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Sample records for hydrostatic bearings

  1. Simple modeling of hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charlie

    2014-07-01

    Hydrostatic bearings are a key component for many large telescopes due to their high load bearing capacity, stiffness and low friction. A simple technique is presented to model these bearings to understand the effects of geometry, oil viscosity, flow control, temperature, etc. on the bearings behavior.

  2. Model Of Bearing With Hydrostatic Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Improved mathematical model of rotational and vibrational dynamics of bearing package in turbopump incorporates effects of hydrostatic damper. Part of larger finite-element model representing rotational and vibrational dynamics of rotor and housing of pump. Includes representations of deadband and nonlinear stiffness and damping of ball bearings, nonlinear stiffness and damping of hydrostatic film, and stiffness of bearing support. Enables incorporation of effects of hydrostatic damper into overall rotor-dynamic mathematical model without addition of mathematical submodel of major substructure.

  3. Active hydrostatic bearing with magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbach, J.; Abel-Keilhack, C.

    2003-05-01

    Special bearings based on magnetic fluids are well known in literature. These bearings use the magnetic pressure inside a ferrofluid that is exposed to a magnetic field. The biggest disadvantage of this principle is the small load that can be supported. In one reference [B. M. Berkovsky, V. F. Medvedev, and M. S. Krakov, Magnetic Fluids, Engineering Applications (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1993)], the specific load is specified as 1 N cm-2. To support heavy loads very large support areas are needed. We will present a completely different concept for bearings with magnetorheological fluids. Hydrostatic bearings get their load bearing capacity from the hydrostatic pressure produced by an external pump and should not be confused with hydrodynamic bearings presented in another reference [R. Patzwald, M. S. thesis, Institute für Werkzeugmaschinen und Fabrikbetrieb, Technische Universität, Berlin (2001)]. The main disadvantage of hydrostatic bearings is that the bearing gap varies with the payload. Conventional systems compensate for these variations with a change of the oil flow rate, that is done, for example, by external valves. Our contribution will present a hydrostatic bearing that uses magnetorheological fluids. Due to the fact that magnetorheological fluids change their rheological properties with the change of an external magnetic field, it is possible to achieve a constant bearing gap even if the payload changes. The great advantage of this system compared to valve based systems is the short response time to payload changes, because the active element (i.e., the fluid) acts directly inside the bearing gap, and not outside like in the case of valves.

  4. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R. (Rigby, ID)

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  5. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  6. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  7. External Coulomb-Friction Damping For Hydrostatic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmann, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    External friction device damps vibrations of shaft and hydrostatic ring bearing in which it turns. Does not rely on wear-prone facing surfaces. Hydrostatic bearing ring clamped in radially flexing support by side plates clamped against radial surfaces by spring-loaded bolts. Plates provide friction against radial motions of shaft.

  8. Three-D CFD Analysis of Hydrostatic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shyi-Jang; Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrostatic bearing promises life and speed characteristics currently unachievable with rolling element bearings alone. In order to achieve the speed and life requirements of the next generation of rocket engines, turbopump manufacturers are proposing hydrostatic bearings to be used in place of, or in series with, rolling element bearings. The design of a hydrostatic bearing is dependent on accurate pressure in the bearing. The stiffness and damping of the hydrostatic bearing is very sensitive to the bearing recess pressure ratio. In the conventional approach, usually ad hoc assumptions were made in determining the bearing pressure of this approach is inherently incorrect. In the present paper, a more elaborate approach to obtain bearing pressure is used. The bearing pressure and complete flow features of the bearing are directly computed by solving the complete 3-D Navier Stokes equation. The code used in the present calculation is a modified version of REACT3D code. Several calculations have been performed for the hydrostatic bearing designed and tested at Texas A&M. Good agreement has been obtained between computed and test results. Detailed flow features in the bearing will also be described and discussed.

  9. Coating Hydrostatic Bearings To Resist Ignition In Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funkhouser, Merle E.

    1993-01-01

    Coats of superalloy MA754 plasma-sprayed onto occasionally rubbing surfaces of hydrostatic journal bearings operating in liquid and/or gaseous oxygen, according to proposal. Prevents ignition and combustion occurring when components made of stainless steels or other conventional bearing alloys rub against each other in oxygen. Eliminates need for runner and enhances control over critical bearing clearance.

  10. External Squeeze-Film Damper For Hydrostatic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmann, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    External squeeze-film damping device suppresses vibrations of rapidly turning shaft supported by pivoted-pad hydrostatic bearing in high-pressure/high-power-density turbomachine. Stacked disks provide damping and clearance for alignment.

  11. Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings in high-speed turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A high speed, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested under a previous contract. This design was then modified to incorporate hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on both the pump end and turbine end to replace the original conventional ball bearing packages. The design, analysis, turbopump modification, assembly, and testing of the turbopump with hybrid bearings is presented here. Initial design considerations and rotordynamic performance analysis was made to define expected turbopump operating characteristics and are reported. The results of testing the turbopump to speeds of 9215 rad/s (88,000 rpm) using a wide range of hydrostatic bearing supply pressures are presented. The hydrostatic bearing test data and the rotordynamic behavior of the turbopump was closely analyzed and are included in the report. The testing of hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on a turbopump to the high speed requirements has indicated the configuration concept is feasible. The program has presented a great deal of information on the technology requirements of integrating the hybrid bearing into high speed turbopump designs for improved bearing life.

  12. Evaluation of a hybrid hydrostatic bearing for cryogenic turbopump application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spica, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.; Meyer, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid hydrostatic bearing was designed to operate in liquid hydrogen at speeds to 80,000 rpm and radial loads to 440 n (100 lbf). The bearing assembly consisted of a pair of 20-mm angular-contact ball bearings encased in a journal, which was in turn supported by a fluid film of liquid hydrogen. The size and operating conditions of the bearing were selected to be compatible with the operating requirements of an advanced technology turbopump. Several test parameters were varied to characterize the bearing's steady-state operation. The rotation of the tester shaft was varied between 0 and 80,000 rpm. Bearing inlet fluid pressure was varied between 2.07 and 4.48 MPa (300 and 650 psia), while the fluid sump pressure was independently varied between 0.34 and 2.07 MPa (50 and 300 psia). The maximum radial load applied to the bearing was 440 N (110 lbf). Measured hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing stiffness was 1.5 times greater than predicted, while the fluid flow rate through the bearing was 35 to 65 percent less than predicted. Under two-phase fluid conditions, the stiffness was even greater and the flow rate was less. The optimal pressure ratio for the bearing should be between 0.2 and 0.55 depending on the balance desired between bearing efficiency and stiffness. Startup and shutdown cyclic tests were conducted to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing assembly to survive at least a 300-firing-duty cycle. For a typical cycle, the shaft was accelerated to 50,000 rpm in 1.8 sec. The bearing operated for 337 start-stop cycles without failure.

  13. Static properties of hydrostatic thrust gas bearings with curved surfaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehsteiner, F. H.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The classical treatment of circular, hydrostatic, orifice-regulated thrust gas bearings, in which perfectly plane bearing plates are assumed, is extended to include axisymmetric, but otherwise arbitrary, plate profiles. Plate curvature has a strong influence on bearing load capability, static stiffness, tilting stiffness, and side force per unit misalignment angle. By a suitable combination of gas inlet impedance and concave plate profile, the static stiffness can be made almost constant over a wide load range, and to remain positive at the closure load. Extensive measurements performed with convex and concave plates agree with theory to within the experimental error throughout and demonstrate the practical feasibility of using curved plates.

  14. An analysis of the 70-meter antenna hydrostatic bearing by means of computer simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the computer program 'A Computer Solution for Hydrostatic Bearings with Variable Film Thickness,' used to design the hydrostatic bearing of the 70-meter antennas, was modified to improve the accuracy with which the program predicts the film height profile and oil pressure distribution between the hydrostatic bearing pad and the runner. This article presents a description of the modified computer program, the theory upon which the computer program computations are based, computer simulation results, and a discussion of the computer simulation results.

  15. Fluid Compressibility Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hydrostatic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for the dynamic performance characteristics of laminar flow, capillar/orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The analysis considers in detail the effect of fluid compressibility in the bearing recesses. At high frequency excitations beyond a break frequency, the bearing hydrostatic stiffness increases sharply and it is accompanied by a rapid decrease in direct damping. Also, the potential of pneumatic hammer instability (negative damping) at low frequencies is likely to occur in hydrostatic bearing applications handling highly compressible fluids. Useful design criteria to avoid undesirable dynamic operating conditions at low and high frequencies are determined. The effect of fluid recess compressibility is brought into perspective, and found to be of utmost importance on the entire frequency spectrum response and stability characteristics of hydrostatic/hybrid journal bearings.

  16. Experimental equipment for measuring physical properties of the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdera, Michal; Drábková, Sylva; Bojko, Marian

    2014-03-01

    The hydraulic circuit, through which the mineral oil is brought, is an important part of hydrostatic bearings. The annular hydrostatic thrust bearing consists of two sliding plates divided by a layer of mineral oil. In the lower plate, there are oil grooves which distribute the liquid between the sliding areas. The hydraulic circuit is made of two basic parts: the energy source and the controlling part. The hydraulic pump, which brings the liquid into the sliding bearing, is the source of the pressure energy. The sliding bearing is weighted down by axial force, which can be changed during the process. That's why in front of the particular oil grooves control components adjusting pressure and flow size are located. This paper deals with a project of a hydraulic circuit for regulation of fluid layer in the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing and the testing equipment for measuring its physical properties. It will include the issue of measuring loading capacity and height of the fluid layer in the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing.

  17. Numerical Simulation on Dynamic Behavior of Hydrostatic Journal Bearing for LH2 Turbopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Ota, Terukazu

    In the present paper, the dynamic behavior of a rotor supported by externally pressurized liquid hydrogen bearing is theoretically investigated. The bearing treated in this study has 20 recesses arranged in two rows in a staggered manner and will be used in the liquid hydrogen turbopump of rocket engines for space transport systems. The equations of motion for a rotor are numerically solved using predictor-corrector scheme. The dynamic bearing reaction forces are calculated from the numerical solution of unsteady turbulent Reynolds lubrication equation. The transient responses of hydrostatic bearing under several operating conditions are presented. Furthermore, the journal center trajectories with imbalanced moment are examined theoretically.

  18. Investigation of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a large steerable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbarger, J.; Castelli, V.; Rippel, H.

    1972-01-01

    The problems inherent in the design and construction of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a tracking antenna of very large size were studied. For a load of 48,000,000 lbs., it is concluded that the hydrostatic bearing concept is feasible, provided that a particular multiple pad arrangement, high oil viscosity, and a particular load spreading arrangement are used. Presently available computer programs and techniques are deemed to be adequate for a good portion of the design job but new integrated programs will have to be developed in the area of the computation of the deflections of the supporting bearing structure. Experimental studies might also be indicated to ascertain the life characteristics of grouting under cyclic loading, and the optimization of hydraulic circuits and pipe sizes to insure the long life operation of pumps with high viscosity oil while avoiding cavitation.

  19. Effect of Elasticity on Capillary Compensated Flexible Multi-recess Hydrostatic Journal Bearing Operating with Micropolar Lubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Suresh; Kumar, Vijay; Gupta, Kapil Dev

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the effects of bearing shell deformation upon the performance characteristics of a capillary compensated multi-recess hydrostatic journal bearing system operating with micropolar lubricant. The finite element method has been used to solve the modified Reynolds' equation governing the micropolar lubricant flow in the bearing and the three dimensional elasticity equations governing the displacement field in the bearing shell. The elasto-hydrostatic performance characteristics of the bearing are presented for various values of micropolar parameters (l m and N 2) and for a wide range of the deformation coefficient bar{C}d which takes into account the flexibility of the bearing shell. The computed results indicate that the influence of the bearing shell flexibility is quite significant on the performance characteristics of recessed hydrostatic journal bearing system operating with micropolar lubricant.

  20. Effect of Elasticity on Capillary Compensated Flexible Multi-recess Hydrostatic Journal Bearing Operating with Micropolar Lubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Suresh; Kumar, Vijay; Gupta, Kapil Dev

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the effects of bearing shell deformation upon the performance characteristics of a capillary compensated multi-recess hydrostatic journal bearing system operating with micropolar lubricant. The finite element method has been used to solve the modified Reynolds' equation governing the micropolar lubricant flow in the bearing and the three dimensional elasticity equations governing the displacement field in the bearing shell. The elasto-hydrostatic performance characteristics of the bearing are presented for various values of micropolar parameters ( l m and N 2) and for a wide range of the deformation coefficient bar{C}d which takes into account the flexibility of the bearing shell. The computed results indicate that the influence of the bearing shell flexibility is quite significant on the performance characteristics of recessed hydrostatic journal bearing system operating with micropolar lubricant.

  1. Dynamic force response of spherical hydrostatic journal bearing for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis

    1994-01-01

    Hydrostatic Journal Bearings (HJB's) are reliable and resilient fluid film rotor support elements ideal to replace roller bearings in cryogenic turbomachinery. HJB' will be used for primary space-power applications due to their long lifetime, low friction and wear, large load capacity, large direct stiffness, and damping force coefficients. An analysis for the performance characteristics of turbulent flow, orifice compensated, spherical hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's) is presented. Spherical bearings allow tolerance for shaft misalignment without force performance degradation and have also the ability to support axial loads. The spherical HJB combines these advantages to provide a bearing design which could be used efficiently on high performance turbomachinery. The motion of a barotropic liquid on the thin film bearing lands is described by bulk-flow mass and momentum equations. These equations are solved numerically using an efficient CFD method. Numerical predictions of load capacity and force coefficients for a 6 recess, spherical HJB in a LO2 environment are presented. Fluid film axial forces and force coefficients of a magnitude about 20% of the radial load capacity are predicted for the case analyzed. Fluid inertia effects, advective and centrifugal, are found to affect greatly the static and dynamic force performance of the bearing studied.

  2. A study of the transient performance of annular hydrostatic journal bearings in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharrer, J. K.; Tellier, J. G.; Hibbs, R. I.

    1992-07-01

    A test apparatus was used to simulate a cryogenic turbopump start transient in order to determine the liftoff and touchdown speed and amount of wear of an annular hydrostatic bearing in liquid oxygen. The bearing was made of sterling silver and the journal made of Inconel 718. The target application of this configuration is the pump end bearing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Liquid Oxygen Turbopump. Sixty-one transient cycles were performed in liquid oxygen with an additional three tests in liquid nitrogen to certify the test facility and configuration. The bearing showed no appreciable wear during the testing, and the results indicate that the performance of the bearing was not significantly degraded during the testing.

  3. Analysis of a two row hydrostatic journal bearing with variable properties, inertia effects and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Adams, M. L.; Mullen, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A computer algorithm for simulation of hydrostatic journal bearing pressure-flow behavior has been generated. The effects taken into account are inertia, cavitation, variable properties (isothermal bearing) and roughness. The program has been specifically tailored for simulation of the hybrid bearing of the cryogenic turbopumps of the main shuttle engine. Due to the high pressure (515 psia) of the supply line no cavitation has been found. The influence of the roughness effects have been found to become important only when the surface-roughness order of magnitude is comparable with that of the bearing clearance itself. Pocket edge inertia and variable properties have been found to have quite an important influence upon the pocket pressure, field pressure distribution and lubricant mass flow.

  4. A test apparatus and facility to identify the rotordynamic coefficients of high-speed hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara; Hale, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A facility and apparatus are described which determine stiffness, damping, and added-mass rotordynamic coefficients plus steady-state operating characteristics of high speed hydrostatic journal bearings. The apparatus has a current top speed of 29,800 rpm with a bearing diameter of 7.62 cm (3 in.). Purified warm water, 55 C (130 F), is used as a test fluid to achieve elevated Reynolds numbers during operation. The test-fluid pump yields a bearing maximum inlet pressure of 6.9 Mpa (1000 psi). Static load on the bearing is independently controlled and measured. Orthogonally mounted external shakers are used to excite the test stator in the direction of, and perpendicular to, the static load. The apparatus can independently calculate all rotordynamic coefficients at a given operating condition.

  5. Development of a polymetric grout for the hydrostatic bearing at DSS 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.; Schwendeman, J. L.; Ball, G. L., III; Jenkins, G. H.; Casperson, R. D.; Gale, G. P.; Riewe, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an investigation into the causes of the deterioration and premature failure of the grout under the hydrostatic bearing runner at DSS 14 are reported. Generic types of materials were screened and tested to find a grout material more resistive to the causes of grout failure. Emphasis was placed on the physical properties, strength, modulus of elasticity, and resistance to erosion and chemical attack by oil and unique requirements imposed by each material for mixing, placing, compacting, and cooling. The polymetric grout developed to replace the dry grout is described.

  6. Three Dimensional Flow and Pressure Patterns in a Hydrostatic Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. Jack; Dzodzo, Milorad B.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a hydrostatic journal bearing (HJB) is described by a mathematical model that uses the three dimensional non-orthogonal form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Using the u, v, w, and p, as primary variables, a conservative formulation, finite volume multi-block method is applied through a collocated, body fitted grid. The HJB has four shallow pockets with a depth/length ratio of 0.067. This paper represents a natural extension to the two and three dimensional studies undertaken prior to this project.

  7. Interface pressure profile analysis for patellar tendon-bearing socket and hydrostatic socket.

    PubMed

    Moo, E K; Osman, N A Abu; Pingguan-Murphy, B; Abas, W A B Wan; Spence, W D; Solomonidis, S E

    2009-01-01

    Conventionally, patellar tendon-bearing (PTB) sockets, which need high dexterity of prosthetist, are widely used. Lack of chartered and experienced prosthetist has often led to painful experience of wearing prosthesis and this will in turn deter the patients to wear the prosthesis, which will further aggravate stump shrinkage. Thus, the hydrostatic socket which demands relatively lower level of fabricating skill is proposed to replace the PTB socket in order to produce the equivalent, if not better, quality of support to the amputee patients. Both sockets' pressure profiles are studied and compared using finite element analysis (FEA) software. Three-dimensional models of both sockets were developed using MIMICS software. The analysis results showed that hydrostatic socket did exhibit more uniform pressure profiles than that of PTB socket. PTB socket showed pressure concentration near the proximal brim of the socket and also at the distal fibula. It was also found that the pressure magnitude in hydrostatic socket is relatively lower than that of PTB socket. PMID:20405814

  8. A fully coupled variable properties thermohydraulic model for a cryogenic hydrostatic journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Wheeler, R. L., III; Hendricks, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The goal set forth here is to continue the work started by Braun et al. (1984-1985) and present an integrated analysis of the behavior of the two row, 20 staggered pockets, hydrostatic cryogenic bearing used by the turbopumps of the Space Shuttle main engine. The variable properties Reynolds equation is fully coupled with the two-dimensional fluid film energy equation. The three-dimensional equations of the shaft and bushing model the boundary conditions of the fluid film energy equation. The effects of shaft eccentricity, angular velocity, and inertia pressure drops at pocket edge are incorporated in the model. Their effects on the bearing fluid properties, load carrying capacity, mass flow, pressure, velocity, and temperature form the ultimate object of this paper.

  9. Comparison of Code Predictions to Test Measurements for Two Orifice Compensated Hydrostatic Bearings at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Rotordynamic coefficients obtained from testing two different hydrostatic bearings are compared to values predicted by two different computer programs. The first set of test data is from a relatively long (L/D=1) orifice compensated hydrostatic bearing tested in water by Texas A&M University (TAMU Bearing No.9). The second bearing is a shorter (L/D=.37) bearing and was tested in a lower viscosity fluid by Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell (Rocketdyne 'Generic' Bearing) at similar rotating speeds and pressures. Computed predictions of bearing rotordynamic coefficients were obtained from the cylindrical seal code 'ICYL', one of the industrial seal codes developed for NASA-LeRC by Mechanical Technology Inc., and from the hydrodynamic bearing code 'HYDROPAD'. The comparison highlights the difference the bearing has on the accuracy of the predictions. The TAMU Bearing No. 9 test data is closely matched by the predictions obtained for the HYDROPAD code (except for added mass terms) whereas significant differences exist between the data from the Rocketdyne 'Generic' bearing the code predictions. The results suggest that some aspects of the fluid behavior in the shorter, higher Reynolds Number 'Generic' bearing may not be modeled accurately in the codes. The ICYL code predictions for flowrate and direct stiffness approximately equal those of HYDROPAD. Significant differences in cross-coupled stiffness and the damping terms were obtained relative to HYDROPAD and both sets of test data. Several observations are included concerning application of the ICYL code.

  10. High Speed, High Temperature, Fault Tolerant Operation of a Combination Magnetic-Hydrostatic Bearing Rotor Support System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark; Montague, Gerald; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Closed loop operation of a single, high temperature magnetic radial bearing to 30,000 RPM (2.25 million DN) and 540 C (1000 F) is discussed. Also, high temperature, fault tolerant operation for the three axis system is examined. A novel, hydrostatic backup bearing system was employed to attain high speed, high temperature, lubrication free support of the entire rotor system. The hydrostatic bearings were made of a high lubricity material and acted as journal-type backup bearings. New, high temperature displacement sensors were successfully employed to monitor shaft position throughout the entire temperature range and are described in this paper. Control of the system was accomplished through a stand alone, high speed computer controller and it was used to run both the fault-tolerant PID and active vibration control algorithms.

  11. Predicted characteristics of an optimized series-hybrid conical hydrostatic ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Hamrock, B. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Optimized series-hybrid fluid-film ball bearings are described and operating characteristics are calculated and discussed. It is predicted that a series-hybrid bearing may be constructed which will reduce ball-bearing speed by 30 percent thereby increasing bearing fatigue life by factors of up to 5.9. Flow rates required are less than 9 kilograms per minute.

  12. Extending the life of the SSME HPOTP through the use of annular hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharrer, Joseph K.; Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.; Nolan, Steven A.; Tabibzadeh, Ramin

    1992-07-01

    A new fluid film bearing package is presented for incorporation into the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump. This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most importantly, it replaces the duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design constraints and solutions are presented along with the effects of the bearing package on the hydrodynamic and rotordynamic performance of the turbopump.

  13. Hotfire testing of a SSME HPOTP with an annular hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Steven A.; Hibbs, Robert I.; Genge, Gary G.

    1993-06-01

    A new fluid film bearing package has been tested in the SSME High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP). This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most important, it replaces a duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design and predicted performance of the turbopump are reviewed. Results are presented for measured pump and bearing performance. The most significant results were obtained from proximity probes located in the bearing bore which revealed large subsynchronous precession at 10 percent of shaft speed during engine start which subsided prior to mainstage power levels and reappeared during engine shutdown at equivalent power levels below 65 percent of nominal. This phenomenon has been attributed to rotating stall in the diffuser. The proximity probes also revealed the location of the bearing in the bore for different operating speeds. Pump vibration characteristics were improved as compared to pumps tested with ball bearings. After seven starts and more than 700 seconds of testing, the pump showed no signs of performance degradation.

  14. Hotfire testing of a SSME HPOTP with an annular hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, Steven A.; Hibbs, Robert I.; Genge, Gary G.

    1994-01-01

    A new fluid film bearing package has been tested in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP). This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most importantly, it replaces a duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design and predicted performance of the turbopump are reviewed. Results are presented for measured pump and bearing performance during testing on the NASA Technology Test Bed (TTB) Engine located at MSFC. The most significant results were obtained from proximity probes located in the bearing bore which revealed large subsynchronous precession at ten percent of shaft speed during engine start which subsided prior to mainstage power levels and reappeared during engine shutdown at equivalent power levels below 65% of nominal. This phenomenon has been attributed to rotating stall in the diffuser. The proximity probes also revealed the location of the bearing in the bore for different operating speeds. Pump vibration characteristics were improved as compared to pumps tested with ball bearings. After seven starts and more than 700 seconds of testing, the pump showed no signs of performance degradation.

  15. The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure up to 1.45 GPa on the Morin Transition of Hematite-Bearing Rock: Implications for Martian Crustal Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Demory, F.; Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, G.; Gabriel, T.; Quesnel, Y.

    2015-07-01

    We quantified the effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 1.45 GPa on the Morin transition of hematite-bearing rock via direct magnetic measurements using a high pressure cell and a SQUID magnetometer. Hematite is present in the martian crust.

  16. Three Dimensional Flow and Pressure Patterns in a Single Pocket of a Hydrostatic Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. Jack; Dzodzo, Milorad B.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a hydrostatic pocket is described by a mathematical model that uses the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations written in terms of the primary variables, u, v, w, and p. Using a conservative formulation, a finite volume multi-block method is applied through a collocated, body fitted grid. The flow is simulated in a shallow pocket with a depth/length ratio of 0.02. The flow structures obtained and described by the authors in their previous two dimensional models are made visible in their three dimensional aspect for the Couette flow. It has been found that the flow regimes formed central and secondary vortical cells with three dimensional corkscrew-like structures that lead the fluid on an outward bound path in the axial direction of the pocket. The position of the central vortical cell center is at the exit region of the capillary restrictor feedline. It has also been determined that a fluid turn around zone occupies all the upstream space between the floor of the pocket and the runner, thus preventing any flow exit through the upstream port. The corresponding pressure distribution under the shaft presented as well. It was clearly established that for the Couette dominated case the pressure varies significantly in the pocket in the circumferential direction, while its variation is less pronounced axially.

