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Sample records for hydrostatic bearings

  1. Hydrostatic bearing support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing support system is provided which comprises a bearing housing having a polygonally configured outer surface which defines at least three symmetrically disposed working faces and a plurality of pressure plates, each of which is disposed relatively opposite a corresponding working face and spaced therefrom to define a gap therebetween. A hydrostatic support film is created in the gap for supporting the housing in spaced relationship to the pressure plates.

  2. Simple modeling of hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charlie

    2014-07-01

    Hydrostatic bearings are a key component for many large telescopes due to their high load bearing capacity, stiffness and low friction. A simple technique is presented to model these bearings to understand the effects of geometry, oil viscosity, flow control, temperature, etc. on the bearings behavior.

  3. Two pad axially grooved hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Andres, Luis A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing having two axial grooves on opposite sides of the bearing for breaking the rotational symmetry in the dynamic force coefficients thus reducing the whirl frequency ratio and increasing the damping and stiffness of the hydrostatic bearing.

  4. Hybrid Hydrostatic/Transient Roller Bearing Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John F.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed bearing assembly for shaft of high-speed turbopump includes both hydrostatic and rolling-element bearings. Rolling-element bearing unloaded at high speed by centrifugal expansion of outer race and transient retainer.

  5. Model Of Bearing With Hydrostatic Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Improved mathematical model of rotational and vibrational dynamics of bearing package in turbopump incorporates effects of hydrostatic damper. Part of larger finite-element model representing rotational and vibrational dynamics of rotor and housing of pump. Includes representations of deadband and nonlinear stiffness and damping of ball bearings, nonlinear stiffness and damping of hydrostatic film, and stiffness of bearing support. Enables incorporation of effects of hydrostatic damper into overall rotor-dynamic mathematical model without addition of mathematical submodel of major substructure.

  6. Hydrostatic liquid-bearing for precision gyro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sgambati, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit with 2W power increase and slightly larger overall dimensions performs as well as or better than its gas-bearing counterpart. Liquid-bearings are built by reworking serviceable gas-bearing components /sleeves, endplates, and cylinders/. Hydrostatic bearing is self-centered, requiring no magnetic suspension or centering jewel.

  7. Modifications Of Hydrostatic-Bearing Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.; Beatty, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Several modifications made to enhance utility of HBEAR, computer program for analysis and design of hydrostatic bearings. Modifications make program applicable to more realistic cases and reduce time and effort necessary to arrive at a suitable design. Uses search technique to iterate on size of orifice to obtain required pressure ratio.

  8. Hydrostatic shoe bearing system for the TIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Schneider, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Godoy, Javier; Farah Simon, Alejandro; Quintanilla, R.; Soto, P.; Salas, Luis; Cruz-Gonzales, Irene

    2000-08-01

    We present an active, low cost hydrostatic shoe bearing system for the Mexican Infrared Telescope which solves the suspension and motion of a 100 ton, 7.8 m telescope. Different geometries are analyzed to optimize the shoe's pressure print. These designs offer a self-adjusting action between the shoe's sliding path and the girth track. Different parameters such as pressure, temperature and proximity are measured and implemented into a control system in order to stabilize the bearing from the fluid's thermal viscosity effects. A simple method for fluid injection is discussed.

  9. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  10. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  11. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  12. External Coulomb-Friction Damping For Hydrostatic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmann, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    External friction device damps vibrations of shaft and hydrostatic ring bearing in which it turns. Does not rely on wear-prone facing surfaces. Hydrostatic bearing ring clamped in radially flexing support by side plates clamped against radial surfaces by spring-loaded bolts. Plates provide friction against radial motions of shaft.

  13. VST hydrostatic bearing system control hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfese, C.; Schipani, P.; Mancini, D.; D'Orsi, S.

    2008-07-01

    The Hydrostatic Bearing System (HBS) control hardware of the VST (VLT Survey Telescope), a 2.6 m. class Alt-Az telescope in installation phase at Cerro Paranal in Northern Chile, at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) site, is aimed at controlling all the devices present in the HBS pumping station and at monitoring the pressure values in the different points of the plant. The HBS control system is based mainly on a Local Control Unit (LCU) mounted in the HBS control cabinet and connected to the plant by means of proper I/Fs. A distributed pressure and temperature acquisition system, based on General Purpose (GP) acquisition boards, is also present. A local interlock chain and related enabling signal for the Azimuth Axis interlock chain have been implemented to avoid fault propagation in case of lack of delivery pressure. In the present paper all technical details concerning the control and monitoring of the HBS subsystem are given.

  14. Three-D CFD Analysis of Hydrostatic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shyi-Jang; Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrostatic bearing promises life and speed characteristics currently unachievable with rolling element bearings alone. In order to achieve the speed and life requirements of the next generation of rocket engines, turbopump manufacturers are proposing hydrostatic bearings to be used in place of, or in series with, rolling element bearings. The design of a hydrostatic bearing is dependent on accurate pressure in the bearing. The stiffness and damping of the hydrostatic bearing is very sensitive to the bearing recess pressure ratio. In the conventional approach, usually ad hoc assumptions were made in determining the bearing pressure of this approach is inherently incorrect. In the present paper, a more elaborate approach to obtain bearing pressure is used. The bearing pressure and complete flow features of the bearing are directly computed by solving the complete 3-D Navier Stokes equation. The code used in the present calculation is a modified version of REACT3D code. Several calculations have been performed for the hydrostatic bearing designed and tested at Texas A&M. Good agreement has been obtained between computed and test results. Detailed flow features in the bearing will also be described and discussed.

  15. Coating Hydrostatic Bearings To Resist Ignition In Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funkhouser, Merle E.

    1993-01-01

    Coats of superalloy MA754 plasma-sprayed onto occasionally rubbing surfaces of hydrostatic journal bearings operating in liquid and/or gaseous oxygen, according to proposal. Prevents ignition and combustion occurring when components made of stainless steels or other conventional bearing alloys rub against each other in oxygen. Eliminates need for runner and enhances control over critical bearing clearance.

  16. External Squeeze-Film Damper For Hydrostatic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmann, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    External squeeze-film damping device suppresses vibrations of rapidly turning shaft supported by pivoted-pad hydrostatic bearing in high-pressure/high-power-density turbomachine. Stacked disks provide damping and clearance for alignment.

  17. Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings in high-speed turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A high speed, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested under a previous contract. This design was then modified to incorporate hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on both the pump end and turbine end to replace the original conventional ball bearing packages. The design, analysis, turbopump modification, assembly, and testing of the turbopump with hybrid bearings is presented here. Initial design considerations and rotordynamic performance analysis was made to define expected turbopump operating characteristics and are reported. The results of testing the turbopump to speeds of 9215 rad/s (88,000 rpm) using a wide range of hydrostatic bearing supply pressures are presented. The hydrostatic bearing test data and the rotordynamic behavior of the turbopump was closely analyzed and are included in the report. The testing of hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on a turbopump to the high speed requirements has indicated the configuration concept is feasible. The program has presented a great deal of information on the technology requirements of integrating the hybrid bearing into high speed turbopump designs for improved bearing life.

  18. Static Characteristics of Conical Hydrostatic Journal Bearing Under Micropolar Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, N. K.; Gautam, S. S.; Verma, S.

    2014-08-01

    A theoretical analysis for static characteristics of a conical hydrostatic journal bearing for a multirecess constant flow valve compensated under micropolar lubrication has been carried out in this work. The numerical solution of the modified Reynolds equation for the conical bearing has been done using Finite Element Method (FEM) using necessary boundary conditions. The various static characteristics have been presented to analyze the performance of bearing at zero speed.

  19. Static Characteristics of Conical Hydrostatic Journal Bearing Under Micropolar Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, N. K.; Gautam, S. S.; Verma, S.

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical analysis for static characteristics of a conical hydrostatic journal bearing for a multirecess constant flow valve compensated under micropolar lubrication has been carried out in this work. The numerical solution of the modified Reynolds equation for the conical bearing has been done using Finite Element Method (FEM) using necessary boundary conditions. The various static characteristics have been presented to analyze the performance of bearing at zero speed.

  20. Evaluation of a hybrid hydrostatic bearing for cryogenic turbopump application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spica, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.; Meyer, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid hydrostatic bearing was designed to operate in liquid hydrogen at speeds to 80,000 rpm and radial loads to 440 n (100 lbf). The bearing assembly consisted of a pair of 20-mm angular-contact ball bearings encased in a journal, which was in turn supported by a fluid film of liquid hydrogen. The size and operating conditions of the bearing were selected to be compatible with the operating requirements of an advanced technology turbopump. Several test parameters were varied to characterize the bearing's steady-state operation. The rotation of the tester shaft was varied between 0 and 80,000 rpm. Bearing inlet fluid pressure was varied between 2.07 and 4.48 MPa (300 and 650 psia), while the fluid sump pressure was independently varied between 0.34 and 2.07 MPa (50 and 300 psia). The maximum radial load applied to the bearing was 440 N (110 lbf). Measured hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing stiffness was 1.5 times greater than predicted, while the fluid flow rate through the bearing was 35 to 65 percent less than predicted. Under two-phase fluid conditions, the stiffness was even greater and the flow rate was less. The optimal pressure ratio for the bearing should be between 0.2 and 0.55 depending on the balance desired between bearing efficiency and stiffness. Startup and shutdown cyclic tests were conducted to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing assembly to survive at least a 300-firing-duty cycle. For a typical cycle, the shaft was accelerated to 50,000 rpm in 1.8 sec. The bearing operated for 337 start-stop cycles without failure.

  1. Optimum design of hydrostatic journal bearings. Part III. Design procedure

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbiny, M.; Salem, F.; El-Hefnawy, N.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic design procedure is presented which can be used by engineers and designers for designing hydrostatic journal bearings with minimum power consumption. Design charts correlating the optimum design variables are presented. These are obtained from an optimization study minimizing the total power consumed by the pump and the power dissipating in viscous shearing within the bearing area. A design example is presented to demonstrate the applications of the proposed procedure.

  2. Dynamic analysis of liquid-lubricated hydrostatic journal bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Kocur, J.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A hybrid bearing reduces the dependency of its behavior on the lubricant viscosity, bearing clearance, bearing surface area by combining the hydrostatic and hydrodynamic effects. The combination permits the hybrid bearing to be incorporated into rotor designs, where the working fluids of the rotor may be used in place of externally supplied lubricants. An effective and practical method to predict the static and dynamic behavior of hybrid bearings is developed. The model includes the three major fluid effects in the bearing; the orifice restriction, inertia losses at the pocket edges, and hydrodynamic effects on the bearing land regions. Lubrication is modeled and calculated using a finite element solution of Reynolds equation with turbulence corrections.

  3. NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Hydrostatic Bearing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Theodore G.

    1991-01-01

    The basic approach for analyzing hydrostatic bearing flows at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is briefly discussed. The Hydrostatic Bearing Team has responsibility for assessing and evaluating flow codes; evaluating friction, ignition, and galling effects; evaluating wear; and performing tests. The Office of Aerospace and Exploration Technology Turbomachinery Seals Tasks consist of tests and analysis. The MSFC in-house analyses utilize one-dimensional bulk-flow codes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is used to enhance understanding of bearing flow physics or to perform parametric analysis that are outside the bulk flow database. As long as the bulk flow codes are accurate enough for most needs, they will be utilized accordingly and will be supported by CFD analysis on an as-needed basis.

  4. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  5. Static properties of hydrostatic thrust gas bearings with curved surfaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehsteiner, F. H.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The classical treatment of circular, hydrostatic, orifice-regulated thrust gas bearings, in which perfectly plane bearing plates are assumed, is extended to include axisymmetric, but otherwise arbitrary, plate profiles. Plate curvature has a strong influence on bearing load capability, static stiffness, tilting stiffness, and side force per unit misalignment angle. By a suitable combination of gas inlet impedance and concave plate profile, the static stiffness can be made almost constant over a wide load range, and to remain positive at the closure load. Extensive measurements performed with convex and concave plates agree with theory to within the experimental error throughout and demonstrate the practical feasibility of using curved plates.

  6. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-11-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  7. Optimization of conical hydrostatic bearing for minimum friction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Hamrock, B. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Equations for the flow rate, load capacity, and friction torque for a conical hydrostatic bearing were developed. These equations were solved by a digital computer program to determine bearing configurations for minimum friction torque. Design curves are presented that show optimal bearing dimensions for minimum friction torque as a function of dimensionless flow rate for a range of dimensionless load capacity. Results are shown for both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The results indicate that hydrostatic pocket friction is a significant portion of the total friction torque. However, the bearing dimensions for a minimum friction design are affected very little by inclusion of pocket friction in the analysis. For laminar flow the values of the outer-land radius ratio X3 and outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change significantly with increasing friction factor. For turbulent flow, the outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change with increasing friction factor; therefore the value determined for X4 in the laminar flow case is valid for all turbulent flows.

  8. Laminar flow in a recess of a hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Andres, Luis A.; Velthuis, Johannes F. M.

    1992-01-01

    The flow in a recess of a hydrostatic journal bearing is studied in detail. The Navier-Stokes equations for the laminar flow of an incompressible liquid are solved numerically in a two-dimensional plane of a typical bearing recess. Pressure- and shear-induced flows, as well as a combination of these two flow conditions, are analyzed. Recess friction, pressure-ram effects at discontinuities in the flow region, and film entrance pressure loss effects are calculated. Entrance pressure loss coefficients over a forward-facing step are presented as functions of the mean flow Reynolds number for pure-pressure and shear-induced laminar flows.

  9. Performance of the Large Binocular Telescope's hydrostatic bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, James; Ashby, David; Kern, Jonathan

    2010-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope's hydrostatic bearing system is operational, and tuning for optimal performance is currently underway. This low friction system allows for the precise control of the 700 ton telescope at temperatures ranging from -20°C to +25°C. It was a challenge to meet the performance requirements on such a massive telescope with a wide range of operating temperatures. This required changes to the original design, including significantly improving oil temperature control, and adding variable capillary resistors to allow for precise flow control to each pocket on each bearing. We will present a system description and report on lessons learned.

  10. Synchronous critical speed tracking in hydrostatic bearing supported rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Thomas W.; Scharrer, Joseph K.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrostatic bearings used in advanced turbopump designs use the pumped propellant as the working fluid and supply the propellant to the bearing from pump discharge. The resulting rotordynamic coefficients are highly speed-dependent and in some instances can cause system natural frequencies to coincide with spin speed over a wide speed range. This paper discusses this 'synchronous tracking' phenomenon. The factors affecting it are defined, and specific examples are presented. Methods which identify synchronous tracking issues early in the design process are reported, and techniques for eliminating this undesirable characteristic are addressed.

  11. A Hydrostatic Bearing Test System for Measuring Bearing Load Using Magnetic-Fluid Lubricants.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu; Chen, Lu-Yu

    2016-05-01

    This paper conducts a study on the design of a hydrostatic bearing test system. It involves the determination of viscous properties of magnetic-fluid lubricants. The load of a hydrostatic thrust bearing using a water-based magnetite nanofluid of varying volume flow rate is measured under an applied external induction field via the test system. Results reveal that the presence of nanoparticles in a carrier liquid would cause an enhanced bearing load. Such an effect could be further magnified by increasing the lubricant volume flow rate or the external induction field strength. PMID:27483902

  12. An analysis of the 70-meter antenna hydrostatic bearing by means of computer simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the computer program 'A Computer Solution for Hydrostatic Bearings with Variable Film Thickness,' used to design the hydrostatic bearing of the 70-meter antennas, was modified to improve the accuracy with which the program predicts the film height profile and oil pressure distribution between the hydrostatic bearing pad and the runner. This article presents a description of the modified computer program, the theory upon which the computer program computations are based, computer simulation results, and a discussion of the computer simulation results.

  13. Hydrostatic Bearing Pad Maximum Load and Overturning Conditions for the 70-meter Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginness, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The reflector diameters of the 64-m antennas were increased to 70-m. In order to evaluate the minimum film thickness of the hydrostatic bearing which supports the antenna weight, it is first necessary to have a good estimation of the maximum operational load on the most heavily loaded bearing pad. The maximum hydrostatic bearing load is shown to be sufficiently small and the ratios of stabilizing to over turning moments are ample.

  14. Fluid Compressibility Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hydrostatic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for the dynamic performance characteristics of laminar flow, capillar/orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The analysis considers in detail the effect of fluid compressibility in the bearing recesses. At high frequency excitations beyond a break frequency, the bearing hydrostatic stiffness increases sharply and it is accompanied by a rapid decrease in direct damping. Also, the potential of pneumatic hammer instability (negative damping) at low frequencies is likely to occur in hydrostatic bearing applications handling highly compressible fluids. Useful design criteria to avoid undesirable dynamic operating conditions at low and high frequencies are determined. The effect of fluid recess compressibility is brought into perspective, and found to be of utmost importance on the entire frequency spectrum response and stability characteristics of hydrostatic/hybrid journal bearings.

  15. Impact of hydrostatic bearings on the design and performance of telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivens, Donald R.; Chivens, David E.

    1999-07-01

    The use of hydrostatic bearings for the support of the azimuth and elevation axes of telescopes offers a number of optical performance advantages. In addition to the benefits resulting from exceedingly low friction, the integration of hydrostatic bearings into the conceptual design of a telescope mount widens the range of geometric possibilities, particularly for larger telescopes. Mount stiffness and tracking accuracy are major advantages. This paper presents an overview of some of the design opportunities made possible by the use of hydrostatic bearings in addition to a discussion of the features and factor that are necessary for the their successful application.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROSTATIC JOURNAL BEARING WITH SLIT-STEP COMPENSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Donaldson, R R; Castro, C; Chung, C A; Hopkins, D J

    2006-07-28

    This paper describes the mathematical modeling and initial testing of an oil-hydrostatic bearing that derives compensation from both a central radial slit where fluid enters and stepped clearances near each end. Bearings using either a radial slit or stepped clearances for compensation were well studied over forty years ago by Donaldson. These bearings have smooth bores uninterrupted with multiple recesses around the circumference. The present slit-step bearing achieves the best of both types with somewhat higher hydrostatic stiffness than the slit bearing and fluid shear drag lower than the step bearing. This is apparent in TABLE 1, which compares calculated values of initial (i.e., centered) hydrostatic stiffness for each type. The slit-step bearing is one of several types being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for possible use on the Precision Optical Grinder and Lathe (POGAL).

