Science.gov

Sample records for hydropower turbine system

  1. Development of environmentally advanced hydropower turbine system design concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, G.F.; Webb, D.R.; Fisher, R.K. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    A team worked together on the development of environmentally advanced hydro turbine design concepts to reduce hydropower`s impact on the environment, and to improve the understanding of the technical and environmental issues involved, in particular, with fish survival as a result of their passage through hydro power sites. This approach brought together a turbine design and manufacturing company, biologists, a utility, a consulting engineering firm and a university research facility, in order to benefit from the synergy of diverse disciplines. Through a combination of advanced technology and engineering analyses, innovative design concepts adaptable to both new and existing hydro facilities were developed and are presented. The project was divided into 4 tasks. Task 1 investigated a broad range of environmental issues and how the issues differed throughout the country. Task 2 addressed fish physiology and turbine physics. Task 3 investigated individual design elements needed for the refinement of the three concept families defined in Task 1. Advanced numerical tools for flow simulation in turbines are used to quantify characteristics of flow and pressure fields within turbine water passageways. The issues associated with dissolved oxygen enhancement using turbine aeration are presented. The state of the art and recent advancements of this technology are reviewed. Key elements for applying turbine aeration to improve aquatic habitat are discussed and a review of the procedures for testing of aerating turbines is presented. In Task 4, the results of the Tasks were assembled into three families of design concepts to address the most significant issues defined in Task 1. The results of the work conclude that significant improvements in fish passage survival are achievable.

  2. A progress report on DOE`s advanced hydropower turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, M.J.; Cada, G.F.; Rinehart, B.E.

    1997-06-01

    Recent hydropower research within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has focused on the development of new turbine designs that can produce hydroelectricity without such adverse environmental affects as fish entrainment/impingement or degradation of water quality. In partnership with the hydropower industry, DOE`s advanced turbine program issued a Request for Proposals for conceptual designs in October 1994. Two contracts were awarded for this initial program phase, work on which will be complete this year. A technical advisory committee with representatives from industry, regulatory agencies, and natural resource agencies was also formed to guide the DOE turbine research. The lack of quantitative biological performance criteria was identified by the committee as a critical knowledge gap. To fill this need, a new literature review was completed on the mechanisms of fish mortality during turbine passage (e.g., scrape/strike, shear, press change, etc.), ways that fish behavior affects their location and orientation in turbines, and how these turbine passage stresses can be measured. Thus year, new Laboratory tests will be conducted on fish response to shear, the least-well understood mechanism of stress. Additional testing of conceptual turbine designs depends on the level of federal funding for this program.

  3. Analysis of Pump-Turbine S Instability and Reverse Waterhammer Incidents in Hydropower Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pejovic, Dr. Stanislav; Zhang, Qin Fen; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Gajic, Prof. Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Hydraulic systems continually experience dynamic transients or oscillations which threaten the hydroelectric plant from extreme water hammer pressures or resonance. In particular, the minimum pressure variations downstream of the turbine runner during the load rejection or other events may cause dangerous water column separation and subsequent rejoinder. Water column separation can be easily observed from the measurements of site transient tests, and has indeed caused serious historical damages to the machine and water conveyance system. Several technical issues regarding water column separation in draft tubes, including S instability of turbine characteristic curves, numerical instability and uncertainty of computer programs, are discussed here through case studies and available model and site test data. Catastrophic accidents experienced at a Kaplan turbine and in a long tailrace tunnel project, as well as other troubles detected in a more timely fashion, are revisited in order to demonstrate the severity of reverse water hammer. However, as there is no simple design solutions for such complex systems, this paper emphasizes that the design of hydraulic systems is always difficult, difficulties that are compounded when the phenomena in question are non-linear (water hammer), dynamic (involving wave interaction and complex devices of turbines, controls, and electrical systems), and non-monotonic (severity of response is seldom simply connected to severity of load as with vibrations and resonance, and the complexity of transient loads), and thus may lead to high economic and safety challenges and consequences.

  4. "Fish Friendly" Hydropower Turbine Development and Deployment. Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of a collaborative research project funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and hydropower industry partners with the objective of completing the remaining developmental engineering required for a “fish-friendly” hydropower turbine called the Alden turbine.

  5. Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-01-04

    In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

  6. Fish behavior in relation to modeling fish passage through hydropower turbines: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.; Whitney, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    We evaluated the literature on fish behavior as it relates to passage of fish near or through hydropower turbines. The goal was to foster compatibility of engineered systems with the normal behavior patterns of fish species and life stages such that entrainment into turbines and injury in passage are minimized. We focused on aspects of fish behavior that could be used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of fish trajectories through turbine systems. Downstream-migrating salmon smolts are generally surface oriented and follow flow. Smolts orient to the ceilings of turbine intakes but are horizontally distributed more evenly, except as affected by intake-specific turbulence and vortices. Smolts often enter intakes oriented head-upstream. Non-salmonids are entrained episodically, suggesting accidental capture of schools (often of juveniles or in cold water) and little behavioral control during turbine passage. Models of fish trajectories should not assume neutral buoyancy throughout the time a fish passes through a turbine, largely because of pressure effects on swim bladders. Fish use their lateral line system to sense obstacles and change their orientation, but this sensory-response system may not be effective in the rapid passage times of turbine systems. A Effects of pre-existing stress levels on fish performance in turbine passage are not well known but may be important. There are practical limits of observation and measurement of fish and flows in the proximity of turbine runners that may inhibit development of information germane to developing a more fish-friendly turbine. We provide recommendations for CFD modelers of fish passage and for additional research. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  7. EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally- Enhanced Hydropower Turbines: Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    The EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally-Enhanced Hydropower Turbines was a component of a larger project. The goal of the overall project was to conduct the final developmental engineering required to advance the commercialization of the Alden turbine. As part of this effort, the conference provided a venue to disseminate information on the status of the Alden turbine technology as well as the status of other advanced turbines and research on environmentally-friendly hydropower turbines. The conference was also a product of a federal Memorandum of Understanding among DOE, USBR, and USACE to share technical information on hydropower. The conference was held in Washington, DC on May 19 and 20, 2011 and welcomed over 100 attendees. The Conference Organizing Committee included the federal agencies with a vested interest in hydropower in the U.S. The Committee collaboratively assembled this conference, including topics from each facet of the environmentally-friendly conventional hydropower research community. The conference was successful in illustrating the readiness of environmentally-enhanced hydropower technologies. Furthermore, the topics presented illustrated the need for additional deployment and field testing of these technologies in an effort to promote the growth of environmentally sustainable hydropower in the U.S. and around the world

  8. Hydropower R&D: Recent advances in turbine passage technology

    SciTech Connect

    ?ada, Glenn F.; Rinehart, Ben N.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the recent and planned R&D activities across the U.S. related to survival of fish entrained in hydroelectric turbines. In this report, we have considered studies that are intended to develop new information that can be used to mitigate turbine-passage mortality. This review focuses on the effects on fish of physical or operational modifications to turbines, comparisons to survival in other downstream passage routes (e.g., bypass systems and spillways), and applications of new modeling, experimental, and technological approaches to develop a greater understanding of the stresses associated with turbine passage. In addition, the emphasis is on biological studies, as opposed to the engineering studies (e.g., turbine index testing) that are often carried out in support of fish passage mitigation efforts.

  9. Hydropower R&D: Recent Advances in Turbine Passage Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Bennie Nelson; Cada, G. F.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the recent and planned R&D activities across the U.S. related to survival of fish entrained in hydroelectric turbines. In this report, we have considered studies that are intended to develop new information that can be used to mitigate turbine-passage mortality. This review focuses on the effects on fish of physical or operational modifications to turbines, comparisons to survival in other downstream passage routes (e.g., bypass systems and spillways), and applications of new modeling, experimental, and technological approaches to develop a greater understanding of the stresses associated with turbine passage. In addition, the emphasis is on biological studies, as opposed to the engineering studies (e.g., turbine index testing) that re often carried out in support of fish passage mitigation efforts.

  10. Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization

    E-print Network

    Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization and flow characterization within full scale conventional hydropower systems, at marine and hydrokinetic. These measurements are critical for turbine inflow characterization, hydrokinetic energy resource assessment, turbine

  11. Development of biological criteria for the design of advanced hydropower turbines

    SciTech Connect

    ?ada, Glenn F.; Coutant, Charles C.; Whitney, Richard R.

    1997-03-01

    A review of the literature related to turbine-passage injury mechanisms suggests the following biological criteria should be considered in the design of new turbines: (1) pressure; (2) cavitation; (3) shear and turbulence; and (4) mechanical injury. Based on the study’s review of fish behavior in relation to hydropower facilities, it provides a number of recommendations to guide both turbine design and additional research.

  12. Research on Darrieus-type hydraulic turbine for extra-low head hydropower utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, A.; Watanabe, S.; Okuma, K.

    2012-11-01

    A Darrieus-type turbine has been investigated for extra-low head hydropower utilization. In the present paper, authors'research on Darrieus-type hydraulic turbine is briefly reviewed. The working principle of Darrieus turbine is explained with advantage of its simple structure, at first. Then the fluid-dynamic difference between rotating and linear motions of a blade in a uniform flow is clarified with guiding principle of high performance design of Darrieus turbine. Cavitation problem is also described. Next, effects of duct-casing, consisting of an intake, runner section and draft tube, are discussed and a simplified structure of Darrieus turbine is shown by installing the inlet nozzle. Finally, in the practical use, an adjustment of inlet nozzle section by lowering the inlet nozzle height is proposed when flow rate is varied temporally and seasonally.

  13. Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2011-10-01

    The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges expected for conventional radial flow machines. Based on these measurements, the expected efficiency peak for prototype application is 93.64%. These data were used in the final sizing of the supporting mechanical and balance of plant equipment. The preliminary equipment cost for the design specification is $1450/kW with a total supply schedule of 28 months. This equipment supply includes turbine, generator, unit controls, limited balance of plant equipment, field installation, and commissioning. Based on the selected head and flow design conditions, fish passage survival through the final turbine is estimated to be approximately 98% for 7.9-inch (200-mm) fish, and the predicted survival reaches 100% for fish 3.9 inches (100 mm) and less in length. Note that fish up to 7.9- inches (200 mm) in length make up more than 90% of fish entrained at hydro projects in the United States. Completion of these efforts provides a mechanical and electrical design that can be readily adapted to site-specific conditions with additional engineering development comparable to costs associated with conventional turbine designs.

  14. Harnessing Hydropower: The Earth's Natural Resource

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    This document is a layman's overview of hydroelectric power. It includes information on: History of Hydropower; Nature’s Water Cycle; Hydropower Plants; Turbines and Generators; Transmission Systems; power dispatching centers; and Substations. It goes on to discuss The Power Grid, Hydropower in the 21st Century; Energy and the Environment; and how hydropower is useful for Meeting Peak Demands. It briefly addresses how Western Area Power Administration is Responding to Environmental Concerns.

  15. Analysis of information systems for hydropower operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, R. L.; Becker, L.; Estes, J.; Simonett, D.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    1976-01-01

    The operations of hydropower systems were analyzed with emphasis on water resource management, to determine how aerospace derived information system technologies can increase energy output. Better utilization of water resources was sought through improved reservoir inflow forecasting based on use of hydrometeorologic information systems with new or improved sensors, satellite data relay systems, and use of advanced scheduling techniques for water release. Specific mechanisms for increased energy output were determined, principally the use of more timely and accurate short term (0-7 days) inflow information to reduce spillage caused by unanticipated dynamic high inflow events. The hydrometeorologic models used in predicting inflows were examined to determine the sensitivity of inflow prediction accuracy to the many variables employed in the models, and the results used to establish information system requirements. Sensor and data handling system capabilities were reviewed and compared to the requirements, and an improved information system concept outlined.

  16. Algorithms for optimizing hydropower system operation

    SciTech Connect

    Grygier, J.C.; Stedinger, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Successive liner programming, an optimal control algorithm, and a combination of linear programming and dynamic programming (LP-DP) are employed to optimize the operation of multireservoir hydrosystems given a deterministic inflow forecast. The algorithm maximize the value of energy produced at on-peak rates, plus the estimated value of water remaining in storage at the end of the 12-month planning period. The LP-DP algorithm is clearly dominated: it takes longer to find a solution and produces significantly less hydropower than the other two procedures. Successive linear programming (SLP) appears to find the global maximum and is easily implemented. For simple systems the optimal control algorithm finds the optimum in about one fifth the time required by SLP but is harder to implement. Computing costs for a two-reservoir, 12-month deterministic problem averaged about seven cents per run using optimal control and 37 cents using successive linear programming.

  17. Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and Climate Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinheimer, David Emmanuel

    Hydropower systems and other river regulation often harm instream ecosystems, partly by altering the natural flow and temperature regimes that ecosystems have historically depended on. These effects are compounded at regional scales. As hydropower and ecosystems are increasingly valued globally due to growing values for clean energy and native species as well as and new threats from climate warming, it is important to understand how climate warming might affect these systems, to identify tradeoffs between different water uses for different climate conditions, and to identify promising water management solutions. This research uses traditional simulation and optimization to explore these issues in California's upper west slope Sierra Nevada mountains. The Sierra Nevada provides most of the water for California's vast water supply system, supporting high-elevation hydropower generation, ecosystems, recreation, and some local municipal and agricultural water supply along the way. However, regional climate warming is expected to reduce snowmelt and shift runoff to earlier in the year, affecting all water uses. This dissertation begins by reviewing important literature related to the broader motivations of this study, including river regulation, freshwater conservation, and climate change. It then describes three substantial studies. First, a weekly time step water resources management model spanning the Feather River watershed in the north to the Kern River watershed in the south is developed. The model, which uses the Water Evaluation And Planning System (WEAP), includes reservoirs, run-of-river hydropower, variable head hydropower, water supply demand, and instream flow requirements. The model is applied with a runoff dataset that considers regional air temperature increases of 0, 2, 4 and 6 °C to represent historical, near-term, mid-term and far-term (end-of-century) warming. Most major hydropower turbine flows are simulated well. Reservoir storage is also generally well simulated, mostly limited by the accuracy of inflow hydrology. System-wide hydropower generation is reduced by 9% with 6 °C warming. Most reductions in hydropower generation occur in the highly productive watersheds in the northern Sierra Nevada. The central Sierra Nevada sees less reduction in annual runoff and can adapt better to changes in runoff timing. Generation in southern watersheds is expected to decrease. System-wide, reservoirs adapt to capture earlier runoff, but mostly decrease in mean reservoir storage with warming due to decreasing annual runoff. Second, a multi-reservoir optimization model is developed using linear programming that considers the minimum instream flows (MIFs) and weekly down ramp rates (DRRs) in the Upper Yuba River in the northern Sierra Nevada. Weekly DRR constraints are used to mimic spring snowmelt flows, which are particularly important for downstream ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada but are currently missing due to the influence of dams. Trade-offs between MIFs, DRRs and hydropower are explored with air temperature warming (+0, 2, 4 and 6 °C). Under base case operations, mean annual hydropower generation increases slightly with 2 °C warming and decreases slightly with 6 °C warming. With 6 °C warming, the most ecologically beneficial MIF and DRR reduce hydropower generation 5.5% compared to base case operations and a historical climate, which has important implications for re-licensing the hydropower project. Finally, reservoir management for downstream temperatures is explored using a linear programming model to optimally release water from a reservoir using selective withdrawal. The objective function is to minimize deviations from desired downstream temperatures, which are specified to mimic the natural temperature regime in the river. One objective of this study was to develop a method that can be readily integrated into a basin-scale multi-reservoir optimization model using a network representation of system features. The second objective was to explore the potential use of reservoirs to maintain an ideal str

  18. Development of a more fish-tolerant turbine runner, advanced hydropower turbine project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E.; Faulkner, H.B.; Jansen, W.

    1997-02-01

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. (ARL) and Northern Research and Engineering Corporation (NREC) conducted a research program to develop a turbine runner which will minimize fish injury and mortality at hydroelectric projects. ARL?NREC have developed a runner shape which minimizes the number of blade leading edges, reduces the pressure versus time and the velocity versus distance gradients within the runner, minimizes or eliminates the clearance between the runner and runner housing, and maximizes the size of the flow passages, all with minimal penalty on turbine efficiency. An existing pump impeller provided the starting point for developing the fish tolerant turbine runner. The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Conceptual design of the new runner began with a re-evaluation of studies which have been previously conducted to identify probable sources of injury to fish passing through hydraulic turbines. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. 86 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Development of a more fish tolerant turbine runner advanced hydropower turbine project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E.; Faulkner, H.B.; Jansen, W.

    1997-01-01

    The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. Flow characteristics of the new runner were analyzed using two- dimensional and three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models. The basic runner geometry was initially selected using the two-dimensional model. The three-dimensional model was used to investigate the flow characteristics in detail through the entire runner and to refine the design by eliminating potential problem areas at the leading and trailing edges. Results of the analyses indicated that the runner has characteristics which should provide safe fish passage with an overall power efficiency of approximately 90%. The size of the new runner, which is larger than conventional turbine runners with the same design flow and head, will provide engineering, fabrication, and installation.challenges related to the turbine components and the civil works. A small reduction in the overall efficiency would reduce the size of the runner considerably, would simplify the turbine manufacturing operations, and would allow installation of the new turbine at more hydroelectric sites.

  20. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  1. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

  2. Assessing the cumulative environmental impact of hydropower construction on river systems based on energy network model

    E-print Network

    Fath, Brian D.

    2014 Keywords: Hydropower construction Sustainable energy development Environmental impact assessment Energy network model a b s t r a c t Hydropower is the major renewable energy source for many nationsAssessing the cumulative environmental impact of hydropower construction on river systems based

  3. Gas turbine premixing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Evulet, Andrei Tristan; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2013-12-31

    Methods and systems are provided for premixing combustion fuel and air within gas turbines. In one embodiment, a combustor includes an upstream mixing panel configured to direct compressed air and combustion fuel through premixing zone to form a fuel-air mixture. The combustor includes a downstream mixing panel configured to mix additional combustion fuel with the fule-air mixture to form a combustion mixture.

  4. Gas turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  5. Fish Passage though Hydropower Turbines: Simulating Blade Strike using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2014-12-08

    mong the hazardous hydraulic conditions affecting anadromous and resident fish during their passage though turbine flows, two are believed to cause considerable injury and mortality: collision on moving blades and decompression. Several methods are currently available to evaluate these stressors in installed turbines, i.e. using live fish or autonomous sensor devices, and in reduced-scale physical models, i.e. registering collisions from plastic beads. However, a priori estimates with computational modeling approaches applied early in the process of turbine design can facilitate the development of fish-friendly turbines. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency of blade strike and nadir pressure environment by modeling potential fish trajectories with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) applied to fish-like composite particles. In the DEM approach, particles are subjected to realistic hydraulic conditions simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and particle-structure interactions—representing fish collisions with turbine blades—are explicitly recorded and accounted for in the calculation of particle trajectories. We conducted transient CFD simulations by setting the runner in motion and allowing for better turbulence resolution, a modeling improvement over the conventional practice of simulating the system in steady state which was also done here. While both schemes yielded comparable bulk hydraulic performance, transient conditions exhibited a visual improvement in describing flow variability. We released streamtraces (steady flow solution) and DEM particles (transient solution) at the same location from where sensor fish (SF) have been released in field studies of the modeled turbine unit. The streamtrace-based results showed a better agreement with SF data than the DEM-based nadir pressures did because the former accounted for the turbulent dispersion at the intake but the latter did not. However, the DEM-based strike frequency is more representative of blade-strike probability than the steady solution is, mainly because DEM particles accounted for the full fish length, thus resolving (instead of modeling) the collision event.

  6. Effects of turbine's selection on hydraulic transients in the long pressurized water conveyance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. X.; Hu, M.; Cai, F. L.; Huang, X. T.

    2014-03-01

    For a hydropower station with longer water conveyance system, an optimum turbine's selection will be beneficial to its reliable and stable operation. Different optional turbines will result in possible differences of the hydraulic characteristics in the hydromechanical system, and have different effects on the hydraulic transients' analysis and control. Therefore, the premise for turbine's selection is to fully understand the properties of the optional turbines and their effects on the hydraulic transients. After a brief introduction of the simulation models for hydraulic transients' computation and stability analysis, the effects of hydraulic turbine's characteristics at different operating points on the hydro-mechanical system's free vibration analysis were theoretically investigated with the hydraulic impedance analysis of the hydraulic turbine. For a hydropower station with long water conveyance system, based on the detailed hydraulic transients' computation respectively for two different optional turbines, the effects of the turbine's selection on hydraulic transients were analyzed. Furthermore, considering different operating conditions for each turbine and the similar operating conditions for these two turbines, free vibration analysis was comprehensively carried out to reveal the effects of turbine's impedance on system's vibration characteristics. The results indicate that, respectively with two different turbines, most of the controlling parameters under the worst cases have marginal difference, and few shows obvious differences; the turbine's impedances under different operating conditions have less effect on the natural angular frequencies; different turbine's characteristics and different operating points have obvious effects on system's vibration stability; for the similar operating conditions of these two turbines, system's vibration characteristics are basically consistent with each other.

  7. Fish passage through hydropower turbines: Simulating blade strike using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, M. C.; Romero-Gomez, P.

    2014-03-01

    Among the hazardous hydraulic conditions affecting anadromous and resident fish during their passage though hydro-turbines two common physical processes can lead to injury and mortality: collisions/blade-strike and rapid decompression. Several methods are currently available to evaluate these stressors in installed turbines, e.g. using live fish or autonomous sensor devices, and in reduced-scale physical models, e.g. registering collisions from plastic beads. However, a priori estimates with computational modeling approaches applied early in the process of turbine design can facilitate the development of fish-friendly turbines. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency of blade strike and rapid pressure change by modeling potential fish trajectories with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) applied to fish-like composite particles. In the DEM approach, particles are subjected to realistic hydraulic conditions simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and particle-structure interactions-representing fish collisions with turbine components such as blades-are explicitly recorded and accounted for in the calculation of particle trajectories. We conducted transient CFD simulations by setting the runner in motion and allowing for unsteady turbulence using detached eddy simulation (DES), as compared to the conventional practice of simulating the system in steady state (which was also done here for comparison). While both schemes yielded comparable bulk hydraulic performance values, transient conditions exhibited an improvement in describing flow temporal and spatial variability. We released streamtraces (in the steady flow solution) and DEM particles (transient solution) at the same locations where sensor fish (SF) were released in previous field studies of the advanced turbine unit. The streamtrace- based results showed a better agreement with SF data than the DEM-based nadir pressures did because the former accounted for the turbulent dispersion at the intake using an empirical method, but the unsteady simulation underestimated turbulence in the intake. However, the DEM-based strike frequency is more representative of blade-strike probability as compared to the steady solution, mainly because DEM particles accounted for the full fish length and width, thus resolving (instead of modeling) the collision event. Although further development and testing is needed, the DEM method shows promise as another tool in the engineering design process to develop turbines that can achieve fish-friendly hydraulic conditions.

  8. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Garold L. Sommers; R. T. Hunt

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research on advanced hydropower technology through its hydropower program, which is organized under the Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This annual report describes the various projects supported by the hydropower program in FY 2002. The program=s current focus is on improving the environmental performance of hydropower projects by addressing problems such as fish mortality during passage through turbines, alteration of instream habitat, and water quality in tailwaters. A primary goal of this research is to develop new, environmentally friendly technology. DOE-funded projects have produced new conceptual designs for turbine systems, and these are now being tested in pilot-scale laboratory tests and in the field. New design approaches range from totally new turbine runners to modifications of existing designs. Biological design criteria for these new turbines have also been developed in controlled laboratory tests of fish response to physical stresses, such as hydraulic shear and pressure changes. These biocriteria are being combined with computational tools to locate and eliminate areas inside turbine systems that are damaging to fish. Through the combination of laboratory, field, and computational studies, new solutions are being found to environmental problems at hydropower projects. The diverse program activities continue to make unique contributions to clean energy production in the U.S. By working toward technology improvements that can reduce environmental problems, the program is helping to reposition hydropower as an acceptable, renewable, domestic energy choice.

  9. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  10. Gas turbine diagnostic system

    E-print Network

    Talgat, Shuvatov

    2011-01-01

    In the given article the methods of parametric diagnostics of gas turbine based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The diagnostic map of interconnection between some parts of turbine and changes of corresponding parameters has been developed. Also we have created model to define the efficiency of the compressor using fuzzy logic algorithms.

  11. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

  12. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

  13. Analysis of information systems for hydropower operations: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, R. L.; Becker, L.; Estes, J.; Simonett, D.; Yeh, W.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis was performed of the operations of hydropower systems, with emphasis on water resource management, to determine how aerospace derived information system technologies can effectively increase energy output. Better utilization of water resources was sought through improved reservoir inflow forecasting based on use of hydrometeorologic information systems with new or improved sensors, satellite data relay systems, and use of advanced scheduling techniques for water release. Specific mechanisms for increased energy output were determined, principally the use of more timely and accurate short term (0-7 days) inflow information to reduce spillage caused by unanticipated dynamic high inflow events. The hydrometeorologic models used in predicting inflows were examined in detail to determine the sensitivity of inflow prediction accuracy to the many variables employed in the models, and the results were used to establish information system requirements. Sensor and data handling system capabilities were reviewed and compared to the requirements, and an improved information system concept was outlined.

  14. Study on the stability of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W. C.; Yang, J. D.; Chen, J. P.; Teng, Y.

    2014-03-01

    According to the fact that the effects of penstock, unit and governor on stability of water level fluctuation for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber are neglected in previous researches, in this paper, Thoma assumption is broken through, the complete mathematical model of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber is established, and the comprehensive transfer function and linear homogeneous differential equation that characterize the dynamic characteristics of system are derived. The stability domain that characterizes the good or bad of stability quantitatively is drawn by using the stability conditions. The effects of the fluid inertia in water diversion system, the air cushion surge chamber parameters, hydraulic turbine characteristics, generator characteristics, and regulation modes of governor on the stability of waterpower-speed control system are analyzed through stability domain. The main conclusions are as follows: The fluid inertia in water diversion system and hydraulic turbine characteristics have unfavorable effects on the system while generator characteristics have favorable effect. The stability keeps getting better with the increase of chamber height and basal area and the decrease of air pressure and air polytropic exponent. The stability of power regulation mode is obviously better than that of frequency regulation mode.

  15. EMTA’s Evaluation of the Elastic Properties for Fiber Polymer Composites Potentially Used in Hydropower Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Paquette, Joshua

    2010-08-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites can offer important advantages over metals where lightweight, cost-effective manufacturing and high mechanical performance can be achieved. To date, these materials have not been used in hydropower systems. In view of the possibility to tailor their mechanical properties to specific applications, they now have become a subject of research for potential use in hydropower systems. The first step in any structural design that uses composite materials consists of evaluating the basic composite mechanical properties as a function of the as-formed composite microstructure. These basic properties are the elastic stiffness, stress-strain response, and strength. This report describes the evaluation of the elastic stiffness for a series of common discontinuous fiber polymer composites processed by injection molding and compression molding in order to preliminarily estimate whether these composites could be used in hydropower systems for load-carrying components such as turbine blades. To this end, the EMTA (Copyright © Battelle 2010) predictive modeling tool developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been applied to predict the elastic properties of these composites as a function of three key microstructural parameters: fiber volume fraction, fiber orientation distribution, and fiber length distribution. These parameters strongly control the composite mechanical performance and can be tailored to achieve property enhancement. EMTA uses the standard and enhanced Mori-Tanaka type models combined with the Eshelby equivalent inclusion method to predict the thermoelastic properties of the composite based on its microstructure.

  16. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

  17. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-10-24

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

  18. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Sy Ali

    2002-03-01

    The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these technologies and the corresponding early adopters are likely to be located.

  19. Transient simulation of hydropower station with consideration of three-dimensional unsteady flow in turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. D.; Fan, H. G.; Chen, N. X.

    2012-11-01

    To study the interaction between the transient flow in pipe and the unsteady turbulent flow in turbine, a coupled model of the transient flow in the pipe and three-dimensional unsteady flow in the turbine is developed based on the method of characteristics and the fluid governing equation in the accelerated rotational relative coordinate. The load-rejection process under the closing of guide vanes of the hydraulic power plant is simulated by the coupled method, the traditional transient simulation method and traditional three-dimensional unsteady flow calculation method respectively and the results are compared. The pressure, unit flux and rotation speed calculated by three methods show a similar change trend. However, because the elastic water hammer in the pipe and the pressure fluctuation in the turbine have been considered in the coupled method, the increase of pressure at spiral inlet is higher and the pressure fluctuation in turbine is stronger.

  20. Power turbine ventilation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor); Brown, Richard W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Air control mechanism within a power turbine section of a gas turbine engine. The power turbine section includes a rotor and at least one variable pitch propulsor blade. The propulsor blade is coupled to and extends radially outwardly of the rotor. A first annular fairing is rotatable with the propulsor blade and interposed between the propulsor blade and the rotor. A second fairing is located longitudinally adjacent to the first fairing. The first fairing and the second fairing are differentially rotatable. The air control mechanism includes a platform fixedly coupled to a radially inner end of the propulsor blade. The platform is generally positioned in a first opening and a first fairing. The platform and the first fairing define an outer space. In a first position corresponding with a first propulsor blade pitch, the platform is substantially conformal with the first fairing. In a second position corresponding with the second propulsor blade pitch, an edge portion of the platform is displaced radially outwardly from the first fairing. When the blades are in the second position and rotating about the engine axis, the displacement of the edge portion with respect to the first fairing allows air to flow from the outer space to the annular cavity.

  1. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  2. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-01-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGRSR) program are described in the quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education) and Research. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  3. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  4. Advanced Turbine Systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1993-11-01

    Allison draws the following preliminary conclusions from this preliminary design effort: (1) All cycles investigated require a high temperature turbine capability to be developed under ATS. (2) The HAT and intercooled chemical recuperation cycles compete in only a narrow sector of the industrial engine market. This is the result of the complexity and water usage of the HAT cycle and the limitation of the chemical recuperation cycle to applications where natural gas is readily available. (3) From a cycle point of view, the ICR and chemical recuperation cycles are similar. Both optimize at fairly low compressor pressure ratios ({approximately}15) because both want high temperature in the exhaust to optimize the recuperation process. Excess steam production with the chemical recuperation process makes it somewhat doubtful that the two recuperation processes are interchangeable from a hardware point of view. Allison intends to perform a global optimization on this cycle during Phase 2 of ATS. (4). There appears to be no substitute for the simple cycle with steam generation in the cogen-steam market since steam is, by definition, a valuable product of the cycle.

  5. Optimization algorithms for large-scale multireservoir hydropower systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hiew, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Five optimization algorithms were vigorously evaluated based on applications on a hypothetical five-reservoir hydropower system. These algorithms are incremental dynamic programming (IDP), successive linear programing (SLP), feasible direction method (FDM), optimal control theory (OCT) and objective-space dynamic programming (OSDP). The performance of these algorithms were comparatively evaluated using unbiased, objective criteria which include accuracy of results, rate of convergence, smoothness of resulting storage and release trajectories, computer time and memory requirements, robustness and other pertinent secondary considerations. Results have shown that all the algorithms, with the exception of OSDP converge to optimum objective values within 1.0% difference from one another. The highest objective value is obtained by IDP, followed closely by OCT. Computer time required by these algorithms, however, differ by more than two orders of magnitude, ranging from 10 seconds in the case of OCT to a maximum of about 2000 seconds for IDP. With a well-designed penalty scheme to deal with state-space constraints, OCT proves to be the most-efficient algorithm based on its overall performance. SLP, FDM, and OCT were applied to the case study of Mahaweli project, a ten-powerplant system in Sri Lanka.

  6. Gas turbine vane cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.G.; McQuiggan, G.G.

    1995-03-07

    A cooling system for stationary vanes in the turbine section of a gas turbine is described. Combustors for the turbine are disposed in a chamber that receives compressed air from a compressor section. This compressed air forms both combustion air and cooling air. The cooling air portion of the compressed air is recirculated through the vanes by bleeding it from the chamber and further pressurizing it, after which it flows through a cooling air flow path in the vanes, thereby resulting in the cooling of the vanes and the heating of the air. The heated air is then returned to the chamber where it mixes with the incoming combustion air, thereby giving up a portion of the heat transferred from the vane to the combustion air. As a result, the temperature of the combustion air is increased, thereby increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of the gas turbine. The cooling scheme provides cooling to the vane inner and outer shrouds, as well as the airfoil, by means of circumferentially extending holes in the shrouds that connect with a cooling air cavity in the airfoil. 5 figs.

  7. Gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idelchik, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system and method of controlling a gas turbine engine. The control system receives an error signal and processes the error signal to form a primary fuel control signal. The control system also receives at least one anticipatory demand signal and processes the signal to form an anticipatory fuel control signal. The control system adjusts the value of the anticipatory fuel control signal based on the value of the error signal to form an adjusted anticipatory signal and then the adjusted anticipatory fuel control signal and the primary fuel control signal are combined to form a fuel command signal.

  8. Magnus air turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Thomas F. (24204 Heritage La., Newhall, CA 91321)

    1982-01-01

    A Magnus effect windmill for generating electrical power is disclosed. A large nacelle-hub mounted pivotally (in Azimuth) atop a support tower carries, in the example disclosed, three elongated barrels arranged in a vertical plane and extending symmetrically radially outwardly from the nacelle. The system provides spin energy to the barrels by internal mechanical coupling in the proper sense to cause, in reaction to an incident wind, a rotational torque of a predetermined sense on the hub. The rotating hub carries a set of power take-off rollers which ride on a stationary circular track in the nacelle. Shafts carry the power, given to the rollers by the wind driven hub, to a central collector or accumulator gear assembly whose output is divided to drive the spin mechanism for the Magnus barrels and the main electric generator. A planetary gear assembly is interposed between the collector gears and the spin mechanism functioning as a differential which is also connected to an auxiliary electric motor whereby power to the spin mechanism may selectively be provided by the motor. Generally, the motor provides initial spin to the barrels for start-up after which the motor is braked and the spin mechanism is driven as though by a fixed ratio coupling from the rotor hub. During high wind or other unusual conditions, the auxiliary motor may be unbraked and excess spin power may be used to operate the motor as a generator of additional electrical output. Interposed between the collector gears of the rotating hub and the main electric generator is a novel variable speed drive-fly wheel system which is driven by the variable speed of the wind driven rotor and which, in turn, drives the main electric generator at constant angular speed. Reference is made to the complete specification for disclosure of other novel aspects of the system such as, for example, the aerodynamic and structural aspects of the novel Magnus barrels as well as novel gearing and other power coupling combination apparatus of the invention. A reading of the complete specification is recommended for a full understanding of the principles and features of the disclosed system.

  9. Hydropower research and development

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report is a compilation of information on hydropower research and development (R and D) activities of the Federal government and hydropower industry. The report includes descriptions of on-going and planned R and D activities, 1996 funding, and anticipated future funding. Summary information on R and D projects and funding is classified into eight categories: fish passage, behavior, and response; turbine-related; monitoring tool development; hydrology; water quality; dam safety; operations and maintenance; and water resources management. Several issues in hydropower R and D are briefly discussed: duplication; priorities; coordination; technical/peer review; and technology transfer/commercialization. Project information sheets from contributors are included as an appendix.

  10. Water turbine system and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2010-06-15

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  11. Water turbine system and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Costin, Daniel P. (Montpelier, VT)

    2009-02-10

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  12. Water turbine system and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Costin, Daniel P. (Montpelier, VT)

    2011-05-10

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  13. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section...Powerplant Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the following...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section...Powerplant Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the following...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section...Powerplant Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the following...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section...Powerplant Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the following...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section...Powerplant Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the following...

  18. Neuro-fuzzy controller of low head hydropower plants using adaptive-network based fuzzy inference system

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, M.B.; Calovic, M.S.; Vesovic, B.V.; Sobajic, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an attempt of nonlinear, multivariable control of low-head hydropower plants, by using adaptive-network based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The new design technique enhances fuzzy controllers with self-learning capability for achieving prescribed control objectives in a near optimal manner. The controller has flexibility for accepting more sensory information, with the main goal to improve the generator unit transients, by adjusting the exciter input, the wicket gate and runner blade positions. The developed ANFIS controller whose control signals are adjusted by using incomplete on-line measurements, can offer better damping effects to generator oscillations over a wide range of operating conditions, than conventional controllers. Digital simulations of hydropower plant equipped with low-head Kaplan turbine are performed and the comparisons of conventional excitation-governor control, state-feedback optimal control and ANFIS based output feedback control are presented. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme and the robustness of the acquired neuro-fuzzy controller, the controller has been implemented on a complex high-order non-linear hydrogenerator model.

  19. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Patrick W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; DeNeale, Scott T.; Chalise, Dol Raj; Centurion, Emma E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost-estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  20. Editorial: Time for green certification for all hydropower?

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-04-10

    While accrediting a large hydropower facility is intrinsically more complex and potentially controversial, it is time to review the progress made in understanding the environmental impacts of large hydropower and the development of environmentally friendly hydropower systems. Over the last two decades, many in-field, laboratory, and modeling technologies have been developed or improved to better understand the mechanisms of fish injury and mortality and to identify turbine design and operation alternatives to reduce such impacts. In 2010, representatives of DOE and the US Department of Interior, and USACE signed a memorandum of understanding to work more closely to develop sustainable hydropower. One of their major objectives is to increase hydropower generation using low-impact and environmentally sustainable approaches. Given the recent scientific and technological advances that have decreased the environmental impact of hydropower and the need to aggressively facilitate development of low impact hydropower, we think it is indeed time to initiate a science-based green certification program that includes rigorous criteria for environmental protection but does not exclude hydropower based on size only.

  1. Gas fired Advanced Turbine System

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of the first phase of the Advanced Gas Turbine System (ATS) program was the concept definition of an advanced engine system that meets efficiency and emission goals far exceeding those that can be provided with today`s equipment. The thermal efficiency goal for such an advanced industrial engine was set at 50% some 15 percentage points higher than current equipment levels. Exhaust emissions goals for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UH) were fixed at 8 parts per million by volume (ppmv), 20 ppmv, and 20 ppmv respectively, corrected to 15% oxygen (O{sub 2}) levels. Other goals had to be addressed; these involved reducing the cost of power produced by 10 percent and improving or maintaining the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) at current levels. This advanced gas turbine was to be fueled with natural gas, and it had to embody features that would allow it bum coal or coal derived fuels.

  2. Wind turbine control system modeling capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, K.; Fingersh, L.J.

    1998-04-01

    At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL`s) National Wind Technology Center the authors are continuing to make progress in their ability to model complete wind turbine systems. An ADAMS{reg_sign} model of the NREL variable speed test bed turbine was developed to determine whether wind turbine control systems could be simulated and to investigate other control strategies for this turbine. Model simulations are compared with data from the operating turbine using the current mode of operation. In general, the simulations show good agreement with test data. Having established confidence in their ability to model the physical machine, the authors evaluated two other control methods. The methods studied are a generalized predictive control method and a bias estimation method. Simulation results using these methods are compared to simulation results of the current mode of operation of the turbine.

  3. Operation of hydropower generation systems in the Alps under future climate and socio-economic drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Alpine hydropower systems are an important source of renewable energy for many countries in Europe. In Switzerland, for instance, they represent the most important domestic source of renewable energy (around 55%). However, future hydropower production may be threatened by unprecedented challenges, such as a decreasing water availability, due to climate change (CC) and associated glacier retreat, and uncertain operating conditions, such as future power needs and highly fluctuating demand on the energy market. This second aspect has gained increasingly relevance since the massive introduction of solar and wind generating systems in the portfolios of many European countries. Because hydropower systems have the potential to provide backup storage of energy to compensate for fluctuations that are typical, for instance, of solar and wind generation systems, it is important to investigate how the increased demand for flexible operation, together with climate change challenge and fluctuating markets, can impact their operating policies. The Swiss Competence Center on Supply of Electricity (www.sccer-soe.ch) has been recently established to explore new potential paths for the development of future power generation systems. In this context, we develop modelling and optimization tools to design and assess new operation strategies for hydropower systems to increase their reliability, flexibility, and robustness to future operation conditions. In particular, we develop an advanced modelling framework for the integrated simulation of the operation of hydropower plants, which accounts for CC-altered streamflow regimes, new demand and market conditions, as well as new boundary conditions for operation (e.g., aquatic ecosystem conservation). The model construction consists of two primary components: a physically based and spatially distributed hydrological model, which describes the relevant hydrological processes at the basin scale, and an agent based decision model, which describes the behavior of hydropower operators. This integrated model allows to quantitatively explore possible trajectories of future evolution of the hydropower systems under the combined effect of climate and socio-economic drivers. In a multi-objective perspective, the model can test how different hydropower operation strategies perform in terms of power production, reliability and flexibility of supply, profitability of operation, and ecosystem conservation. This contribution presents the methodological framework designed to formulate the integrated model, its expected outcomes, and some preliminary results on a pilot study.

