of 3[H]palmitic acid, proteins encoded by pDUMP were observed to incorporate palmitic acid whilst the hexahistidine fusion proteins did not. Using mass spectrometry and image analysis we determined the efficiency of lipidation between the three clones to vary from 31.7 to 100%. In addition, lipidated, but not hexahistidine, forms of the proteins were presented on the E. coli surface. PMID:12583997

  3. Lifestyle and Metformin Treatment Favorably Influence Lipoprotein Subfraction Distribution in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Temprosa, M.; Otvos, J.; Brunzell, J.; Marcovina, S.; Mather, K.; Arakaki, R.; Watson, K.; Horton, E.; Barrett-Connor, E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Although intensive lifestyle change (ILS) and metformin reduce diabetes incidence in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), their effects on lipoprotein subfractions have not been studied. Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize the effects of ILS and metformin vs placebo interventions on lipoprotein subfractions in the Diabetes Prevention Program. Design: This was a randomized clinical trial, testing the effects of ILS, metformin, and placebo on diabetes development in subjects with IGT. Participants: Selected individuals with IGT randomized in the Diabetes Prevention Program participated in the study. Interventions: Interventions included randomization to metformin 850 mg or placebo twice daily or ILS aimed at a 7% weight loss using a low-fat diet with increased physical activity. Main Outcome Measures: Lipoprotein subfraction size, density, and concentration measured by magnetic resonance and density gradient ultracentrifugation at baseline and 1 year were measured. Results: ILS decreased large and buoyant very low-density lipoprotein, small and dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and small high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and raised large HDL. Metformin modestly reduced small and dense LDL and raised small and large HDL. Change in insulin resistance largely accounted for the intervention-associated decreases in large very low-density lipoprotein, whereas changes in body mass index (BMI) and adiponectin were strongly associated with changes in LDL. Baseline and a change in adiponectin were related to change in large HDL, and BMI change associated with small HDL change. The effect of metformin to increase small HDL was independent of adiponectin, BMI, and insulin resistance. Conclusion: ILS and metformin treatment have favorable effects on lipoprotein subfractions that are primarily mediated by intervention-related changes in insulin resistance, BMI, and adiponectin. Interventions that slow the development of diabetes may also

  4. Cigarette smoking and serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations: an analysis of published data.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, W. Y.; Palomaki, G. E.; Haddow, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the association between cigarette smoking in adults and serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations the results of 54 published studies were analysed. Overall, smokers had significantly higher serum concentrations of cholesterol (3.0%), triglycerides (9.1%), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (10.4%), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (1.7%) and lower serum concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (-5.7%) and apolipoprotein AI (-4.2%) compared with nonsmokers. Among non-smokers and light, moderate, and heavy smokers a significant dose response effect was present for cholesterol (0, 1.8, 4.3, and 4.5% respectively), triglycerides (0, 10.7, 11.5, and 18.0%), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (0, 7.2, 44.4, and 39.0%), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (0, -1.1, 1.4, and 11.0%), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (0, -4.6, -6.3, and -8.9%), and apolipoprotein AI (0, -3.7 and -5.7% in non-smokers and light and heavy smokers). These dose response effects may provide new evidence for a causal relation between exposure to cigarette smoke and changes in serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations whether as a direct result of physiological changes or of dietary changes induced by smoking. Adequate prospective data to estimate the excess risk of coronary artery disease existed only for cholesterol concentration. When that information was combined with data from the present study, and given that smokers as a group face an average overall excess risk of coronary artery disease of 70%, it was estimated that the observed increased serum cholesterol concentration in smokers may account for at least 9% of that excess risk. Furthermore, the dose response effect of smoking on serum cholesterol concentration suggests a gradient of increased absolute risk of coronary artery disease between light and heavy smokers. PMID:2496857

  5. Robustness of two-step acid hydrolysis procedure for composition analysis of poplar.

    PubMed

    Bhagia, Samarthya; Nunez, Angelica; Wyman, Charles E; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-09-01