  17. Literature review of tilting pad and turbulent hydrostatic journal bearings for nuclear main coolant pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Flack, R.D.; Allaire, P.E.

    1984-07-01

    Literature on the dynamic and static operating characteristics of tilting-pad and turbulent hydrostatic journal bearings is reviewed. Experimental and theoretical work as well as applications in which these bearings were used in a dynamical analysis of the rotor/bearing system are included. Journal bearings receive considerable use in the nuclear power industry such bearings in a reactor main coolant pump are considered herein.

  18. Hydrostatic bearing arrangement for high stiffness support of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Douglas R.; Krabbendam, Victor L.; Romero, Mario; Olsson, Karl-Olof; Benigni, Thomas G.

    2008-07-01

    Meeting the stringent slew and settling requirements of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will require an exceptionally stiff mount. The unique three mirror design and large, 64 cm diameter, focal plane preclude the use of a fast steering mirror or active focal plane. Consequently, a smooth (low vibrations) drive and bearing system is also required. This combination of smooth motion and high stiffness is best achieved with hydrostatic bearings. Hydrostatic bearings have historically proven use for the support of azimuth and elevation axes of telescopes due to these performance advantages. In addition to the known benefit of mount stiffness and tracking accuracy from exceedingly low friction, the hydrostatic bearing provides a wide range of geometric possibilities for large telescopes, reference 1. This paper analyzes various bearing arrangements for the azimuth and elevation axes of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope to conceptualize the greatest stiffness for the mount and provide data to determine system performance.

  19. Clearance sensing hydrostatic bearing restrictor for the homopolar generator systems tester

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This work documents the development of an advanced hydrostatic bearing system for the subcritical operation of the Homopolar Generator Systems Tester. Since this Systems Tester is unique in that it was built with stationary shaft bearings, several new hydrostatic bearing ideas were developed. First, a new clearance sensing variable restrictor was developed to accommodate the almost five fold increase in radial bearing clearance intrinsic to the machine geometry encountered during each machine cycle. A new dynamic hydrostatic thrust-bearing model was developed that permits tilt about any axis perpendicular to the axis of rotation as well as axial motion. These bearings are well instrumented providing data to verify the models both at rest and during operation. In addition to the bearing advances, overall machine design decisions, as well as the factors which influenced them, are examined. Magnetic effects are discussed with respect to both rotor dynamic effects and thrust bearing loading. Bearing sump and sealing philosophies are also discussed. Decisions concerning rotor geometry are similarly reviewed. Finally, the results of the experiment are evaluated in terms of the future impact on not only homopolar generators, but on rotating machinery in general.

  20. Experimental equipment for measuring physical properties of the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdera, Michal; Drábková, Sylva; Bojko, Marian

    2014-03-01

    The hydraulic circuit, through which the mineral oil is brought, is an important part of hydrostatic bearings. The annular hydrostatic thrust bearing consists of two sliding plates divided by a layer of mineral oil. In the lower plate, there are oil grooves which distribute the liquid between the sliding areas. The hydraulic circuit is made of two basic parts: the energy source and the controlling part. The hydraulic pump, which brings the liquid into the sliding bearing, is the source of the pressure energy. The sliding bearing is weighted down by axial force, which can be changed during the process. That's why in front of the particular oil grooves control components adjusting pressure and flow size are located. This paper deals with a project of a hydraulic circuit for regulation of fluid layer in the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing and the testing equipment for measuring its physical properties. It will include the issue of measuring loading capacity and height of the fluid layer in the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing.

  1. A parameter identification method for the rotordynamic coefficients of a high Reynolds number hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouvas, C.; Childs, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    In identifying the rotordynamic coefficients of a high-Reynolds-number hydrostatic bearing, fluid-flow induced forces present a unique problem, in that they provide an unmeasureable and uncontrollable excitation to the bearing. An analysis method is developed that effectively eliminates the effects of fluid-flow induced excitation on the estimation of the bearing rotordynamic coefficients, by using power spectral densities. In addition to the theoretical development, the method is verified experimentally by single-frequency testing, and repeatability tests. Results obtained for a bearing are the twelve rotordynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and inertia coefficients) as functions of eccentricity ratio, speed, and supply pressure.

  2. The effect of journal misalignment on the operation of a turbulent flow hydrostatic bearing

    SciTech Connect

    San Andres, L. )

    1993-07-01

    An analysis for calculation of the dynamic force and moment response in turbulent flow, orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The fully developed flow of a barotropic liquid is described by variable properties, bulk-flow equations and local turbulent friction factors based on bearing surface condition. Bearing load and moments and, dynamic force and moment coefficients are calculated for perturbations in journal center displacements and misaligned journal axis rotations. Numerical results for the effect of static misalignment angles in the plane of the eccentricity vector are presented for a water lubricated hydrostatic bearing. The predictions show that journal axis misalignment causes a reduction in load capacity due to loss in film thickness, increases the flow rate and produces significant restoring moments (couples). Force and moment coefficients due to dynamic journal axis rotations are also discussed. 37 refs.

  3. Investigation of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a large steerable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbarger, J.; Castelli, V.; Rippel, H.

    1972-01-01

    The problems inherent in the design and construction of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a tracking antenna of very large size were studied. For a load of 48,000,000 lbs., it is concluded that the hydrostatic bearing concept is feasible, provided that a particular multiple pad arrangement, high oil viscosity, and a particular load spreading arrangement are used. Presently available computer programs and techniques are deemed to be adequate for a good portion of the design job but new integrated programs will have to be developed in the area of the computation of the deflections of the supporting bearing structure. Experimental studies might also be indicated to ascertain the life characteristics of grouting under cyclic loading, and the optimization of hydraulic circuits and pipe sizes to insure the long life operation of pumps with high viscosity oil while avoiding cavitation.

  4. NASTRAN structural model for the large ground antenna pedestal with applications to hydrostatic bearing of film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on the 64-meter antenna hydrostatic bearing oil film thickness under a variety of loads and elastic moduli. These parametric studies used a NASTRAN pedestal structural model to determine the deflections under the hydrostatic bearing pad. The deflections formed the input for a computer program to determine the hydrostratic bearing oil film thickness. For the future 64-meter to 70-meter antenna extension and for the 2.2-meter (86-in.) haunch concrete replacement cases, the program predicted safe oil film thickness (greater than 0.13 mm (0.005 in.) at the corners of the pad). The effects of varying moduli of elasticity for different sections of the pedestal and the film height under stressed runner conditions were also studied.

  5. Effect of Elasticity on Capillary Compensated Flexible Multi-recess Hydrostatic Journal Bearing Operating with Micropolar Lubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Suresh; Kumar, Vijay; Gupta, Kapil Dev

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the effects of bearing shell deformation upon the performance characteristics of a capillary compensated multi-recess hydrostatic journal bearing system operating with micropolar lubricant. The finite element method has been used to solve the modified Reynolds' equation governing the micropolar lubricant flow in the bearing and the three dimensional elasticity equations governing the displacement field in the bearing shell. The elasto-hydrostatic performance characteristics of the bearing are presented for various values of micropolar parameters ( l m and N 2) and for a wide range of the deformation coefficient bar{C}d which takes into account the flexibility of the bearing shell. The computed results indicate that the influence of the bearing shell flexibility is quite significant on the performance characteristics of recessed hydrostatic journal bearing system operating with micropolar lubricant.

  6. Dynamic force response of spherical hydrostatic journal bearing for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis

    1994-01-01

    Hydrostatic Journal Bearings (HJB's) are reliable and resilient fluid film rotor support elements ideal to replace roller bearings in cryogenic turbomachinery. HJB' will be used for primary space-power applications due to their long lifetime, low friction and wear, large load capacity, large direct stiffness, and damping force coefficients. An analysis for the performance characteristics of turbulent flow, orifice compensated, spherical hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's) is presented. Spherical bearings allow tolerance for shaft misalignment without force performance degradation and have also the ability to support axial loads. The spherical HJB combines these advantages to provide a bearing design which could be used efficiently on high performance turbomachinery. The motion of a barotropic liquid on the thin film bearing lands is described by bulk-flow mass and momentum equations. These equations are solved numerically using an efficient CFD method. Numerical predictions of load capacity and force coefficients for a 6 recess, spherical HJB in a LO2 environment are presented. Fluid film axial forces and force coefficients of a magnitude about 20% of the radial load capacity are predicted for the case analyzed. Fluid inertia effects, advective and centrifugal, are found to affect greatly the static and dynamic force performance of the bearing studied.

  7. Vibration of a hydrostatic gas bearing due to supply pressure oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, H. D.; Watkins, C. B.; Eronini, I. E.

    1984-01-01

    The vibration of a statically loaded, inherently compensated hydrostatic journal bearing due to oscillating supply pressure is investigated. Both angular and radial vibration modes are analyzed. The time-dependent Reynolds equation governing the pressure distribution between the oscillating journal and the sleeve is solved numerically together with the journal equation of motion to obtain the response characteristics of the bearing. The Reynolds equation and the equation of motion are simplified by applying regular perturbation theory for small displacements. The results presented include Bode plots of bearing oscillation gain and phase for a particular bearing configuration for various combinations of parameters over a range of frequencies, including the resonant frequency. The results are compared with the results of an earlier study involving the response of a similar bearing to oscillating exhaust pressure.

  8. Numerical modelling of the flow in the annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing using CFD methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdera, M.; Drbáková, S.

    2013-04-01

    The current research of hydrostatic bearings and hydrostatic slide-ways is far from being over. The topic is constantly evolving, creating new geometries of the sliding bearings, developing new types of friction materials and lubricants. The control elements of hydraulic mechanisms that serve to regulation of the hydrostatic bearings tipping are still in progress. Almost every application has different requirements for the bearings, whether in terms of loading capacity, speed rotation, and also the price. All these aspects should be included in the design of hydrostatic thrust bearings. Thanks to great advances in the development of computer technology and software for numerical modelling, we can simulate real movement of viscous fluids. To create a numerical model of hydrostatic thrust bearing, Ansys Fluent 14.0 software package has been applied. The article describes the basic methods of numerical modelling of the given problem and evaluates the pressure field and the loading capacity of annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing and its dependence on the change in static pressure.

  9. A test apparatus and facility to identify the rotordynamic coefficients of high-speed hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara; Hale, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A facility and apparatus are described which determine stiffness, damping, and added-mass rotordynamic coefficients plus steady-state operating characteristics of high speed hydrostatic journal bearings. The apparatus has a current top speed of 29,800 rpm with a bearing diameter of 7.62 cm (3 in.). Purified warm water, 55 C (130 F), is used as a test fluid to achieve elevated Reynolds numbers during operation. The test-fluid pump yields a bearing maximum inlet pressure of 6.9 Mpa (1000 psi). Static load on the bearing is independently controlled and measured. Orthogonally mounted external shakers are used to excite the test stator in the direction of, and perpendicular to, the static load. The apparatus can independently calculate all rotordynamic coefficients at a given operating condition.

  10. Dynamic characteristics of a hydrostatic gas bearing driven by oscillating exhaust pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, C.B.; Eronini, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Vibration of a statically loaded, inherently compensated hydrostatic journal bearing due to oscillating exhaust pressure is investigated. Both angular and radial vibration modes are analyzed. The time-dependent Reynolds equation governing the pressure distribution between the oscillating journal and sleeve is solved together with the journal equation of motion to obtain the response characteristics of the bearing. The Reynolds equation and the equation of motion are simplified by applying regular perturbation theory for small displacements. The numerical solutions of the perturbation equations are obtained by discretizing the pressure field using finite-difference aproximations with a discrete, nonuniform line-source model which excludes effects due to feeding hole volume. An iterative scheme is used to simultaneously satisfy the equations of motion for the journal. The results presented include Bode plots of bearing-oscillation gain and phase for a particular bearing configuration for various combinations of parameters over a range of frequencies, including the resonant frequency. 17 references.

  11. Dynamic characteristics of a hydrostatic gas bearing driven by oscillating exhaust pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, C. B.; Eronini, I. E.; Branch, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Vibration of a statically loaded, inherently compensated hydrostatic journal bearing due to oscillating exhaust pressure is investigated. Both angular and radial vibration modes are analyzed. The time-dependent Reynolds equation governing the pressure distribution between the oscillating journal and sleeve is solved together with the journal equation of motion to obtain the response characteristics of the bearing. The Reynolds equation and the equation of motion are simplified by applying regular perturbation theory for small displacements. The numerical solutions of the perturbation equations are obtained by discretizing the pressure field using finite-difference aproximations with a discrete, nonuniform line-source model which excludes effects due to feeding hole volume. An iterative scheme is used to simultaneously satisfy the equations of motion for the journal. The results presented include Bode plots of bearing-oscillation gain and phase for a particular bearing configuration for various combinations of parameters over a range of frequencies, including the resonant frequency.

  12. Analysis of a two row hydrostatic journal bearing with variable properties, inertia effects and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Adams, M. L.; Mullen, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A computer algorithm for simulation of hydrostatic journal bearing pressure-flow behavior has been generated. The effects taken into account are inertia, cavitation, variable properties (isothermal bearing) and roughness. The program has been specifically tailored for simulation of the hybrid bearing of the cryogenic turbopumps of the main shuttle engine. Due to the high pressure (515 psia) of the supply line no cavitation has been found. The influence of the roughness effects have been found to become important only when the surface-roughness order of magnitude is comparable with that of the bearing clearance itself. Pocket edge inertia and variable properties have been found to have quite an important influence upon the pocket pressure, field pressure distribution and lubricant mass flow.

  13. Oil pocket's bearing capacity analysis of liquid hydrostatic worktable in Gantry Moving Milling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Liang, Yingna; Gao, Dianrong

    2014-09-01

    Durning the design process of hydrostatic rotary worktable, the processing and assembly tolerance, (the offset of worktable and the gap of the oil film's thickness) is ignored. But it will cause that the real bearing of oil pocket deviates from the initial design value, and then the performance of rotary worktable will be reduced significantly. Up to now, no effort is found toward the research of influence of the processing and assembly tolerance on the performance of the rotary worktable. So the hydrostatic oil film is assumed as the elastomer in this paper, and then the bearing capacity of the oil pocket is studied with and without the mass offset of the worktable by taking an expression between the bearing capacity and the oil film's thickness of the oil pocket as the deform compatibility equation. The influence of the processing tolerance of the oil sealing belt's gap on the bearing capacity of the oil pocket is analyzed. In the light of the liquid hydrostatic worktable of Gantry Moving Milling Center using on the scene, the oil pocket's pressure of the worktable is tested using Rotary Worktable Test System under the circumstance of the mass offset of the worktable and the gap tolerance of the oil sealing belt, and then the equivalent offset of worktable, the average pressure of the oil pocket and the actual thickness of the oil film are analyzed respectively. The test results show that the bearing capacity component of the oil pocket caused by G is consistent, and the component caused by M is relative to the position of the oil pocket. When the oil sealing belt's gap is larger than the theoretical value, the bearing capacity of the oil pocket is smaller than the others; whereas the bearing capacity of the oil pocket is larger than the others. The maximum and minimum equivalent offsets are 0.256 4 mm and 0.047 5 mm, respectively, and the average oil pocket pressure varies from 0.345 MPa to 0.460 MPa, the maximum and minimum value of the actual oil film

  14. Three Dimensional Flow and Pressure Patterns in a Hydrostatic Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. Jack; Dzodzo, Milorad B.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a hydrostatic journal bearing (HJB) is described by a mathematical model that uses the three dimensional non-orthogonal form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Using the u, v, w, and p, as primary variables, a conservative formulation, finite volume multi-block method is applied through a collocated, body fitted grid. The HJB has four shallow pockets with a depth/length ratio of 0.067. This paper represents a natural extension to the two and three dimensional studies undertaken prior to this project.

  15. Development of a polymetric grout for the hydrostatic bearing at DSS 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.; Schwendeman, J. L.; Ball, G. L., III; Jenkins, G. H.; Casperson, R. D.; Gale, G. P.; Riewe, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an investigation into the causes of the deterioration and premature failure of the grout under the hydrostatic bearing runner at DSS 14 are reported. Generic types of materials were screened and tested to find a grout material more resistive to the causes of grout failure. Emphasis was placed on the physical properties, strength, modulus of elasticity, and resistance to erosion and chemical attack by oil and unique requirements imposed by each material for mixing, placing, compacting, and cooling. The polymetric grout developed to replace the dry grout is described.

  16. A fully coupled variable properties thermohydraulic model for a cryogenic hydrostatic journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Wheeler, R. L., III; Hendricks, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The goal set forth here is to continue the work started by Braun et al. (1984-1985) and present an integrated analysis of the behavior of the two row, 20 staggered pockets, hydrostatic cryogenic bearing used by the turbopumps of the Space Shuttle main engine. The variable properties Reynolds equation is fully coupled with the two-dimensional fluid film energy equation. The three-dimensional equations of the shaft and bushing model the boundary conditions of the fluid film energy equation. The effects of shaft eccentricity, angular velocity, and inertia pressure drops at pocket edge are incorporated in the model. Their effects on the bearing fluid properties, load carrying capacity, mass flow, pressure, velocity, and temperature form the ultimate object of this paper.

  17. NASTRAN Structural Model for the Large 64-meter Antenna Pedestal. Part 3: Applications to Hydrostatic Bearing Oil Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, C. T.; Schonfeld, D.

    1984-01-01

    Investigations are conducted on the 64-meter antenna hydrostatic bearing oil film thickness under a variety of loads and elastic moduli. These parametric studies use a NASTRAN pedestal structural model to determine the deflections under the hydrostatic bearing pad. The deflections form the input for a computer program to determine the hydrostatic bearing oil film thickness. For the future 64-meter to 70-meter antenna extension and for the 2.2-meter (86-in.) haunch concrete replacement cases, safe oil film thickness (greater than 0.13 mm (0.005 in.) at the corners of the pad) are predicted. The effects of varying moduli of elasticity for different sections of the pedestal and the film height under distressed runner conditions are also studied.