  4. Lightning protection system for a wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, Daniel P.; Petter, Jeffrey K.

    2008-05-27

    In a wind turbine (104, 500, 704) having a plurality of blades (132, 404, 516, 744) and a blade rotor hub (120, 712), a lightning protection system (100, 504, 700) for conducting lightning strikes to any one of the blades and the region surrounding the blade hub along a path around the blade hub and critical components of the wind turbine, such as the generator (112, 716), gearbox (708) and main turbine bearings (176, 724).

  5. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  6. Blade feathering system for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Harner, K.I.; Patrick, J.P.; Vosseller, K.F.

    1984-07-31

    A blade feathering system for wind turbines includes a feather actuator, control means operatively connected thereto and an adjustment means operatively connected to the control means for selectively varying the rate of operation of the feather actuator for feathering the wind turbine blades at a variable rate.

  7. Innovative system for wind turbine testing

    SciTech Connect

    Camporeale, S.M.; Fortunato, B.; Marilli, G.

    1998-07-01

    An innovative system for testing small wind turbine models, is presented. The system is especially designed for Darrieus type turbines. The turbine is directly coupled to a direct current machine and a chopper, electronically controlled by means of a Pulse Width Modulator, is used to supply the circuit. The system is used for driving the turbine during the start-up procedure and for braking at various speeds during the performance test. In the paper the main characteristics of the electronic system are described and compared with a traditional system. The main goal of the electronic control is to increase the accuracy in the measurements of torque and speed for each steady state point of the turbine characteristic curve. Another useful advantage provided by the electronic control is related to the possibility of fine tuning the load in order to obtain a large number of steady state experimental points describing the characteristic curve of the turbine. Moreover the system is suitable for integration in an automatic data acquisition and control system. The experimental results, obtained in testing a small turbine in a wind tunnel by means of the electronic control system are presented and discussed at the end of the paper.

  8. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wenglarz, R.A.

    1994-08-01

    Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

  9. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

  10. Turbine anti-icing system

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, B. D.

    1985-12-31

    Exhaust gas is recirculated from the exhaust stack of a gas fired turbine to the air inlet along a constantly-open path to prevent inlet freeze-up. When anti-icing is not needed the exhaust stack is fully opened, creating a partial vacuum in the exhaust stack. At the turbine inlet the recirculation line, is opened to atmosphere. The resultant pressure differential between the opposite ends of the recirculation line creates a driving force for positively purging the recirculation line of unwanted residual exhaust gases. This in turn eliminates a source of unwanted moisture which could otherwise condense, freeze and interfere with turbine operations.

  11. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  12. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  13. DOE Hydropower Program biennial report 1996-1997 (with an updated annotated bibliography)

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, B.N.; Francfort, J.E.; Sommers, G.L.; Cada, G.F.; Sale, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    This report, the latest in a series of biennial Hydropower Program reports sponsored by the US Department of Energy, summarizes the research and development and technology transfer activities of fiscal years 1996 and 1997. The report discusses the activities in the six areas of the hydropower program: advanced hydropower turbine systems; environmental research; hydropower research and development; renewable Indian energy resources; resource assessment; and technology transfer. The report also includes an annotated bibliography of reports pertinent to hydropower, written by the staff of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Federal and state agencies, cities, metropolitan water districts, irrigation companies, and public and independent utilities. Most reports are available from the National Technical Information Service.

  14. Development of a multiplane multispeed balancing system for turbine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype high speed balancing system was developed for assembled gas turbine engine modules. The system permits fully assembled gas turbine modules to be operated and balanced at selected speeds up to full turbine speed. The balancing system is a complete stand-alone system providing all necesary lubrication and support hardware for full speed operation. A variable speed motor provides the drive power. A drive belt and gearbox provide rotational speeds up to 21,000 rpm inside a vacuum chamber. The heart of the system is a dedicated minicomputer with attendant data acquisition, storage and I/O devices. The computer is programmed to be completely interactive with the operator. The system was installed at CCAD and evaluated by testing 20 T55 power turbines and 20 T53 power turbines. Engine test results verified the performance of the high speed balanced turbines.

  15. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Sommers, Garold L.; Hunt, Richard T.; Cada, Glenn F.; Sale, Michael J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Carlson, Thomas; Ahlgrimm, James; Acker, Tomas L.

    2005-02-01

    This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2004 the under four program areas at the time: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Water Use Optimization, and Improved Mitigation Practices); (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Environmental Performance Testing Methods, Computational and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis); (3) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Hydro/Wind Integration, National Hydropower Collaborative, and Integration and Communications); and (4) Supporting Engineering and Analysis (Valuation Methods and Assessments and Characterization of Innovative Technology).

  16. DOE Hydropower Program Biennial Report for FY 2005-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Michael J.; Cada, Glenn F.; Acker, Thomas L.; Carlson, Thomas; Dauble, Dennis D.; Hall, Douglas G.

    2006-07-01

    This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2005-2006 the under four program areas at the time: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Water Use Optimization, and Improved Mitigation Practices); (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Environmental Performance Testing Methods, Computational and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis); (3) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Hydro/Wind Integration, National Hydropower Collaborative, and Integration and Communications); and (4) Supporting Engineering and Analysis (Valuation Methods and Assessments and Characterization of Innovative Technology).

  17. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Esbeck, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    DOE`s ATS Program will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in the 3 to 20 MW class. Market studies were conducted for application of ATS to the dispersed/distributed electric power generation market. The technology studies have led to the design of a gas-fired, recuperated, industrial size gas turbine. The Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program continues. In the High Performance Steam Systems program, a 100 hour development test to prove the advanced 1500 F, 1500 psig system has been successfully completed. A market transformation will take place: the customer will be offered a choice of energy conversion technologies to meet heat and power generation needs into the next century.

  18. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  19. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  20. Development of advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, R.L.; Little, D.A.; Wiant, B.C.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems study is to investigate innovative natural gas fired cycle developments to determine the feasibility of achieving 60% efficiency within a 8-year time frame. The potential system was to be environmentally superior, cost competitive and adaptable to coal-derived fuels. Progress is described.

  1. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  6. Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

    1993-11-01

    The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

  7. Historical Perspective on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydropower Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Michael J.; Cada, G. F.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01

    For 30 years, the U.S. Department of Energy supported unique research and development activities focused on improving the domestic hydropower industry. In the 1970s and early 1980s, DOE’s Hydropower Program focused on technology assessment and a Small Hydropower Demonstration Program. After a period of zero funding in the late 1980s, the Program restarted with the goal of developing new technology that would improve the environmental performance of hydropower projects. A unique partnership of industry and federal cost-sharing allowed the Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems activity to be established in 1994 – this led to new fish-friendly turbine designs and testing. Interagency cooperation with organizations like the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been a consistent part of the Program, along with scientific leadership and technical expertise from three of DOE’s National Laboratories: INL, ORNL, and PNNL. Program accomplishments include several new turbine designs, biological design criteria, computational and physical modeling, and environmental sensors. In contrast to other R&D on fish passage at dams, the DOE-sponsored research has focused on making the path through the turbine safer.

  8. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Macri

    2003-10-01

    Rolls-Royce Corporation has completed a cooperative agreement under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FC21-96MC33066 in support of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program to stimulate industrial power generation markets. This DOE contract was performed during the period of October 1995 to December 2002. This final technical report, which is a program deliverable, describes all associated results obtained during Phases 3A and 3B of the contract. Rolls-Royce Corporation (formerly Allison Engine Company) initially focused on the design and development of a 10-megawatt (MW) high-efficiency industrial gas turbine engine/package concept (termed the 701-K) to meet the specific goals of the ATS program, which included single digit NOx emissions, increased plant efficiency, fuel flexibility, and reduced cost of power (i.e., $/kW). While a detailed design effort and associated component development were successfully accomplished for the 701-K engine, capable of achieving the stated ATS program goals, in 1999 Rolls-Royce changed its focus to developing advanced component technologies for product insertion that would modernize the current fleet of 501-K and 601-K industrial gas turbines. This effort would also help to establish commercial venues for suppliers and designers and assist in involving future advanced technologies in the field of gas turbine engine development. This strategy change was partly driven by the market requirements that suggested a low demand for a 10-MW aeroderivative industrial gas turbine, a change in corporate strategy for aeroderivative gas turbine engine development initiatives, and a consensus that a better return on investment (ROI) could be achieved under the ATS contract by focusing on product improvements and technology insertion for the existing Rolls-Royce small engine industrial gas turbine fleet.

  9. Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the ARE442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.; Jager, D.

    2010-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the ARE 442 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the ARE 442 is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

  10. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOEpatents

    Huber, David John (North Canton, OH); Briesch, Michael Scot (Orlando, FL)

    1998-01-01

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts.

  11. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOEpatents

    Huber, D.J.; Briesch, M.S.

    1998-07-21

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts. 1 fig.

  12. Convolution seal for transition duct in turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2015-03-10

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a convolution seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  13. Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-22

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  14. Leaf seal for transition duct in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2013-06-11

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a leaf seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  15. CRAEATED ON JUNE 5, 2014 Wind Turbine Control Systems Analysis

    E-print Network

    Lavaei, Javad

    CRAEATED ON JUNE 5, 2014 Wind Turbine Control Systems Analysis ­ Introduction to PID Controller power was converted into electrical energy. Large wind turbines are used to convert kinetic energy turbine design to minimize deviation of the rotor speed at variable wind speed. The proportional

  16. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  17. Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    North, William Edward

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

  18. Optimizing wind turbine control system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schluter, Larry L.; Vachon, William A.

    1993-05-01

    The impending expiration of the levelized period in the Interim Standard Offer Number 4 (ISO4) utility contracts for purchasing wind-generated power in California mandates, more than ever, that windplants be operated in a cost-effective manner. Operating plans and approaches are needed that maximize the net revenue from wind parks--after accounting for operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a design tool that makes it possible to tailor a control system of a wind turbine (WT) to maximize energy production while minimizing the financial consequences of fatigue damage to key structural components. Plans for code enhancements to include expert systems and fuzzy logic are discussed, and typical results are presented in which the code is applied to study the controls of a generic Danish 15-m horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT).

  19. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2001-07-01

    The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL. As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  20. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2000-05-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in the quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL. As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  1. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2002-07-01

    The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  2. Development of Silicon Nitride Ceramic Components for Advanced Turbine and Microturbine Systems

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Development of Silicon Nitride Ceramic Components for Advanced Turbine and Microturbine Systems H Background Silicon Nitride Components for Gas Turbines Ceramics Stationary Gas Turbines Program - Solar Turbines CSGT (Centaur 50S) Silicon Nitride Components for Microturbines Microturbine Program - Ingersoll

  3. Regenerative system for a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, W.

    1987-04-28

    A regenerative system is described for a gas turbine, wherein the turbine has a single shaft on which are mounted a compressor section and a work section, comprising: an air heater mounted adjacent the exit of the work section, the hot exit gas and pressurized air passing through passages formed in the air heater; combustor housings surrounding the compressor section, each containing a combustor mounted within it and extending coaxially thereof, each combustor having a transition section extending to the entrance to the work section; an annular connector housing extending between the combustor housing and the exit of the compressor section to carry the compressed air radially; an outer duct leading from the connector housing to one end of the air heater; and an inner duct attached to the other end of the air heater.

  4. Turbine gas temperature measurement and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A fluidic Turbine Inlet Gas Temperature (TIGIT) Measurement and Control System was developed for use on a Pratt and Whitney Aircraft J58 engine. Based on engine operating requirements, criteria for high temperature materials selection, system design, and system performance were established. To minimize development and operational risk, the TIGT control system was designed to interface with an existing Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Trim System and thereby modulate steady-state fuel flow to maintain a desired TIGT level. Extensive component and system testing was conducted including heated (2300F) vibration tests for the fluidic sensor and gas sampling probe, temperature and vibration tests on the system electronics, burner rig testing of the TIGT measurement system, and in excess of 100 hours of system testing on a J58 engine. (Modified author abstract)

  5. DOE Hydropower Program Biennial Report for FY 2005-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Michael J; Cada, Glenn F; Acker, Thomas L.; Carlson, Thomas; Dauble, Dennis D.; Hall, Douglas G.

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydropower Program is part of the Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Program's mission is to conduct research and development (R&D) that will increase the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower. The Department's Hydropower Program activities are conducted by its national laboratories: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [formerly Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory], Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and by a number of industry, university, and federal research facilities. Programmatically, DOE Hydropower Program R&D activities are conducted in two areas: Technology Viability and Technology Application. The Technology Viability area has two components: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Water Use Optimization, and Improved Mitigation Practices) and (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Environmental Performance Testing Methods, Computational and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis). The Technology Application area also has two components: (1) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Hydro/Wind Integration, National Hydropower Collaborative, and Integration and Communications) and (2) Supporting Engineering and Analysis (Valuation Methods and Assessments and Characterization of Innovative Technology). This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2005-2006 under all four program areas. Major accomplishments include the following: Conducted field testing of a Retrofit Aeration System to increase the dissolved oxygen content of water discharged from the turbines of the Osage Project in Missouri. Contributed to the installation and field testing of an advanced, minimum gap runner turbine at the Wanapum Dam project in Washington. Completed a state-of-the-science review of hydropower optimization methods and published reports on alternative operating strategies and opportunities for spill reduction. Carried out feasibility studies of new environmental performance measurements of the new MGR turbine at Wanapum Dam, including measurement of behavioral responses, biomarkers, bioindex testing, and the use of dyes to assess external injuries. Evaluated the benefits of mitigation measures for instream flow releases and the value of surface flow outlets for downstream fish passage. Refined turbulence flow measurement techniques, the computational modeling of unsteady flows, and models of blade strike of fish. Published numerous technical reports, proceedings papers, and peer-reviewed literature, most of which are available on the DOE Hydropower website. Further developed and tested the sensor fish measuring device at hydropower plants in the Columbia River. Data from the sensor fish are coupled with a computational model to yield a more detailed assessment of hydraulic environments in and around dams. Published reports related to the Virtual Hydropower Prospector and the assessment of water energy resources in the U.S. for low head/low power hydroelectric plants. Convened a workshop to consider the environmental and technical issues associated with new hydrokinetic and wave energy technologies. Laboratory and DOE staff participated in numerous workshops, conferences, coordination meetings, planning meetings, implementation meetings, and reviews to transfer the results of DOE-sponsored research to end-users.

  6. SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data

    E-print Network

    Reiter, Ehud

    SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data Jin Yu of Aberdeen Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, UK {jyu, ereiter, jhunter, ssripada}@csd.abdn.ac.uk Abstract: SumTime-Turbine produces textual summaries of archived time- series data from gas turbines. These summaries should help

  7. Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen cooled, turbine powered space weapon systems require a relatively simple, but reasonably accurate hydrogen gas expansion turbine model. Such a simplified turbine model would require little computational time and allow incorporation into system level computer programs while providing reasonably accurate volume/mass estimates. This model would then allow optimization studies to be performed on multiparameter space power systems and provide improved turbine mass and size estimates for the various operating conditions (when compared to empirical and power law approaches). An axial flow gas expansion turbine model was developed for these reasons and is in use as a comparative bench mark in space power system studies at Sandia. The turbine model is based on fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and material strength considerations, but is considered simplified because it does not account for design details such as boundary layer effects, shock waves, turbulence, stress concentrations, and seal leakage. Although the basic principles presented here apply to any gas or vapor axial flow turbine, hydrogen turbines are discussed because of their immense importance on space burst power platforms.

  8. Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

    2013-05-14

    The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

  9. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The combustion system discussed here incorporates a modular three- stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; also in the first stage, sulfur is captured with sorbent; coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed from the combustion gases by inertial means in the second stage by the use of an impact separator and slagging cyclone separator in series. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The objective of this contract is to establish the technology required for subsequent commercial development and application by the private sector of utility-size direct coal-fueled gas turbines. Emissions from these units are to meet or be lower than the Environment Protection Agency's (EPA's) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for a pulverized coal-=fired steam turbine generator plant.

  10. A Summary of Environmentally Friendly Turbine Design Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Odeh, Mufeed

    1999-07-01

    The Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program (AHTS) was created in 1994 by the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Hydropower Research Foundation. The Program’s main goal is to develop “environmentally friendly” hydropower turbines. The Program’s first accomplishment was the development of conceptual designs of new environmentally friendly turbines. In order to do so, two contractors were competitively selected. The ARL/NREC team of engineers and biologists provided a conceptual design for a new turbine runner*. The new runner has the potential to generate hydroelectricity at close to 90% efficiency. The Voith team produced new fish-friendly design criteria for Kaplan and Francis turbines that can be incorporated in units during rehabilitation projects or in new hydroelectric facilities**. These include the use of advanced plant operation, minimum gap runners, placement of wicket gates behind stay vanes, among others. The Voith team will also provide design criteria on aerating Francis turbines to increase dissolved oxygen content. Detailed reviews of the available literature on fish mortality studies, causation of injuries to fish, and available biological design criteria that would assist in the design of fish-friendly turbines were performed. This review identified a need for more biological studies in order to develop performance criteria to assist turbine manufacturers in designing a more fish-friendly turbine.

  11. Advanced Turbine Systems Program. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-03-01

    The Allison Gas Turbine Division (Allison) of General Motors Corporation conducted the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program feasibility study (Phase I) in accordance with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC`s) contract DE-AC21-86MC23165 A028. This feasibility study was to define and describe a natural gas-fired reference system which would meet the objective of {ge}60% overall efficiency, produce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions 10% less than the state-of-the-art without post combustion controls, and cost of electricity of the N{sup th} system to be approximately 10% below that of the current systems. In addition, the selected natural gas-fired reference system was expected to be adaptable to coal. The Allison proposed reference system feasibility study incorporated Allison`s long-term experience from advanced aerospace and military technology programs. This experience base is pertinent and crucial to the success of the ATS program. The existing aeroderivative technology base includes high temperature hot section design capability, single crystal technology, advanced cooling techniques, high temperature ceramics, ultrahigh turbomachinery components design, advanced cycles, and sophisticated computer codes.

  12. Advanced Turbine Systems Program industrial system concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S.

    1995-12-31

    Solar approached Phase II of ATS program with the goal of 50% thermal efficiency. An intercolled and recuperated gas turbine was identified as the ultimate system to meet this goal in a commercial gas turbine environment. With commercial input from detailed market studies and DOE`s ATS program, Solar redefined the company`s proposed ATS to fit both market and sponsor (DOE) requirements. Resulting optimized recuperated gas turbine will be developed in two sizes, 5 and 15 MWe. It will show a thermal efficiency of about 43%, a 23% improvement over current industrial gas turbines. Other ATS goals--emissions, RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability), cost of power--will be met or exceeded. During FY95, advanced development of key materials, combustion and component technologies proceeded to the point of acceptance for inclusion in ATS Phase III.

  13. Hydrogen turbine power conversion system assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. E.; Lucci, A. D.; Campbell, J.; Lee, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A three part technical study was conducted whereby parametric technical and economic feasibility data were developed on several power conversion systems suitable for the generation of central station electric power through the combustion of hydrogen and the use of the resulting heat energy in turbogenerator equipment. The study assessed potential applications of hydrogen-fueled power conversion systems and identified the three most promising candidates: (1) Ericsson Cycle, (2) gas turbine, and (3) direct steam injection system for fossil fuel as well as nuclear powerplants. A technical and economic evaluation was performed on the three systems from which the direct injection system (fossil fuel only) was selected for a preliminary conceptual design of an integrated hydrogen-fired power conversion system.

  14. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  15. Turbine generator fire protection by sprinkler system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.T.; Clayton, T.C.

    1985-07-01

    Turbine generator fire hazards were investigated with the objective of developing a properly engineered fire protection system for typical, large, modern turbine generator installations. The investigations consisted of collecting and evaluating information regarding fire hazards, fire occurrences, industry experience involving the application of water to turbine generators, and industry experience with various fire protection systems. This information was gathered from electric utilities, turbine generator manufacturers, insurance underwriters, and the National Fire Protection Association. The study resulted in a recommended properly engineered fire protection system for a typical 600 to 700 MWe turbine generator. This properly engineered system is designed to minimize the risk of fire and, at the same time, minimize the risk of damage to the turbine generator in the unlikely event of inadvertent actuation. 14 refs., 29 figs., 28 tabs.

  16. System for damping vibrations in a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Roberts III, Herbert Chidsey; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-11-24

    A system for damping vibrations in a turbine includes a first rotating blade having a first ceramic airfoil, a first ceramic platform connected to the first ceramic airfoil, and a first root connected to the first ceramic platform. A second rotating blade adjacent to the first rotating blade includes a second ceramic airfoil, a second ceramic platform connected to the second ceramic airfoil, and a second root connected to the second ceramic platform. A non-metallic platform damper has a first position in simultaneous contact with the first and second ceramic platforms.

  17. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2003-05-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for the reporting period October 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002 are described in this quarterly report. No new membership, workshops, research projects, internships, faculty fellowships or special studies were initiated during this reporting period. Contract completion is set for June 30, 2003. During the report period, six research progress reports were received (3 final reports and 3 semi-annual reports). The University of Central Florida contract SR080 was terminated during this period, as UCF was unable to secure research facilities. AGTSR now projects that it will under spend DOE obligated funds by approximately 340-350K$.

  18. Short-term Hydropower Reservoir Operations in Chile's Central Interconnected System: Tradeoffs between Hydrologic Alteration and Economic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Hydropower accounts for about 50% of the installed capacity in Chile's Central Interconnected System (CIS) and new developments are envisioned in the near future. Large projects involving reservoirs are perceived negatively by the general public. In terms of operations, hydropower scheduling takes place at monthly, weekly, daily and hourly intervals, and operations at each level affect different environmental processes. Due to its ability to quickly and inexpensively respond to short-term changes in demand, hydropower reservoirs often are operated to provide power during periods of peak demand. This operational scheme, known as hydropeaking, changes the hydrologic regime by altering the rate and frequency of changes in flow magnitude on short time scales. To mitigate impacts on downstream ecosystems, operational constraints -typically minimum instream flows and maximum ramping rates- are imposed on hydropower plants. These operational restrictions limit reduce operational flexibility and can reduce the economic value of energy generation by imposing additional costs on the operation of interconnected power systems. Methods to predict the degree of hydrologic alteration rely on statistical analyses of instream flow time series. Typically, studies on hydrologic alteration use historical operational records for comparison between pre- and post-dam conditions. Efforts to assess hydrologic alteration based on future operational schemes of reservoirs are scarce. This study couples two existing models: a mid-term operations planning and a short-term economic dispatch to simulate short-term hydropower reservoir operations under different future scenarios. Scenarios of possible future configurations of the Chilean CIS are defined with emphasis on the introduction of non-conventional renewables (particularly wind energy) and large hydropower projects in Patagonia. Both models try to reproduce the actual decision making process in the Chilean Central Interconnected System (CIS). Chile's CIS is structured as a mandatory pool with audited costs and therefore the economic dispatch can be formulated as a cost minimization problem. Consequently, hydropower reservoir operations are controlled by the ISO. Reservoirs with the most potential to cause short-term hydrologic alteration were identified from existing operational records. These records have also been used to validate our simulated operations. Results in terms of daily and subdaily hydrologic alteration as well as the economic performance of the CIS are presented for alternative energy matrix scenarios. Tradeoff curves representing the compromise between indicators of hydrologic alteration and economic indicators of the CIS operation are developed.

  19. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

    2010-05-01

    This test is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines are being tested at the NWTC as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a grid connected ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 30.5 meter (100 ft) lattice tower manufactured by Abundant Renewable Energy. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

  20. ADAPTIVE CLEARANCE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR TURBINE ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center primarily deals in developing controls, dynamic models, and health management technologies for air and space propulsion systems. During the summer of 2004 I was granted the privilege of working alongside professionals who were developing an active clearance control system for commercial jet engines. Clearance, the gap between the turbine blade tip and the encompassing shroud, increases as a result of wear mechanisms and rubbing of the turbine blades on shroud. Increases in clearance cause larger specific fuel consumption (SFC) and loss of efficient air flow. This occurs because, as clearances increase, the engine must run hotter and bum more fuel to achieve the same thrust. In order to maintain efficiency, reduce fuel bum, and reduce exhaust gas temperature (EGT), the clearance must be accurately controlled to gap sizes no greater than a few hundredths of an inch. To address this problem, NASA Glenn researchers have developed a basic control system with actuators and sensors on each section of the shroud. Instead of having a large uniform metal casing, there would be sections of the shroud with individual sensors attached internally that would move slightly to reform and maintain clearance. The proposed method would ultimately save the airline industry millions of dollars.

  1. Hydropower Projects

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-02

    The Water Power Program helps industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Through support for public, private, and nonprofit efforts, the Water Power Program promotes the development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced hydropower devices and pumped storage hydropower applications. These technologies help capture energy stored by diversionary structures, increase the efficiency of hydroelectric generation, and use excess grid energy to replenish storage reserves for use during periods of peak electricity demand. In addition, the Water Power Program works to assess the potential extractable energy from domestic water resources to assist industry and government in planning for our nation’s energy future. From FY 2008 to FY 2014, DOE’s Water Power Program announced awards totaling approximately $62.5 million to 33 projects focused on hydropower. Table 1 provides a brief description of these projects.

  2. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, M. J.; Cada, G. F.; Carlson, T. J.; Dauble, D. D.; Hunt, R. T.; Sommers, G. L.; Rinehart, B. N.; Flynn, J. V.; Brookshier, P. A.

    2002-04-01

    This annual report describes the various projects supported by the hydropower program in FY 2001. The program’s focus for FY 2002 was on improving the environmental performance of hydropower projects by addressing problems such as fish mortality during passage through turbines, alteration of instream habitat, and water quality in tailwaters. A primary goal of this research was to develop new, environmentally friendly technology. DOE-funded projects have produced new conceptual designs for turbine systems, and these were tested in pilot-scale laboratory tests and in the field. New design approaches range from totally new turbine runners (e.g., work by Alden Research Laboratory and Concepts NREC) to modifications to existing designs (e.g., Voith Siemens work on Minimum Gap Runners). Biological criteria have also been developed in controlled laboratory tests of fish response to physical stresses, such as hydraulic shear and pressure changes. These biocriteria were combined with computational design tools to locate and eliminate damaging areas inside turbine systems.

  3. Mod-2 wind turbine system development. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Progress in the design, fabrication, and testing of a wind turbine system is reported. The development of the MOD-2 wind turbine through acceptance testing and initial operational evaluation is documented. The MOD-2 project intends to develop early commercialization of wind energy. The first wind turbine farm (three MOD-2 units) are now being operated at the Bonneville Power Administration site near Goldendale, Washington.

  4. Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S.

    E-print Network

    Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower Turbines Background One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S. is the provision of adequate fish passage at projects. Mortality of downstream migrating fish, particularly as a result of passing through hydropower

  5. Mod-2 wind turbine system development. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The development of the MOD-2 wind turbine through acceptance testing and initial operational evaluation is documented. Pitch control hydraulic system, yaw control system, drive train, electrical power station, control system, operations and maintenance experience, and availability are discussed.

  6. The effects of turbine passage on C-start behavior of salmon at the Wanapum Dam, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    ?ada, Glenn F.; Ryon, Michael G.; Smith, John G.; Luckett, Cloe A.

    2006-06-01

    In 2005, Grant County Public Utility District No. 2 (GCPUD) replaced one of the 10 Kaplan turbines at Wanapum Dam with an advanced turbine that was developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program. Compared to a conventional Kaplan turbine, the advanced minimum gap runner (MGR) turbine is predicted to have lower values for several potential fish injury mechanisms, and therefore was expected to improve turbine-passage fish survival. Fish survival tests of the new turbine were carried out by GCPUD between February and April 2005. A total of 8,960 tagged juvenile summer Chinook salmon were used to quantify the differences in direct mortality associated with turbine passage for the new and old turbines. There were few test conditions in which the study was noted a distinct difference between the old Kaplan turbine and the new MGR turbine on the basis of changes in the escape behavior of uninjured fish.

  7. WIND TURBINE DRIVETRAIN TEST FACILITY DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Mcintosh, J.

    2012-01-03

    The Wind Turbine Drivetrain Test Facility (WTDTF) is a state-of-the-art industrial facility used for testing wind turbine drivetrains and generators. Large power output wind turbines are primarily installed for off-shore wind power generation. The facility includes two test bays: one to accommodate turbine nacelles up to 7.5 MW and one for nacelles up to 15 MW. For each test bay, an independent data acquisition system (DAS) records signals from various sensors required for turbine testing. These signals include resistance temperature devices, current and voltage sensors, bridge/strain gauge transducers, charge amplifiers, and accelerometers. Each WTDTF DAS also interfaces with the drivetrain load applicator control system, electrical grid monitoring system and vibration analysis system.

  8. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2003-05-01

    The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading. No new memberships, workshops, research projects, internships, faculty fellowships or special studies were initiated during this reporting period. Contract completion is set for June 30, 2003. During the report period, nine subcontractor reports were received (5 final reports and 4 semi-annual reports). The report technology distribution is as follows: 3--aero-heat transfer, 2--combustion and 4--materials. AGTSR continues to project that it will under spend DOE obligated funds by approximately $329K.

  9. Advanced turbine systems study system scoping and feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    United Technologies Research Center, Pratt Whitney Commercial Engine Business, And Pratt Whitney Government Engine and Space Propulsion has performed a preliminary analysis of an Advanced Turbine System (ATS) under Contract DE-AC21-92MC29247 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The natural gas-fired reference system identified by the UTC team is the Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle in which the gas turbine exhaust heat and heat rejected from the intercooler is used in a saturator to humidify the high pressure compressor discharge air. This results in a significant increase in flow through the turbine at no increase in compressor power. Using technology based on the PW FT4000, the industrial engine derivative of the PW4000, currently under development by PW, the system would have an output of approximately 209 MW and an efficiency of 55.3%. Through use of advanced cooling and materials technologies similar to those currently in the newest generation military aircraft engines, a growth version of this engine could attain approximately 295 MW output at an efficiency of 61.5%. There is the potential for even higher performance in the future as technology from aerospace R D programs is adapted to aero-derivative industrial engines.

  10. Fuel Flexible Turbine System (FFTS) Program

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-31

    In this fuel flexible turbine system (FFTS) program, the Parker gasification system was further optimized, fuel composition of biomass gasification process was characterized and the feasibility of running Capstone MicroTurbine(TM) systems with gasification syngas fuels was evaluated. With high hydrogen content, the gaseous fuel from a gasification process of various feed stocks such as switchgrass and corn stover has high reactivity and high flashback propensity when running in the current lean premixed injectors. The research concluded that the existing C65 microturbine combustion system, which is designed for natural gas, is not able to burn the high hydrogen content syngas due to insufficient resistance to flashback (undesired flame propagation to upstream within the fuel injector). A comprehensive literature review was conducted on high-hydrogen fuel combustion and its main issues. For Capstone?s lean premixed injector, the main mechanisms of flashback were identified to be boundary layer flashback and bulk flow flashback. Since the existing microturbine combustion system is not able to operate on high-hydrogen syngas fuels, new hardware needed to be developed. The new hardware developed and tested included (1) a series of injectors with a reduced propensity for boundary layer flashback and (2) two new combustion liner designs (Combustion Liner Design A and B) that lead to desired primary zone air flow split to meet the overall bulk velocity requirement to mitigate the risk of core flashback inside the injectors. The new injector designs were evaluated in both test apparatus and C65/C200 engines. While some of the new injector designs did not provide satisfactory performance in burning target syngas fuels, particularly in improving resistance to flashback. The combustion system configuration of FFTS-4 injector and Combustion Liner Design A was found promising to enable the C65 microturbine system to run on high hydrogen biomass syngas. The FFTS-4 injector was tested in a C65 engine operating on 100% hydrogen and with the redesigned combustion liner - Combustion Liner Design A - installed. The results were promising for the FFTS program as the system was able to burn 100% hydrogen fuel without flashback while maintaining good combustion performance. While initial results have been demonstrated the feasibility of this program, further research is needed to determine whether these results will be repeated with FFTS-4 injectors installed in all injector ports and over a wide range of operating conditions and fuel variations.

  11. Inspection system for a turbine blade region of a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Smed, Jan P. (Winter Springs, FL); Lemieux, Dennis H. (Casselberry, FL); Williams, James P. (Orlando, FL)

    2007-06-19

    An inspection system formed at least from a viewing tube for inspecting aspects of a turbine engine during operation of the turbine engine. An outer housing of the viewing tube may be positioned within a turbine engine using at least one bearing configured to fit into an indentation of a support housing to form a ball and socket joint enabling the viewing tube to move during operation as a result of vibrations and other movements. The viewing tube may also include one or more lenses positioned within the viewing tube for viewing the turbine components. The lenses may be kept free of contamination by maintaining a higher pressure in the viewing tube than a pressure outside of the viewing tube and enabling gases to pass through an aperture in a cap at a viewing end of the viewing tube.

  12. 76 FR 7835 - Great River Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Scoping Meetings and Environmental Site Review and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ...Project No. 13637-001] Great River Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Scoping Meetings and...2010. d. Applicant: Great River Hydropower, LLC. e. Name of Project: Upper...46-foot-wide by 25-foot-high concrete hydropower structure consisting of 30 turbine...

  13. Convolution seal for transition duct in turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2015-05-26

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface feature for interfacing with an adjacent transition duct. The turbine system further includes a convolution seal contacting the interface feature to provide a seal between the interface feature and the adjacent transition duct.

  14. 77 FR 32497 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas, Inc. (Wind Turbine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ...Power Systems Americas, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Generating Sets) Fort Smith...special-purpose subzone at the wind turbine nacelle and generating set manufacturing...activity related to the manufacturing of wind turbine nacelles and generating sets at the...

  15. Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

    2003-09-30

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

  16. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-31

    Achieving the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) goals of 60% efficiency, single-digit NO{sub x}, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coatings and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives, requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompass two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined-cycle system for the industrial market, and a combined-cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced Ge heavy-duty machine utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities required the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving ATS goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS was placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS was placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling, while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emission combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE Power Systems is solely responsible for offering GE products for the industrial and utility markets.

  17. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS ? PROJECT SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Alvin

    2010-06-18

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach ?1425-1760?C (?2600-3200?F) with pressures of ?300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require (1) durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), (2) high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and (3) effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in the TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has continued its collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University, while working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers. This paper presents the technical accomplishments that were made during FY09 in the initial areas of advanced materials, aerothermal heat transfer and non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based turbine applications in the Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems project, and introduces three new technology areas ? high temperature overlayer coating development, diffusion barrier coating development, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy development that are being conducted in this effort.

  18. Water turbine technology for small power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salovaara, T.

    1980-02-01

    The paper examines hydro-power stations and the efficiency and costs of using water turbines to run them. Attention is given to different turbine types emphasizing the use of Kaplan-turbines and runners. Hydraulic characteristics and mechanical properties of low head turbines and small turbines, constructed of fully fabricated steel plate structures, are presented.

  19. Aerothermodynamics and operation of turbine system under unsteady pulsating flow

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jinwook, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    An assessment of a turbine system operating under highly pulsating flow environment typically found in vehicular turbochargers is made to: identify the key operating parameters, enable the formulation of a reduced order ...

  20. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Compressor development, turbine, combustion, regenerator system, gearbox/transmission, ceramic material and component development, foil gas bearings, bearings and seals, rotor dynamics development, and controls and accessories are discussed.

  1. Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Objective is to provide the conceptual design and product development plant for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000 (secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS). This report addresses the remaining 7 of the 9 subtasks in Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components: catalytic combustion, recuperator, high- temperature turbine disc, advanced control system, and ceramic materials.

  2. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE (NGGT) SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-05

    Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand for an NGGT product. This analysis concluded that improvements to the US energy situation might be best served in the near/mid term (2002-2009) by a ''Technology-Focused'' program rather than a specific ''Product-Focused'' program. Within this new program focus, GEPS performed a parametric screening study of options in the three broad candidate categories of gas turbines: aero-derivative, heavy duty, and a potential hybrid combining components of the other two categories. GEPS's goal was to determine the best candidate systems that could achieve the DOE PRDA expectations and GEPS's internal design criteria in the period specified for initial product introduction, circa 2005. Performance feasibility studies were conducted on candidate systems selected in the screening task, and critical technology areas were identified where further development would be required to meet the program goals. DOE PRDA operating parameters were found to be achievable by 2005 through evolutionary technology. As a result, the study was re-directed toward technology enhancements for interim product introductions and advanced/revolutionary technology for potential NGGT product configurations. Candidate technologies were identified, both evolutionary and revolutionary, with a potential for possible development products via growth step improvements. Benefits were analyzed from two perspectives: (1) What would be the attributes of the top candidate system assuming the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity in 2009/2010; and (2) What would be the expected level of public benefit, assuming relevant technologies were incorporated into existing new and current field products as they became available. Candidate systems incorporating these technologies were assessed as to how they could serve multiple applications, both in terms of incorporation of technology into current products, as well as to an NGGT product. In summary, potential program costs are shown for development of the candidate systems along with the importance of future DOE enabling participation. Three main conclusions have been established via this study: (1) Rapid recent changes within the power generation regulatory environment and the resulting ''bubble'' of gas turbine orders has altered the timing and relative significance associated with the conclusions of the ADL study upon which the original DOE NGGT solicitation was based. (2) Assuming that the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity circa 2010, the top candidate system that meets or exceeds the DOE PRDA requirements was determined to be a hybrid aero-derivative/heavy duty concept. (3) An investment by DOE of approximately $23MM/year to develop NGGT technologies near/mid term for validation and migration into a reasonable fraction of the installed base of GE F-class products could be leveraged into $1.2B Public Benefit, with greatest benefits resulting from RAM improvements. In addition to the monetary Public Benefit, there is also significant benefit in terms of reduced energy consumption, and reduced power plant land usage.

  3. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  4. INDUSTRIAL ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS: DEVELOPMENT & DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    George Escola

    2004-02-20

    Rochelle Municipal Utilities (RMU) was selected for the field evaluation site and placed an order for the first Mercury 50 generator set in November 1997. Field evaluation of the Mercury 50 package at Rochelle began in June 2000 and ran through December 2003. A total of 4,749 package hours were achieved on two generation 2-design engines. Engine Serial Number (ESN) 6 was installed in April 2000 and accumulated 2,324 hours and 267 starts until it was exchanged for ESN 7 in April 2001. ESN 7 ran until completion of the field evaluation period accumulating 2,426 hours and 292 starts. While the 4,749 hours of package operation falls short of the 8,000-hour goal, important lessons were learned at the Rochelle site that resulted in bringing a far superior generation 3 Mercury 50 package to commercialization. Among the issues raised and resolved were: (1) Engine shaft stability; (2) Engine power and efficiency degradation--Air inlet Restrictions, Compressor Efficiency, Turbine Efficiency, Exhaust System Cracks/Leaks; (3) Recuperator Core Durability; (4) Cold Weather Operations; (5) Valve Actuator Reliability; and (6) Remote Operation and Maintenance Support.

  5. Turbine speed control system based on a fuzzy-PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei; Yu, Hai-Yan

    2008-12-01

    The flexibility demand of marine nuclear power plant is very high, the multiple parameters of the marine nuclear power plant with the once-through steam generator are strongly coupled, and the normal PID control of the turbine speed can’t meet the control demand. This paper introduces a turbine speed Fuzzy-PID controller to coordinately control the steam pressure and thus realize the demand for quick tracking and steady state control over the turbine speed by using the Fuzzy control’s quick dynamic response and PID control’s steady state performance. The simulation shows the improvement of the response time and steady state performance of the control system.