    The NREL standard procedure for lignocellulosic biomass composition has two steps: primary hydrolysis in 72% wt sulfuric acid at 30°C for 1h followed by secondary hydrolysis of the slurry in 4wt% acid at 121°C for 1h. Although pointed out in the NREL procedure, the impact of particle size on composition has never been shown. In addition, the effects of primary hydrolysis time and separation of solids prior to secondary hydrolysis on composition have never been shown. Using poplar, it was found that particle sizes less than 0.250mm significantly lowered the glucan content and increased the Klason lignin but did not affect xylan, acetate, or acid soluble lignin contents. Composition was unaffected for primary hydrolysis time between 30 and 90min. Moreover, separating solids prior to secondary hydrolysis had negligible effect on composition suggesting that lignin and polysaccharides are completely separated in the primary hydrolysis stage. PMID:27282557

  6. Hydrolysis of organosolv wheat pulp in formic acid at high temperature for glucose production.

    PubMed

    Kupiainen, Laura; Ahola, Juha; Tanskanen, Juha

    2012-07-01

    Organosolv methods can be used to delignify lignocellulosic crop residues for pulp production or to pretreat them prior to enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. In this study, organic solvent was used as an acidic hydrolysis catalyst to produce glucose. Hydrolysis experiments were carried out in 5-20% formic acid at 180-220 °C. Wheat straw pulp delignified with a formicodeli™ method was used as a raw material. It was found that glucose yields from pulp are significantly higher than yields from microcrystalline cellulose, a model component for cellulose hydrolysis. The results indicate that cellulose hydrolysis of real fibers takes place more selectively to glucose than hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose particles does. The effect of the particle size on pulp hydrolysis was investigated, the crystallinity of hydrolyzed pulp was measured by XRD analysis, and the product distribution and its influence on the process was discussed. PMID:22609651

  7. Gastric protein hydrolysis of raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Drechsler, Krista C; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, R Paul

    2016-11-15

    Gastric protein hydrolysis may influence gastric emptying rate and subsequent protein digestibility in the small intestine. This study examined the gastric hydrolysis of dietary protein from raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig as a model for the adult human. The gastric hydrolysis of almond proteins was quantified by performing tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent image analysis. There was an interaction between digestion time, stomach region, and almond type for gastric protein hydrolysis (p<0.05). Gastric emptying rate of protein was a significant (p<0.05) covariate in the gastric protein hydrolysis. In general, greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in raw almonds (compared to roasted almonds), hypothesized to be related to structural changes in almond proteins during roasting. Greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in the distal stomach (compared to the proximal stomach), likely related to the lower pH in the distal stomach. PMID:27283660

  8. Small-molecule inhibitors of gram-negative lipoprotein trafficking discovered by phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Sarah M; Fleming, Paul R; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E; Whiteaker, James D; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A

    2015-03-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25583975

  9. Enhanced delivery of lipophilic nutrients to the infant brain via high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Naberhuis, J K; Lai, C-S

    2015-11-01

    Lipoproteins are the primary carriers of lipophilic cognitive nutrients such as docosahexaenoic acid, lutein, and α-tocopherol within circulation. The critical roles these nutrients play in growth and development are well established, and as such, their efficient delivery to the infant brain is crucial. Given the selectivity of the blood brain barrier, the lipoprotein fraction primarily responsible for brain delivery of these nutrients must be determined so that efforts aimed at increasing brain nutrient uptake, via lipoprotein profile manipulation, can be appropriately focused. Based on the preclinical and clinical data reviewed here, we hypothesize that high density lipoprotein is the fraction chiefly responsible for delivery of docosahexaenoic acid, lutein, and α-tocopherol to the infant brain. As high density lipoprotein levels tend to be lower in preterm, formula-fed infants as compared to their full-term, breast-fed counterparts, efforts aimed at increasing circulating high density lipoprotein levels, and subsequent delivery of cognitive lipophilic nutrients to the brain via manipulation of formula composition, may be most effective if targeted to this group. These efforts include (1) limiting the polyunsaturated: saturated fatty acid ratio; (2) increasing the casein: whey ratio; (3) altering the proportion of saturated fatty acids found in the sn-2 position of the parent triglyceride; (4) cholesterol supplementation; and (5) nucleotide supplementation. PMID:26323246