  18. Comparison of Code Predictions to Test Measurements for Two Orifice Compensated Hydrostatic Bearings at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Rotordynamic coefficients obtained from testing two different hydrostatic bearings are compared to values predicted by two different computer programs. The first set of test data is from a relatively long (L/D=1) orifice compensated hydrostatic bearing tested in water by Texas A&M University (TAMU Bearing No.9). The second bearing is a shorter (L/D=.37) bearing and was tested in a lower viscosity fluid by Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell (Rocketdyne 'Generic' Bearing) at similar rotating speeds and pressures. Computed predictions of bearing rotordynamic coefficients were obtained from the cylindrical seal code 'ICYL', one of the industrial seal codes developed for NASA-LeRC by Mechanical Technology Inc., and from the hydrodynamic bearing code 'HYDROPAD'. The comparison highlights the difference the bearing has on the accuracy of the predictions. The TAMU Bearing No. 9 test data is closely matched by the predictions obtained for the HYDROPAD code (except for added mass terms) whereas significant differences exist between the data from the Rocketdyne 'Generic' bearing the code predictions. The results suggest that some aspects of the fluid behavior in the shorter, higher Reynolds Number 'Generic' bearing may not be modeled accurately in the codes. The ICYL code predictions for flowrate and direct stiffness approximately equal those of HYDROPAD. Significant differences in cross-coupled stiffness and the damping terms were obtained relative to HYDROPAD and both sets of test data. Several observations are included concerning application of the ICYL code.

  19. High Speed, High Temperature, Fault Tolerant Operation of a Combination Magnetic-Hydrostatic Bearing Rotor Support System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark; Montague, Gerald; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Closed loop operation of a single, high temperature magnetic radial bearing to 30,000 RPM (2.25 million DN) and 540 C (1000 F) is discussed. Also, high temperature, fault tolerant operation for the three axis system is examined. A novel, hydrostatic backup bearing system was employed to attain high speed, high temperature, lubrication free support of the entire rotor system. The hydrostatic bearings were made of a high lubricity material and acted as journal-type backup bearings. New, high temperature displacement sensors were successfully employed to monitor shaft position throughout the entire temperature range and are described in this paper. Control of the system was accomplished through a stand alone, high speed computer controller and it was used to run both the fault-tolerant PID and active vibration control algorithms.

  20. Predicted characteristics of an optimized series-hybrid conical hydrostatic ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Hamrock, B. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Optimized series-hybrid fluid-film ball bearings are described and operating characteristics are calculated and discussed. It is predicted that a series-hybrid bearing may be constructed which will reduce ball-bearing speed by 30 percent thereby increasing bearing fatigue life by factors of up to 5.9. Flow rates required are less than 9 kilograms per minute.

  1. Extending the life of the SSME HPOTP through the use of annular hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharrer, Joseph K.; Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.; Nolan, Steven A.; Tabibzadeh, Ramin

    1992-07-01

    A new fluid film bearing package is presented for incorporation into the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump. This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most importantly, it replaces the duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design constraints and solutions are presented along with the effects of the bearing package on the hydrodynamic and rotordynamic performance of the turbopump.

  2. A new type of hydrostatic/hydrodynamic gas journal bearing and its optimization for maximum stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Chang, H.S.

    1995-07-01

    The orifice annular and shallow pocket restricted hybrid has journal bearing is a new type of gas bearing which has good high-speed stability performance. In this paper, the stability of this bearing with three shallow pockets is studied theoretically, and the optimization for its maximum stability is carried out by use of the Complex Method. Some useful conclusions are obtained.

  3. Non-Newtonian temperature and pressure effects of a lubricant slurry in a rotating hydrostatic step bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.; Finn, W.E.; Dareing, D.W. |

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the pressure and temperature effects of graphite powder lubricant when added to a Newtonian carrier fluid and applied in a rotating hydrostatic step bearing. Temperature and pressure profiles were determined both analytically and experimentally. The rheological behavior of the non-Newtonian lubricant was modeled using a power law model previously shown to approximate experimental data for this fluid. Ethylene glycol was used as the Newtonian lubricant, providing a check on the test apparatus and a base line for comparison with the non-Newtonian graphite slurry. Data revealed a temperature increase with bearing rotational speed for both fluids and compared favorably with the mathematical predictions. A significantly higher temperature rise was seen in the non- Newtonian lubricant due to the higher shear rates. The pressure profile was not directly dependent on bearing rotational speed in the mathematical model, but experimental data demonstrated a reduction in pressure at higher rotation speeds. This loss was greater for the non-Newtonian lubricant and attributed to temperature dependence of power law constants. It was concluded that the effects of operating speed and temperature on a non-Newtonian lubricant should be considered as well as their greater load-carrying capacity.

  4. Hotfire testing of a SSME HPOTP with an annular hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Steven A.; Hibbs, Robert I.; Genge, Gary G.

    1993-06-01

    A new fluid film bearing package has been tested in the SSME High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP). This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most important, it replaces a duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design and predicted performance of the turbopump are reviewed. Results are presented for measured pump and bearing performance. The most significant results were obtained from proximity probes located in the bearing bore which revealed large subsynchronous precession at 10 percent of shaft speed during engine start which subsided prior to mainstage power levels and reappeared during engine shutdown at equivalent power levels below 65 percent of nominal. This phenomenon has been attributed to rotating stall in the diffuser. The proximity probes also revealed the location of the bearing in the bore for different operating speeds. Pump vibration characteristics were improved as compared to pumps tested with ball bearings. After seven starts and more than 700 seconds of testing, the pump showed no signs of performance degradation.

  5. Hotfire testing of a SSME HPOTP with an annular hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, Steven A.; Hibbs, Robert I.; Genge, Gary G.

    1993-01-01

    A new fluid film bearing package has been tested in the SSME High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP). This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most important, it replaces a duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design and predicted performance of the turbopump are reviewed. Results are presented for measured pump and bearing performance. The most significant results were obtained from proximity probes located in the bearing bore which revealed large subsynchronous precession at 10 percent of shaft speed during engine start which subsided prior to mainstage power levels and reappeared during engine shutdown at equivalent power levels below 65 percent of nominal. This phenomenon has been attributed to rotating stall in the diffuser. The proximity probes also revealed the location of the bearing in the bore for different operating speeds. Pump vibration characteristics were improved as compared to pumps tested with ball bearings. After seven starts and more than 700 seconds of testing, the pump showed no signs of performance degradation.

  6. Hotfire testing of a SSME HPOTP with an annular hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, Steven A.; Hibbs, Robert I.; Genge, Gary G.

    1994-01-01

    A new fluid film bearing package has been tested in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP). This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most importantly, it replaces a duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design and predicted performance of the turbopump are reviewed. Results are presented for measured pump and bearing performance during testing on the NASA Technology Test Bed (TTB) Engine located at MSFC. The most significant results were obtained from proximity probes located in the bearing bore which revealed large subsynchronous precession at ten percent of shaft speed during engine start which subsided prior to mainstage power levels and reappeared during engine shutdown at equivalent power levels below 65% of nominal. This phenomenon has been attributed to rotating stall in the diffuser. The proximity probes also revealed the location of the bearing in the bore for different operating speeds. Pump vibration characteristics were improved as compared to pumps tested with ball bearings. After seven starts and more than 700 seconds of testing, the pump showed no signs of performance degradation.

  7. The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure up to 1.45 GPa on the Morin Transition of Hematite-Bearing Rock: Implications for Martian Crustal Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Demory, F.; Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, G.; Gabriel, T.; Quesnel, Y.

    2015-07-01

    We quantified the effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 1.45 GPa on the Morin transition of hematite-bearing rock via direct magnetic measurements using a high pressure cell and a SQUID magnetometer. Hematite is present in the martian crust.

  8. Calculation methods for externally pressurised (hydrostatic) journal bearings with capillary restrictor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-09-01

    ESDU 92026 provides a procedure for the design and performance analysis of the bearings with five or more identical equally-spaced rectangular recesses (or pockets) fed by identical capillary restrictors from a constant pressure supply. The method takes account of stiffness and overload capacity requirements and determines the bearing overall size and proportions from the required load, speed and shaft diameter, recommends the clearance and supply pressure, and defines the recess dimensions and capillary restrictor size from the properties of the chosen lubricant. Equations and charts allow prediction of the journal displacement under load, the power loss, the lubricant flow rate, and the bearing and lubricant temperatures. The method applies to laminar flow and guidance is given for assessing the onset of non-laminar flow in the bearing and restrictors. Guidance is also given on the likelihood of bearing-induced instability. The user is assisted by flowcharts in applying the method, and two practical worked examples illustrate the procedure. ESDU 92037 introduces a FORTRAN program that implements the method, and magnetic media are available in ESDUpac A9237.

  9. Three Dimensional Flow and Pressure Patterns in a Single Pocket of a Hydrostatic Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. Jack; Dzodzo, Milorad B.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a hydrostatic pocket is described by a mathematical model that uses the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations written in terms of the primary variables, u, v, w, and p. Using a conservative formulation, a finite volume multi-block method is applied through a collocated, body fitted grid. The flow is simulated in a shallow pocket with a depth/length ratio of 0.02. The flow structures obtained and described by the authors in their previous two dimensional models are made visible in their three dimensional aspect for the Couette flow. It has been found that the flow regimes formed central and secondary vortical cells with three dimensional corkscrew-like structures that lead the fluid on an outward bound path in the axial direction of the pocket. The position of the central vortical cell center is at the exit region of the capillary restrictor feedline. It has also been determined that a fluid turn around zone occupies all the upstream space between the floor of the pocket and the runner, thus preventing any flow exit through the upstream port. The corresponding pressure distribution under the shaft presented as well. It was clearly established that for the Couette dominated case the pressure varies significantly in the pocket in the circumferential direction, while its variation is less pronounced axially.

  10. The 3,6 m Indo-Belgian Devasthal Optical Telescope: the hydrostatic azimuth bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ville, Jonathan; Piérard, Maxime; Bastin, Christian

    2012-09-01

    AMOS SA has been awarded of the contract for the design, manufacturing, assembly, tests and on site installation (Devasthal, Nainital in central Himalayan region) of the 3.6 m Indo-Belgian Devasthal Optical Telescope (IDOT). The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien optical configuration with a Cassegrain focus equipped with one axial port and two side ports. The primary mirror is a meniscus active mirror. The mount is an Alt-Az type with for the azimuth axis a 5 m diameter hydrostatic track. This paper presents the solution adopted by AMOS to meet the specific requirements for the azimuth axis. The track is designed to be able to control the positioning of the telescope around the azimuth axis with an accuracy of 0.05 arc second for all tracking configurations. The challenge came from this tight accuracy with a mass in rotation weighting 125 tons. The azimuth track was mounted and tested in AMOS workshop; the tests and performances are also discussed.

  11. Amplitude effects on the dynamic performance of hydrostatic gas thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, A. K.; Tapia, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    A strip gas film bearing with inherently compensated inlets is analyzed to determine the effect of disturbance amplitude on its dynamic performance. The governing Reynolds' equation is solved using finite-difference techniques. The time dependent load capacity is represented by a Fourier series up to and including the third harmonics. For the range of amplitudes investigated the linear stiffness was independent of the amplitude, and the linear damping was inversely proportional to (1 - epsilon-squared) to the 1.5 power where epsilon is the amplitude relative to the film thickness.

  12. Amplitude effects on the dynamic performance of a hydrostatic gas thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, A. K.; Tapia, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Reynolds' equation is applied to a strip gas thrust bearing to analyze amplitude disturbance effects on its dynamic performance. The Reynolds' equation is numerically approximated using finite difference techniques. The time dependent load carrying capacity is represented by a Fourier series up to and including the third harmonics. Design curves for the load capacity and the linear stiffness and damping are presented as a function of inlet location, restrictor coefficient, supply pressure, amplitude of oscillation, and squeeze number. For the range of amplitudes investigated the dimensionless load capacity, stiffness and damping does not exhibit an appreciable change in magnitude; thus, only one design curve is needed to represent each relationship. A design methodology is presented.

  13. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 1.61 GPa on the Morin transition of hematite-bearing rocks: Implications for planetary crustal magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, Natalia S.; Demory, François; Rochette, Pierre; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Gabriel, Thomas; Quesnel, Yoann

    2015-12-01

    We present new experimental data on the dependence of the Morin transition temperature (TM) on hydrostatic pressure up to 1.61 GPa, obtained on a well-characterized multidomain hematite-bearing sample from a banded iron formation. We used a nonmagnetic high-pressure cell for pressure application and a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometer to measure the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) under pressure on warming from 243 K to room temperature (T0). IRM imparted at T0 under pressure in 270 mT magnetic field (IRM270mT) is not recovered after a cooling-warming cycle. Memory effect under pressure was quantified as IRM recovery decrease of 10%/GPa. TM, determined on warming, reaches T0 under hydrostatic pressure 1.38-1.61 GPa. The pressure dependence of TM up to 1.61 GPa is positive and essentially linear with a slope dTM/dP = (25 ± 2) K/GPa. This estimate is more precise than previous ones and allows quantifying the effect of a pressure wave on the upper crust magnetization, with special emphasis on Mars.

  14. Damping Bearings In High-Speed Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents comparison of damping bearings with traditional ball, roller, and hydrostatic bearings in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. Concept of damping bearings described in "Damping Seals and Bearings for a Turbomachine" (MFS-28345).

  15. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, L.P.

    1981-02-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  16. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  17. Dynamic modeling of hydrostatic guideway considering compressibility and inertia effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yikang; Mao, Kuanmin; Zhu, Yaming; Wang, Fengyun; Mao, Xiaobo; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Hydrostatic guideways are used as an alternative to contact bearings due to high stiffness and high damping in heavy machine tools. To improve the dynamic characteristic of bearing structure, the dynamic modeling of the hydrostatic guidway should be accurately known. This paper presents a "mass-spring-Maxwell" model considering the effects of inertia, squeeze, compressibility and static bearing. To determine the dynamic model coefficients, numerical simulation of different cases between displacement and dynamic force of oil film are performed with fluent code. Simulation results show that hydrostatic guidway can be taken as a linear system when it is subjected to a small oscillation amplitude. Based on a dynamic model and numerical simulation, every dynamic model's parameters are calculated by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Identification results show that "mass-spring-damper" model is the most appropriate dynamic model of the hydrostatic guidway. This paper provides a reference and preparation for the analysis of the dynamic model of the similar hydrostatic bearings.

  18. The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT): hydrostatic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnels, Steve

    2010-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is an optical-infrared 25 Meter ELT to be located in Chile. It is being designed and constructed by a group of U.S. and international universities and research institutions1. Structural performance of large telescopes can be enhanced significantly with the added stiffness that results from distributing loads to many points in the structure. In defining the two rotating assemblies in an altitude-over-azimuth mount more than a kinematic set of constraints can lead to hydrostatic bearing oil film failure due to unintended forces that result from runner bearing irregularities. High Frequency Over Constraint (HFOC) increases stiffness without risk of oil film failure. It was used successfully on the Magellan 6.5 Meter Telescopes. GMT will employ this and two additional methods to enhance stiffness at frequencies from DC wind up through the telescope primary mode frequencies of ~11 Hz. This will be achieved without excessive hydrostatic bearing pad forces. Detailed discussion of GMT's hydrostatic constraints, azimuth track and optics support structure (OSS) runner bearing illustrations, and performance criteria are provided for the design.

  19. Hydrostatic fluid bearing gyro. [temperature control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brello, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing are described of a thermal control assembly capable of precisely controlling the LDG-540 Gyro case temperature at 50 C over an ambient environment range of 23 C and atmosphere pressure to 5 C and a vacuum of 0.00001 torr. The thermal control assembly is a hermetically sealed enclosure about the LDG-540 Gyro with envelope dimensions not to exceed those of the Saturn K8-AB5 Gyro. The heaters are capable of delivery 30 watts at 28 V.D.C. and have dual temperature sensors rated at 750 ohms at 50 C. All six (6) LGD-540 Gyros will be equipped with a fine control heater and a resistance thermometer to monitor the gyro cast temperature. All six gyros will be interchangeable in the thermal control assembly by means of simply assembly techniques.

  20. Hydrostatic lubrication in turbopumps of rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, R.; Ciulli, E.; Piccigallo, B.; Staffilano, U.

    2003-09-01

    The paper presents a computational procedure that can be useful in assessing the main performance parameters (load, flow rate, attitude angle) of hydrostatic journal bearings, without resorting to full numerical computing. The procedure is based on the "lumped resistance method", which has been extended to take into account turbulence and inertia effects. Comparison with available experimental data shows a pretty reasonable agreement, in spite of the heavy approximations that have been introduced.

  1. The Hydrostatic Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alpha E.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an example demonstrating the quantitative resolution of the hydrostatic paradox which is the realization that the force due to fluid pressure on the bottom of a vessel can be considerably greater or considerably less than the weight of the fluid in the vessel. (JRH)

  2. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  3. Maintenance of hydrostatic transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.

    1981-10-01

    Problems in hydrostatic transmission maintenance are identified and ways of overcoming them are suggested. It is found that problems arise from lack of lubrication, impurities in the oil, and cavitation at the pump and at the motor. It is under suggested that under nonsevere operating conditions, oil and filter should be changed every year, or every 1500 to 2000 hr running time. Under severe operating conditions or in dusty environments, the interval should be every 6 months or 1000 hr.

  4. Hybrid bearings for turbopumps and the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John F. (Inventor); Owens, Gregg R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In rocket engines power is usually obtained by burning fuel and oxidizer which are mixed, pressurized, and directed to a combustion chamber by means of turbopumps. Roller bearings are generally used in these turbopumps, but because of bearing demands hydrostatic bearings were proposed. The use of such bearings is quite feasible because during flight hydrostatic lubrication can reduce roller bearing wear. A disadvantage of such proposals is that during startup, acceleration, and shutdown high pressure fluids are not available for hydrostatic bearings. The fluid lubrication film is not always present in bearings of turbopumps. During these periods a second bearing is required to carry the load. This requirement suggests the use of hybrid bearings in rocket engine turbopumps. Such duplex bearings were provided, but when their inner races are keyed to the shaft or journal two of them are required. And such duplex bearings do not wear evenly. A hybrid hydrostatic-rolling element bearing was provided wherein the rolling element bearing is locked on the stationary housing rather than on the rotating journal.

  5. Optimal speed sharing characteristics of a series-hybrid bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    A series-hybrid bearing assembly consisting of a conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing and a ball bearing is described. Computer studies are used to predict friction torque and life characteristics of a 150-millimeter ball bearing. A conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing is designed for minimum friction and maximum speed reduction of the ball-bearing component of the series-hydrid bearing. At a thrust load of 4000 pounds and speeds corresponding to DN (bearing bore in millimeters times shaft speed in rpm) values of 3 and 4 million, ball-bearing speed may be reduced by 30 percent. This speed reduction corresponds to ball-bearing fatigue life improvement factors of 3.4 at 3 million DN and 5.9 at 4 million DN. An oil flow rate of 18.2 pounds per minute is required to maintain a fluid-film thickness of 0.001 inch in the hydrostatic bearing.