  6. Hydropower potential of the New York State barge canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, A. S.; Brown, R. S.

    1980-09-01

    The physical characteristics of the canal system as it relates to hydropower development were studied. The hydropower potential of the canal system was determined, including an inventory of existing and proposed hydropower plants. The remaining unrealized potential of the canal system was evaluated. Various sites were selected for further investigation on the basis of the unrealized potential of the barge canal system. Preliminary estimates of the engineering and economic feasibility of developing hydropower at these sites were also studied.

  7. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2003

    SciTech Connect

    ?ada, Glenn F.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Hunt, Richard T.; Sale, Michael J.; Sommers, Garold L.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2003 the under four program areas at the time: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Testing of the Alden/NREC pilot scale runner, and Improved Mitigation Practices); (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Biological Design Criteria, Computer and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis); (3) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Wind/Hydro Integration Studies and Technical Support and Outreach); and (4) Engineering and Analysis (Innovative Technology Characterization).

  8. PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2000-02-01

    Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

  9. & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    ENERGY PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION In the United States hydropower supplies of reservoir operators at hydropower facilities is optimizing flood protection vs. energy generation 12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which

  10. & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    ENERGY PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION In the United States hydropower supplies 12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity

  11. Virtual Hydropower Prospecting – Searching for Hydropower Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Hall

    2007-12-01

    The availability of geographic information system (GIS) tools and analytical modeling of natural streams has made it possible to perform virtual “river inventories” that were formerly done using topographic maps, stream flow estimates, and physical reconnaissance. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) virtually assessed the gross power potential of all natural streams in the United States of America and identified feasible potential project sites and estimated their developable power potential. The results of this virtual prospecting have been incorporated into a GIS application called the Virtual Hydropower Prospector that is available for public use on the Internet.

  12. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wen-Ching (Export, PA); Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

    1999-01-01

    A system and method for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system (20, 22, 78) and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream (74) and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer (18). The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine.

  13. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOEpatents

    Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Bannister, R.L.

    1999-04-27

    A system and method are disclosed for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer. The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine. 2 figs.

  14. Advanced Turbine Systems annual program review

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, W.E.

    1995-10-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) is a joint Air Force, Navy, Army, NASA, ARPA, and industry program focused on developing turbine engine technologies, with the goal of doubling propulsion capability by around the turn-of-the-century, and thus providing smaller, lighter, more durable, more affordable turbine engines in the future. IHPTET`s technology development plan for increasing propulsion capability with respect to time is divided into three phases. This phased approach reduces the technological risk of taking one giant leap, and also reduces the {open_quotes}political{close_quotes} risk of not delivering a product for an extended period of time, in that the phasing allows continuous transfer of IHPTET technologies to our warfighters and continuous transfer to the commercial sector (dual-use). The IHPTET program addresses the three major classes of engines: turbofan/turbojet, turboshaft/turboprop, and expendables.

  15. Coordinate Control of Wind Turbine and Battery in Wind Turbine Generator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjyu, Tomonobu; Kikunaga, Yasuaki; Tokudome, Motoki; Uehara, Akie; Yona, Atsushi; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    Battery is installed for with wind power generator to level the output power fluctuations, since output power fluctuations of wind power generator are large. However, if large battery is installed in wind turbine generator, the capital cost for wind power system will increase. Hence, the smallest size of battery should be preferable to save the capital cost. In this paper, we propose a methodology for controlling combined system output power and storage energy capacity of battery system. The system consists of wind turbine generator and battery energy storage system. The generated power fluctuation in low and high frequency range are smoothed by pitch angle control and battery charge or discharge. This coordinated control reduces the rated battery capacity and windmill blade stress. In our proposed method, we apply H? control theory to achieve good response and robustness. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is simulated.

  16. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Kaufeld, J.; Kordes, R.

    1981-01-01

    A 74.5 kW(100 hp) advanced automotive gas turbine engine is described. A design iteration to improve the weight and production cost associated with the original concept is discussed. Major rig tests included 15 hours of compressor testing to 80% design speed and the results are presented. Approximately 150 hours of cold flow testing showed duct loss to be less than the design goal. Combustor test results are presented for initial checkout tests. Turbine design and rig fabrication is discussed. From a materials study of six methods to fabricate rotors, two have been selected for further effort. A discussion of all six methods is given.

  17. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 1: Issues, Impacts, and Economics of Wind and Hydropower Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  18. Plasma-sprayed dual density ceramic turbine seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, D. L.; Schechter, B.; Cross, K. R.; Cavanagh, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Dual density, plasma sprayed ceramic coating systems were investigated for possible application as abradable turbine tip seal systems in small gas turbine engines. Abradability, erosion resistance, internal leakage, and microstructural characterization were investigated for polyester and cenosphere filled zirconium oxide composites. Results indicate the polyester system is more abradable but displays significantly less erosion resistance than the cenosphere system. It is also stated that the absence of significant blade tip damage during abradability testing of both systems suggests additional effort may result in a more nearly optimum balance of abradability and erosion resistance.

  19. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, Paul W. (Longwood, FL); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

    1995-01-01

    A gas turbine system in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas.

  20. Characterizing wind turbine system response to lightning activity

    SciTech Connect

    McNiff, B.; LaWhite, N.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01

    A lightning protection research program was instituted by National Renewable Energy Laboratory to minimize lightning damage to wind turbines and to further the understanding of effective damage mitigation techniques. To that end, a test program is under way to observe lightning activity, protection system response, and damage at a wind power plant in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Turbine Verification Program. The authors installed Lightning activated surveillance cameras along with a special storm tracking device to observe the activity in the wind plant area. They instrumented the turbines with lightning and ground current detection devices to log direct and indirect strike activity at each unit. They installed a surge monitor on the utility interface to track incoming activity from the transmission lines. Maintenance logs are used to verify damage and determine downtime and repair costs. Actual strikes to turbines were recorded on video and ancillary devices. The test setup and some results are discussed in this paper.

  1. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, P.W.; Bannister, R.L.

    1995-07-11

    A gas turbine system is described in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas. 4 figs.

  2. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2001-06-01

    The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

  3. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

  4. Investigation of geothermal energy technologies and gas turbine hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tiangco, V.; McCluer, P.; Hughes, E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a preliminary study of the technical and economic feasibilities of integrating gas turbine systems into geothermal technologies. Levelized cost analysis employing revenue requirement approach was used to measure the economic feasibility of the geothermal and gas turbine hybrids at different geothermal sites. Twelve geothermal resource areas were included in this study; Brawley, CA, Coso Hot Springs, CA, Dixie Valley, NV, East Mesa, CA, Glass Mountain, CA, Heber, CA, Mono-Long Valley, CA, Salton Sea, CA, Stillwater, NV, Surprise Valley, CA, Vale, OR, and Wabuska, NV. The geothermal power generation technologies included in this study were air-cooled subcritical binary, condensate-cooled dual flash, and gas turbine hybrids of these two technologies. Geothermal/gas turbine concepts can be cost-effective at many geothermal resource areas. This study indicated that integrating gas turbine systems using GE LM2500 with binary cycles is potentially more cost effective than stand alone binary power plants in low temperature resource areas such as East Mesa, CA, Heber, CA, Stillwater, NV, Vale, OR and Wabuska, NV. In addition, this study showed that dual flash/gas turbine hybrid power plants maybe considered for higher temperature resources with high O&M costs.

  5. UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz

    2004-07-01

    The South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), administratively housed at Clemson University, has participated in the advancement of combustion turbine technology for over a decade. The University Turbine Systems Research Program, previously referred to as the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program, has been administered by SCIES for the U.S. DOE during the 1992-2003 timeframe. The structure of the program is based on a concept presented to the DOE by Clemson University. Under the supervision of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UTSR consortium brings together the engineering departments at leading U.S. universities and U.S. combustion turbine developers to provide a solid base of knowledge for the future generations of land-based gas turbines. In the UTSR program, an Industrial Review Board (IRB) (Appendix C) of gas turbine companies and related organizations defines needed gas turbine research. SCIES prepares yearly requests for university proposals to address the research needs identified by the IRB organizations. IRB technical representatives evaluate the university proposals and review progress reports from the awarded university projects. To accelerate technology transfer technical workshops are held to provide opportunities for university, industry and government officials to share comments and improve quality and relevancy of the research. To provide educational growth at the Universities, in addition to sponsored research, the UTSR provides faculty and student fellowships. The basis for all activities--research, technology transfer, and education--is the DOE Turbine Program Plan and identification, through UTSR consortium group processes, technology needed to meet Program Goals that can be appropriately researched at Performing Member Universities.

  6. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 2: Participant Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  7. Feasibility of Floating Platform Systems for Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Boone, A.

    2003-11-01

    This paper provides a general technical description of several types of floating platforms for wind turbines. Platform topologies are classified into multiple- or single-turbine floaters and by mooring method. Platforms using catenary mooring systems are contrasted to vertical mooring systems and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Specific anchor types are described in detail. A rough cost comparison is performed for two different platform architectures using a generic 5-MW wind turbine. One platform is a Dutch study of a tri-floater platform using a catenary mooring system, and the other is a mono-column tension-leg platform developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Cost estimates showed that single unit production cost is $7.1 M for the Dutch tri-floater, and $6.5 M for the NREL TLP concept. However, value engineering, multiple unit series production, and platform/turbine system optimization can lower the unit platform costs to $4.26 M and $2.88 M, respectively, with significant potential to reduce cost further with system optimization. These foundation costs are within the range necessary to bring the cost of energy down to the DOE target range of $0.05/kWh for large-scale deployment of offshore floating wind turbines.

  8. Wind Turbine Blade Design System - Aerodynamic and Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Soumitr

    2011-12-01

    The ever increasing need for energy and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy" field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind Turbine will enhance its economic viability, which can be achieved by better aerodynamic designs. In the present study, a design system that has been under development for gas turbine turbomachinery has been modified for designing wind turbine blades. This is a very different approach for wind turbine blade design, but will allow it to benefit from the features inherent in the geometry flexibility and broad design space of the presented system. It starts with key overall design parameters and a low-fidelity model that is used to create the initial geometry parameters. The low-fidelity system includes the axisymmetric solver with loss models, T-Axi (Turbomachinery-AXIsymmetric), MISES blade-to-blade solver and 2D wing analysis code XFLR5. The geometry parameters are used to define sections along the span of the blade and connected to the CAD model of the wind turbine blade through CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface), a CAD neutral API that facilitates the use of parametric geometry definition with CAD. Either the sections or the CAD geometry is then available for CFD and Finite Element Analysis. The GE 1.5sle MW wind turbine and NERL NASA Phase VI wind turbine have been used as test cases. Details of the design system application are described, and the resulting wind turbine geometry and conditions are compared to the published results of the GE and NREL wind turbines. A 2D wing analysis code XFLR5, is used for to compare results from 2D analysis to blade-to-blade analysis and the 3D CFD analysis. This kind of comparison concludes that, from hub to 25% of the span blade to blade effects or the cascade effect has to be considered, from 25% to 75%, the blade acts as a 2d wing and from 75% to the tip 3D and tip effects have to be taken into account for design considerations. In addition, the benefits of this approach for wind turbine design and future efforts are discussed.

  9. Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Pillsbury, Paul W. (Winter Springs, FL)

    1990-01-01

    Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The gas turbine system includes a primary zone for burning coal in the presence of compressed air to produce hot combustion gases and debris, such as molten slag. The turbine system further includes a secondary combustion zone for the lean combustion of the hot combustion gases. The operation of the system is improved by the addition of a cyclone separator for removing debris from the hot combustion gases. The cyclone separator is disposed between the primary and secondary combustion zones and is in pressurized communication with these zones. In a novel aspect of the invention, the cyclone separator includes an integrally disposed impact separator for at least separating a portion of the molten slag from the hot combustion gases.

  10. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary layouts were made for the exhaust system, air induction system, and battery installation. Points of interference were identified and resolved by altering either the vehicle or engine designs. An engine general arrangement evolved to meet the vehicle engine compartment constraints while minimizing the duct pressure losses and the heat rejection. A power transfer system (between gasifier and power turbines) was developed to maintain nearly constant temperatures throughout the entire range of engine operation. An advanced four speed automatic transmission was selected to be used with the engine. Performance calculations show improvements in component efficiencies and an increase in fuel economy. A single stage centrifugal compressor design was completed and released for procurement. Gasifier turbine, power turbine, combustor, generator, secondary systems, materials, controls, and transmission development are reported.

  11. Benefits of solar/fossil hybrid gas turbine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    The potential benefits of solar/fossil hybrid gas turbine power systems were assessed. Both retrofit and new systems were considered from the aspects of cost of electricity, fuel conservation, operational mode, technology requirements, and fuels flexibility. Hybrid retrofit (repowering) of existing combustion (simple Brayton cycle) turbines can provide near-term fuel savings and solar experience, while new and advanced recuperated or combined cycle systems may be an attractive fuel saving and economically competitive vehicle to transition from today's gas and oil-fired powerplants to other more abundant fuels.

  12. Benefits of solar/fossil hybrid gas turbine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    The potential benefits of solar/fossil hybrid gas turbine power systems were assessed. Both retrofit and new systems were considered from the aspects of; cost of electricity, fuel conservation, operational mode, technology requirements, and fuels flexibility. Hybrid retrofit (repowering) of existing combustion (simple Brayton cycle) turbines can provide near-term fuel savings and solar experience, while new and advanced recuperated or combined cycle systems may be an attractive fuel saving and economically competitive vehicle to transition from today's gas and oil-fired powerplants to other more abundant fuels.

  13. Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Pillsbury, Paul W. (Winter Springs, FL)

    1990-01-01

    Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The systems include a primary combustion compartment coupled to an impact separator for removing molten slag from hot combustion gases. Quenching means are provided for solidifying the molten slag removed by the impact separator, and processing means are provided forming a slurry from the solidified slag for facilitating removal of the solidified slag from the system. The released hot combustion gases, substantially free of molten slag, are then ducted to a lean combustion compartment and then to an expander section of a gas turbine.

  14. Power fluctuations smoothing and regulations in wind turbine generator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadehrokni, Hamed

    Wind is one of the most popular renewable energy sources and it has the potential to become the biggest energy source in future. Since the wind does not always blow constantly, the output wind power is not constant which may make some problem for the power grid. According to the grid code which is set by independent system operator, ISO, wind turbine generator systems need to follow some standards such as the predetermined acceptable power fluctuations. In order to smooth the output powers, the energy storage system and some power electronics modules are employed. The utilized power electronics modules in the wind turbine system can pursue many different goals, such as maintaining the voltage stability, frequency stability, providing the available and predetermined output active and reactive power. On the other side, the energy storage system can help achieving some of these goals but its main job is to store the extra energy when not needed and release the stored energy when needed. The energy storage system can be designed in different sizes, material and also combination of different energy storage systems (hybrid designs). Combination of power electronics devises and also energy storage system helps the wind turbine systems to smooth the output power according to the provided standards. In addition prediction of wind speed may improve the performance of wind turbine generator systems. In this research study all these three topics are studied and the obtained results are written in 10 papers which 7 of them are published and three of them are under process.

  15. 76 FR 2359 - Great River Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ...Project No. 13637-001] Great River Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted...2010. d. Applicant: Great River Hydropower, LLC. e. Name of Project: Upper...46-foot-wide by 25-foot-high concrete hydropower structure consisting of 30 turbine...

  16. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Southwest Windpower H40 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.; Link, H.; Meadors, M.; Bianchi, J.

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this test was to evaluate the safety and function characteristics of the Whisper H40 wind turbine. The general requirements of wind turbine safety and function tests are defined in the IEC standard WT01. The testing was conducted in accordance with the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) Quality Assurance System, including the NWTC Certification Team Certification Quality Manual and the NWTC Certification Team General Quality Manual for the Testing of Wind Turbines, as well as subordinate documents. This safety and function test was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Field Verification Program for small wind turbines.

  17. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  18. Single module pressurized fuel cell turbine generator system

    DOEpatents

    George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Veyo, Stephen E. (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A pressurized fuel cell system (10), operates within a common pressure vessel (12) where the system contains fuel cells (22), a turbine (26) and a generator (98) where preferably, associated oxidant inlet valve (52), fuel inlet valve (56) and fuel cell exhaust valve (42) are outside the pressure vessel.

  19. BIOMASS COMBUSTION IN GAS-TURBINE-BASED SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a comparative evaluation of a range of biomass power generation systems. he objective was to identify systems most suitable for unique properties of biomass. he characteristics of biomass fuels were reviewed, and the performance of several gas-turbine-b...

  20. Vibration-based SHM System: Application to Wind Turbine Blades

    E-print Network

    Vibration-based SHM System: Application to Wind Turbine Blades D Tcherniak1, L L Mřlgaard2 1 Research Engineer, Br¨uel & Kjćr Sound & Vibration Measurement A/S, Nćrum, Denmark 2 Senior Researcher-mail: dmitri.tcherniak@bksv.com Abstract. This study presents an vibration-based system designed for structural

  1. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  2. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  3. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht H. Mayer

    2000-07-15

    Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.

  4. Final Report: Retrofit Aeration System (RAS) for Francis Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Sullivan; DOE Project Officer Keith Bennett

    2006-08-01

    Osage Plant and Bagnell Dam impounds the Osage River forming the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri. Since it is nearly 100 feet deep, the lake stratifies during the summer months causing low DO water to be discharged into the Osage river below the dam. To supplement DO, the turbines are vented during the low DO season. AmerenUE is continually researching new methods of DO enhancement. New turbines, manufactured by American Hydro Corporation, were installed in Units 3 & 5 during the spring of 2002. Additional vent capacity and new nosecones were included in the new turbine design. The retrofit aeration system is an attempt to further enhance the DO in the tailrace by installation of additional venting capability on Unit 6 (not upgraded with new turbine) and refining design on special nosecones which will be mounted on both Unit 3 (upgraded turbine) and Unit 6. Baseline DO testing for Units 3 & 6 was conducted mid August, 2002. This data wascompared to further tests planned for the summer of 2003 and 2004 after installation of the retrofit aeration system.

  5. Fuel effects on gas turbine combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mosier, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of variations in properties and characteristics of liquid hydrocarbon-base fuels in gas turbine engine combustors was investigated. Baseline fuels consisted of military-specification materials processed from petroleum and shale oil. Experimental fuels were comprised of liquid petroleum blends that were prepared specifically to exhibit desired physical and chemical properties. These fuels were assessed for their influence on ignition and performance characteristics in combustors of the F100, TF30, and J57 (TF33) engines at simulated operating conditions. In general, during relatively short duration tests, combustor ignition and performance became increasingly poorer as fuel quality deviated from specification or historical values.

  6. Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system

    DOEpatents

    Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-10-04

    A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener loads and pitch bearing loads. The shroud may further incorporate a ring gear for driving an electric generator. In one embodiment, the electric generator may be cantilevered from the nacelle such that the gear on the generator drive shaft is contacted by the ring gear of the shroud. The shroud also provides protection for the gearing and aids in preventing gear lubricant contamination.

  7. Wind turbine rotor speed control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kisovec, A.V.

    1982-10-26

    A wind turbine rotor speed control for ensuring a constant rotational speed within tight tolerances includes a self-sufficient rotor incorporating aerodynamic and mechanical devices to provide the control. There is a fixed turbine blade adapted to be mounted on a shaft for rotation therewith, the fixed blade having pivotal blade tips at its respective ends. The pitch control of the blade tips regulates the rotor speed. Aerodynamic tabs are pivotally secured adjacent each of the ends of the respective trailing edges of the fixed blade. The relative wind acts on each tab which is connected to a series of links and pitch cams to regulate the pitch of the blade tips from a feathered position, to a cut-in position, to a rated wind position, and vice-versa. There are torque cams actuated by torsional strain on the shaft bearing which is connected to the shaft and to the pitch cams by a series of links so that as the wind approaches its rated velocity value the pitch cams become ineffective and the torque cams take over the speed control. There are also overspeed centrifugal devices connected to the pitch cams to cause the blade tips to feather in emergency overspeed conditions so as to stop the rotor.

  8. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A gas turbine powertrain for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced environmental impact is investigated. The automotive gas turbine, when installed in an automobile (3000 pounds inertia weight), provides a CFDC fuel economy of 42.8 miles per gallon based on EPA test procedures and diesel No. 2 fuel. The AGT powered vehicle substantially gives the same overall vehicle driveability and performance as a comparable production vehicle powered by a conventional spark ignition powertrain system. The emissions are less than federal standards, and a variety of fuels can be used.

  9. System for pressure modulation of turbine sidewall cavities

    DOEpatents

    Leone, Sal Albert (Scotia, NY); Book, Matthew David (Altamont, NY); Banares, Christopher R. (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method are provided for controlling cooling air flow for pressure modulation of turbine components, such as the turbine outer sidewall cavities. The pressure at which cooling and purge air is supplied to the turbine outer side wall cavities is modulated, based on compressor discharge pressure (Pcd), thereby to generally maintain the back flow margin (BFM) so as to minimize excessive leakage and the consequent performance deterioration. In an exemplary embodiment, the air pressure within the third stage outer side wall cavity and the air pressure within the fourth stage outer side wall cavity are each controlled to a respective value that is a respective prescribed percentage of the concurrent compressor discharge pressure. The prescribed percentage may be determined from a ratio of the respective outer side wall pressure to compressor discharge pressure at Cold Day Turn Down (CDTD) required to provide a prescribed back flow margin.

  10. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the development of a gas turbine engine to improve fuel economy, reduce gaseous emissions and particulate levels, and compatible with a variety of alternate fuels is reported. The powertrain is designated AGT101 and consists of a regenerated single shaft gas turbine engine, a split differential gearbox and a Ford Automatic Overdrive production transmission. The powertrain is controlled by an electronic digital microprocessor and associated actuators, instrumentation, and sensors. Standard automotive accessories are driven by engine power provided by an accessory pad on the gearbox. Component/subsystem development progress is reported in the following areas: compressor, turbine, combustion system, regenerator, gearbox/transmission, structures, ceramic components, foil gas bearing, bearings and seals, rotor dynamics, and controls and accessories.

  11. Impacts of hydropower development on downstream fish passage

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Hydroelectric dams can have a significant impact on anadeomous species (e.g., Atlantic salmon and American shad) that spend most of their adult life in the ocean but return to freshwater to spawn. Mortality can result from turbine passage and delays in downstream migration caused by flow regulation. Minimization and compensation are two general approaches that can be employeed to reduce the adverse impacts of hydroelectric dams on downstream migrants. Mortality resulting from turbine passage can be minimized by (1) installation of intake diversion and bypass systems, (2) collection and transportation of downstream migrants around dams, and (3) controlled spills. Restoration of degraded spawning/nursery habitat, on the other hand, can be employed to compensate for losses in natural production reulting from the construction of new dams or the operation of existing hydroelectric dams. Close cooperation between developers and regulators of hydropower projects will be required to ensure the protection of anadromous fish stocks in regions such as the Northeast where hydropower resources are abundant.

  12. System definition and analysis gas-fired industrial advanced turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, G.M.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to define and analyze an engine system based on the gas fuel Advanced Turbine from Task 3. Using the cycle results of Task 3, a technical effort was started for Task 6 which would establish the definition of the engine flowpath and the key engine component systems. The key engine systems are: gas turbine engine overall flowpath; booster (low pressure compressor); intercooler; high pressure compressor; combustor; high pressure turbine; low pressure turbine and materials; engine system packaging; and power plant configurations. The design objective is to use the GE90 engine as the platform for the GE Industrial Advanced Turbine System. This objective sets the bounds for the engine flowpath and component systems.

  13. Debris trap in a turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

  14. A High Efficiency PSOFC/ATS-Gas Turbine Power System

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; M.D. Moeckel; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2001-02-01

    A study is described in which the conceptual design of a hybrid power system integrating a pressurized Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell generator and the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine was developed. The Mercury{trademark} 50 was designed by Solar Turbines as part of the US. Department of Energy Advanced Turbine Systems program. The focus of the study was to develop the hybrid power system concept that principally would exhibit an attractively-low cost of electricity (COE). The inherently-high efficiency of the hybrid cycle contributes directly to achieving this objective, and by employing the efficient, power-intensive Mercury{trademark} 50, with its relatively-low installed cost, the higher-cost SOFC generator can be optimally sized such that the minimum-COE objective is achieved. The system cycle is described, major system components are specified, the system installed cost and COE are estimated, and the physical arrangement of the major system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the system design point are also presented. In addition, two bottoming cycle options are described, and estimates of their effects on overall-system performance, cost, and COE are provided.

  15. Turbine imaging technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, R. A.; Carlson, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging technologies for observing juvenile fish within a Kaplan turbine, and specifically that would enable scientists to determine mechanisms of fish injury within an operating turbine unit. This report documents the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. These observations were used to make modifications to dam structures and operations to improve conditions for fish passage while maintaining or improving hydropower production. The physical and hydraulic environment that fish experience as they pass through the hydroelectric plants were studied and the regions with the greatest potential for injury were defined. Biological response data were also studied to determine the probable types of injuries sustained in the turbine intake and what types of injuries are detectable with imaging technologies. The study grouped injury-causing mechanisms into two categories: fluid (pressure/cavitation, shear, turbulence) and mechanical (strike/collision, grinding/pinching, scraping). The physical constraints of the environment, together with the likely types of injuries to fish, provided the parameters needed for a rigorous imaging technology evaluation. Types of technology evaluated included both tracking and imaging systems using acoustic technologies (such as sonar and acoustic tags) and optic technologies (such as pulsed-laser videography, which is high-speed videography using a laser as the flash). Criteria for determining image data quality such as frame rate, target detectability, and resolution were used to quantify the minimum requirements of an imaging sensor.

  16. Proposed Wind Turbine Aeroelasticity Studies Using Helicopter Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladkany, Samaan G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced systems for the analysis of rotary wing aeroelastic structures (helicopters) are being developed at NASA Ames by the Rotorcraft Aeromechanics Branch, ARA. The research has recently been extended to the study of wind turbines, used for electric power generation Wind turbines play an important role in Europe, Japan & many other countries because they are non polluting & use a renewable source of energy. European countries such as Holland, Norway & France have been the world leaders in the design & manufacture of wind turbines due to their historical experience of several centuries, in building complex wind mill structures, which were used in water pumping, grain grinding & for lumbering. Fossil fuel cost in Japan & in Europe is two to three times higher than in the USA due to very high import taxes. High fuel cost combined with substantial governmental subsidies, allow wind generated power to be competitive with the more traditional sources of power generation. In the USA, the use of wind energy has been limited mainly because power production from wind is twice as expensive as from other traditional sources. Studies conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) indicate that the main cost in the production of wind turbines is due to the materials & the labor intensive processes used in the construction of turbine structures. Thus, for the US to assume world leadership in wind power generation, new lightweight & consequently very flexible wind turbines, that could be economically mass produced, would have to be developed [4,5]. This effort, if successful, would result in great benefit to the US & the developing nations that suffer from overpopulation & a very high cost of energy.

  17. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, M. J.; Cada, G. F.; Dauble, D. D.; Rinehart, B. N.; Sommers, G. L.; Flynn, J. V.; Brookshier, P. A.

    2001-04-17

    This report describes the activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydropower Program during Fiscal Year 2000 (October 1, 1999, to September 30, 2000). Background, current activities, and future plans are presented in the following sections for all components of the Program. Program focus for FY 2000 was on (1) advanced turbine development, (2) basic and applied R&D, (3) environmental mitigation, (4) low head/low power hydropower technology, and (5) technology transfer.

  18. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  19. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems reference system definition update

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the the Direct Coal-Fueled 80 MW Combustion Turbine Program is to establish the technology required for private sector use of an advanced coal-fueled combustion turbine power system. Under this program the technology for a direct coal-fueled 80 MW combustion turbine is to be developed. This unit would be an element in a 207 MW direct coal-fueled combustion turbine combined cycle which includes two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. Key to meeting the program objectives is the development of a successful high pressure slagging combustor that burns coal, while removing sulfur, particulates, and corrosive alkali matter from the combustion products. Westinghouse and Textron (formerly AVCO Research Laboratory/Textron) have designed and fabricated a subscale slagging combustor. This slagging combustor, under test since September 1988, has been yielding important experimental data, while having undergone several design iterations.

  20. Exergy analysis for a gas turbine cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.D.; Pang, H.S.; Kim, S.M.; Kwak, H.Y.

    1996-10-01

    A general exergy balance equation that is applicable to any component of thermal systems has been formulated in this study. One of distinct features of this formulation is that the exergy involved in the component of any thermal system can be decomposed into exergy flows, entropy production flows, and the appropriate exergy rate terms such as fuel and available work. The exergy analysis based on this equation permits one to predict the thermal efficiency of the system, the exergy destruction in each component as well as the mass flow rate, the composition, and the temperature of the exhaust gases. The authors have examined the performance of a 1,000 kW gas turbine cogeneration system when it is operated at part and full-load conditions through this analysis. They have also tested the effect of the inlet air temperature and the relative humidity of the inlet air on the performance of the system. The predicted values of the performances for the system have been compared with the actual performance data provided by the gas turbine manufacturer. It has been found that the measured data of net power and the properties of exhaust gases are in good agreement with calculation ones, differing by less than 3%. The exergy balance equation may be utilized in the exergoeconomic analysis to estimate the production costs depending on various input costs in a gas turbine cogeneration system.

  1. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  2. Monitoring system of wind turbine rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenstein, B.; Schubert, L.; Meyendorf, N.; Friedmann, H.; Ebert, C.

    2009-03-01

    Conventionally, modal monitoring of Wind Turbine Rotor Blades is primarily based on the evaluation of eigenfrequencies. Beyond this, combining a sensor network with the Operational Modal Analysis (OMA) method, mode shape and parallely a local component are utilized here. In addition it is expected that the damping, which is also determined by the OMA method, will give a lead on damage development at the rotor already at an early stage. Modal monitoring by means of measurement is combined with FEM simulation and with the comparison of results obtained from measurement and simulation. Moreover, this will establish a connection between the engineer and the design data of a rotor blade, which also are based on FEM analyzes. A further significant increase regarding error resolution is possible by combining the global modal methods with locally sensitive monitoring methods, based on guided elastic waves. These assume plate-like structures through which elastic waves propagate in the low-frequency ultrasonic range (10 - 100 kHz) in certain modes. These different wave modes interact distinctively with inner structural damages such as web fractures and delaminations. It is differentiated between piezoelectrically excited waves (acousto ultrasonics), and waves produced by energy released at fractures, delamination etc. (acoustic emission). Applying a moderate number of sensors, the combination of both methods can allow an effective monitoring of the global structure.

  3. Steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David (Mauldin, SC); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY); Li, Ming Cheng (Cincinnati, OH); Hyde, Susan Marie (Schenectady, NY); Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY); Wesorick, Ronald Richard (Albany, NY); Glynn, Christopher Charles (Hamilton, OH); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Cincinnati, OH)

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows.

  4. Control of wind turbine generators connected to power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, H. H.; Mozeico, H. V.; Gilbert, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    A unique simulation model based on a Mode-O wind turbine is developed for simulating both speed and power control. An analytical representation for a wind turbine that employs blade pitch angle feedback control is presented, and a mathematical model is formulated. For Mode-O serving as a practical case study, results of a computer simulation of the model as applied to the problems of synchronization and dynamic stability are provided. It is shown that the speed and output of a wind turbine can be satisfactorily controlled within reasonable limits by employing the existing blade pitch control system under specified conditions. For power control, an additional excitation control is required so that the terminal voltage, output power factor, and armature current can be held within narrow limits. As a result, the variation of torque angle is limited even if speed control is not implemented simultaneously with power control. Design features of the ERDA/NASA 100-kW Mode-O wind turbine are included.

  5. Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

    2006-01-01

    Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program. Emissions measurements were obtained over a variety of operating conditions. A kinetics model is formulated to describe the emissions performance. The model is a tool for determining the conditions for low emission performance. The flow field was also modeled using CFD. A first prototype was developed for low emission performance on natural gas. The design utilized the tools anchored to the atmospheric prototype performance. The 1/6 scale combustor was designed for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. A second prototype was developed to evaluate changes in the design approach. The prototype was developed at a 1/10 scale for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. The performance of the first two prototypes gave a strong indication of the best design approach. Review of the emission results led to the development of a 3rd prototype to further reduce the combustor emissions. The original plan to produce a scaled-up prototype was pushed out beyond the scope of the current program. The 3rd prototype was designed at 1/10 scale and targeted further reductions in the full-speed full-load emissions.

  6. Optimizing Hydropower Day-Ahead Scheduling for the Oroville-Thermalito Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselka, T. D.; Mahalik, M.

    2012-12-01

    Under an award from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Water Power Program, a team of national laboratories is developing and demonstrating a suite of advanced, integrated analytical tools to assist managers and planners increase hydropower resources while enhancing the environment. As part of the project, Argonne National Laboratory is developing the Conventional Hydropower Energy and Environmental Systems (CHEERS) model to optimize day-ahead scheduling and real-time operations. We will present the application of CHEERS to the Oroville-Thermalito Project located in Northern California. CHEERS will aid California Department of Water Resources (CDWR) schedulers in making decisions about unit commitments and turbine-level operating points using a system-wide approach to increase hydropower efficiency and the value of power generation and ancillary services. The model determines schedules and operations that are constrained by physical limitations, characteristics of plant components, operational preferences, reliability, and environmental considerations. The optimization considers forebay and afterbay implications, interactions between cascaded power plants, turbine efficiency curves and rough zones, and operator preferences. CHEERS simultaneously considers over time the interactions among all CDWR power and water resources, hydropower economics, reservoir storage limitations, and a set of complex environmental constraints for the Thermalito Afterbay and Feather River habitats. Power marketers, day-ahead schedulers, and plant operators provide system configuration and detailed operational data, along with feedback on model design and performance. CHEERS is integrated with CDWR data systems to obtain historic and initial conditions of the system as the basis from which future operations are then optimized. Model results suggest alternative operational regimes that improve the value of CDWR resources to the grid while enhancing the environment and complying with water delivery obligations for non-power uses.

  7. Advanced, Environmentally Friendly Hydroelectric Turbines for the Restoration of Fish and Water Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Brookshier, P.A.; Cada, G.F.; Flynn, J.V.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sale, M.J.; Sommers, G.L.

    1999-09-06

    Hydroelectric power contributes about 10 percent of the electrical energy generated in the United States, and nearly 20 percent of the world?s electrical energy. The contribution of hydroelectric generation has declined in recent years, often as a consequence of environmental concerns centering around (1) restriction of upstream and downstream fish passage by the dam, and (2) alteration of water quality and river flows by the impoundment. The Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy is developing turbine technology which would help to maximize global hydropower resources while minimizing adverse environmental effects. Major technical goals for the Program are (1) the reduction of mortality among turbine-passed fish to 2 percent or less, compared to current levels ranging up to 30 percent or greater; and (2) development of aerating turbines that would ensure that water discharged from reservoirs has a dissolved oxygen concentration of at least 6 mg/L. These advanced, ?environmentally friendly? turbines would be suitable both for new hydropower installations and for retrofitting at existing dams. Several new turbine designs that have been he AHTS program are described.

  8. The Use of Advanced Hydroelectric Turbines to Improve Water Quality and Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect

    Brookshier, P.A.; Cada, G.F.; Flynn, J.V.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sale, M.J.; Sommers, G.L.

    1999-09-20

    Hydroelectric power contributes about 10 percent of the electrical energy generated in the United States, and nearly 20 percent of the world?s electrical energy. It is a renewable energy source that can contribute significantly to reduction of greenhouse gases by offsetting conventional carbon-based electricity generation. However, rather than growing in importance, hydroelectric generation has actually declined in recent years, often as a consequence of environmental concerns centering around (1) restriction of upstream and downstream fish passage by the dam, and (2) alteration of water quality and river flows by the impoundment. The Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy is developing turbine technology which would help to maximize global hydropower resources while minimizing adverse environmental effects. Major technical goals for the Program are (1) the reduction of mortality among turbine-passed fish to 2 percent or less, compared to current levels ranging up to 30 percent or greater; and (2) development of aerating turbines that would ensure that water discharged from reservoirs has a dissolved oxygen concentration of at least 6 mg/L. These advanced, ?environmentally friendly? turbines would be suitable both for new hydropower installations and for retrofitting at existing dams. Several new turbine designs that have been developed in the initial phases of the AHTS program are described.

  9. A Portable Expert System for Gas Turbine Maintenance 

    E-print Network

    Quentin, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    Combustion turbines for electric power generation and industrial applications have steadily increased in size, efficiency and prominence. The newest class of gas turbine-generators coming into service will deliver 150 megawatts, with turbine inlet...

  10. Design and Implementation of a new Autonomous Sensor Fish to Support Advanced Hydropower Development

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Tian, Chuan; Morris, Scott J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Zhou, Da; Hou, Hongfei

    2014-11-04

    Acceleration in development of additional conventional hydropower requires tools and methods to perform laboratory and in-field validation of turbine performance and fish passage claims. The new-generation Sensor Fish has been developed with more capabilities to accommodate a wider range of users over a wider range of turbine designs and operating environments. It provides in situ measurements of three dimensional (3D) accelerations, 3D rotational velocities, 3D orientation, pressure, and temperature at a sampling frequency of 2048 Hz. It also has an automatic floatation system and built-in radio frequency transmitter for recovery. The relative errors of the pressure, acceleration and rotational velocity were within ±2%, ±5%, and ±5%, respectively. The accuracy of orientation was within ±4° and accuracy of temperature was ±2°C. It is being deployed to evaluate the biological effects of turbines or other hydraulic structures in several countries.

  11. UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH-HIGH EFFICIENCY ENGINES AND TURBINES (UTSR-HEET)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz; William H. Day

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the U S Department of Energy established a cooperative agreement for a program now designated as the University Turbine Systems (UTSR) Program. As stated in the cooperative agreement, the objective of the program is to support and facilitate development of advanced energy systems incorporating turbines through a university research environment. This document is the first annual, technical progress report for the UTSR Program. The Executive Summary describes activities for the year of the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), which administers the UTSR Program. Included are descriptions of: Outline of program administrative activities; Award of the first 10 university research projects resulting from a year 2001 RFP; Year 2002 solicitation and proposal selection for awards in 2003; Three UTSR Workshops in Combustion, Aero/Heat Transfer, and Materials; SCIES participation in workshops and meetings to provide input on technical direction for the DOE HEET Program; Eight Industrial Internships awarded to higher level university students; Increased membership of Performing Member Universities to 105 institutions in 40 states; Summary of outreach activities; and a Summary table describing the ten newly awarded UTSR research projects. Attachment A gives more detail on SCIES activities by providing the monthly exceptions reports sent to the DOE during the year. Attachment B provides additional information on outreach activities for 2002. The remainder of this report describes in detail the technical approach, results, and conclusions to date for the UTSR university projects.

  12. DESIGN OF SMALL SCALE GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS FOR UNMANNED-AERIAL VEHICLES

    E-print Network

    Camci, Cengiz

    DESIGN OF SMALL SCALE GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS FOR UNMANNED-AERIAL VEHICLES (AERSP 597/497-K) SPRING 814 865 9871 cxc11@psu.edu Summary : The proposed course is a three-credit gas turbine design course will be evaluated against (agreed) deadlines by the instructor. A number of lecturers from the gas turbine industry

  13. Proceedings of the Advanced Turbine Systems annual program review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Goals of the 8-year program are to develop cleaner, more efficient, and less expensive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial electric power generation, cogeneration, and mechanical drive units. During this Nov. 9-11, 1994, meeting, presentations on energy policy issues were delivered by representatives of regulatory, industry, and research institutions; program overviews and technical reviews were given by contractors; and ongoing and proposed future projects sponsored by university and industry were presented and displayed at the poster session. Panel discussions on distributed power and Advanced Gas Systems Research education provided a forum for interactive dialog and exchange of ideas. Exhibitors included US DOE, Solar Turbines, Westinghouse, Allison Engine Co., and GE.