  17. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 1.61 GPa on the Morin transition of hematite-bearing rocks: Implications for planetary crustal magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, Natalia S.; Demory, François; Rochette, Pierre; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Gabriel, Thomas; Quesnel, Yoann

    2015-12-01

    We present new experimental data on the dependence of the Morin transition temperature (TM) on hydrostatic pressure up to 1.61 GPa, obtained on a well-characterized multidomain hematite-bearing sample from a banded iron formation. We used a nonmagnetic high-pressure cell for pressure application and a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometer to measure the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) under pressure on warming from 243 K to room temperature (T0). IRM imparted at T0 under pressure in 270 mT magnetic field (IRM270mT) is not recovered after a cooling-warming cycle. Memory effect under pressure was quantified as IRM recovery decrease of 10%/GPa. TM, determined on warming, reaches T0 under hydrostatic pressure 1.38-1.61 GPa. The pressure dependence of TM up to 1.61 GPa is positive and essentially linear with a slope dTM/dP = (25 ± 2) K/GPa. This estimate is more precise than previous ones and allows quantifying the effect of a pressure wave on the upper crust magnetization, with special emphasis on Mars.

  18. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  19. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, L.P.

    1981-02-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  20. Performance of gas-lubricated nonconforming pivoted-pad journal bearings and a flexibly mounted spiral-groove thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    A test program was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of gas-lubricated nonconforming pivoted-pad journal bearings and a spiral-groove thrust bearing designed for the Brayton cycle rotating unit (BRU). Hydrostatic, hybrid (simultaneously hydrostatic and hydrodynamic), and hydrodynamic tests were conducted in argon gas at ambient pressure and temperature ranges representative of hydrostatic operation up to the 10.5-kWe BRU power-generating level. Performance of the gas lubricated bearings is presented, including hydrostatic gas flow rates, bearing clearances, bearing temperatures, and transient performance.

  1. The Hydrostatic Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alpha E.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an example demonstrating the quantitative resolution of the hydrostatic paradox which is the realization that the force due to fluid pressure on the bottom of a vessel can be considerably greater or considerably less than the weight of the fluid in the vessel. (JRH)

  2. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  3. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon

  4. Hybrid bearings for turbopumps and the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John F. (inventor); Owens, Gregg R. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In rocket engines power is usually obtained by burning fuel and oxidizer which are mixed, pressurized, and directed to a combustion chamber by means of turbopumps. Roller bearings are generally used in these turbopumps, but because of bearing demands hydrostatic bearings were proposed. The use of such bearings is quite feasible because during flight hydrostatic lubrication can reduce roller bearing wear. A disadvantage of such proposals is that during startup, acceleration, and shutdown high pressure fluids are not available for hydrostatic bearings. The fluid lubrication film is not always present in bearings of turbopumps. During these periods a second bearing is required to carry the load. This requirement suggests the use of hybrid bearings in rocket engine turbopumps. Such duplex bearings were provided, but when their inner races are keyed to the shaft or journal two of them are required. And such duplex bearings do not wear evenly. A hybrid hydrostatic-rolling element bearing was provided wherein the rolling element bearing is locked on the stationary housing rather than on the rotating journal.

  5. Hydrostatic drive arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Hoashi, K.; Morita, K.; Matsuda, K.

    1986-04-22

    A hydrostatic drive arrangement is described for a vehicle which consists of: a pair of variable speed hydrostatic transmissions each having a hydraulic pump, a hydraulic motor and a closed loop hydraulic circuit interconnecting the pump and the motor for communicating fluid therebetween; synchronizing valve means interconnected between the hydraulic circuits of the transmissions normally permitting interflow of fluid through first passage means between the hydraulic circuits for synchronizing the output speeds of the transmissions when the fluid pressure in the hydraulic circuits is below a predetermined value, the synchronizing valve means being responsive to fluid pressures in the hydraulic circuits to restrict interflow therebetween through restricted second passage means when the fluid pressure in one of the hydraulic circuits exceeds the predetermined value; a hydraulic charge pump connected with the closed loop hydraulic circuits for replenishing fluid lost from the hydraulic circuits; and selector valve means disposed between the hydraulic charge pump and the synchronizing valve means for selectively communicating the synchronizing valve means normally blocking communication between the synchronizing valve means and the hydraulic charge pump and establishing communication between the synchronizing valve means and the drain thereby permitting interflow of fluid between the hydraulic circuits, and means responsive to a steering operation of the vehicle to establish communication between the synchronizing valve means and the hydraulic charge pump thereby blocking interflow of fluid between the hydraulic circuits.

  6. Hydrostatic continuously variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, T.; Saito, M.; Matsuto, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Sakakibara, K.; Yakigaya, N.; Nakamura, K.

    1989-05-09

    A hydrostatic continuously variable transmission is described, comprising: a swashplate type hydraulic pump having a pump swashplate and annularly arranged pump plungers whose suction and discharge strokes are provided by the pump swashplate; a swashplate type hydraulic motor having a motor swashplate and annularly arranged motor plungers whose expansion and shrinkage strokes are provided by the motor swashplate; and a hydraulic closed circuit formed between the hydraulic pump and the hydraulic motor. The transmission has at least one of a relationship that a middle point of a discharge region of the hydraulic pump is angularly delayed at a given angle in a direction of rotation of the hydraulic pump relative to a tilting axis of the pump swashplate and a relationship that a middle point of an expansion region of the hydraulic motor is angularly advanced at a given angle in a direction of rotation of the hydraulic motor relative to a tilting axis of the motor swashplate, wherein the transmission has at least one of a relationship that a suction region of the hydraulic pump is set at an angle larger than that of the discharge region thereof and a relationship that a shrinkage region of the hydraulic motor is set at an angle larger than that of the expansion region of the motor.

  7. Orbit transfer vehicle engine technology program. Task B-6 high speed turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Bearing types were evaluated for use on the Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) high pressure fuel pump. The high speed, high load, and long bearing life requirements dictated selection of hydrostatic bearings as the logical candidate for this engine. Design and fabrication of a bearing tester to evaluate these cryogenic hydrostatic bearings was then conducted. Detailed analysis, evaluation of bearing materials, and design of the hydrostatic bearings were completed resulting in fabrication of Carbon P5N and Kentanium hydrostatic bearings. Rotordynamic analyses determined the exact bearing geometry chosen. Instrumentation was evaluated and data acquisition methods were determined for monitoring shaft motion up to speeds in excess of 200,000 RPM in a cryogenic atmosphere. Fabrication of all hardware was completed, but assembly and testing was conducted outside of this contract.

  8. Performance of gas-lubricated cruciform-mounted tilting-pad journal bearings and a damped flexibly mounted spiral-groove thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    A test program was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of gas-lubricated cruciform-mounted tilting-pad journal bearings and a damped spiral-groove thrust bearing designed for the Brayton cycle rotating unit (BRU). Hydrostatic, hybrid (simultaneously hydrostatic and hydrodynamic), and hydrodynamic tests were conducted in argon gas at ambient pressure and temperature ranges representative of operation to the 10.5 kWe BRU power-generating level. Performance of the gas lubricated bearings is presented including hydrostatic gas flow rates, bearing clearances, bearing temperatures, and transient performance.

  9. The diversity of hydrostatic skeletons.

    PubMed

    Kier, William M

    2012-04-15

    A remarkably diverse group of organisms rely on a hydrostatic skeleton for support, movement, muscular antagonism and the amplification of the force and displacement of muscle contraction. In hydrostatic skeletons, force is transmitted not through rigid skeletal elements but instead by internal pressure. Functioning of these systems depends on the fact that they are essentially constant in volume as they consist of relatively incompressible fluids and tissue. Contraction of muscle and the resulting decrease in one of the dimensions thus results in an increase in another dimension. By actively (with muscle) or passively (with connective tissue) controlling the various dimensions, a wide array of deformations, movements and changes in stiffness can be created. An amazing range of animals and animal structures rely on this form of skeletal support, including anemones and other polyps, the extremely diverse wormlike invertebrates, the tube feet of echinoderms, mammalian and turtle penises, the feet of burrowing bivalves and snails, and the legs of spiders. In addition, there are structures such as the arms and tentacles of cephalopods, the tongue of mammals and the trunk of the elephant that also rely on hydrostatic skeletal support but lack the fluid-filled cavities that characterize this skeletal type. Although we normally consider arthropods to rely on a rigid exoskeleton, a hydrostatic skeleton provides skeletal support immediately following molting and also during the larval stage for many insects. Thus, the majority of animals on earth rely on hydrostatic skeletons. PMID:22442361

  10. SSME Long-life Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, M. F.; Murphy, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings for LH2 and LO2 service in turbopumps were studied as a means of improving speed and life capabilities. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed with emphasis on achieving maximum stiffness and damping. Parallel load bearings were tested at steady-state and transient conditions with LH2 (externally fed) and LN2 (internally fed). The hydrostatic elements were tested with Freon 113 for empirical determination of dynamic characteristics. Tests using an eccentric journal for loading showed the externally and internally fed hydrostatic bearings to have significant separated coefficients of direct stiffness and damping. For the internally fed bearing, the strongly speed-dependent cross-coupling stiffness arising from fluid swirl, along with significant cross-coupling damping, resulted in low net effective stiffness and damping. The test method used can produce separated coefficients with a sufficiently elliptic journal orbit; otherwise, only net effective coefficients combining direct and cross-coupling terms can be determined. Testing with nonsynchronous excitation is recommended to avoid this restriction. Investigation of hard materials, including ceramics, is recommended as a means of eliminating the need for the rolling bearing for startup and shutdown support. The testing was performed in 1984 (LH2), 1985 (LN2) and 1985-86 (Freon).

  11. High-temperature ''hydrostatic'' extrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. G.; Rice, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    Quasi-fluids permit hydrostatic extrusion of solid materials. The use of sodium chloride, calcium fluoride, or glasses as quasi-fluids reduces handling, corrosion, and sealing problems, these materials successfully extrude steel, molybdenum, ceramics, calcium carbonate, and calcium oxide. This technique also permits fluid-to-fluid extrusion.

  12. 46 CFR 64.83 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 64.83 Section 64.83 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Periodic Inspections and Tests of MPTs § 64.83 Hydrostatic test. (a) The hydrostatic test..., removing tank insulation; (5) Filling the tank with water and pressurizing to the test pressure...

  13. 46 CFR 64.83 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 64.83 Section 64.83 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Periodic Inspections and Tests of MPTs § 64.83 Hydrostatic test. (a) The hydrostatic test..., removing tank insulation; (5) Filling the tank with water and pressurizing to the test pressure...

  14. Worm Gear With Hydrostatic Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaiko, Lev I.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed worm-gear transmission, oil pumped at high pressure through meshes between teeth of gear and worm coil. Pressure in oil separates meshing surfaces slightly, and oil reduces friction between surfaces. Conceived for use in drive train between gas-turbine engine and rotor of helicopter. Useful in other applications in which weight critical. Test apparatus simulates and measures some loading conditions of proposed worm gear with hydrostatic engagement.

  15. ANSYS Modeling of Hydrostatic Stress Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic pressure has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Plasticity textbooks, from the earliest to the most modem, infer that there is no hydrostatic effect on the yielding of metals, and even modem finite element programs direct the user to assume the same. The object of this study is to use the von Mises and Drucker-Prager failure theory constitutive models in the finite element program ANSYS to see how well they model conditions of varying hydrostatic pressure. Data is presented for notched round bar (NRB) and "L" shaped tensile specimens. Similar results from finite element models in ABAQUS are shown for comparison. It is shown that when dealing with geometries having a high hydrostatic stress influence, constitutive models that have a functional dependence on hydrostatic stress are more accurate in predicting material behavior than those that are independent of hydrostatic stress.

  16. PELLISSIER H5 HYDROSTATIC LEVEL

    SciTech Connect

    Imfeld, Hans L.

    2003-05-01

    Conventional spirit leveling using double scale invar rods has been in use at SLAC for some time as the standard method of obtaining very precise height difference information. Typical accuracy of {+-} 100 {micro}m and better can routinely be achieved. Procedures and software have evolved to the point where the method is relatively fast and reliable. However, recent projects such as the Final Focus Test Beam have pushed the requested vertical positioning tolerances for alignment of quadrupoles to the 30 {mu}m level. It is apparent that conventional spirit leveling cannot achieve this level of accuracy. To meet the challenge, the alignment group contracted with Pellissier, Inc. to develop a portable hydrostatic leveling system. The H5 grew out of this development effort and is expected to provide the needed accuracy and ease of use required for such vertical positioning projects. The H5 hydrostatic level is a portable instrument that under ideal operating conditions will provide elevation differences with an accuracy of +/- 5 {mu}m over double leg closed loop surveys. The H5 incorporates several features that eliminate problems common with hydrostatic leveling, primarily errors due to thermal gradients along the fluid tube. It utilizes self-checking software and automatic water level detection to reduce observational errors. Design features also have made the instrument reasonably quick and easy to operate when used on a flat surface. The instrument can be adapted for use in a wide variety of environments by using support fixtures and brackets. The H5 is robust and operators require little training to become proficient in its use. It has been successfully employed on several projects including the FFTB project at SLAC, as well as the Green Bank Telescope project for the NRAO and the SSC project in Texas.

  17. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware, supports sustainability.

  18. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  19. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  20. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  1. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware, supports sustainability.

  2. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  3. Bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Kapich, Davorin D. (Carlsbad, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  4. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  5. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-12-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  6. Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing Testing and Conical Magnetic Bearing Development for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    During the six month tenure of the grant, activities included continued research of hydrostatic bearings as a viable backup-bearing solution for a magnetically levitated shaft system in extreme temperature environments (1000 F), developmental upgrades of the fault-tolerant magnetic bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and assisting in the development of a conical magnetic bearing for extreme temperature environments, particularly turbomachinery. It leveraged work from the ongoing Smart Efficient Components (SEC) and the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) program at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effort was useful in providing technology for more efficient and powerful gas turbine engines.

  7. Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Metal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1940s, the theory of plasticity has assumed that hydrostatic stress does not affect the yield or postyield behavior of metals. This assumption is based on the early work of Bridgman. Bridgman found that hydrostatic pressure (compressive stress) does not affect yield behavior until a substantial amount of pressure (greater than 100 ksi) is present. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hydrostatic tension on yield behavior. Two different specimen geometries were examined: an equal-arm bend specimen and a double edge notch specimen. The presence of a notch is sufficient to develop high enough hydrostatic tensile stresses to affect yield. The von Mises yield function, which does not have a hydrostatic component, and the Drucker-Prager yield function, which includes a hydrostatic component, were used in finite element analyses of the two specimen geometries. The analyses were compared to test data from IN 100 specimens. For both geometries, the analyses using the Drucker-Prager yield function more closely simulated the test data. The von Mises yield function lead to 5-10% overprediction of the force-displacement or force-strain response of the test specimens.

  8. Bear Scratch

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    When looking for a place to set up a trapping location, scientists look for existing bear sign such as scratches on trees and bear scat. Sometimes traps are set in areas that have no obvious bear sign to determine if indeed bears are present....

  9. Dynamic Cores in Hydrostatic Disguise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Klessen, Ralf S.; Vzquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2003-07-01

    We discuss the column density profiles of ``cores'' in three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) numerical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds. The SPH scheme allows us to perform a high spatial resolution analysis of the density maxima (cores) at scales between ~0.003 and 0.3 pc. We analyze simulations in three different physical conditions: large-scale driving (LSD), small-scale driving (SSD), and random Gaussian initial conditions without driving (GC), each one at two different time steps: just before self-gravity is turned on (t0) and when gravity has been operating such that 5% of the total mass in the box has been accreted into cores (t1). For this data set, we perform Bonnor-Ebert fits to the column density profiles of cores found by a clump-finding algorithm. We find that, for the particular fitting procedure we use, 65% of the cores can be matched to Bonnor-Ebert (BE) profiles, and of these, 47% correspond to stable equilibrium configurations with ?max<6.5, even though the cores analyzed in the simulations are not in equilibrium but instead are dynamically evolving. The temperatures obtained with the fitting procedure vary between 5 and 60 K (in spite of the simulations being isothermal, with T=11.3 K), with the peak of the distribution being at T=11 K and most clumps having fitted temperatures between 5 and 30 K. Central densities obtained with the BE fit tend to be smaller than the actual central densities of the cores. We also find that for the LSD and GC cases, there are more BE-like cores at t0 than at t1 with ?max<=20, while in the case of SSD, there are more such cores at t1 than at t0. We interpret this as a consequence of the stronger turbulence present in the cores of run SSD, which prevents good BE fits in the absence of gravity, and delays collapse in its presence. Finally, in some cases we find substantial superposition effects when we analyze the projection of the density structures, even though the scales over which we project are small (<~0.18 pc). As a consequence, different projections of the same core may give very different values of the BE fits. Finally, we briefly discuss recent results claiming that Bok globule B68 is in hydrostatic equilibrium, stressing that they imply that this core is unstable by a wide margin. We conclude that fitting BE profiles to observed cores is not an unambiguous test of hydrostatic equilibrium and that fit-estimated parameters such as mass, central density, density contrast, temperature, or radial profile of the BE sphere may differ significantly from the actual values in the cores.

  10. Demagnetization of terrestrial and extraterrestrial rocks under hydrostatic pressure up to 1.2 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, Natalia S.; Gattacceca, Jrme; Rochette, Pierre; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Trukhin, Vladimir I.

    2010-03-01

    We carried out hydrostatic pressure demagnetization experiments up to 1.24 GPa on samples of terrestrial and extraterrestrial rocks and minerals of different lithologies as well as on synthetic samples. The magnetic remanence of samples was measured directly under pressure using a non-magnetic high-pressure cell of piston-cylinder type that was inserted into a high sensitivity SQUID magnetometer. In order to bring light on the pressure demagnetization effect, we investigated 50 samples with different magnetic mineralogies, remanent coercivities ( Bcr) and hysteresis parameters. The samples consisted of pyrrhotite-, magnetite- and titanomagnetite-bearing Martian meteorites, taenite-, tetrataenite- and kamacite-bearing ordinary chondrites and pyrrhotite-bearing Rumuruti chondrite; magnetite- and titanomagnetite-bearing basalts, andesites, ignimbrites, obsidians and granites; a variety of pyrrhotite- and hematite-bearing rocks and minerals (jasper, schist, rhyolite, radiolarite); samples of goethite and greigite as well as synthetic samples of dispersed powders of magnetite, hematite, pyrrhotite and native iron set into epoxy resin. Under hydrostatic pressure of 1.24 GPa, applied in a low magnetic field (<5 ?T), the samples lost up to 84% of their initial saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) without any changes in their intrinsic magnetic properties. We found that the efficiency of the pressure demagnetization is not exclusively controlled by the magnetic hardness of the samples ( Bcr), but that it is strongly dependent on their magnetic mineralogy. For a given magnetic mineralogy the resistance to hydrostatic pressure is roughly proportional to ln( Bcr). It was shown that there is no simple equivalence between pressure demagnetization and alternating field demagnetization effects. The pressure demagnetization was shown to be time-independent but repeated application of the same pressure level resulted in further demagnetization.

  11. A computationally efficient finite volume hydrostatic/non-hydrostatic hybrid model with a vertical Lagrangian coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Andronova, N. G.; Penner, J. E.; Stout, Q. F.; Vandenberg, D.

    2011-12-01

    Resolving interactions between clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere, which have both direct and indirect effects on climate change, requires accurate and stable numerical discretization of the equations for the non-hydrostatic atmosphere. On the other hand, the use of the hydrostatic approximation allows one to achieve high computational efficiency in simulations of large scale atmospheric motions. Here we demonstrate a computational approach for the representation of small scale motions within a GCM by utilizing adaptive grid techniques that work to couple hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic flows for future climate model predictions. We have developed consistent equations for treating the change in physics associated with smooth solutions across the interface between hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic regions. We demonstrate the use of our grid adaptation technique (the ABLCarT library) over a portion of the global grid to test its capability to treat efficiently and accurately horizontal and vertical advection. We use a test suite to examine the behavior of the adaptive coupled hydrostatic-nonhydrostatic model using 2D and 3D configurations.

  12. Gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission.

  13. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin Zhang, Xiangyi; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ?1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  14. A Load Cell for Hydrostatic Weighing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahey, Thomas D.; Schroeder, Richard

    1978-01-01

    Although a load cell is more expensive than the autopsy scale for hydrostatic weighing, it is more accurate, easier to read, has no moving parts, is less susceptible to rust, and is less likely to be damaged by large subjects exceeding its capacity. (Author)

  15. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All new installations of thermal fluid heaters must be given a hydrostatic test of 11/2 times the maximum allowable... all accessible parts under pressure. The thermal fluid may be used as the hydrostatic test medium....

  16. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hose 154.562 Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. Each cargo hose must pass a hydrostatic pressure test at ambient temperature of at least one and a half times its specified maximum working pressure but not more... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section...

  17. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vapor pressure of the filling material and the partial pressure of the air or other inert gas minus 100... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test...

  18. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vapor pressure of the filling material and the partial pressure of the air or other inert gas minus 100... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test...

  19. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vapor pressure of the filling material and the partial pressure of the air or other inert gas minus 100... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General. The hydrostatic pressure test...

  20. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All new installations of thermal fluid heaters must be given a hydrostatic test of 11/2 times the maximum allowable... condition of the heater warrants such a test. Where hydrostatic tests are required, an inspection is made...

  1. Bearing system

    SciTech Connect

    Kapich, D.D.

    1987-02-10

    A bearing system is described for supporting a rotating shaft on a housing, the bearing system comprising: a pair of primary bearings and a pair of backup bearings, each backup bearing comprising an outer race supported on the housing, an inner race on the shaft, rolling elements disposed between the races, and a retainer ring for constraining the rolling elements; the primary bearing being operative to support the shaft during normal operation in a first predetermined position such that in each of the backup bearings the rolling elements contact only one of the races; the backup bearings being configured so that upon axial displacement of the shaft in a predetermined direction form the first predetermined position to a second predetermined position the rolling elements in each bearing contact both races and the shaft is supported by the backup bearings; and shaft displacement means for selectively applying axial force to the shaft to displaced the shaft from the first predetermined position to the second predetermined position while the shaft rotates relative to the housing, the shaft displacement means including a chamber defined by surfaces on the housing and the shaft and means for introducing high pressure fluid into the chamber.

  2. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  3. Thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gas lubricated thrust bearing is described which employs relatively rigid inwardly cantilevered spokes carrying a relatively resilient annular member or annulus. This annulus acts as a beam on which are mounted bearing pads. The resilience of the beam mount causes the pads to accept the load and, with proper design, responds to a rotating thrust-transmitting collar by creating a gas film between the pads and the thrust collar. The bearing may be arranged for load equalization thereby avoiding the necessity of gimbal mounts or the like for the bearing. It may also be arranged to respond to rotation in one or both directions.

  4. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; DeMaster

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  5. A Multipurpose Device for Some Hydrostatics Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    A number of well-known hydrostatics problems dealing with Archimedes' principle concern a loaded boat floating in a pool. Examples of this sort of problem include: 1. (a) If a stone is thrown overboard from a boat floating in a pool, does the water level in the pool rise, fall, or remain unchanged? (b) If a hole is made in the bottom of the boat

  6. A Multipurpose Device for Some Hydrostatics Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    A number of well-known hydrostatics problems dealing with Archimedes' principle concern a loaded boat floating in a pool. Examples of this sort of problem include: 1. (a) If a stone is thrown overboard from a boat floating in a pool, does the water level in the pool rise, fall, or remain unchanged? (b) If a hole is made in the bottom of the boat…

  7. Bearing monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Roger; Stevenson, Mark W.; Kwan, Chi-Man; Haynes, Leonard S.

    2001-07-01

    At Ford Motor Company, thrust bearing in drill motors is often damaged by metal chips. Since the vibration frequency is several Hz only, it is very difficult to use accelerometers to pick up the vibration signals. Under the support of Ford and NASA, we propose to use a piezo film as a sensor to pick up the slow vibrations of the bearing. Then a neural net based fault detection algorithm is applied to differentiate normal bearing from bad bearing. The first step involves a Fast Fourier Transform which essentially extracts the significant frequency components in the sensor. Then Principal Component Analysis is used to further reduce the dimension of the frequency components by extracting the principal features inside the frequency components. The features can then be used to indicate the status of bearing. Experimental results are very encouraging.

  8. Hydrostatic Adjustment in Vertically Stratified Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Dean G.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrostatic adjustment due to diabatic heat in two nonisothermal atmospheres is examined. In the first case the temperature stratification is continuous; in the second case the atmosphere is composed of a warm, isothermal troposphere and a colder, isothermal semi-infinitely deep stratosphere.In both cases hydrostatic adjustment, to a good approximation, follows the pattern found in the Lamb problem (semi-infinitely deep. isothermal atmosphere): Initially we have acoustic waves with the kinetic energy increasing or decreasing at the expense of available elastic energy. After this initial period the acoustic waves evolve into acoustic-gravity waves with the kinetic, available potential and available elastic energies interacting with each other. Relaxation to hydrostatic balance occurs within a few oscillations. Stratification in an atmosphere with a continuous temperature profile affects primarily the shape and amplitude of the disturbances. In the two-layer atmosphere, a certain amount of energy is trapped in the tropospheric waveguide as disturbances reflect off the tropopause and back into the troposphere. With each internal reflection a portion of this trapped energy escapes and radiates to infinity.