  6. Optimal speed sharing characteristics of a series-hybrid bearing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    A series-hybrid bearing assembly consisting of a conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing and a ball bearing is described. Computer studies are used to predict friction torque and life characteristics of a 150-mm ball bearing. A conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing is designed for minimum friction and maximum speed reduction of the ball-bearing component of the series-hybrid bearing. At a thrust load of 4000 lb and speeds corresponding to DN (bearing bore in millimeters times shaft speed in rpm) values of 3 and 4 million, ball-bearing speed may be reduced to 30%. This speed reduction corresponds to ball-bearing fatigue life improvement factors of 3.4 at 3 million DN and 5.9 at 4 million DN. An oil flow rate at 18.2 lb/min is required to maintain a fluid-film thickness of 0.001 in. in the hydrostatic bearing.

  7. 46 CFR 64.83 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 64.83 Section 64.83 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Periodic Inspections and Tests of MPTs § 64.83 Hydrostatic test. (a) The hydrostatic test..., the heating coil passing a hydrostatic test at a pressure of 200 psig or more or 50 percent or...

  8. 46 CFR 64.83 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 64.83 Section 64.83 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Periodic Inspections and Tests of MPTs § 64.83 Hydrostatic test. (a) The hydrostatic test..., the heating coil passing a hydrostatic test at a pressure of 200 psig or more or 50 percent or...

  9. Hybrid bearings for LH2 and LO2 turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, M. F.; Lee, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid combinations of hydrostatic and ball bearings can improve bearing performance for liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen turbopumps. Analytic studies were conducted to optimize hybrid bearing designs for the SSME-type turbopump conditions. A method to empirically determine damping coefficients was devised. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed, and three were fabricated. Six hybrid and hydrostatic-only bearing configurations will be tested for steady-state and transient performance, and quantification of damping coefficients. The initial tests were conducted with the liquid hydrogen bearing.

  10. Orbit transfer vehicle engine technology program. Task B-6 high speed turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Bearing types were evaluated for use on the Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) high pressure fuel pump. The high speed, high load, and long bearing life requirements dictated selection of hydrostatic bearings as the logical candidate for this engine. Design and fabrication of a bearing tester to evaluate these cryogenic hydrostatic bearings was then conducted. Detailed analysis, evaluation of bearing materials, and design of the hydrostatic bearings were completed resulting in fabrication of Carbon P5N and Kentanium hydrostatic bearings. Rotordynamic analyses determined the exact bearing geometry chosen. Instrumentation was evaluated and data acquisition methods were determined for monitoring shaft motion up to speeds in excess of 200,000 RPM in a cryogenic atmosphere. Fabrication of all hardware was completed, but assembly and testing was conducted outside of this contract.

  11. Performance of gas-lubricated cruciform-mounted tilting-pad journal bearings and a damped flexibly mounted spiral-groove thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    A test program was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of gas-lubricated cruciform-mounted tilting-pad journal bearings and a damped spiral-groove thrust bearing designed for the Brayton cycle rotating unit (BRU). Hydrostatic, hybrid (simultaneously hydrostatic and hydrodynamic), and hydrodynamic tests were conducted in argon gas at ambient pressure and temperature ranges representative of operation to the 10.5 kWe BRU power-generating level. Performance of the gas lubricated bearings is presented including hydrostatic gas flow rates, bearing clearances, bearing temperatures, and transient performance.

  12. SSME Long-life Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, M. F.; Murphy, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings for LH2 and LO2 service in turbopumps were studied as a means of improving speed and life capabilities. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed with emphasis on achieving maximum stiffness and damping. Parallel load bearings were tested at steady-state and transient conditions with LH2 (externally fed) and LN2 (internally fed). The hydrostatic elements were tested with Freon 113 for empirical determination of dynamic characteristics. Tests using an eccentric journal for loading showed the externally and internally fed hydrostatic bearings to have significant separated coefficients of direct stiffness and damping. For the internally fed bearing, the strongly speed-dependent cross-coupling stiffness arising from fluid swirl, along with significant cross-coupling damping, resulted in low net effective stiffness and damping. The test method used can produce separated coefficients with a sufficiently elliptic journal orbit; otherwise, only net effective coefficients combining direct and cross-coupling terms can be determined. Testing with nonsynchronous excitation is recommended to avoid this restriction. Investigation of hard materials, including ceramics, is recommended as a means of eliminating the need for the rolling bearing for startup and shutdown support. The testing was performed in 1984 (LH2), 1985 (LN2) and 1985-86 (Freon).

  13. 46 CFR 64.83 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 64.83 Section 64.83 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Periodic Inspections and Tests of MPTs § 64.83 Hydrostatic test. (a) The hydrostatic test..., removing tank insulation; (5) Filling the tank with water and pressurizing to the test pressure...

  14. Worm Gear With Hydrostatic Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaiko, Lev I.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed worm-gear transmission, oil pumped at high pressure through meshes between teeth of gear and worm coil. Pressure in oil separates meshing surfaces slightly, and oil reduces friction between surfaces. Conceived for use in drive train between gas-turbine engine and rotor of helicopter. Useful in other applications in which weight critical. Test apparatus simulates and measures some loading conditions of proposed worm gear with hydrostatic engagement.

  15. ANSYS Modeling of Hydrostatic Stress Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic pressure has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Plasticity textbooks, from the earliest to the most modem, infer that there is no hydrostatic effect on the yielding of metals, and even modem finite element programs direct the user to assume the same. The object of this study is to use the von Mises and Drucker-Prager failure theory constitutive models in the finite element program ANSYS to see how well they model conditions of varying hydrostatic pressure. Data is presented for notched round bar (NRB) and "L" shaped tensile specimens. Similar results from finite element models in ABAQUS are shown for comparison. It is shown that when dealing with geometries having a high hydrostatic stress influence, constitutive models that have a functional dependence on hydrostatic stress are more accurate in predicting material behavior than those that are independent of hydrostatic stress.

  16. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the

  17. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  18. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression.

    PubMed

    Saini, Karanvir; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials. PMID:25687001

  19. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  20. NST observations of H alpha features and the non-hydrostatic support of the solar chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, J.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of many structures of cool plasma in the solar chromosphere that extend much above the pressure scale height suggests that these structures are supported against gravity by mechanisms other than hydrostatic support. One possible mechanism is magnetic support, and the other is dynamic support. To reveal which is the dominant mechanism of non-hydrostatic support of chromospheric plasma, we have taken high resolution images of the chromosphere at the limb and on the disk by using the New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear. We will report different kinds of chromospheric features/events which may hold a key to this problem.

  1. Hydrostatic supports for telescopes: the experience of 3.5 NTT with a glance at VTL.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreolli, C.; Andreolli, C.

    1988-10-01

    Today's large telescopes use hydrostatic supports to give their axes of motion the highest precision and stiffness. Since their performance of a hydrostatic bearing depend as much on the pad as on the structures directly concerned, certain designing expedients that are peculiar of large machine tools can be adopted profitably with telescopes as well. This was the case with 3.5 m NTT. It may be assumed correctly that the experience made with 3.5 m NTT, may be extended successfully to telescopes of a larger size.

  2. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  3. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  5. Bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  6. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  7. Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing Testing and Conical Magnetic Bearing Development for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    During the six month tenure of the grant, activities included continued research of hydrostatic bearings as a viable backup-bearing solution for a magnetically levitated shaft system in extreme temperature environments (1000 F), developmental upgrades of the fault-tolerant magnetic bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and assisting in the development of a conical magnetic bearing for extreme temperature environments, particularly turbomachinery. It leveraged work from the ongoing Smart Efficient Components (SEC) and the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) program at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effort was useful in providing technology for more efficient and powerful gas turbine engines.

  8. Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Metal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1940s, the theory of plasticity has assumed that hydrostatic stress does not affect the yield or postyield behavior of metals. This assumption is based on the early work of Bridgman. Bridgman found that hydrostatic pressure (compressive stress) does not affect yield behavior until a substantial amount of pressure (greater than 100 ksi) is present. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hydrostatic tension on yield behavior. Two different specimen geometries were examined: an equal-arm bend specimen and a double edge notch specimen. The presence of a notch is sufficient to develop high enough hydrostatic tensile stresses to affect yield. The von Mises yield function, which does not have a hydrostatic component, and the Drucker-Prager yield function, which includes a hydrostatic component, were used in finite element analyses of the two specimen geometries. The analyses were compared to test data from IN 100 specimens. For both geometries, the analyses using the Drucker-Prager yield function more closely simulated the test data. The von Mises yield function lead to 5-10% overprediction of the force-displacement or force-strain response of the test specimens.

  9. Demagnetization of terrestrial and extraterrestrial rocks under hydrostatic pressure up to 1.2 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, Natalia S.; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Rochette, Pierre; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Trukhin, Vladimir I.

    2010-03-01

    We carried out hydrostatic pressure demagnetization experiments up to 1.24 GPa on samples of terrestrial and extraterrestrial rocks and minerals of different lithologies as well as on synthetic samples. The magnetic remanence of samples was measured directly under pressure using a non-magnetic high-pressure cell of piston-cylinder type that was inserted into a high sensitivity SQUID magnetometer. In order to bring light on the pressure demagnetization effect, we investigated 50 samples with different magnetic mineralogies, remanent coercivities ( Bcr) and hysteresis parameters. The samples consisted of pyrrhotite-, magnetite- and titanomagnetite-bearing Martian meteorites, taenite-, tetrataenite- and kamacite-bearing ordinary chondrites and pyrrhotite-bearing Rumuruti chondrite; magnetite- and titanomagnetite-bearing basalts, andesites, ignimbrites, obsidians and granites; a variety of pyrrhotite- and hematite-bearing rocks and minerals (jasper, schist, rhyolite, radiolarite); samples of goethite and greigite as well as synthetic samples of dispersed powders of magnetite, hematite, pyrrhotite and native iron set into epoxy resin. Under hydrostatic pressure of 1.24 GPa, applied in a low magnetic field (<5 μT), the samples lost up to 84% of their initial saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) without any changes in their intrinsic magnetic properties. We found that the efficiency of the pressure demagnetization is not exclusively controlled by the magnetic hardness of the samples ( Bcr), but that it is strongly dependent on their magnetic mineralogy. For a given magnetic mineralogy the resistance to hydrostatic pressure is roughly proportional to ln( Bcr). It was shown that there is no simple equivalence between pressure demagnetization and alternating field demagnetization effects. The pressure demagnetization was shown to be time-independent but repeated application of the same pressure level resulted in further demagnetization.

  10. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  11. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin Zhang, Xiangyi; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ∼1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  12. Fluid Film Bearing Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The next generation of rocket engine turbopumps is being developed by industry through Government-directed contracts. These turbopumps will use fluid film bearings because they eliminate the life and shaft-speed limitations of rolling-element bearings, increase turbopump design flexibility, and reduce the need for turbopump overhauls and maintenance. The design of the fluid film bearings for these turbopumps, however, requires sophisticated analysis tools to model the complex physical behavior characteristic of fluid film bearings operating at high speeds with low viscosity fluids. State-of-the-art analysis and design tools are being developed at the Texas A&M University under a grant guided by the NASA Lewis Research Center. The latest version of the code, HYDROFLEXT, is a thermohydrodynamic bulk flow analysis with fluid compressibility, full inertia, and fully developed turbulence models. It can predict the static and dynamic force response of rigid and flexible pad hydrodynamic bearings and of rigid and tilting pad hydrostatic bearings. The Texas A&M code is a comprehensive analysis tool, incorporating key fluid phenomenon pertinent to bearings that operate at high speeds with low-viscosity fluids typical of those used in rocket engine turbopumps. Specifically, the energy equation was implemented into the code to enable fluid properties to vary with temperature and pressure. This is particularly important for cryogenic fluids because their properties are sensitive to temperature as well as pressure. As shown in the figure, predicted bearing mass flow rates vary significantly depending on the fluid model used. Because cryogens are semicompressible fluids and the bearing dynamic characteristics are highly sensitive to fluid compressibility, fluid compressibility effects are also modeled. The code contains fluid properties for liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen, and liquid nitrogen as well as for water and air. Other fluids can be handled by the code provided that the

  13. Journal bearing

    DOEpatents

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  14. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 61.30-10 Section 61.30-10 Shipping... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All new installations of thermal fluid heaters must be given a hydrostatic test of 11/2 times the maximum...

  15. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  16. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Hose § 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test...

  17. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All new installations of thermal fluid heaters must be given a hydrostatic test of 11/2 times the maximum allowable... condition of the heater warrants such a test. Where hydrostatic tests are required, an inspection is made...

  18. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  19. A Multipurpose Device for Some Hydrostatics Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    A number of well-known hydrostatics problems dealing with Archimedes' principle concern a loaded boat floating in a pool. Examples of this sort of problem include: 1. (a) If a stone is thrown overboard from a boat floating in a pool, does the water level in the pool rise, fall, or remain unchanged? (b) If a hole is made in the bottom of the boat…

  20. Hydrostatic Adjustment in Vertically Stratified Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Dean G.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrostatic adjustment due to diabatic heat in two nonisothermal atmospheres is examined. In the first case the temperature stratification is continuous; in the second case the atmosphere is composed of a warm, isothermal troposphere and a colder, isothermal semi-infinitely deep stratosphere.In both cases hydrostatic adjustment, to a good approximation, follows the pattern found in the Lamb problem (semi-infinitely deep. isothermal atmosphere): Initially we have acoustic waves with the kinetic energy increasing or decreasing at the expense of available elastic energy. After this initial period the acoustic waves evolve into acoustic-gravity waves with the kinetic, available potential and available elastic energies interacting with each other. Relaxation to hydrostatic balance occurs within a few oscillations. Stratification in an atmosphere with a continuous temperature profile affects primarily the shape and amplitude of the disturbances. In the two-layer atmosphere, a certain amount of energy is trapped in the tropospheric waveguide as disturbances reflect off the tropopause and back into the troposphere. With each internal reflection a portion of this trapped energy escapes and radiates to infinity.

  1. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; DeMaster

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  2. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  3. A magnetically suspended and hydrostatically stabilized centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hart, R M; Filipenco, V G; Kung, R T

    1996-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump intended for application as a long-term implantable ventricular assist device has been built and tested. The rotor is freely suspended in the blood by magnetic and hydrostatic restoring forces. This design obviates the need for bearings and shaft seals, and eliminates the problems of reliability and thrombogenicity associated with them. The positional stability and hydrodynamic performance of the pump has been characterized in vitro at flows of up to 10 L/min at physiologic pressures. Radial position control is realized by an analog electronic feedback control system. The pressure distribution in the fluid surrounding the rotor provides dynamic control in the axial direction with no active feedback. Rotor excursion is less than 50 microns (mu) when the housing receives an impulse peaking at an acceleration of 40 g or upon sudden blockage of the flow. In vitro blood measurements indicate an acceptable level of hemolysis compared with that of a standard centrifugal pump. PMID:8817962

  4. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  5. The performance and application of high speed long life LH2 hybrid bearings for reusable rocket engine turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented for two different experimental programs which were conducted to investigate the characteristics of a hybrid (hydrostatic/ball) bearing operating in liquid hydrogen. The same bearing design was used in both programs. Analytical predictions were made of the bearing characteristics and are compared with the experimental results when possible. The first program used a bearing tester to determine the steady state, transient, and cyclic life characteristics of the bearing over a wide range of operating conditions. The second program demonstrated the feasibility of applying hybrid bearings to an actual high speed turbopump by retrofitting and then testing an existing liquid hydrogen turbopump with the bearings.

  6. Parameter identification of a rotor supported in a pressurized bearing lubricated with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, John W.; Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    A rig for testing an externally pressurized (hydrostatic), water-lubricated bearing was developed. Applying a nonsynchronous sweep frequency, rotating perturbation force with a constant amplitude as an input, rotor vibration response data was acquired in Bode and Dynamic Stiffness formats. Using this data, the parameters of the rotor/bearing system were identified. The rotor/bearing model was represented by the generalized (modal) parameters of the first lateral mode, with the rotational character of the fluid force taken into account.

  7. Seismic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Textron Systems (Textron) has been using geophones for target detection for many years. This sensing capability was utilized for detection and classification purposes only. Recently Textron has been evaluating multiaxis geophones to calculate bearings and track targets more specifically personnel. This capability will not only aid the system in locating personnel in bearing space or cartesian space but also enhance detection and reduce false alarms. Textron has been involved in the testing and evaluation of several sensors at multiple sites. One of the challenges of calculating seismic bearing is an adequate signal to noise ratio. The sensor signal to noise ratio is a function of sensor coupling to the ground, seismic propagation and range to target. The goals of testing at multiple sites are to gain a good understanding of the maximum and minimum ranges for bearing and detection and to exploit that information to tailor sensor system emplacement to achieve desired performance. Test sites include 10A Site Devens, MA, McKenna Airfield Ft. Benning, GA and Yuma Proving Ground Yuma, AZ. Geophone sensors evaluated include a 28 Hz triax spike, a 15 Hz triax spike and a hybrid triax spike consisting of a 10 Hz vertical geophone and two 28 Hz horizontal geophones. The algorithm uses raw seismic data to calculate the bearings. All evaluated sensors have triaxial geophone configuration mounted to a spike housing/fixture. The suite of sensors also compares various types of geophones to evaluate benefits in lower bandwidth. The data products of these tests include raw geophone signals, seismic features, seismic bearings, seismic detection and GPS position truth data. The analyses produce Probability of Detection vs range, bearing accuracy vs range, and seismic feature level vs range. These analysis products are compared across test sites and sensor types.

  8. Acoustic cymbal performance under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Kirk E.; Huang, Dehua; Howarth, Thomas R.