  14. Cooling systems for ultra-high temperature turbines.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes an introduction of research and development activities on steam cooling in gas turbines at elevated temperature of 1500 C and 1700 C level, partially including those on water cooling. Descriptions of a new cooling system that employs heat pipes are also made. From the view point of heat transfer, its promising applicability is shown with experimental data and engine performance numerical evaluation. PMID:11460628

  15. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

  16. Reliability, Availability and Maintainability Considerations for Gas Turbine Cogeneration Systems 

    E-print Network

    Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    that one filter can be INSTALLATION, COMMISSIONING & STARTUP cleaned while the other is in service. Lube oil systems should have provisions for tie-ins for Adequate care taken during installation, commi centrifuges so that oil cleaning can be accom... is be assigned to supervise the overall machinery assembly available for overhead cranes or swing cranes. at the cogeneration site. Special car'e should be taken during component lifting, cleaning and inspection of In the case of Industrial Gas Turbines...

  17. Instrumentation for propulsion systems development. [high speed fans and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, I.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus and techniques developed or used by NASA-Lewis to make steady state or dynamic measurements of gas temperature, pressure, and velocity and of the temperature, tip clearance, and vibration of the blades of high-speed fans or turbines are described. The advantages and limitations of each instrument and technique are discussed and the possibility of modifying them for use in developing various propulsion systems is suggested.

  18. Advanced technology cogeneration system conceptual design study: Closed cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, E. A. T.; Daudet, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a three task study performed for the Department of Energy under the direction of the NASA Lewis Research Center are documented. The thermal and electrical energy requirements of three specific industrial plants were surveyed and cost records for the energies consumed were compiled. Preliminary coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed heated closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration system designs were developed for each industrial plant. Preliminary cost and return-on-equity values were calculated and the results compared. The best of the three sites was selected for more detailed design and evaluation of both closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems during Task II. Task III involved characterizing the industrial sector electrical and thermal loads for the 48 contiguous states, applying a family of closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems to these loads, and conducting a market penetration analysis of the closed cycle gas turbine cogeneration system.

  19. 2014 Hydropower Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Uria-Martinez, Rocio; O'Connor, Patrick W.; Johnson, Megan M.

    2015-04-30

    The U.S. hydropower fleet has been providing clean, reliable power for more than a hundred years. However, no systematic documentation exists of the U.S. fleet and the trends influencing it in recent years. This first-ever Hydropower Market Report seeks to fill this gap and provide industry and policy makers with a quantitative baseline on the distribution, capabilities, and status of hydropower in the United States.

  20. Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, Colin (Lebanon, IN); Mongia, Hukam C. (Carmel, IN)

    1993-01-01

    A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

  1. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system initial development report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The powertrain consists of a single shaft regenerated gas turbine engine utilizing ceramic hot section components, coupled to a slit differential gearbox with an available variable stator torque converter and an available Ford intergral overdrive four-speed automatic transmission. Predicted fuel economy using gasoline fuel over the combined federal driving cycle (CFDC) is 15.3 km/1, which represents a 59% improvement over the spark-ignition-powered baseline vehicle. Using DF2 fuel, CFDC mileage estimates are 17.43 km/1. Zero to 96.6 km/hr acceleration time is 11.9 seconds with a four-second accleration distance of 21.0 m. The ceramic radial turbine rotor is discussed along with the control system for the powertrain.

  2. Development of an aeroderivative gas turbine DLE combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, G.; Stegmaier, J. )

    1993-05-01

    GE embarked on the detailed design of a new gas-fired, premixed combustion system for its family of aeroderivative gas turbines. This new lean premixed system, sometimes referred to as a dry low-NO[sub x], or a dry low-emissions combustion system, will reduce the emissions of NO[sub x] to less than 25 ppm. The emissions of other pollutants, such as CO, unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), and particulates are also expected to be extremely low. The effects of engine operating conditions and combustor film cooling on emissions and lean flame stability were also studied in some detail. 4 figs.

  3. Drive turbine system for 20-inch turbofan simulators. 2: Core turbine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Drive-turbines for a given set of 20-inch turbo-fan simulators are described. The simulators had both single-stage and two-stage fans that had design pressure ratios as low as 1.25 and as high as 3.0. The desired objective of the study was to be able to drive all of the single-stage fans with one core turbine and to drive all of the two-stage fans with this same core turbine in combination with a duct turbine. The core turbine is described. Included are the design operating conditions, design velocity diagram and a power-speed envelope determined by an off-design performance procedure. Also discussed is the adaption and scaling of an existing turbine design to this particular application.

  4. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-09-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  5. Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed $1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

  6. Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-09-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed 1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

  7. Multi-Megawatt Gas Turbine Power Systems for Lunar Colonies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2006-01-01

    A concept for development of second generation 10 MWe prototype lunar power plant utilizing a gas cooled fission reactor supplying heated helium working fluid to two parallel 5 MWe closed cycle gas turbines is presented. Such a power system is expected to supply the energy needs for an initial lunar colony with a crew of up to 50 persons engaged in mining and manufacturing activities. System performance and mass details were generated by an author developed code (BRMAPS). The proposed pilot power plant can be a model for future plants of the same capacity that could be tied to an evolutionary lunar power grid.

  8. Hydropower annual report 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, Glenn F.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Hunt, Richard T.; Sale, Michael J.; Sommers, Garold L.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes hydropower activities supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind and Hydropower Program during Fiscal Year 2003 (October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003). Background on the program, FY03 accomplishments, and future plans are presented in the following sections.

  9. Developing international hydropower

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.B. )

    1993-03-01

    Through the rest of the decade, many of the available hydropower development opportunities will be in the international marketplace. Tapping into this market will be particularly difficult for US companies without a decisive support strategy. Non-US companies have several distinct advantages for developing hydropower projects overseas. With more government support and unified industry efforts, US developers might level the playing field.

  10. Gas turbine engine fuel control system

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, R.G.

    1983-10-04

    A fuel system includes a known hydromechanical governor fuel control, which has an electromechanical trim device. The trim device is controlled by a circuit which includes an error signal generating means for producing an error signal representing the difference between the desired and actual values of an engine parameter a proportional-plus-integral controller circuit, a trim datum signal generator and a differentiator which connects the generator to the integrator of the controller, so that in transient conditions the integrator output will ramp to a new value required for a new steady state condition.

  11. Cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David (Mauldin, SC); Salamah, Samir Armando (Niskayuna, NY); Bylina, Noel Jacob (Niskayuna, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A plurality of arcuate circumferentially spaced supply and return manifold segments are arranged on the rim of a rotor for respectively receiving and distributing cooling steam through exit ports for distribution to first and second-stage buckets and receiving spent cooling steam from the first and second-stage buckets through inlet ports for transmission to axially extending return passages. Each of the supply and return manifold segments has a retention system for precluding substantial axial, radial and circumferential displacement relative to the rotor. The segments also include guide vanes for minimizing pressure losses in the supply and return of the cooling steam. The segments lie substantially equal distances from the centerline of the rotor and crossover tubes extend through each of the segments for communicating steam between the axially adjacent buckets of the first and second stages, respectively.

  12. Analysis methods for wind turbine control and electrical system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1995-05-01

    The integration of new energy technologies into electric power systems requires methods which recognize the full range of dynamic events in both the new generating unit and the power system. Since new energy technologies are initially perceived as small contributors to large systems, little attention is generally paid to system integration, i.e. dynamic events in the power system are ignored. As a result, most new energy sources are only capable of base-load operation, i.e. they have no load following or cycling capability. Wind turbines are no exception. Greater awareness of this implicit (and often unnecessary) limitation is needed. Analysis methods are recommended which include very low penetration (infinite bus) as well as very high penetration (stand-alone) scenarios.

  13. Analysis methods for wind turbine control and electrical system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1995-01-01

    The integration of new energy technologies into electric power systems requires methods which recognize the full range of dynamic events in both the new generating unit and the power system. Since new energy technologies are initially perceived as small contributors to large systems, little attention is generally paid to system integration, i.e. dynamic events in the power system are ignored. As a result, most new energy sources are only capable of base-load operation, i.e. they have no load following or cycling capability. Wind turbines are no exception. Greater awareness of this implicit (and often unnecessary) limitation is needed. Analysis methods are recommended which include very low penetration (infinite bus) as well as very high penetration (stand-alone) scenarios.

  14. Turbine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Per

    Turbines for most space propulsion applications, such as the hydrogen and oxygen pump turbines for the Vulcain engine, are characterized by a high pressure ratio, a highly energetic working fluid, and a small size. Data on Vulcain turbines are given. The following topics are reviewed: turbine concept design and design tools; blade design; losses occurring in a blade which are due to friction, secondary flow, tip clearance and shock formation; and turbine testing. The purpose of any turbine is to provide power for other parts of an engineering system (compressors, electrical generators, pumps) or to drive mechanical components such as wheels or propellers to give propulsion to a vehicle. It should therefore always be the performance and cost effectiveness of this larger system and not of the isolated turbine that are the main objectives for the turbine design engineer.

  15. Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeffrey

    2008-09-30

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector development, multiple concepts including high thermal resistance thermal barrier coatings (TBC), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC), and monolithic ceramics were evaluated before down-selection to the most promising candidate materials for field evaluation. Preliminary, component and sub-scale testing was conducted to determine material properties and demonstrate proof-of-concept. Full-scale rig and engine testing was used to validated engine performance prior to field evaluation at a Qualcomm Inc. cogeneration site located in San Diego, California. To ensure that the CFCC liners with the EBC proposed under this program would meet the target life, field evaluations of ceramic matrix composite liners in Centaur{reg_sign} 50 gas turbine engines, which had previously been conducted under the DOE sponsored Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program (DE-AC02-92CE40960), was continued under this program at commercial end-user sites under Program Subtask 1A - Extended CFCC Materials Durability Testing. The goal of these field demonstrations was to demonstrate significant component life, with milestones of 20,000 and 30,000 hours. Solar personnel monitor the condition of the liners at the field demonstration sites through periodic borescope inspections and emissions measurements. This program was highly successful at evaluating advanced materials and down-selecting promising solutions for use in gas turbine combustions systems. The addition of the advanced materials technology has enabled the predicted life of the Mercury 50 combustion system to reach 30,000 hours, which is Solar's typical time before overhaul for production engines. In particular, a 40 mil thick advanced Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system was selected over various other TBC systems, ODS liners and CFCC liners for the 4,000-hour field evaluation under the program. This advanced TBC is now production bill-of-material at various thicknesses up to 40 mils for all of Solar's advanced backside-cooled combustor liners (Centaur 50, Taurus 60, Mars 100, Taurus 70,

  16. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-15

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  17. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1998-10-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

  18. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  19. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-29

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

  20. Lightning accommodation systems for wind turbine generator safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    The wind turbine safety program identifies the naturally occurring lightning phenomenon as a hazard with the potential to cause loss of program objectives, injure personnel, damage system instrumentation, structure or support equipment and facilities. Several candidate methods of lightning accommodation for each blade were designed, analyzed, and tested by submitting sample blade sections to simulated lightning. Lightning accommodation systems for composite blades were individually developed. Their effectiveness was evaluated by submitting the systems to simulated lightning strikes. The test data were analyzed and system designs were reviewed on the basis of the analysis. This activity is directed at defining design and procedural constraints, requirements for safety devices and warning methods, special procedures, protective equipment and personnel training.

  1. Lightning accommodation systems for wind turbine generator safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1981-01-01

    The wind turbine safety program identifies the naturally occurring lightning phenomenon as a hazard with the potential to cause loss of program objectives, injure personnel, damage system instrumentation, structure or support equipment and facilities. Several candidate methods of lightning accommodation for each blade were designed, analyzed, and tested by submitting sample blade sections to simulated lightning. Lightning accommodation systems for composite blades were individually developed. Their effectiveness was evaluated by submitting the systems to simulated lightning strikes. The test data were analyzed and system designs were reviewed on the basis of the analysis. This activity is directed at defining design and procedural constraints, requirements for safety devices and warning methods, special procedures, protective equipment and personnel training.

  2. Hydropower Resource Assessment of Brazilian Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Hall

    2011-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with the assistance of the Empresa de Pesquisa Energetica (EPE) and the Agencia Nacional de Energia Electrica (ANEEL) has performed a comprehensive assessment of the hydropower potential of all Brazilian natural streams. The methodology by which the assessment was performed is described. The results of the assessment are presented including an estimate of the hydropower potential for all of Brazil, and the spatial distribution of hydropower potential thus providing results on a state by state basis. The assessment results have been incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) application for the Internet called the Virtual Hydropower Prospector do Brasil. VHP do Brasil displays potential hydropower sites on a map of Brazil in the context of topography and hydrography, existing power and transportation infrastructure, populated places and political boundaries, and land use. The features of the application, which includes tools for finding and selecting potential hydropower sites and other features and displaying their attributes, is fully described.

  3. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  4. Integrating Systems Health Management with Adaptive Controls for a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Goebel, Kai; Trinh, Khanh V.; Balas, Mark J.; Frost, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. Systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage. Advanced adaptive controls can provide the mechanism to enable optimized operations that also provide the enabling technology for Systems Health Management goals. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbine blades with contingency management and adaptive controls. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  5. A noninterference blade vibration measurement system for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, William B.; Chi, Ray M.

    1987-06-01

    A noninterfering blade vibration system has been demonstrated in tests of a gas turbine first stage fan. Conceptual design of the system, including its theory, design of case mounted probes, and data acquisition and signal processing hardware was done in a previous effort. The current effort involved instrumentation of an engine fan stage with strain gages; data acquisition using shaft-mounted reference and case-mounted optical probes; recording of data on a wideband tape recorder; and posttest processing using off-line analysis in a facility computer and a minicomputer-based readout system designed for near- real-time readout. Results are presented in terms of true blade vibration frequencies, time and frequency dependent vibration amplitudes and comparison of the optical noninterference results with strain gage readings.

  6. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An automotive gas turbine powertrain system which, when installed in a 1985 production vehicle (3000 pounds inertia weight), is being developed with a CFDC fuel economy of 42.8 miles per gallon based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) test procedures and diesel No. 2 fuel. The AGT-powered vehicle shall give substantially the same overall vehicle driveability and performance as a comparable 1985 production vehicle powered by a conventional spark ignition powertrain system (baseline system). Gaseous emissions and particulate levels less than: NOx = 0.4 gm/mile, HC = 0.41 gm/mile, and CO = 3.4 gm/mile, and a total particulate of 0.2 gm/mile, using the same fuel as used for fuel economy measurements is expected, along with the ability to use a variety of alternate fuels.

  7. UNSTEADY, COOLED TURBINE SIMULATION USING A PC-LINUX ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Cincinnati, University of

    1 UNSTEADY, COOLED TURBINE SIMULATION USING A PC-LINUX ANALYSIS SYSTEM Michael G. List1 , Mark G-processor, GUMBO, and a post- processing and visualization tool, Turbomachinery Visual3 (TV3) were run in a Linux for running unsteady, cooled turbine analysis on commodity PC's running the Linux operating system

  8. Development of Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    General Electric Global Research will define, develop, and test new fuel nozzle technology concepts for gas turbine operation on a wide spectrum of opportunity fuels and/or fuel blends. This will enable gas turbine operation on ultra-low Btu fuel streams such as very weak natural gas, highly-diluted industrial process gases, or gasified waste streams that are out of the capability range of current turbine systems.

  9. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development: Quarterly report, November 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress made in the advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. The topics of the report include selection of the Allison GFATS, castcool technology development for industrial engines test plan and schedule, code development and background gathering phase for the ultra low NOx combustion technology task, active turbine clearance task, and water vapor/air mixture cooling of turbine vanes task.

  10. Shaken, not stirred: The recipe for a fish-friendly turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.

    1997-03-01

    It is generally agreed that injuries and mortalities among turbine-passed fish can result from several mechanisms, including rapid and extreme water pressure changes, cavitation, shear, turbulence, and mechanical injuries (strike and grinding). Advances in the instrumentation available for monitoring hydraulic conditions and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques now make it possible both to estimate accurately the levels of these potential injury mechanisms in operating turbines and to predict the levels in new turbine designs. This knowledge can be used to {open_quotes}design-out{close_quotes} the most significant injury mechanisms in the next generation of turbines. However, further improvements in turbine design are limited by a poor understanding of the levels of mechanical and hydraulic stresses that can be tolerated by turbine-passed fish. The turbine designers need numbers (biological criteria) that define a safety zone for fish within which pressures, shear forces, cavitation, and chance of mechanical strike are all at acceptable levels for survival. This paper presents the results of a literature review of fish responses to the types of biological stresses associated with turbine passage, as studied separately under controlled conditions in the laboratory rather than in combination at field sites. Some of the controlled laboratory and field studies reviewed here were bioassays carried out for reasons unrelated to hydropower production. Analysis of this literature was used to develop provisional biological criteria for hydroelectric turbine designers. These biological criteria have been utilized in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program to evaluate the results of conceptual engineering designs and the potential value of future turbine models and prototypes.

  11. The use of small advanced turbine units in distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    There is a tremendous future for the application of small- and medium-sized advanced gas turbine systems in the world markets. Modern, industrialized countries; developing countries like China and the former republics of the Soviet Union; as well as island-based economies, such as those in Southeast Asia -- Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia--will be able to realize the economic advantages and environmental benefits of what is now becoming known as {open_quotes}distributed resources{close_quotes}. I am more convinced of this opinion after delivering s similar speech and conversing with conferees at POWER-GEN Asia 1995 held in Singapore in late September of this year; and discussing the subject with a high level delegation from China that visited the Energy Commission in early October. The interest, at least amongst this small group of people was nothing short of a market researcher`s dream. While my focus today is on small turbines, we should realize that when these advanced, clean units become commercially available, perhaps as early as four or five years from now, other distributed generation resources such as solar photovoltaic, and fuel cells, will become competitors at the distribution level of electrical service.

  12. Apparatus and method for gas turbine active combustion control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeh, Chukwueloka (Inventor); Kammer, Leonardo C. (Inventor); Shah, Minesh (Inventor); Fortin, Jeffrey B. (Inventor); Knobloch, Aaron (Inventor); Myers, William J. (Inventor); Mancini, Alfred Albert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An Active Combustion Control System and method provides for monitoring combustor pressure and modulating fuel to a gas turbine combustor to prevent combustion dynamics and/or flame extinguishments. The system includes an actuator, wherein the actuator periodically injects pulsed fuel into the combustor. The apparatus also includes a sensor connected to the combustion chamber down stream from an inlet, where the sensor generates a signal detecting the pressure oscillations in the combustor. The apparatus controls the actuator in response to the sensor. The apparatus prompts the actuator to periodically inject pulsed fuel into the combustor at a predetermined sympathetic frequency and magnitude, thereby controlling the amplitude of the pressure oscillations in the combustor by modulating the natural oscillations.

  13. Oil cooling system for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A.; Kast, H. B. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    A gas turbine engine fuel delivery and control system is provided with means to recirculate all fuel in excess of fuel control requirements back to aircraft fuel tank, thereby increasing the fuel pump heat sink and decreasing the pump temperature rise without the addition of valving other than that normally employed. A fuel/oil heat exchanger and associated circuitry is provided to maintain the hot engine oil in heat exchange relationship with the cool engine fuel. Where anti-icing of the fuel filter is required, means are provided to maintain the fuel temperature entering the filter at or above a minimum level to prevent freezing thereof. Fluid circuitry is provided to route hot engine oil through a plurality of heat exchangers disposed within the system to provide for selective cooling of the oil.

  14. Modeling Wind Turbines in the Simulation of Power System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlich, Istvan; Shewarega, Fekadu; Scheufeld, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling of variable speed wind turbines for stability studies. Using the space-phasor representation and the fundamental relationships governing the operation of the machine quasi stationary model, suitable control algorithms for the simulation of the doubly-fed induction machine (DFIM) as well as the permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM) operating on an interconnected system are developed. The control schemes include the pitch-angle/speed control and the decoupled control of the real and reactive power outputs. As an additional modeling option, the generic model for variable speed machine has been introduced. The models were then implemented on a representative test network, and simulations have been carried out to observe the response of the control system to typical abnormal situations such as three phase grid faults to compare the accuracy of the generic models with the detailed quasi-stationary (QSS) models.

  15. Study on Unified Chaotic System-Based Wind Turbine Blade Fault Diagnostic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ying-Che; Hsieh, Chin-Tsung; Yau, Her-Terng; Li, Yu-Chung

    At present, vibration signals are processed and analyzed mostly in the frequency domain. The spectrum clearly shows the signal structure and the specific characteristic frequency band is analyzed, but the number of calculations required is huge, resulting in delays. Therefore, this study uses the characteristics of a nonlinear system to load the complete vibration signal to the unified chaotic system, applying the dynamic error to analyze the wind turbine vibration signal, and adopting extenics theory for artificial intelligent fault diagnosis of the analysis signal. Hence, a fault diagnostor has been developed for wind turbine rotating blades. This study simulates three wind turbine blade states, namely stress rupture, screw loosening and blade loss, and validates the methods. The experimental results prove that the unified chaotic system used in this paper has a significant effect on vibration signal analysis. Thus, the operating conditions of wind turbines can be quickly known from this fault diagnostic system, and the maintenance schedule can be arranged before the faults worsen, making the management and implementation of wind turbines smoother, so as to reduce many unnecessary costs.

  16. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

  17. Using Conventional Hydropower to Help Alleviate Variable Resource Grid Integration Challenges in the Western U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L.

    2011-12-01

    Integrating high penetration levels of wind and solar energy resources into the power grid is a formidable challenge in virtually all interconnected systems due to the fact that supply and demand must remain in balance at all times. Since large scale electricity storage is currently not economically viable, generation must exactly match electricity demand plus energy losses in the system as time unfolds. Therefore, as generation from variable resources such as wind and solar fluctuate, production from generating resources that are easier to control and dispatch need to compensate for these fluctuations while at the same time respond to both instantaneous change in load and follow daily load profiles. The grid in the Western U.S. is not exempt to grid integration challenges associated with variable resources. However, one advantage that the power system in the Western U.S. has over many other regional power systems is that its footprint contains an abundance of hydropower resources. Hydropower plants, especially those that have reservoir water storage, can physically change electricity production levels very quickly both via a dispatcher and through automatic generation control. Since hydropower response time is typically much faster than other dispatchable resources such as steam or gas turbines, it is well suited to alleviate variable resource grid integration issues. However, despite an abundance of hydropower resources and the current low penetration of variable resources in the Western U.S., problems have already surfaced. This spring in the Pacific Northwest, wetter than normal hydropower conditions in combination with transmission constraints resulted in controversial wind resource shedding. This action was taken since water spilling would have increased dissolved oxygen levels downstream of dams thereby significantly degrading fish habitats. The extent to which hydropower resources will be able to contribute toward a stable and reliable Western grid is currently being studied. Typically these studies consider the inherent flexibility of hydropower technologies, but tend to fall short on details regarding grid operations, institutional arrangements, and hydropower environmental regulations. This presentation will focus on an analysis that Argonne National Laboratory is conducting in collaboration with the Western Area Power Administration (Western). The analysis evaluates the extent to which Western's hydropower resources may help with grid integration challenges via a proposed Energy Imbalance Market. This market encompasses most of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council footprint. It changes grid operations such that the real-time dispatch would be, in part, based on a 5-minute electricity market. The analysis includes many factors such as site-specific environmental considerations at each of its hydropower facilities, long-term firm purchase agreements, and hydropower operating objectives and goals. Results of the analysis indicate that site-specific details significantly affect the ability of hydropower plant to respond to grid needs in a future which will have a high penetration of variable resources.

  18. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-10-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

  19. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

  20. Climate Warming and Adaptability of High-Elevation Hydropower Generation in California

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    and allows more hydropower generation in the summer when energy price is greater. Currently, CaliforniaClimate Warming and Adaptability of High-Elevation Hydropower Generation in California Kaveh Madani's high-elevation hydropower system is composed of more than 150 power plants. Most of the associated

  1. Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Robert J. (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-12-15

    An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

  2. Oil cooling system for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A.; Kast, H. B. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    A gas turbine engine fuel delivery and control system is provided with means to recirculate all fuel in excess fuel control requirements back to the aircraft fuel tank. This increases the fuel pump heat sink and decreases the pump temperature rise without the addition of valving other than normally employed. A fuel/oil heat exchanger and associated circuitry is provided to maintain the hot engine oil in heat exchange relationship with the cool engine fuel. Where anti-icing of the fuel filter is required, means are provided to maintain the fuel temperature entering the filter at or above a minimum level to prevent freezing thereof. In one embodiment, a divider valve is provided to take all excess fuel from either upstream or downstream of the fuel filter and route it back to the tanks, the ratio of upstream to downstream extraction being a function of fuel pump discharge pressure.

  3. Int. Symp. on Heat Transfer in Gas Turbine Systems 9 14 August, 2009, Antalya, Turkey

    E-print Network

    Camci, Cengiz

    Int. Symp. on Heat Transfer in Gas Turbine Systems 9 ­ 14 August, 2009, Antalya, Turkey EXPERIMENTAL TURBINE AERO-HEAT TRANSFER STUDIES IN ROTATING RESEARCH FACILITIES Cengiz Camci Turbomachinery Aero-Heat Transfer Laboratory Department of Aerospace Engineering The Pennsylvania State University 233

  4. Mod-2 wind turbine system cluster research test program. Volume 1: Initial plan E-1290

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Upon completion of the design and development of three Mod-2 wind turbines, a series of research experiments are planned to gather data on and evaluate the performance, environmental effects, and operation of a cluster as well as a single, large multimegawatt wind turbine. Information on the program objectives, a Mod-2 system description, a planned schedule, organizational roles, and responsibilities, is included.

  5. Advanced Turbine Systems Program -- Conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The objective of Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. This quarterly report, addresses only Task 4, conversion of a gas turbine to a coal-fired gas turbine, which was completed during the quarter and the nine subtasks included in Task 8, design and test of critical components. These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies as follows: catalytic combustion; recuperator; autothermal fuel reformer; high temperature turbine disc; advanced control system (MMI); and ceramic materials.

  6. The influence of external cooling system on the performance of supercritical steam turbine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosman, Wojciech

    2010-09-01

    The problem presented in this paper refers to the concepts applied to the design of supercritical steam turbines. The issue under the investigation is the presence of a cooling system. Cooling systems aim to protect the main components of the turbines against overheating. However the cooling flows mix with the main flow and modify the expansion line in the steam path. This affects the expansion process in the turbine and changes the performance when compared to the uncooled turbine. The analysis described here investigates the range of the influence of the cooling system on the turbine cycle. This influence is measured mainly through the change of the power generation efficiency. The paper explains the approach towards the assessment of the cooling effects and presents results of the modeling for three supercritical steam cycles.

  7. Development of an imaging system for the detection of alumina on turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwell, S. J.; Kell, J.; Day, J. C. C.

    2014-03-01

    An imaging system capable of detecting alumina on turbine blades by acquiring LED-induced fluorescence images has been developed. Acquiring fluorescence images at adjacent spectral bands allows the system to distinguish alumina from fluorescent surface contaminants. Repair and overhaul processes require that alumina is entirely removed from the blades by grit blasting and chemical stripping. The capability of the system to detect alumina has been investigated with two series of turbine blades provided by Rolls-Royce plc. The results illustrate that the system provides a superior inspection method to visual assessment when ascertaining whether alumina is present on turbine blades during repair and overhaul processes.

  8. Analyzing tradeoffs between hydropower production and hydrological alteration to support water resources planning in large river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micotti, Marco; Pianosi, Francesca; Bizzi, Simone; Mason, Emanuele; Weber, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    In many countries water is a key renewable resource to complement carbon-emitting energy production in the face of demand pressure from fast-growing industrial production and urbanization. In this study, we analyze the case of the Red River Vietnam, a large basin of 169.000 kmq where the storing capacity, mainly targeted at hydropower production, has steadily increased since from the Eighties through the construction of a number of reservoirs (Hoa Binh completed in 1994, Tuyen Quang in 2008, Son La in 2012), which nowadays account for the 15% of the national electric power production. On the other hand, reservoir operation dramatically alters downstream river hydrology, geomorphological processes and riverine ecosystems. In this work, we focus in particular on the alteration of the hydrological regime downstream of the Hoa Binh reservoir and explore re-operation options to mitigate the hydrological alteration while guaranteeing reasonable hydropower production. To reach this goal we (i) define an index of hydrological alteration starting from the well established set of Indicators of Hydrological Alteration and applying a novel selection and aggregation procedure; (ii) embed such an index into a multi-objective optimization process, to design reservoir operating policies that represent Pareto-optimal solutions between maximization of hydropower production and minimization of hydrological alteration. This work demonstrates the potential of multi-objective optimization and simulation tools to analyze tradeoffs between conflicting needs and thus support the evaluation and planning of sustainable energy production programs.

  9. [Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research]. Technical Quarterly Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    Major Accomplishments by Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) during this reporting period are highlighted below and amplified in later sections of this report: AGTSR distributed 50 proposals from the 98RFP to the IRB for review, evaluation and rank-ordering during the summer; AGTSR conducted a detailed program review at DOE-FETC on July 24; AGTSR organized the 1998 IRB proposal review meeting at SCIES on September 15-16; AGTSR consolidated all the IRB proposal scores and rank-orderings to facilitate the 98RFP proposal deliberations; AGTSR submitted meeting minutes and proposal short-list recommendation to the IRB and DOE for the 98RFP solicitation; AGTSR reviewed two gas turbine related proposals as part of the CU RFP State Project for renovating the central energy facility; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from the University of Pittsburgh, Wisconsin, and Minnesota; AGTSR assisted GTA in obtaining university stakeholder support of the ATS program from California, Pennsylvania, and Colorado; AGTSR assisted GTA in distributing alert notices on potential ATS budget cuts to over 150 AGTSR performing university members; AGTSR submitted proceedings booklet and organizational information pertaining to the OAI hybrid gas turbine workshop to DOE-FETC; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR updated the university consortium poster to include new members and research highlights; For DOE-FETC, the general AGTSR Fact Sheet was updated to include new awards, workshops, educational activity and select accomplishments from the research projects; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR prepared three fact sheets highlighting university research supported in combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted pictures on materials research for inclusion in the ATS technology brochure; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted a post-2000 roadmap showing potential technology paths AGTSR could pursue in the next decade; AGTSR distributed the ninth newsletter UPDATE to DOE, the IRB: and two interested partners involved in ATS; AGTSR submitted information on its RFP's, workshops, and educational activities for the 1999 ASMWIGTI technology report for worldwide distribution; AGTSR coordinated university poster session titles and format with Conference Management Associates (CMA) for the 98 ATS Annual; and AGTSR submitted 2-page abstract to CMA for the 98 ATS Review titled: ''AGTSR: A Virtual National Lab''.

  10. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include the AGT 101 engine test; compressor design modification; cold air turbine testing; Mod 1 alloy turbine rotor fabrication; combustion aspects; regenerator development; and thermal screening tests for ceramic materials. The foil gas bearings, rotor dynamics, and AGT controls and accessories are also considered.

  11. Steam Turbine Cogeneration 

    E-print Network

    Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system...

  12. Recent DOE-sponsored hydropower engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    Chappell, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of DOE Engineering Development research activity since Waterpower 1981. General results of about 11 projects that have been completed since Waterpower 1981 are presented and compared. Continuing efforts are also described briefly. DOE has sponsored four projects dealing with the use of pumps as turbines. This approach results in capital cost savings, shorter time for completing a hydropower plant, wider variety of off-the-shelf equipment available, and better maintenance services. Results are summarized for feasibility studies, laboratory tests, and in-the-field experience surveys of the use of pumps as turbines. Other projects discussed include microhydropower plants (less than 100 kW in capacity), head augmentation devices, Schneider engines, the use of marine thrusters as turbines, low cost cross-flow turbines made of plastic, variable speed constant frequency generators, hydraulic air compressors, scroll motor turbines and modular float-in powerhouses. The paper also discusses some of the technologies where future research may prove fruitful.

  13. Lifting system and apparatus for constructing wind turbine towers

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, Tracy; Schrader, Terry; Goldhardt, James; Lott, James

    2011-02-01

    The disclosed invention is utilized for mounting a wind turbine and blade assembly on the upper end of a wind turbine tower. The invention generally includes a frame or truss that is pivotally secured to the top bay assembly of the tower. A transverse beam is connected to the frame or truss and extends fore of the tower when the frame or truss is in a first position and generally above the tower when in a second position. When in the first position, a wind turbine or blade assembly can be hoisted to the top of the tower. The wind turbine or blade assembly is then moved into position for mounting to the tower as the frame or truss is pivoted to a second position. When the turbine and blade assembly are secured to the tower, the frame or truss is disconnected from the tower and lowered to the ground.

  14. Fuel flexibility via real-time Raman fuel-gas analysis for turbine system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, M.; Woodruff, S.; Chorpening, B.; Tucker, D.

    2015-06-01

    The modern energy production base in the U.S. is increasingly incorporating opportunity fuels such as biogas, coalbed methane, coal syngas, solar-derived hydrogen, and others. In many cases, suppliers operate turbine-based generation systems to efficiently utilize these diverse fuels. Unfortunately, turbine engines are difficult to control given the varying energy content of these fuels, combined with the need for a backup natural gas supply to provide continuous operation. Here, we study the use of a specially designed Raman Gas Analyzer based on capillary waveguide technology with sub-second response time for turbine control applications. The NETL Raman Gas Analyzer utilizes a low-power visible pump laser, and a capillary waveguide gas-cell to integrate large spontaneous Raman signals, and fast gas-transfer piping to facilitate quick measurements of fuel-gas components. A U.S. Department of Energy turbine facility known as HYPER (hybrid performance system) serves as a platform for apriori fuel composition measurements for turbine speed or power control. A fuel-dilution system is used to simulate a compositional upset while simultaneously measuring the resultant fuel composition and turbine response functions in real-time. The feasibility and efficacy of system control using the spontaneous Raman-based measurement system is then explored with the goal of illustrating the ability to control a turbine system using available fuel composition as an input process variable.

  15. Abradable dual-density ceramic turbine seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, D. L.; Schechter, B.; Cross, K. R.; Cavanagh, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A plasma sprayed dual density ceramic abradable seal system for direct application to the HPT seal shroud of small gas turbine engines. The system concept is based on the thermal barrier coating and depends upon an additional layer of modified density ceramic material adjacent to the gas flow path to provide the desired abradability. This is achieved by codeposition of inert fillers with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to interrupt the continuity of the zirconia struture. The investigation of a variety of candidate fillers, with hardness values as low as 2 on Moh's scale, led to the conclusion that solid filler materials in combination with a YSZ matrix, regardless of their hardness values, have a propensity for compacting rather than shearing as originally expected. The observed compaction is accompanied by high energy dissipation in the rub interaction, usually resulting in the adhesive transfer of blade material to the stationary seal member. Two YSZ based coating systems which incorported hollow alumino silicate spheres as density reducing agents were surveyed over the entire range of compositions from 100 percent filler to 100 percent YSZ. Abradability and erosion characteristics were determined, hardness and permeability characterized, and engine experience acquired with several system configurations.

  16. Vibration-based SHM System: Application to Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcherniak, D.; Mřlgaard, L. L.

    2015-07-01

    This study presents an vibration-based system designed for structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades. Mechanical energy is introduced by means of an electromechanical actuator mounted inside the blade. The actuator's plunger periodically hits the blade structure; the induced vibrations propagate along the blade and are measured by an array of accelerometers. Unsupervised learning is applied to the data: the vibration patterns corresponding to the undamaged blade are used to create a statistical model of the reference state. During the detection stage, the current vibration pattern is compared with the reference state, and the novelties can be associated with damage. The vibration pattern is described by the covariance matrix between the accelerometer signals. The mid-range frequencies are used: this range is above the frequencies excited by blade-wind interaction, thus ensuring a good signal-to-noise ratio. Simultaneously, the frequencies are low enough to be able to propagate the entire blade length, so good results can be obtained even using only one actuator. The system is demonstrated on a real 34m blade mounted on a test rig. Using the suggested approach, the system enables detection of, e.g., a 20cm long trailing edge opening under realistic noise conditions. It is also demonstrated that the system provides rough information about damage location. Progression of damage, if any, can also be detected.

  17. Evaluation of lightning accommodation systems for wind-driven turbine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1982-03-01

    Wind-driven turbine generators are being evaluated as an alternative source of electric energy. Areas of favorable location for the wind-driven turbines (high wind density) coincide with areas of high incidence of thunderstorm activity. These locations, coupled with the 30-m or larger diameter rotor blades, make the wind-driven turbine blades probable terminations for lightning strikes. Several candidate systems of lightning accommodation for composite-structural-material blades were designed and their effectiveness evaluated by submitting the systems to simulated lightning strikes. The test data were analyzed and system design were reviewed on the basis of the analysis.

  18. Evaluation of lightning accommodation systems for wind-driven turbine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1982-01-01

    Wind-driven turbine generators are being evaluated as an alternative source of electric energy. Areas of favorable location for the wind-driven turbines (high wind density) coincide with areas of high incidence of thunderstorm activity. These locations, coupled with the 30-m or larger diameter rotor blades, make the wind-driven turbine blades probable terminations for lightning strikes. Several candidate systems of lightning accommodation for composite-structural-material blades were designed and their effectiveness evaluated by submitting the systems to simulated lightning strikes. The test data were analyzed and system design were reviewed on the basis of the analysis.

  19. Knowledge-based system for preliminary aerodynamic design of aircraft engine turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Sanjay; Cherry, Dave; Gregory, Brent

    1993-03-01

    The turbine design optimization system described here automates the turbine preliminary design process and stimulates designer interactions through the use of knowledge engineering. The turbine design optimization problem is an np-complete problem and needs to be solved iteratively. Automation of the design process permits search over a much larger domain than is possible for the human designer. In addition it allows designers to look beyond the horizons of the present, limited design subtask so that they can work on new ideas and concepts, testing hypotheses by using the system to answer what-if questions. The optimization system allows the user to make tradeoffs between multiple design objectives.

  20. Design of advanced automatic inspection system for turbine blade FPI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Xie, W. F.; Viens, M.; Birglen, L.; Mantegh, I.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine turbine blade is the most susceptible part to discontinuities as it works in the extremely high pressure and temperature. Among various types of NDT method, Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection (FPI) is comparably cheap and efficient thus suitable for detecting turbine blade surface discontinuities. In this paper, we have developed an Advanced Automatic Inspection System (AAIS) with Image Processing and Pattern Recognition techniques to aid human inspector. The system can automatically detect, measure and classify the discontinuities from turbine blade FPI images. The tests on the sample images provided by industrial partner have been performed to evaluate the system.

  1. Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Coutant, Charles C

    2006-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

  2. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Task 3 -- System selection; Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1994-07-01

    Solar Turbines Incorporated has elected to pursue an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine system to exceed the goals of the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, which are to develop and commercialize an industrial gas turbine system that operates at thermal efficiencies at least 15% higher than 1991 products, and with emissions not exceeding eight ppmv NOx and 20 ppmv CO and UHC. Solar`s goal is to develop a commercially viable industrial system (3--20 MW) driven by a gas turbine engine with a thermal efficiency of 50% (ATS50), with the flexibility to meet the differing operational requirements of various markets. Dispersed power generation is currently considered to be the primary future target market for the ICR in the 5--15 MW size class. The ICR integrated system approach provides an ideal candidate for the assumed dispersed power market, with its small footprint, easy transportability, and environmental friendliness. In comparison with other systems that use water or toxic chemicals such as ammonia for NOx control, the ICR has no consumables other than fuel and air. The low pressure ratio of the gas turbine engine also is favorable in that less parasitic power is needed to pump the natural gas into the combustor than for simple-cycle machines. Solar has narrowed the ICR configuration to two basic approaches, a 1-spool, and a 2-spool version of the ATS50. The 1-spool engine will have a lower first-cost but lower part-power efficiencies. The 2-spool ATS may not only have better part-power efficiency, its efficiency will also be less sensitive to reduced turbine rotor inlet temperature levels. Thus hot-end parts life can be increased with only small sacrifices in efficiency. The flexibility of the 2-spool arrangement in meeting customer needs is its major advantage over the 1-spool. This Task 3 Topical Report is intended to present Solar`s preliminary system selection based upon the initial trade-off studies performed to date.