  10. Lgt Processing Is an Essential Step in Streptococcus suis Lipoprotein Mediated Innate Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Rebel, Johanna M. J.; Smits, Mari A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Smith, Hilde E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis causes invasive infections in pigs and occasionally in humans. The host innate immune system plays a major role in counteracting S. suis infections. The main components of S. suis able to activate the innate immune system likely include cell wall constituents that may be released during growth or after cell wall integrity loss, however characterization of these components is still limited. Methology/Principal Findings A concentrated very potent innate immunity activating supernatant of penicillin-treated S. suis was SDS-PAGE fractionated and tested for porcine peripheral blood mononucleated cell (PBMC) stimulating activity using cytokine gene transcript analysis. More than half of the 24 tested fractions increased IL-1β and IL-8 cytokine gene transcript levels in porcine PBMCs. Mass spectrometry of the active fractions indicated 24 proteins including 9 lipoproteins. Genetic inactivation of a putative prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) gene resulted in deficient lipoprotein synthesis as evidenced by palmitate labeling. The Lgt mutant showed strongly reduced activation of porcine PBMCs, indicating that lipoproteins are dominant porcine PBMC activating molecules of S. suis. Conclusion/Significance This study for the first time identifies and characterizes lipoproteins of S. suis as major activators of the innate immune system of the pig. In addition, we provide evidence that Lgt processing of lipoproteins is required for lipoprotein mediated innate immune activation. PMID:21811583

  11. Efcts of chronic ethanol feeding on serum lipoprotein metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Baraona, E; Lieber, C S

    1970-04-01

    In rats, chronic ethanol feeding was found to enhance the postprandial hyperlipemia and to increase the incorporation of dietary palmitic acid-(3)H and intravenously injected L-lysine-(14)C into serum lipoproteins. The main increases of total amount, labeling, and specific activity of lipid and protein occurred in the d < 1.019 lipoprotein fraction. Fat absorption and the clearance of injected chylomicrons were not affected by ethanol feeding. Blocking of lipoprotein and chylomicron removal with Triton did not prevent the action of ethanol on serum lipids, indicating that the ethanol effect is not likely due to defective removal of lipids from the circulation. Ethanol enhanced the incorporation of chylomicron fatty acids into newly synthetized very low density lipoproteins, as shown by an increased reappearance of the fatty acid label into the lipids of this fraction after injection of palmitate-(14)C/glycerol-(3)H doubly labeled chylomicrons. These results indicate that alcoholic hyperlipemia is due, at least in part, to an increase in newly synthetized lipoproteins. The hyperlipemia produced by ethanol was accompanied by hepatic steatosis. The simultaneous production of fatty liver and hyperlipemia makes it unlikely that defective lipoprotein synthesis or secretion is a primary mechanism for the pathogenesis of the alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:5443177

  12. Apolipoprotein A-V interaction with members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Lookene, Aivar; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Gliemann, Jørgen; Ryan, Robert O; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2007-03-27

    Apolipoprotein A-V is a potent modulator of plasma triacylglycerol levels. To investigate the molecular basis for this phenomenon we explored the ability of apolipoprotein A-V, in most experiments complexed to disks of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, to interact with two members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and the mosaic type-1 receptor, SorLA. Experiments using surface plasmon resonance showed specific binding of both free and lipid-bound apolipoprotein A-V to both receptors. The binding was calcium dependent and was inhibited by the receptor associated protein, a known ligand for members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. Preincubation with heparin decreased the receptor binding of apolipoprotein A-V, indicating that overlap exists between the recognition sites for these receptors and for heparin. A double mutant, apolipoprotein A-V (Arg210Glu/Lys211Gln), showed decreased binding to heparin and decreased ability to bind the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Association of apolipoprotein A-V with the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein or SorLA resulted in enhanced binding of human chylomicrons to receptor-covered sensor chips. Our results indicate that apolipoprotein A-V may influence plasma lipid homeostasis by enhancing receptor-mediated endocytosis of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. PMID:17326667