    2001-05-01

    Continual awareness about the need to develop light-weight, low-volume, broadband, underwater acoustic projector and receive arrays that perform consistently in diverse environments is evident in recent Navy acoustic system initiatives. Acoustic cymbals, so named for resemblance to the percussive musical instruments, are miniature flextensional transducers that may perhaps meet the performance criteria for consistent performance under hydrostatic pressure after modifications in the design. These acoustic cymbals consist of a piezoceramic disk (or ring) bonded to two opposing cymbal-shaped metal shells. Operating as mechanical transformers, the two metal shells convert the large generative force inherently within the disk's radial mode into increased volume displacement at the metal shell surface to obtain volume displacement that translates into usable source levels and/or sensitivities at sonar frequencies in a relatively broad band. The air-backed design for standard acoustic cymbal transducers presents a barrier to deepwater applications. A new acoustic cymbal design for high-pressure applications will be presented for the first time. This practical pressure compensation is designed to diminish the effects of hydrostatic pressure to maintain consistent acoustic cymbal performance. Transmit and receive performance data, determined at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's (NUWC) Acoustic Pressure Tank Facility (APTF), is presented.

  9. Power control for a hydrostatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Geringer, K.G.

    1988-05-24

    A power control for a hydrostatic transmission is described having a pair of hydraulic units at least one of which being of variable displacement. The variable displacement hydraulic unit has hydraulic servo means for varying the displacement. The hydrostatic transmission furthermore has a fixed displacement speed signal pump driven at a speed proportional to the input speed of the transmission and providing a hydraulic input speed signal. The power control comprises first and second valves in series flow relationship between the speed signal pump and the servo means. The first valve is a variable orifice valve spring biased toward a cloeed position and biased by the input speed signal toward an open position to establish a pressure drop having a generally linear relationship to the input speed signal. The second valve is spring biased toward a closed position relative to communicating the output of the first valve to the servo means and having first and second opposed pilots connected across the first valve so that the input speed signal induced pressure drop biases the second valve toward an open position. The second valve also has an output feedback proportional to pressure in the servo means and connected to a third pilot biasing the second valve towards the closed position.

  10. Hydrostatic compression in glycerinated rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W; Fortune, N S; Geeves, M A

    1990-01-01

    Glycerinated muscle fibers isolated from rabbit psoas muscle, and a number of other nonmuscle elastic fibers including glass, rubber, and collagen, were exposed to hydrostatic pressures of up to 10 MPa (100 Atm) to determine the pressure sensitivity of their isometric tension. The isometric tension of muscle fibers in the relaxed state (passive tension) was insensitive to increased pressure, whereas the muscle fiber tension in rigor state increased linearly with pressure. The tension of all other fiber types (except rubber) also increased with pressure; the rubber tension was pressure insensitive. The pressure sensitivity of rigor tension was 2.3 kN/m2/MPa and, in comparison with force/extension relation determined at atmospheric pressure, the hydrostatic compression in rigor muscle fibers was estimated to be 0.03% Lo/MPa. As reported previously, the active muscle fiber tension is depressed by increased pressure. The possible underlying basis of the different pressure-dependent tension behavior in relaxed, rigor, and active muscle is discussed. PMID:2275960

  11. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  12. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 61.30-10 Section 61.30-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All...

  13. A Simple Explanation of the Classic Hydrostatic Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the…

  14. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  15. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  16. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  17. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  18. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  19. Development of bearings and a damper based on magnetically controllable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldbakke, J. M.; Hesselbach, J.

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents two different kinds of magnetically controllable fluid bearings and a new magnetorheological fluid damper based upon open porous metallic foams. For the bearings, it will distinguish between a magnetohydrostatic bearing and a hydrostatic bearing with a magnetically controllable fluid. The magnetohydrostatic bearings get their load bearing capacity from the magnetohydrostatic pressure that is generated by the gradient of the magnetic field along a fluid surface. With such magnetohydrostatic bearings a specific load up to 1.6 N cm2 can be reached. To support heavier loads hydrostatic bearings with magnetically controllable fluids can be used. This bearing concept makes it possible to achieve a constant bearing gap even if the load of the bearing changes. For this purpose the fluids are used as a hydraulic medium. Due to the magnetically controlled rheological behaviour of the fluid the bearing gap remains constant. The great advantage of this closed loop system compared to that of common hydrostatic bearings using valves is the quicker response to payload changes. The reason for that is that the active element (i.e. the fluid) acts directly inside the bearing gap and not outside like in the case of valves. The foam damper developed uses the fluid to produce controllable damping forces. The open porous foam is directly placed in the active volume of the damper. By moving the foam piston the magnetically controllable fluid is pressed through the pores. The flow in the pores can be controlled by changing the fluid viscosity by applying a magnetic field. With this damper structure it is possible to reach higher damping forces whilst featuring a small design space.

  20. Computer simulations of 3C-SiC under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stresses.

    PubMed

    Guedda, H Z; Ouahrani, T; Morales-García, A; Franco, R; Salvadó, M A; Pertierra, P; Recio, J M

    2016-03-01

    The response of 3C-SiC to hydrostatic pressure and to several uni- and bi-axial stress conditions is thoroughly investigated using first principles calculations. A topological interpretation of the chemical bonding reveals that the so-called non-covalent interactions enhance only at high pressure while the nature of the covalent Si-C bonding network keeps essentially with the same pattern. The calculated low compressibility agrees well with experimental values and is in concordance with the high structural stability of this polymorph under hydrostatic pressure. Under uniaxial [001] stress, the c/a ratio shows a noticeable drop inducing a closure of the band gap and the emergence of a metallic state around 40 GPa. This behavior correlates with a plateau of the electron localization function exhibiting a roughly constant and non-negligible value surrounding CSi4 and SiC4 covalent bonded units. PMID:26922870

  1. Seismic evaluation of a large nuclear pump bearing using non-linear dynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, K.A.; Hugins, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrostatic bearings of a large vertical pump using sodium as the lubricant were critically examined to determine their ability to withstand seismic loads. Initial linear dynamics analyses predicted journal displacements to exceed bearing clearance by a ratio of 3:1. Equivalent time-history excitations were then developed from the response spectra to determine the number, magnitude, and duration of the bearing impact loads. Predicted loads were further reduced by 50% by modeling non-linear bearing characteristics normally present but not generally included in conventional linear analyses. Results are presented of the comprehensive design evaluation performed, based on these non-linear predictions, that assess stress, wear, and fatigue to demonstrate hydrostatic bearing integrity.

  2. System for testing bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, John C.

    1993-07-01

    Disclosed here is a system for testing bearings wherein a pair of spaced bearings provides support for a shaft on which is mounted a bearing to be tested, this bearing being mounted in a bearing holder spaced from and in alignment with the pair of bearings. The bearing holder is provided with an annular collar positioned in an opening in the bearing holder for holding the bearing to be tested. A screw threaded through the bearing holder into engagement with the annular collar can be turned to force the collar radially out of alignment with the pair of bearings to apply a radial load to the bearing.

  3. Hydrostatic Stress Effect On the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of notched geometries. New experiments and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN 100) equal-arm bend and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions was performed. In all test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, which is independent of hydrostatic pressure, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains, the Drucker-Prager FEMs predicted loads that were 3% to 5% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEMs predicted strains that were 20% to 35% greater than the von Mises values. The Drucker-Prager yield function seems to more accurately predict the overall specimen response of geometries with significant internal hydrostatic stress influence.

  4. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure on Carcinogenic Properties of Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Shinsaku; Kim, Young Hak; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. The inflammation increases the permeability of blood vessels and consequently elevates pressure in the interstitial tissues. However, there have been only a few reports on the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cultured cells, and the relationship between elevated hydrostatic pressure and cell properties related to malignant tumors is less well understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the cultured epithelial cells seeded on permeable filters. Surprisingly, hydrostatic pressure from basal to apical side induced epithelial stratification in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) I and Caco-2 cells, and cavities with microvilli and tight junctions around their surfaces were formed within the multi-layered epithelia. The hydrostatic pressure gradient also promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis, and increased transepithelial ion permeability. The inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) promoted epithelial stratification by the hydrostatic pressure whereas the activation of PKA led to suppressed epithelial stratification. These results indicate the role of the hydrostatic pressure gradient in the regulation of various epithelial cell functions. The findings in this study may provide clues for the development of a novel strategy for the treatment of the carcinoma. PMID:26716691

  5. CUSHIONED BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

  6. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  7. A simple explanation of the classic hydrostatic paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-07-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the same. However, if the shape of the container is different, the amount of the liquid (and as a consequence the weight) can greatly vary. In this paper, a simple explanation of the hydrostatic paradox, specifically designed and implemented for educational purposes regarding secondary education, is provided.

  8. High-pressure phase transitions in BiFeO3: hydrostatic versus non-hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, Mael; Bouvier, Pierre; Haumont, Raphaël; Garbarino, Gaston; Kreisel, Jens

    2011-05-01

    We report high pressure X-ray diffraction experiments on BiFeO3 (BFO) single crystals in diamond-anvil cells up to 14 GPa. Two data sets are compared, one in hydrostatic conditions, with helium used as a pressure-transmitting medium (PTM), and the other in non-hydrostatic conditions, with silicon oil as a PTM. It is shown that the crystal undergoes different phase transitions in the two cases, highlighting the high sensitivity of BFO to non-hydrostatic stress. Consequences for the interpretation of high pressure structural studies are discussed.

  9. 46 CFR 131.585 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units. 131.585... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 131.585 Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units. (a) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit...

  10. 46 CFR 131.585 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units. 131.585... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 131.585 Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units. (a) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit...

  11. Control of hydrostatic transmission wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop

    In this study, we proposed a control strategy for a wind turbine that employed a hydrostatic transmission system for transmitting power from the wind turbine rotor via a hydraulic transmission line to a ground level generator. Wind turbine power curve tracking was achieved by controlling the hydraulic pump displacement and, at the other end of the hydraulic line, the hydraulic motor displacement was controlled so that the overall transmission loss was minimized. Steady state response, dynamic response, and system stability were assessed. The maximum transmission efficiency obtained ranged from 79% to 84% at steady state when the proposed control strategy was implemented. The leakage and friction losses of the hydraulic components were the main factors that compromised the efficiency. The simulation results showed that the system was stable and had fast and well-damped transient response. Double wind turbine system sharing hydraulic pipes, a hydraulic motor, and a generator were also studied. The hydraulic pipe diameter used in the double-turbine system increased by 27% compared to the single-turbine system in order to make the transmission coefficient comparable between both systems. The simulation results suggested that the leakage losses were so significant that the efficiency of the system was worsened compared with the single-turbine system. Future studies of other behavioral aspects and practical issues such as fluid dynamics, structure strength, materials, and costs are needed.

  12. Dielectric elastomer actuators with hydrostatic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2009-03-01

    The rapidly growing adoption of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators as a high performance EAP technology for many kinds of new applications continuously opens new technical challenges, in order to take always the most from each adopted device and actuating configuration. This paper presents a new type of DE actuators, which show attractive potentialities for specific application needs. The concept here proposed adopts an incompressible fluid to mechanically couple active and passive parts. The active parts work according to the DE actuation principle, while the passive parts represent the end effector, in contact with the load. The fluid is used to transfer actuation hydrostatically from an active to a passive part and, then, to the load. This can provide specific advantages, including improved safety and less stringent design constraints for the architecture of the actuator, especially for soft end effectors. Such a simple concept can be readily implemented according to different shapes and intended functionalities of the resulting actuators. The paper describes the structure and the performance of the first prototype devices developed so far.

  13. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David; Rudeen, David Keith

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  14. A hydrostatic pressure-cycle energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Hahn, Gregory; Morgan, Eric

    2015-04-01

    There have been a number of new applications for energy harvesting with the ever-decreasing power consumption of microelectronic devices. In this paper we explore a new area of marine animal energy harvesting for use in powering tags known as bio-loggers. These devices record data about the animal or its surroundings, but have always had limited deployment times due to battery depletion. Reduced solar irradiance below the water's surface provides the impetus to explore other energy harvesting concepts beyond solar power for use on marine animals. We review existing tag technologies in relation to this application, specifically relating to energy consumption. Additionally, we propose a new idea for energy harvesting, using hydrostatic pressure changes as a source for energy production. We present initial testing results of a bench-top model and show that the daily energy harvesting potential from this technology can meet or exceed that consumed by current marine bio-logging tags. The application of this concept in the arena of bio-logging technology could substantially increase bio-logger deployment lifetimes, allowing for longitudinal studies over the course of multiple breeding and/or migration cycles.

  15. Model flames in a hydrostatic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres Calleja, Alvaro

    A model flame system based on the advection-diffusion-reaction method is defined and used to numerically study the problem of a flame propagating up an initially hydrostatic atmosphere, in 2-D. We identify and characterize the flame's steady states over a range of parameters, in the case where the gravitational scale height is much greater than the size of the flame, which itself is much greater than the flame's laminar width. We observe both laminar and turbulent steady flames and verify that, for strong enough gravity G, the turbulent flame speed is independent of the laminar flame speed and scales like the square root of GL, where L is the size of our domain. As this scaling law is commonly used to implement flame subgrid models, one of the aims of this thesis is to understand its robustness. We describe the flame geometry and discuss its relationship with the flame speed. The flow statistics inside turbulent flames are measured and found to be gaussian and isotropic, corresponding to strong mixing.

  16. Automated hydrostatic testing for pipeline leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B. ); Musilli, M. )

    1994-11-01

    Leaks in pipelines carrying such products as crude oil and crude oil by-products lead not only to loss of product, but present the prospect of blowouts in the future that can cause millions of dollars in property damage and costly EPA-mandated cleanups. These leaks are considered sufficiently serious that the US Department of Transportation, which is charged with regulating the safety of pipelines throughout the country, may at times require pipeline operators to hydrostatically test their pipelines. One fully automated pipeline leak locating method based on computer analysis of dynamic pressure signals uses three IBM-compatible personal computers and two 16-channel high-speed analog-to-digital interfaces. The system detects leaks by means of dynamic pressure changes sampled at a high rate and locates them precisely by means of pressure signal velocity. In this way, leaks as small as 3--13mm (0.125--0.5 in.) can be located with an accuracy of a single pipe length in a pipeline section of 160 km (100 mi). This article describes the instrumentation needed and the test procedure used.

  17. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  18. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  19. Influence of boundary conditions and turntable speeds on the stability of hydrostatic oil cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Zhang, Chengyin; Shen, Feng

    2011-09-01

    The flow, bearing, and carrying capacity of the cycloidal hydrostatic oil cavity in hydrostatic turntable systems are numerically simulated, considering the rotation speeds of a turntable from 0 to 5 m/s and different boundary conditions. The vortex effect is weakened, and the stability of the oil cavity is enhanced with the increase in lubricant viscosity. However, the increase in inlet speed, depth, and inlet radius of the oil cavity causes the vortex effect to increase and the stability of oil cavity to reduce. With the increase in the oil film thickness, the carrying capacity of the oil cavity diminishes. The oil cavity pressure increases along the direction of the motion of the turntable; it is distributed unevenly because of the rotation of the turntable. With the increase in turntable speed, the location and size of the vortex scope in the oil cavity flow field and the strength of the vortex near the entrance gradually weaken and move away from the entry. The distribution of pressure is determined by the locations of the vortex. When the vortex is close to the wall, the wall pressure increases at its location. Otherwise, the wall pressure decreases first and then increases after the center of the vortex.

  20. Dynamic whirl in well-aligned, liquid-lubricated end-face seals with hydrostatic tilt instability

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, R.

    1980-01-01

    Dynamic whirl in well-aligned, fully liquid-lubricated end-face seals is analyzed and tested. As with whirl of journal bearings, seal whirl occurs under lightly loaded conditions, in this case controlled by balance ratio. The two common seal arrangements are analyzed, including effects of the elastomer secondary sealing elements. Whirling is found to be induced by hydrostatic tilt instability and controlled hydrodynamically. Elastomer effects tend to suppress seal whirl, while seal-ring inertia effects are generally insignificant. Test results support the analysis and give insight into the relative magnitudes of liquid film and elastomer moments with variations of pressure, shaft speed and whirl amplitude.

  1. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  2. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Fleming, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  3. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Flemig, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficiency of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficieny points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  4. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Flemig, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    The feasibility and efficiency of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficieny points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  5. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Fleming, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-08-01

    The feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  6. Cryogenic turbopump bearing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1989-01-01

    Materials used for modern cryogenic turbopump bearings must withstand extreme conditions of loads and speeds under marginal lubrication. Naturally, these extreme conditions tend to limit the bearing life. It is possible to significantly improve the life of these bearings, however, by improving the fatigue and wear resistance of bearing alloys, and improving the strength, liquid oxygen compatibility and lubricating ability of the bearing cage materials. Improved cooling will also help to keep the bearing temperatures low and hence prolong the bearing life.

  7. An in-vitro traumatic model to evaluate the response of myelinated cultures to sustained hydrostatic compression injury.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Laura R; Gupta, Ranjan

    2009-12-01

    While a variety of in-vitro models have been employed to investigate the response of load-bearing tissues to hydrostatic pressure, long-term studies are limited by the need to provide for adequate gas exchange during pressurization. Applying compression in vitro may alter the equilibrium of the system and thereby disrupt the gas exchange kinetics. To address this, several sophisticated compression chamber designs have been developed. However, these systems are limited in the magnitude of pressure that can be applied and may require frequent media changes, thereby eliminating critical autocrine and paracrine signaling factors. To better isolate the cellular response to long-term compression, we created a model that features continuous gas flow through the chamber during pressurization, and a negative feedback control system to rigorously control dissolved oxygen levels. Monitoring dissolved oxygen continuously during pressurization, we find that the ensuing response exhibits characteristics of a second- or higher-order system which can be mathematically modeled using a second-order differential equation. Finally, we use the system to model chronic nerve compression injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and spinal nerve root stenosis, with myelinated neuron-Schwann cell co-cultures. Cell membrane integrity assay results show that co-cultures respond differently to hydrostatic pressure, depending on the magnitude and duration of stimulation. In addition, we find that myelinated Schwann cells proliferate in response to applied hydrostatic compression. PMID:19645529

  8. SSME long-life bearings. Final Report, January 1982-July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, M.F.; Murphy, B.T.

    1986-07-01

    Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings for LH2 and LO2 service in turbopumps were studied as a means of improving speed and life capabilities. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed with emphasis on achieving maximum stiffness and damping. Parallel load bearings were tested at steady-state and transient conditions with LH2 (externally fed) and LN2 (internally fed). The hydrostatic elements were tested with Freon 113 for empirical determination of dynamic characteristics. Tests using an eccentric journal for loading showed the externally and internally fed hydrostatic bearings to have significant separated coefficients of direct stiffness and damping. For the internally fed bearing, the strongly speed-dependent cross-coupling stiffness arising from fluid swirl, along with significant cross-coupling damping, resulted in low net effective stiffness and damping. The test method used can produce separated coefficients with a sufficiently elliptic journal orbit; otherwise, only net effective coefficients combining direct and cross-coupling terms can be determined. Testing with nonsynchronous excitation is recommended to avoid this restriction. Investigation of hard materials, including ceramics, is recommended as a means of eliminating the need for the rolling bearing for startup and shutdown support. The testing was performed in 1984 (LH2), 1985 (LN2) and 1985-86 (Freon).