  9. Compression of ?-cristobalite under different hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernok, Ana; Marquardt, Katharina; Bykova, Elena; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    The response of ?-cristobalite to high-pressure has been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies for more than two decades. The results indicated prolific polymorphism under high pressures, yet no consensus has emerged on what is the sequence of these pressure-induced transformations. In particular, the structure of the high-pressure polymorph that appears above ~10 GPa (hereafter cristobalite X-I), which is believed to be a direct link between the low-pressure (silicon in SiO4 tetrahedra) and the high-pressure (SiO6 octahedra) forms of silica remained elusive. This study examined the response of ?-cristobalite when compressed at different levels of hydrostaticity, with the special focus on formation and stability of cristobalite X-I. The structural behavior of cristobalite under pressure was investigated up to ~80 GPa and at ambient temperature. We investigated behavior of single crystals and powders, in either (quasy)-hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic environment. In situ high pressure transformation path and structural behavior was studied by means of Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The samples recovered after pressure release were additionally investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Low- or ?-cristobalite responds differently to high pressure depending on the degree of the hydrostaticity. The highest attainable hydrostaticity preserves the initial structure of cristobalite at least up to ~15 GPa. When the crystal experiences even slight stresses during an experiment, transformation sequence leads to cristobalite X-I - a monoclinic polymorph with silicon in octahedral coordination. This polymorph belongs to the family of the high-pressure silica phases that are comprised of distorted close-packed array of oxygen ions in which silicon atoms fully or partially occupy octahedral sites. The reflections collected on a single crystal at ~11 GPa can be indexed by a monoclinic unit cell a=6.658(9) , b=4.1077(6) , c=6.8947(11) , ?=98.31(4) , V=186.6(3) 3 (Z=8 and ?=4.28 g/cm3). The structure was solved in P 21/n space group and refined at this pressure with the final R1 indices of 9% for 209 unique reflections. The increase in coordination number of silicon from cristobalite to its six-fold coordinated polymorph does not require any thermal activation; however the high-pressure polymorph cannot be preserved at ambient conditions. No other silica polymorph was found to transform to an octahedra-based structure on cold compression at such low pressures (~11 GPa). This structure could be accommodated in (quasi)-hydrostatic environment where temperature is not sufficient to form stishovite. In non-hydrostatic conditions in the presence of uniaxial stress, cristobalite eventually transforms to seifertite-like SiO2, which is quenchable. Presence of seifertite might not always require the minimum shock pressures equal to that of thermodynamic equilibrium (~80 GPa) as it can be clearly formed at much lower pressures in an environment of uniaxial compression (e.g. dynamic event).

  10. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  11. Foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  12. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  13. The performance and application of high speed long life LH2 hybrid bearings for reusable rocket engine turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented for two different experimental programs which were conducted to investigate the characteristics of a hybrid (hydrostatic/ball) bearing operating in liquid hydrogen. The same bearing design was used in both programs. Analytical predictions were made of the bearing characteristics and are compared with the experimental results when possible. The first program used a bearing tester to determine the steady state, transient, and cyclic life characteristics of the bearing over a wide range of operating conditions. The second program demonstrated the feasibility of applying hybrid bearings to an actual high speed turbopump by retrofitting and then testing an existing liquid hydrogen turbopump with the bearings.

  14. Parameter identification of a rotor supported in a pressurized bearing lubricated with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, John W.; Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    A rig for testing an externally pressurized (hydrostatic), water-lubricated bearing was developed. Applying a nonsynchronous sweep frequency, rotating perturbation force with a constant amplitude as an input, rotor vibration response data was acquired in Bode and Dynamic Stiffness formats. Using this data, the parameters of the rotor/bearing system were identified. The rotor/bearing model was represented by the generalized (modal) parameters of the first lateral mode, with the rotational character of the fluid force taken into account.

  15. Scaling of caterpillar body properties and its biomechanical implications for the use of a hydrostatic skeleton.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huai-Ti; Slate, Daniel J; Paetsch, Christopher R; Dorfmann, A Luis; Trimmer, Barry A

    2011-04-01

    Caterpillars can increase their body mass 10,000-fold in 2 weeks. It is therefore remarkable that most caterpillars appear to maintain the same locomotion kinematics throughout their entire larval stage. This study examined how the body properties of a caterpillar might change to accommodate such dramatic changes in body load. Using Manduca sexta as a model system, we measured changes in body volume, tissue density and baseline body pressure, and the dimensions of load-bearing tissues (the cuticle and muscles) over a body mass range from milligrams to several grams. All Manduca biometrics relevant to the hydrostatic skeleton scaled allometrically but close to the isometric predictions. Body density and pressure were almost constant. We next investigated the effects of scaling on the bending stiffness of the caterpillar hydrostatic skeleton. The anisotropic non-linear mechanical response of Manduca muscles and soft cuticle has previously been quantified and modeled with constitutive equations. Using biometric data and these material laws, we constructed finite element models to simulate a hydrostatic skeleton under different conditions. The results show that increasing the internal pressure leads to a non-linear increase in bending stiffness. Increasing the body size results in a decrease in the normalized bending stiffness. Muscle activation can double this stiffness in the physiological pressure range, but thickening the cuticle or increasing the muscle area reduces the structural stiffness. These non-linear effects may dictate the effectiveness of a hydrostatic skeleton at different sizes. Given the shared anatomy and size variation in Lepidoptera larvae, these mechanical scaling constraints may implicate the diverse locomotion strategies in different species. PMID:21389205

  16. Hydrostatic compression in glycerinated rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W; Fortune, N S; Geeves, M A

    1990-01-01

    Glycerinated muscle fibers isolated from rabbit psoas muscle, and a number of other nonmuscle elastic fibers including glass, rubber, and collagen, were exposed to hydrostatic pressures of up to 10 MPa (100 Atm) to determine the pressure sensitivity of their isometric tension. The isometric tension of muscle fibers in the relaxed state (passive tension) was insensitive to increased pressure, whereas the muscle fiber tension in rigor state increased linearly with pressure. The tension of all other fiber types (except rubber) also increased with pressure; the rubber tension was pressure insensitive. The pressure sensitivity of rigor tension was 2.3 kN/m2/MPa and, in comparison with force/extension relation determined at atmospheric pressure, the hydrostatic compression in rigor muscle fibers was estimated to be 0.03% Lo/MPa. As reported previously, the active muscle fiber tension is depressed by increased pressure. The possible underlying basis of the different pressure-dependent tension behavior in relaxed, rigor, and active muscle is discussed. PMID:2275960

  17. Acoustic cymbal performance under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Kirk E.; Huang, Dehua; Howarth, Thomas R.

    2001-05-01

    Continual awareness about the need to develop light-weight, low-volume, broadband, underwater acoustic projector and receive arrays that perform consistently in diverse environments is evident in recent Navy acoustic system initiatives. Acoustic cymbals, so named for resemblance to the percussive musical instruments, are miniature flextensional transducers that may perhaps meet the performance criteria for consistent performance under hydrostatic pressure after modifications in the design. These acoustic cymbals consist of a piezoceramic disk (or ring) bonded to two opposing cymbal-shaped metal shells. Operating as mechanical transformers, the two metal shells convert the large generative force inherently within the disk's radial mode into increased volume displacement at the metal shell surface to obtain volume displacement that translates into usable source levels and/or sensitivities at sonar frequencies in a relatively broad band. The air-backed design for standard acoustic cymbal transducers presents a barrier to deepwater applications. A new acoustic cymbal design for high-pressure applications will be presented for the first time. This practical pressure compensation is designed to diminish the effects of hydrostatic pressure to maintain consistent acoustic cymbal performance. Transmit and receive performance data, determined at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's (NUWC) Acoustic Pressure Tank Facility (APTF), is presented.

  18. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  19. 46 CFR 131.585 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit must... springs of each spring-tensioned gripe used with a hydrostatic-release unit must be renewed when the...

  20. 46 CFR 131.585 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit must... springs of each spring-tensioned gripe used with a hydrostatic-release unit must be renewed when the...

  1. 46 CFR 131.585 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit must... springs of each spring-tensioned gripe used with a hydrostatic-release unit must be renewed when the...

  2. 46 CFR 131.585 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit must... springs of each spring-tensioned gripe used with a hydrostatic-release unit must be renewed when the...

  3. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  4. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  5. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  6. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  7. 49 CFR 230.36 - Hydrostatic testing of boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic testing of boilers. 230.36 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.36 Hydrostatic testing of boilers. (a) Time of test....

  8. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 61.30-10 Section 61.30-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All...

  9. 46 CFR 61.30-10 - Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic test. 61.30-10 Section 61.30-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-10 Hydrostatic test. All...

  10. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vapor pressure of the filling material and the partial pressure of the air or other inert gas minus 100... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605... Testing of Non-bulk Packagings and Packages § 178.605 Hydrostatic pressure test. (a) General....

  11. 49 CFR 178.814 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.814 Section 178.814 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Testing of IBCs § 178.814 Hydrostatic...

  12. Black Bear

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Oklahoma Unit has been studying population expansion and genetics of black bear in southeastern Oklahoma since 2001. Live capture and hair snares have been used to collect samples; from left to right: field technician, JD Davis and M.S. candidates, Angie Brown and Meredith Magnuson....

  13. Computer simulations of 3C-SiC under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stresses.

    PubMed

    Guedda, H Z; Ouahrani, T; Morales-García, A; Franco, R; Salvadó, M A; Pertierra, P; Recio, J M

    2016-03-01

    The response of 3C-SiC to hydrostatic pressure and to several uni- and bi-axial stress conditions is thoroughly investigated using first principles calculations. A topological interpretation of the chemical bonding reveals that the so-called non-covalent interactions enhance only at high pressure while the nature of the covalent Si-C bonding network keeps essentially with the same pattern. The calculated low compressibility agrees well with experimental values and is in concordance with the high structural stability of this polymorph under hydrostatic pressure. Under uniaxial [001] stress, the c/a ratio shows a noticeable drop inducing a closure of the band gap and the emergence of a metallic state around 40 GPa. This behavior correlates with a plateau of the electron localization function exhibiting a roughly constant and non-negligible value surrounding CSi4 and SiC4 covalent bonded units. PMID:26922870

  14. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  15. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure on Carcinogenic Properties of Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Shinsaku; Kim, Young Hak; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. The inflammation increases the permeability of blood vessels and consequently elevates pressure in the interstitial tissues. However, there have been only a few reports on the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cultured cells, and the relationship between elevated hydrostatic pressure and cell properties related to malignant tumors is less well understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the cultured epithelial cells seeded on permeable filters. Surprisingly, hydrostatic pressure from basal to apical side induced epithelial stratification in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) I and Caco-2 cells, and cavities with microvilli and tight junctions around their surfaces were formed within the multi-layered epithelia. The hydrostatic pressure gradient also promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis, and increased transepithelial ion permeability. The inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) promoted epithelial stratification by the hydrostatic pressure whereas the activation of PKA led to suppressed epithelial stratification. These results indicate the role of the hydrostatic pressure gradient in the regulation of various epithelial cell functions. The findings in this study may provide clues for the development of a novel strategy for the treatment of the carcinoma. PMID:26716691

  16. Hydrostatic Stress Effect On the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of notched geometries. New experiments and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN 100) equal-arm bend and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions was performed. In all test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, which is independent of hydrostatic pressure, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains, the Drucker-Prager FEMs predicted loads that were 3% to 5% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEMs predicted strains that were 20% to 35% greater than the von Mises values. The Drucker-Prager yield function seems to more accurately predict the overall specimen response of geometries with significant internal hydrostatic stress influence.

  17. A hydrostatic pressure-cycle energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Hahn, Gregory; Morgan, Eric

    2015-04-01

    There have been a number of new applications for energy harvesting with the ever-decreasing power consumption of microelectronic devices. In this paper we explore a new area of marine animal energy harvesting for use in powering tags known as bio-loggers. These devices record data about the animal or its surroundings, but have always had limited deployment times due to battery depletion. Reduced solar irradiance below the water's surface provides the impetus to explore other energy harvesting concepts beyond solar power for use on marine animals. We review existing tag technologies in relation to this application, specifically relating to energy consumption. Additionally, we propose a new idea for energy harvesting, using hydrostatic pressure changes as a source for energy production. We present initial testing results of a bench-top model and show that the daily energy harvesting potential from this technology can meet or exceed that consumed by current marine bio-logging tags. The application of this concept in the arena of bio-logging technology could substantially increase bio-logger deployment lifetimes, allowing for longitudinal studies over the course of multiple breeding and/or migration cycles.

  18. Biomolecular electron transfer under high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tars, Mrt; Ellervee, Aleksandr; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Freiberg, Arvi

    1998-08-01

    The dependence of the photoinduced electron transfer rate on hydrostatic pressure up to 8 kbar was studied at 295 K in a bridged Zn-porphyrin donor and pyromellitimide acceptor supermolecule dissolved in toluene. A picosecond fluorescence emission kinetics of the donor, limited by the electron transfer rate, was detected by using synchroscan streak camera. The experiment was complemented with model calculations based on modified classical and semi-classical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. A peculiar asymmetric inverted parabola-like dependence of the electron transfer rate on pressure was observed. The dependence was successfully reproduced by nonadiabatic theory in the high-temperature limit assuming that the reorganisation free energy or both the reorganisation free energy and the reaction driving force (linearly) changed with pressure. The reaction driving force dependence on pressure alone failed to explain the asymmetry, suggesting that the electron transfer was accompanied with vibration frequency changes. It was inferred that the effective frequency in the product state should be larger than in the reactant state. The usage of the nonadiabatic theory is well justified due to the fulfilment of the inequalities V? kBT and V?< ?L> -1 ( V is the electronic coupling matrix element, < ?L> -1 is the solvent relaxation rate). The influence of the donor-acceptor distance reduction under compression on the electron transfer rate was found to be minor.

  19. A Multipurpose Device for Some Hydrostatics Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2008-10-01

    A number of well-known hydrostatics problems dealing with Archimedes' principle concern a loaded boat floating in a pool.1-4 Examples of this sort of problem include: 1. (a) If a stone is thrown overboard from a boat floating in a pool, does the water level in the pool rise, fall, or remain unchanged? (b) If a hole is made in the bottom of the boat so that the boat sinks, does the water level in the pool change? If so, when does the change begin (when water first begins to enter the boat or later)? 2. A boat floating in a pool carries a mass M that can either be placed on the raft or hung below the raft. (a) How does the water level in the pool compare in the two cases? (b) In which case does the raft float higher in the water? This paper describes a simple low-cost experimental setup that can be used to demonstrate the solutions to such problems in a concrete and dramatic way.

  20. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David; Rudeen, David Keith

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  1. Measurement of hydrostatic pressures during simulated post cementation.

    PubMed

    Morando, G; Leupold, R J; Meiers, J C

    1995-12-01

    Tooth sensitivity and fracture after cementation of posts for endodontically treated teeth have been a problem. This investigation developed an in vitro method of measuring intraradicular hydrostatic pressures created during simulated post cementation. The testing apparatus consisted of a pressure transducer and brush recorder connected to precision milled post spaces in a Plexiglas block. Cast post and cores were fabricated and cemented with three different luting agents: resinous cement, glass ionomer cement, and zinc phosphate cement. Mean hydrostatic pressures (psi) recorded during post cementation were zinc phosphate cement, 22.67; resinous cement, 19.77; and glass ionomer cement, 17.66. Zinc phosphate cement created substantially greater hydrostatic pressures than either the resinous or glass ionomer cements. This in vitro system was capable of discriminating intraradicular hydrostatic pressures among different classes of luting agents. PMID:8778381

  2. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the conformation of plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Kornblatt, J A; Kornblatt, M J; Clery, C; Balny, C

    1999-10-01

    Plasminogen undergoes a large conformational change when it binds 6-aminohexanoate. Using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and native PAGE, we show that hydrostatic pressure brings about the same conformational change. The volume change for this conformational change is -33 mL.mol-1. Binding of ligand and hydrostatic pressure both cause the protein to open up to expose surfaces that had previously been buried in the interior. PMID:10491165

  3. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2? is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2? expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2? in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2?, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2?, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-?B were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2? gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-?B expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2? independent of NF-?B, because the level of HIF-2? gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-?B expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2?. PMID:25569085

  4. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2? is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2? expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2? in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2?, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2?, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-?B were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2? gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-?B expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2? independent of NF-?B, because the level of HIF-2? gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-?B expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2?. PMID:25569085

  5. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Flemig, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficiency of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficieny points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  6. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Fleming, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  7. Hydrostatic and boundary lubrication of joints--nature of boundary lubricant.

    PubMed

    Moskalewski, Stanis?aw; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    A very low coefficient of friction in joints makes it difficult to define clearly the mechanism of cartilage lubrication. The present paper describes the two currently predominant and mutually complementary views aiming to elucidate this mechanism. The first mechanism, referred to as hydrostatic lubrication, involves interstitial fluid pressurization from the cartilage and its importance for the formation of a layer separating the weight-bearing surfaces. The second mechanism, called boundary lubrication, assumes the existence of a substance that binds to the cartilage surface, permanently separating the friction elements. It has not been clearly determined which substances occurring in the synovial fluid function as boundary lubricants. The authors briefly describe the physicochemical properties of lubricin, surface-active phospholipids and hyaluronic acid, including their role in boundary lubrication. PMID:22402631

  8. Hydrostatic Water Level Systems At Homestake DUSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetler, L. D.; Volk, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Two arrays of Fermilab-style hydrostatic water level sensors have been installed in the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD, the site of the new Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). Sensors were constructed at Fermilab from 8.5 cm diameter PVC pipe (housing) that was sealed on the ends and fit with a proximity sensor. The instrument have a height of 10 cm. Two ports in each sensor housing provide for connectivity, the upper port for air and the bottom port for water. Multiple instruments connected in series provide a precise water level and differences in readings between successive sensors provide for ground tilt to be resolved. Sensor resolution is 5 ?m per count and has a range of approximately 1.25 cm. Data output from each sensor is relayed to a Fermilab-constructed readout card that also has temperature/relative humidity and barometric pressure sensors connected. All data are relayed out of the mine by fiber optic cable and can be recorded by Ethernet at remote locations. The current arrays have been installed on the 2000-ft level (610 m) and consist of six instruments in each array. Three sensors were placed in a N-S oriented drift and three in an E-W oriented drift. Using this orientation, it is anticipated that tilt direction may be resolved in addition to overall tilt magnitude. To date the data show passage of earth tides and frequency analysis has revealed five components to this signal, three associated with the semi-diurnal (~12.4 hr) and two with the diurnal (~24.9 hr) tides. Currently, installation methods are being analyzed between concrete pillar and rib-mounting using the existing setup on the 2000-ft level. Using these results, two additional arrays of Fermilab instruments will be installed on the 4550-ft and 4850-ft levels (1387 and 1478 m, respectively). In addition to Fermilab instruments, several high resolution Budker tiltmeters (1 ?m resolution) will be installed in the mine workings in the near future, some correlated to Fermilab instruments (for comparative analysis) and others in independent arrays. All tiltmeter data will be analyzed with water reduction data (currently being collected from the #6 winze as the mine is dewatered) and data from rock stress/fracture experiments to document net ground settling due to dewatering, potential collapse of stope areas and renewed excavation activities.

  9. Hydrostatic Microextrusion of Steel and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Guido; Monti, Manuel; D'Angelo, Luciano

    2011-05-01

    The paper presents an experimental investigation based on hydrostatic micro extrusion of billets in low carbon steel and commercially pure copper, and the relevant results. The starting billets have a diameter of 0.3 mm and are 5 mm long; a high pressure generator consisting of a manually operated piston screw pump is used to pressurize the fluid up to 4200 bar, the screw pump is connected through a 3-way distribution block to the extrusion die and to a strain gauge high pressure sensor. The sensor has a full scale of 5000 bar and the extrusion pressure is acquired at a sampling rate of 2 kHz by means of an acquisition program written in the LabVIEW environment. Tests have been conducted at room temperature and a lubricant for wire drawing (Chemetall Gardolube DO 338) acts both as the pressurizing fluid and lubricant too. In addition, billets were graphite coated. Different fluid pressures and process durations have been adopted, resulting in different extrusion lengths. The required extrusion pressure is much higher than in non-micro forming operations (this effect is more evident for steel). On the cross section of the extruded parts, hardness and grain size distribution have been measured, the former through Vickers micro hardness (10 g load) tests. In the case of the extrusion of copper, the material behaves as in microdrawing process. In the case of the extrusion of steel, the hardness increases from the core to the surface as in the drawing process, but with lower values. The analysis evidenced the presence of the external layer, but its thickness is about 1/3 of the external layer in the drawn wire and the grains appear smaller than in the layer of the drawn wire. The extruding force required along the extruding direction is higher (22-24 N) than the drawing force along the same direction (12 N): being the material, the reduction ratio, the die sliding length the same in both cases, the higher extrusion force should be caused by a higher tangential friction force and/or a higher redundant work of deformation and/or a different material behaviour. Which is the real mechanism is not clear at present, but surface layer grains in extrusion are more deformed than in wire drawing. For this reason the deformation inhomogeneity increases in extrusion and the material under the highly deformed surface layer should be subjected to lower strains, strain hardening and finally resulting in lower hardness.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of hydrostatic internal gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Majda, Andrew J.; Khouider, Boualem

    2008-11-01

    Stratified hydrostatic fluids have linear internal gravity waves with different phase speeds and vertical profiles. Here a simplified set of partial differential equations (PDE) is derived to represent the nonlinear dynamics of waves with different vertical profiles. The equations are derived by projecting the full nonlinear equations onto the vertical modes of two gravity waves, and the resulting equations are thus referred to here as the two-mode shallow water equations (2MSWE). A key aspect of the nonlinearities of the 2MSWE is that they allow for interactions between a background wind shear and propagating waves. This is important in the tropical atmosphere where horizontally propagating gravity waves interact together with wind shear and have source terms due to convection. It is shown here that the 2MSWE have nonlinear internal bore solutions, and the behavior of the nonlinear waves is investigated for different background wind shears. When a background shear is included, there is an asymmetry between the east- and westward propagating waves. This could be an important effect for the large-scale organization of tropical convection, since the convection is often not isotropic but organized on large scales by waves. An idealized illustration of this asymmetry is given for a background shear from the westerly wind burst phase of the Madden Julian oscillation; the potential for organized convection is increased to the west of the existing convection by the propagating nonlinear gravity waves, which agrees qualitatively with actual observations. The ideas here should be useful for other physical applications as well. Moreover, the 2MSWE have several interesting mathematical properties: they are a system of nonconservative PDE with a conserved energy, they are conditionally hyperbolic, and they are neither genuinely nonlinear nor linearly degenerate over all of state space. Theory and numerics are developed to illustrate these features, and these features are important in designing the numerical scheme. A numerical method is designed with simplicity and minimal computational cost as the main design principles. Numerical tests demonstrate that no catastrophic effects are introduced when hyperbolicity is lost, and the scheme can represent propagating discontinuities without introducing spurious oscillations.

  11. Deep Levels in Semiconductors Under Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William Patrick

    Photoluminescence (PL) studies of deep and shallow donor levels in bulk Al_{0.3} Ga_{0.7}As and GaAs-Al_{0.3}Ga _{0.7}As(40A/80A) multiple quantum wells (MQW) under hydrostatic pressure are presented in the pressure range from 0 to 70kbar and temperatures from 15 to 125^circK. The samples used were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on a GaAs substrate, where the PL was excited using principally 5145A radiation from an Ar^+ laser. A new trap center is reported for the first time in both bulk Al_{0.3}Ga _{0.7}As and GaAs-Al _{0.3}Ga_{0.7 }As(40A/80A) MQW. This center forms an efficient electron trap, and produces a pressure induced hysteresis in the PL intensity. A large lattice relaxation model is implied by the strong pressure induced hysteresis. The energy of the center is higher than that of the X conduction band (CB) at ambient pressures, and it is neither the DX nor the shallow donor (SD) centers. The center has an unusually high emission barrier E_{ rm e} > 26meV, much larger than the DX or SD centers. A new characteristic of this center is observed at 15 and 40^circK in the MQW, where the BE^{rm X} is seen to channel to the FE^ {rm X} at ~ 40kbar, and recovery of the BE^{rm X} is not observed upon cycling the pressure. Pressure coefficients for levels associated with the Gamma and X-CB's from both samples are reported. Activation energies (E_{ rm a}) from Arrhenius plots of the temperature dependence of the PL from bulk Al_{0.3 }Ga_{0.7}As is discussed along with proposed scattering mechanisms and an energy level diagram for both shallow and deep donor states at selected pressures between 0 to 44kbar. Broadening of the E_sp{1{rm h} }{Gamma} in the MQW sample is observed below and above the Gamma -X crossover. Below crossover, broadening is attributed to many body effects related to heavily doped MQW's. Above the crossover, mixing of the Gamma and X states causes asymmetric and broadened Fano lineshapes.