  13. Analysis of Drug Interactions with Lipoproteins by High-Performance Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoproteins such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are known to interact with drugs and other solutes in blood. These interactions have been examined in the past by methods such as equilibrium dialysis and capillary electrophoresis. This chapter describes an alternative approach that has recently been developed for examining these interactions by using high-performance affinity chromatography. In this method, lipoproteins are covalently immobilized to a solid support and used within a column as a stationary phase for binding studies. This approach allows the same lipoprotein preparation to be used for a large number of binding studies, leading to precise estimates of binding parameters. This chapter will discuss how this technique can be applied to the identification of interaction models and be used to differentiate between systems that have interactions based on partitioning, adsorption or mixed-mode interactions. It is also shown how this approach can then be used for the measurement of binding parameters for HDL and LDL with drugs. Examples of these studies are provided, with particular attention being given to the use of frontal analysis to examine the interactions of R- and S-propranolol with HDL and LDL. The advantages and possible limitations of this method are described. The extension of this approach to other types of drug-lipoprotein interactions is also considered. PMID:25392741

  14. Receptor-mediated uptake of remnant lipoproteins by cholesterol-loaded human monocyte-macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lenten, B.J.; Fogelman, A.M.; Jackson, R.L.; Shapiro, S.; Haberland, M.E.; Edwards, P.A.

    1985-07-25

    Normal human monocyte-macrophages were cholesterol-loaded, and the rates of uptake and degradation of several lipoproteins were measured and compared to rates in control cells. Receptor activities for SVI-rabbit beta-very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL), SVI-human low density lipoprotein, and SVI-human chylomicrons were down-regulated in cholesterol-loaded cells; however, the rate of uptake and degradation of SVI-human chylomicron remnants was unchanged from control cells. Cholesterol-loaded alveolar macrophages from a Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit, which lack low density lipoprotein receptors, showed receptor down-regulation for SVI-beta-VLDL but not for SVI-human chylomicron remnants. In addition to chylomicron remnants, apo-E-phospholipid complexes competed for SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake, but apo-A-I-phospholipid complexes did not. Chylomicron remnants and beta-VLDL were equally effective in competing for SVI-beta-VLDL and SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake in cholesterol-loaded macrophages. The authors conclude: 1) specific lipoprotein receptor activity persists in cholesterol-loaded cells; 2) this receptor activity recognizes lipo-proteins (at least in part) by their apo-E content; and 3) cholesteryl ester accumulation can occur in monocyte-macrophages incubated with chylomicron remnants.

  15. Morphology and structure of lipoproteins revealed by an optimized negative-staining protocol of electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Song, James; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Ishida, Brian Y; Zhang, Shengli; Kane, John P; Weisgraber, Karl H; Oda, Michael N; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Pownall, Henry J; Ren, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein levels are predictors of risk for coronary artery disease. Lipoprotein structure-function relationships provide important clues that help identify the role of lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease. The compositional and conformational heterogeneity of lipoproteins are major barriers to the identification of their structures, as discovered using traditional approaches. Although electron microscopy (EM) is an alternative approach, conventional negative staining (NS) produces rouleau artifacts. In a previous study of apolipoprotein (apo)E4-containing reconstituted HDL (rHDL) particles, we optimized the NS method in a way that eliminated rouleaux. Here we report that phosphotungstic acid at high buffer salt concentrations plays a key role in rouleau formation. We also validate our protocol for analyzing the major plasma lipoprotein classes HDL, LDL, IDL, and VLDL, as well as homogeneously prepared apoA-I-containing rHDL. High-contrast EM images revealed morphology and detailed structures of lipoproteins, especially apoA-I-containing rHDL, that are amenable to three-dimensional reconstruction by single-particle analysis and electron tomography. PMID:20978167