  3. Stabilization of Wind Turbine Generator System by STATCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyeen, S. M.; Mannan, Mohammad Abdul; Ali, Mohd. Hasan; Takahashi, Rion; Murata, Toshiaki; Tamura, Junji

    Recently voltage-source or current-source inverter based various FACTS devices have been used for flexible power flow control, secure loading, damping of power system oscillation and even for the stabilization of wind energy generation. In this paper, we propose the static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) based on voltage source converter (VSC) PWM technique to stabilize grid connected wind generator system. A simple control strategy of STATCOM is adopted where only measurement of rms voltage at the wind generator terminal is needed. Fuzzy logic controller rather than conventional PI controller is proposed as the control methodology of STATCOM. Multi-mass shaft model of wind turbine generator system (WTGS) is also considered as shaft modeling has a big influence on the transient performance of WTGS. Transient performance of STATCOM connected WTGS is compared also with that of pitch controlled WTGS. Both symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults are analyzed. Moreover, the steady state performance of STATCOM connected WTGS is analyzed. It is reported that STATCOM can reduce the voltage fluctuation significantly. Finally STATCOM is applied to a wind park model with multiple wind generators. Comprehensive results are presented to assess the performance of STATCOM connected WTGS, where the simulations have been done by PSCAD/EMTDC.

  4. Twisted Savonius turbine based marine current energy conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md. Imtiaj

    The Ocean Network Seafloor Instrumentation (ONSFI) Project is a multidisciplinary research and development project that aims to design, fabricate and validate a proof-of-concept seafloor array of wireless marine sensors for use in monitoring seabed processes. The sensor pods, known as Seaformatics, will be powered by ocean bottom currents and will be able to communicate with each other and to the Internet through surface master units to facilitate observation of the ocean floor from the shore. This thesis explores the use of the twisted Savonius turbine as a means of converting the kinetic energy of the free flowing water into electrical energy for the pods. This will eliminate the need for battery replacement. A physical model of the turbine was constructed and tested in the Water Flume at the Marine Institute of Memorial University and in the Wind Tunnel in the Engineering Building at Memorial University. A mathematical model of the turbine was constructed in SolidWorks. This was tested in the Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD software FLOW-3D. Experimental results were compared with CFD results and the agreement was reasonable. A twisted Savonius turbine emulator was developed to test a dc-dc boost converter. A low cost microcontroller based MPPT algorithm was developed to obtain maximum power from the turbine. Overall the thesis shows that the twisted Savonius turbine can provide the power needed by the sensor pods. It also shows that CFD is a viable way to study the performance of the Savonius type of turbine.

  5. Internal combustion engine system having a power turbine with a broad efficiency range

    DOEpatents

    Whiting, Todd Mathew; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2010-04-13

    An engine system incorporating an air breathing, reciprocating internal combustion engine having an inlet for air and an exhaust for products of combustion. A centripetal turbine receives products of the combustion and has a housing in which a turbine wheel is rotatable. The housing has first and second passages leading from the inlet to discrete, approximately 180.degree., portions of the circumference of the turbine wheel. The passages have fixed vanes adjacent the periphery of the turbine wheel and the angle of the vanes in one of the passages is different than those in the other so as to accommodate different power levels providing optimum approach angles between the gases passing the vanes and the blades of the turbine wheel. Flow through the passages is controlled by a flapper valve to direct it to one or the other or both passages depending upon the load factor for the engine.

  6. Advanced turbine systems study system scoping and feasibility study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    United Technologies Research Center, Pratt & Whitney Commercial Engine Business, And Pratt & Whitney Government Engine and Space Propulsion has performed a preliminary analysis of an Advanced Turbine System (ATS) under Contract DE-AC21-92MC29247 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The natural gas-fired reference system identified by the UTC team is the Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle in which the gas turbine exhaust heat and heat rejected from the intercooler is used in a saturator to humidify the high pressure compressor discharge air. This results in a significant increase in flow through the turbine at no increase in compressor power. Using technology based on the PW FT4000, the industrial engine derivative of the PW4000, currently under development by PW, the system would have an output of approximately 209 MW and an efficiency of 55.3%. Through use of advanced cooling and materials technologies similar to those currently in the newest generation military aircraft engines, a growth version of this engine could attain approximately 295 MW output at an efficiency of 61.5%. There is the potential for even higher performance in the future as technology from aerospace R&D programs is adapted to aero-derivative industrial engines.

  7. Gas turbine system simulation: An object-oriented approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Follen, Gregory J.; Putt, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype gas turbine engine simulation has been developed that offers a generalized framework for the simulation of engines subject to steady-state and transient operating conditions. The prototype is in preliminary form, but it successfully demonstrates the viability of an object-oriented approach for generalized simulation applications. Although object oriented programming languages are-relative to FORTRAN-somewhat austere, it is proposed that gas turbine simulations of an interdisciplinary nature will benefit significantly in terms of code reliability, maintainability, and manageability. This report elucidates specific gas turbine simulation obstacles that an object-oriented framework can overcome and describes the opportunity for interdisciplinary simulation that the approach offers.

  8. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.

  9. Composite turbine blade design options for Claude (open) cycle OTEC power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T.R.

    1985-11-01

    Small-scale turbine rotors made from composites offer several technical advantages for a Claude (open) cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system. Westinghouse Electric Corporation has designed a composite turbine rotor/disk using state-of-the-art analysis methods for large-scale (100-MW/sub e/) open cycle OTEC applications. Near-term demonstrations using conventional low-pressure turbine blade shapes with composite material would achieve feasibility and modern credibility of the open cycle OTEC power system. Application of composite blades for low-pressure turbo-machinery potentially improves the reliability of conventional metal blades affected by stress corrosion.

  10. Predictive control of a chaotic permanent magnet synchronous generator in a wind turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manal, Messadi; Adel, Mellit; Karim, Kemih; Malek, Ghanes

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how to address the chaos problem in a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) in a wind turbine system. Predictive control approach is proposed to suppress chaotic behavior and make operating stable; the advantage of this method is that it can only be applied to one state of the wind turbine system. The use of the genetic algorithms to estimate the optimal parameter values of the wind turbine leads to maximization of the power generation. Moreover, some simulation results are included to visualize the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. Project supported by the CMEP-TASSILI Project (Grant No. 14MDU920).

  11. Steam Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Turbonetics Energy, Inc.'s steam turbines are used as power generating systems in the oil and gas, chemical, pharmaceuticals, metals and mining, and pulp and paper industries. The Turbonetics line benefited from use of NASA research data on radial inflow steam turbines and from company contact with personnel of Lewis Research Center, also use of Lewis-developed computer programs to determine performance characteristics of turbines.

  12. Aalborg Universitet Wind Turbine Control Impact on Stability of Wind Farms Based on Real-Life Systems

    E-print Network

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet Wind Turbine Control Impact on Stability of Wind Farms Based on Real version (APA): Kocewiak, L. H., Hjerrild , J., & Bak, C. L. (2012). Wind Turbine Control Impact in frequency domain. The interaction between the wind turbine control system and the wind farm structure

  13. Development of a catalytic combustion system for the MIT Micro Gas Turbine Engine

    E-print Network

    Peck, Jhongwoo, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    As part of the MIT micro-gas turbine engine project, the development of a hydrocarbon-fueled catalytic micro-combustion system is presented. A conventionally-machined catalytic flow reactor was built to simulate the ...

  14. The DOE/NASA wind turbine data acquisition system. Part 3: Unattended power performance monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halleyy, A.; Heidkamp, D.; Neustadter, H.; Olson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Software documentation, operational procedures, and diagnostic instructions for development version of an unattended wind turbine performance monitoring system is provided. Designed to be used for off line intelligent data acquisition in conjunction with the central host computer.

  15. Field test of ultra-low head hydropower package based on marine thrusters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The project includes the design, fabrication, assembly, installation, and field test of the first full-scale operating hydropower package (turbine, transmission, and generator) based on a design which incorporates a marine-thruster as the hydraulic prime mover. Included here are: the project overview; engineering design; ultra-low head hydropower package fabrication; component procurement, cost control, and scheduling; thruster hydraulic section installation; site modeling and resulting recommended modifications; testing; and baseline environmental conditions at Stone Drop. (MHR)

  16. Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

  17. Self Adaptive Air Turbine for Wave Energy Conversion Using Shutter Valve and OWC Heoght Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bella, Francis A

    2014-09-29

    An oscillating water column (OWC) is one of the most technically viable options for converting wave energy into useful electric power. The OWC system uses the wave energy to “push or pull” air through a high-speed turbine, as illustrated in Figure 1. The turbine is typically a bi-directional turbine, such as a Wells turbine or an advanced Dennis-Auld turbine, as developed by Oceanlinx Ltd. (Oceanlinx), a major developer of OWC systems and a major collaborator with Concepts NREC (CN) in Phase II of this STTR effort. Prior to awarding the STTR to CN, work was underway by CN and Oceanlinx to produce a mechanical linkage mechanism that can be cost-effectively manufactured, and can articulate turbine blades to improve wave energy capture. The articulation is controlled by monitoring the chamber pressure. Funding has been made available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to CN (DOE DE-FG-08GO18171) to co-share the development of a blade articulation mechanism for the purpose of increasing energy recovery. However, articulating the blades is only one of the many effective design improvements that can be made to the composite subsystems that constitute the turbine generator system.

  18. Ceramic regenerator systems development program. [for automobile gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines. The results of 19,600 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate showed minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 6935 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 3510 hours at 982 C. Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  19. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.H.; Yanar, M.; Helminiak, M.; Chyu, M.; Siw, S.; Slaughter, W.S.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.S.; Feng, C.; Tannebaum, J.M.; Chen, R.; Zhang, B.; Fu, T.; Richards, G.A,; Sidwell, T.G.; Straub, D.; Casleton, K.H.; Dogan, O.M.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen-fired and oxy-fueled land-based gas turbines currently target inlet operating temperatures of ?1425-1760°C (?2600-3200°F). In view of natural gas or syngas-fired engines, advancements in both materials, as well as aerothermal cooling configurations are anticipated prior to commercial operation. This paper reviews recent technical accomplishments resulting from NETL’s collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University for future land-based gas turbine applications.

  20. Developing hydropower overseas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.B. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines how the National Hydropower Association (NHA) has found ways to support its members who desire to expand their business programs to foreign markets through participation in a wide range of government programs. The topics of the article include the market in developing countries, the certificate of review, products and services, and domestic and international competition.

  1. Dynamic Modeling of Adjustable-Speed Pumped Storage Hydropower Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Mohanpurkar, M.; Havsapian, R.; Koritarov, V.

    2015-04-06

    Hydropower is the largest producer of renewable energy in the U.S. More than 60% of the total renewable generation comes from hydropower. There is also approximately 22 GW of pumped storage hydropower (PSH). Conventional PSH uses a synchronous generator, and thus the rotational speed is constant at synchronous speed. This work details a hydrodynamic model and generator/power converter dynamic model. The optimization of the hydrodynamic model is executed by the hydro-turbine controller, and the electrical output real/reactive power is controlled by the power converter. All essential controllers to perform grid-interface functions and provide ancillary services are included in the model.

  2. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1994--July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes the tasks completed under this project during the period from August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1994. The objective of the study is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. The tasks completed include a market study for the advanced turbine system; definition of an optimized recuperated gas turbine as the prime mover meeting the requirements of the market study and whose characteristics were, in turn, used for forecasting the total advanced turbine system (ATS) future demand; development of a program plan for bringing the ATS to a state of readiness for field test; and demonstration of the primary surface recuperator ability to provide the high thermal effectiveness and low pressure loss required to support the proposed ATS cycle.

  3. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

  4. Electromagnetic Calculation of Combined Earthing System with Ring Earth Electrode and Vertical Rods for Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toshiaki; Yasuda, Yoh; Ueda, Toshiaki

    With the worldwide spread of wind turbine installations, various problems such as landscape issues, bird strikes and grid connections have arisen. Protection of wind turbines from lightning is cited as one of the main problems. Wind turbines are often struck by lightning because of their open-air locations, such as in mountainous areas, and their special configuration and very-high construction. Especially, low-voltage and control circuits can fail or suffer burnout while blades can incur serious damage if struck by lightning. Wind turbine failures caused by lightning strikes account for approximately 25% of all failures. The problem is regarded as a global one that needs immediate resolution. It is important to understand the impedance characteristics of wind turbine earthing systems from the viewpoint of lightning protection. A report from IEC TR61400-24 recommends a “ring earth electrode”. This was originally defined in IEC 61024 (currently revised and re-numbered as IEC 62305), where such an electrode is recommended to reduce touch and step voltages in households and buildings. IEC TR61400-24 also recommended additional electrodes of vertical or horizontal rods. However, these concepts have not been fully discussed from the viewpoint of its application to wind turbines. To confirm the effect of a combination of a ring earth electrode and additional vertical rods for protection of a wind turbine, this report uses the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to present an electromagnetic transient analysis on such a wind turbine earthing system. The results show that an optimal combination can be arranged from viewpoints of lightning protection and construction cost. Thus, this report discusses how to establish a quantitative design methodology of the wind turbine earthing system to provide effective lightning protection.

  5. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This report describes progress and work performed during January through June 1984 to develop technology for an Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) engine for automotive applications. Work performed during the first eight periods initiated design and analysis, ceramic development, component testing, and test bed evaluation. Project effort conducted under this contract is part of the DOE Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle System Program. This program is oriented at providing the United States automotive industry the high-risk long-range techology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced environmental impact. Technology resulting from this program is intended to reach the marketplace by the early 1990s.

  6. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems: Subscale combustion testing. Topical report, Task 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This is the final report on the Subscale Combustor Testing performed at Textron Defense Systems` (TDS) Haverhill Combustion Laboratories for the Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. This program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1986 as an R&D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular staged, rich-lean-quench, Toroidal Vortex Slogging Combustor (TVC) concept. Fuel-rich conditions in the first stage inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen; molten coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed, tapped and quenched from the combustion gases by inertial separation in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The primary objective of this work was to verify the feasibility of a direct coal-fueled combustion system for combustion turbine applications. This has been accomplished by the design, fabrication, testing and operation of a subscale development-type coal-fired combustor. Because this was a complete departure from present-day turbine combustors and fuels, it was considered necessary to make a thorough evaluation of this design, and its operation in subscale, before applying it in commercial combustion turbine power systems.

  7. Estimation of economic parameters of U.S. hydropower resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Douglas G.; Hunt, Richard T.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Carroll, Greg R.

    2003-06-01

    Tools for estimating the cost of developing and operating and maintaining hydropower resources in the form of regression curves were developed based on historical plant data. Development costs that were addressed included: licensing, construction, and five types of environmental mitigation. It was found that the data for each type of cost correlated well with plant capacity. A tool for estimating the annual and monthly electric generation of hydropower resources was also developed. Additional tools were developed to estimate the cost of upgrading a turbine or a generator. The development and operation and maintenance cost estimating tools, and the generation estimating tool were applied to 2,155 U.S. hydropower sites representing a total potential capacity of 43,036 MW. The sites included totally undeveloped sites, dams without a hydroelectric plant, and hydroelectric plants that could be expanded to achieve greater capacity. Site characteristics and estimated costs and generation for each site were assembled in a database in Excel format that is also included within the EERE Library under the title, “Estimation of Economic Parameters of U.S. Hydropower Resources - INL Hydropower Resource Economics Database.”

  8. Optimizing Wind And Hydropower Generation Within Realistic Reservoir Operating Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, T. M.; Clement, M. A.; Zagona, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the benefits of utilizing the flexibility of hydropower systems to balance the variability and uncertainty of wind generation. However, previous hydropower and wind coordination studies have simplified non-power constraints on reservoir systems. For example, some studies have only included hydropower constraints on minimum and maximum storage volumes and minimum and maximum plant discharges. The methodology presented here utilizes the pre-emptive linear goal programming optimization solver in RiverWare to model hydropower operations with a set of prioritized policy constraints and objectives based on realistic policies that govern the operation of actual hydropower systems, including licensing constraints, environmental constraints, water management and power objectives. This approach accounts for the fact that not all policy constraints are of equal importance. For example target environmental flow levels may not be satisfied if it would require violating license minimum or maximum storages (pool elevations), but environmental flow constraints will be satisfied before optimizing power generation. Additionally, this work not only models the economic value of energy from the combined hydropower and wind system, it also captures the economic value of ancillary services provided by the hydropower resources. It is recognized that the increased variability and uncertainty inherent with increased wind penetration levels requires an increase in ancillary services. In regions with liberalized markets for ancillary services, a significant portion of hydropower revenue can result from providing ancillary services. Thus, ancillary services should be accounted for when determining the total value of a hydropower system integrated with wind generation. This research shows that the end value of integrated hydropower and wind generation is dependent on a number of factors that can vary by location. Wind factors include wind penetration level, variability due to geographic distribution of wind resources, and forecast error. Electric power system factors include the mix of thermal generation resources, available transmission, demand patterns, and market structures. Hydropower factors include relative storage capacity, reservoir operating policies and hydrologic conditions. In addition, the wind, power system, and hydropower factors are often interrelated because stochastic weather patterns can simultaneously influence wind generation, power demand, and hydrologic inflows. One of the central findings is that the sensitivity of the model to changes cannot be performed one factor at a time because the impact of the factors is highly interdependent. For example, the net value of wind generation may be very sensitive to changes in transmission capacity under some hydrologic conditions, but not at all under others.

  9. High temperature corrosion issues in advanced gas turbines systems intended for power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Lee, W.Y.; Pint, B.A.

    1996-10-01

    The new generation of land-based gas turbine systems to be based on technology developed by the Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is intended to represent a significant step forward in overall efficiency, economy of operation, and environmental compatibility. These advances require the hot gas path components to endure increased combustion temperatures for extended times with a minimum of cooling. Improved bottoming cycles including chemical recuperation and humidified air are also being considered. Whereas some of the required improvements in performance will rely on the transfer of component design, materials and processing from aircraft gas turbines, the specific duty cycle of the ATS machines will require increased emphasis on the use of thermal barrier coatings. The high-temperature corrosion issues raised by the severe operating conditions of these turbines and, in particular, those associated with the use of thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  10. Performance and Feasibility Analysis of a Wind Turbine Power System for Use on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichter, Matthew D.; Viterna, Larry

    1999-01-01

    A wind turbine power system for future missions to the Martian surface was studied for performance and feasibility. A C++ program was developed from existing FORTRAN code to analyze the power capabilities of wind turbines under different environments and design philosophies. Power output, efficiency, torque, thrust, and other performance criteria could be computed given design geometries, atmospheric conditions, and airfoil behavior. After reviewing performance of such a wind turbine, a conceptual system design was modeled to evaluate feasibility. More analysis code was developed to study and optimize the overall structural design. Findings of this preliminary study show that turbine power output on Mars could be as high as several hundred kilowatts. The optimized conceptual design examined here would have a power output of 104 kW, total mass of 1910 kg, and specific power of 54.6 W/kg.

  11. Materials for advanced turbine engines. Volume 1: Advanced blade tip seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelahy, J. W.; Fairbanks, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    Project 3, the subject of this technical report, was structured toward the successful engine demonstration of an improved-efficiency, long-life, tip-seal system for turbine blades. The advanced tip-seal system was designed to maintain close operating clearances between turbine blade tips and turbine shrouds and, at the same time, be resistant to environmental effects including high-temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal cycling. The turbine blade tip comprised an environmentally resistant, activated-diffussion-bonded, monocrystal superalloy combined with a thin layer of aluminium oxide abrasive particles entrapped in an electroplated NiCr matrix. The project established the tip design and joint location, characterized the single-crystal tip alloy and abrasive tip treatment, and established the manufacturing and quality-control plans required to fully process the blades. A total of 171 blades were fully manufactured, and 100 were endurance and performance engine-tested.

  12. Advanced Turbine Systems Program, Conceptual Design and Product Development. Task 6, System definition and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The strategy of the ATS program is to develop a new baseline for industrial gas turbine systems for the 21st century, meeting the buying criteria of industrial gas turbine end users, and having growth potential. These criteria guided the Solar ATS Team in selecting the system definition described in this Topical Report. The key to selecting the ATS system definition was meeting or exceeding each technical goal without negatively impacting other commercial goals. Among the most crucial goals are the buying criteria of the industrial gas turbine market. Solar started by preliminarily considering several cycles with the potential to meet ATS program goals. These candidates were initially narrowed based on a qualitative assessment of several factors such as the potential for meeting program goals and for future growth; the probability of successful demonstration within the program`s schedule and expected level of funding; and the appropriateness of the cycle in light of end users` buying criteria. A first level Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis then translated customer needs into functional requirements, and ensured favorable interaction between concept features. Based on this analysis, Solar selected a recuperated cycle as the best approach to fulfilling both D.O.E. and Solar marketing goals. This report details the design and analysis of the selected engine concept, and explains how advanced features of system components achieve program goals. Estimates of cost, performance, emissions and RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability) are also documented in this report.

  13. Exhaust system for use with a turbine and method of assembling same

    DOEpatents

    Dalsania, Prakash Bavanjibhai; Sadhu, Antanu

    2015-08-18

    An exhaust system for use with a steam turbine is provided. An exhaust hood includes an input and an output, the input receiving fluid from the steam turbine. The exhaust hood includes a first side wall that extends between the input and the output. The first side wall includes an aperture. An ejector is coupled to the exhaust hood. The ejector includes inlets and an outlet. At least one of the inlets receives fluid from the exhaust hood via the aperture.

  14. Air cooled turbine component having an internal filtration system

    SciTech Connect

    Beeck, Alexander R.

    2012-05-15

    A centrifugal particle separator is provided for removing particles such as microscopic dirt or dust particles from the compressed cooling air prior to reaching and cooling the turbine blades or turbine vanes of a turbine engine. The centrifugal particle separator structure has a substantially cylindrical body with an inlet arranged on a periphery of the substantially cylindrical body. Cooling air enters centrifugal particle separator through the separator inlet port having a linear velocity. When the cooling air impinges the substantially cylindrical body, the linear velocity is transformed into a rotational velocity, separating microscopic particles from the cooling air. Microscopic dust particles exit the centrifugal particle separator through a conical outlet and returned to a working medium.

  15. Large-scale hydropower system optimization using dynamic programming and object-oriented programming: the case of the Northeast China Power Grid.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Shan; Ji, Chang-Ming; Wang, Ai-Jing; Lund, Jay R

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines long-term optimal operation using dynamic programming for a large hydropower system of 10 reservoirs in Northeast China. Besides considering flow and hydraulic head, the optimization explicitly includes time-varying electricity market prices to maximize benefit. Two techniques are used to reduce the 'curse of dimensionality' of dynamic programming with many reservoirs. Discrete differential dynamic programming (DDDP) reduces the search space and computer memory needed. Object-oriented programming (OOP) and the ability to dynamically allocate and release memory with the C++ language greatly reduces the cumulative effect of computer memory for solving multi-dimensional dynamic programming models. The case study shows that the model can reduce the 'curse of dimensionality' and achieve satisfactory results. PMID:24334896

  16. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The proposed approach is to build on Westinghouse`s successful 501 series of gas turbines. The 501F offered a combined cycle efficiency of 54%; 501G increased this efficiency to 58%; the proposed single-shaft 400 MW class ATS combined cycle will have a plant cycle efficiency greater than 60%. Westinghous`s strategy is to build upon the next evolution of advances in combustion, aerodynamics, cooling, leakage control, materials, and mechanical design. Westinhouse will base its future gas turbine product line, both 50 and 60 Hz, on ATS technology; the 501G shows early influences of ATS.

  17. Steam turbine high pressure vent and seal system

    SciTech Connect

    Groenendaal, J.C. Jr.; Brown, B.

    1987-04-28

    A steam turbine is described comprising: an outer cylinder; an inner cylinder disposed within the outer cylinder; a blade ring disposed partially within the inner cylinder and partially within the outer cylinder; a nozzle chamber assembly disposed within the inner cylinder for introducing motive steam to the turbine and having nozzle chamber and nozzle block portions; a rotor having circular array of rotatable blades and a thrust balance piston disposed thereon; a dummy ring disposed within one end of the inner cylinder adjacent the balance piston; labyrinth sealing means disposed between the dummy ring and the balance piston forming a rotating seal.

  18. Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Achieving the goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system: the turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase, leading also to increased NOx emission. However, improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. The program is focused on two specific products: a 70MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling technology, and a 200MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machine utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency.

  19. Compressor and Turbine Models of Brayton Units for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-30

    Closed Brayton Cycles with centrifugal flow, single-shaft turbo-machines are being considered, with gas cooled nuclear reactors, to provide 10's to 100's of electrical power to support future space exploration missions and Lunar and Mars outposts. Such power system analysis is typically based on the cycle thermodynamics, for given operating pressures and temperatures and assumed polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and turbine of the Brayton energy conversion units. Thus the analysis results not suitable for modeling operation transients such as startup and changes in the electric load. To simulate these transients, accurate models of the turbine and compressor in the Brayton rotating unit, which calculate the changes in the compressor and turbine efficiencies with system operation are needed. This paper presents flow models that account for the design and dimensions of the compressor impeller and diffuser, and the turbine stator and rotor blades. These models calculate the various enthalpy losses and the polytropic efficiencies along with the pressure ratios of the turbine and compressor. The predictions of these models compare well with reported performance data of actual hardware. In addition, the results of a parametric analysis to map the operations of the compressor and turbine, as functions of the rotating shaft speed and inlet Mach number of the gas working fluid, are presented and discussed. The analysis used a binary mixture of He-Xe with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole as the working fluid.

  20. Compressor and Turbine Models of Brayton Units for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    Closed Brayton Cycles with centrifugal flow, single-shaft turbo-machines are being considered, with gas cooled nuclear reactors, to provide 10's to 100's of electrical power to support future space exploration missions and Lunar and Mars outposts. Such power system analysis is typically based on the cycle thermodynamics, for given operating pressures and temperatures and assumed polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and turbine of the Brayton energy conversion units. Thus the analysis results not suitable for modeling operation transients such as startup and changes in the electric load. To simulate these transients, accurate models of the turbine and compressor in the Brayton rotating unit, which calculate the changes in the compressor and turbine efficiencies with system operation are needed. This paper presents flow models that account for the design and dimensions of the compressor impeller and diffuser, and the turbine stator and rotor blades. These models calculate the various enthalpy losses and the polytropic efficiencies along with the pressure ratios of the turbine and compressor. The predictions of these models compare well with reported performance data of actual hardware. In addition, the results of a parametric analysis to map the operations of the compressor and turbine, as functions of the rotating shaft speed and inlet Mach number of the gas working fluid, are presented and discussed. The analysis used a binary mixture of He-Xe with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole as the working fluid.

  1. Stability Analysis of a Run-of-River Diversion Hydropower Plant with Surge Tank and Spillway in the Head Pond

    PubMed Central

    Sarasúa, José Ignacio; Elías, Paz; Wilhelmi, José Román; Sánchez, José Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Run-of-river hydropower plants usually lack significant storage capacity; therefore, the more adequate control strategy would consist of keeping a constant water level at the intake pond in order to harness the maximum amount of energy from the river flow or to reduce the surface flooded in the head pond. In this paper, a standard PI control system of a run-of-river diversion hydropower plant with surge tank and a spillway in the head pond that evacuates part of the river flow plant is studied. A stability analysis based on the Routh-Hurwitz criterion is carried out and a practical criterion for tuning the gains of the PI controller is proposed. Conclusions about the head pond and surge tank areas are drawn from the stability analysis. Finally, this criterion is applied to a real hydropower plant in design state; the importance of considering the spillway dimensions and turbine characteristic curves for adequate tuning of the controller gains is highlighted. PMID:25405237

  2. Stability analysis of a run-of-river diversion hydropower plant with surge tank and spillway in the head pond.

    PubMed

    Sarasúa, José Ignacio; Elías, Paz; Martínez-Lucas, Guillermo; Pérez-Díaz, Juan Ignacio; Wilhelmi, José Román; Sánchez, José Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Run-of-river hydropower plants usually lack significant storage capacity; therefore, the more adequate control strategy would consist of keeping a constant water level at the intake pond in order to harness the maximum amount of energy from the river flow or to reduce the surface flooded in the head pond. In this paper, a standard PI control system of a run-of-river diversion hydropower plant with surge tank and a spillway in the head pond that evacuates part of the river flow plant is studied. A stability analysis based on the Routh-Hurwitz criterion is carried out and a practical criterion for tuning the gains of the PI controller is proposed. Conclusions about the head pond and surge tank areas are drawn from the stability analysis. Finally, this criterion is applied to a real hydropower plant in design state; the importance of considering the spillway dimensions and turbine characteristic curves for adequate tuning of the controller gains is highlighted. PMID:25405237

  3. Cooling system having reduced mass pin fins for components in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J

    2014-03-11

    A cooling system having one or more pin fins with reduced mass for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The cooling system may include one or more first surfaces defining at least a portion of the cooling system. The pin fin may extend from the surface defining the cooling system and may have a noncircular cross-section taken generally parallel to the surface and at least part of an outer surface of the cross-section forms at least a quartercircle. A downstream side of the pin fin may have a cavity to reduce mass, thereby creating a more efficient turbine airfoil.

  4. Experimental study of cryogenic liquid turbine expander with closed-loop liquefied nitrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Sun, Jinju; Song, Peng

    2015-04-01

    A cryogenic liquid turbine expander is developed as a replacement for traditional Joule-Thomson valves used in the cryogenic systems for the purpose of energy saving. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the turbine expander and is the subject of this paper. The test rig comprises a closed-loop liquefied nitrogen system, cryogenic liquid turbine expander unit, and its auxiliary and measuring systems. The test operating parameters of the turbine expander are determined on the basis of flow similarity rules. Pre-cooling of the liquid nitrogen system is first performed, and then the tests are conducted at different flow rates and speed ratios. The turbine expander flow rate, inlet and outlet pressure and temperature, rotational speed and shaft torque were measured. Experimental results and their uncertainties were analyzed and discussed. The following are demonstrated: (1) For both test cases, turbine expander peak isentropic efficiency is respectively 78.8% and 68.4% obtained at 89.6% and 92% of the design flow rate. The large uncertainties in isentropic efficiency are caused by the large enthalpy variations subjected to small measurement uncertainties in temperature and pressure. (2) Total efficiency and hydraulic efficiency of the turbine expander are obtained. They are essentially the same, since both include flow-related effects and also bearing losses. Comparisons of total efficiency and hydraulic efficiency were used to justify measurement uncertainties of different quantities, since the former involves the measured mass flow rate and enthalpy drop (being dependant on inlet and outlet temperature and pressure), while the latter involves the actual shaft power, volume flow rate, and inlet and outlet pressure. (3) Losses in flow passages and the shaft-bearing system have been inferred based on the measured turbine expander total efficiency, isentropic efficiency, and mechanical efficiency, which are respectively 57.6-74.8%, 62.1-78.8% and 89.5-96.4%. Uncertainty analysis is conducted for experimental isentropic efficiency, hydraulic efficiency, and total efficiency. The hydraulic efficiency seems to be the best measure for assessing the performance of cryogenic liquid turbine expander. (4) Isentropic efficiency versus speed ratio is obtained from the experimental data. The experimental isentropic efficiency increases with the speed ratio, and it reaches 78.8% at the largest experimental speed ratio. A higher efficiency would be achieved if the speed ratio could reach a larger value. This provides some guidance for an optimal operation of the turbine expander in the future.

  5. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1993--July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This Yearly Technical Progress Report covers the period August 3, 1993 through July 31, 1994 for Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE Contract No. DE-AC421-93MC30246. As allowed by the Contract (Part 3, Section J, Attachment B) this report is also intended to fulfill the requirements for a fourth quarterly report. The objective of Phase 2 of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized in the year 2000. During the period covered by this report, Solar has completed three of eight program tasks and has submitted topical reports. These three tasks included a Project Plan submission of information required by NEPA, and the selection of a Gas-Fueled Advanced Turbine System (GFATS). In the latest of the three tasks, Solar`s Engineering team identified an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine as the eventual outcome of DOE`s ATS program coupled with Solar`s internal New Product Introduction (NPI) program. This machine, designated ``ATS50`` will operate at a thermal efficiency (turbine shaft power/fuel LHV) of 50 percent, will emit less than 10 parts per million of NOx and will reduce the cost of electricity by 10 percent. It will also demonstrate levels of reliability, availability, maintainability, and durability (RAMD) equal to or better than those of today`s gas turbine systems. Current activity is concentrated in three of the remaining five tasks a Market Study, GFATS System Definition and Analysis, and the Design and Test of Critical Components.

  6. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part I: Steady state performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-07-01

    The hybridization of gas turbine technology with high temperature fuel cells represents an ultra-high efficiency, ultra-low emission, fuel flexible power generation platform. The performance of past prototypes has been limited by marginal compatibility of the two primary sub-systems. This paper addresses the challenge of selecting compatible hardware by presenting a simple and robust method for bespoke hybrid system design and off-the-shelf component integration. This is the first application of detailed, spatially resolved, physical models capable of resolving off-design performance to the integration analysis of FC-GT hybrids. Static maps are produced for both turbine and fuel cell sub-systems that readily evaluate the compatibility and hybrid performance. Molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells are considered for hybridization with recuperated micro-turbines and larger axial flow gas turbine systems. Current state-of-the-art molten carbonate technology is shown to pair well with present micro-turbine technology in an FC bottoming cycle design achieving 74.4% LHV efficiency. Solid oxide technology demonstrates remarkable potential for integration with larger scale axial turbo-machinery to achieve greater than 75% LHV efficiency. This performance map technique closely matches results from detailed integrated hybrid system analyses, and enables quick determination of performance requirements for balance of plant design and optimization.

  7. A Plan for Revolutionary Change in Gas Turbine Engine Control System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of Distributed Engine Control technology on the gas turbine engine has been a vexing challenge for the controls community. A successful implementation requires the resolution of multiple technical issues in areas such as network communications, power distribution, and system integration, but especially in the area of high temperature electronics. Impeding the achievement has been the lack of a clearly articulated message about the importance of the distributed control technology to future turbine engine system goals and objectives. To resolve these issues and bring the technology to fruition has, and will continue to require, a broad coalition of resources from government, industry, and academia. This presentation will describe the broad challenges facing the next generation of advanced control systems and the plan which is being put into action to successfully implement the technology on the next generation of gas turbine engine systems.

  8. Advanced turbine systems program. Final report, August 3, 1993--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Six tasks were approved under the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) extension program. The six tasks include the following: Task 5.0 -- Market Study. The objective of the market study task is to focus on distributed generation prospects for an industrial ATS, using the Allison ATS family as the primary gas turbine systems. Task 6.0 -- Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System (GFATS) Definition and Analysis. Task 8.01 -- Castcool{reg_sign} Blades Fabrication Process Development. Task 8.04 -- ATS Low Emission Combustion System. Task 8.07 -- Ceramic Vane Design and Evaluation. Task 9.0 -- Program Management. Each of these tasks is described, progress is discussed, and results are given.

  9. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August--October, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The objective of Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. During this report period, the following tasks were completed: Market study; System definition and analysis; and Integrated program plans. Progress on Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components, is also discussed. This particular task includes expanded materials and component research covering recuperators, combustion, autothermal fuel reformation, ceramics application and advanced gas turbine system controls.

  10. Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

  11. Advanced turbine systems sensors and controls needs assessment study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.L.; Fry, D.N.; McEvers, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed an assessment of the sensors and controls needs for land-based advanced gas turbines being designed as a part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program for both utility and industrial applications. The assessment included visits to five turbine manufacturers. During these visits, in-depth discussions were held with design and manufacturing staff to obtain their views regarding the need for new sensors and controls for their advanced turbine designs. The Unsteady Combustion Facilities at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was visited to assess the need for new sensors for gas turbine combustion research. Finally, a workshop was conducted at the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center which provided a forum for industry, laboratory, and university engineers to discuss and prioritize sensor and control needs. The assessment identified more than 50 different measurement, control, and monitoring needs for advanced turbines that cannot currently be met from commercial sources. While all the identified needs are important, some are absolutely critical to the success of the ATS Program.

  12. Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Lance G

    2014-07-07

    A variable phase turbine assembly will be designed and manufactured having a turbine, operable with transcritical, two-phase or vapor flow, and a generator – on the same shaft supported by process lubricated bearings. The assembly will be hermetically sealed and the generator cooled by the refrigerant. A compact plate-fin heat exchanger or tube and shell heat exchanger will be used to transfer heat from the geothermal fluid to the refrigerant. The demonstration turbine will be operated separately with two-phase flow and with vapor flow to demonstrate performance and applicability to the entire range of low temperature geothermal resources. The vapor leaving the turbine is condensed in a plate-fin refrigerant condenser. The heat exchanger, variable phase turbine assembly and condenser are all mounted on single skids to enable factory assembly and checkout and minimize installation costs. The system will be demonstrated using low temperature (237F) well flow from an existing large geothermal field. The net power generated, 1 megawatt, will be fed into the existing power system at the demonstration site. The system will demonstrate reliable generation of inexpensive power from low temperature resources. The system will be designed for mass manufacturing and factory assembly and should cost less than $1,200/kWe installed, when manufactured in large quantities. The estimated cost of power for 300F resources is predicted to be less than 5 cents/kWh. This should enable a substantial increase in power generated from low temperature geothermal resources.

  13. Automotive Gas Turbine Power System-Performance Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    1997-01-01

    An open cycle gas turbine numerical modelling code suitable for thermodynamic performance analysis (i.e. thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, cycle state points, working fluid flowrates etc.) of automotive and aircraft powerplant applications has been generated at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power Technology Division. The use this code can be made available to automotive gas turbine preliminary design efforts, either in its present version, or, assuming that resources can be obtained to incorporate empirical models for component weight and packaging volume, in later version that includes the weight-volume estimator feature. The paper contains a brief discussion of the capabilities of the presently operational version of the code, including a listing of input and output parameters and actual sample output listings.

  14. Turbine blades and systems with forward blowing slots

    DOEpatents

    Zuteck, Michael D.; Zalusky, Leigh; Lees, Paul

    2015-09-15

    A blade for use in a wind turbine comprises a pressure side and suction side meeting at a trailing edge and leading edge. The pressure side and suction side provide lift to the turbine blade upon the flow of air from the leading edge to the trailing edge and over the pressure side and suction side. The blade includes one or more openings at the suction side, in some cases between the leading edge and the trailing edge. The one or more openings are configured to provide a pressurized fluid towards the leading edge of the blade, in some cases at an angle between about 0.degree. and 70.degree. with respect to an axis oriented from a centerline of the blade toward the leading edge.

  15. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) power-train system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Johnson, R. A.; Gibson, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Technical work on the design and component testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) advanced automotive gas turbine is described. Selected component ceramic component design, and procurement were tested. Compressor tests of a modified rotor showed high speed performance improvement over previous rotor designs; efficiency improved by 2.5%, corrected flow by 4.6%, and pressure ratio by 11.6% at 100% speed. The aerodynamic design is completed for both the gasifier and power turbines. Ceramic (silicon carbide) gasifier rotors were spin tested to failure. Improving strengths is indicated by burst speeds and the group of five rotors failed at speeds between 104% and 116% of engine rated speed. The emission results from combustor testing showed NOx levels to be nearly one order of magnitude lower than with previous designs. A one piece ceramic exhaust duct/regenerator seal platform is designed with acceptable low stress levels.

  16. Cooling system for a bearing of a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In a gas turbine, a bore tube assembly radially inwardly of an aft bearing conveys cooling steam to the buckets of the turbine and returns the cooling steam to a return. To cool the bearing and thermally insulate the bearing from the cooling steam paths, a radiation shield is spaced from the bore tube assembly by a dead air gap. Additionally, an air passageway is provided between the radiation shield and the inner surface of an aft shaft forming part of the rotor. Air is supplied from an inlet for flow along the passage and radially outwardly through bores in the aft shaft disk to cool the bearing and insulate it from transfer of heat from the cooling steam.