  12. Hydrostatic Microextrusion of Steel and Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Guido; Monti, Manuel; D'Angelo, Luciano

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents an experimental investigation based on hydrostatic micro extrusion of billets in low carbon steel and commercially pure copper, and the relevant results. The starting billets have a diameter of 0.3 mm and are 5 mm long; a high pressure generator consisting of a manually operated piston screw pump is used to pressurize the fluid up to 4200 bar, the screw pump is connected through a 3-way distribution block to the extrusion die and to a strain gauge high pressure sensor. The sensor has a full scale of 5000 bar and the extrusion pressure is acquired at a sampling rate of 2 kHz by means of an acquisition program written in the LabVIEW environment. Tests have been conducted at room temperature and a lubricant for wire drawing (Chemetall Gardolube DO 338) acts both as the pressurizing fluid and lubricant too. In addition, billets were graphite coated. Different fluid pressures and process durations have been adopted, resulting in different extrusion lengths. The required extrusion pressure is much higher than in non-micro forming operations (this effect is more evident for steel). On the cross section of the extruded parts, hardness and grain size distribution have been measured, the former through Vickers micro hardness (10 g load) tests. In the case of the extrusion of copper, the material behaves as in microdrawing process. In the case of the extrusion of steel, the hardness increases from the core to the surface as in the drawing process, but with lower values. The analysis evidenced the presence of the external layer, but its thickness is about 1/3 of the external layer in the drawn wire and the grains appear smaller than in the layer of the drawn wire. The extruding force required along the extruding direction is higher (22-24 N) than the drawing force along the same direction (12 N): being the material, the reduction ratio, the die sliding length the same in both cases, the higher extrusion force should be caused by a higher tangential friction force and/or a higher redundant work of deformation and/or a different material behaviour. Which is the real mechanism is not clear at present, but surface layer grains in extrusion are more deformed than in wire drawing. For this reason the deformation inhomogeneity increases in extrusion and the material under the highly deformed surface layer should be subjected to lower strains, strain hardening and finally resulting in lower hardness.

  13. Non-hydrostatic modeling for free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Doo Yong

    Non-hydrostatic pressure, which deviates from the linear distribution of pressure, called hydrostatic assumption, becomes significant and critical for modeling free surface flows when the vertical motion of flows is no longer negligible such as a short wave motion, a wave or current motion over steep topographic variation, and a wave or current motion in a curved channel. Through an extensive review of literature, a non-hydrostatic free surface model based on a single-valued height function is proposed to efficiently apply in a large computational domain. The Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) for wave application or the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) for current implementation is employed to formulate mathematic model, and solved by a fractional step approach, often called projection method. A new top-layer boundary condition, which improves the efficiency and accuracy of the model, is suggested to close a kinematic boundary condition at the free surface. The proposed model, first, is implemented for wave motions: a relatively deep-water waves with steep bottom topography, a nonlinear motion of waves around surface-piercing cylinders, and a dispersive motion of waves in a curved channel. Numerical results show that the non-hydrostatic model can successfully resolve the effect of non-linearity as well as dispersion when a reflection, refraction, shoaling, and diffraction transform a train of wave. The modeling results support the existing non-linear diffraction theory in estimating wave run-up around surface-piercing structures, and show the role of dispersion in generating higher harmonics in a curved channel. By embedding a generalized length-scale turbulence model that provides flexibility in choosing an appropriate eddy viscosity for different turbulent flows, the proposed non-hydrostatic model is further extended into open-channel current applications. In a mildly and a strongly curved channel, the model shows its performance to resolve the secondary motion of Prandtl's first kind when the centrifugal force and vorticity plays an important role. Non-hydrostatic effect in a curved channel is also investigated numerically by comparing the non-hydrostatic model with a quasi-hydrostatic model. This numerical investigation reports that the non-hydrostatic pressure of effect is not only the function of curvature but also water depth.

  14. Hydrostatic pressure mimics gravitational pressure in characean cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, M. P.; Wayne, R.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure applied to one end of a horizontal Chara cell induces a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming, thus mimicking the effect of gravity. A positive hydrostatic pressure induces a more rapid streaming away from the applied pressure and a slower streaming toward the applied pressure. In contrast, a negative pressure induces a more rapid streaming toward and a slower streaming away from the applied pressure. Both the hydrostatic pressure-induced and gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming respond identically to cell ligation, UV microbeam irradiation, external Ca2+ concentrations, osmotic pressure, neutral red, TEA Cl-, and the Ca2+ channel blockers nifedipine and LaCl3. In addition, hydrostatic pressure applied to the bottom of a vertically-oriented cell can abolish and even reverse the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. These data indicate that both gravity and hydrostatic pressure act at the same point of the signal transduction chain leading to the induction of a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming and support the hypothesis that characean cells respond to gravity by sensing a gravity-induced pressure differential between the cell ends.

  15. Hydrostatic Stress Effect on the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has negligible effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of various geometries. Fatigue tests and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN100) equal-arm bend specimens and new monotonic tests and nonlinear finite element analyses of IN100 smooth tension, smooth compression, and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions were performed. A new FEA constitutive model was developed that incorporates a pressure-dependent yield function with combined multilinear kinematic and multilinear isotropic hardening using the ABAQUS user subroutine (UMAT) utility. In all monotonic tensile test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains for the DENT specimen, the Drucker-Prager FEM s predicted loads that were approximately 3% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEM s predicted strains that were up to 35% greater than the von Mises values. Both the Drucker-Prager model and the von Mises model performed equally-well in simulating the equal-arm bend fatigue test.

  16. Bearing Remover And Presser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Rex A.

    1995-01-01

    Document describes simple bearing-servicing tool consisting of only three parts capable of removing and replacing rotary bearing within race. Threaded drive operates between guide and pressure plate for dislodging bearing from race.

  17. Characterization and measurement of hybrid gas journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Tom Marquis

    This thesis concentrates on the study of hybrid gas journal bearings (bearings with externally pressurized mass addition). It differs from most work in that it goes back to "basics" to explore the hydrodynamic phenomena in the bearing gap. The thesis compares geometrically identical bearings with 2 configurations of external pressurization, porous liners where mass-addition compensation is varied by varying the liner's permeability, and bushings with 2 rows of 6 feedholes where the mass-addition compensation is varied by the feedhole diameter. Experimentally, prototype bearings with mass-addition compensation that spans 2 orders of magnitude with differing clearances are built and their aerostatic properties and mass addition characteristics are thoroughly tested. The fundamental equations for compressible, laminar, Poiseuille flow are used to suggest how the mass flow "compensation" should be mathematically modeled. This is back-checked against the experimental mass flow measurements and is used to determine a mass-addition compensation parameter (called Kmeas) for each prototype bushing. In so doing, the methodology of modeling and measuring the mass addition in a hybrid gas bearing is re-examined and an innovative, practical, and simple method is found that makes it possible to make an "apples-to-apples" comparison between different configurations of external pressurization. This mass addition model is used in conjunction with the Reynolds equation to perform theory-based numerical analysis of virtual hybrid gas journal bearings (CFD experiments). The first CFD experiments performed use virtual bearings modeled to be identical to the experimental prototypes and replicate the experimental work. The results are compared and the CFD model is validated. The ontological significance of appropriate dimensionless similitude parameters is re-examined and a, previously lacking, complete set of similitude factors is found for hybrid bearings. A new practical method is developed to study in unprecedented detail the aerostatic component of the hybrid bearings. It is used to definitively compare the feedhole bearings to the porous liner bearings. The hydrostatic bearing efficiency (HBE) is defined and it is determined that the maximum achievable hydrostatic bearing efficiency (MAHBE) is determined solely by the bearing's mass addition configuration. The MAHBE of the porous liner bearings is determined to be over 5 times that of the feedhole bearings. The method also presents a means to tune the Kmeas to the clearance to achieve the MAHBE as well as giving a complete mapping of the hitherto misunderstood complex shapes of aerostatic load versus radial deflection curves. This method also rediscovers the obscure phenomenon of static instability which is called in this thesis the "near surface effect" and appears to be the first work to present a practical method to predict the range of static instability and quantify its resultant stiffness fall-off. It determines that porous liner type bearings are not subject to the phenomenon which appears for feedhole type bearings when the clearance exceeds a critical value relative to its mass-addition compensation. The standing pressure waves of hydrostatic and hybrid bearings with the 2 configurations of external pressurization as well as a geometrically identical hydrodynamic bearing are studied in detail under the methodology of the "CFD microscope". This method is used to characterize and identify the development, growth, and movement of the pressure wave extrema with increased hydrodynamic action (either increasing speed or increasing eccentricity). This method is also used to determine the "cause" of the "near surface effect". A gedanken experiment is performed based on these results which indicates that a bearing with a "stronger aerostatic strength" component should be more stable than one with a low aerostatic strength component. Numerical instability "speed limits" are found that are also related to the hydrostatic strength of the bearing. The local conditions in the standing waves are characterized in terms of their local Mach number, Knudsen number, Reynolds number, and Taylor Number. It is concluded that low eccentricity bearing whirl can be attributed to the off load-line orientation of the bearing load force caused by the overlay of the hydrodynamic bearing standing wave onto the hydrostatic bearing wave of the hybrid bearing, whereas it is hypothesized that aperiodic and random self-excited vibration which occurs at high eccentricity, as reported in the literature, is probably due to shock waves, turbulence, near surface effect, and slip at local areas of the standing wave.

  18. Investigating Science through Bears (and Teddy Bears).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karlene Ray

    1997-01-01

    Presents cooperative classroom projects using science as the initial basis for the study of bears. These projects may also involve other areas of the curriculum such as mathematics, art, and music. "Black Bear" activities include following a park ranger to study our National Parks and researching and building a full-sized brown bear habitat. (AIM)

  19. Wheel drives for large telescopes: save the cost and keep the performance over hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Marvin F.

    2014-07-01

    The use of steel wheels on steel tracks has been around since steel was invented, and before that it was iron wheels on iron tracks. Not to be made obsolete by the passage of time, this approach for moving large objects is still valid, even optimal, but the detailed techniques for achieving high performance and long life have been much improved. The use of wheel-and-track designs has been very popular in radio astronomy for the largest of the large radio telescopes (RT), including such notables as the 305m Arecibo RT, the 100m telescopes at Effelsberg, Germany (at 3600 tonnes) and the Robert C. Byrd, Greenbank Telescope (GBT, 7600 tonnes) at Greenbank, West Virginia. Of course, the 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank is the grandfather of all large aperture radio telescopes that use wheel drives. Smaller sizes include NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescopes at 25m and others. Wheel drives have also been used on large radars of significance such as the 410 tonne Ground Based Radar-Prototype (GBR-P) and the 150 foot (45.7m) Altair Radar, and the 2130 tonne Sea Based X-Band Radar (SBX). There are also many examples of wheel driven communications antennas of 18 meters and larger. All of these instruments have one thing in common: they all use steel wheels that run in a circle on one or more flat, level, steel tracks. This paper covers issues related to designing for wheel driven systems. The intent is for managing motion to sub arc-second levels, and for this purpose it is primary for the designer to manage measurement and alignment errors, and to establish repeatability through dimensional control, structural and drive stiffness management, adjustability and error management. In a practical sense, there are very few, if any, fabricators that can machine structural and drive components to sufficiently small decimal places to matter. In fact, coming within 2-3 orders of magnitude of the precision needed is about the best that can be expected. Further, it is incumbent on the design team to develop the servo control system features, correction algorithms and structural features in concert with each other. Telescope designers are generally adept at many of these practices, so the scope of this paper is not that, but is limited to those items that pertain to a precision wheel driven system.

  20. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 1: Design, fabrication, and hydrostatic bearing testing. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmann, P.S.; Hayden, W.R.; Lorenc, S.A.; Sabiers, R.L.; Shimp, N.R.

    1990-12-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial testing of a rocket engine turbopump (TPA) for the delivery of high pressure liquid oxygen using hot oxygen for the turbine drive fluid are described. This TPA is basic to the dual expander engine which uses both oxygen and hydrogen as working fluids. Separate tasks addressed the key issue of materials for this TPA. All materials selections emphasized compatibility with hot oxygen. The OX TPA design uses a two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a single-stage axial turbine on a common shaft. The design includes ports for three shaft displacement/speed sensors, various temperature measurements, and accelerometers.

  1. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 1: Design, fabrication, and hydrostatic bearing testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmann, P. S.; Hayden, W. R.; Lorenc, S. A.; Sabiers, R. L.; Shimp, N. R.

    1990-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial testing of a rocket engine turbopump (TPA) for the delivery of high pressure liquid oxygen using hot oxygen for the turbine drive fluid are described. This TPA is basic to the dual expander engine which uses both oxygen and hydrogen as working fluids. Separate tasks addressed the key issue of materials for this TPA. All materials selections emphasized compatibility with hot oxygen. The OX TPA design uses a two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a single-stage axial turbine on a common shaft. The design includes ports for three shaft displacement/speed sensors, various temperature measurements, and accelerometers.

  2. Hydrostatic levelling systems: Measuring at the system limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Edi; Geiger, Alain; Ingensand, Hilmar; Licht, Hans; Limpach, Philippe; Steiger, Andreas; Zwyssig, Roger

    2010-09-01

    Three hydrostatic displacement monitoring system applications in Switzerland are discussed; the first concerns experience gained monitoring the foundation of the Albigna dam, the second relating to the underground stability of the Swiss Light Source synchrotron and the third concerning the deformation of a bridge near the city of Lucerne. Two different principles were applied, the Hydrostatic Levelling System (HLS) using the half-filled pipe principle developed by the Paul Scherrer Institute and the Large Area Settlement System (LAS) using the differential pressure principle. With both systems ground deformations induced by tidal forces can be seen. However, high accuracy of single sensors is not sufficient. A well-designed configuration of the complete system is equally important. On the other hand there are also limits imposed by installation logistics and by the environmental conditions. An example is the bridge monitoring application, where the acceleration along the bridge due to the passage of heavy trucks limits the feasibility of using hydrostatic levelling measurements.

  3. Hydrostaticity of Pressure Media in Diamond Anvil Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Shu-Jie; Chen, Liang-Chen; Jin, Chang-Qing

    2009-09-01

    Hydrostaticity under high pressure of several materials from solid, fluid to gas, which are widely used as pressure media in modern high-pressure experiments, is investigated in diamond anvil cells. Judging from the R-line widths and R1 - R2 peak separation of Ruby fluorescence, the inert argon gas is hydrostatic up to about 30 GPa. The behavior of silicon oil is found to be similar to argon at pressures less than 10 GPa, while the widening of R-lines and increase of R1 - R2 peak separation at higher pressure loads indicate a significant degradation of hydrostaticity. Therefore silicon oil is considered as a good pressure medium at pressures less than 10 GPa but poor at higher pressures.

  4. Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Domain Formation in Model Lipid Raft Membranes.

    PubMed

    Worcester, David L; Weinrich, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements demonstrate that hydrostatic pressure promotes liquid-ordered (Lo) domain formation in lipid membranes prepared as both oriented multilayers and unilamellar vesicles made of a canonical ternary lipid mixture for which demixing transitions have been extensively studied. The results demonstrate an unusually large dependence of the mixing transition on hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, data at 28 °C show that the magnitude of increase in Lo caused by 10 MPa pressure is much the same as the decrease in Lo produced by twice minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) of general anesthetics such as halothane, nitrous oxide, and xenon. Therefore, the results may provide a plausible explanation for the reversal of general anesthesia by hydrostatic pressure. PMID:26538052

  5. [Inactivation of bacterial spores by high hydrostatic pressure].

    PubMed

    Delacour, H; Cléry, C; Masson, P; Vidal, D R

    2002-01-01

    High pressure biotechnology was developed in Japan in the 90's. This new technology has been used in several domains, including chemical synthesis, food industry, physical chemistry of proteins. Moreover, it could be used instead of heat or chemical treatment for inactivation of pathogenic micro-organisms. Hydrostatic pressures ranging from 100 to 300 MPa cause the inactivation of viruses, parasites, yeast and bacteria. However, bacterial spores are particularly resistant and their inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure can be achieved in combination with synergistic treatments (heat, chemicals and ultrasound). PMID:11976548

  6. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  7. A model for hydrostatic consolidation of Pierre shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.; Braddock, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for consolidation of transversely isotropic porous media under hydrostatic stress. The solutions are applied to model the time variation of pore pressure, volume strain and strains parallel and normal to bedding, and to obtain coefficients of consolidation and permeability, as well as other properties, and the bulk modulus resulting from hydrostatic consolidation of Pierre shale. It is found that the coefficients consolidation and permeability decrease and the bulk moduli increase with increasing confining pressure, reflecting the closure of voids in the rock. ?? 1991.

  8. Angled Injection: Turbulent Flow Hybrid Bearings Comparison to Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis; Childs, Dara

    1997-01-01

    Hydrostatic/hydrodynamic (hybrid) journal bearings handling process liquids have limited dynamic stability characteristics and their application as support elements to high speed flexible rotating systems is severely restricted. Measurements on water hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection have demonstrated improved rotordynamic performance with virtual elimination of cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and null or negative whirl frequency ratios. A bulk-flow model for prediction of the static performance and force coefficients of hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection is advanced. The analysis reveals that the fluid momentum exchange at the orifice discharge produces a pressure rise in the hydrostatic recess retards the shear flow induced by journal rotation, and thus, reduces cross-coupling forces. The predictions from the model are compared with experimental measurements for a 45 deg. angled orifice injection, 5 recess water hybrid bearing operating at 10.2, 17.4, and 24.6 krpm and with supply pressures of 4, 5.5, and 7 MPa. The correlations include recess pressures, flow rates, and rotordynamic force coefficients at the journal centered position.

  9. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  10. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  11. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  12. Design and fabrication of gas bearings for Brayton cycle rotating unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, A.; Tessarzik, J. M.; Arwas, E. B.; Waldron, W. D. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Analysis, design, and testing of two types of pivoted pad journal bearings and a spiral-grooved thrust bearing suitable for direct installation into the NASA 2 to 15 KW Brayton Cycle Rotating Unit (BRU) have been accomplished. Both types of tilting pad bearing assemblies are of the preloaded type, consisting of three pads with one pad flexibly mounted. One type utilizes a non-conforming pivot, while the other replaces the conventional spherical pivot with a cruciform flexible member. The thrust bearing is flexure mounted to accommodate static machine mislinement. Test results indicate that both types of journal bearings should satisfy the requirements imposed by the BRU. Hydrostatic tests of the spiral-grooved thrust bearing showed it to be free of pneumatic hammer with as many as 24 orifices over the BRU pressure and load range.

  13. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  14. Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Daniel G. (Knoxville, TN); Gerth, Howard L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

  15. 46 CFR 154.562 - Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Hydrostatic test. 154.562 Section 154.562 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Hose 154.562 Cargo hose:...

  16. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrostatic pressure test. 178.605 Section 178.605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Testing of Non-bulk Packagings and Packages...

  17. Comparison of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure to inactivate foodborne viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HPP) and hydrodynamic pressure (HDP), in combination with chemical treatments, was evaluated for inactivation of foodborne viruses and non-pathogenic surrogates in a pork sausage product. Sausages were immersed in water, 100 ppm EDTA, or 2 percent lactoferrin...

  18. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-30(f) or 56.97-40, piping systems must be subjected to a hydrostatic test pressure that at every... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests 56.97-30 Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4). (a) Provision of... no time during the hydrostatic test may any part of the piping system be subjected to a...

  19. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-30(f) or 56.97-40, piping systems must be subjected to a hydrostatic test pressure that at every... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests 56.97-30 Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4). (a) Provision of... no time during the hydrostatic test may any part of the piping system be subjected to a...

  20. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-30(f) or 56.97-40, piping systems must be subjected to a hydrostatic test pressure that at every... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests 56.97-30 Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4). (a) Provision of... no time during the hydrostatic test may any part of the piping system be subjected to a...

  1. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-30(f) or 56.97-40, piping systems must be subjected to a hydrostatic test pressure that at every... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests 56.97-30 Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4). (a) Provision of... no time during the hydrostatic test may any part of the piping system be subjected to a...

  2. 46 CFR 56.97-30 - Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-30(f) or 56.97-40, piping systems must be subjected to a hydrostatic test pressure that at every... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Pressure Tests 56.97-30 Hydrostatic tests (modifies 137.4). (a) Provision of... no time during the hydrostatic test may any part of the piping system be subjected to a...

  3. Earth boring bit with improved two piece bearing and seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.F.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes an earth boring bit having an improved two piece bearing and seal assembly. It comprises: a bit body which includes at least one leg and a cantilevered bearing lug that extends downwardly and inwardly; a thread formed on the bearing lug to extend outwardly from an inner, end region to an outer, base region having a transverse shoulder; a threaded bearing sleeve having a circumferential bearing surface secured to the bearing lug, and a mouth at one end intersecting the transverse shoulder; a rotatable cutter with a bearing surface assembled on the bearing sleeve; a lubrication in the body, including a hydrostatic pressure compensator to lubricate the bearing surfaces and exclude ambient drilling fluids; a cutter seal groove formed near the outermost region of the bearing surface in the cutter to have a circumferential wall and an end wall; a circumferential shaft seal surface in the bearing lug to align with the bearing sleeve circumferential surface and oppose the cutter seal groove circumferential wall and to connect with an end wall in the lug; retainer means; and seal means.

  4. Measurement of small values of hydrostatic pressure difference / Pomiar małych wartości różnicy ciśnień hydrostatycznych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, Krzysztof; Filipek, Wiktor

    2012-10-01

    In order to describe the fluid flow through the porous centre, made of identical spheres, it is necessary to know the pressure, but in fact - the pressure distribution. For the flows in the range that was traditionally called laminar flow (i. e. for Reynolds numbers (Bear, 1988; Duckworth, 1983; Troskolański, 1957) from the range 0,01 to 3) it is virtually impossible with the use of the tools directly available on the market. Therefore, many scientists who explore this problem have concentrated only on the research of the velocity distribution of the medium that penetrates the intended centre (Bear, 1988) or pressure distribution at high hydraulic gradients (Trzaska & Broda, 1991, 2000; Trzaska et al., 2005). It may result from the inaccessibility to the measurement methods that provide measurement of very low hydrostatic pressures, such as pressure resulting from the weight of liquid located in the gravitational field (Duckworth, 1983; Troskolański, 1957). The pressure value c. 10 Pa (Troskolański, 1957) can be generated even by 1 mm height difference between the two levels of the free water surface, which in fact constitutes the definition of gauging tools of today measuring the level of the hydrostatic pressure. Authors proposed a method of hydrostatic pressure measurement and devised a gauging tool. Then a series of tests was conducted aiming at establishing what is the influence of various factors, such as temperature, atmospheric pressure, velocity of measurement completion, etc. on the accuracy and method of measurements. A method for considerable reduction of hysteresis that occurs during measurement was also devised. The method of measurement of small hydrostatic difference measurements allows for the accuracy of measurement of up to 0.5 Pa. Measurement results can be improved successfully by one order of magnitude, which for sure would entail necessary temperature stabilization of the tool. It will be more difficult though to compensate the influence of atmospheric pressure on the measurement process.

  5. Oil-free bearing development for high-speed turbomachinery in distributed energy systems - dynamic and environmental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacz, Eliza; Kozanecka, Dorota; Kozanecki, Zbigniew; Łagodziński, Jakub

    2015-09-01

    Modern distributed energy systems, which are used to provide an alternative to or an enhancement of traditional electric power systems, require small size highspeed rotor turbomachinery to be developed. The existing conventional oil-lubricated bearings reveal performance limits at high revolutions as far as stability and power loss of the bearing are concerned. Non-conventional, oil-free bearings lubricated with the machine working medium could be a remedy to this issue. This approach includes a correct design of the machine flow structure and an accurate selection of the bearing type. Chosen aspects of the theoretical and experimental investigations of oil-free bearings and supports; including magnetic, tilting pad, pressurized aerostatic and hydrostatic bearings as well as some applications of oil-free bearing technology for highspeed turbomachinery; are described in the paper.

  6. Experiments with needle bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferretti, Pericle

    1933-01-01

    Experiments and results are presented in testing needle bearings, especially in comparison with roller bearings. Reduction in coefficient of friction is discussed as well as experimental methods and recording devices.

  7. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  8. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  9. Surface forces between colloidal particles at high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, D. W.; Pouligny, B.; Best, A.; Nick, T. A.; Berger, R.; Butt, H.-J.

    2016-02-01

    It was recently suggested that the electrostatic double-layer force between colloidal particles might weaken at high hydrostatic pressure encountered, for example, in deep seas or during oil recovery. We have addressed this issue by means of a specially designed optical trapping setup that allowed us to explore the interaction of a micrometer-sized glass bead and a solid glass wall in water at hydrostatic pressures of up to 1 kbar. The setup allowed us to measure the distance between bead and wall with a subnanometer resolution. We have determined the Debye lengths in water for salt concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. We found that in the pressure range from 1 bar to 1 kbar the maximum variation of the Debye lengths was <1 nm for both salt concentrations. Furthermore, the magnitude of the zeta potentials of the glass surfaces in water showed no dependency on pressure.

  10. Application of hydrostatic extrusion to fabrication of zircaloy tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, N.; Kakuma, T.; Matsushita, T.; Kimpara, M.

    1982-01-01

    Two approaches are presented to the fabrication of BWR Zircaloy cladding tubes: (7) replacing the final pass of the pilgering process with cold hydrostatic extrusion, and (2) application of hot hydrostatic extrusion to the manufacture of tube shells which are then processed by the conventional pilgering process. With the first approach, an extrusion ratio (ER) of 5 could be obtained, but it should be limited to a maximum of 3 to prevent the occurence of galling. The properties of the obtained tubes were nearly identical to those of the current BWR cladding tubes. Application of the second technique resulted in an increase of ER to three times that of the conventional direct extrusion. The tubing processed at higher ER showed higher strength and lower ductility in the tension tests but exhibited higher ductility in the burst tests. 5 refs.