  16. Plasma lipoprotein and apolipoprotein distribution as a function of density in the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed Central

    Babin, P J

    1987-01-01

    I have previously described [Babin (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 4290-4296] the apolipoprotein composition of the major classes of trout plasma lipoproteins. The present work describes the use of an isopycnic density gradient centrifugation procedure and sequential flotation ultracentrifugation to show: (1) the presence of intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) in the plasma, between 1.015 and 1.040 g/ml; (2) the existence of a single type of Mr 240,000 apoB-like in the low density lipoproteins (LDL, 1.040 less than p less than 1.085 g/ml); (3) the presence of apoA-I-like (Mr 25,000) in the densest LDL; (4) the adequacy of 1.085 g/ml as a cutoff between the LDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL); (5) the accumulation of Mr 55,000 and 76,000 apolipoproteins and apoA-like apolipoproteins in the 1.21 g/ml infranatant. The fractionation of trout lipoprotein spectrum thus furnishes the distribution of the different lipoprotein classes and leads to the description of the constituent apolipoproteins, which account for about 36% of circulating plasma proteins in this species. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3689318

  17. Characterization of metabolic interrelationships and in silico phenotyping of lipoprotein particles using self-organizing maps[S

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Linda S.; Mäkelä, Sanna M.; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Karjalainen, Anna; Liinamaa, Johanna M.; Kaski, Kimmo; Savolainen, Markku J.; Hannuksela, Minna L.; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2010-01-01

    Plasma lipid concentrations cannot properly account for the complex interactions prevailing in lipoprotein (patho)physiology. Sequential ultracentrifugation (UCF) is the gold standard for physical lipoprotein isolations allowing for subsequent analyses of the molecular composition of the particles. Due to labor and cost issues, however, the UCF-based isolations are usually done only for VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions; sometimes with the addition of intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) particles and the fractionation of HDL into HDL2 and HDL3 (as done here; n = 302). We demonstrate via these data, with the lipoprotein lipid concentration and composition information combined, that the self-organizing map (SOM) analysis reveals a novel data-driven in silico phenotyping of lipoprotein metabolism beyond the experimentally available classifications. The SOM-based findings are biologically consistent with several well-known metabolic characteristics and also explain some apparent contradictions. The novelty is the inherent emergence of complex lipoprotein associations; e.g., the metabolic subgrouping of the associations between plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations and the structural subtypes of LDL particles. Importantly, lipoprotein concentrations cannot pinpoint lipoprotein phenotypes. It would generally be beneficial to computationally enhance the UCF-based lipoprotein data as illustrated here. Particularly, the compositional variations within the lipoprotein particles appear to be a fundamental issue with metabolic and clinical corollaries. PMID:19734566

  18. Isolation and partial characterization of high-density lipoprotein HDL1 from rat plasma by gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Lusk, L T; Walker, L F; DuBien, L H; Getz, G S

    1979-01-01

    The lipoproteins isolated from rat plasma by flotation in the density range 1.019-1.063 g/ml were further characterized. Using rate zonal ultracentrifugation, we isolated two lipoproteins in almost equal proportions from this density range. Similar isolations may be accomplished with density gradients in a swinging-bucket rotor. On isopycnic-density-gradient ultracentrifugation one component banded at rho = 1.031 g/ml and the other at rho = 1.054 g/ml. More that 98% of the apoprotein of the lighter component was B protein, and hence this particle is LD (low-density) lipoprotein. Of the apoproteins of the rho = 1.054 g/ml particles, designated lipoprotein HDL1, over 60% was arginine-rich peptide, and the remainder was A-I, A-IV and C peptides. The molecular weight of these lipoproteins determined by agarose column chromatography was 2.36 x 10(6) for LD lipoprotein and 1.30 x 10(6) for lipoprotein HDL1. On electron microscopy the radius of LD lipoprotein was 14.0 nm and that of lipoprotein HDL1 was 10.0 nm, in contrast with molecular radii of 10.4 nm and 8.4 nm respectively determined from the gel-permeation-chromatography data. The lipid and phospholipid composition of both particles was determined. Lipoprotein HDL1 was notable for both the concentration of its esterified cholesterol, which was similar to that of LD lipoprotein, and the low triacylglycerol content, resembling that of HD lipoprotein. The possible origin of lipoprotein HDL1 is discussed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:230819