  9. Hydrostatic Microextrusion of Steel and Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Guido; Monti, Manuel; D'Angelo, Luciano

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents an experimental investigation based on hydrostatic micro extrusion of billets in low carbon steel and commercially pure copper, and the relevant results. The starting billets have a diameter of 0.3 mm and are 5 mm long; a high pressure generator consisting of a manually operated piston screw pump is used to pressurize the fluid up to 4200 bar, the screw pump is connected through a 3-way distribution block to the extrusion die and to a strain gauge high pressure sensor. The sensor has a full scale of 5000 bar and the extrusion pressure is acquired at a sampling rate of 2 kHz by means of an acquisition program written in the LabVIEW environment. Tests have been conducted at room temperature and a lubricant for wire drawing (Chemetall Gardolube DO 338) acts both as the pressurizing fluid and lubricant too. In addition, billets were graphite coated. Different fluid pressures and process durations have been adopted, resulting in different extrusion lengths. The required extrusion pressure is much higher than in non-micro forming operations (this effect is more evident for steel). On the cross section of the extruded parts, hardness and grain size distribution have been measured, the former through Vickers micro hardness (10 g load) tests. In the case of the extrusion of copper, the material behaves as in microdrawing process. In the case of the extrusion of steel, the hardness increases from the core to the surface as in the drawing process, but with lower values. The analysis evidenced the presence of the external layer, but its thickness is about 1/3 of the external layer in the drawn wire and the grains appear smaller than in the layer of the drawn wire. The extruding force required along the extruding direction is higher (22-24 N) than the drawing force along the same direction (12 N): being the material, the reduction ratio, the die sliding length the same in both cases, the higher extrusion force should be caused by a higher tangential friction

  10. Hydrostatic Water Level Systems At Homestake DUSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetler, L. D.; Volk, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Two arrays of Fermilab-style hydrostatic water level sensors have been installed in the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD, the site of the new Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). Sensors were constructed at Fermilab from 8.5 cm diameter PVC pipe (housing) that was sealed on the ends and fit with a proximity sensor. The instrument have a height of 10 cm. Two ports in each sensor housing provide for connectivity, the upper port for air and the bottom port for water. Multiple instruments connected in series provide a precise water level and differences in readings between successive sensors provide for ground tilt to be resolved. Sensor resolution is 5 μm per count and has a range of approximately 1.25 cm. Data output from each sensor is relayed to a Fermilab-constructed readout card that also has temperature/relative humidity and barometric pressure sensors connected. All data are relayed out of the mine by fiber optic cable and can be recorded by Ethernet at remote locations. The current arrays have been installed on the 2000-ft level (610 m) and consist of six instruments in each array. Three sensors were placed in a N-S oriented drift and three in an E-W oriented drift. Using this orientation, it is anticipated that tilt direction may be resolved in addition to overall tilt magnitude. To date the data show passage of earth tides and frequency analysis has revealed five components to this signal, three associated with the semi-diurnal (~12.4 hr) and two with the diurnal (~24.9 hr) tides. Currently, installation methods are being analyzed between concrete pillar and rib-mounting using the existing setup on the 2000-ft level. Using these results, two additional arrays of Fermilab instruments will be installed on the 4550-ft and 4850-ft levels (1387 and 1478 m, respectively). In addition to Fermilab instruments, several high resolution Budker tiltmeters (1 μm resolution) will be installed in the mine workings in the near future, some

  11. Hydrostatic pressure mimics gravitational pressure in characean cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, M. P.; Wayne, R.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure applied to one end of a horizontal Chara cell induces a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming, thus mimicking the effect of gravity. A positive hydrostatic pressure induces a more rapid streaming away from the applied pressure and a slower streaming toward the applied pressure. In contrast, a negative pressure induces a more rapid streaming toward and a slower streaming away from the applied pressure. Both the hydrostatic pressure-induced and gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming respond identically to cell ligation, UV microbeam irradiation, external Ca2+ concentrations, osmotic pressure, neutral red, TEA Cl-, and the Ca2+ channel blockers nifedipine and LaCl3. In addition, hydrostatic pressure applied to the bottom of a vertically-oriented cell can abolish and even reverse the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. These data indicate that both gravity and hydrostatic pressure act at the same point of the signal transduction chain leading to the induction of a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming and support the hypothesis that characean cells respond to gravity by sensing a gravity-induced pressure differential between the cell ends.

  12. Hydrostatic Stress Effect on the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has negligible effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of various geometries. Fatigue tests and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN100) equal-arm bend specimens and new monotonic tests and nonlinear finite element analyses of IN100 smooth tension, smooth compression, and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions were performed. A new FEA constitutive model was developed that incorporates a pressure-dependent yield function with combined multilinear kinematic and multilinear isotropic hardening using the ABAQUS user subroutine (UMAT) utility. In all monotonic tensile test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains for the DENT specimen, the Drucker-Prager FEM s predicted loads that were approximately 3% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEM s predicted strains that were up to 35% greater than the von Mises values. Both the Drucker-Prager model and the von Mises model performed equally-well in simulating the equal-arm bend fatigue test.

  13. Characterization and measurement of hybrid gas journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Tom Marquis

    developed to study in unprecedented detail the aerostatic component of the hybrid bearings. It is used to definitively compare the feedhole bearings to the porous liner bearings. The hydrostatic bearing efficiency (HBE) is defined and it is determined that the maximum achievable hydrostatic bearing efficiency (MAHBE) is determined solely by the bearing's mass addition configuration. The MAHBE of the porous liner bearings is determined to be over 5 times that of the feedhole bearings. The method also presents a means to tune the Kmeas to the clearance to achieve the MAHBE as well as giving a complete mapping of the hitherto misunderstood complex shapes of aerostatic load versus radial deflection curves. This method also rediscovers the obscure phenomenon of static instability which is called in this thesis the "near surface effect" and appears to be the first work to present a practical method to predict the range of static instability and quantify its resultant stiffness fall-off. It determines that porous liner type bearings are not subject to the phenomenon which appears for feedhole type bearings when the clearance exceeds a critical value relative to its mass-addition compensation. The standing pressure waves of hydrostatic and hybrid bearings with the 2 configurations of external pressurization as well as a geometrically identical hydrodynamic bearing are studied in detail under the methodology of the "CFD microscope". This method is used to characterize and identify the development, growth, and movement of the pressure wave extrema with increased hydrodynamic action (either increasing speed or increasing eccentricity). This method is also used to determine the "cause" of the "near surface effect". A gedanken experiment is performed based on these results which indicates that a bearing with a "stronger aerostatic strength" component should be more stable than one with a low aerostatic strength component. Numerical instability "speed limits" are found that are also

  14. A hydrostatic stress-dependent anisotropic model of viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Tao, Q.; Verrilli, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrostatic stress-dependent, anisotropic model of viscoplasticity is formulated as an extension of Bodner's model. This represents a further extension of the isotropic Bodner model over that made to anisotropy by Robinson and MitiKavuma. Account is made of the inelastic deformation that can occur in metallic composites under hydrostatic stress. A procedure for determining the material parameters is identified that is virtually identical to the established characterization procedure for the original Bodner model. Characterization can be achieved using longitudinal/transverse tensile and shear tests and hydrostatic stress tests; alternatively, four off-axis tensile tests can be used. Conditions for a yield stress minimum under off-axis tension are discussed. The model is applied to a W/Cu composite; characterization is made using off-axis tensile data generated at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  15. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 1: Design, fabrication, and hydrostatic bearing testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmann, P. S.; Hayden, W. R.; Lorenc, S. A.; Sabiers, R. L.; Shimp, N. R.

    1990-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial testing of a rocket engine turbopump (TPA) for the delivery of high pressure liquid oxygen using hot oxygen for the turbine drive fluid are described. This TPA is basic to the dual expander engine which uses both oxygen and hydrogen as working fluids. Separate tasks addressed the key issue of materials for this TPA. All materials selections emphasized compatibility with hot oxygen. The OX TPA design uses a two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a single-stage axial turbine on a common shaft. The design includes ports for three shaft displacement/speed sensors, various temperature measurements, and accelerometers.

  16. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 1: Design, fabrication, and hydrostatic bearing testing. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmann, P.S.; Hayden, W.R.; Lorenc, S.A.; Sabiers, R.L.; Shimp, N.R.

    1990-12-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial testing of a rocket engine turbopump (TPA) for the delivery of high pressure liquid oxygen using hot oxygen for the turbine drive fluid are described. This TPA is basic to the dual expander engine which uses both oxygen and hydrogen as working fluids. Separate tasks addressed the key issue of materials for this TPA. All materials selections emphasized compatibility with hot oxygen. The OX TPA design uses a two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a single-stage axial turbine on a common shaft. The design includes ports for three shaft displacement/speed sensors, various temperature measurements, and accelerometers.

  17. Wheel drives for large telescopes: save the cost and keep the performance over hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Marvin F.

    2014-07-01

    The use of steel wheels on steel tracks has been around since steel was invented, and before that it was iron wheels on iron tracks. Not to be made obsolete by the passage of time, this approach for moving large objects is still valid, even optimal, but the detailed techniques for achieving high performance and long life have been much improved. The use of wheel-and-track designs has been very popular in radio astronomy for the largest of the large radio telescopes (RT), including such notables as the 305m Arecibo RT, the 100m telescopes at Effelsberg, Germany (at 3600 tonnes) and the Robert C. Byrd, Greenbank Telescope (GBT, 7600 tonnes) at Greenbank, West Virginia. Of course, the 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank is the grandfather of all large aperture radio telescopes that use wheel drives. Smaller sizes include NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescopes at 25m and others. Wheel drives have also been used on large radars of significance such as the 410 tonne Ground Based Radar-Prototype (GBR-P) and the 150 foot (45.7m) Altair Radar, and the 2130 tonne Sea Based X-Band Radar (SBX). There are also many examples of wheel driven communications antennas of 18 meters and larger. All of these instruments have one thing in common: they all use steel wheels that run in a circle on one or more flat, level, steel tracks. This paper covers issues related to designing for wheel driven systems. The intent is for managing motion to sub arc-second levels, and for this purpose it is primary for the designer to manage measurement and alignment errors, and to establish repeatability through dimensional control, structural and drive stiffness management, adjustability and error management. In a practical sense, there are very few, if any, fabricators that can machine structural and drive components to sufficiently small decimal places to matter. In fact, coming within 2-3 orders of magnitude of the precision needed is about the best that can be expected. Further, it is incumbent on the design team to develop the servo control system features, correction algorithms and structural features in concert with each other. Telescope designers are generally adept at many of these practices, so the scope of this paper is not that, but is limited to those items that pertain to a precision wheel driven system.

  18. A model for hydrostatic consolidation of Pierre shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.; Braddock, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for consolidation of transversely isotropic porous media under hydrostatic stress. The solutions are applied to model the time variation of pore pressure, volume strain and strains parallel and normal to bedding, and to obtain coefficients of consolidation and permeability, as well as other properties, and the bulk modulus resulting from hydrostatic consolidation of Pierre shale. It is found that the coefficients consolidation and permeability decrease and the bulk moduli increase with increasing confining pressure, reflecting the closure of voids in the rock. ?? 1991.

  19. Pairwise association of neopentane as a function of hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    It is shown that the contact-minimum configuration of two neopentane molecules is favoured on increasing hydrostatic pressure over the range 1-4000 atm, at room temperature, in line with the methane results (Graziano, 2014). This is due to the decrease in water accessible surface area accompanying the association, that leads to a gain in configurational/translational entropy of water molecules, whose magnitude increases with hydrostatic pressure. Of course, the strengthening of pairwise hydrophobic interaction cannot shed light on the pressure-induced denaturation of globular proteins.

  20. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  1. Restoration of bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Hanau, H.

    1977-01-01

    Process consisting of grinding raceways to oversize but original quality condition and installing new oversize balls or bearings restores wornout ball and roller bearings to original quality, thereby doubling their operating life. Evaluations reveal process results in restoration of 90% of replaced bearings at less than 50% of new-bearing costs.

  2. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  3. Numerical construction of magneto-hydrostatic atmospheres in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, Stuart; Braun, Douglas; Barnes, Graham

    2016-05-01

    There is a general interest in constructing magneto-hydrostatic models of the solar atmosphere. These models describe large-scale, long-lived magnetic structures like sunspots, prominences, coronal loops, and the corona itself on global scales. The nonlinearity of the magneto-hydrostatic equations prohibits direct analytic solution except when idealized approximations like self-similarity are made. Numerical approaches, too, are limited in scope, and primarily focus on the two-dimensional problem --- the general three-dimensional magneto-hydrostatic problem is not treated. In this presentation we present a new numerical scheme for solving the magneto-hydrostatic equations in three dimensions. We are presently using this method to construct sunspot models for helioseismic MHD wave-propagation simulations with the goal of comparing the simulations to local-helioseismic measurements. We will present the details of the method and its application to test cases.This work is supported by NASA Heliophysics Division through grant NNX14AD42G and by the NSF Solar-Terrestrial program through grant AGS-1127327.

  4. Brittle thermoelectric semiconductors extrusion under high hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorenko, N.A.

    1994-08-10

    Origins of strength increase of brittle materials like thermoelectric (TE) semiconductors during plastic deformation under high external pressure are analyzed. TE material stressed state in the process of extrusion is reviewed. Plastic deformation of monocrystalline TE material billet produced by extrusion under sufficiently high external hydrostatic pressure is more uniform than under ordinary ambient pressure and can lead to crack free extruded TE material structure, crystallographic symmetry of which coincides with original billet one. Experimental device realized the scheme of extrusion under high hydrostatic pressure is described. Here extrusion are carrying out in compressed liquid medium. The developed device ensures the value of hydrostatic pressure up to 2 GPa and extrusion temperature interval 300--600 K. Properties of extruded Bi-Sb and Bi-Sb-Te single crystals are also reviewed. Possible application of presented method of extrusion under high hydrostatic pressure to form TE branches with highly accurate cross section for miniature TE coolers or generators is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Comparison of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure to inactivate foodborne viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HPP) and hydrodynamic pressure (HDP), in combination with chemical treatments, was evaluated for inactivation of foodborne viruses and non-pathogenic surrogates in a pork sausage product. Sausages were immersed in water, 100 ppm EDTA, or 2 percent lactoferrin...

  6. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Testing of Non-bulk Packagings and Packages...

  7. Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Daniel G.; Gerth, Howard L.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

  8. Design and fabrication of gas bearings for Brayton cycle rotating unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, A.; Tessarzik, J. M.; Arwas, E. B.; Waldron, W. D. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Analysis, design, and testing of two types of pivoted pad journal bearings and a spiral-grooved thrust bearing suitable for direct installation into the NASA 2 to 15 KW Brayton Cycle Rotating Unit (BRU) have been accomplished. Both types of tilting pad bearing assemblies are of the preloaded type, consisting of three pads with one pad flexibly mounted. One type utilizes a non-conforming pivot, while the other replaces the conventional spherical pivot with a cruciform flexible member. The thrust bearing is flexure mounted to accommodate static machine mislinement. Test results indicate that both types of journal bearings should satisfy the requirements imposed by the BRU. Hydrostatic tests of the spiral-grooved thrust bearing showed it to be free of pneumatic hammer with as many as 24 orifices over the BRU pressure and load range.

  9. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  10. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  11. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  12. Earth boring bit with improved two piece bearing and seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.F.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes an earth boring bit having an improved two piece bearing and seal assembly. It comprises: a bit body which includes at least one leg and a cantilevered bearing lug that extends downwardly and inwardly; a thread formed on the bearing lug to extend outwardly from an inner, end region to an outer, base region having a transverse shoulder; a threaded bearing sleeve having a circumferential bearing surface secured to the bearing lug, and a mouth at one end intersecting the transverse shoulder; a rotatable cutter with a bearing surface assembled on the bearing sleeve; a lubrication in the body, including a hydrostatic pressure compensator to lubricate the bearing surfaces and exclude ambient drilling fluids; a cutter seal groove formed near the outermost region of the bearing surface in the cutter to have a circumferential wall and an end wall; a circumferential shaft seal surface in the bearing lug to align with the bearing sleeve circumferential surface and oppose the cutter seal groove circumferential wall and to connect with an end wall in the lug; retainer means; and seal means.

  13. Measurement of small values of hydrostatic pressure difference / Pomiar małych wartości różnicy ciśnień hydrostatycznych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, Krzysztof; Filipek, Wiktor

    2012-10-01

    In order to describe the fluid flow through the porous centre, made of identical spheres, it is necessary to know the pressure, but in fact - the pressure distribution. For the flows in the range that was traditionally called laminar flow (i. e. for Reynolds numbers (Bear, 1988; Duckworth, 1983; Troskolański, 1957) from the range 0,01 to 3) it is virtually impossible with the use of the tools directly available on the market. Therefore, many scientists who explore this problem have concentrated only on the research of the velocity distribution of the medium that penetrates the intended centre (Bear, 1988) or pressure distribution at high hydraulic gradients (Trzaska & Broda, 1991, 2000; Trzaska et al., 2005). It may result from the inaccessibility to the measurement methods that provide measurement of very low hydrostatic pressures, such as pressure resulting from the weight of liquid located in the gravitational field (Duckworth, 1983; Troskolański, 1957). The pressure value c. 10 Pa (Troskolański, 1957) can be generated even by 1 mm height difference between the two levels of the free water surface, which in fact constitutes the definition of gauging tools of today measuring the level of the hydrostatic pressure. Authors proposed a method of hydrostatic pressure measurement and devised a gauging tool. Then a series of tests was conducted aiming at establishing what is the influence of various factors, such as temperature, atmospheric pressure, velocity of measurement completion, etc. on the accuracy and method of measurements. A method for considerable reduction of hysteresis that occurs during measurement was also devised. The method of measurement of small hydrostatic difference measurements allows for the accuracy of measurement of up to 0.5 Pa. Measurement results can be improved successfully by one order of magnitude, which for sure would entail necessary temperature stabilization of the tool. It will be more difficult though to compensate the influence

  14. Oil-free bearing development for high-speed turbomachinery in distributed energy systems - dynamic and environmental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacz, Eliza; Kozanecka, Dorota; Kozanecki, Zbigniew; Łagodziński, Jakub

    2015-09-01

    Modern distributed energy systems, which are used to provide an alternative to or an enhancement of traditional electric power systems, require small size highspeed rotor turbomachinery to be developed. The existing conventional oil-lubricated bearings reveal performance limits at high revolutions as far as stability and power loss of the bearing are concerned. Non-conventional, oil-free bearings lubricated with the machine working medium could be a remedy to this issue. This approach includes a correct design of the machine flow structure and an accurate selection of the bearing type. Chosen aspects of the theoretical and experimental investigations of oil-free bearings and supports; including magnetic, tilting pad, pressurized aerostatic and hydrostatic bearings as well as some applications of oil-free bearing technology for highspeed turbomachinery; are described in the paper.