  17. Performance optimization of a gas turbine-based cogeneration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tamer

    2006-06-01

    In this paper an exergy optimization has been carried out for a cogeneration plant consisting of a gas turbine, which is operated in a Brayton cycle, and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). In the analysis, objective functions of the total produced exergy and exergy efficiency have been defined as functions of the design parameters of the gas turbine and the HRSG. An equivalent temperature is defined as a new approach to model the exergy rate of heat transfer from the HRSG. The optimum design parameters of the cogeneration cycle at maximum exergy are determined and the effects of these parameters on exergetic performance are investigated. Some practical mathematical relations are also derived to find the optimum values of the adiabatic temperature ratio for given extreme temperatures and consumer temperature.

  18. Assessing Hydropower in the West

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Megan M.; Uria Martinez, Rocio

    2015-06-01

    On April 27, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released the 2014 Hydropower Market Report, which provides a quantitative baseline on the distribution, capabilities, and status of hydropower in the United States. Although the report shows many interesting trends and figures, this article focuses on those related to the western region.

  19. Analysis of off-grid hybrid wind turbine/solar PV water pumping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While many remote water pumping systems exist (e.g. mechanical windmills, solar photovoltaic , wind-electric, diesel powered), very few combine both the wind and solar energy resources to possibly improve the reliability and the performance of the system. In this paper, off-grid wind turbine (WT) a...

  20. Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1

    E-print Network

    Marquez, Horacio J.

    Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1 Donglin Li Tongwen Chen2 in order to achieve a better tradeoff be- tween structural durability and dynamic performance in a system Introduction During the first half of the 19-th century, development of steam engines led to increasing sources

  1. Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus their close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NO{sub x} and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompasses two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined cycle system for the industrial market and a combined cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine.

  2. Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, September, 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA-based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through GE Power Systems. Achieving the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) goals of 60% efficiency, single-digit NOx, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both the efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emissions. Improved coatings and other materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions which will achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives, requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompass two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined-cycle system for the industrial market, and a combined-cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine.

  3. Design and implementation of a new autonomous sensor fish to support advanced hydropower development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z D; Lu, J; Myjak, M J; Martinez, J J; Tian, C; Morris, S J; Carlson, T J; Zhou, D; Hou, H

    2014-11-01

    Acceleration in development of additional conventional hydropower requires tools and methods to perform laboratory and in-field validation of turbine performance and fish passage claims. The new-generation Sensor Fish has been developed with more capabilities to accommodate a wider range of users over a broader range of turbine designs and operating environments. It provides in situ measurements of three-dimensional (3D) linear accelerations, 3D rotational velocities, 3D orientation, pressure, and temperature at a sampling frequency of 2048 Hz. It also has an automatic floatation system and built-in radio-frequency transmitter for recovery. The relative errors of the pressure, acceleration, and rotational velocity were within ±2%, ±5%, and ±5%, respectively. The accuracy of orientation was within ±4° and accuracy of temperature was ±2?°C. The new-generation Sensor Fish is becoming a major technology and being deployed for evaluating the conditions for fish passage of turbines or other hydraulic structures in both the United States and several other countries. PMID:25430138

  4. Design and implementation of a new autonomous sensor fish to support advanced hydropower development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. D.; Lu, J.; Myjak, M. J.; Martinez, J. J.; Tian, C.; Morris, S. J.; Carlson, T. J.; Zhou, D.; Hou, H.

    2014-11-01

    Acceleration in development of additional conventional hydropower requires tools and methods to perform laboratory and in-field validation of turbine performance and fish passage claims. The new-generation Sensor Fish has been developed with more capabilities to accommodate a wider range of users over a broader range of turbine designs and operating environments. It provides in situ measurements of three-dimensional (3D) linear accelerations, 3D rotational velocities, 3D orientation, pressure, and temperature at a sampling frequency of 2048 Hz. It also has an automatic floatation system and built-in radio-frequency transmitter for recovery. The relative errors of the pressure, acceleration, and rotational velocity were within ±2%, ±5%, and ±5%, respectively. The accuracy of orientation was within ±4° and accuracy of temperature was ±2 °C. The new-generation Sensor Fish is becoming a major technology and being deployed for evaluating the conditions for fish passage of turbines or other hydraulic structures in both the United States and several other countries.

  5. Systems and methods for detecting a flame in a fuel nozzle of a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Storey, James Michael; Lipinski, John; Mestroni, Julio Enrique; Williamson, David Lee; Marshall, Jason Randolph; Krull, Anthony

    2013-05-07

    A system may detect a flame about a fuel nozzle of a gas turbine. The gas turbine may have a compressor and a combustor. The system may include a first pressure sensor, a second pressure sensor, and a transducer. The first pressure sensor may detect a first pressure upstream of the fuel nozzle. The second pressure sensor may detect a second pressure downstream of the fuel nozzle. The transducer may be operable to detect a pressure difference between the first pressure sensor and the second pressure sensor.

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Hybrid Gas Turbine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of fuel cell systems and hybrid fuel cell systems requires the evolution of analysis strategies for evaluating thermodynamic performance. A gas turbine thermodynamic cycle integrated with a fuel cell was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of the several uncertainties in the thermodynamic performance parameters. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for the overall thermal efficiency and net specific power output due to the uncertainties in the thermodynamic random variables. These results can be used to quickly identify the most critical design variables in order to optimize the design and make it cost effective. The analysis leads to the selection of criteria for gas turbine performance.

  7. 30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELLBIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELL-BIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE TO LEFT (DOUBLE TURBINE SYSTEM), PHOTO TAKEN FROM PENSTOCK. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  8. U.S. Hydropower presented by

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    -Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Hydropower Assessment ­ NHA Annual Meeting 2011 National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program (NHAAP) What: · A core geospatial energy-water database · A core hydropower,200 Climatology Stations #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Hydropower Assessment

  9. Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, Krishna

    2011-11-30

    The purpose of this program was to develop low-emissions, efficient fuel-flexible combustion technology which enables operation of a given gas turbine on a wider range of opportunity fuels that lie outside of current natural gas-centered fuel specifications. The program encompasses a selection of important, representative fuels of opportunity for gas turbines with widely varying fundamental properties of combustion. The research program covers conceptual and detailed combustor design, fabrication, and testing of retrofitable and/or novel fuel-flexible gas turbine combustor hardware, specifically advanced fuel nozzle technology, at full-scale gas turbine combustor conditions. This project was performed over the period of October 2008 through September 2011 under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868 for the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines". The overall objective of this program was met with great success. GE was able to successfully demonstrate the operability of two fuel-flexible combustion nozzles over a wide range of opportunity fuels at heavy-duty gas turbine conditions while meeting emissions goals. The GE MS6000B ("6B") gas turbine engine was chosen as the target platform for new fuel-flexible premixer development. Comprehensive conceptual design and analysis of new fuel-flexible premixing nozzles were undertaken. Gas turbine cycle models and detailed flow network models of the combustor provide the premixer conditions (temperature, pressure, pressure drops, velocities, and air flow splits) and illustrate the impact of widely varying fuel flow rates on the combustor. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were employed to compare some fundamental combustion characteristics of the target fuels, including flame speeds and lean blow-out behavior. Perfectly premixed combustion experiments were conducted to provide experimental combustion data of our target fuels at gas turbine conditions. Based on an initial assessment of premixer design requirements and challenges, the most promising sub-scale premixer concepts were evaluated both experimentally and computationally. After comprehensive screening tests, two best performing concepts were scaled up for further development. High pressure single nozzle tests were performed with the scaled premixer concepts at target gas turbine conditions with opportunity fuels. Single-digit NOx emissions were demonstrated for syngas fuels. Plasma-assisted pilot technology was demonstrated to enhance ignition capability and provide additional flame stability margin to a standard premixing fuel nozzle. However, the impact of plasma on NOx emissions was observed to be unacceptable given the goals of this program and difficult to avoid.

  10. Development of a system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of a cogeneration steam turbine unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Novoselov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Generalized results from the work on developing elements of a comprehensive system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of cogeneration turbines are presented. The parameters of the electrohydraulic turbine control system are considered together with a number of problems concerned with assessing the state of condensers and delivery water heaters.

  11. Impacts of changes in flow in glacier fed river in Nepal on hydropower production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka Mishra, S.

    2014-12-01

    Variability of water flow in rivers due to change in temperature, precipitation and melting of glacier translates to change in water availability for agriculture, biodiversity conservation, and hydropower production impacting 1.5 billion people living downstream in India and Nepal. Previous studies ranked hydropower sector as the highest priority sector considering the urgency and severity of impacts in countries such as Nepal where hydropower shares 96 percentage of electricity production. In India, 45 per cent of hydroelectricity is generated from glacier fed rivers and hydropower shares 17 per cent of power generation. This study developed a framework to estimate the change in river flow attributed to global climate change and quantify its impact on hydropower generation in South Asian Mountains. The framework is applied on one of the major rivers Koshi River in Nepal with existing and proposed hydropower plants. The integrated assessment approach involved estimation of the change in flow in the river in the first part. Model was developed to estimate the change in flow that uses time series data on precipitation, temperature, remote sensing imagery on snow accumulation and ablation, and slope and surface hydrology. In the second part, another model was developed to investigate the impact of change in flow on hydropower production in various types of hydropower production plants. Data on flow, characteristics of hydropower plants and hydropower produced monthly from power plants in and outside of the river basin were used to model the flow and power generation from various categories of power plants. We will further discuss the results of the integrated assessments of potential changes in hydropower generation in various categories of hydropower plants based on Koshi River under various expected changes in flow and the implications for hydropower generation from other river systems in Nepal and India.

  12. Device to lower NOx in a gas turbine engine combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Laster, Walter R; Schilp, Reinhard; Wiebe, David J

    2015-02-24

    An emissions control system for a gas turbine engine including a flow-directing structure (24) that delivers combustion gases (22) from a burner (32) to a turbine. The emissions control system includes: a conduit (48) configured to establish fluid communication between compressed air (22) and the combustion gases within the flow-directing structure (24). The compressed air (22) is disposed at a location upstream of a combustor head-end and exhibits an intermediate static pressure less than a static pressure of the combustion gases within the combustor (14). During operation of the gas turbine engine a pressure difference between the intermediate static pressure and a static pressure of the combustion gases within the flow-directing structure (24) is effective to generate a fluid flow through the conduit (48).

  13. Fiber-Optic Defect and Damage Locator System for Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Vahid Sotoudeh; Dr. Richard J. Black; Dr. Behzad Moslehi; Mr. Aleks Plavsic

    2010-10-30

    IFOS in collaboration with Auburn University demonstrated the feasibility of a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) integrated sensor system capable of providing real time in-situ defect detection, localization and quantification of damage. In addition, the system is capable of validating wind turbine blade structural models, using recent advances in non-contact, non-destructive dynamic testing of composite structures. This new generation method makes it possible to analyze wind turbine blades not only non-destructively, but also without physically contacting or implanting intrusive electrical elements and transducers into the structure. Phase I successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technology with the construction of a 1.5 kHz sensor interrogator and preliminary instrumentation and testing of both composite material coupons and a wind turbine blade.

  14. System and method for online inspection of turbines using an optical tube with broadspectrum mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Baleine, Erwan

    2015-12-22

    An optical inspection system for nondestructive internal visual inspection and non-contact infra-red (IR) temperature monitoring of an online, operating power generation turbine. The optical inspection system includes an optical tube having a viewing port, at least one reflective mirror or a mirror array having a reflectivity spectral range from 550 nm to 20 .mu.m, and capable of continuous operation at temperatures greater than 932 degrees Fahrenheit (500 degrees Celsius), and a transparent window with high transmission within the same spectral range mounted distal the viewing port. The same optical mirror array may be used to measure selectively surface temperature of metal turbine blades in the near IR range (approximately 1 .mu.m wavelength) and of thermal barrier coated turbine blades in the long IR range (approximately 10 .mu.m wavelength).

  15. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. HEPS4Power - Extended-range Hydrometeorological Ensemble Predictions for Improved Hydropower Operations and Revenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Konrad; Monhart, Samuel; Liniger, Mark; Spririg, Christoph; Jordan, Fred; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    In recent years large progresses have been achieved in the operational prediction of floods and hydrological drought with up to ten days lead time. Both the public and the private sectors are currently using probabilistic runoff forecast in order to monitoring water resources and take actions when critical conditions are to be expected. The use of extended-range predictions with lead times exceeding 10 days is not yet established. The hydropower sector in particular might have large benefits from using hydro meteorological forecasts for the next 15 to 60 days in order to optimize the operations and the revenues from their watersheds, dams, captions, turbines and pumps. The new Swiss Competence Centers in Energy Research (SCCER) targets at boosting research related to energy issues in Switzerland. The objective of HEPS4POWER is to demonstrate that operational extended-range hydro meteorological forecasts have the potential to become very valuable tools for fine tuning the production of energy from hydropower systems. The project team covers a specific system-oriented value chain starting from the collection and forecast of meteorological data (MeteoSwiss), leading to the operational application of state-of-the-art hydrological models (WSL) and terminating with the experience in data presentation and power production forecasts for end-users (e-dric.ch). The first task of the HEPS4POWER will be the downscaling and post-processing of ensemble extended-range meteorological forecasts (EPS). The goal is to provide well-tailored forecasts of probabilistic nature that should be reliable in statistical and localized at catchment or even station level. The hydrology related task will consist in feeding the post-processed meteorological forecasts into a HEPS using a multi-model approach by implementing models with different complexity. Also in the case of the hydrological ensemble predictions, post-processing techniques need to be tested in order to improve the quality of the forecasts against observed discharge. Analysis should be specifically oriented to the maximisation of hydroelectricity production. Thus, verification metrics should include economic measures like cost loss approaches. The final step will include the transfer of the HEPS system to several hydropower systems, the connection with the energy market prices and the development of probabilistic multi-reservoir production and management optimizations guidelines. The baseline model chain yielding three-days forecasts established for a hydropower system in southern-Switzerland will be presented alongside with the work-plan to achieve seasonal ensemble predictions.

  17. Development of a FBG based distributed strain sensor system for wind turbine structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Tyler J.; Achuthan, Ajit; Marzocca, Pier; Grappasonni, Chiara; Coppotelli, Giuliano

    2013-07-01

    The development of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based distributed strain sensor system for real time structural health monitoring of a wind turbine rotor and its validation under a laboratory scale test setup is discussed in this paper. A 1 kW, 1.6 m diameter rotor, horizontal axis wind turbine with three instrumented blades is used in this study. The sensor system consists of strain sensors, surface mounted at various locations on the blade. At first the sensors are calibrated under static loading conditions to validate the FBG mounting and the proposed data collection techniques. Then, the capability of the sensor system coupled with the operational modal analysis (OMA) methods to capture natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes in terms of distributed strains are validated under various non-rotating dynamic loading conditions. Finally, the sensor system is tested under rotating conditions using the wind flow from an open-jet wind tunnel, for both a baseline wind turbine and a wind turbine with a structurally modified blade. The blade was modified by attaching a lumped mass at the blade tip simulating structural damage or ice accretion. The dynamic characteristics of the baseline (healthy) blade and modified (altered) blade are compared to validate the sensor system’s ability for real time structural health monitoring of the rotor.

  18. Hot spot detection system for vanes or blades of a combustion turbine

    DOEpatents

    Twerdochlib, Michael (Oviedo, FL)

    1999-01-01

    This invention includes a detection system that can determine if a turbine component, such as a turbine vane or blade, has exceeded a critical temperature, such as a melting point, along any point along the entire surface of the vane or blade. This system can be employed in a conventional combustion turbine having a compressor, a combustor and a turbine section. Included within this system is a chemical coating disposed along the entire interior surface of a vane or blade and a closed loop cooling system that circulates a coolant through the interior of the vane or blade. If the temperature of the vane or blade exceeds a critical temperature, the chemical coating will be expelled from the vane or blade into the coolant. Since while traversing the closed loop cooling system the coolant passes through a detector, the presence of the chemical coating in the coolant will be sensed by the system. If the chemical coating is detected, this indicates that the vane or blade has exceeded a critical temperature.

  19. Hot spot detection system for vanes or blades of a combustion turbine

    DOEpatents

    Twerdochlib, M.

    1999-02-02

    This invention includes a detection system that can determine if a turbine component, such as a turbine vane or blade, has exceeded a critical temperature, such as a melting point, along any point along the entire surface of the vane or blade. This system can be employed in a conventional combustion turbine having a compressor, a combustor and a turbine section. Included within this system is a chemical coating disposed along the entire interior surface of a vane or blade and a closed loop cooling system that circulates a coolant through the interior of the vane or blade. If the temperature of the vane or blade exceeds a critical temperature, the chemical coating will be expelled from the vane or blade into the coolant. Since while traversing the closed loop cooling system the coolant passes through a detector, the presence of the chemical coating in the coolant will be sensed by the system. If the chemical coating is detected, this indicates that the vane or blade has exceeded a critical temperature. 5 figs.

  20. Shaking table test and numerical analysis of offshore wind turbine tower systems controlled by TLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbing; Liu, Youkun; Bai, Xueyuan

    2015-03-01

    A wind turbine system equipped with a tuned liquid column damper (TLCD) is comprehensively studied via shaking table tests using a 1/13-scaled model. The effects of wind and wave actions are considered by inputting response-equivalent accelerations on the shaking table. The test results show that the control effect of the TLCD system is significant in reducing the responses under both wind-wave equivalent loads and ground motions, but obviously varies for different inputs. Further, a blade-hub-tower integrated numerical model for the wind turbine system is established. The model is capable of considering the rotational effect of blades by combining Kane's equation with the finite element method. The responses of the wind tower equipped with TLCD devices are numerically obtained and compared to the test results, showing that under both controlled and uncontrolled conditions with and without blades' rotation, the corresponding responses exhibit good agreement. This demonstrates that the proposed numerical model performs well in capturing the wind-wave coupled response of the offshore wind turbine systems under control. Both numerical and experimental results show that the TLCD system can significantly reduce the structural response and thus improve the safety and serviceability of the offshore wind turbine tower systems. Additional issues that require further study are discussed.

  1. Technologies for evaluating fish passage through turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2003-10-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of two types of technologies to observe fish and near neutrally buoyant drogues as they move through hydropower turbines. Existing or reasonably modified light-emitting and ultrasonic technologies were used to observe flow patterns, the response of fish to flow, and interactions between fish and turbine structures with good spatial and temporal accuracy. This information can be used to assess the biological benefits of turbine design features such as reductions in gaps at the tips and hub of turbine runner blades, reshaping wicket gates and stay vanes, modifications to draft tube splitter piers, and design changes that enhance egress through the powerhouse and tailrace.

  2. System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134

    SciTech Connect

    Annen, K.D.

    1981-08-01

    The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

  3. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Karstensen, K.W.

    1995-07-01

    This Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period February 1, 1995, through April 30, 1995, for Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30246. The objective of Phase II of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. Tasks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 of Phase II have been completed in prior quarters. Their results have been discussed in the applicable quarterly reports and in their respective topical reports. With the exception of Task 7, final editions of these topical reports have been submitted to the DOE. This quarterly report, then, addresses only Task 4 and the nine subtasks included in Task 8, {open_quotes}Design and Test of Critical Components.{close_quotes} These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies as follows: (1) Catalytic Combustion - Subtasks 8.2 and 8.5, (2) Recuperator - Subtasks 8.1 and 8.7, (3) Autothermal Fuel Reformer - Subtask 8.3, (4) High Temperature Turbine Disc - Subtask 8.4, (5) Advanced Control System (MMI) - Subtask 8.6, and (6) Ceramic Materials - Subtasks 8.8 and 8.9. Major technological achievements from Task 8 efforts during the quarter are as follows: (1) The subscale catalytic combustion rig in Subtask 8.2 is operating consistently at 3 ppmv of NO{sub x} over a range of ATS operating conditions. (2) The spray cast process used to produce the rim section of the high temperature turbine disc of Subtask 8.4 offers additional and unplanned spin-off opportunities for low cost manufacture of certain gas turbine parts.

  4. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT): Power-train system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Johnson, R. A.; Gibson, R. K.; Smith, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Technical work on the design and effort leading to the testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) automotive gas turbine is described. The general effort was concentrated on building an engine for test starting in July. The buildup progressed with only routine problems and the engine was delivered to the test stand 9 July. In addition to the engine build effort, work continued in selected component areas. Ceramic turbine parts were built and tested. Burst tests of ceramic rotors show strengths are approaching that achieved in test bars; proof testing is required for acceptable strength ceramic vanes. Over 25 hours was accumulated on the combustor rig in three test modes: pilot nozzle only, start nozzle, and main nozzle operation. Satisfactory ignition was achieved for a wide range of starting speeds and the lean blowout limit was as low as 0.06 kg/b (0.14 lb/hr). Lean blowout was more a function of nozzle atomization than fuel/air ratio. A variety of cycle points were tested. Transition from start nozzle flow to main nozzle flow was done manually without difficulty. Regenerator parts were qualification tested without incident and the parts were assembled on schedule. Rig based performance matched first build requirements. Repeated failures in the harmonic drive gearbox during rig testing resulted in that concept being abandoned for an alternate scheme.

  5. Surface profiling system optimized for inspection of turbine blades. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-28

    Research continued on the development of a surface profiling system for the inspection of turbine blades. The systems is a Numerical Stereo Camera System (NSCS). The NSCS is a high-speed 3-D topographical surface mapping system that projects a structured pattern laser light onto the surface of a target object, views the projected pattern with an axis video camera, and calculates the 3-D profile of the surface from that apparent distortion in the pattern as it appears on target surface.

  6. Cooling system for a gas turbine using a cylindrical insert having V-shaped notch weirs

    SciTech Connect

    Grondahl, Clayton M.; Germain, Malcolm R.

    1981-01-01

    An improved cooling system for a gas turbine is disclosed. A plurality of V-shaped notch weirs are utilized to meter a coolant liquid from a pool of coolant into a plurality of platform and airfoil coolant channels formed in the buckets of the turbine. The V-shaped notch weirs are formed in a separately machined cylindrical insert and serve to desensitize the flow of coolant into the individual platform and airfoil coolant channels to design tolerances and non-uniform flow distribution.

  7. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August--October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the tasks completed for the advanced turbine systems program. The topics of the report include last row turbine blade development, single crystal blade casting development, ceramic materials development, combustion cylinder flow mapping, shroud film cooling, directional solidified valve development, shrouded blade cooling, closed-loop steam cooling, active tip clearance control, flow visualization tests, combustion noise investigation, TBC field testing, catalytic combustion development, optical diagnostics probe development, serpentine channel cooling tests, brush seal development, high efficiency compressor design, advanced air sealing development, advanced coating development, single crystal blade development, Ni-based disc forging development, and steam cooling effects on materials.

  8. Development of the helical reaction hydraulic turbine. Final technical report, July 1, 1996--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, A.

    1998-08-01

    The present report contains the final results obtained during July 1996--July 1998. This report should be considered in association with the Annual Progress Report submitted in July 1997 due to the fact that not all of the intermediate results reflected in the Progress Report have been included in the Final Report. The aim of the project was to build a helical hydraulic turbine prototype and demonstrate its suitability and advantages as a novel apparatus to harness hydropower from ultra low-head rivers and other free water streams such as ocean currents or rivers without dams. The research objectives of the project are: Design, optimization and selection of the hydro foil section for the helical turbine; Design of the turbine for demonstration project; Construction and testing of the turbine module; Assessing test results and determining scale-up feasibility. The research conducted under this project has substantially exceeded the original goals including designing, constructing and testing of a scaled-up triple-helix turbine, as well as developing recommendations for application of the turbine for direct water pumping in irrigation systems and for future use in wind farms. Measurements collected during two years of turbine testing are kept in the PI files.

  9. Non-contact FBG sensing based steam turbine rotor dynamic balance vibration detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Cai, Lin

    2015-10-01

    This paper has proposed a non-contact vibration sensor based on fiber Bragg grating sensing, and applied to detect vibration of steam turbine rotor dynamic balance experimental platform. The principle of the sensor has been introduced, as well as the experimental analysis; performance of non-contact FBG vibration sensor has been analyzed in the experiment; in addition, turbine rotor dynamic vibration detection system based on eddy current displacement sensor and non-contact FBG vibration sensor have built; finally, compared with results of signals under analysis of the time domain and frequency domain. The analysis of experimental data contrast shows that: the vibration signal analysis of non-contact FBG vibration sensor is basically the same as the result of eddy current displacement sensor; it verified that the sensor can be used for non-contact measurement of steam turbine rotor dynamic balance vibration.

  10. The UTRC wind energy conversion system performance analysis for horizontal axis wind turbines (WECSPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The theory for the UTRC Energy Conversion System Performance Analysis (WECSPER) for the prediction of horizontal axis wind turbine performance is presented. Major features of the analysis are the ability to: (1) treat the wind turbine blades as lifting lines with a prescribed wake model; (2) solve for the wake-induced inflow and blade circulation using real nonlinear airfoil data; and (3) iterate internally to obtain a compatible wake transport velocity and blade loading solution. This analysis also provides an approximate treatment of wake distortions due to tower shadow or wind shear profiles. Finally, selected results of internal UTRC application of the analysis to existing wind turbines and correlation with limited test data are described.

  11. 77 FR 32497 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas, Inc. (Wind Turbine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Generating Sets) Fort Smith, AR Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended...

  12. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments and reports issued by Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) during October 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995, reports on changes in the AGTSR membership, describes 1993, 1994 and 1995 subcontract progress, third combustion workshop, first combustion specialty meeting, materials workshop, industrial internship, research topics highlighted, and seminar sponsorship.

  13. Mod-2 wind turbine system concept and preliminary design report. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The configuration development of the MOD-2 wind turbine system is presented. The MOD-2 is design optimized for commercial production rates which, in multi-unit installations, will be integrated into a utility power grid and achieve a cost of electricity at less than 4 cents per kilowatt hour.

  14. Motion performance and mooring system of a floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Haitao

    2012-09-01

    The development of offshore wind farms was originally carried out in shallow water areas with fixed (seabed mounted) structures. However, countries with limited shallow water areas require innovative floating platforms to deploy wind turbines offshore in order to harness wind energy to generate electricity in deep seas. The performances of motion and mooring system dynamics are vital to designing a cost effective and durable floating platform. This paper describes a numerical model to simulate dynamic behavior of a new semi-submersible type floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) system. The wind turbine was modeled as a wind block with a certain thrust coefficient, and the hydrodynamics and mooring system dynamics of the platform were calculated by SESAM software. The effect of change in environmental conditions on the dynamic response of the system under wave and wind loading was examined. The results indicate that the semi-submersible concept has excellent performance and SESAM could be an effective tool for floating wind turbine design and analysis.

  15. A coal-fueled combustion turbine cogeneration system with topping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, J.M.; Garland, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Cogeneration systems fired with coal or other solid fuels and containing conventional extracting-condensing or back pressure steam turbines can be found throughout the world. A potentially more economical plant of higher output per unit thermal energy is presented that employs a pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) and coal carbonizer. The carbonizer produces a char that is fed to the PFB and a low heating value fuel gas that is utilized in a topping combustion system. The topping combustor provides the means for achieving state-of-the-art turbine inlet temperatures and is the main contributor to enhancing the plant performance. An alternative to this fully coal-fired system is the partially coal, partially natural gas-fired air heater topping combustion cycle. In this cycle compressed air is preheated in an atmospheric pressure coal-fired boiler and its temperature raised further by burning natural gas in a topping gas turbine combustor. The coal fired boiler also generates steam for use in a cogeneration combined cycle. The conceptual design of the combustion turbine is presented with special emphasis on the low-emissions multiannular swirl burner topping combustion system and its special requirements and features.

  16. Dry low NO{sub x} combustion systems for GE heavy-duty gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past 10 years there has been a dramatic increase in the regulatory requirements for low emissions from gas turbine power plants. Environmental agencies throughout the world are now requiring even lower rates of emissions of NO{sub x} and other pollutants from both new and existing gas turbines. Traditional methods of reducing NO{sub x} emissions from combustion turbines (water and steam injection) are limited in their ability to reach the extremely low levels required in many localities. GE`s involvement in the development of both the traditional methods (References 1-6) as well as the newer Dry Low NO{sub x}(DLN) technology (References 7,8) has been well documented. The focus of this paper is DLN. Since the 1991 commercial introduction of GE`s DLN combustion systems for natural gas-fired heavy-duty gas turbines, systems have been installed in more than 100 machines, from the most modern F class turbine inlet temperature class of 1316 C (2400 F) to field retrofits of older machines. To date, these machines have operated over 500,000 hours with DLN, of which more than 150,000 hours is in the F class. To meet marketplace demands, General Electric has developed DLN products broadly classified as either DLN-1, which was developed for E class (1093+ C (2000+ F) turbine inlet temperature) machines, or DLN-2, which was developed specifically for the F class machines and is also being applied to the EC,G and H machines.

  17. Projecting changes in annual hydropower generation using regional runoff data: an assessment of the United States federal hydropower plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Shih-Chieh; Sale, Michael J; Ashfaq, Moetasim; Uria Martinez, Rocio; Kaiser, Dale Patrick; Wei, Yaxing; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Federal hydropower plants account for approximately half of installed US conventional hydropower capacity, and are an important part of the national renewable energy portfolio. Utilizing the strong linear relationship between the US Geological Survey WaterWatch runoff and annual hydropower generation, a runoff-based assessment approach is introduced in this study to project changes in annual and regional hydropower generation in multiple power marketing areas. Future climate scenarios are developed with a series of global and regional climate models, and the model output is bias-corrected to be consistent with observed data for the recent past. Using this approach, the median decrease in annual generation at federal projects is projected to be less than 2 TWh, with an estimated ensemble uncertainty of 9 TWh. Although these estimates are similar to the recently observed variability in annual hydropower generation, and may therefore appear to be manageable, significantly seasonal runoff changes are projected and it may pose significant challenges in water systems with higher limits on reservoir storage and operational flexibility. Future assessments will be improved by incorporating next-generation climate models, by closer examination of extreme events and longer-term change, and by addressing the interactions among hydropower and other water uses.

  18. Gas-turbine cogeneration system with steam injection. Final report, April 1983-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, W.G.

    1989-11-01

    A gas-turbine topping-cycle cogeneration system utilizing the Allison 501-KH gas turbine has been developed to specifically meet the needs of industrial cogenerators in the 2-10 MWe range. The steam-injected cogeneration system has been installed in the General Motors Hydra-Matic plant in Warren, Michigan. Operation of the cogeneration system commenced in June 1988. The cogeneration system was installed with sufficient instrumentation to allow performance monitoring over a one-year period. Tests measured the NOx and carbon monoxide emission levels and the effectiveness of the passive steam cleanup system. As expected, the measurements show the NOx emissions decreased as the steam injection rate was increased. Small amounts of steam injection seem to reduce the carbon monoxide emitted, but as the steam injection rate is increased further, the emitted levels of carbon monoxide increased significantly. The passive steam cleanup system was very effective at removing contaminants from the steam.

  19. Revenue Maximization of Electricity Generation for a Wind Turbine Integrated with a Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    E-print Network

    Li, Perry Y.

    Revenue Maximization of Electricity Generation for a Wind Turbine Integrated with a Compressed Air controller is developed for a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system integrated with a wind turbine storage vessel. The storage vessel contains both liquid and compressed air at the same pressure. Energy

  20. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Wind turbine blade testing system using base excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrell, Jason; Thresher, Robert; Lambert, Scott; Hughes, Scott; Johnson, Jay

    2014-03-25

    An apparatus (500) for fatigue testing elongate test articles (404) including wind turbine blades through forced or resonant excitation of the base (406) of the test articles (404). The apparatus (500) includes a testing platform or foundation (402). A blade support (410) is provided for retaining or supporting a base (406) of an elongate test article (404), and the blade support (410) is pivotally mounted on the testing platform (402) with at least two degrees of freedom of motion relative to the testing platform (402). An excitation input assembly (540) is interconnected with the blade support (410) and includes first and second actuators (444, 446, 541) that act to concurrently apply forces or loads to the blade support (410). The actuator forces are cyclically applied in first and second transverse directions. The test article (404) responds to shaking of its base (406) by oscillating in two, transverse directions (505, 507).

  2. Alumina-Forming MAX Phases in Turbine Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Harder, Bryan J.; Garg, Arnita; Nesbitt, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Coatings for high temperature turbine components are based on low conductivity YSZ thermal barriers and protective NiAl, NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Good oxidation hot corrosion resistance, intermediate CTE, and strain tolerance of Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC MAX phases are thus of special interest. Their alumina scale growth follows a cubic law in accord with FeCrAlY alloys, with oxygen grain boundary diffusivity: Dgb 1.8 x 10-10 exp(-375 kJmole) m3s. Protective cubic kinetics are also found in high pressure burner rig (6 atm., 25 ms) and TGA tests of MAXthal 211Ti2AlC. The initial portion (0.1 hr) is dominated by fast TiO2 growth (with little evidence of scale volatility in high pressure water vapor, as found for SiO2 scales). Bulk Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC substrates show promise as potential bond coats for YSZ TBCs in 1000-1200 C furnace life (500 h) tests. Cr2AlC is proving to be very resistant to 700-900 C Na2SO4 hot corrosion and is of interest for disk alloys. Preliminary diffusion bonded Cr2AlC-superalloy hybrid couples have survived 1000 hr interrupted furnace tests at 800C with no indication of cracking or debonding. Diffusion zones of -NiAl+Cr7C3 were produced in these above 1000 C, but did not grow to any great extent after 1000 hr at 800 C. Processing as coatings presents challenges, however the basic properties of MAX phases provide novel opportunities for high temperature turbine components.

  3. Large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The development associated with large wind turbine systems is briefly described. The scope of this activity includes the development of several large wind turbines ranging in size from 100 kW to several megawatt levels. A description of the wind turbine systems, their programmatic status and a summary of their potential costs is included.

  4. A high-speed photographic system for flow visualization in a steam turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic system was designed to visualize the moisture flow in a steam turbine. Good performance of the system was verified using dry turbine mockups in which an aerosol spray simulated, in a rough way, the moisture flow in the turbine. Borescopes and fiber-optic light tubes were selected as the general instrumentation approach. High speed motion-picture photographs of the liquid flow over the stator blade surfaces were taken using stroboscopic lighting. Good visualization of the liquid flow was obtained. Still photographs of drops in flight were made using short duration flash sources. Drops with diameters as small as 30 micrometers (0.0012 in.) could be resolved. In addition, motion pictures of a spray of water simulating the spray off the rotor blades and shrouds were taken at normal framing rates. Specially constructed light tubes containing small tungsten-halogen lamps were used. Sixteen millimeter photography was used in all cases. Two potential problems resulting from the two-phase turbine flow (attenuation and scattering of light by the fog present and liquid accumulation on the borescope mirrors) were taken into account in the photographic system design but not evaluated experimentally.

  5. Hydropower: Partnership with the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    This brochure provides useful information on types of hydroelectric facilities as well as general information on capacity, generation, environmental issues, and advanced conventional hydropower technology within the United States.

  6. Energy recuperation in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine (GT) combined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchonthara, Prapan; Bhattacharya, Sankar; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    A combined power generation system consisting of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine (GT) with steam and heat recuperation (HR) was evaluated using a commercial process simulation tool, ASPEN Plus. The effect of steam recuperation (SR) on the overall efficiency of the combined system was investigated by comparing the SOFC-GT during heat and steam recuperation (HSR) against the system during only heat recuperation. At low turbine inlet temperatures (TITs), the overall efficiency of the SOFC-GT combined system with heat and steam recuperation improved by showing an increase in TIT and a reduction in pressure ratio (PR). On the other hand, at high TITs, the opposite trend was observed. The integration of steam recuperation was found to improve the overall efficiency and specific power of SOFC-GT combined systems with a relatively compact SOFC component.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  8. Transition in Gas Turbine Control System Architecture: Modular, Distributed, and Embedded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Controls systems are an increasingly important component of turbine-engine system technology. However, as engines become more capable, the control system itself becomes ever more constrained by the inherent environmental conditions of the engine; a relationship forced by the continued reliance on commercial electronics technology. A revolutionary change in the architecture of turbine-engine control systems will change this paradigm and result in fully distributed engine control systems. Initially, the revolution will begin with the physical decoupling of the control law processor from the hostile engine environment using a digital communications network and engine-mounted high temperature electronics requiring little or no thermal control. The vision for the evolution of distributed control capability from this initial implementation to fully distributed and embedded control is described in a roadmap and implementation plan. The development of this plan is the result of discussions with government and industry stakeholders

  9. LASER STABILIZATION FOR NEAR ZERO NO{sub x} GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Khanna

    2002-09-30

    Historically, the development of new industrial gas turbines has been primarily driven by the intent to achieve higher efficiency, lower operating costs and lower emissions. Higher efficiency and lower cost is obtained through higher turbine operating temperatures, while reduction in emissions is obtained by extending the lean operating limit of the combustor. However reduction in the lean stability limit of operation is limited greatly by the chemistry of the combustion process and by the occurrence of thermo-acoustic instabilities. Solar Turbines, CFD Research Corporation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have teamed to advance the technology associated with laser-assisted ignition and flame stabilization, to a level where it could be incorporated onto a gas turbine combustor. The system being developed is expected to enhance the lean stability limit of the swirl stabilized combustion process and assist in reducing combustion oscillations. Such a system has the potential to allow operation at the ultra-lean conditions needed to achieve NO{sub x} emissions below 5 ppm without the need of exhaust treatment or catalytic technologies. The research effort was focused on analytically modeling laser-assisted flame stabilization using advanced CFD techniques, and experimentally demonstrating the technology, using a solid-state laser and low-cost durable optics. A pulsed laser beam was used to generate a plasma pool at strategic locations within the combustor flow field such that the energy from the plasma became an ignition source and helped maintain a flame at ultra lean operating conditions. The periodic plasma generation and decay was used to nullify the fluctuations in the heat release from the flame itself, thus decoupling the heat release from the combustor acoustics and effectively reducing the combustion oscillations. The program was built on an existing technology base and includes: extending LANL's existing laser stabilization experience to a sub-scale combustor rig, performing and validating CFD predictions, and ultimately conducting a full system demonstration in a multi-injector combustion system at Solar Turbines.

  10. Advanced turbine systems program -- Conceptual design and product development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-26

    This Final Technical Report presents the accomplishments on Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The ATS is an advanced, natural gas fired gas turbine system that will represent a major advance on currently available industrial gas turbines in the size range of 1--20 MW. This report covers a market-driven development. The Market Survey reported in Section 5 identified the customer`s performance needs. This market survey used analyses performed by Solar turbine Incorporated backed up by the analyses done by two consultants, Research Decision Consultants (RDC) and Onsite Energy Corporation (Onsite). This back-up was important because it is the belief of all parties that growth of the ATS will depend both on continued participation in Solar`s traditional oil and gas market but to a major extent on a new market. This new market is distributed electrical power generation. Difficult decisions have had to be made to meet the different demands of the two markets. Available resources, reasonable development schedules, avoidance of schedule or technology failures, probable acceptance by the marketplace, plus product cost, performance and environmental friendliness are a few of the complex factors influencing the selection of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System described in Section 3. Section 4 entitled ``Conversion to Coal`` was a task which addresses the possibility of a future interruption to an economic supply of natural gas. System definition and analysis is covered in Section 6. Two major objectives were met by this work. The first was identification of those critical technologies that can support overall attainment of the program goals. Separate technology or component programs were begun to identify and parameterize these technologies and are described in Section 7. The second objective was to prepare parametric analyses to assess performance sensitivity to operating variables and to select design approaches to meet the overall program goals.

  11. Regulatory approaches for addressing dissolved oxygen concerns at hydropower facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J.; Cada, Glenn F.; Sale, Michael J.; Eddlemon, Gerald K.