  19. A cellular automaton model of crystalline cellulose hydrolysis by cellulases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellulose from plant biomass is an abundant, renewable material which could be a major feedstock for low emissions transport fuels such as cellulosic ethanol. Cellulase enzymes that break down cellulose into fermentable sugars are composed of different types - cellobiohydrolases I and II, endoglucanase and β-glucosidase - with separate functions. They form a complex interacting network between themselves, soluble hydrolysis product molecules, solution and solid phase substrates and inhibitors. There have been many models proposed for enzymatic saccharification however none have yet employed a cellular automaton approach, which allows important phenomena, such as enzyme crowding on the surface of solid substrates, denaturation and substrate inhibition, to be considered in the model. Results The Cellulase 4D model was developed de novo taking into account the size and composition of the substrate and surface-acting enzymes were ascribed behaviors based on their movements, catalytic activities and rates, affinity for, and potential for crowding of, the cellulose surface, substrates and inhibitors, and denaturation rates. A basic case modeled on literature-derived parameters obtained from Trichoderma reesei cellulases resulted in cellulose hydrolysis curves that closely matched curves obtained from published experimental data. Scenarios were tested in the model, which included variation of enzyme loadings, adsorption strengths of surface acting enzymes and reaction periods, and the effect on saccharide production over time was assessed. The model simulations indicated an optimal enzyme loading of between 0.5 and 2 of the base case concentrations where a balance was obtained between enzyme crowding on the cellulose crystal, and that the affinities of enzymes for the cellulose surface had a large effect on cellulose hydrolysis. In addition, improvements to the cellobiohydrolase I activity period substantially improved overall glucose production. Conclusions

  20. Formation of hydroxyapatite by hydrolysis of alpha-tricalcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durucan, Caner

    Low-temperature cement-type formation of hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAp) has value in terms of developing synthetic compounds similar in compositions to those formed by natural mineralization of bone. Understanding the in vitro kinetics of formation of the synthetic composition could produce insights into developing hard tissue analogs. The kinetics and chemistry of cement-type formation of HAp by hydrolysis of particulate alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-Ca 3(PO4)2 or alpha-TCP) were examined. In particular, the effects of reaction temperature, synthesis route, inorganic salt additives and presence of biodegradable polymers (poly(alpha-hydroxyl acids) on the hydrolysis rate and microstructural/mechanical properties of HAp were determined using the following analytical techniques: isothermal calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscsopy (SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), solution chemistry, diametrical compression and 3-point bending tests. For the phase-pure alpha-TCP/water system the complete reaction times and morphologies of the resultant HAp were found to be strongly dependent on reaction temperature over a range of 37°C to 56°C. Isothermal calorimetry analyses revealed a thermally activated hydrolysis mechanism, leading to higher reaction rates with an increase in hydrolysis temperature. The microstructure of the resultant HAp typically had entangled, flake-like morphology, with HAp formed at 37°C having a smaller crystalline size than that formed at 45°C and 56°C. The cement hardening contributed to entanglement at the microstructural level. In all cases the hydrated product was phase pure calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite [Ca10-x(HPO4) x(PO4)6-x(OH)2-x], and no other intermediates or by-products were formed through the complete transformation. According to the proposed kinetic model, a two-step mechanism was found to control the overall hydrolysis reaction and thereby HAp formation at 37°C. During the first