  15. Hydrostatic compression of Fe(1-x)O wuestite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Sato-Sorensen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrostatic compression measurements on Fe(0.95)O wuestite up to 12 GPa yield a room temperature value for the isothermal bulk modulus of K(ot) = 157 (+ or - 10) GPa at zero pressure. This result is in accord with previous hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic measurements of K(ot) for wuestites of composition: 0.89 = Fe/O 0.95. Dynamic measurements of the bulk modulus by ultrasonic, shock-wave and neutron-scattering experiments tend to yield a larger value: K(ot) approximately 180 GPa. The discrepancy between static and dynamic values cannot be explained by the variation of K(ot) with composition, as has been proposed. This conclusion is based on high-precision compression data and on theoretical models of the effects of defects on elastic constants. Barring serious errors in the published measurements, the available data suggest that wuestite exhibits a volume relaxation under pressure.

  16. The influence of hydrostatic pressure on tissue engineered bone development.

    PubMed

    Neßler, K H L; Henstock, J R; El Haj, A J; Waters, S L; Whiteley, J P; Osborne, J M

    2016-04-01

    The hydrostatic pressure stimulation of an appropriately cell-seeded porous scaffold within a bioreactor is a promising method for engineering bone tissue external to the body. We propose a mathematical model, and employ a suite of candidate constitutive laws, to qualitatively describe the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the quantity of minerals deposited in such an experimental setup. By comparing data from numerical simulations with experimental observations under a number of stimulation protocols, we suggest that the response of bone cells to an applied pressure requires consideration of two components; (i) a component describing the cell memory of the applied stimulation, and (ii) a recovery component, capturing the time cells require to recover from high rates of mineralisation. PMID:26796221

  17. Surface forces between colloidal particles at high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, D. W.; Pouligny, B.; Best, A.; Nick, T. A.; Berger, R.; Butt, H.-J.

    2016-02-01

    It was recently suggested that the electrostatic double-layer force between colloidal particles might weaken at high hydrostatic pressure encountered, for example, in deep seas or during oil recovery. We have addressed this issue by means of a specially designed optical trapping setup that allowed us to explore the interaction of a micrometer-sized glass bead and a solid glass wall in water at hydrostatic pressures of up to 1 kbar. The setup allowed us to measure the distance between bead and wall with a subnanometer resolution. We have determined the Debye lengths in water for salt concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. We found that in the pressure range from 1 bar to 1 kbar the maximum variation of the Debye lengths was <1 nm for both salt concentrations. Furthermore, the magnitude of the zeta potentials of the glass surfaces in water showed no dependency on pressure.

  18. Hydrostatic Pressure Sensing with High Birefringence Photonic Crystal Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Fávero, Fernando C.; Quintero, Sully M. M.; Martelli, Cicero; Braga, Arthur M.B.; Silva, Vinícius V.; Carvalho, Isabel C. S.; Llerena, Roberth W. A.; Valente, Luiz C. G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the waveguiding properties of high birefringence photonic crystal fibers (HiBi PCF) is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. A fiber design presenting form birefringence induced by two enlarged holes in the innermost ring defining the fiber core is investigated. Numerical results show that modal sensitivity to the applied pressure depends on the diameters of the holes, and can be tailored by independently varying the sizes of the large or small holes. Numerical and experimental results are compared showing excellent agreement. A hydrostatic pressure sensor is proposed and demonstrated using an in-fiber modal interferometer where the two orthogonally polarized modes of a HiBi PCF generate fringes over the optical spectrum of a broad band source. From the analysis of experimental results, it is concluded that, in principle, an operating limit of 92 MPa in pressure could be achieved with 0.0003% of full scale resolution. PMID:22163435

  19. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  20. Hydrostatic stress dependent yield of 7075-T6 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Benzley, S.E.; Priddy, T.G.; Soo Hoo, M.S.

    1980-03-01

    Tension and compression tests on notched cylindrical bars made of 7075-T6 aluminum have been conducted as a part of an investigation of the mechanics of ductile fracture. The compression tests showed significantly stiffer behavior in the nonlinear portion of the experiment than those found from the tension tests. This difference was accounted for by incorporating a hydrostatic stress dependent yield model in the analysis of the experiment. The model was verified by comparing finite element calculations with the actual experimental results.

  1. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  2. LoCuSS: Testing hydrostatic equilibrium in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. P.; Mazzotta, P.; Okabe, N.; Ziparo, F.; Mulroy, S. L.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; McCarthy, I. G.; Lieu, M.; Bahé, Y. M.; Bourdin, H.; Evrard, A. E.; Futamase, T.; Haines, C. P.; Jauzac, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Martino, R.; May, P. E.; Taylor, J. E.; Umetsu, K.

    2016-02-01

    We test the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium in an X-ray luminosity selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3 from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). Our weak-lensing measurements of M500 control systematic biases to sub-4 per cent, and our hydrostatic measurements of the same achieve excellent agreement between XMM-Newton and Chandra. The mean ratio of X-ray to lensing mass for these 50 clusters is β_X= 0.95± 0.05, and for the 44 clusters also detected by Planck, the mean ratio of Planck mass estimate to LoCuSS lensing mass is β_P= 0.95± 0.04. Based on a careful like-for-like analysis, we find that LoCuSS, the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project, and Weighing the Giants agree on β_P ≃ 0.9-0.95 at 0.15 < z < 0.3. This small level of hydrostatic bias disagrees at ˜5σ with the level required to reconcile Planck cosmology results from the cosmic microwave background and galaxy cluster counts.

  3. Non-hydrostatic equilibrium of the Sun and alternative physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferronsky, V.

    2009-04-01

    The proved fact that the Earth and the Moon don't stay in hydrostatic equilibrium and many other evidences bring us to conclusion that dynamics and physics of all other Solar System bodies including the Sun itself ought to be studied on non-hydrostatic basis. The only reasonable and logical alternative to that is the dynamical approach. We accepted this option and found it as a promising direction. It was found that in order to change hydrostatics by dynamical physics the outer force field of the body must be replaced by its inner volumetric force pressure. This is because the gravitational and electromagnetic forces, being inner mass forces, are volumetric in their nature. The analytical approach of that is shown in our abstract presented to GD10 of GA2009. A novel equation of state for the Sun and other stars following from the dynamical approach was obtained. The common nature of gravitational and electromagnetic energy, generated by interacted (collide and scattered) elementary particles, follows from the dynamics. New ideas related to mechanism of the Solar System creation are aroused from the approach. See more information in our works: Ferronsky V.I. and S.V. Ferronsky (2007). Dynamics of the Earth, Scientific World, Moscow; Ferronsky V.I. (2008). Non-averaged virial theorem for natural systems: http://zhurnal.ape.relarn.ru/articles/2008/066e.pdf; Ferronsky V.I., S.A. Denisik and S.V. Ferronsky (1987). Jacobi Dynamics, Riedel, Dordrecht.

  4. Non-equilibration of hydrostatic pressure in blebbing cells.

    PubMed

    Charras, Guillaume T; Yarrow, Justin C; Horton, Mike A; Mahadevan, L; Mitchison, T J

    2005-05-19

    Current models for protrusive motility in animal cells focus on cytoskeleton-based mechanisms, where localized protrusion is driven by local regulation of actin biochemistry. In plants and fungi, protrusion is driven primarily by hydrostatic pressure. For hydrostatic pressure to drive localized protrusion in animal cells, it would have to be locally regulated, but current models treating cytoplasm as an incompressible viscoelastic continuum or viscous liquid require that hydrostatic pressure equilibrates essentially instantaneously over the whole cell. Here, we use cell blebs as reporters of local pressure in the cytoplasm. When we locally perfuse blebbing cells with cortex-relaxing drugs to dissipate pressure on one side, blebbing continues on the untreated side, implying non-equilibration of pressure on scales of approximately 10 microm and 10 s. We can account for localization of pressure by considering the cytoplasm as a contractile, elastic network infiltrated by cytosol. Motion of the fluid relative to the network generates spatially heterogeneous transients in the pressure field, and can be described in the framework of poroelasticity. PMID:15902261

  5. 1-Way Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A one-way bearing is provided having sprags and rolling bearings both disposed between an inner and an outer race. The sprags may comprise three-dimensional sprags for preventing rotation in a non-preferential direction. The roll- ing bearings may comprise thrust rollers for transmitting axial, tilt, and radial loads between the inner and outer races.

  6. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  7. A new generation of the regional climate model REMO: REMO non-hydrostatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Kevin; Raub, Thomas; Marien, Lennart; Buntemeyer, Lars; Jacob, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    The regional climate model REMO is well established and has proofed it's value in regional climate simulations for more than a decade. However, due to the hydrostatic formulation REMO is not able to produce useful regional climate information on scales smaller than ~10 km. The demand for higher resolution data especially in the climate service sector is evident. Often climate change information on urban district or even point level is needed. A previous development of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core for REMO utilizing ideas of Miller and Pearce (1974) and Janjic (2001) has been picked up and implemented into the latest hydrostatic REMO version. One of the advantages of the Janjic formulation is that hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic computations are well separated. This offers a straightforward implementation of the non-hydrostatic calculations into an existing hydrostatic model. Other advantages are the easy quantification of the error done by the hydrostatic approximation and the lower computational costs at lower resolutions by switching of the non-hydrostatic part. We will show results from climate simulations on the EURO-CORDEX domain with and without non-hydrostatic option.

  8. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  9. Bearings working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The service life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbomachinery bearings was a predominant factor in engine durability and maintenance problems. Recent data has indicated that bearing life is about one order of magnitude lower than the goal of seven and one-half hours particularly those in the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP). Bearing technology, primarily cryogenic turbomachinery bearing technology, is expanded by exploring the life and performance effects of design changes; design concept changes; materials changes; manufacturing technique changes; and lubrication system changes. Each variation is assessed against the current bearing design in full scale cryogenic tests.

  10. Compression of α-cristobalite under different hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernok, Ana; Marquardt, Katharina; Bykova, Elena; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    The response of α-cristobalite to high-pressure has been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies for more than two decades. The results indicated prolific polymorphism under high pressures, yet no consensus has emerged on what is the sequence of these pressure-induced transformations. In particular, the structure of the high-pressure polymorph that appears above ~10 GPa (hereafter cristobalite X-I), which is believed to be a direct link between the low-pressure (silicon in SiO4 tetrahedra) and the high-pressure (SiO6 octahedra) forms of silica remained elusive. This study examined the response of α-cristobalite when compressed at different levels of hydrostaticity, with the special focus on formation and stability of cristobalite X-I. The structural behavior of cristobalite under pressure was investigated up to ~80 GPa and at ambient temperature. We investigated behavior of single crystals and powders, in either (quasy)-hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic environment. In situ high pressure transformation path and structural behavior was studied by means of Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The samples recovered after pressure release were additionally investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Low- or α-cristobalite responds differently to high pressure depending on the degree of the hydrostaticity. The highest attainable hydrostaticity preserves the initial structure of cristobalite at least up to ~15 GPa. When the crystal experiences even slight stresses during an experiment, transformation sequence leads to cristobalite X-I - a monoclinic polymorph with silicon in octahedral coordination. This polymorph belongs to the family of the high-pressure silica phases that are comprised of distorted close-packed array of oxygen ions in which silicon atoms fully or partially occupy octahedral sites. The reflections collected on a single crystal at ~11 GPa can be indexed by a monoclinic unit cell a=6.658(9) Å, b=4

  11. Bulk-Flow Analysis of Hybrid Thrust Bearings for Advanced Cryogenic Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1998-01-01

    A bulk-flow analysis and computer program for prediction of the static load performance and dynamic force coefficients of angled injection, orifice-compensated hydrostatic/hydrodynamic thrust bearings have been completed. The product of the research is an efficient computational tool for the design of high-speed thrust bearings for cryogenic fluid turbopumps. The study addresses the needs of a growing technology that requires of reliable fluid film bearings to provide the maximum operating life with optimum controllable rotordynamic characteristics at the lowest cost. The motion of a cryogenic fluid on the thin film lands of a thrust bearing is governed by a set of bulk-flow mass and momentum conservation and energy transport equations. Mass flow conservation and a simple model for momentum transport within the hydrostatic bearing recesses are also accounted for. The bulk-flow model includes flow turbulence with fluid inertia advection, Coriolis and centrifugal acceleration effects on the bearing recesses and film lands. The cryogenic fluid properties are obtained from realistic thermophysical equations of state. Turbulent bulk-flow shear parameters are based on Hirs' model with Moody's friction factor equations allowing a simple simulation for machined bearing surface roughness. A perturbation analysis leads to zeroth-order nonlinear equations governing the fluid flow for the thrust bearing operating at a static equilibrium position, and first-order linear equations describing the perturbed fluid flow for small amplitude shaft motions in the axial direction. Numerical solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations renders the bearing flow rate, thrust load, drag torque and power dissipation. Solution to the first-order equations determines the axial stiffness, damping and inertia force coefficients. The computational method uses well established algorithms and generic subprograms available from prior developments. The Fortran9O computer program hydrothrust runs

  12. Nonlinear study of a misaligned hydrodynamic journal bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, F.K.; Braun, M.J.; Hu, Y. )

    1993-07-01

    Hydrodynamic/hydrostatic journal bearings have been widely used in various types of high speed rotating machinery. For space applications, the issue of using cryogenic fluids as working lubricants has steadily gained in significance. The main objective of this paper is to study the nonlinear effects in a hydrodynamic journal bearing with special attention to the effects of journal axial misalignment. The numerical model that couples the Reynolds equation with the dynamics of the rotor is solved by means of a finite difference solution technique. Fluid film pressures that resulted from an iterative scheme are integrated to generate bearing supporting forces. A two-dimensional Newton-Raphson iteration method is used to locate the journal equilibrium position from which both linear and nonlinear bearing stiffness are evaluated by means of the small perturbation technique. The effects of axial misalignment on bearing equilibrium position, lubricant fluid film thickness, pressure distribution, and stiffness characteristics are examined. General conclusions are drawn from the parametric studies in load, speed, inlet temperature, and axial misalignment. 24 refs.

  13. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  14. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Mary Ann; Bingert, John F.; Bingert, Sherri A.; Thoma, Dan J.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process.

  15. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Bingert, S.A.; Thoma, D.J.

    1998-09-08

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process. 5 figs.

  16. An application of an efficient non-hydrostatic mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flassak, Th.; Moussiopoulos, N.

    1987-12-01

    This paper deals with a non-hydrostatic mesoscale model that achieves full vectorization on computers like the CYBER 205. The model formulation ensures the conservation of all fluxes and takes into account the terrain inhomogeneities by the aid of suitable transformations. The diagnostic equation for the pressure change is solved using a very efficient vectorized elliptic solver. By imposing appropriate boundary conditions no additional precautions at the boundaries are necessary to achieve meaningful results. As an application, the steady-state inviscid flow over a single mountain is simulated.

  17. Steel pressure vessels for hydrostatic pressures to 50 kilobars.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, A; Whalley, E

    1978-07-01

    Cylindrical steel pressure vessels are described that can be used for hydrostatic pressures up to 50 kilobars. Monoblock vessels of 350 maraging steel can be used to 40 kilobars and compound vessels with an inner vessel of 350 maraging steel and an outer vessel of 300 maraging steel to 50 kilobars. Neither requires the cylinder to be end loaded, and so they are much easier to use than the more usual compound vessels with a tungsten carbide inner and steel outer vessel. PMID:18699223

  18. Hydrostatic extrusion of BSCCO/Ag composite wire

    SciTech Connect

    Bingert, J.F.; Bingham, B.L.; Sebring, R.J.; Kelly, A.M.

    1995-03-01

    The application of hydrostatic extrusion processing to composite wire fabrication offers several advantages over conventional reduction techniques. These include enhanced uniformity, increased reduction capability, and successful extrusion of normally brittle materials. Specifically, this work involved an experiment to screen the effects of seven extrusion process parameters on the uniformity and density of as-extruded BSCCO-core wire, and the required extrusion pressure. Results suggest the following factors to be potentially significant: (1) back pressure, extrusion ratio, and die angle on core uniformity, (2) packing method, extrusion ratio, silver powder additions, and temperature on density, and (3) extrusion ratio and temperature on extrusion pressure.

  19. Hydrostatic pressure sensing with surface-core fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the employment of surface-core fibers for hydrostatic pressure sensing. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the use of these fibers for the referenced purpose. Theoretical simulations of the fiber structure were performed in order to estimate fiber phase and group birefringence values and its pressure sensitivity coefficient. In order to test fiber performance when acting as a pressure sensor, the same was placed in an polarimetric setup and its spectral response was measured. A sensitivity of 4.8 nm/MPa was achieved, showing good resemblance to the expected sensitivity value (4.6 nm/MPa).

  20. Single-molecule imaging at high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, Hugh; Lucas Black, S.; Flors, Cristina; Lloyd, Diarmuid; Bruce Ward, F.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2013-04-01

    Direct microscopic fluorescence imaging of single molecules can provide a wealth of mechanistic information, but up to now, it has not been possible under high pressure conditions, due to limitations in microscope pressure cell design. We describe a pressure cell window design that makes it possible to image directly single molecules at high hydrostatic pressure. We demonstrate our design by imaging single molecules of Alexa Fluor 647 dye bound to DNA, at 120 and 210 bar, and following their fluorescence photodynamics. We further show that the failure pressure of this type of pressure cell window can be in excess of 1 kbar.

  1. Multicore MgB 2 wires made by hydrostatic extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Pachla, W.; Hušek, I.; Kulczyk, M.; Melišek, T.; Holúbek, T.; Diduszko, R.; Reissner, M.