    2003-03-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are a common water quality problem downstream of hydropower facilities. At some facilities, structural improvements (e.g. installation of weir dams or aerating turbines) or operational changes (e.g., spilling water over the dam) can be made to improve DO levels. In other cases, structural and operational approaches are too costly for the project to implement or are likely to be of limited effectiveness. Despite improvements in overall water quality below dams in recent years, many hydropower projects are unable to meet state water quality standards for DO. Regulatory agencies in the U.S. are considering or implementing dramatic changes in their approach to protecting the quality of the Nation’s waters. New policies and initiatives have emphasized flexibility, increased collaboration and shared responsibility among all parties, and market-based, economic incentives. The use of new regulatory approaches may now be a viable option for addressing the DO problem at some hydropower facilities. This report summarizes some of the regulatory-related options available to hydropower projects, including negotiation of site-specific water quality criteria, use of biological monitoring, watershed-based strategies for the management of water quality, and watershed-based trading. Key decision points center on the health of the local biological communities and whether there are contributing impacts (i.e., other sources of low DO effluents) in the watershed. If the biological communities downstream of the hydropower project are healthy, negotiation for site-specific water quality standards or biocriteria (discharge performance criteria based on characteristics of the aquatic biota) might be pursued. If there are other effluent dischargers in the watershed that contribute to low DO problems, watershed-scale strategies and effluent trading may be effective. This report examines the value of regulatory approaches by reviewing their use in other

  12. Application of multi-objective controller to optimal tuning of PID gains for a hydraulic turbine regulating system using adaptive grid particle swam optimization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihuan; Yuan, Yanbin; Yuan, Xiaohui; Huang, Yuehua; Li, Xianshan; Li, Wenwu

    2015-05-01

    A hydraulic turbine regulating system (HTRS) is one of the most important components of hydropower plant, which plays a key role in maintaining safety, stability and economical operation of hydro-electrical installations. At present, the conventional PID controller is widely applied in the HTRS system for its practicability and robustness, and the primary problem with respect to this control law is how to optimally tune the parameters, i.e. the determination of PID controller gains for satisfactory performance. In this paper, a kind of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, named adaptive grid particle swarm optimization (AGPSO) is applied to solve the PID gains tuning problem of the HTRS system. This newly AGPSO optimized method, which differs from a traditional one-single objective optimization method, is designed to take care of settling time and overshoot level simultaneously, in which a set of non-inferior alternatives solutions (i.e. Pareto solution) is generated. Furthermore, a fuzzy-based membership value assignment method is employed to choose the best compromise solution from the obtained Pareto set. An illustrative example associated with the best compromise solution for parameter tuning of the nonlinear HTRS system is introduced to verify the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed AGPSO-based optimization approach, as compared with two another prominent multi-objective algorithms, i.e. Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGAII) and Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II (SPEAII), for the quality and diversity of obtained Pareto solutions set. Consequently, simulation results show that this AGPSO optimized approach outperforms than compared methods with higher efficiency and better quality no matter whether the HTRS system works under unload or load conditions. PMID:25481821

  13. Advanced turbine systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, September 1 - November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system: the turbine inlet temperature must increase, although this will lead to increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials along with creative combustor design can result in solutions. The program is focused on two specific products: a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology, and a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machines utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. This report reports on tasks 3-8 for the industrial ATS and the utility ATS. Some impingement heat transfer results are given.

  14. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2000-12-31

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

  15. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-06-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

  16. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-09-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

  17. NWTC Researchers Field-Test Advanced Control Turbine Systems to Increase Performance, Decrease Structural Loading of Wind Turbines and Plants

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) are studying component controls, including new advanced actuators and sensors, for both conventional turbines as well as wind plants. This research will help develop innovative control strategies that reduce aerodynamic structural loads and improve performance. Structural loads can cause damage that increase maintenance costs and shorten the life of a turbine or wind plant.

  18. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August 25--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.

  19. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.

  20. Effectiveness of an ammonia-water mixture turbine system to hot water heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takashi; Noguchi, Hideki; Amano, Yoshiharu; Hashizume, Takumi; Akiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Yoshiaki; Usui, Akira

    1999-07-01

    An ammonia-water mixture (AWM) turbine system is proposed in the paper. The authors call this Waseda ammonia-water Mixture Turbine System (W-MTS). The paper presents some results of the investigation for design of a bottoming cycle that is supplied steam as heat source. The results of the cycle simulation show that the W-MTS is superior to the other simple Kalina cycles (KCS1 and KCS34) to pressurized hot water and steam as a latent and a sensible heat source at a temperature of 160 C. The main components of the W-MTS are a heat recovery vapor generator, two condensers, an AWM turbine and two separators. The W-MTS features two simple Kalina cycles, KCS-1 and KCS-34. The W-MTS behaves like KCS-1 at low ammonia mass fraction region, and like KCS-34 at high ammonia mass fraction region. The W-MTS shows the higher output power rather than the two simple Kalina cycles at all over the ammonia mass fraction. The W-MTS is expected to be effective with the heat recovery of two preheaters in a AWM-vapor generation not only to sensible heat sources, such as exhaust gas that comes from gas turbine, hot water from a waste heat recovery system, etc., but also latent heat source e.g. steam. The results of the simulation show that the ammonia mass fraction at the inlet of the heat recovery vapor generator, turbine inlet pressure and temperature in the separator are the key parameters for optimizing the operating conditions of the cycles. In the temperature rage between 120 C and 200 C, the W-MTS generates more power rather than two simple Kaline cycles.

  1. Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Brian

    2014-09-30

    Air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to provide thermal insulation for the hottest components in gas turbines. Zirconia stabilized with 7wt% yttria (7YSZ) is the most common ceramic top coat used for turbine blades. The 7YSZ coating can be degraded from the buildup of fly-ash deposits created in the power-generation process. Fly ash from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can result from coal-based syngas. TBCs are also exposed to harsh gas environments containing CO2, SO2, and steam. Degradation from the combined effects of fly ash and harsh gas atmospheres has the potential to severely limit TBC lifetimes. The main objective of this study was to use lab-scale testing to systematically elucidate the interplay between prototypical deposit chemistries (i.e., ash and its constituents, K2SO4, and FeS) and environmental oxidants (i.e., O2, H2O and CO2) on the degradation behavior of advanced TBC systems. Several mechanisms of early TBC failure were identified, as were the specific fly-ash constituents responsible for degradation. The reactivity of MCrAlY bondcoats used in TBC systems was also investigated. The specific roles of oxide and sulfate components were assessed, together with the complex interplay between gas composition, deposit chemistry and alloy reactivity. Bondcoat composition design strategies to mitigate corrosion were established, particularly with regard to controlling phase constitution and the amount of reactive elements the bondcoat contains in order to achieve optimal corrosion resistance.

  2. Automotive gas turbine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel control system is reported for automotive-type gas turbines and particulary advanced gas turbines utilizing variable geometry components to improve mileage and reduce pollution emission. The fuel control system compensates for fuel density variations, inlet temperature variations, turbine vane actuation, acceleration, and turbine braking. These parameters are utilized to control various orifices, spool valves and pistons.

  3. Proceedings of the Department of Energy advanced gas turbine central power systems workshop

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, S.

    1980-04-01

    The basic objective of the DOE Central Power Systems group is the development of technology for increasing the use of coal in central station electric power generation in an economical and environmentally acceptable manner. The two major research and development areas of this program are the Open Cycle Gas Turbine System and the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine System. Recognizing that the ultimate success of the DOE program is measured by end-user acceptance of the technology developed, the workshop was held to obtain utility industry comments and suggestions on the development of these systems and their potential use by electric power utilities. Representatives of equipment manufacturers, architect and engineering firms, and universities were also invited as participants to provide a comprehensive review of the technology development and implementation process. The 65 participants and observers examined the following topics: technical considerations of the Open Cycle and of the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine program; commercialization of both systems; and regulatory impacts on the development of both systems. Each group evaluated the existing program, indicating R and D objectives that they supported and cited recommendations for modifications and expansion of future R and D work.

  4. Analysis and numerical optimization of gas turbine space power systems with nuclear fission reactor heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-07-01

    A new three objective optimization technique is developed and applied to find the operating conditions for fission reactor heated Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) space power systems at which maximum efficiency, minimum radiator area, and minimum total system mass is achieved. Such CCGT space power systems incorporate a nuclear reactor heat source with its radiation shield; the rotating turbo-alternator, consisting of the compressor, turbine and the electric generator (three phase AC alternator); and the heat rejection subsystem, principally the space radiator, which enables the hot gas working fluid, emanating from either the turbine or a regenerative heat exchanger, to be cooled to compressor inlet conditions. Numerical mass models for all major subsystems and components developed during the course of this work are included in this report. The power systems modeled are applicable to future interplanetary missions within the Solar System and planetary surface power plants at mission destinations, such as our Moon, Mars, the Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), or Saturn's moon Titan. The detailed governing equations for the thermodynamic processes of the Brayton cycle have been derived and successfully programmed along with the heat transfer processes associated with cycle heat exchangers and the space radiator. System performance and mass results have been validated against a commercially available non-linear optimization code and also against data from existing ground based power plants.

  5. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part II: Dynamics and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems have achieved ultra-high efficiency and ultra-low emissions at small scales, but have yet to demonstrate effective dynamic responsiveness or base-load cost savings. Fuel cell systems and hybrid prototypes have not utilized controls to address thermal cycling during load following operation, and have thus been relegated to the less valuable base-load and peak shaving power market. Additionally, pressurized hybrid topping cycles have exhibited increased stall/surge characteristics particularly during off-design operation. This paper evaluates additional control actuators with simple control methods capable of mitigating spatial temperature variation and stall/surge risk during load following operation of hybrid fuel cell systems. The novel use of detailed, spatially resolved, physical fuel cell and turbine models in an integrated system simulation enables the development and evaluation of these additional control methods. It is shown that the hybrid system can achieve greater dynamic response over a larger operating envelope than either individual sub-system; the fuel cell or gas turbine. Results indicate that a combined feed-forward, P-I and cascade control strategy is capable of handling moderate perturbations and achieving a 2:1 (MCFC) or 4:1 (SOFC) turndown ratio while retaining >65% fuel-to-electricity efficiency, while maintaining an acceptable stack temperature profile and stall/surge margin.

  6. Hydropower production from bridges in urban or suburban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucciarelli, Tullio; Sammartano, Vincenzo; Sinagra, Marco; Morreale, Gabriele; Ferreira, Teresa

    2015-04-01

    A new technology for hydropower production from rivers crossing urban or suburban areas is proposed, based on the use of Cross-Flow turbines having its axis horizontal and normal to the flow direction. A large part of the river cross-section could be covered by the turbine cross-section and this would generate a small, but consistent jump between the water levels of the inlet and the outlet sections. The turbine should be anchored to a pre-existing bridge and the total length of its axis should be of the same order of the bridge length. Due to the large axis extension, it should be possible to easily attain a gross power similar to the power produced with a more traditional installation, based on weirs or barrages, if single jumps of few tens of centimeters were added over a large number of bridges. If the bridges were set in urbanized areas, the production of electricity would be located close to its consumption, according to the smart grid requirements, and the hydrological basin at the bridge section (along with the corresponding discharge) would be greater than the basin of traditional plants located in more upstream locations. The maximum water level to be attained in the upstream section of the bridge should be the minimum among the following ones: 1) the level corresponding to the maximum flood allowed by the surrounding infra-structures, 2) the level corresponding to the maximum force allowed by the bridge structures. The resulting upstream water level hydrographs should be compatible with the river suspended and bed load equilibrium and with the requirement of the aquatic living population. The system should include a mechanism able to raise the turbine completely out of the water level, if required, for maintenance or other purposes. The complete lifting of the turbine could be used to: a) reconstruct the natural river bed profile during floods, b) allow the navigation or fish movements during some periods of the year, or even some hours of the day. A possible technology which would allow the accomplishment of the proposed targets is the use of a Cross-Flow turbine, arranged according to the scheme of Fig.1, where: - the position of the rotating wall (rw) is set according to the pressure measured at its top, so that a small but constant falling discharge (Q2) is guaranteed. This falling discharge allows the transition of floating objects and hid the all machinery, with an obvious skyline improvement. - the average distance d is set in order to guarantee in the confined channel below the turbine an average velocity V similar to the original one existing in the river. PIC Fig.1 - Scheme of the river Cross-Flow turbine. Observe in Fig.2 the results of a CFX simulation, carried on with the following input data for a large rectangular section per unit width: ho (m) h1(m) h2 (m) d(m) 1.5314 1.99 0.082 0.1021 Q2(m2/s) Q3(m2/s)w (r.p.m.)V0(m/s) 0.04 0.267 27 2.61 Table 1. Input data for the CFD simulation. Simulation have been carried out using ANSYS code, with a computational domain divided using both tetrahedral and prismatic elements. The mechanical power estimated at the rotational shaft was of 4.84 KW/m and the hydraulic power of the water stream was of 7.25 KW/m. Thus the turbine efficiency was of about 49.97 %. PIC Fig.2 - Vectors velocity water field close to the Cross-Flow turbine domain. From the environmental point of view the turbine constitutes nonetheless a physical barrier that moving organisms will have to negotiate on their movements through the blades, particularly larger ones such as fish. Also, the hydraulic environment of the river will be modified, e.g. turbulence, shear stress, pressure and flow patterns, affecting as well the smaller organisms. While developing the turbine, a thorough appraisal of its environmental consequences for aquatic ecosystems has to be done, in order to develop an environmentally-friendly structure, embedding mitigation aspects. Furthermore, the structure itself will be subject to colonization on its surfaces by a biological matrix including microbial organisms but also

  7. Selection of natural Gas Fired Advanced Turbine Systems (GFATS) program - Task 3. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    Research continued on natural gas-fired turbines.The objective of Task 3 was to perform initial trade studies and select one engine system (Gas-Fired Advanced Turbine System [GFATS]) that the contractor could demonstrate, at full scale, in the 1998 to 2000 time frame. This report describes the results of the selection process. This task, including Allison internal management reviews of the selected system, has been completed. Allison`s approach to ATS is to offer an engine family that is based on the newest T406 high technology engine. This selection was based on a number of parameters including return on investment (ROI), internal rate of return (IRR) market size and potential sales into that market. This base engine family continues a history at Allison of converting flight engine products to industrial use.

  8. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  9. Summary Report of the 2010 Technology Summit Meeting on Small Hydropower Small Hydropower

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    of technically feasible hydropower potential by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified 372 GW Increasing the contribution of hydropower to U.S. energy supply is an important goal that can be accomplishedSummary Report of the 2010 Technology Summit Meeting on Small Hydropower Small Hydropower

  10. Evaluating run of the river hydropower feasibility and efficiency under climate change for UK study sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasten-Zapata, Ernesto; Moggridge, Helen; Jones, Julie

    2015-04-01

    As renewable energy generation has been encouraged by the UK Government, hydropower importance has also been highlighted. Moreover, the UK Environment Agency has mapped feasible run of the river (ROR) hydropower sites within England and Wales and small hydropower schemes have been provided with economic grants by the Government to support their initial operation. However, ROR hydropower schemes depend on the available river flow volumes and are therefore vulnerable to variations in river regimes. Therefore, an analysis of the impacts of climate change towards existing and feasible run of the river schemes is important and required. The main objective of this research is to evaluate the impacts of climate change on river regimes and its implications to installed and feasible ROR hydropower operations by analyzing four study sites distributed across the UK. Study sites present different characteristics accounting for diverse properties of hydropower schemes including: catchment characteristics (topography, land use, climate, etc.), turbine type, turbine efficiency and head. Both feasible and currently operating schemes will be included in the analysis. Operating sites will be analysed according to their installed turbine type, hands off flow and maximum generation. On the other hand, feasible sites will be analysed considering different possible turbine types and changes in river flow that could affect the hands off flow and maximum generation thresholds. Future climate is simulated based on the temperature and precipitation outputs from Global Climate Models. Due to their relatively coarse resolution, output from these models will be downscaled, bias corrected and coupled to previously calibrated and validated hydrological models for each of the study catchments (linked to poster in session CL5.5/CR3.7/HS4.8/SSS12.14). By coupling model simulations of future climate change and hydrological models, future river flow volumes will be estimated and used as inputs for the hydropower schemes to calculate the expected power generation. Mean, low and high flows will also be analysed to determine climate change impacts for the operation of ROR hydropower schemes. In addition, an uncertainty analysis will be included to identify the highest source of uncertainty from all the simulation parameters. The current progress of the research will be presented along with the following future steps.

  11. Current turbine for water pumping and electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.I.E.

    1983-12-01

    This paper describes work on Phase I of ''Mini Hydropower Research and Development Project'' in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Khartoum, in cooperation with the National Council for Research in Sudan. The main purpose of Phase I of the project has been to demonstrate and evaluate the use of water current energy for powering small-scale pumping units and for generating electricity. Power requirements for pumping water for irrigation on typical small land holdings in the Sudan will be of the order of 5-10 Kw. The same sizes of power should sufficiently meet power requirements of home factories for processing farm produce of these lands and of domestic uses. A vertical shaft impulse turbine of innovative design has been built in the Faculty of Engineering, University of Khartoum, to extract energy from water current of canals, rivers or streams. The useful shaft power from the turbine is used for pumping water or electricity generation. The turbine set is suspended from a floating pontoon (made from plastic drums) which is secured in the current by means of two horizontal supporting poles and steel cables. Field trials of a number of model turbine systems are currently being carried out and valuable findings are being obtained about the desirable features to be developed in these machines. However, concrete results are still to be finalized with a view to facilitating analytical design of pump-turbine and generatorturbine systems. Indications are that this work should lead to an efficient, cheap and simple-to-build current turbine. Detailed information on system design and performance are expected to be ready in time for the conference.

  12. Gas-turbine cogeneration system with steam injection. Annual report, October 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, W.G.

    1988-11-04

    A gas-turbine topping-cycle cogeneration system was developed to specifically meet the needs of industrial cogenerators in the 2-10 MW(sub e) range. The steam-injected cogeneration system was installed in the GM/Hydramatic plant in Warren, Michigan. Operation of the cogeneration system commenced in June of 1988. The cogeneration system was installed with sufficient instrumentation to allow monitoring of the performance for at least a one-year period. Two areas of interest are the effects of steam injection on the NOx and carbon monoxide emission levels and the performance of the passive feedwater cleanup system.

  13. Advanced turbine systems-research and development thermal barrier coatings technology: 1st bimonthly report, December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Objective is development of ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems. Operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic, with fewer transients than in aircraft gas turbine engines. Durability and performance demands of ATS can be achieved reduction of metal temperatures, and this can be accomplished by applying thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) onto the substrate. Phase I and II are discussed; TBC systems will be selected for application on blades for hot section specimen bench test in Phase III.

  14. The 15 kW sub e (nominal) solar thermal electric power conversion concept definition study: Steam Rankine turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A study to define the performance and cost characteristics of a solar powered, steam Rankine turbine system located at the focal point of a solar concentrator is presented. A two stage re-entry turbine with reheat between stages, which has an efficiency of 27% at a turbine inlet temperature of 732 C was used. System efficiency was defined as 60 Hertz electrical output divided by absorbed thermal input in the working fluid. Mass production costs were found to be approximately 364 dollars/KW.

  15. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 2: Advanced energy conversion systems. Part 1: Open-cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. H.; Corman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Ten energy conversion systems are defined and analyzed in terms of efficiency. These include: open-cycle gas turbine recuperative; open-cycle gas turbine; closed-cycle gas turbine; supercritical CO2 cycle; advanced steam cycle; liquid metal topping cycle; open-cycle MHD; closed-cycle inert gas MHD; closed-cycle liquid metal MHD; and fuel cells. Results are presented.

  16. Smart Sensor System for Structural Condition Monitoring of Wind Turbines: 30 May 2002--30 April 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M. J.; Sundaresan, M. J.

    2006-08-01

    This report describes the efforts of the University of Cincinnati, North Carolina A&T State University, and NREL to develop a structural neural system for structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades.

  17. Fluid flow analysis of the SSME high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbine coolant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teal, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to provide improved analysis capability for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbine coolant systems. Each of the systems was analyzed to determine fluid flow rate and thermodynamic and transport properties at all key points in the systems. Existing computer codes were used as a baseline for these analyses. These codes were modified to provide improved analysis capability. The major areas of improvement are listed. A review of the drawings was performed, and pertinent geometry changes were included in the models. Improvements were made in the calculation of thermodynamic and transport properties for a mixture of hydrogen and steam. A one-dimensional turbine model for each system is included as a subroutine to each code. This provides a closed loop analysis with a minimum of required boundary conditions as input. An improved labyrinth seal model is included in the high pressure fuel turbine coolant model. The modifications and the analysis results are presented in detail.

  18. Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Jeong, Hyomi; Jang, JaeKyung; Park, Gyu Hae; Todd, Michael D.; Farrar, Charles R.; Ammerman, Curtt N.

    2012-06-28

    This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

  19. Task 6 -- Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-10

    The Allison Engine Company has completed the Task 6 Conceptual Design and Analysis of Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) contract. At the heart of Allison`s system is an advanced simple cycle gas turbine engine. This engine will incorporate components that ensure the program goals are met. Allison plans to commercialize the ATS demonstrator and market a family of engines incorporating this technology. This family of engines, ranging from 4.9 MW to 12 MW, will be suitable for use in all industrial engine applications, including electric power generation, mechanical drive, and marine propulsion. In the field of electric power generation, the engines will be used for base load, standby, cogeneration, and distributed generation applications.

  20. Hybrid lean premixing catalytic combustion system for gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Critchley, Ian L.

    2003-12-09

    A system and method of combusting a hydrocarbon fuel is disclosed. The system combines the accuracy and controllability of an air staging system with the ultra-low emissions achieved by catalytic combustion systems without the need for a pre-heater. The result is a system and method that is mechanically simple and offers ultra-low emissions over a wide range of power levels, fuel properties and ambient operating conditions.

  1. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS): Phase 1 system scoping and feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1993-04-15

    As part of this involvement Solar intends to design and commercialize a unique gas turbine system that promises high cycle efficiencies and low exhaust emissions. This engine of approximately 12-MW will be targeted for the dispersed power markets both urban and rural. Goals of 50% thermal efficiency and 8 parts-per-million by volume (ppmv) nitrogen oxide emissions were established. Reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) will continue to be the most important factors in the competitive marketplace. The other major goal adopted was one of reducing the cost of power produced by 10%. This reduction is based on the cost of power (COP) associated with today`s engines that lie in the same horsepower range as that targeted in this study. An advanced cycle based on an approximation of the Ericsson Cycle was adopted after careful studies of a number of different cycles. This advanced intercooled, recuperated engine when fired at 2450{degree}F will be capable of meeting the 50% efficiency goal if the cooling air requirements do not exceed 7% of the total air flow rate. This latter qualification will probably dictate the use of ceramic parts for both the nozzle guide vanes and the turbine blades. Cooling of these parts will probably be required and the 7% cooling flow allowance is thought to be adequate for such materials. Analyses of the cost of power and RAM goals show that the installed cost of this advanced engine can be approximately 50% above today`s costs. This cost is based on $4.00 per million Btu fuel and a COP reduction of 10% while maintaining the same RAM as today`s engines.

  2. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved costing and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machines utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities require the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving Advanced Turbine System (ATS) goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS will be placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS will be placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS will be placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emissions combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE`s Industrial and Power Systems is solely responsible for offering Ge products for the industrial and utility markets. The GE ATS program will be managed fully by this organization with core engine technology being supplied by GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) and fundamental studies supporting both product developments being conducted by GE Corporate Research and Development (CRD).

  3. Turbine systems and methods for using internal leakage flow for cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Nestor; Gazzillo, Clement; Boss, Michael J.; Parry, William; Tyler, Karen J.

    2010-02-09

    A cooling system for a turbine with a first section and a second section. The first section may include a first line for diverting a first flow with a first temperature from the first section, a second line for diverting a second flow with a second temperature less than the first temperature from the first section, and a merged line for directing a merged flow of the first flow and the second flow to the second section.

  4. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly report, January--March, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring a series of studies related to advanced gas turbine systems. Ten universities participated in the first round studies, and an additional 13 studies have been funded this year. The five areas being covered are heat transfer, aerodynamics, materials, combustion, and dynamics. Summaries are given for the 6-month progress on the 1993 subcontract studies and on the planned research for the new subcontract studies.

  5. MOD-2 wind turbine system concept and preliminary design report. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The configuration development of the MOD-2 wind turbine system (WTS) is documented. The MOD-2 WTS project is a continuation of DOE programs to develop and achieve early commercialization of wind energy. The MOD-2 is design optimized for commercial production rates which, in multiunit installations, will be integrated into a utility power grid and achieve a cost of electricity at less than four cents per kilowatt hour.

  6. Hydropower Potential Studies Reviewed for Scoping Study

    E-print Network

    Inventory and Hydropower Energy Assessment of Reclamation Owned Conduits B6 Bureau of Reclamation Renewable Energy Update S B7 Scoping Study of Hydropower Potential in Wallowa County, Oregon PUMPED STORAGE/ENERGY Development: Comprehensive Assessment of Hydropower Energy Potential in the US E 2 Assessment of Natural

  7. A hybrid fiber-optic sensor system for condition monitoring of large scale wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-gil; Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-07-01

    A hybrid fiber-optic sensor system which combines fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and a Michelson interferometer is suggested for condition monitoring uses of large scale wind turbine blades. The system uses single broadband light source to address both sensors, which simplifies the optical setup and enhances the cost-effectiveness of condition monitoring system. An athermal-packaged FBG is used to supply quasi-coherent light for the Michelson interferometer demodulation. For the feasibility test, different profiles of test strain, temperature and vibration have been applied to test structures, and successfully reconstructed with the proposed sensor system.

  8. Counter-rotating type axial flow pump unit in turbine mode for micro grid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, R.; Takano, G.; Murakami, T.; Kanemoto, T.; Komaki, K.

    2012-11-01

    Traditional type pumped storage system contributes to adjust the electric power unbalance between day and night, in general. This serial research proposes the hybrid power system combined the wind power unit with the pump-turbine unit, to provide the constant output for the grid system, even at the suddenly fluctuating/turbulent wind. In the pumping mode, the pump should operate unsteadily at not only the normal but also the partial discharge. The operation may be unstable in the rising portion of the head characteristics at the lower discharge, and/or bring the cavitation at the low suction head. To simultaneously overcome both weak points, the authors have proposed a superior pump unit that is composed of counter-rotating type impellers and a peculiar motor with double rotational armatures. This paper discusses the operation at the turbine mode of the above unit. It is concluded with the numerical simulations that this type unit can be also operated acceptably at the turbine mode, because the unit works so as to coincide the angular momentum change through the front runners/impellers with that thorough the rear runners/impellers, namely to take the axial flow at not only the inlet but also the outlet without the guide vanes.

  9. Operation of the counter-rotating type pump-turbine unit installed in the power stabilizing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemoto, T.; Honda, H.; Kasahara, R.; Miyaji, T.

    2014-03-01

    This serial research intends to put a unique power stabilization system with a pumped storage into practical use. The pumped storage is equipped with a counter-rotating type pump-turbine unit whose operating mode can be shifted instantaneously in response to the fluctuation of power from renewable resources. This paper verifies that the system is reasonably effective to stabilize the fluctuating power. It is necessary to quickly increase the rotational speed when the operation is shifted from the turbine to the pumping modes, because the unit cannot pump-up water from a lower reservoir at a slow rotational speed while keeping gross/geodetic head constant. The maximum hydraulic efficiency at the turbine mode is close to the efficiency of the counter-rotating type hydroelectric unit designed exclusively for the turbine mode. The system is also provided for a pilot plant to be operated in the field.

  10. DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-31

    The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

  11. Selection of an industrial natural-gas-fired advanced turbine system - Task 3A

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, G.M.

    1997-05-01

    TASK OBJECTIVES: Identify a gas-fueled turbine and steam system which will meet the program goals for efficiency - and emissions. TECHNICAL GOALS AND REQUIREMENTS: Goals for the Advanced Turbine System Program (ATS) where outlined in the statement of work for five basic categories: Cycle Efficiency - System heat rate to have a 15% improvement over 1991 vintage systems being offered to the market. Environmental No post-combustion devices while meeting the following parameter targets: (1) Nitrous Oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions to equal 8 parts per million dry (ppmd) with 15% oxygen. (2) Carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions to equal 20 parts per million(ppmd) each. Cost of electricity to be 10 percent less when compared to similar 1991 systems. Fuel Flexibility Have to ability to burn coal or coal derived fuels without extensive redesign. Reliability, Availability, Maintainability Reliability, availability and maintainability must be comparable to modern advanced power generation systems. For all cycle and system studies, analyses were done for the following engine system ambient conditions: Temperature - 59F; Altitude - Sea Level; Humidity - 60%. For the 1991 reference system, GE Aircraft Engines used its LM6OOO engine product offering for comparison of the Industrial System parameters developed under this program.

  12. Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

  13. Differential pressure sensing system for airfoils usable in turbine engines

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Stampahar, Maria E.

    2005-09-13

    A detection system for identifying airfoils having a cooling systems with orifices that are plugged with contaminants or with showerheads having a portion burned off. The detection system measures pressures at different locations and calculates or measures a differential pressure. The differential pressure may be compared with a known benchmark value to determine whether the differential pressure has changed. Changes in the differential pressure may indicate that one or more of the orifices in a cooling system of an airfoil are plugged or that portions of, or all of, a showerhead has burned off.

  14. [Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development]. Task 8.7, Recuperator materials

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Solar`s Primary Surface Recuperator (PSR) is a compact, high thermal effectiveness heat exchanger for reducing fuel consumption and increasing the thermal efficiency of gas turbine engines. (Recuperation extracts waste heat from the turbine exhaust stream to heat the compressor discharge air before entry into the combustion system.) Solar`s PSR is comprised of thin, folded, corrugated sheets of a stainless steel (eg type 347) in modular units (air cells). Since sheet data are not applicable to thin foils, effort was focused on acquiring creep, tensile, and oxidation data for a variety of stainless and alloy materials. A new thin foil material was created from two separate materials welded together at gage; the advanced alloy would be used only in the hottest sections of the recuperator and the stainless would be used elsewhere to keep the cost down.

  15. Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01

    This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

  16. Load variation effects on the pressure fluctuations exerted on a Kaplan turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, K.; Mulu, B.; Raisee, M.; Cervantes, M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction of intermittent electricity production systems like wind power and solar systems to electricity market together with the consumption-based electricity production resulted in numerous start/stops, load variations and off-design operation of water turbines. The hydropower systems suffer from the varying loads exerted on the stationary and rotating parts of the turbines during load variations which they are not designed for. On the other hand, investigations on part load operation of single regulated turbines, i.e., Francis and propeller, proved the formation of rotating vortex rope (RVR) in the draft tube. The RVR induces oscillating flow both in plunging and rotating modes which results in oscillating force with two different frequencies on the runner blades, bearings and other rotating parts of the turbine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of transient operations on the pressure fluctuations on the runner and mechanism of the RVR formation/mitigation. Draft tube and runner blades of the Porjus U9 model, a Kaplan turbine, were equipped with pressure sensors. The model was run in off-cam mode during different load variation conditions to check the runner performance under unsteady condition. The results showed that the transients between the best efficiency point and the high load happens in a smooth way while transitions to/from the part load, where rotating vortex rope (RVR) forms in the draft tube induces high level of fluctuations with two frequencies on the runner; plunging and rotating mode of the RVR.

  17. Development of a coal-fired gas turbine cogeneration system: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Hart, P.J.; Thomas, W.H.; Rothrock, J.W.; Harris, C.N.; Bourke, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Allison Advanced Coal-Fueled Turbine Program is now in the sixth year of a development effort that has led to a POC engine demonstration test on a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. Earlier forecasts by CWS suppliers that suitable CWS fuels would be commercially available at an economic price have not been realized. A program replan has, therefore, been executed that incorporates the use of readily available dry pulverized coal. To support this program, technology issues relating to combustor performance and emission control, hot gas cleanup, and turbine deposition, erosion and corrosion (DEC) have been addressed. In addition, system assessment studies have been performed to evaluate the commercial prospects for small (<8 MWe) coal-fired industrial cogeneration systems and the application of the rich-quench-lean (RQL) coal-combustion technology to larger (> 100 MWe) utility-sized gas turbines. These results are reported by Wenglarz (1992). Combustor and engine tests on dry coal are now planned in preparation for a commercial demonstration that will follow the completion of this program.

  18. Development of a coal-fired gas turbine cogeneration system: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Hart, P.J.; Thomas, W.H.; Rothrock, J.W.; Harris, C.N.; Bourke, R.C.

    1992-12-01

    The Allison Advanced Coal-Fueled Turbine Program is now in the sixth year of a development effort that has led to a POC engine demonstration test on a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. Earlier forecasts by CWS suppliers that suitable CWS fuels would be commercially available at an economic price have not been realized. A program replan has, therefore, been executed that incorporates the use of readily available dry pulverized coal. To support this program, technology issues relating to combustor performance and emission control, hot gas cleanup, and turbine deposition, erosion and corrosion (DEC) have been addressed. In addition, system assessment studies have been performed to evaluate the commercial prospects for small (<8 MWe) coal-fired industrial cogeneration systems and the application of the rich-quench-lean (RQL) coal-combustion technology to larger (> 100 MWe) utility-sized gas turbines. These results are reported by Wenglarz (1992). Combustor and engine tests on dry coal are now planned in preparation for a commercial demonstration that will follow the completion of this program.

  19. Assessing residual hydropower potential of the La Plata Basin accounting for future user demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, I.; Brandimarte, L.; Perera, M. S. U.; Peviani, M.

    2012-08-01

    La Plata Basin is shared by five countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay), which have fast growing economies in South America. These countries need energy for their sustainable development; hence, hydropower can play a very important role as a renewable clean source of energy. This paper presents an analysis of the current hydropower production and electricity demand in La Plata Basin (LPB), and it analyses the maximum and residual hydropower potential of the basin for a horizon of 30 yr (i.e. year 2040). Current hydropower production is estimated based on historical available data, while future energy production is deduced from the available water in the catchment (estimated based on measured hydrographs of the past years), whereas electricity demand is assessed by correlating existing electricity demand with the estimated population growth and economic development. The maximum and residual hydropower potential of the basin were assessed for the mean annual flows of the present hydrological regime (1970-2000) and topographical characteristics of the area. Computations were performed using an integrated GIS environment called VAPIDRO-ASTE released by the Research on Energy System (Italy). The residual hydropower potential of the basin is computed considering first that the water supply needs for population, industry and agriculture are served, and then hydropower energy is produced. The calculated hydropower production is found to be approximately half of the estimated electricity demand, which shows that there is a need to look for other sources of energy in the future.

  20. Assessing residual hydropower potential of the La Plata Basin accounting for future user demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, I.; Brandimarte, L.; Perera, M. S. U.; Peviani, M.

    2012-04-01

    La Plata Basin is shared by five countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay), which are having fast growing economies in South America. These countries need energy for their sustainable development; hence hydropower can play a very important role as a renewable clean source of energy. This paper presents an analysis of the current hydropower production and electricity demand in La Plata Basin (LPB) and makes an analysis of the maximum and residual hydropower potential of the basin for a horizon of 30 yr (i.e. year 2040). Current hydropower production is estimated based on historic available data while future energy production is deduced from the maximum available water in the catchment, whereas electricity demand is assessed by correlating existing electricity demand with the estimated population growth and economic development. The maximum and residual hydropower potential of the basin, were assessed for the mean annual flows of the present hydrological regime (1970-2000) and topographical characteristics of the area. Computations were performed using an integrated GIS environment called Vapidro-Aste released by the Research on Energy System (Italy). The residual hydropower potential of the basin is computed considering that first the water supply needs for population, industry and agriculture are served and than hydropower energy is produced. The calculated hydropower production is found to be approximately half of the estimated electricity demand, which shows that there is a need to look for other sources of energy in the future.

  1. An optimal hydropower contract load determination method considering both human and riverine ecosystem needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xin'an; Yang, Zhifeng; Liu, Cailing; Zhao, Yanwei

    2015-09-01

    In this research, a new method is developed to determine the optimal contract load for a hydropower reservoir, which is achieved by incorporating environmental flows into the determination process to increase hydropower revenues, while mitigating the negative impacts of hydropower generation on riverine ecosystems. In this method, the degree of natural flow regime alteration is adopted as a constraint of hydropower generation to protect riverine ecosystems, and the maximization of mean annual revenue is set as the optimization objective. The contract load in each month and the associated reservoir operating parameters were simultaneously optimized by a genetic algorithm. The proposed method was applied to China's Wangkuai Reservoir to test its effectiveness. The new method offers two advantages over traditional studies. First, it takes into account both the economic benefits and the ecological needs of riverine systems, rather than only the economic benefits, as in previous methods. Second, although many measures have been established to mitigate the negative ecological impacts of hydropower generation, few have been applied to the hydropower planning stage. Thus, since the contract load is an important planning parameter for hydropower generation, influencing both economic benefits and riverine ecosystem protection, this new method could provide guidelines for the establishment of river protection measures at the hydropower planning stage.

  2. US hydropower resource assessment for Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1996-09-01

    US DOE is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model developed by INEL for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was tested using hydropower information and data provided by Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the PC user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes, and generate reports. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Hawaii.

  3. Transition duct with late injection in turbine system

    DOEpatents

    LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray; Flanagan, James Scott; Kim, Won -Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston

    2015-09-15

    A system for supplying an injection fluid to a combustor is disclosed. The system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The passage defines a combustion chamber. The system further includes a tube providing fluid communication for the injection fluid to flow through the transition duct and into the combustion chamber.

  4. Fully coupled dynamic analysis of a floating wind turbine system

    E-print Network

    Withee, Jon E

    2004-01-01

    The use of wind power is in a period of rapid growth worldwide and wind energy systems have emerged as a promising technology for utilizing offshore wind resources for the large scale generation of electricity. Drawing ...

  5. Analysis of the electrical harmonic characteristics of a slip recovery variable speed generating system for wind turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, J. I.; Reddoch, T. W.

    1988-02-01

    Variable speed electric generating technology can enhance the general use of wind energy in electric utility applications. This enhancement results from two characteristic properties of variable speed wind turbine generators: an improvement in drive train damping characteristics, which results in reduced structural loading on the entire wind turbine system, and an improvement in the overall efficiency by using a more sophisticated electrical generator. Electronic converter systems are the focus of this investigation -- in particular, the properties of a wound-rotor induction generator with the slip recovery system and direct-current link converter. Experience with solid-state converter systems in large wind turbines is extremely limited. This report presents measurements of electrical performances of the slip recovery system and is limited to the terminal characteristics of the system. Variable speed generating systems working effectively in utility applications will require a satisfactory interface between the turbine/generator pair and the utility network. The electrical testing described herein focuses largely on the interface characteristics of the generating system. A MOD-O wind turbine was connected to a very strong system; thus, the voltage distortion was low and the total harmonic distortion in the utility voltage was less than 3 percent (within the 5 percent limit required by most utilities). The largest voltage component of a frequency below 60 Hz was 40 dB down from the 60-Hz less than component.

  6. Design of aircraft turbine fan drive gear transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, E.; Hirsch, R. A.; Peterson, V. W.

    1970-01-01

    The following basic types of gear reduction concepts were studied as being feasible power train systems for a low-bypass-ratio, single-spool, geared turbofan engine for general aircraft use: (1) single-stage external-internal reduction, (2) gears (offset shafting), (3) multiple compound idler gear system (concentric shafting), and (4) star gear planetary system with internal ring gear final output member (concentric shafting-counterrotation). In addition, studies were made of taking the accessories drive power off both the high-speed and low-speed shafting, using either face gears or spiral bevel gears. Both antifriction and sleeve-type bearings were considered for the external-internal and star-planet reduction concepts.

  7. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine blade/aileron systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strain, J. C.; Mirandy, L.