  11. All-fiber liquid crystalline hydrostatic pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinski, Tomasz R.; Domanski, Andrzej W.; Bock, Wojtek J.

    1994-03-01

    The paper introduces an all-fiber version of the hydrostatic pressure sensor with a chiral nematic liquid crystal film acting as a sensing element. The liquid crystalline film was obtained from a new class of liquid crystalline materials dispersed in a polymer matrix. As light sources, two laser diodes operating at red and infrared wavelengths were used, which were coupled to a compact liquid crystalline optrode. The optrode was placed inside a standard thermally stabilized high-pressure chamber designed to sustain pressures up to 500 MPa. Insertion of the optrode into the chamber was accomplished due to a fiber optic leadthrough system. The all-fiber liquid crystalline hydrostatic pressure sensor offers high response to pressure and, depending on the liquid crystalline optrode used, can be preset for a required range of pressure. Potential areas of applications include pipelines and mining instrumentation, process-control technologies, and environmental protection.

  12. The influence of hydrostatic pressure on tissue engineered bone development.

    PubMed

    Neßler, K H L; Henstock, J R; El Haj, A J; Waters, S L; Whiteley, J P; Osborne, J M

    2016-04-01

    The hydrostatic pressure stimulation of an appropriately cell-seeded porous scaffold within a bioreactor is a promising method for engineering bone tissue external to the body. We propose a mathematical model, and employ a suite of candidate constitutive laws, to qualitatively describe the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the quantity of minerals deposited in such an experimental setup. By comparing data from numerical simulations with experimental observations under a number of stimulation protocols, we suggest that the response of bone cells to an applied pressure requires consideration of two components; (i) a component describing the cell memory of the applied stimulation, and (ii) a recovery component, capturing the time cells require to recover from high rates of mineralisation. PMID:26796221

  13. Rolling element bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Foszcz, J.L.

    1995-08-07

    At first glance, there seems to be a bewildering array of rolling element bearings available. Understanding the differences between then can help in properly applying the right bearing or replacing one that is misapplied. The author explains the differences in rolling element bearings, how to recognize them, where they are best used, and where to find them.

  14. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  15. Tracking Polar Bears

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Movements of 9 satellite-collared adult female polar bears were tracked in February, 2010 by satellite telemetry. Bears were collared in 2007, 2008, and 2009 on the spring-time sea ice of the southern Beaufort Sea or on the autumn pack ice in 2009. Polar bear satellite telemetry data are shown with ...

  16. Full-bore well tester with hydrostatic bias

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, H.L.

    1984-04-03

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a pressure controlled well tester apparatus having a full-bore ball valve closure element includes valve actuator means responsive to changes in the pressure of fluids in the well annulus for moving the ball valve between its open and closed positions, and bias means responsive to the hydrostatic pressure of fluids in the well bore for assisting in moving the ball valve to its fully closed position.

  17. Hydrostatic rectosigmoid perforation: a rare personal watercraft injury.

    PubMed

    Gill, Richdeep S; Mangat, Harshdeep; Al-Adra, David P; Evans, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Personal watercrafts (PWC), also known as jet skis, seadoos, and wave-runners have risen in popularity since their introduction in the 1970s. Hydrostatic rectal injury is a rare presentation of passengers thrown off a PWC. The perforation of the rectum is owing to the excessive hydrostatic force of water exerted through the anal canal. We present the first case of rectosigmoid perforation secondary to PWC hydrostatic injury in Canada. A 14-year-old female passenger presented to the pediatric trauma center with severe abdominal pain and blood per rectum following a fall off the back of a PWC at a local lake. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a laceration in the anterolateral rectal wall at the rectosigmoid junction with associated free intra-peritoneal air and profuse free fluid. At exploratory laparotomy, a full thickness perforation was identified at the rectosigmoid junction. The rectum was oversewn as a Hartman pouch, and a proximal end colostomy was performed to divert the fecal stream. Management of traumatic pediatric rectal injuries involves detailed perineal examination with proctoscopy, and if warranted, exploratory laparotomy. Despite the rare occurrence of hydrostatic rectal perforations in Canada, it is a serious and potentially devastating injury. In the United States, the National Transportation Safety Board recommends wet suit bottoms for all pediatric PWC operators and passengers. In Canada, similar recommendations have not been made. The use of PWC in Canada is less common than in the US. However, it is steadily increasing, especially on local lakes. Education regarding potential injuries and prevention is recommended. PMID:21292097

  18. Effect of dynamic hydrostatic pressure on rabbit intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Kasra, Mehran; Goel, Vijay; Martin, James; Wang, Shea-Tien; Choi, Woosung; Buckwalter, Joseph

    2003-07-01

    The pathogenesis of vibration-induced disorders of intervertebral disc at the cellular level is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to establish a method to investigate the ranges of constructive and destructive hydrostatic loading frequencies and amplitudes in preventing or inducing extracellular disc matrix degradation. Using a hydraulic chamber, normal rabbit intervertebral disc cells were tested under dynamic hydrostatic loading. Monolayer cultures of disc outer annulus cells and 3-dimensional (3-D) alginate cultures of disc nucleus pulposus cells were tested. Effects of different loading amplitudes (3-D culture, 0-3 MPa; monolayer, 0-1.7 MPa) and frequencies (1-20 Hz) on disc collagen and protein metabolism were investigated by measuring 3H-proline-labeled proteins associated with the cells in the extracellular matrix and release of 3H-proline-labeled molecules into culture medium. High frequency and high amplitude hydrostatic stress stimulated collagen synthesis in cultures of outer annulus cells whereas the lower amplitude and frequency hydrostatic stress had little effect. For the same loading duration and repetition, neither treatment significantly affected the relative amount of protein released from the cell layers, indicating that protein degradation and stability were unaffected. In the 3-D nucleus culture, higher amplitude and frequency increased synthesis rate and lowered degradation. In this case, loading amplitude had a stronger influence on cell response than that of loading frequency. Considering the ranges of loading amplitude and frequency used in this study, short-term application of high loading amplitudes and frequencies was beneficial in stimulation of protein synthesis and reduction of protein degradation. PMID:12798057

  19. Rectangular Shell Plating Under Uniformly Distributed Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, M; Sommer, A

    1940-01-01

    A check of the calculation methods used by Foppl and Henky for investigating the reliability of shell plating under hydrostatic pressure has proved that the formulas yield practical results within the elastic range of the material. Foppl's approximate calculation leaves one on the safe side. It further was found on the basis of the marked ductility of the shell plating under tensile stress that the strength is from 50 to 100 percent higher in the elastic range than expected by either method.

  20. Cold hydrostatic extrusion of powder metallurgy processed superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourrahimi, S.; Thieme, C. L. H.; Foner, S.; Murphy, R. J.

    1983-12-01

    Hydrostatically extruded multifilamentary composites of Cu-Nb, Cu-Nb with a central tin core and Nb-Al were directly drawn to fine wires without intermediate annealing. Uniform deformation was observed throughout the process. Cu-Nb composite wires were Sn plated for external diffusion. Overall critical current densities of better than 104 A/cm2 at 16 T were achieved for Nb3Sn-Cu composite wires with nominal areal reductions of 2000.

  1. Non-hydrostatic equilibrium of the Sun and alternative physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferronsky, V.

    2009-04-01

    The proved fact that the Earth and the Moon don't stay in hydrostatic equilibrium and many other evidences bring us to conclusion that dynamics and physics of all other Solar System bodies including the Sun itself ought to be studied on non-hydrostatic basis. The only reasonable and logical alternative to that is the dynamical approach. We accepted this option and found it as a promising direction. It was found that in order to change hydrostatics by dynamical physics the outer force field of the body must be replaced by its inner volumetric force pressure. This is because the gravitational and electromagnetic forces, being inner mass forces, are volumetric in their nature. The analytical approach of that is shown in our abstract presented to GD10 of GA2009. A novel equation of state for the Sun and other stars following from the dynamical approach was obtained. The common nature of gravitational and electromagnetic energy, generated by interacted (collide and scattered) elementary particles, follows from the dynamics. New ideas related to mechanism of the Solar System creation are aroused from the approach. See more information in our works: Ferronsky V.I. and S.V. Ferronsky (2007). Dynamics of the Earth, Scientific World, Moscow; Ferronsky V.I. (2008). Non-averaged virial theorem for natural systems: http://zhurnal.ape.relarn.ru/articles/2008/066e.pdf; Ferronsky V.I., S.A. Denisik and S.V. Ferronsky (1987). Jacobi Dynamics, Riedel, Dordrecht.

  2. Muscular hydrostat mechanism for lip protrusion in speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Honda, Kiyoshi

    2005-09-01

    The lip is an organ consisting mostly of muscle similar to the tongue. While the tongue is known as a muscular hydrostat, it is unclear whether the lip is also. In this paper the muscular hydrostat issue was explored from the anatomical and functional point of view using high-resolution static MRI (hr-MRI 0.125 mm/pixel) and tagged-cineMRI (t-MRI). A 3-D reconstruction of the lips and its muscles was obtained from hr-MRI during sustained vowels /i/ and /u/. The muscular geometry of the orbicularis oris, mentalis, and depressor labii inferior muscles were superimposed onto the principal strains that depicts compression and expansion of the internal tissue obtained from t-MRI. It is shown that (1) orbicularis oris muscle shape can predict both the borderline of glabrous and hairy skin and the manner in which the lips are protruded; (2) the lips volume is almost identical for both speech tasks; and (3) direction and intensity of compression of orbicularis oris and mentalis muscle bundles imply the role of these muscles in the protrusion appearance. These results indicate that the muscular architecture and volume preserving characteristics of the lips are consistent with a muscular hydrostat. [This work was supported by NIH (USA) and NiCT (Japan).

  3. LoCuSS: Testing hydrostatic equilibrium in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. P.; Mazzotta, P.; Okabe, N.; Ziparo, F.; Mulroy, S. L.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; McCarthy, I. G.; Lieu, M.; Bahé, Y. M.; Bourdin, H.; Evrard, A. E.; Futamase, T.; Haines, C. P.; Jauzac, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Martino, R.; May, P. E.; Taylor, J. E.; Umetsu, K.

    2016-02-01

    We test the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium in an X-ray luminosity selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3 from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). Our weak-lensing measurements of M500 control systematic biases to sub-4 per cent, and our hydrostatic measurements of the same achieve excellent agreement between XMM-Newton and Chandra. The mean ratio of X-ray to lensing mass for these 50 clusters is β_X= 0.95± 0.05, and for the 44 clusters also detected by Planck, the mean ratio of Planck mass estimate to LoCuSS lensing mass is β_P= 0.95± 0.04. Based on a careful like-for-like analysis, we find that LoCuSS, the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project, and Weighing the Giants agree on β_P ≃ 0.9-0.95 at 0.15 < z < 0.3. This small level of hydrostatic bias disagrees at ˜5σ with the level required to reconcile Planck cosmology results from the cosmic microwave background and galaxy cluster counts.

  4. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  5. High-pressure crystal structure of elastically isotropic CaTiO3 perovskite under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Ross, Nancy L; Wang, Di; Angel, Ross J

    2011-11-16

    The structural evolution of orthorhombic CaTiO3 perovskite has been studied using high-pressure single-crystal x-ray diffraction under hydrostatic conditions up to 8.1 GPa and under a non-hydrostatic stress field formed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to 4.7 GPa. Under hydrostatic conditions, the TiO6 octahedra become more tilted and distorted with increasing pressure, similar to other 2:4 perovskites. Under non-hydrostatic conditions, the experiments do not show any apparent difference in the internal structural variation from hydrostatic conditions and no additional tilts and distortions in the TiO6 octahedra are observed, even though the lattice itself becomes distorted due to the non-hydrostatic stress. The similarity between the hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic cases can be ascribed to the fact that CaTiO3 perovskite is nearly elastically isotropic and, as a consequence, its deviatoric unit-cell volume strain produced by the non-hydrostatic stress is very small; in other words, the additional octahedral tilts relevant to the extra unit-cell volume associated with the deviatoric unit-cell volume strain may be totally neglected. This study further addresses the role that three factors--the elastic properties, the crystal orientation and the pressure medium--have on the structural evolution of an orthorhombic perovskite loaded in a DAC under non-hydrostatic conditions. The influence of these factors can be clearly visualized by plotting the three-dimensional distribution of the deviatoric unit-cell volume strain in relation to the cylindrical axis of the DAC and indicates that, if the elasticity of a perovskite is nearly isotropic as it is for CaTiO3, the other two factors become relatively insignificant. PMID:22037221

  6. Using changes in hydrostatic and osmotic pressure to manipulate metabolic function in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Shuichi; Ogawa, Rei

    2011-06-01

    Articular cartilage has distinct histological depth zones. In each zone, chondrocytes are subject to different hydrostatic (HP) and osmotic pressure (OP) due to weight-bearing and joint-loading. Previous in vitro studies of regeneration and pathophysiology in cartilage have failed to consider the characteristics of histological heterogeneity and the effects of combinations of changes in HP and OP. Thus, we have constructed molecular, biochemical, and histological profiles of anabolic and catabolic molecules produced by chondrocytes from each depth zone isolated from bovine articular cartilage in response to changes in HP and OP. We cultured the chondrocytes with combinations of loading or off-loading of HP at 0-0.5 MPa, 0.5 Hz, and changes in OP of 300-450 mosM over 1 wk, and evaluated mRNA expression and immunohistology of both anabolic and catabolic molecules and amounts of accumulated sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Any changes in HP and OP upregulated mRNA of anabolic and catabolic molecules in surface-, middle-, and deep-zone cells, in descending order of magnitude. Off-loading HP maintained the anabolic and reduced the catabolic mRNA; high OP retained upregulation of catabolic mRNA. These molecular profiles were consistent with immunohistological and biochemical findings. Changes in HP and OP are essential for simulating chondrocyte physiology and useful for manipulating phenotypes. PMID:21270297

  7. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  8. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  9. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  10. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  11. Nonaxisymmetric incompressible hydrostatic pressure effects in radial face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat seal having an angular misalinement is analyzed, taking into account the radial variations in seal clearance. An analytical solution for axial force, tilting moment, and leakage is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalinement. Nonaxisymmetric hydrostatic pressures due to the radial variations in the film thickness have a considerable effect on seal stability. When the high pressure is on the outer periphery of the seal, both the axial force and the tilting moment are nonrestoring. The case of high-pressure seals where cavitation is eliminated is discussed, and the possibility of dynamic instability is pointed out.

  12. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Hill, M.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Bingert, S.A.; Thoma, D.J.

    1998-09-08

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process. 5 figs.

  13. Hydrostatic and dynamic models of solar coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a sequence of one-dimensional fluid flow models of the transition zone and the inner corona. A hydrostatic model atmosphere in reasonable agreement with observations of closed, large-scale coronal structures found in the quiet sun is considered and various physical effects are introduced, one at a time, observing the response of the model. As a result of the investigations, a model is developed of the plasma flow in a coronal hole. It is shown that the data severely circumscribe the allowable range of possible models.

  14. A hydrostatic MHD code for modeling stellar interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Luis; Mitchell, Joseph; Braithwaite, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In gravitationally stratified fluids, the length scales of fluid motion are often much greater in the horizontal direction than in the vertical. When modeling these fluids, it can be advantageous to use the hydrostatic approximation often used in atmospheric physics, which filters out vertically propagating sound waves and thus allows a longer time step. We describe a finite-difference numerical scheme that uses this approximation. This code is suitable for modeling (magneto)hydrodynamic processes in radiative stellar interiors, such as the baroclinic instability and stratified turbulence, or the Tayler-Spruit dynamo.

  15. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Mary Ann (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM); Bingert, Sherri A. (Jemez Springs, NM); Thoma, Dan J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process.

  16. Steel pressure vessels for hydrostatic pressures to 50 kilobars.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, A; Whalley, E

    1978-07-01

    Cylindrical steel pressure vessels are described that can be used for hydrostatic pressures up to 50 kilobars. Monoblock vessels of 350 maraging steel can be used to 40 kilobars and compound vessels with an inner vessel of 350 maraging steel and an outer vessel of 300 maraging steel to 50 kilobars. Neither requires the cylinder to be end loaded, and so they are much easier to use than the more usual compound vessels with a tungsten carbide inner and steel outer vessel. PMID:18699223

  17. Multicore MgB 2 wires made by hydrostatic extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kov?, P.; Pachla, W.; Huek, I.; Kulczyk, M.; Meliek, T.; Holbek, T.; Diduszko, R.; Reissner, M.

    2008-12-01

    Seven-filament MgB2/Fe and MgB2/Nb/Cu wires have been made by in situ process using hydrostatic extrusion, drawing and two-axial drawing deformation into the wire size of 1.1 1.1 mm2. The conductors were sintered at 650 C/0.5 h and studied in terms of field-dependent transport critical current density and thermal stability. XRD, SEM and EDX analysis were applied for structural characterization. Transport current property and compositional/structural differences are compared and discussed in connection to used powders and metallic materials.

  18. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, Peter W.; Rao, Dantam K.; Wilson, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a design and analysis study performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061. The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in long-term space missions. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) system consisting of two 25-kWe free-piston Stirling engine modules. Two different versions of the RSSPC engine modules have been defined under NASA Contract NAS3-25463. These modules currently use hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Results of this study show that active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are technically feasible for RSSPC application provided that wire insulation with 60,000-hr life capability at 300 C can be developed for the bearing coils. From a design integration standpoint, both versions of the RSSPC were found to be conceptually amenable to magnetic support of the power piston assembly. However, only one version of the RSSPC was found to be amendable to magnetic support of the displacer assembly. Unacceptable changes to the basic engine design would be required to incorporate magnetic displacer bearings into the second version. Complete magnetic suspension of the RSSPC can potentially increase overall efficiency of the Stirling cycle power converter by 0.53 to 1.4 percent (0.15 to 0.4 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. However, these advantages are accompanied by a 5 to 8 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC, depending on the RSSPC version employed. Additionally, magnetic bearings are much more complex, both mechanically and particularly electronically, than hydrostatic bearings. Accordingly, long-term stability and reliability represent areas of uncertainty for magnetic bearings. Considerable development effort will be required to establish the long-term suitability of these bearings for Stirling space power applications.

  19. Hollow rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A low mass rolling element with a lightweight core and hollow center was developed for use in bearings. The core is plated so as to provide a hard surface and increase the life and reliability of the high speed ball bearings.

  20. Damper bearing rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1990-01-01

    High side loads reduce the life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. High stiffness damper seals were recommended to reduce the loads on the pump and turbine end bearings in the HPOTP. The seals designed for use on the pump end are expected to adequately reduce the bearing loads; the predicted performance of the planned turbine end seal is marginal. An alternative to the suggested turbine end seal design is a damper bearing with radial holes from the pressurized center of the turbopump rotor, feeding a smooth land region between two rough-stator/smooth-rotor annular seals. An analysis was prepared to predict the leakage and rotor dynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and added mass) of the damper bearing. Governing equations of the seal analysis modified to model the damper bearing; differences between the upstream conditions of the damper bearing and a typical annular seal; prediction of the damper bearing analysis; and assumptions of the analysis which require further investigation are described.

  1. Bearing servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Rex A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A tool for removing and/or replacing bearings in situ is presented. The tool is comprised of a brace having a first end adapted to engage a first end of the bearing housing, and a second end adapted to engage a second end of the bearing housing. If the two ends of the bearing housing are different in configuration, then the respective ends of the brace are configured accordingly. An elongate guide member integral with the brace has two parts, each projecting endwise from a respective end of the brace. A removable pressure plate can be mounted on either part of the guide member for longitudinal movement therealong and has first and second ends of different configurations adapted to engage the first and second ends of the bearing. A threaded-type drive is cooperative between the guide and the pressure plate to move the pressure plate longitudinally along the guide and apply a force to the bearing, either to remove the bearing from its housing, or to emplace a new bearing in the housing.

  2. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  3. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  4. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  5. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si{sub Ga} shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity.

  6. A Non-classical Hydrostatic Equation for Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Bras, R. L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Sakaki, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The classical hydrostatic equation (CHE) of a liquid fluid in unsaturated porous media is critically re-examined vis-a-vis Newton's first law, the principle of minimum potential energy, and the principle of virtual work. We found that the CHE is inconsistent with these fundamental principles. A non-classical hydrostatic equation (NCHE), derived based on Newton's first law and the principle of minimum potential energy, includes an extra term as a nonlinear function of tension and liquid content. The NCHE makes four quantitative and experimentally verifiable predictions that are inconsistent with the CHE: 1) tension head is a nonlinear function of elevation (nonlinearity); 2) the vertical profile of equilibrium liquid content extends within a finite distance bounded by 'edges' (discontinuity); 3) equilibrium profiles of liquid content and tension head may decrease or increase with elevation (non-monotonicity); and 4) opposite horizontal equilibrium distribution of liquid content to that according to the CHE (lateral reversion). Preliminary laboratory experiments have confirmed nonlinearity and provided suggestive evidence consistent with discontinuity. In addition, an analytical expression of areal liquid content as a function of liquid content in terms of retention curve was obtained for the first time. This study provides an alternative explanation of flow and transport in unsaturated porous media deviating from Darcy's law or Richards' equation, and may be a starting point of formulating revised Darcy's and Richards' equation.

  7. Opportunities of hydrostatically coupled dielectric elastomer actuators for haptic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2011-04-01

    As a means to improve versatility and safety of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) for several fields of application, so-called 'hydrostatically coupled' DEAs (HC-DEAs) have recently been described. HC-DEAs are based on an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a DE-based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load, so as to enable hydrostatic transmission. This paper presents ongoing developments of HC-DEAs and potential applications in the field of haptics. Three specific examples are considered. The first deals with a wearable tactile display used to provide users with tactile feedback during electronic navigation in virtual environments. The display consists of HCDEAs arranged in contact with finger tips. As a second example, an up-scaled prototype version of an 8-dots refreshable cell for dynamic Braille displays is shown. Each Braille dot consists of a miniature HC-DEA, with a diameter lower than 2 mm. The third example refers to a device for finger rehabilitation, conceived to work as a sort of active version of a rehabilitation squeezing ball. The device is designed to dynamically change its compliance according to an electric control. The three examples of applications intend to show the potential of the new technology and the prospective opportunities for haptic interfaces.

  8. Arcturus and the Bears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, E.

    2009-08-01

    Arcturus is the brightest star in Bootes. The ancient Greek name Arktouros means Bear Guard. The star, however, is not close to Ursa Maior (Big She-Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little She-Bear), as the name would suggest. This curious discrepancy could be explained by the star proper motion, assuming the name Bear Guard is a remote cultural heritage. The proper motion analysis could allow us to get an insight also into an ancient myth regarding Ursa Maior. Though we cannot explain scientifically such a myth, some interesting suggestions can be obtained about its possible origin, in the context of the present knowledge of the importance of the cult of the bear both during the Palaeolithic times and for several primitive populations of modern times, as shown by the ethnological studies.

  9. OTV bearing deflection investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, B. L.; Diepenbrock, R. T.; Millis, M. G.

    1993-04-01

    The primary goal of the Bearing Deflectometer Investigation was to gain experience in the use of fiber optic displacement probe technology for bearing health monitoring in a liquid hydrogen turbo pump. The work specified in this Task Order was conducted in conjunction with Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory Contract F04611-86-C-0010. APD conducted the analysis and design coordination to provide a displacement probe design compatible with the XLR-134 liquid hydrogen turbo pump assembly (TPA). Specifications and requirements of the bearing deflectometer were established working with Mechanical Technology Instruments, Inc. (MTI). The TPA design accommodated positioning of the probe to measure outer race cyclic deflections of the pump inlet bearing. The fiber optic sensor was installed as required in the TPA and sensor output was recorded during the TPA testing. Data review indicated that no bearing deflection signature could be differentiated from the inherent system noise. Alternate sensor installations were not investigated, but might yield different results.

  10. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis

    1994-01-01

    The Phase 2 (1994) Annual Progress Report presents two major report sections describing the thermal analysis of tilting- and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings. A literature review on the subject of two-phase flow in fluid film bearings and part of the proposed work for 1995 are also included. The programs delivered at the end of 1994 are named hydroflext and hydrotran. Both codes are fully compatible with the hydrosealt (1993) program. The new programs retain the same calculating options of hydrosealt plus the added bearing geometries, and unsteady flow and transient forced response. Refer to the hydroflext & hydrotran User's Manual and Tutorial for basic information on the analysis and instructions to run the programs. The Examples Handbook contains the test bearing cases along with comparisons with experimental data or published analytical values. The following major tasks were completed in 1994 (Phase 2): (1) extension of the thermohydrodynamic analysis and development of computer program hydroflext to model various bearing geometries, namely, tilting-pad hydrodynamic journal bearings, flexure-pad cylindrical bearings (hydrostatic and hydrodynamic), and cylindrical pad bearings with a simple elastic matrix (ideal foil bearings); (2) improved thermal model including radial heat transfer through the bearing stator; (3) calculation of the unsteady bulk-flow field in fluid film bearings and the transient response of a point mass rotor supported on bearings; and (4) a literature review on the subject of two-phase flows and homogeneous-mixture flows in thin-film geometries.