    2008-12-01

    Seven-filament MgB2/Fe and MgB2/Nb/Cu wires have been made by in situ process using hydrostatic extrusion, drawing and two-axial drawing deformation into the wire size of 1.1 × 1.1 mm2. The conductors were sintered at 650 °C/0.5 h and studied in terms of field-dependent transport critical current density and thermal stability. XRD, SEM and EDX analysis were applied for structural characterization. Transport current property and compositional/structural differences are compared and discussed in connection to used powders and metallic materials.

  2. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  3. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curwen, Peter W.; Rao, Dantam K.; Wilson, Donald R.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes a design and analysis study performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061. The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in long-term space missions. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) system consisting of two 25-kWe free-piston Stirling engine modules. Two different versions of the RSSPC engine modules have been defined under NASA Contract NAS3-25463. These modules currently use hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Results of this study show that active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are technically feasible for RSSPC application provided that wire insulation with 60,000-hr life capability at 300 C can be developed for the bearing coils. From a design integration standpoint, both versions of the RSSPC were found to be conceptually amenable to magnetic support of the power piston assembly. However, only one version of the RSSPC was found to be amendable to magnetic support of the displacer assembly. Unacceptable changes to the basic engine design would be required to incorporate magnetic displacer bearings into the second version. Complete magnetic suspension of the RSSPC can potentially increase overall efficiency of the Stirling cycle power converter by 0.53 to 1.4 percent (0.15 to 0.4 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. However, these advantages are accompanied by a 5 to 8 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC, depending on the RSSPC version employed. Additionally, magnetic bearings are much more complex, both mechanically and particularly electronically, than hydrostatic bearings. Accordingly, long

  4. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, Peter W.; Rao, Dantam K.; Wilson, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a design and analysis study performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061. The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in long-term space missions. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) system consisting of two 25-kWe free-piston Stirling engine modules. Two different versions of the RSSPC engine modules have been defined under NASA Contract NAS3-25463. These modules currently use hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Results of this study show that active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are technically feasible for RSSPC application provided that wire insulation with 60,000-hr life capability at 300 C can be developed for the bearing coils. From a design integration standpoint, both versions of the RSSPC were found to be conceptually amenable to magnetic support of the power piston assembly. However, only one version of the RSSPC was found to be amendable to magnetic support of the displacer assembly. Unacceptable changes to the basic engine design would be required to incorporate magnetic displacer bearings into the second version. Complete magnetic suspension of the RSSPC can potentially increase overall efficiency of the Stirling cycle power converter by 0.53 to 1.4 percent (0.15 to 0.4 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. However, these advantages are accompanied by a 5 to 8 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC, depending on the RSSPC version employed. Additionally, magnetic bearings are much more complex, both mechanically and particularly electronically, than hydrostatic bearings. Accordingly, long

  5. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  6. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  7. Extending bearing life

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.

    1997-08-01

    Long-term bearing operation cannot be achieved unless proper handling, storage, installation, and maintenance procedures are followed. These factors can shorten--sometimes drastically--expected bearing service life. Failures are generally related to improper lubrication or installation and induced conditions. Most major bearing manufacturers offer technical assistance in inspection, evaluation, and reporting on bearings which have failed in service. Actual percentages associated with each failure category vary, depending on the source, but generally they are 70% from lubrication and installation, 20% from induced factors, and 10% from reaching their fatigue limit or design life. The paper describes lubricant-related failures and procedures for the correct handling, storage, installation, and maintenance.

  8. Collapse of composite tubes under uniform external hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. T.; Ross, C. T. F.; Little, A. P. F.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes an experimental and a theoretical investigation into the collapse of 22 circular cylindrical composite tubes under external hydrostatic pressure. The investigations were on the collapse of fibre reinforced plastic tube specimens made from a mixture of three carbon and two E-glass fibre layers. The theoretical investigations were carried out using an in-house finite element computer program called BCLAM, together with the commercial computer package, namely ANSYS. It must be emphasised here that BS 5500 does not appear to exclusively cater for the buckling of composite shells under external hydrostatic pressure, so the work presented here is novel and should be useful to industry. The experimental investigations showed that the composite specimens behaved similarly to isotropic materials previously tested, in that the short vessels collapsed through axisymmetric deformation while the longer tubes collapsed through non-symmetric bifurcation buckling. Furthermore it was discovered that the models failed at changes of the composite lay-up due to the manufacturing process of these models. These changes seemed to be the weak points of the specimens.

  9. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambliss, K.; Sundaram, S. K.; Simos, N.; Diwan, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high-speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  10. Inelastic compaction, dilation and hysteresis of sandstones under hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Hamiel, Yariv; Zhu, Wenlu

    2014-05-01

    Sandstones display non-linear and inelastic behaviour such as hysteresis when subjected to cyclic loading. We present three hydrostatic compaction experiments with multiple loading-unloading cycles on Berea and Darley Dale sandstones and explain their hysteretic behaviour using non-linear inelastic compaction and dilation. Each experiment included eight to nine loading-unloading cycles with increasing maximum pressure in each subsequent cycle. Different pressure-volumetric strain relations during loading and unloading were observed. During the first cycles, under relatively low pressures, not all of the volumetric strain is recovered at the end of each cycle whereas at the last cycles, under relatively high pressures, the strain is recovered and the pressure-volumetric strain hysteresis loops are closed. The observed pressure-volumetric strain relations are non-linear and the effective bulk modulus of the sandstones changes between cycles. Observations are modelled with two inelastic deformation processes: irreversible compaction caused by changes in grain packing and recoverable compaction associated with grain contact adhesion, frictional sliding on grains or frictional sliding on cracks. The irreversible compaction is suggested to reflect rearrangement of grains into a more compact mode as the maximum pressure increases. Our model describes the `inelastic compaction envelope' in which sandstone sample will follow during hydrostatic loading. Irreversible compaction occurs when pressure is greater than a threshold value defined by the `inelastic compaction envelope'.

  11. Opportunities of hydrostatically coupled dielectric elastomer actuators for haptic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2011-04-01

    As a means to improve versatility and safety of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) for several fields of application, so-called 'hydrostatically coupled' DEAs (HC-DEAs) have recently been described. HC-DEAs are based on an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a DE-based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load, so as to enable hydrostatic transmission. This paper presents ongoing developments of HC-DEAs and potential applications in the field of haptics. Three specific examples are considered. The first deals with a wearable tactile display used to provide users with tactile feedback during electronic navigation in virtual environments. The display consists of HCDEAs arranged in contact with finger tips. As a second example, an up-scaled prototype version of an 8-dots refreshable cell for dynamic Braille displays is shown. Each Braille dot consists of a miniature HC-DEA, with a diameter lower than 2 mm. The third example refers to a device for finger rehabilitation, conceived to work as a sort of active version of a rehabilitation squeezing ball. The device is designed to dynamically change its compliance according to an electric control. The three examples of applications intend to show the potential of the new technology and the prospective opportunities for haptic interfaces.

  12. Study of glass hydrometer calibration by hydrostatic weighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaoyun; Wang, Jintao; Li, Zhihao; Zhang, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Glass hydrometers are simple but effective instruments for measuring the density of liquids. Glass hydrometers calibration based on the Archimedes law, using silicon ring as a reference standard solid density, n-tridecane with density stability and low surface tension as the standard working liquid, based on hydrostatic weighing method designs a glass hydrometer calibration system. Glass hydrometer calibration system uses CCD image measurement system to align the scale of hydrometer and liquid surface, with positioning accuracy of 0.01 mm. Surface tension of the working liquid is measured by Whihemy plate. According to twice glass hydrometer weighing in the air and liquid can calculate the correction value of the current scale. In order to verify the validity of the principle of the hydrostatic weighing method of glass hydrometer calibration system, for measuring the density range of (770-790) kg/m3, with a resolution of 0.2 kg/m3 of hydrometer. The results of measurement compare with the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt(PTB) ,verifying the validity of the calibration system.

  13. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  14. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  15. Double nanoplate-based NEMS under hydrostatic and electrostatic actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Hosseini, S. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Presented herein is a comprehensive investigation on the nonlinear vibration behavior of nanoplate-based nano electromechanical systems (NEMS) under hydrostatic and electrostatic actuations based on nonlocal elasticity and Gurtin-Murdoch theory. Using nonlinear strain-displacement relations, the geometrical nonlinearity is modeled. Based on Kelvin-Voigt model, the influence of the viscoelastic coefficient is also discussed. Nonlocal plate theory and Hamilton's principle are utilized for deriving the governing equations. Furthermore, the differential quadrature method (DQM) is employed to compute the nonlinear frequency. In addition, pull-in voltage and hydrostatic pressure are considered by comparing the results obtained from nanoplates made of two different materials including aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si). Finally, the influences of important parameters including the small scale, thickness of the nanoplate, center gap and Winkler coefficient in the actuated nanoplate are thoroughly studied. The plots for the ratio of nonlinear-to-linear frequencies against thickness, maximum transverse amplitude and non-dimensional center gap of nanoplate are also presented.

  16. Effect of Eccentricity on the Static and Dynamic Performance of a Turbulent Hybrid Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of journal eccentricity on the static and dynamic performance of a water lubricated, 5-recess hybrid bearing is presented in detail. The hydrostatic bearing has been designed to operate at a high speed and with a large level of external pressurization. The operating conditions determine the flow in the bearing to be highly turbulent and strongly dominated by fluid inertia effects. The analysis covers the spectrum of journal center displacements directed towards the middle of a recess and towards the mid-land portion between two consecutive recesses. Predicted dynamic force coefficients are uniform for small to moderate eccentricities. For large journal center displacements, fluid cavitation and recess position determine large changes in the bearing dynamic performance. The effect of fluid inertia force coefficients on the threshold speed of instability and whirl ratio of a single mass flexible rotor is discussed.

  17. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  18. Passive Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic bearing for limited rotation devices requires no feedback control system to sense and correct shaft position. Passive Magnetic Torsion Bearing requires no power supply and has no rubbing parts. Torsion wire restrains against axial instability. Magnetic flux geometry chosen to assure lateral stability with radial restoring force that maintains alignment.

  19. Cylindrical bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1981-01-01

    Program CYBEAN computes behavior of rolling-element bearings including effects of bearing geometry, shaft misalinement, and temperature. Accurate assessment is possible for various outer-ring and housing configurations. CYBEAN is structured for coordinated execution of modules that perform specific analytical tasks. It is written in FORTRAN IV for use on the UNIVAC 1100/40 computer.

  20. Bearing servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Rex A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A tool for removing and/or replacing bearings in situ is presented. The tool is comprised of a brace having a first end adapted to engage a first end of the bearing housing, and a second end adapted to engage a second end of the bearing housing. If the two ends of the bearing housing are different in configuration, then the respective ends of the brace are configured accordingly. An elongate guide member integral with the brace has two parts, each projecting endwise from a respective end of the brace. A removable pressure plate can be mounted on either part of the guide member for longitudinal movement therealong and has first and second ends of different configurations adapted to engage the first and second ends of the bearing. A threaded-type drive is cooperative between the guide and the pressure plate to move the pressure plate longitudinally along the guide and apply a force to the bearing, either to remove the bearing from its housing, or to emplace a new bearing in the housing.

  1. OTV bearing deflection investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, B. L.; Diepenbrock, R. T.; Millis, M. G.

    1993-04-01

    The primary goal of the Bearing Deflectometer Investigation was to gain experience in the use of fiber optic displacement probe technology for bearing health monitoring in a liquid hydrogen turbo pump. The work specified in this Task Order was conducted in conjunction with Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory Contract F04611-86-C-0010. APD conducted the analysis and design coordination to provide a displacement probe design compatible with the XLR-134 liquid hydrogen turbo pump assembly (TPA). Specifications and requirements of the bearing deflectometer were established working with Mechanical Technology Instruments, Inc. (MTI). The TPA design accommodated positioning of the probe to measure outer race cyclic deflections of the pump inlet bearing. The fiber optic sensor was installed as required in the TPA and sensor output was recorded during the TPA testing. Data review indicated that no bearing deflection signature could be differentiated from the inherent system noise. Alternate sensor installations were not investigated, but might yield different results.

  2. Arcturus and the Bears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, E.

    2009-08-01

    Arcturus is the brightest star in Bootes. The ancient Greek name Arktouros means Bear Guard. The star, however, is not close to Ursa Maior (Big She-Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little She-Bear), as the name would suggest. This curious discrepancy could be explained by the star proper motion, assuming the name Bear Guard is a remote cultural heritage. The proper motion analysis could allow us to get an insight also into an ancient myth regarding Ursa Maior. Though we cannot explain scientifically such a myth, some interesting suggestions can be obtained about its possible origin, in the context of the present knowledge of the importance of the cult of the bear both during the Palaeolithic times and for several primitive populations of modern times, as shown by the ethnological studies.

  3. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanandres, Luis

    1994-12-01

    The Phase 2 (1994) Annual Progress Report presents two major report sections describing the thermal analysis of tilting- and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings. A literature review on the subject of two-phase flow in fluid film bearings and part of the proposed work for 1995 are also included. The programs delivered at the end of 1994 are named hydroflext and hydrotran. Both codes are fully compatible with the hydrosealt (1993) program. The new programs retain the same calculating options of hydrosealt plus the added bearing geometries, and unsteady flow and transient forced response. Refer to the hydroflext & hydrotran User's Manual and Tutorial for basic information on the analysis and instructions to run the programs. The Examples Handbook contains the test bearing cases along with comparisons with experimental data or published analytical values. The following major tasks were completed in 1994 (Phase 2): (1) extension of the thermohydrodynamic analysis and development of computer program hydroflext to model various bearing geometries, namely, tilting-pad hydrodynamic journal bearings, flexure-pad cylindrical bearings (hydrostatic and hydrodynamic), and cylindrical pad bearings with a simple elastic matrix (ideal foil bearings); (2) improved thermal model including radial heat transfer through the bearing stator; (3) calculation of the unsteady bulk-flow field in fluid film bearings and the transient response of a point mass rotor supported on bearings; and (4) a literature review on the subject of two-phase flows and homogeneous-mixture flows in thin-film geometries.

  4. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis

    1994-01-01

    The Phase 2 (1994) Annual Progress Report presents two major report sections describing the thermal analysis of tilting- and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings. A literature review on the subject of two-phase flow in fluid film bearings and part of the proposed work for 1995 are also included. The programs delivered at the end of 1994 are named hydroflext and hydrotran. Both codes are fully compatible with the hydrosealt (1993) program. The new programs retain the same calculating options of hydrosealt plus the added bearing geometries, and unsteady flow and transient forced response. Refer to the hydroflext & hydrotran User's Manual and Tutorial for basic information on the analysis and instructions to run the programs. The Examples Handbook contains the test bearing cases along with comparisons with experimental data or published analytical values. The following major tasks were completed in 1994 (Phase 2): (1) extension of the thermohydrodynamic analysis and development of computer program hydroflext to model various bearing geometries, namely, tilting-pad hydrodynamic journal bearings, flexure-pad cylindrical bearings (hydrostatic and hydrodynamic), and cylindrical pad bearings with a simple elastic matrix (ideal foil bearings); (2) improved thermal model including radial heat transfer through the bearing stator; (3) calculation of the unsteady bulk-flow field in fluid film bearings and the transient response of a point mass rotor supported on bearings; and (4) a literature review on the subject of two-phase flows and homogeneous-mixture flows in thin-film geometries.

  5. Development of methods and equipment for bellows assemblies testing under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol’khovik, E.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a newbellows assemblies test method for stop and safety valves. To create the real conditions it is suggested testing under external hydrostatic pressure, which is available in the piping system.A designed test apparatus allows testing of the bellows under the effect of external hydrostatic pressure. The paper describes the design of the apparatus, its specifications and the test procedures.

  6. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-10-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as ɛ = ( AP + B) σn over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where ɛ, P and σ denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constants. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain.

  7. Mechanoluminescence of ZnS:Mn phosphors excited by hydrostatic pressure steps and pressure pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, V. K.; Chandra, B. P.; Jha, Piyush

    2014-11-01

    When a hydrostatic pressure step is applied rapidly on ZnS:Mn phosphor introduced into a pressure cell as oil suspension, initially the mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with time, attains a peak value for a particular time, and then it decreases with time (G. Alzetta, N. Minnaja, S. Santucci, Nuovo Cimento 23, 1962, 910). When a hydrostatic pressure pulse is applied onto ZnS:Mn phosphor, then two ML pulses of equal intensity are emitted; one during the application of pressure and the other during the release of pressure. In case of ZnS:Mn phosphor, at low hydrostatic pressure the energy produced during the electron-hole recombination excites the Mn2+ centres; however, at high hydrostatic pressure, the impact of accelerated electrons with the Mn2+ centres causes the light emission. Considering the piezoelectrically-induced detrapping model of ML at low pressure and the piezoelectrically-induced impact excitation model of ML at high pressure, expressions are derived for different characteristics of ML, in which a good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results. At low hydrostatic pressure in the range from 3 MPa to 40 MPa, piezoelectrically-induced detrapping model of ML becomes applicable in ZnS:Mn phosphors; while at high hydrostatic pressure beyond 40 MPa, the piezoelectrically-induced impact excitation model of ML becomes applicable. The ML induced by hydrostatic pressure can be used for sensing both the magnitude and rise time of applied hydrostatic pressure.

  8. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... supporting structure during the hydrostatic test should be considered. The design shall consider the combined... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99)....

  9. Touchdown Ball-Bearing System for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Price, Robert; Gelotte, Erik; Singer, Herbert B.

    2003-01-01

    The torque-limited touchdown bearing system (TLTBS) is a backup mechanical-bearing system for a high-speed rotary machine in which the rotor shaft is supported by magnetic bearings in steady-state normal operation. The TLTBS provides ball-bearing support to augment or supplant the magnetic bearings during startup, shutdown, or failure of the magnetic bearings. The TLTBS also provides support in the presence of conditions (in particular, rotational acceleration) that make it difficult or impossible to control the magnetic bearings or in which the magnetic bearings are not strong enough (e.g., when the side load against the rotor exceeds the available lateral magnetic force).

  10. Magnetically-controlled bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-lubricant ball-bearing assembly has permanently-magnetized bearing retainer fabricated of porous material. Pores of retainer are filled with ferrolubricant. Surface tension causes retainer to deliver sufficient lubricant to nonmagnetic ball bearings.