    1995-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability analyses have been performed for the MOD-5A blade/aileron system. Various configurations having different aileron torsional stiffness, mass unbalance, and control system damping have been investigated. The analysis was conducted using a code recently developed by the General Electric Company - AILSTAB. The code extracts eigenvalues for a three degree of freedom system, consisting of: (1) a blade flapwise mode; (2) a blade torsional mode; and (3) an aileron torsional mode. Mode shapes are supplied as input and the aileron can be specified over an arbitrary length of the blade span. Quasi-steady aerodynamic strip theory is used to compute aerodynamic derivatives of the wing-aileron combination as a function of spanwise position. Equations of motion are summarized herein. The program provides rotating blade stability boundaries for torsional divergence, classical flutter (bending/torsion) and wing/aileron flutter. It has been checked out against fixed-wing results published by Theodorsen and Garrick. The MOD-5A system is stable with respect to divergence and classical flutter for all practical rotor speeds. Aileron torsional stiffness must exceed a minimum critical value to prevent aileron flutter. The nominal control system stiffness greatly exceeds this minimum during normal operation. The basic system, however, is unstable for the case of a free (or floating) aileron. The instability can be removed either by the addition of torsional damping or mass-balancing the ailerons. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  8. Digital system for dynamic turbine engine blade displacement measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrumentation concept for measuring blade tip displacements which employs optical probes and an array of micro-computers is presented. The system represents a hitherto unknown instrumentation capability for the acquisition and direct digitization of deflection data concurrently from all of the blade tips of an operational engine rotor undergoing flutter or forced vibration. System measurements are made using optical transducers which are fixed to the case. Measurements made in this way are the equivalent of those obtained by placing three surface-normal displacement transducers at three positions on each blade of an operational rotor.

  9. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems: Development and Demonstration. Annual report, September 14, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program for advanced turbine systems (ATS) that will serve industrial power generation markets. The objective of the cooperative agreements granted under the program is to join the DOE with industry in research and development that will lead to commercial offerings in the private sector. The ATS will provide ultra-high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness. The ATS will foster (1) early market penetration that enhances the global competitiveness of U.S. industry, (2) public health benefits resulting from reduced exhaust gas emissions of target pollutants, (3) reduced cost of power used in the energy-intensive industrial marketplace and (4) the retention and expansion of the skilled U.S. technology base required for the design, development and maintenance of state-of-the-art advanced turbine products. The Industrial ATS Development and Demonstration program is a multi-phased effort. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) has participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the program. On September 14, 1995 Solar was awarded a Cooperative Agreement for Phases 3 and 4 of the program (DE-FC21-95MC31173) by the DOE`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Technical administration of the Cooperative Agreement will be provided from EE`s Chicago Operations Office. Contract administration of the Cooperative Agreement will be provided from DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC).

  10. Wind turbine generator interaction with diesel generators on an isolated power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, G. W.; Wilreker, V. F.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1983-07-01

    The results of a dynamic interaction investigation to characterize any disturbances caused by interfacing the Mod 0A wind turbine (150 kW configuration) with the Block Island utility diesel generator grid are reported. The tests were run when only two diesel generators were on line, and attention was given to power, frequency, and voltage time profiles. The interconnected system was examined in the start-up and synchronization phase, normal shutdown and cut-out of the wind turbine, during fixed pitch generation, and during variable pitch operation. Governors were installed on the diesel generators to accommodate the presence of wind-derived electricity. The blade pitch control was set to maintain power at 150 kW or below. Power and voltage transients were insignificant during start-up and shutdown, and frequency aberrations were within the range caused by load fluctuations. It is concluded that wind turbine generation can be successfully implemented by an isolated utility, even with a significant penetration to the total grid output.

  11. Wind turbine generator interaction with diesel generators on an isolated power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, G. W.; Wilreker, V. F.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a dynamic interaction investigation to characterize any disturbances caused by interfacing the Mod 0A wind turbine (150 kW configuration) with the Block Island utility diesel generator grid are reported. The tests were run when only two diesel generators were on line, and attention was given to power, frequency, and voltage time profiles. The interconnected system was examined in the start-up and synchronization phase, normal shutdown and cut-out of the wind turbine, during fixed pitch generation, and during variable pitch operation. Governors were installed on the diesel generators to accommodate the presence of wind-derived electricity. The blade pitch control was set to maintain power at 150 kW or below. Power and voltage transients were insignificant during start-up and shutdown, and frequency aberrations were within the range caused by load fluctuations. It is concluded that wind turbine generation can be successfully implemented by an isolated utility, even with a significant penetration to the total grid output.

  12. Unsteady, Cooled Turbine Simulation Using a PC-Linux Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    List, Michael G.; Turner, Mark G.; Chen, Jen-Pimg; Remotigue, Michael G.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    The fist stage of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) of the GE90 engine was simulated with a three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Sokes solver, MSU Turbo, which uses source terms to simulate the cooling flows. In addition to the solver, its pre-processor, GUMBO, and a post-processing and visualization tool, Turbomachinery Visual3 (TV3) were run in a Linux environment to carry out the simulation and analysis. The solver was run both with and without cooling. The introduction of cooling flow on the blade surfaces, case, and hub and its effects on both rotor-vane interaction as well the effects on the blades themselves were the principle motivations for this study. The studies of the cooling flow show the large amount of unsteadiness in the turbine and the corresponding hot streak migration phenomenon. This research on the GE90 turbomachinery has also led to a procedure for running unsteady, cooled turbine analysis on commodity PC's running the Linux operating system.

  13. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Annual report, July 1990--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The combustion system discussed here incorporates a modular three- stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; also in the first stage, sulfur is captured with sorbent; coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed from the combustion gases by inertial means in the second stage by the use of an impact separator and slagging cyclone separator in series. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The objective of this contract is to establish the technology required for subsequent commercial development and application by the private sector of utility-size direct coal-fueled gas turbines. Emissions from these units are to meet or be lower than the Environment Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for a pulverized coal-=fired steam turbine generator plant.

  14. Conventional Hydropower Technologies Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2011-07-01

    This factsheet gives a description of the U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program's efforts to increase generating capacity and efficiency at existing hydroelectric facilities, add hydroelectric generating capacity to non-powered dams, and reduce the environmental effects of hydropower.

  15. An improved method for evaluating ecological suitability of hydropower development by considering water footprint and transportation connectivity in Tibet, China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guannan; Wang, Xuan; Xu, Linyu; Zhang, Jin; Yu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Ecological suitability evaluation for hydropower development is effective in locating the most suitable area for construction and emphasizes a clear direction for water resources governance. In this paper, water footprints and transportation connectivity were introduced to improve the existing ecological suitability evaluation application for hydropower development by revising the defects of the traditional indicator system. The following conclusions were reached. (1) Tibet was in a state of water use surplus; the prospect of further hydropower development is positive. (2) Chamdo, Lhasa and Nyingchi excelled in water use efficiency, and Ali was placed last. Nakchu was slightly superior to Ali, but it lagged behind the southern regions. Lhasa, Chamdo, Nyingchi, Xigaze and Shannan were suitable for hydropower development, which could further meet local needs and benefit other regions of China. (3) The evaluation results were in accordance with the actual eco-environmental conditions of the built hydropower projects, indicating that current hydropower development planning was basically reasonable. PMID:25259500

  16. Aircraft gas turbine engine fuel pumping systems in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.D.; Kucera, G.D.; Clemons, J.S.; Lee, J.

    1997-07-01

    Since their introduction, main engine fuel pumping systems for aircraft gas turbine engines have remained relatively unchanged. The main engine fuel pump has been an engine accessory gearbox driven, positive displacement pump (except for the Concorde), until recently when centrifugal pumps were introduced on Pratt-Whitney and General Electric military engines. This paper describes some of the issues that must be addressed as pumping system technology moves into the 21st century and gives a description of two programs that address these issues.

  17. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  18. Development of a light-weight, wind-turbine-rotor-based data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Rumsey, M.; Robertson, P.; Kelley, N.; McKenna, E.; Gass, K.

    1997-12-01

    Wind-energy researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing a new, light-weight, modular system capable of acquiring long-term, continuous time-series data from current-generation small or large, dynamic wind-turbine rotors. Meetings with wind-turbine research personnel at NREL and SNL resulted in a list of the major requirements that the system must meet. Initial attempts to locate a commercial system that could meet all of these requirements were not successful, but some commercially available data acquisition and radio/modem subsystems that met many of the requirements were identified. A time synchronization subsystem and a programmable logic device subsystem to integrate the functions of the data acquisition, the radio/modem, and the time synchronization subsystems and to communicate with the user have been developed at SNL. This paper presents the data system requirements, describes the four major subsystems comprising the system, summarizes the current status of the system, and presents the current plans for near-term development of hardware and software.

  19. Part-load performance characteristics of a lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Juan; Li, Ming; Zhu, Jun-qiang

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the part-load performance of a lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine (LBCCGT) system in three different control modes: varying fuel, bleeding off the fuel mixture flow after the compressor and varying rotational speed. The conversions of methane species for chemical process are considered. A 1D heterogeneous plug flow model was utilized to analyze the system performance. The actual turbomachinery components were designed and predicted performance maps were applied to system performance research. The part-load characteristics under three control strategies were numerically investigated. The main results show that: the combustor inlet temperature is a significant factor that can significantly affect the part-load characteristics of the LBCCGT system; the rotational speed control mode can provide the best performance characteristics for part-load operations; the operation range of the bleed off mode is narrower than that of the speed control mode and wider than that of the fuel only mode; with reduced power, methane does not achieve full conversion over the reactor at the fuel only control mode, which will not warrant stable operation of the turbine system; the thermal efficiency of the LBCCGT system at fuel only control strategy is higher than that at bleed off control strategy within the operation range.

  20. A Holistic Framework for Environmental Flows Determination in Hydropower Contexts

    SciTech Connect

    McManamay, Ryan A; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2013-05-01

    Among the ecological science community, the consensus view is that the natural flow regime sustains the ecological integrity of river systems. This prevailing viewpoint by many environmental stakeholders has progressively led to increased pressure on hydropower dam owners to change plant operations to affect downstream river flows with the intention of providing better conditions for aquatic biological communities. Identifying the neccessary magnitude, frequency, duration, timing, or rate of change of stream flows to meet ecological needs in a hydropower context is challenging because the ecological responses to changes in flows may not be fully known, there are usually a multitude of competing users of flow, and implementing environmental flows usually comes at a price to energy production. Realistically, hydropower managers must develop a reduced set of goals that provide the most benefit to the identified ecological needs. As a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program, the Instream Flow Project (IFP) was carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argon National Laboratory (ANL) as an attempt to develop tools aimed at defining environmental flow needs for hydropower operations. The application of these tools ranges from national to site-specific scales; thus, the utility of each tool will depend on various phases of the environmental flow process. Given the complexity and sheer volume of applications used to determine environmentally acceptable flows for hydropower, a framework is needed to organize efforts into a staged process dependent upon spatial, temporal, and functional attributes. By far, the predominant domain for determining environmental flows related to hydropower is within the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing process. This process can take multiple years and can be very expensive depending on the scale of each hydropower project. The utility of such a framework is that it can expedite the environmental flow process by 1) organizing data and applications to identify predictable relationships between flows and ecology, and 2) suggesting when and where tools should be used in the environmental flow process. In addition to regulatory procedures, a framework should also provide the coordination for a comprehensive research agenda to guide the science of environmental flows. This research program has further reaching benefits than just environmental flow determination by providing modeling applications, data, and geospatial layers to inform potential hydropower development. We address several objectives within this document that highlight the limitations of existing environmental flow paradigms and their applications to hydropower while presenting a new framework catered towards hydropower needs. Herein, we address the following objectives: 1) Provide a brief overview of the Natural Flow Regime paradigm and existing environmental flow frameworks that have been used to determine ecologically sensitive stream flows for hydropower operations. 2) Describe a new conceptual framework to aid in determining flows needed to meet ecological objectives with regard to hydropower operations. The framework is centralized around determining predictable relationships between flow and ecological responses. 3) Provide evidence of how efforts from ORNL, PNNL, and ANL have filled some of the gaps in this broader framework, and suggest how the framework can be used to set the stage for a research agenda for environmental flow.

  1. Design and fabrication of a low cost Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine system: Phase 2, volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-03-01

    Described is the successful fabrication, installation, and checkout of 100 kW 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). The turbines are Darrieus-type VAWTs with rotors 17 meters (55 feet) in diameter and 25.15 meters (83 feet) in height. They can produce 100 kW of electric power at a cost of energy as low as 3 cents per kWh, in an 18 mph wind regime using 12% annualized costs. Four turbines were produced; three are installed and are operable at: (1) Wind Systems Test Center, Rocky Flats, Colorado; (2) the US Department of Agriculture Conservation and Production Research Center at Bushland, Texas; and (3) Tisbury Water Authority, Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, on the island of Martha's Vineyard. The fourth turbine is stored at Bushland, Texas awaiting selection of an erection site.

  2. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The configuration of the subscale combustor has evolved during the six years of this program from a system using only an impact separator to remove particulates to a system which also included a slagging cyclone separator before the lean-quench combustor. The system also now includes active slag tapping after the impact separator rather than a bucket to collect the slag. The subscale 12 MM Btu/hr (higher heating value, HHV) slagging combustor has demonstrated excellent coal-fired operation at 6 atm. The combustor has fired both coal-water mixtures (CWM) and pulverized coal (PC). Three Wyoming subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals have been successfully fired in the TVC. As a result of this active testing, the following conclusions may be drawn: (1) it was possible to achieve the full design thermal capacity of 12 MM Btu/hr with the subscale slagging combustor, while burning 100% pulverized coal and operating at the design pressure of 6 atm; (2) because of the separate-chamber, rich-lean design of the subscale slagging combustor, NO{sub x} emissions that easily meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) limits were achieved; (3) carbon burnout efficiency was in excess of 99% when 100% coal-fired; (4) ninety percent of the ash can be separated as slag in the impact separator, and a total 98 to 99% removed with the addition of the slagging cyclone separator; (5) Objectives for third-stage exit temperature (1850{degrees}F), and exit temperature pattern factor (14%) were readily achieved; (6) overall pressure loss is currently an acceptable 5 to 6% without cyclone separator and 7 to 9% with the cyclone; and (7) feeding pulverized coal or sorbent into the combustor against 6 atm pressure is achievable.

  3. Lithium-Ion Ultracapacitors integrated with Wind Turbines Power Conversion Systems to Extend Operating Life and Improve Output Power Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Adel Nasiri

    2012-05-23

    In this project we designed and modeled a system for a full conversion wind turbine and built a scaled down model which utilizes Lithium-Ion Capacitors on the DC bus. One of the objectives is to reduce the mechanical stress on the gearbox and drivetrain of the wind turbine by adjusting the torque on generator side according to incoming wind power. Another objective is to provide short-term support for wind energy to be more ���¢��������grid friendly���¢������� in order to ultimately increase wind energy penetration. These supports include power smoothing, power ramp rate limitation, low voltage ride through, and frequency (inertia) support. This research shows how energy storage in small scale and in an economical fashion can make a significant impact on performance of wind turbines. Gearbox and drivetrain premature failures are among high cost maintenance items for wind turbines. Since the capacitors are directly applied on the turbine DC bus and their integration does not require addition hardware, the cost of the additional system can be reasonable for the wind turbine manufacturers and utility companies.

  4. Real-Time Safety Risk Assessment Based on a Real-Time Location System for Hydropower Construction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qixiang; Qiang, Maoshan

    2014-01-01

    The concern for workers' safety in construction industry is reflected in many studies focusing on static safety risk identification and assessment. However, studies on real-time safety risk assessment aimed at reducing uncertainty and supporting quick response are rare. A method for real-time safety risk assessment (RTSRA) to implement a dynamic evaluation of worker safety states on construction site has been proposed in this paper. The method provides construction managers who are in charge of safety with more abundant information to reduce the uncertainty of the site. A quantitative calculation formula, integrating the influence of static and dynamic hazards and that of safety supervisors, is established to link the safety risk of workers with the locations of on-site assets. By employing the hidden Markov model (HMM), the RTSRA provides a mechanism for processing location data provided by the real-time location system (RTLS) and analyzing the probability distributions of different states in terms of false positives and negatives. Simulation analysis demonstrated the logic of the proposed method and how it works. Application case shows that the proposed RTSRA is both feasible and effective in managing construction project safety concerns. PMID:25114958

  5. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-03-30

    In the early 90's GE recognized the need to introduce new technology to follow on to the ''F'' technology the Company introduced in 1988. By working with industry and DOE, GE helped shape the ATS program goal of demonstrating a gas turbine, combined-cycle system using natural gas as the primary fuel that achieves the following targets: system efficiency exceeding 60% lower heating value basis; environmental superiority under full-load operating conditions without the use of post-combustion emissions controls, environmental superiority includes limiting NO{sub 2} to less than 10 parts per mission by volume (dry basis) at 15% oxygen; busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems meeting the same environmental requirements; fuel-flexible designs operating on natural gas but also capable of being adapted to operate on coal-based, distillate, or biomass fuels; reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to modern advanced power generation systems; and commercial systems that could enter the market in the year 2000.

  6. Integrated operation of a pressurized gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system and turbine simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, S.; Najewicz, D.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.; Feitelberg, A.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. This technology will ultimately be incorporated into advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at F conditions (2,350 F rotor inlet temperature) and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions of such a combustor. Testing of the GE HGCU system has been underway since December 1990. The two most recent tests, Test 5 and Test 6, represent the latest advancements in regenerator configuration, type of sorbent, and chloride control systems. Test 5 was based on the use of zinc titanate sorbent and included a revised regenerator configuration and a sodium bicarbonate injection system for chloride control. Test 6 incorporated the use of Z-Sorb, a chloride guard in the regenerator recycle loop, and further modifications to the regenerator internal configuration. This report describes the test conditions in detail and discusses the test results.

  7. The design of stationary and mobile solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Wolfgang; Lorenz, Hagen

    A general thermodynamic model has shown that combined fuel cell cycles may reach an electric-efficiency of more than 80%. This value is one of the targets of the Department of Energy (DOE) solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) program. The combination of a SOFC and GT connects the air flow of the heat engine and the cell cooling. The principle strategy in order to reach high electrical-efficiencies is to avoid a high excess air for the cell cooling and heat losses. Simple combined SOFC-GT cycles show an efficiency between 60 and 72%. The combination of the SOFC and the GT can be done by using an external cooling or by dividing the stack into multiple sub-stacks with a GT behind each sub-stack as the necessary heat sink. The heat exchangers (HEXs) of a system with an external cooling have the benefit of a pressurization on both sides and therefore, have a high heat exchange coefficient. The pressurization on both sides delivers a low stress to the HEX material. The combination of both principles leads to a reheat (RH)-SOFC-GT cycle that can be improved by a steam turbine (ST) cycle. The first results of a study of such a RH-SOFC-GT-ST cycle indicate that a cycle design with an efficiency of more than 80% is possible and confirm the predictions by the theoretical thermodynamic model mentioned above. The extremely short heat-up time of a thin tubular SOFC and the market entrance of the micro-turbines give the option of using these SOFC-GT designs for mobile applications. The possible use of hydrocarbons such as diesel oil is an important benefit of the SOFC. The micro-turbine and the SOFC stack will be matched depending on the start-up requirements of the mobile system. The minimization of the volume needed is a key issue. The efficiency of small GTs is lower than the efficiency of large GTs due to the influence of the leakage within the stages of GTs increasing with a decreasing size of the GT. Thus, the SOFC module pressure must be lower than in larger stationary SOFC-GT systems. This leads to an electrical-efficiency of 45% of a cycle used as a basis for a design study. The result of the design study is that the space available in a mid-class car allows the placement of such a system, including space reserves. A further improvement of the system might allow an electrical-efficiency of about 55%.

  8. Definitional mission report on U. S. hydropower sector international competitiveness. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, E.L.

    1992-06-01

    The report assesses the U.S. hydropower sector's technological competitiveness in major equipment categories such as turbines/generators, switch gears, transformers, etc. for the full range of hydroelectric power plants, that is, from small plants of 50MW or less to large plants such as Guayabo-Siquirres. The subject has three interwoven threads, each affecting the others but subject to individual discussion. They are technological ability; productivity and the state of industrial plant; and management and sales methods.

  9. Feasibility study of aileron and spoiler control systems for large horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Snyder, M. H.; Calhoun, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using aileron or spoiler controls as alternates to pitch control for large horizontal axis wind turbines was studied. The NASA Mod-0 100 kw machine was used as the basis for the study. Specific performance studies were conducted for 20% chord ailerons over the outboard 30% span, and for 10% chord spoilers over the same portion of the span. Both control systems utilized control deflections up to 60 deg. Results of the study show that either ailerons or spoilers can provide the control necessary to limit turbine power in high wind conditions. The aileron system, as designed, provides overspeed protection at hurricane wind speeds, low wind speed starting torque of 778 N-m (574 ft. lb) at 3.6 m/sec, and a 1.3 to 1.5% increase in annual energy compared to a fixed pitch rotor. The aileron control system preliminary design study includes aileron loads analysis and the design of a failsafe flyweight actuator for overspeed protection in the event of a hydraulic system failure.

  10. A Study on the Requirements for Fast Active Turbine Tip Clearance Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the requirements of a control system for active turbine tip clearance control in a generic commercial turbofan engine through design and analysis. The control objective is to articulate the shroud in the high pressure turbine section in order to maintain a certain clearance set point given several possible engine transient events. The system must also exhibit reasonable robustness to modeling uncertainties and reasonable noise rejection properties. Two actuators were chosen to fulfill such a requirement, both of which possess different levels of technological readiness: electrohydraulic servovalves and piezoelectric stacks. Identification of design constraints, desired actuator parameters, and actuator limitations are addressed in depth; all of which are intimately tied with the hardware and controller design process. Analytical demonstrations of the performance and robustness characteristics of the two axisymmetric LQG clearance control systems are presented. Takeoff simulation results show that both actuators are capable of maintaining the clearance within acceptable bounds and demonstrate robustness to parameter uncertainty. The present model-based control strategy was employed to demonstrate the tradeoff between performance, control effort, and robustness and to implement optimal state estimation in a noisy engine environment with intent to eliminate ad hoc methods for designing reliable control systems.

  11. Applying combined pinch and exergy analysis to closed-cycle gas turbine system design

    SciTech Connect

    Dhole, V.R.; Zheng, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Pinch technology has developed into a powerful tool for thermodynamic analysis of chemical processes and associated utilities, resulting in significant energy savings. Conventional pinch analysis identifies the most economical energy consumption in terms of heat loads and provides practical design guidelines to achieve this. However, in analyzing systems involving heat and power, for example, steam and gas turbines, etc., pure heat load analysis is insufficient. Exergy analysis, on the other hand, provides a tool for heat and power analysis, although at times it does not provide clear practical design guideline. An appropriate combination of pinch and exergy analysis can provide practical methodology for the analysis of heat and power systems. The methodology has been successfully applied to refrigeration systems. This paper introduces the application of a combined pinch and exergy approach to commercial power plants with a demonstration example of a closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) system. Efficiency improvement of about 0.82 percent (50.2 to 51.02 percent) can be obtained by application of the new approach. More importantly, the approach can be used as an analysis and screening tool for the various design improvements and is generally applicable to any commercial power generation facility.

  12. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  13. Development of Parametric Mass and Volume Models for an Aerospace SOFC/Gas Turbine Hybrid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, Robert; Wang, Xiao-yen; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Freeh, Joshua E.

    2005-01-01

    In aerospace power systems, mass and volume are key considerations to produce a viable design. The utilization of fuel cells is being studied for a commercial aircraft electrical power unit. Based on preliminary analyses, a SOFC/gas turbine system may be a potential solution. This paper describes the parametric mass and volume models that are used to assess an aerospace hybrid system design. The design tool utilizes input from the thermodynamic system model and produces component sizing, performance, and mass estimates. The software is designed such that the thermodynamic model is linked to the mass and volume model to provide immediate feedback during the design process. It allows for automating an optimization process that accounts for mass and volume in its figure of merit. Each component in the system is modeled with a combination of theoretical and empirical approaches. A description of the assumptions and design analyses is presented.

  14. Structural analysis of wind turbine rotors for NSF-NASA Mod-0 wind power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary estimates of vibratory loads and stresses in hingeless and teetering rotors for the proposed 100-kW wind power system are presented. Stresses in the shank areas of the 19-m (62.5-ft) blades are given for static, rated, and overload conditions. The teetering rotor has substantial advantages over the hingeless rotor with respect to shank stresses, fatigue life, and tower loading. A teetering rotor will probably be required in order to achieve a long service life in a large wind turbine exposed to periodic overload conditions.

  15. Bushing retention system for thermal medium cooling delivery tubes in a gas turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY)

    2002-01-01

    Bushings are provided in counterbores for wheels and spacers for supporting thermal medium cooling tubes extending axially adjacent the rim of the gas turbine rotor. The retention system includes a retaining ring disposed in a groove adjacent an end face of the bushing and which retaining ring projects radially inwardly to prevent axial movement of the bushing in one direction. The retention ring has a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs along its inner diameter whereby the ring is supported by the lands of the tube maintaining its bushing retention function, notwithstanding operation in high centrifugal fields and rotation of the ring in the groove into other circular orientations.

  16. Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1993--July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The stated objective of the project was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems (GFATS) in order to select one that would achieve all of the ATS Program goals. Detailed cycle performance, cost of electricity, and RAM analysis were carried out to provide information on the final selection of the GFATS cycle. To achieve the very challenging goals, innovative approaches and technological advances are required, especially in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, mechanical design, leakage control, materials, and coating technologies.

  17. 75 FR 16456 - Inglis Hydropower, LLC; Notice Soliciting Scoping Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ...Commission [Project No. 12783-003] Inglis Hydropower, LLC; Notice Soliciting Scoping Comments...July 22, 2009. d. Applicant: Inglis Hydropower, LLC. e. Name of Project: Inglis Hydropower Project. f. Location: The proposed...

  18. 77 FR 64506 - Robert D. Willis Hydropower Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ...Power Administration Robert D. Willis Hydropower Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration...power rate for the Robert Douglas Willis Hydropower Project (Willis) pursuant to the Willis...Power Administration Robert D. Willis Hydropower Project Rate ) Rate Order No....

  19. US hydropower resource assessment for South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    A total of 33 sites have been identified and assessed for their hydropower potential. Information as to the potential megawatts of capacity for 4 of the sites was not available; however, these sites have been identified as having hydropower potential and are included in the group of 33. The Hydropower Evaluation Software results for site capacities range from 35 kilowatts to 234 megawatts. Most of the sites have potential capacities of under 1 megawatts. The unadjusted hydropower potential for South Dakota was identified as being 1,124 megawatts. The Hydropower Evaluation Software results lower this estimate 38% to 695 megawatts. The greatest reduction in undeveloped potential occurs at developed sites with current power production. These sites have a Hydropower Evaluation Software estimated capacity of 285 megawatts, a 50% reduction in capacity. The number of sites does not change, only the identified capacity is reassessed.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of injected water recovery systems for the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bidini, G.; Desideri, U.; Di Maria, F.

    1996-12-31

    The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) cycle is an inter-cooled gas turbine cycle, having an air-water mixing evaporator before the combustion chamber, and a heat recovering system for the exhaust gases. The considerable amount of water consumed in the mixing evaporator (about 1,200--2,400 m{sup 3} daily for a 100 MW unit), represents a significant drawback to the use of the HAT cycle as well as of other steam injected gas turbines. In fact, this means high operational costs for water treatment, and eventual legislative restrictions limiting the use of water, not to mention the environmental impact of the depletion of water resources. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the changes in the performance of the HAT cycle when a water recovery system is added in the exhaust gases, and to determine the heat exchangers conditions for maximum water and heat recovery. Finally, the size of a surface condenser for water recovery is determined for a given HAT cycle power output. The results show the possibility to recover up to 85% of the consumed water and up to 30% of input heat from the condensation of the water contained in the exhaust gas. The paper also examines all the thermodynamic processes in each cycle component from the viewpoint of recovering water from the exhaust gas. Since part of the water contained in the exhaust gas is due to the inlet air humidity and the combustion process, the relative amount of water and their contributions to the overall heat recovery are also calculated.

  1. Industrial advanced turbine systems: Development and demonstration. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The US DOE has initiated a program for advanced turbine systems (ATS) that will serve industrial power generation markets. The ATS will provide ultra-high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness. The ATS will foster (1) early market penetration that enhances the global competitiveness of US industry, (2) public health benefits resulting from reduced exhaust gas emissions of target pollutants, (3) reduced cost of power used in the energy-intensive industrial marketplace and (4) the retention and expansion of the skilled US technology base required for the design, development and maintenance of state-of-the-art advanced turbine products. The Industrial ATS Development and Demonstration program is a multi-phased effort. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) has participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the program. On September 14, 1995 Solar was awarded a Cooperative Agreement for Phases 3 and 4 of the program. Phase 3 of the work is separated into two subphases: Phase 3A entails Component Design and Development Phase 3B will involve Integrated Subsystem Testing. Phase 4 will cover Host Site Testing. Forecasts call for completion of the program within budget as originally estimated. Scheduled completion is forecasted to be approximately 3 years late to original plan. This delay has been intentionally planned in order to better match program tasks to the anticipated availability of DOE funds. To ensure the timely realization of DOE/Solar program goals, the development schedule for the smaller system (Mercury 50) and enabling technologies has been maintained, and commissioning of the field test unit is scheduled for May of 2000. As of the end of the reporting period work on the program is 22.80% complete based upon milestones completed. This measurement is considered quite conservative as numerous drawings on the Mercury 50 are near release. Variance information is provided in Section 4.0-Program Management.

  2. The U.S. Department of Energy`s advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Layne, P.W.

    1998-06-01

    Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) are poised to capture the majority of new electric power generation capacity well into the next century. US Department of Energy (DOE) programs supporting the development of ATS technology will enable gas turbine manufacturers to provide ATS systems to the commercial marketplace at the turn of the next century. A progress report on the ATS Program will he presented in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and system configurations meeting the goals of the program will be discussed. Progress has been made in the are as of materials, heat transfer, aerodynamics, and combustion. Applied research conducted by universities, industry, and Government has resulted in advanced designs and power cycle configurations to develop an ATS which operates on natural gas, coal, and biomass fuels. Details on the ATS Program research, development, and technology validation and readiness activities will be presented. The future direction of the program and relationship to other Government programs will be discussed in this paper.

  3. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

  4. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q98.

  5. Cycle Analysis of Micro Gas Turbine-Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Hybrid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimijima, Shinji; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    A hybrid system based on a micro gas turbine (µGT) and a high-temperature fuel cell, i.e., molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) or solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), is expected to achieve a much higher efficiency than conventional distributed power generation systems. In this study, a cycle analysis method and the performance evaluation of a µGT-MCFC hybrid system, of which the power output is 30kW, are investigated to clarify its feasibility. We developed a general design strategy in which a low fuel input to a combustor and higher MCFC operating temperature result in a high power generation efficiency. A high recuperator temperature effectiveness and a moderate steam-carbon ratio are the requirements for obtaining a high material strength in a turbine. In addition, by employing a combustor for complete oxidation of MCFC effluents without additional fuel input, i.e., a catalytic combustor, the power generation efficiency of a µGT-MCFC is achieved at over 60%(LHV).

  6. Present and future hydropower scheduling in Statkraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruland, O.

    2012-12-01

    Statkraft produces close to 40 TWH in an average year and is one of the largest hydropower producers in Europe. For hydropower producers the scheduling of electricity generation is the key to success and this depend on optimal use of the water resources. The hydrologist and his forecasts both on short and on long terms are crucial to this success. The hydrological forecasts in Statkraft and most hydropower companies in Scandinavia are based on lumped models and the HBV concept. But before the hydrological model there is a complex system for collecting, controlling and correcting data applied in the models and the production scheduling and, equally important, routines for surveillance of the processes and manual intervention. Prior to the forecasting the states in the hydrological models are updated based on observations. When snow is present in the catchments snow surveys are an important source for model updating. The meteorological forecast is another premise provider to the hydrological forecast and to get as precise meteorological forecast as possible Statkraft hires resources from the governmental forecasting center. Their task is to interpret the meteorological situation, describe the uncertainties and if necessary use their knowledge and experience to manually correct the forecast in the hydropower production regions. This is one of several forecast applied further in the scheduling process. Both to be able to compare and evaluate different forecast providers and to ensure that we get the best available forecast, forecasts from different sources are applied. Some of these forecasts have undergone statistical corrections to reduce biases. The uncertainties related to the meteorological forecast have for a long time been approached and described by ensemble forecasts. But also the observations used for updating the model have a related uncertainty. Both to the observations itself and to how well they represent the catchment. Though well known, these uncertainties have thus far been handled superficially. Statkraft has initiated a program called ENKI to approach these issues. A part of this program is to apply distributed models for hydrological forecasting. Developing methodologies to handle uncertainties in the observations, the meteorological forecasts, the model itself and how to update the model with this information are other parts of the program. Together with energy price expectations and information about the state of the energy production system the hydrological forecast is input to the next step in the production scheduling both on short and long term. The long term schedule for reservoir filling is premise provider to the short term optimizing of water. The long term schedule is based on the actual reservoir levels, snow storages and a long history of meteorological observations and gives an overall schedule at a regional level. Within the regions a more detailed tool is used for short term optimizing of the hydropower production Each reservoir is scheduled taking into account restrictions in the water courses and cost of start and stop of aggregates. The value of the water is calculated for each reservoir and reflects the risk of water spillage. This compared to the energy price determines whether an aggregate will run or not. In a gradually more complex energy system with relatively lower regulated capacity this is an increasingly more challenging task.

  7. Analysis of a model of fuel cell - gas turbine hybrid power system for enhanced energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calay, Rajnish K.; Mustafa, Mohamad Y.; Virk, Mohammad S.; Mustafa, Mahmoud F.

    2012-11-01

    A simple mathematical model to evaluate the performance of FC-GT hybrid system is presented in this paper. The model is used to analyse the influence of various parameters on the performance of a typical hybrid system, where excess heat rejected from the solid-oxide fuel cell stack is utilised to generate additional power through a gas turbine system and to provide heat energy for space heating. The model is based on thermodynamic analysis of various components of the plant and can be adapted for various configurations of the plant components. Because there are many parameters defining the efficiency and work output of the hybrid system, the technique is based on mathematical and graphical optimisation of various parameters; to obtain the maximum efficiency for a given plant configuration.

  8. Emittance and absorptance of NASA ceramic thermal barrier coating system. [for turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral emittance measurements were made on a two-layer ceramic thermal barrier coating system consisting of a metal substrate, a NiCrAly bond coating and a yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic coating. Spectral emittance data were obtained for the coating system at temperatures of 300 to 1590 K, ceramic thickness of zero to 0.076 centimeter, and wavelengths of 0.4 to 14.6 micrometers. The data were transformed into total hemispherical emittance values and correlated with respect to ceramic coating thickness and temperature using multiple regression curve fitting techniques. The results show that the ceramic thermal barrier coating system is highly reflective and significantly reduces radiation heat loads on cooled gas turbine engine components. Calculation of the radiant heat transfer within the nonisothermal, translucent ceramic coating material shows that the gas-side ceramic coating surface temperature can be used in heat transfer analysis of radiation heat loads on the coating system.

  9. Sulfur deposition in a gas turbine natural gas fuel control system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Pareek, V.

    1999-07-01

    The precipitation of elemental sulfur in sour gas producing reservoirs containing several tenths of a percent elemental sulfur (S8) is a common phenomenon. Occurrence of sulfur deposition in natural gas systems containing significantly lower concentrations of elemental sulfur, however, is rather infrequent. This paper describes the conditions under which sulfur precipitation observed in the fuel delivery system of a gas turbine resulted from a sulfur concentration measured in the low parts per billion by volume (ppbv). Even at these low levels of concentration, the rate of deposition was enough to interfere with the operation of the gas fuel control system to the extent that the valve plugging symptoms were readily identifiable. This report on the extensive series of rig and full scale tests that led to a solution should prove helpful in dealing with similar deposit problems in natural gas systems containing very low levels of S8.

  10. Comparison of Integrated Gasifier-Combined Cycle and AFB-steam turbine systems for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Abbott, J. M.; Burns, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    In the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS) a number of advanced coal fired systems were examined and systems using a integrated coal gasifier IGCC or a fluid bed combustor AFB were found to yield attractive cogeneration results in industrial cogeneration applications. A range of site requirements and cogeneration sizing strategies using ground rules based on CTAS were used in comparing an IGCC and an AFB. The effect of time variations in site requirements and the sensitivity to fuel and electricity price assumptions are examined. The economic alternatives of industrial or utility ownership are also considered. The results indicate that the IGCC system has potentially higher fuel and emission savings and could be an attractive option for utility ownership. The AFB steam turbine system has a potentially higher return on investment and could be attractive assuming industrial ownership.

  11. AFFECT OF NEW BLADES ON NOISE REDUCTION OF SMALL WIND TURBINE WATER PUMPING SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustical noise data were collected on small wind turbines used for water pumping -- different blade designs were tested on each wind turbine. Three different blade designs were tested on 1 kW wind turbines and each successive blade design was shown to produce less noise with respect to rotor spee...

  12. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-02-25

    Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation. This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability benefits, and the range of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States.

  13. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed. PMID:25554314

  14. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  15. 76 FR 81929 - Small Hydropower Development in the United States; Notice of Small/Low-Impact Hydropower Webinar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ...Docket No. AD09-9-000] Small Hydropower Development in the United States; Notice of Small/Low-Impact Hydropower Webinar The Federal Energy Regulatory...will host a Small/Low- Impact Hydropower Webinar on January 25, 2012,...

  16. 76 FR 30937 - Small Hydropower Development in the United States; Notice of Small/Low-Impact Hydropower Webinar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ...Docket No. AD09-9-000] Small Hydropower Development in the United States; Notice of Small/Low-Impact Hydropower Webinar The Federal Energy Regulatory...will host a Small/ Low-Impact Hydropower Webinar on June 22, 2011,...

  17. 75 FR 65012 - Small Hydropower Development in the United States; Notice of Small/Low-Impact Hydropower Webinar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ...Docket No. AD09-9-000] Small Hydropower Development in the United States; Notice of Small/Low-Impact Hydropower Webinar October 13, 2010. The...will host a Small/Low- Impact Hydropower Webinar on November 10,...

  18. 78 FR 14528 - Mayo Hydropower, LLC, Avalon Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ...Commission [Project No. 11169-029] Mayo Hydropower, LLC, Avalon Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of...Motions To Intervene On November 20, 2012, Mayo Hydropower, LLC (transferor) and Avalon...

  19. Data-Based Performance Assessments for the DOE Hydropower Advancement Project

    SciTech Connect

    March, Patrick; Wolff, Dr. Paul; Smith, Brennan T; Zhang, Qin Fen; Dham, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy s Hydropower Advancement Project (HAP) was initiated to characterize and trend hydropower asset conditions across the U.S.A. s existing hydropower fleet and to identify and evaluate the upgrading opportunities. Although HAP includes both detailed performance assessments and condition assessments of existing hydropower plants, this paper focuses on the performance assessments. Plant performance assessments provide a set of statistics and indices that characterize the historical extent to which each plant has converted the potential energy at a site into electrical energy for the power system. The performance metrics enable benchmarking and trending of performance across many projects in a variety contexts (e.g., river systems, power systems, and water availability). During FY2011 and FY2012, assessments will be performed on ten plants, with an additional fifty plants scheduled for FY2013. This paper focuses on the performance assessments completed to date, details the performance assessment process, and describes results from the performance assessments.

  20. Nonaxisymmetric turbine end wall design: Part 1 -- Three-dimensional linear design system

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, N.W.; Rose, M.G.; Taylor, M.D.; Shahpar, S.; Hartland, J.; Gregory-Smith, D.G.

    2000-04-01

    A linear design system, already in use for the forward and inverse design of three-dimensional turbine aerofoils, has been extended for the design of their end walls. This paper shows how this method has been applied to the design of a nonaxisymmetric end wall for a turbine rotor blade in linear cascade. The calculations show that nonaxisymmetric end wall profiling is a powerful tool for reducing secondary flows, in particular the secondary kinetic energy and exit angle deviations. Simple end wall profiling is shown to be at least as beneficial aerodynamically as the now standard techniques of differentially skewing aerofoil sections up the span, and (compound) leaning of the aerofoil. A design is presented that combines a number of end wall features aimed at reducing secondary loss and flow deviation. The experimental study of this geometry, aimed at validating the design method, is the subject of the second part of this paper. The effects of end wall perturbations on the flow field are calculated using a three-dimensional pressure correction based Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD code. These calculations are normally performed overnight on a cluster of work stations. The design system then calculates the relationships between perturbations in the end wall and resulting changes in the flow field. With these available, linear superposition theory is used to enable the designer to investigate quickly the effect on the flow field of many combinations of end wall shapes (a matter of minutes for each shape).