  11. 75 FR 48728 - The Hydrostatic Testing Provision of the Portable Fire Extinguishers Standard; Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Order No. 5-2007 (72 FR 31160). Signed at Washington, DC, this 6th day of August 2010. David Michaels... Occupational Safety and Health Administration The Hydrostatic Testing Provision of the Portable Fire... the Hydrostatic Testing provision of the Portable Fire Extinguishers Standard for General Industry...

  12. 78 FR 70324 - Thy Hydrostatic Testing Provision of the Portable Fire Extinguishers Standard; Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 1-2012 (77 FR 3912). Signed at... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Thy Hydrostatic Testing Provision of the Portable Fire... contained in the Hydrostatic Testing provision of the Portable Fire Extinguishers Standard for...

  13. ERK activation is required for hydrostatic pressure-induced tensile changes in engineered articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    DuRaine, G D; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify ERK 1/2 involvement in the changes in compressive and tensile mechanical properties associated with hydrostatic pressure treatment of self-assembled cartilage constructs. In study 1, ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was detected by immunoblot, following application of hydrostatic pressure (1?h of static 10?MPa) applied at days 10-14 of self-assembly culture. In study 2, ERK 1/2 activation was blocked during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14. With pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway by the MEK1/ERK inhibitor U0126 during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14, the increase in Young's modulus induced by hydrostatic pressure was blocked. Furthermore, this reduction in Young's modulus with U0126 treatment during hydrostatic pressure application corresponded to a decrease in total collagen expression. However, U0126 did not inhibit the increase in aggregate modulus or GAG induced by hydrostatic pressure. These findings demonstrate a link between hydrostatic pressure application, ERK signalling and changes in the biomechanical properties of a tissue-engineered construct. PMID:23255524

  14. Mechanoluminescence of ZnS:Mn phosphors excited by hydrostatic pressure steps and pressure pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, V. K.; Chandra, B. P.; Jha, Piyush

    2014-11-01

    When a hydrostatic pressure step is applied rapidly on ZnS:Mn phosphor introduced into a pressure cell as oil suspension, initially the mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with time, attains a peak value for a particular time, and then it decreases with time (G. Alzetta, N. Minnaja, S. Santucci, Nuovo Cimento 23, 1962, 910). When a hydrostatic pressure pulse is applied onto ZnS:Mn phosphor, then two ML pulses of equal intensity are emitted; one during the application of pressure and the other during the release of pressure. In case of ZnS:Mn phosphor, at low hydrostatic pressure the energy produced during the electron-hole recombination excites the Mn2+ centres; however, at high hydrostatic pressure, the impact of accelerated electrons with the Mn2+ centres causes the light emission. Considering the piezoelectrically-induced detrapping model of ML at low pressure and the piezoelectrically-induced impact excitation model of ML at high pressure, expressions are derived for different characteristics of ML, in which a good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results. At low hydrostatic pressure in the range from 3 MPa to 40 MPa, piezoelectrically-induced detrapping model of ML becomes applicable in ZnS:Mn phosphors; while at high hydrostatic pressure beyond 40 MPa, the piezoelectrically-induced impact excitation model of ML becomes applicable. The ML induced by hydrostatic pressure can be used for sensing both the magnitude and rise time of applied hydrostatic pressure.

  15. Touchdown Ball-Bearing System for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Price, Robert; Gelotte, Erik; Singer, Herbert B.

    2003-01-01

    The torque-limited touchdown bearing system (TLTBS) is a backup mechanical-bearing system for a high-speed rotary machine in which the rotor shaft is supported by magnetic bearings in steady-state normal operation. The TLTBS provides ball-bearing support to augment or supplant the magnetic bearings during startup, shutdown, or failure of the magnetic bearings. The TLTBS also provides support in the presence of conditions (in particular, rotational acceleration) that make it difficult or impossible to control the magnetic bearings or in which the magnetic bearings are not strong enough (e.g., when the side load against the rotor exceeds the available lateral magnetic force).

  16. Lash-free spherical bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Grooved and chamfered spherical bearing can maintain close contact between its ball and race, even when it is vibrated. Bearing thus eliminates major cause of wear and loosening in spherical bearings: pounding of ball on race under vibration.

  17. Measuring Bearing-Cage Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschak, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Bearing slip measured optically. Concept for measuring rotational speed of bearing cage promises to be simple and accurate. Based on fiber optics, requires no contact between measuring device and bearing, and would not introduce wear.

  18. Dynamic Culturing of Cartilage Tissue: The Significance of Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ana L.; Duarte, Ana R.C.; Frias, Ana M.; Pedro, Adriano J.; Oliveira, João T.; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui L.

    2012-01-01

    Human articular cartilage functions under a wide range of mechanical loads in synovial joints, where hydrostatic pressure (HP) is the prevalent actuating force. We hypothesized that the formation of engineered cartilage can be augmented by applying such physiologic stimuli to chondrogenic cells or stem cells, cultured in hydrogels, using custom-designed HP bioreactors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of distinct HP regimens on cartilage formation in vitro by either human nasal chondrocytes (HNCs) or human adipose stem cells (hASCs) encapsulated in gellan gum (GG) hydrogels. To this end, we varied the frequency of low HP, by applying pulsatile hydrostatic pressure or a steady hydrostatic pressure load to HNC-GG constructs over a period of 3 weeks, and evaluated their effects on cartilage tissue-engineering outcomes. HNCs (10×106 cells/mL) were encapsulated in GG hydrogels (1.5%) and cultured in a chondrogenic medium under three regimens for 3 weeks: (1) 0.4 MPa Pulsatile HP; (2) 0.4 MPa Steady HP; and (3) Static. Subsequently, we applied the pulsatile regimen to hASC-GG constructs and varied the amplitude of loading, by generating both low (0.4 MPa) and physiologic (5 MPa) HP levels. hASCs (10×106 cells/mL) were encapsulated in GG hydrogels (1.5%) and cultured in a chondrogenic medium under three regimens for 4 weeks: (1) 0.4 MPa Pulsatile HP; (2) 5 MPa Pulsatile HP; and (3) Static. In the HNC study, the best tissue development was achieved by the pulsatile HP regimen, whereas in the hASC study, greater chondrogenic differentiation and matrix deposition were obtained for physiologic loading, as evidenced by gene expression of aggrecan, collagen type II, and sox-9; metachromatic staining of cartilage extracellular matrix; and immunolocalization of collagens. We thus propose that both HNCs and hASCs detect and respond to physical forces, thus resembling joint loading, by enhancing cartilage tissue development in a frequency- and amplitude-dependant manner. PMID:22559784

  19. [Effects of hydrostatic pressure in physiological range on bladder smooth muscle cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wei, Tangqiang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Yan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Kanjie

    2012-08-01

    To explore the effects of the physiological range of hydrostatic pressure on human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) cultured in vitro, we used a hydrostatic compression device designed in our laboratory into the experiments, which were grouped by varied hydrostatic pressure gradients. Cellular morphology was observed with HE staining; cytoskeleton F-actin, cell cycle, both proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) were detected respectively with immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and RT-PCR. We found that the proliferation, cytoskeleton and cycle distribution of HBSMCs were not obviously different among the groups of different hydrostatic pressure; however, the mRNA expression of MMP-7 exhibited a trend of first increasing and then declining as the pressure gradually rises. Thus the physiological range of hydrostatic pressure may not have significant influence on proliferation, morphology, skeleton, and cell cycle of HBSMCs, but it may have great effect on the expression of MMP-7. PMID:23016418

  20. Ball Bearing Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Load-deflection relationships for different types of elliptical contacts such as those found in a ball bearing are developed. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented. Ball bearings subjected to radial, thrust and combined ball loads are analyzed. A design criterion for fatigue life of ball bearings is developed. The section of a satisfactory lubricant, as well as describing systems that provide a constant flow of lubricant to the contact, is considered.

  1. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23233238

  2. On the Resistance of Nanofibrous Superhydrophobic Coatings to Hydrostatic Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, T. M.; Emami, B.; Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Gad-El-Hak, M.; Tepper, G. C.

    2011-11-01

    We present a numerical study aimed at investigating the influence of microstructural parameters on the resistance of submerged fibrous superhydrophobic coatings to elevated hydrostatic pressures. In particular, we generate 3-D virtual geometries comprised of randomly or orthogonally oriented horizontal fibers with bimodal diameter distributions resembling the microstructure of coatings produced via DC and AC electrospinning, respectively. These virtual geometries are then used as the computational domain for performing Full Morphology (FM) simulations to establish a relationship between the coatings' critical pressure--pressure beyond which the surface departs from the Cassie state--and their microstructures. Our numerical simulations are aimed at providing guidelines for the design and optimization of the coatings' microstructures. Financial support from DARPA, contract number W91CRB-10-1-0003, is acknowledged.

  3. A nonlinear steady model for moist hydrostatic mountain waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, A.; Fitzjarrald, D.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of hydrostatic gravity waves generated by the passage of a steady, stably stratified, moist flow over a two-dimensional topography is considered. Coriolis effects are neglected. The cloud region is determined by the dynamics, and within that region the Brunt-Vaisala frequency takes on a value smaller than the outside value. In both the dry and cloudy regions the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is constant with height. The moist layer is considered to be either next to the mountain or at midlevels and to be deep enough so that an entire cloud forms in that layer. The nonlinearity in the flow and lower boundary affects the dynamics of these waves and wave drag. The latter is found to depend upon: (1) the location of the moist layer with respect to the ground, (2) the amount of moisture, (3) the degree of nonlinearity and (4) the departure from symmetry in the bottom topography.

  4. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  5. Damage Characterization in Copper Deformed under Hydrostatic Stress - Experimental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Flater, P. J.; House, J. W.; Nixon, M. E.

    2006-07-28

    The results of an experimental investigation designed to determine the effect of damage created by hydrostatic tensile loading on the properties of copper are reported. Three metallurgical conditions of half-hard OFHC copper were investigated; as worked; annealed 2hr at 400 deg. C ({approx}40 micron grain diameter); and annealed 2hr at 800 deg. C ({approx}80 micron grain diameter). Mechanical property characterization included uniaxial compression tests. High rate plasticity and damage was introduced by Taylor and rod-on-rod impact tests. The damage from the high rate experiments was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Quasi-static compression specimens machined from recovered high rate samples were tested to determine the influence of damage on the mechanical response of the material. The compression test results will be discussed in relationship to the starting microstructure and the extent of damaged introduced into the material.

  6. Solid-Supported Lipid Multilayers under High Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Benedikt; Paulus, Michael; Nase, Julia; Salmen, Paul; Degen, Patrick; Wirkert, Florian J; Honkimäki, Veijo; Tolan, Metin

    2016-03-22

    In this work, the structure of solid-supported lipid multilayers exposed to increased hydrostatic pressure was studied in situ by X-ray reflectometry at the solid-liquid interface between silicon and an aqueous buffer solution. The layers' vertical structure was analyzed up to a maximum pressure of 4500 bar. The multilayers showed phase transitions from the fluid into different gel phases. With increasing pressure, a gradual filling of the sublayers between the hydrophilic head groups with water was observed. This process was inverted when the pressure was decreased, yielding finally smaller water layers than those in the initial state. As is commonly known, water has an abrasive effect on lipid multilayers by the formation of vesicles. We show that increasing pressure can reverse this process so that a controlled switching between multi- and bilayers is possible. PMID:26927365

  7. Hydrostatic factors affect the gravity responses of algae and roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Wayne, Randy; Leopold, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis of Wayne et al. (1990) that plant cells perceive gravity by sensing a pressure differential between the top and the bottom of the cell was tested by subjecting rice roots and cells of Caracean algae to external solutions of various densities. It was found that increasing the density of the external medium had a profound effect on the polar ratio (PR, the ratio between velocities of the downwardly and upwardly streaming cytoplasm) of the Caracean algae cells. When these cells were placed in solutions of denser compound, the PR decreased to less than 1, as the density of the external medium became higher than that of the cell; thus, the normal gravity-induced polarity was reversed, indicating that the osmotic pressure of the medium affects the cell's ability to respond to gravity. In rice roots, an increase of the density of the solution inhibited the rate of gravitropism. These results agree with predictions of a hydrostatic model for graviperception.

  8. Ultrahigh hydrostatic pressure extraction of flavonoids from Epimedium koreanum Nakai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lili; Zhang, Shouqin; Dou, Jianpeng; Zhu, Junjie; Liang, Qing

    2011-02-01

    Herba Epimedii is one of the most famous Chinese herbal medicines listed in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China, as one of the representatives of traditional Chinese herb, it has been widely applied in the field of invigorate the kidney and strengthen 'Yang'. The attention to Epimedium extract has more and more increased in recent years. In this work, a novel extraction technique, ultra-high hydrostatic pressure extraction (UPE) technology was applied to extract the total flavonoids of E. koreanum. Three factors (pressure, ethanol concentration and extraction time) were chosen as the variables of extraction experiments, and the optimum UPE conditions were pressure 350 MPa; ethanol concentration 50% (v/v); extraction time 5 min. Compared with Supercritical CO2 extraction, Reflux extraction and Ultrasonic-assisted extraction, UPE has excellent advantages (shorter extraction time, higher yield, better antioxidant activity, lower energy consumption and eco-friendly).

  9. Cell Membranes Under Hydrostatic Pressure Subjected to Micro-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilev, Vassil M.; Kostadinov, Kostadin G.; Mladenov, Ivalo M.; Shulev, Assen A.; Stoilov, Georgi I.; Djondjorov, Peter A.

    2011-04-01

    The work is concerned with the determination of the mechanical behaviour of cell membranes under uniform hydrostatic pressure subject to micro-injections. For that purpose, assuming that the shape of the deformed cell membrane is axisymmetric a variational statement of the problem is developed on the ground of the so-called spontaneous curvature model. In this setting, the cell membrane is regarded as an axisymmetric surface in the three-dimensional Euclidean space providing a stationary value of the shape energy functional under the constraint of fixed total area and fixed enclosed volume. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations and natural boundary conditions are derived, analyzed and used to express the forces and moments in the membrane. Several examples of such surfaces representing possible shapes of cell membranes under pressure subjected to micro injection are determined numerically.

  10. Hydrometer calibration by hydrostatic weighing with automated liquid surface positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Jesus; Wright, John D.; Bean, Vern E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe an automated apparatus for calibrating hydrometers by hydrostatic weighing (Cuckow's method) in tridecane, a liquid of known, stable density, and with a relatively low surface tension and contact angle against glass. The apparatus uses a laser light sheet and a laser power meter to position the tridecane surface at the hydrometer scale mark to be calibrated with an uncertainty of 0.08 mm. The calibration results have an expanded uncertainty (with a coverage factor of 2) of 100 parts in 106 or less of the liquid density. We validated the apparatus by comparisons using water, toluene, tridecane and trichloroethylene, and found agreement within 40 parts in 106 or less. The new calibration method is consistent with earlier, manual calibrations performed by NIST. When customers use calibrated hydrometers, they may encounter uncertainties of 370 parts in 106 or larger due to surface tension, contact angle and temperature effects.

  11. Enhancements to the Pellissier H5 Hydrostatic Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, David; Shelton, John W.; Radcliff, Bill

    The Pellissier H5 Hydrostatic Level is used for applications requiring an order of magnitude improvement in accuracy over conventional optical leveling. The H5 has been used on such applications as the 32-meter radius track for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Green Bank Telescope (GBT) alidade, the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) project at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), measurements of the Golden Gate Bridge, etc. For the GBT alidade track, 16 benchmarks on a 32-meter radius were measured 3 times over a 2-week period. In each case, the levels closed to better than 0.050 mm over the 200-meter run. The H5 has been well described in the literature by Imfeld, Pellissier, Plouffe, and Ruland [1], so a description will not be repeated in this article. The GBT metrology system [2,3] will employ 12 ground-based laser ranging instruments on a 120-meter radius, i.e., 12 monuments on 62-meter spacing (0.75 km loop). The metrology system will use measured distances only, so the 3-D coordinates of the instrument locations are required in order to do trilateration calculations. The goal is to establish the (x,y,z) coordinates to an accuracy of less than 0.1 mm. The x and y coordinates can be measured by the instruments, but due to the insensitivity of the monument geometry in the z direction, and the need to orient the ground instruments with respect to the gravity vector (to point the telescope), hydrostatic leveling is required.

  12. Roller bearing geometry design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Pinkston, B. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is extended and applied to the design of cylindrical roller bearings. The kinematic stabilization mechanism puts a reverse skew into the rolling elements by changing the roller taper. Twelve basic bearing modification designs are identified amd modeled. Four have single transverse convex curvature in their rollers while eight have rollers which have compound transverse curvature made up of a central cylindrical band surrounded by symmetric bands with slope and transverse curvature. The bearing designs are modeled for restoring torque per unit axial displacement, contact stress capacity, and contact area including dynamic loading, misalignment sensitivity and roller proportion. Design programs are available which size the single transverse curvature roller designs for a series of roller slopes and load separations and which design the compound roller bearings for a series of slopes and transverse radii of curvature. The compound rollers are proportioned to have equal contact stresses and minimum size. Design examples are also given.

  13. Protecting Bear While Tranqualized

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The kerchief over the bear's eyes protects it from dust and debris and reduces visual stimulation. The small tubing in its nose, known as a nasal cannula, delivers oxygen to the animal while it is tranquilized....

  14. Scientists Track Polar Bears

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Scientists track Polar bears with by attaching GPS equipped collars to a sample population.  These collars transmit data that help develop maps like this one that shows a swim of nearly 220 miles long....

  15. Optimal Synchronizability of Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arajo, N. A. M.; Seybold, H.; Baram, R. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-02-01

    Bearings are mechanical dissipative systems that, when perturbed, relax toward a synchronized (bearing) state. Here we find that bearings can be perceived as physical realizations of complex networks of oscillators with asymmetrically weighted couplings. Accordingly, these networks can exhibit optimal synchronization properties through fine-tuning of the local interaction strength as a function of node degree [Motter, Zhou, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 71, 016116 (2005)PLEEE81539-3755]. We show that, in analogy, the synchronizability of bearings can be maximized by counterbalancing the number of contacts and the inertia of their constituting rotor disks through the mass-radius relation, mr?, with an optimal exponent ?=? which converges to unity for a large number of rotors. Under this condition, and regardless of the presence of a long-tailed distribution of disk radii composing the mechanical system, the average participation per disk is maximized and the energy dissipation rate is homogeneously distributed among elementary rotors.

  16. The water-bearing numerical model and its operational forecasting experiments part I: the water-bearing numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Daqing; Xu, Youping

    1998-06-01

    In first paper of articles, the physical and calculating schemes of the water-bearing numerical model are described. The model is developed by bearing all species of hydrometeors in a conventional numerical model in which the dynamic framework of hydrostatic equilibrium is taken. The main contributions are: the mixing ratios of all species of hydrometeors are added as the prognostic variables of model, the prognostic equations of these hydrometeors are introduced, the cloud physical framework is specially designed, some technical measures are used to resolve a series of physical, mathematical and computational problems arising from water-bearing; and so on. The various problems (in such aspects as the designs of physical and calculating schemes and the composition of computational programme) which are exposed in feasibility test, in sensibility test, and especially in operational forecasting experiments are successfully resolved using a lot of technical measures having been developed from researches and tests. Finally, the operational forecasting running of the water-bearing numerical model and its forecasting system is realized stably and reliably, and the fine forecasts are obtained. All of these mentioned above will be described in second paper.

  17. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  18. High speed hybrid bearing comprising a fluid bearing and a rolling bearing convected in series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of an antifriction bearing and a process by which its fatigue life may be extended. The method involves a rotating shaft supported by a fluid bearing and a rolling element bearing coupled in series. Each bearing turns at a fraction of the rotational speed of the shaft. The fluid bearing is preferably conical, thereby providing thrust and radial load support in a single bearing structure.

  19. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S. (Houston, TX); Somogyi, Dezso (Sugar Land, TX); Dietle, Lannie L. (Stafford, TX)

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  20. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  1. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  2. Embryonic stem cell-derived osteocytes are capable of responding to mechanical oscillatory hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Ehnes, D D; Price, F D; Shrive, N G; Hart, D A; Rancourt, D E; zur Nieden, N I

    2015-07-16

    Osteoblasts can be derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by a 30 day differentiation process, whereupon cells spontaneously differentiate upon removal of LIF and respond to exogenously added 1,25?(OH)2 vitamin D3 with enhanced matrix mineralization. However, bone is a load-bearing tissue that has to perform under dynamic pressure changes during daily movement, a capacity that is executed by osteocytes. At present, it is unclear whether ESC-derived osteogenic cultures contain osteocytes and whether these are capable of responding to a relevant cyclic hydrostatic compression stimulus. Here, we show that ESC-osteoblastogenesis is followed by the generation of osteocytes and then mechanically load ESC-derived osteogenic cultures in a compression chamber using a cyclic loading protocol. Following mechanical loading of the cells, iNOS mRNA was upregulated 31-fold, which was consistent with a role for iNOS as an immediate early mechanoresponsive gene. Further analysis of matrix and bone-specific genes suggested a cellular response in favor of matrix remodeling. Immediate iNOS upregulation also correlated with a concomitant increase in Ctnnb1 and Tcf7l2 mRNAs along with increased nuclear TCF transcriptional activity, while the mRNA for the repressive Tcf7l1 was downregulated, providing a possible mechanistic explanation for the noted matrix remodeling. We conclude that ESC-derived osteocytes are capable of responding to relevant mechanical cues, at least such that mimic oscillatory compression stress, which not only provides new basic understanding, but also information that likely will be important for their use in cell-based regenerative therapies. PMID:25936968

  3. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage, Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  4. Magnetic Bearing Consumes Low Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    Energy-efficient linear magnetic bearing maintains a precise small separation between its moving and stationary parts. Originally designed for cryogenic compressors on spacecraft, proposed magnetic bearing offers an alternative to roller or gas bearing in linear motion system. Linear noncontacting bearing operates in environments where lubricants cannot be used.

  5. Tribology of alternative bearings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin; Tipper, Joanne; Stone, Martin; Ingham, Eileen

    2006-12-01

    The tribological performance and biological activity of the wear debris produced has been compared for highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and modified metal bearings in a series of in vitro studies from a single laboratory. The functional lifetime demand of young and active patients is 10-fold greater than the estimated functional lifetime of traditional polyethylene. There is considerable interest in using larger diameter heads in these high demand patients. Highly cross-linked polyethylene show a four-fold reduction in functional biological activity. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have the lowest wear rates and least reactive wear debris. The functional biological activity is 20-fold lower than with highly cross-linked polyethylene. Hence, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings address the tribological lifetime demand of highly active patients. Metal-on-metal bearings have substantially lower wear rates than highly cross-linked polyethylene and wear decreases with head diameter. Bedding in wear is also lower with reduced radial clearance. Differential hardness ceramic-on-metal bearings and the application of ceramic-like coatings reduce metal wear and ion levels. PMID:17016223

  6. Fault tolerant magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, E.H.; Sortore, C.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Williams, R.D.; Fedigan, S.J.; Aimone, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    A fault tolerant magnetic bearing system was developed and demonstrated on a large flexible-rotor test rig. The bearing system comprises a high speed, fault tolerant digital controller, three high capacity radial magnetic bearings, one thrust bearing, conventional variable reluctance position sensors, and an array of commercial switching amplifiers. Controller fault tolerance is achieved through a very high speed voting mechanism which implements triple modular redundancy with a powered spare CPU, thereby permitting failure of up to three CPU modules without system failure. Amplifier/cabling/coil fault tolerance is achieved by using a separate power amplifier for each bearing coil and permitting amplifier reconfiguration by the controller upon detection of faults. This allows hot replacement of failed amplifiers without any system degradation and without providing any excess amplifier kVA capacity over the nominal system requirement. Implemented on a large (2440 mm in length) flexible rotor, the system shows excellent rejection of faults including the failure of three CPUs as well as failure of two adjacent amplifiers (or cabling) controlling an entire stator quadrant.

  7. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  8. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while minimizing it on the opposite side. The advantage of this configuration is that it makes it possible to approach the theoretical maximum force per unit area that could be exerted by a given amount of permanent-magnet material. The configuration is named after physicist Klaus Halbach, who conceived it for use in particle accelerators. Halbach arrays have also been studied for use in magnetic-levitation ("maglev") railroad trains. In a radial Halbach magnetic bearing, the basic Halbach arrangement is modified into a symmetrical arrangement of sector-shaped permanent magnets mounted on the outer cylindrical surface of a drum rotor (see Figure 2). The magnets are oriented to concentrate the magnetic field on their radially outermost surface. The stator coils are mounted in a stator shell surrounding the rotor.

  9. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  10. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  11. P and W Cryogenic Fluid-Film Bearing and Seal Technology Development and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Philip C.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation will summarize Pratt & Whitney's past, present, and future activities toward cryogenic fluid-film bearing and seal technology development and implementation. The three major areas of focus for this technology are analytical models and design tools, component testing, and technology implementation. The analytical models and design tools area will include a summary of current tools along with an overview of P&W's new full 3-D Navier-Stokes solution for hydrostatic bearings, HYDROB3D. P&W's comprehensive component test program, including teaming with the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, and Carrier Corporation, will be outlined. Component test programs consisting of material development and testing, surface patterns/roughness, pocket and orifice geometry variations, and static and dynamic performance of both journal and thrust bearings will be summarized. Finally, the technology implementation area will show the benefits and plans for P&W to incorporate this technology into products.

  12. Modular gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gearing system using modular gear bearing components. Each component is composed of a core, one or more modules attached to the core and two or more fastening modules rigidly attaching the modules to the core. The modules, which are attached to the core, may consist of gears, rollers or gear bearing components. The core orientation affects the orientation of the modules attached to the core. This is achieved via the keying arrangement of the core and the component modules that attach to the core. Such an arrangement will also facilitate the phase tuning of gear modules with respect to the core and other gear modules attached to the core.

  13. Low hydrostatic head electrolyte addition to fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell and system for supply electrolyte, as well as fuel and an oxidant to a fuel cell stack having at least two fuel cells, each of the cells having a pair of spaced electrodes and a matrix sandwiched therebetween, fuel and oxidant paths associated with a bipolar plate separating each pair of adjacent fuel cells and an electrolyte fill path for adding electrolyte to the cells and wetting said matrices. Electrolyte is flowed through the fuel cell stack in a back and forth fashion in a path in each cell substantially parallel to one face of opposite faces of the bipolar plate exposed to one of the electrodes and the matrices to produce an overall head uniformly between cells due to frictional pressure drop in the path for each cell free of a large hydrostatic head to thereby avoid flooding of the electrodes. The bipolar plate is provided with channels forming paths for the flow of the fuel and oxidant on opposite faces thereof, and the fuel and the oxidant are flowed along a first side of the bipolar plate and a second side of the bipolar plate through channels formed into the opposite faces of the bipolar plate, the fuel flowing through channels formed into one of the opposite faces and the oxidant flowing through channels formed into the other of the opposite faces.

  14. Converging hydrostatic and hydromechanic concepts of preferential flow definitions.

    PubMed

    Kutilek, M; Germann, P F

    2009-02-16

    The boundary between preferential flow and Richards-type flow is a priori set at a volumetric soil water content theta* at which soil water diffusivity D (theta*) = eta (= 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)), where eta is the kinematic viscosity. First we estimated with a hydrostatic approach from soil water retention curves the boundary, theta(K), between the structural pore domain, in which preferential flow occurs, and the matrix pore domain, in which Richards-type flow occurs. We then compared theta(K) with theta* that was derived from the respective soil hydrological property functions of same soil sample. Second, from in situ investigations we determined 96 values of theta(G) as the terminal soil water contents that established themselves when the corresponding water-content waves of preferential flow have practically ceased. We compared the frequency distribution of theta(G) with the one of theta* that was calculated from the respective soil hydrological property functions of 32 soil samples that were determined with pressure plate apparatuses in the laboratory. There is support of the notion that theta(K) approximately = theta(G) approximately = theta*, thus indicating the potential of theta* to explain more generally what constitutes preferential flow. However, the support is assessed as working hypothesis on which to base further research rather than a procedure to a clear-cut identification of preferential flow and associated flow paths. PMID:18676058

  15. A CANDIDATE DETECTION OF THE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, Melissa L.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Harvey, Paul; Dunham, Michael M.; Schnee, Scott

    2010-10-10

    The first hydrostatic core (FHSC) represents a very early phase in the low-mass star formation process, after collapse of the parent core has begun but before a true protostar has formed. This large (few AU), cool (100 K), pressure-supported core of molecular hydrogen is expected from theory, but has yet to be observationally verified. Here, we present observations of an excellent candidate for the FHSC phase: Per-Bolo 58, a dense core in Perseus that was previously believed to be starless. The 70 {mu}m flux of 65 mJy, from new deep Spitzer MIPS observations, is consistent with that expected for the FHSC. A low signal-to-noise detection at 24 {mu}m leaves open the possibility that Per-Bolo 58 could be a very low luminosity protostar, however. We utilize radiative transfer models to determine the best-fitting FHSC and protostar models to the spectral energy distribution and 2.9 mm visibilities of Per-Bolo 58. The source is consistent with an FHSC with some source of lower opacity through the envelope allowing 24 {mu}m emission to escape; a small outflow cavity and a cavity in the envelope are both possible. While we are unable to rule out the presence of a protostar, if present it would be one of the lowest luminosity protostellar objects yet observed, with an internal luminosity of {approx}0.01 L {sub sun}.

  16. Exocytosis from chromaffin cells: hydrostatic pressure slows vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Stühmer, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Pressure affects reaction kinetics because chemical transitions involve changes in volume, and therefore pressure is a standard thermodynamic parameter to measure these volume changes. Many organisms live in environments at external pressures other than one atmosphere (0.1 MPa). Marine animals have adapted to live at depths of over 7000 m (at pressures over 70 MPa), and microorganisms living in trenches at over 110 MPa have been retrieved. Here, kinetic changes in secretion from chromaffin cells, measured as capacitance changes using the patch-clamp technique at pressures of up to 20 MPa are presented. It is known that these high pressures drastically slow down physiological functions. High hydrostatic pressure also affects the kinetics of ion channel gating and the amount of current carried by them, and it drastically slows down synaptic transmission. The results presented here indicate a similar change in volume (activation volume) of 390 ± 57 Å(3) for large dense-core vesicles undergoing fusion in chromaffin cells and for degranulation of mast cells. It is significantly larger than activation volumes of voltage-gated ion channels in chromaffin cells. This information will be useful in finding possible protein conformational changes during the reactions involved in vesicle fusion and in testing possible molecular dynamic models of secretory processes. PMID:26009771

  17. Gravity Wave Breaking in Two-Layer Hydrostatic Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qingfang; Smith, Ronald B.

    2003-05-01

    To better understand mountain-induced gravity wave breaking and potential vorticity generation in the troposphere, a two-layer hydrostatic flow over a three-dimensional Witch-of-Agnesi type of mountain is investigated. It is suggested that a two-layer model is the simplest model in which the partitioning of upper- and lower-level wave breaking and dissipation can be studied.High-resolution shallow water model runs are carried out with unsheared upstream flow and a wide variety of mountain heights. A regime diagram is constructed, in which gravity wave breaking is classified based on shock number, location, and type. It is demonstrated that different types of shocks identified in the numerical simulations can be consistently described using a shock regime diagram, derived from viscous shock theory. Four curious shock properties are shown to influence orographic flow: the steepening requirement, the tendency for external jumps to amplify shear, the bifurcation in external jumps, and the `double shock.' Some results are compared with continuously stratified flow simulations by a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model.It is demonstrated that vertical wind shear controls the vertical distribution of wave breaking and potential vorticity generation.

  18. Raman study of radiation-damaged zircon under hydrostatic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Miletich, Ronald; Ruschel, Katja; Vczi, Tams

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced changes of Raman band parameters of four natural, gem-quality zircon samples with different degrees of self-irradiation damage, and synthetic ZrSiO4 without radiation damage, have been studied under hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell up to ~10 GPa. Radiation-damaged zircon shows similar up-shifts of internal SiO4 stretching modes at elevated pressures as non-damaged ZrSiO4. Only minor changes of band-widths were observed in all cases. This makes it possible to estimate the degree of radiation damage from the width of the ?3(SiO4) band of zircon inclusions in situ, almost independent from potential fossilized pressures or compressive strain acting on the inclusions. An application is the non-destructive analysis of gemstones such as corundum or spinel: broadened Raman bands are a reliable indicator of self-irradiation damage in zircon inclusions, whose presence allows one to exclude artificial color enhancement by high-temperature treatment of the specimen.

  19. Thermal conductivity measurement under hydrostatic pressure using the 3? method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shulman, Jason; Xue, Yuyi; Chu, C. W.; Nolas, George S.

    2004-11-01

    We have designed and modeled new techniques, based on the 3? method, to measure thermal conductivity of liquids (?l) and solids (?s) under hydrostatic pressure (P). The system involves a solid sample immersed in a liquid pressure medium, both of which have unknown thermal properties. The temperature (T) and P dependance of ?l are first determined through the use of a modified 3? technique. This method uses a conducting wire (Pt, in this work), which is immersed in the pressure medium, as the heater/sensor. In addition to ?l, this allows for the accurate determination of the specific heat per volume of the liquid and Pt, (?C)l and (?C)Pt, respectively. The information of ?l and (?C)l can then be used to make corrections to measurements of ?s, in which the sample is immersed in the pressure medium, and a metal strip acts as the heater/sensor. We present the T and P dependence of ?l and (?C)l for the widely used pressure medium 3M Fluorinert FC77 up to 0.8 GPa. The measurement of ?s for a thermoelectric clathrate material, Sr8Ga16Ge30, in FC77 is analyzed in detail, and the refined data achieves an accuracy of 1%. The setup can be modified to measure ? and ?C up to 3.5 GPa.

  20. High hydrostatic pressure and biology: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Demazeau, Grard; Rivalain, Nolwennig

    2011-03-01

    Pressure as a thermodynamical parameter was successively introduced in physics, hydrometallurgy, geochemistry, and biology. In all cases, the main objective was to recreate a natural phenomenon (gas or liquid compressibility, synthesis or crystal growth of minerals, survival of deep sea microorganisms). The introduction of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in Biology was an important scientific feature over the last hundred years. This paper describes the different steps that have led to the spreading of pressure in biology and the opening of new frontiers either in basic and applied researches due to the specific characteristics of the pressure parameter. Because of the low energy conveyed by this parameter, leading to the preservation of most organoleptic properties of foods, and its ability to inactivate many pathogens, the use of HHP began to spread at the end of the twentieth century into the food industry, in particular for the development of pathogen inactivation processes. Today, even if this field is still the first application domain for HHP, more and more research works have shown that this parameter could be of great interest in health and medicine sciences. PMID:21184058

  1. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on gas solubilization in micelles.

    PubMed

    Meng, Bin; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2015-03-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations of anionic sodium decylsulfate and nonionic pentaethylene glycol monodecyl ether micelles in water have been performed to examine the impact of hydrostatic pressure on argon solubilization as a function of pressure. The potential-of-mean force between the micelles and argon demonstrates that nonpolar gases are attracted to the interiors of both micelles. The affinity of argon for micelle interiors, however, decreases with increasing pressure as a result of the comparatively higher molar volume of argon inside assemblies. We evaluate solubility enhancement coefficients, which describe the drop in the solute chemical potential as a function of the micellized surfactant concentration, to quantify the impact of micellization on gas solubilization. While argon is similarly attracted to the hydrophobic cores of both micelles, the gas is more effectively sequestered within nonionic micelles compared with anionic micelles as a result of salting out by charged head groups and accompanying counterions. The solubility enhancement coefficients of both micelles decrease with increasing pressure, reflecting the changing forces observed in the potentials-of-mean force. An analytical liquid drop model is proposed to describe the pressure dependence of argon solubilization within micelles that captures the simulation solubility enhancement coefficients after fitting an effective micelle radius for each surfactant. PMID:25730396

  2. Scaling of the hydrostatic skeleton in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Jessica A; Kier, William M

    2014-06-01

    The structural and functional consequences of changes in size or scale have been well studied in animals with rigid skeletons, but relatively little is known about scale effects in animals with hydrostatic skeletons. We used glycol methacrylate histology and microscopy to examine the scaling of mechanically important morphological features of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris over an ontogenetic size range from 0.03 to 12.89 g. We found that L. terrestris becomes disproportionately longer and thinner as it grows. This increase in the length to diameter ratio with size means that, when normalized for mass, adult worms gain ~117% mechanical advantage during radial expansion, compared with hatchling worms. We also found that the cross-sectional area of the longitudinal musculature scales as body mass to the ~0.6 power across segments, which is significantly lower than the 0.66 power predicted by isometry. The cross-sectional area of the circular musculature, however, scales as body mass to the ~0.8 power across segments, which is significantly higher than predicted by isometry. By modeling the interaction of muscle cross-sectional area and mechanical advantage, we calculate that the force output generated during both circular and longitudinal muscle contraction scales near isometry. We hypothesize that the allometric scaling of earthworms may reflect changes in soil properties and burrowing mechanics with size. PMID:24871920

  3. Recent Advances in Food Processing Using High Hydrostatic Pressure Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Yi; Huang, Hsiao-Wen; Hsu, Chiao-Ping; Yang, Binghuei Barry

    2016-03-11

    High hydrostatic pressure is an emerging non-thermal technology that can achieve the same standards of food safety as those of heat pasteurization and meet consumer requirements for fresher tasting, minimally processed foods. Applying high-pressure processing can inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and enzymes, as well as modify structures with little or no effects on the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have approved the use of high-pressure processing (HPP), which is a reliable technological alternative to conventional heat pasteurization in food-processing procedures. This paper presents the current applications of HPP in processing fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, dairy, and egg products; such applications include the combination of pressure and biopreservation to generate specific characteristics in certain products. In addition, this paper describes recent findings on the microbiological, chemical, and molecular aspects of HPP technology used in commercial and research applications. PMID:25629307

  4. String and Sticky Tape Experiments: Light Pipes, Hydrostatics, Surface Tension and a Milk Carton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of light pipes using low-cost materials, relating it to fiber optics communication. Also provides several experiments in hydrostatics and hydrodynamics using the materials for light pipe. (JM)

  5. Electronic structure computation and differential capacitance profile in ?-doped FET as a function of hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos-Pinedo, C.; Rodrguez-Vargas, I.; Martnez-Orozco, J. C.

    2014-05-15

    In this work we present the results obtained from the calculation of the level structure of a n-type delta-doped well Field Effect Transistor when is subjected to hydrostatic pressure. We study the energy level structure as a function of hydrostatic pressure within the range of 0 to 6 kbar for different Schottky barrier height (SBH). We use an analytical expression for the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the SBH and the pressure dependence of the basic parameters of the system as the effective mass m(P) and the dielectric constant ?(P) of GaAs. We found that due to the effects of hydrostatic pressure, in addition to electronic level structure alteration, the profile of the differential capacitance per unit area C{sup ?2} is affected.

  6. HIGH HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE PROCESSING: A POTENTIAL SOLUTION FOR SHELLFISH-BORNE VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molluscan shellfish bioconcentrate enteric viruses from human wastes that are present in the growing waters. Consequently, the consumption of raw shellfish poses considerable risk for contracting illnesses associated with these viruses. High hydrostatic pressure is a new nonthermal sanitizing proc...

  7. Teddy Bear Still Lifes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art activity for first-grade students in which the students draw their own still-life pictures, using teddy bears and balls as the subject matter. Explains that the students must include three objects, a line for the table, and overlap the shapes. (CMK)

  8. Teddy bear clinic.

    PubMed

    Creedon, C M

    1989-02-01

    1. The Shriners Institute in Boston developed a day to educate children about hospitals and the OR environment. 2. OR nurses have instituted extensive procedures and policies to allow potential patients the information they need to know their rights. 3. The most important instruction was for the children to ask those questions that they thought their teddy bears might ask. PMID:2922787

  9. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R. (Avon, CT); Lynds, Jr., Lahmer (Glastonbury, CT)

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  10. History of ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowson, D.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The familiar precision rolling-element bearings of the twentieth century are products of exacting technology and sophisticated science. Their very effectiveness and basic simplicity of form may discourage further interest in their history and development. Yet the full story covers a large portion of recorded history and surprising evidence of an early recognition of the advantages of rolling motion over sliding action and progress toward the development of rolling-element bearings. The development of rolling-element bearings is followed from the earliest civilizations to the end of the eighteenth century. The influence of general technological developments, particularly those concerned with the movement of large building blocks, road transportation, instruments, water-raising equipment, and windmills are discussed, together with the emergence of studies of the nature of rolling friction and the impact of economic factors. By 1800 the essential features of ball and rolling-element bearings had emerged and it only remained for precision manufacture and mass production to confirm the value of these fascinating machine elements.

  11. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  12. Oregon Zoo Polar Bear

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Tasul, an Oregon Zoo polar bear, sports a high-tech collar that will help researchers study her endangered wild counterparts in the Arctic. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo....

  13. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  14. Black Bear Cub Measurements

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Virginia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife research unit students (L to R) Colleen Olfenbuttel (MS), Johnny Wills (MS), and Sybille Klenzendorf (Ph.D.) weigh and measure a black bear cub at a den site in western Virginia....

  15. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  16. Magnetic-Bearing Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Poole, William L.

    1991-01-01

    Microcomputer-controlled magnetic-bearing test fixture used to develop approaches to design of controls for magnetic bearing actuators designed and constructed. Includes load cells connected to bar, in turn, connected through screw positioners to geared drive motors. Position of equivalent suspended element sensed by position sensors and controlled by drive motors. Provides control of gap in magnetic bearing and of current in electromagnet coil. Measurements made include magnetic-bearing gaps, magnetic flux in bearing gaps, and bearing forces. Approaches to linearization and control developed by use of fixture applicable to wide range of small-gap suspension systems.

  17. Magnetic bearings for cryogenic turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannello, Victor; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages over gas bearings for the support of rotors in cryogenic turboexpanders and compressors. Their performance is relatively independent of the temperature or pressure of the process gas for a large range of conditions. Active magnetic bearing systems that use capacitive sensors have been developed for high speed compressors for use in cryogenic refrigerators. Here, the development of a magnetic bearing system for a miniature ultra high speed compressor is discussed. The magnetic bearing has demonstrated stability at rotational speeds exceeding 250,000 rpm. This paper describes the important features of the magnetic bearing and presents test results demonstrating its performance characteristics.

  18. Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Design concept for ball bearing incorporates small pieces of shim stock, wire spokes like those in bicycle wheels, or other flexing elements to reduce both stiction and friction slope. In flexure bearing, flexing elements placed between outer race of ball bearing and outer ring. Elements flex when ball bearings encounter small frictional-torque "bumps" or even larger ones when bearing balls encounter buildups of grease on inner or outer race. Flexure of elements reduce high friction slopes of "bumps", helping to keep torque between outer ring and inner race low and more nearly constant. Concept intended for bearings in gimbals on laser and/or antenna mirrors.

  19. Assessment of non-hydrostatic ocean models using laboratory scale problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berntsen, Jarle; Xing, Jiuxing; Alendal, Guttorm

    2006-08-01

    Numerical ocean models have become important in scientific studies of oceans, for the management of marine systems, and for industrial off-shore activities. It is therefore essential that the increasing amounts of model outputs are to be trusted. However, the development of quantitative methods for skill assessment of ocean models has proved to be very difficult. Exercises on comparisons of model results from different models and on comparisons of model results with observations often reveal significant differences. Most numerical studies of the oceanic flow are today performed with hydrostatic ocean models. With increasing spatial resolution the hydrostatic assumption becomes more questionable, and the interest in non-hydrostatic models for the ocean is increasing. In computational fluid dynamics there is a tradition for assessment of the models through comparisons with laboratory experiments. Non-hydrostatic ocean models may also be assessed using this approach. In the present paper a non-hydrostatic z-coordinate model and a non-hydrostatic ?-coordinate model are applied to study lock release gravity currents in a flat bottom tank, and the propagation and breaking of an internal solitary wave in a tank with a sloping bottom. The focus of the latter case is especially on model outputs showing the propagation and breaking of the solitary wave up an incline. The agreement between the results from the two models is generally very good, and front speeds and wave speeds are in good agreement with corresponding values from experimental data.

  20. Day-night variations in malate concentration, osmotic pressure, and hydrostatic pressure in Cereus validus

    SciTech Connect

    Luettge, U.; Nobel, P.S.

    1984-07-01

    Malate concentration and stem osmotic pressure concomitantly increase during nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation and then decrease during the daytime in the obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Cereus validus (Cactaceae). Changes in malate osmotic pressure calculated using the Van't Hoff relation match the changes in stem osmotic pressure, indicating that changes in malate level affected the water relations of the succulent stems. In contrast to stem osmotic pressure, stem water potential showed little day-night changes, suggesting that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure occurred. This was corroborated by direct measurements of hydrostatic pressure using the Juelich pressure probe where a small oil-filled micropipette is inserted directly into chlorenchyma cells, which indicated a 4-fold increase in hydrostatic pressure from dusk to dawn. A transient increase of hydrostatic pressure at the beginning of the dark period was correlated with a short period of stomatal closing between afternoon and nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation, suggesting that the rather complex hydrostatic pressure patterns could be explained by an interplay between the effects of transpiration and malate levels. A second CAM plant, Agave deserti, showed similar day-night changes in hydrostatic pressure in its succulent leaves. It is concluded that, in addition to the inverted stomatal rhythm, the oscillations of malate markedly affect osmotic pressures and hence water relations of CAM plants. 13 references, 4 figures.

  1. Hydraulic efficiency of a hydrostatic transmission with a variable displacement pump and motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, Daniel

    Pumps and motors are commonly connected hydraulically to create hydrostatic drives, also known as hydrostatic transmissions. A typical hydrostatic transmission consists of a variable displacement pump and a fixed displacement motor. Maximum efficiency is typically created for the system when the motor operates at maximum volumetric displacement. The objective of this research is to determine if a hydrostatic transmission with a variable displacement motor can be more efficient than one with a fixed displacement motor. A work cycle for a Caterpillar 320D excavator was created and the efficiency of the hydrostatic drive system, controlling the swing circuit, with a fixed displacement motor was compared to the efficiency with a variable displacement motor. Both multiplicative and additive uncertainty analysis were performed to determine uncertainty models that could be used to analyze the robustness of the system with feedback control applied. A PID and an H∞ controller were designed for a position control model, as well as velocity control. It was found that while it may seem obvious to achieve maximum efficiency at maximum displacement, there are some cases where maximum efficiency is achieved at a lower displacement. It was also found that for the given work cycle, a hydrostatic transmission with a variable displacement motor can be more efficient.

  2. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the fracture of concrete. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The topic of this research deals with (1) the hydrostatic pressure distribution along dam upstream face cracks and (2) the material resistance versus cracking when water pressure is present in the crack. Fracture experiments were performed where hydrostatic pressure was present during formation and growth of a crack in a concrete specimen. Experimental results yielded information regarding both the pressure distribution along cracks and the fracture properties as affected by the presence of hydrostatic pressure. Cracking of concrete is characterized by the formation of a fracture process zone along which a transition from intact to completely fractured material occurs. Water penetrates into this fracture process zone, and pressure is built-up gradually from zero pressure to full hydrostatic pressure. The water distribution along the crack is.independent of the concrete mix and specimen size; it is a function of the crack opening displacement alone. The relationship between water pressure and crack opening displacement is influenced by the level of hydrostatic pressure. For the application of this research to the analysis of darns with upstream cracks, the experimental results are approximated by simple functions describing the relationship between water pressure and crack opening displacement and fracture properties and hydrostatic pressure. In a case study, a gravity dam subjected to overtopping is analyzed, and the impact of this research on dam analysis is discussed. The conclusions from this investigation apply primarily to the concrete dam.

  3. 10. DETAIL VIEW OF END BEARING CONDITION SHOWING MOVEABLE BEARING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW OF END BEARING CONDITION SHOWING MOVEABLE BEARING AT SOUTHEAST END OF LOWER ROAD LEVEL - Mahoning Avenue Pratt Double-Deck Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek at Mahoning Avenue (C.R. 319), Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  4. The transition from hydrostatic to greater than hydrostatic fluid pressure in presently active continental hydrothermal systems in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Fluid flow at hydrostatic pressure (P{sub h}) is relatively common through fractures in silicic and in mafic crystalline rocks where temperatures are less than about 350-370C. In contrast, pore-fluid pressure (P{sub f}) > P{sub h} has been encountered at the bottom of 3 geothermal exploration wells that attained temperatures >370C (at Larderello, Italy, at Nesjavellir, Iceland, and at The Geysers, California). Chemical sealing by deposition of minerals in veins appears to have allowed the development of the high P{sub f} encountered in the above wells. The upper limit for the magnitude of P{sub f} that can be attained is controlled by either the onset of shear fracturing (where differential stress is relatively high) that reopens clogged veins, or the hydraulic opening of new or old fractures (at relatively low values of differential stress). The brittle-plastic transition for silicic rocks can occur at temperatures as high as 370-400C in tectonically active regions. In regions where high-temperature geothermal systems develop and persist, it appears that either strain rates commonly are in the range 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}13}, or that silicic rocks in the shallow crust generally behave rheologically more like wet quartz diorite than wet Westerly granite.

  5. The transition from hydrostatic to greater than hydrostatic fluid pressure in presently active continental hydrothermal systems in crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foumier, Robert O.

    Fluid flow at hydrostatic pressure (Ph) is relatively common through fractures in silicic and in mafic crystalline rocks where temperatures are less than about 350-370C. In contrast, pore-fluid pressure (Pf) > Ph has been encountered at the bottom of 3 geothermal exploration wells that attained temperatures >370C (at Larderello, Italy, at Nesjavellir, Iceland, and at The Geysers, California). Chemical sealing by deposition of minerals in veins appears to have allowed the development of the high Pf encountered in the above wells. The upper limit for the magnitude of Pf that can be attained is controlled by either the onset of shear fracturing (where differential stress is relatively high) that reopens clogged veins, or the hydraulic opening of new or old fractures (at relatively low values of differential stress). The brittle-plastic transition for silicic rocks can occur at temperatures as high as 370-400C in tectonically active regions. In regions where high-temperature geothermal systems develop and persist, it appears that either strain rates commonly are in the range 10-12 to 10-13, or that silicic rocks in the shallow crust generally behave rheologically more like wet quartz diorite than wet Westerly granite.

  6. Hydrostatic and osmotic pressure activated channel in plant vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Joel; Lassalles, Jean-Paul

    1991-01-01

    The vacuolar membrane of red beet vacuoles contains a channel which was not gated by voltage or Ca2+ ions. Its unit conductance was 20 pS in 200 mM symmetrical KCl solutions. It was stretch activated: the conductance remained constant but the probability of opening was increased by suction or pressure applied to a membrane patch. A 1.5-kNm-2 suction applied to isolated patches or a 0.08-kNm-2 pressure applied to a 45-?m diameter vacuole induced an e-fold change in the mean current. A 75% inhibition of the channel current was obtained with 10 ?M Gd3+ on the cytoplasmic side. The channel was more permeable for K+ than for Cl- (PK/PCl ? 3). A possible clustering for this channel was suggested by the recordings of the patch current. The channel properties were not significantly affected by a change in sorbitol osmolality in the solutions under isoosmotic conditions, between 0.6 and 1 mol/kg sorbitol. However, the channel was very sensitive to an osmotic gradient. A 0.2-mol/kg sorbitol gradient induced a two-fold increase in unit conductance and a thirty-fold increase in the mean patch current of the channel. A current was measured, when the osmotic gradient was the only driving force applied to the vacuolar membrane. The hydrostatic and osmotic pressure (HOP) activated channel described in this paper could be gated in vivo condition by a change in osmolality, without the need of a change in the turgor pressure in the cell. The HOP channel represents a possible example of an osmoreceptor for plant cells. PMID:19431814

  7. Single acetylcholine receptor channel currents recorded at high hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, S H; Sthmer, W; Conti, F

    1987-01-01

    A technique for performing patch-clamp experiments under high hydrostatic (oil) pressure is described. The method allows the transfer of whole cell or membrane patches in a recording configuration into a pressure vessel, where pressure can be increased up to 60 MPa (approximately equal to 600 bar). We have studied in this way the pressure dependence of single acetylcholine receptor channels in excised "outside-out" membrane patches from cultured rat muscle cells. In the range of 0.1 to 60 MPa the open channel conductance in 140 mM NaCl solutions did not vary by more than 2%, which implies that the translocation of sodium ions through the channel pore does not involve steps with significant activation volumes. At high acetylcholine concentrations (20 microM) bursts of single-channel activity allowed measurements of the mean open and mean closed times of the channel. Pressurization to 40 MPa increased both mean open and mean closed times giving apparent activation volumes of about 59 and 139 A3, respectively. This implies a net volume increase of 80 A3, associated with the transition from the agonist-free state to the open state of the channel, which may be partially associated with the agonist-binding step. All the observed pressure effects were reversible. The activation volumes for the gating of acetylcholine receptor channels are comparable to those of sodium and potassium channels in the squid giant axon, suggesting that there is some basic common mechanism in the operation of ion-channel proteins. Images PMID:2437577

  8. Magnetic bearings grow more attractive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    Advances in materials and electronics have enabled designers to devise simpler, smaller magnetic bearings. As a result, costs have dropped, widening the applications for these very-low-friction devices. Avcon (Advanced Controls Technology) has patented a permanent-magnet bias actively controlled bearing. Here high-energy rare earth permanent-magnet materials supply the basic bearing load levitation, while servo-driven electromagnets generate stabilization and centering forces for motion contol. Previous heavy-duty magnetic bearings used electromagnets entirely for suspension and control, which led to large bearings and control systems with higher power requirements. Avcon has developed several types of permanent-magnet bias bearings. The simplest is the radial repulsion bearing. Avcon's homopolar permanent-magnet bias active bearing is the most versatile of the company's designs.

  9. Vygotsky and the Three Bears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulczewski, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Peggy Kulczewski, a kindergarten classroom teacher, remembers the day when students enjoyed a story she told them from the book "The Three Bears". The students' discussion about comparison of the bears was very helpful to the whole group.

  10. A Semi-Hydrostatic Theory of Gravity-Dominated Compressible Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubos, T.; Voitus, F.

    2014-12-01

    Compressible Euler equations support the propagation of acoustic waves. Although much progress has been achieved towards efficient and accurate solutions to the resulting numerical difficulties, it can still be desirable to identify "unified" equations of motion that would not support acoustic waves while retaining accuracy at large and small scales. Even if such equations are eventually not chosen as the basis of a numerical model, they may help identifying the independent degrees of freedom of the atmospheric flow to be modeled and how the dependent fields are related to the independent fields. From Hamilton's least action principle (HP), "semi-hydrostatic" compressible equations of motion with density diagnosed from potential temperature through hydrostatic balance are derived. Energy, potential vorticity and momentum are conserved. Slaving density to potential temperature suppresses the degrees of freedom supporting the propagation of acoustic waves and results in a sound-proof system. Scale analysis and linear normal modes analysis for an isothermal state of rest suggest that the semy-hydrostatic system is accurate from hydrostatic to non-hydrostatic scales, except for deep internal gravity waves (Figure : decimal logarithm of relative error of the frequency of internal normal modes of a non-rotating isothermal atmosphere as a function of horizontal and vertical wavenumbers k,m normalized by the scale height H). Especially the Lamb wave and long Rossby waves are not distorted, unlike with anelastic or pseudo-incompressible systems. Compared to similar equations derived by Arakawa and Konor (2009), the semi-hydrostatic system possesses an additional term in the horizontal momentum budget. This term is an apparent force resulting from the vertical coordinate not being the actual height of an air parcel, but its hydrostatic height, i.e. the hypothetical height it would have after the atmospheric column it belongs to has reached hydrostatic balance through adiabatic vertical displacements of air parcels. As with hydrostatic prmitive equations (HPE), vertical velocity is diagnosed through Richardson's equation. The semi-hydrostatic system has therefore precisely the same degrees of freedom as the HPE, while retaining much of the accuracy of the fully compressible Euler equations.

  11. Passive magnetic bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  12. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  13. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  14. Frictionless Bearing Uses Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation was to develop a frictionless bearing for high speed, light load applications. The device involves the incorporation of permanent magnets in the bearing design. The repulsion of like magnetic poles provides concentric support of the inner member so that no metallic contact occurs between the bearing surfaces.

  15. First order ball bearing kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingbury, E.

    1984-01-01

    Two first order equations are given connecting geometry and internal motions in an angular contact ball bearing. Total speed, kinematic equivalence, basic speed ratio, and modal speed ratio are defined and discussed; charts are given for the speed ratios covering all bearings and all rotational modes. Instances where specific first order assumptions might fail are discussed, and the resulting effects on bearing performance reviewed.

  16. Radium bearing waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A.; Schofield, W.D.

    1995-07-01

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach.

  17. Magnetic translator bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard L. (Inventor); Downer, James R. (Inventor); Eisenhaure, David B. (Inventor); Hawkey, Timothy J. (Inventor); Johnson, Bruce G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system for enabling translational motion includes a carriage and a shaft for movably supporting the carriage; a first magnetic bearing fixed to one of the carriage and shaft and slidably received in a first channel of the other of the carriage and shaft. The first channel is generally U shaped with two side walls and a back wall. The magnetic bearing includes a pair of spaced magnetic pole pieces, each pole piece having a pair of electromagnetic coils mounted on poles on opposite ends of the pole piece proximate the side walls, and a third electromagnetic coil mounted on a pole of the pole piece proximate the backwall; a motion sensor for sensing translational motion along two axes and rotationally about three axes of the carriage and shaft relative to each other; and a correction circuit responsive to the sensor for generating a correction signal to drive the coils to compensate for any misalignment sensed between the carriage and the shaft.

  18. Cyclic hydrostatic pressure stimulates enhanced bone development in the foetal chick femur in vitro.

    PubMed

    Henstock, J R; Rotherham, M; Rose, J B; El Haj, A J

    2013-04-01

    Mechanical loading of bone and cartilage in vivo results in the generation of cyclic hydrostatic forces as bone compression is transduced to fluid pressure in the canalicular network and the joint synovium. It has therefore been suggested that hydrostatic pressure is an important stimulus by which osteochondral cells and their progenitors sense and respond to mechanical loading in vivo. In this study, hydrostatic pressure regimes of 0-279kPa at 0.005-2Hz were applied to organotypically cultured ex vivo chick foetal femurs (e11) for 1hour per day in a custom designed bioreactor for 14days and bone formation assessed by X-ray microtomography and qualified by histology. We found that the mineralised portion of the developing femur cultured under any cyclic hydrostatic pressure regime was significantly larger and/or denser than unstimulated controls but that constant (non-cycling) hydrostatic pressure had no effect on bone growth. Further experiments showed that the increase in bone formation was directly proportional to stimulation frequency (R(2)=0.917), but independent of the magnitude of the pressure applied, whilst even very low frequencies of stimulation (0.005Hz) had significant effects on bone growth. Expression of Type-II collagen in both epiphyses and diaphysis was significantly upregulated (1.48-fold and 1.95-fold respectively), together with osteogenic genes (osteonectin and osteopontin) and the osteocyte maturation marker CD44. This work demonstrates that cyclic hydrostatic pressure promotes bone growth and mineralisation in a developmental model and supports the hypothesis that hydrostatic forces play an important role in regulating bone growth and remodelling in vivo. PMID:23333177

  19. Bearing for liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J. (Shaler Township, Allegheny County, PA); Wasko, John (Plum Borough, PA); Pennell, William E. (Unity Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid metal pump bearing support comprises a series of tangentially oriented spokes that connect the bearing cylinder to the pump internals structure. The spokes may be arranged in a plurality of planes extending from the bearing cylinder to the pump internals with the spokes in one plane being arranged alternately with those in the next plane. The bearing support structure provides the pump with sufficient lateral support for the bearing structure together with the capability of accommodating differential thermal expansion without adversely affecting pump performance.

  20. Bearing, gearing, and lubrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of selected NASA research programs on rolling-element and fluid-film bearings, gears, and elastohydrodynamic lubrication are reported. Advances in rolling-element bearing material technology, which have resulted in a significant improvement in fatigue life, and which make possible new applications for rolling bearings, are discussed. Research on whirl-resistant, fluid-film bearings, suitable for very high-speed applications, is discussed. An improved method for predicting gear pitting life is reported. An improved formula for calculating the thickness of elastohydrodynamic films (the existence of which help to define the operating regime of concentrated contact mechanisms such as bearings, gears, and cams) is described.

  1. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  2. Hybrid Bearing Prognostic Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Certo, Joseph M.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Dimofte, Florin

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a new Hybrid Bearing Prognostic Test Rig to evaluate the performance of sensors and algorithms in predicting failures of rolling element bearings for aeronautics and space applications. The failure progression of both conventional and hybrid (ceramic rolling elements, metal races) bearings can be tested from fault initiation to total failure. The effects of different lubricants on bearing life can also be evaluated. Test conditions monitored and recorded during the test include load, oil temperature, vibration, and oil debris. New diagnostic research instrumentation will also be evaluated for hybrid bearing damage detection. This paper summarizes the capabilities of this new test rig.

  3. Bearing construction for refrigeration compresssor

    DOEpatents

    Middleton, Marc G. (Wyoming, MI); Nelson, Richard T. (Worthington, OH)

    1988-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor has a cylinder block and a crankshaft rotatable about a vertical axis to reciprocate a piston in a cylinder on the cylinder block. A separate bearing housing is secured to the central portion of the cylinder block and extends vertically along the crankshaft, where it carries a pair of roller bearings to journal the crankshaft. The crankshaft has a radially extending flange which is journaled by a thrust-type roller bearing above the bearing housing to absorb the vertical forces on the crankshaft so that all three of the roller bearings are between the crankshaft and the bearing housing to maintain and control the close tolerances required by such bearings.

  4. Electron transfer and electronic energy relaxation under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, A; Ellervee, A; Tars, M; Timpmann, K; Laisaar, A

    1997-10-01

    The following question has been addressed in the present work. How external high (up to 8 kbar) hydrostatic pressure acts on photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer and on exciton relaxation processes? Unlike phenomena, as they are, have been studied in different systems: electron transfer in an artificial Zn-porphyrin-pyromellitimide (ZnP-PM) supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complex dissolved in toluene measured at room temperature; exciton relaxation in a natural photosynthetic antenna protein called FMO protein measured at low temperatures, between 4 and 100 K. Spectrally selective picosecond time-resolved emission technique has been used to detect pressure-induced changes in the systems. The following conclusions have been drawn from the electron transfer study: (i) External pressure may serve as a potential and sensitive tool not only to study, but also to control and tune elementary chemical reactions in solvents; (ii) Depending on the system parameters, pressure can both accelerate and inhibit electron transfer reactions; (iii) If competing pathways of the reaction are available, pressure can probably change the branching ratio between the pathways; (iv) The classical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory describes well the phenomena in the ZnP-PM complex, assuming that the driving force or/and reorganisation energy depend linearly on pressure; (v) A decrease in the ZnP-PM donor-acceptor distance under pressure exerts a minor effect on the electron transfer rate. The effect of pressure on the FMO protein exciton relaxation dynamics at low temperatures has been found marginal. This may probably be explained by a unique structure of the protein [D.E. Trondrud, M.F. Schmid, B.W. Matthews, J. Mol. Biol. 188 (1986) p. 443; Y.-F. Li, W. Zhou, E. Blankenship, J.P. Allen, J. Mol. Biol., submitted]. A barrel made of low compressibility beta-sheets may, like a diving bell, effectively screen internal bacteriochlorophyll a molecules from external influence of high pressure. The origin of the observed slow pico = and subnanosecond dynamics of the excitons at the exciton band bottom remains open. The phenomenon may be due to weak coupling of phonons to the exciton states or/and to low density of the relevant low-frequency ( approximately 50 cm(-1)) phonons. Exciton solvation in the surrounding protein and water-glycerol matrix may also contribute to this effect. Drastic changes of spectral, kinetic and dynamic properties have been observed due to protein denaturation, if the protein was compressed at room temperature and then cooled down, as compared to the samples, first cooled and then pressurised. PMID:17029906

  5. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Tim; Thom, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based solvents, such as CFC-113 and 1,1,1, trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanism bearings. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change requiring the use of ODC-free cleaners for precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises; what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life? The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0 x 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90 C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing, the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition, the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  6. PPAR? Ligands Decrease Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Platelet Aggregation and Proinflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Shu; Xu, Jin-Song; Fu, Hui-Min; Su, Hai; Wang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is known to be associated with platelet overactivity, but the direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on platelet function remain unclear. The present study sought to investigate whether elevated hydrostatic pressure is responsible for platelet activation and to address the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?). We observed that hypertensive patients had significantly higher platelet volume and rate of ADP-induced platelets aggregation compared to the controls. In vitro, Primary human platelets were cultured under standard (0 mmHg) or increased (120, 180, 240 mmHg) hydrostatic pressure for 18 h. Exposure to elevated pressure was associated with morphological changes in platelets. Platelet aggregation and PAC-1 (the active confirmation of GPIIb/IIIa) binding were increased, CD40L was translocated from cytoplasm to the surface of platelet and soluble CD40L (sCD40L) was released into the medium in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure (180 and 240 mmHg). The PPAR? activity was up-regulated as the pressure was increased from 120 mmHg to 180 mmHg. Pressure-induced platelet aggregation, PAC-1 binding, and translocation and release of CD40L were all attenuated by the PPAR? agonist Thiazolidinediones (TZDs). These results demonstrate that platelet activation and aggregation are increased by exposure to elevated pressure and that PPAR? may modulate platelet activation induced by high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:24586940

  7. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. PMID:25775930

  8. Gold-bearing skarns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Orris, Greta J.; Hammerstrom, Jane M.; Bliss, James D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, a significant proportion of the mining industry's interest has been centered on discovery of gold deposits; this includes discovery of additional deposits where gold occurs in skarn, such as at Fortitude, Nevada, and at Red Dome, Australia. Under the classification of Au-bearing skarns, we have modeled these and similar gold-rich deposits that have a gold grade of at least 1 g/t and exhibit distinctive skarn mineralogy. Two subtypes, Au-skarns and byproduct Au-skarns, can be recognized on the basis of gold, silver, and base-metal grades, although many other geological factors apparently are still undistinguishable largely because of a lack of detailed studies of the Au-skarns. Median grades and tonnage for 40 Au-skarn deposits are 8.6 g/t Au, 5.0 g/t Ag, and 213,000 t. Median grades and tonnage for 50 byproduct and Au-skarn deposits are 3.7 g/t Au, 37 g/t Ag, and 330,000 t. Gold-bearing skarns are generally calcic exoskarns associated with intense retrograde hydrosilicate alteration. These skarns may contain economic amounts of numerous other commodities (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Bi, W, Sb, Co, Cd, and S) as well as gold and silver. Most Au-bearing skarns are found in Paleozoic and Cenozoic orogenic-belt and island-arc settings and are associated with felsic to intermediate intrusive rocks of Paleozoic to Tertiary age. Native gold, electru, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth minerals, and magnetite or hematite are the most common opaque minerals. Gangue minerals typically include garnet (andradite-grossular), pyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite), wollastonite, chlorite, epidote, quartz, actinolite-tremolite, and (or) calcite.

  9. Actively controlled superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyssa, Yehia M.; Huang, X.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled conventional radial beating using copper winding and soft magnetic material can provide only up to 200 N/sq cm of pressure. Large cryogenic pumps for space applications operating at 30,000 rpm and high rpm machines may require larger magnetic pressure. We show that using superconducting winding in the rotor and the stator of a magnetic bearing system increases the pressure by an order of magnitude. The paper addresses winding configuration, stability, ac losses, and power requirement for the superconducting winding.

  10. Linear magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowskiy, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    A self regulating, nonfrictional, active magnetic bearing is disclosed which has an elongated cylindrical housing for containing a shaft type armature with quadrature positioned shaft position sensors and equidistantly positioned electromagnets located at one end of the housing. Each set of sensors is responsive to orthogonal displacement of the armature and is used to generate control signals to energize the electromagnets to center the armature. A bumper magnet assembly is located at one end of the housing for dampening any undesired axial movement of the armature or to axially move the armature either continuously or fixedly.

  11. Description of a magnetic bearing test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Poole, William L.

    1987-01-01

    A description of a microcomputer controlled magnetic bearing test fixture is presented. Parameters which are controlled are magnetic bearing current and gaps. Parameters which are measured are magnetic bearing gaps, magnetic flux in the bearing gaps, and bearing forces. The test fixture is configured for bearing elements similar to those used in a laboratory test model Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD).

  12. History of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip; Haluck, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is propelled into orbit by two solid rocket motors and three liquid fed main engines. After the solid motors fall away, the shuttle engines continue to run for a total time of 8 minutes. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps. A critical part of the turbopump is the main shaft that supports the drive turbine and the pump inducer and impeller. Rolling element bearings hold the shaft in place during rotation. If the bearings were to fail, the shaft would move, allowing components to rub in a liquid oxygen or hydrogen environment, which could have catastrophic results. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and axial loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of a conventional means of lubrication. The Rocketdyne built Shuttle turbopumps demonstrated their capability to perform during launches; however, the seven hour life requirement was not being met. One of the limiting factors was the bearings. In the late 1970's, an engineering team was formed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), to develop a test rig and plan for testing the Shuttle s main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. The goals of the program were to better understand the operation of bearings in a cryogenic environment and to further develop and refine existing computer models used to predict the operational limits of these bearings. In 1982, testing began in a rig named the Bearing and Seal Material Tester or BSMT as it was commonly called. The first testing investigated the thermal margin and thermal runaway limits of the HPOTP bearings. The test rig was later used to explore potential bearing improvements in the area of increased race curvatures, new cage materials for better lubrication, new wear resistant rolling element materials, and other ideas to improve wear life. The most notable improvements during this tester s time was the incorporation of silicon nitride balls and bronze filled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cage inserts into the bearings and the anchoring of the SHABERTH bearing model and SINDA thermal computer model for cryogenic bearing analysis. In the mid 1990's, Pratt and Whitney (P&W) won the contract to deliver new high pressure turbopumps for the Shuttle s engines. P&W used two new bearing materials for the rings, Cronidur 30 and AISI 9310 steel and testing was needed on these new materials. A test rig had been designed and delivered to MSFC for testing hydrostatic bearings but with the need by Pratt to validate their bearings, the rig was reconfigured for testing of two ball bearings or a ball bearing and a roller bearing. The P&W bearings are larger than the Rocketdyne bearings and could not be installed in the BSMT. This new test rig was called the LH2 test rig and began operation in 1995. The LH2 test rig accumulated 75,000 seconds of run time in hydrogen. This test rig was valuable in two areas: validating the use of silicon nitride balls and rollers in Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) bearings, which Pratt eventually used, and in proving the robustness of the balls and rollers after river marks appeared on the surface of the rolling elements. Individual test reports have been presented at conferences and symposiums throughout the years. This paper is a comprehensive report of all the bearing testing done at Marshall. It represents thousands of hours of dedication and labor in all engineering and technical fields that made this program a success.

  13. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  14. Bulk-Flow Analysis of Hybrid Thrust Bearings for Advanced Cryogenic Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1998-01-01

    A bulk-flow analysis and computer program for prediction of the static load performance and dynamic force coefficients of angled injection, orifice-compensated hydrostatic/hydrodynamic thrust bearings have been completed. The product of the research is an efficient computational tool for the design of high-speed thrust bearings for cryogenic fluid turbopumps. The study addresses the needs of a growing technology that requires of reliable fluid film bearings to provide the maximum operating life with optimum controllable rotordynamic characteristics at the lowest cost. The motion of a cryogenic fluid on the thin film lands of a thrust bearing is governed by a set of bulk-flow mass and momentum conservation and energy transport equations. Mass flow conservation and a simple model for momentum transport within the hydrostatic bearing recesses are also accounted for. The bulk-flow model includes flow turbulence with fluid inertia advection, Coriolis and centrifugal acceleration effects on the bearing recesses and film lands. The cryogenic fluid properties are obtained from realistic thermophysical equations of state. Turbulent bulk-flow shear parameters are based on Hirs' model with Moody's friction factor equations allowing a simple simulation for machined bearing surface roughness. A perturbation analysis leads to zeroth-order nonlinear equations governing the fluid flow for the thrust bearing operating at a static equilibrium position, and first-order linear equations describing the perturbed fluid flow for small amplitude shaft motions in the axial direction. Numerical solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations renders the bearing flow rate, thrust load, drag torque and power dissipation. Solution to the first-order equations determines the axial stiffness, damping and inertia force coefficients. The computational method uses well established algorithms and generic subprograms available from prior developments. The Fortran9O computer program hydrothrust runs on a Windows 95/NT personal computer. The program, help files and examples are licensed by Texas A&M University Technology License Office. The study of the static and dynamic performance of two hydrostatic/hydrodynamic bearings demonstrates the importance of centrifugal and advection fluid inertia effects for operation at high rotational speeds. The first example considers a conceptual hydrostatic thrust bearing for an advanced liquid hydrogen turbopump operating at 170,000 rpm. The large axial stiffness and damping coefficients of the bearing should provide accurate control and axial positioning of the turbopump and also allow for unshrouded impellers, therefore increasing the overall pump efficiency. The second bearing uses a refrigerant R134a, and its application in oil-free air conditioning compressors is of great technological importance and commercial value. The computed predictions reveal that the LH2 bearing load capacity and flow rate increase with the recess pressure (i.e. increasing orifice diameters). The bearing axial stiffness has a maximum for a recess pressure rati of approx. 0.55. while the axial damping coefficient decreases as the recess pressure ratio increases. The computer results from three flow models are compared. These models are a) inertialess, b) fluid inertia at recess edges only, and c) full fluid inertia at both recess edges and film lands. The full inertia model shows the lowest flow rates, axial load capacity and stiffness coefficient but on the other hand renders the largest damping coefficients and inertia coefficients. The most important findings are related to the reduction of the outflow through the inner radius and the appearance of subambient pressures. The performance of the refrigerant hybrid thrust bearing is evaluated at two operating speeds and pressure drops. The computed results are presented in dimensionless form to evidence consistent trends in the bearing performance characteristics. As the applied axial load increases, the bearing film thickness and flow rate decrease while the recess pressure increases. The axial stiffness coefficient shows a maximum for a certain intermediate load while the damping coefficient steadily increases. The computed results evidence the paramount of centrifugal fluid inertia at low recess pressures (i.e. low loads), and where there is actually an inflow through the bearing inner diameter, accompanied by subambient pressures just downstream of the bearing recess edge. These results are solely due to centrifugal fluid inertia and advection transport effects. Recommendations include the extension of the computer program to handle flexure pivot tilting pad hybrid bearings and the ability to calculate moment coefficients for shaft angular misalignments.

  15. A two-dimensional depth-integrated non-hydrostatic numerical model for nearshore wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinhua; Dong, Bingjiang; Mao, Bing; Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we develop a shallow-water depth-integrated non-hydrostatic numerical model (SNH model) using a hybrid finite-volume and finite-difference method. Numerical discretization is performed using the non-incremental pressure-correction method on a collocated grid. We demonstrate that an extension can easily be made from an existing finite-volume method and collocated-grid based hydrostatic shallow-water equations (SWE) model to a non-hydrostatic model. A series of benchmark tests are used to validate the proposed numerical model. Our results demonstrate that the proposed model is robust and well-balanced, and it captures the wet-dry fronts accurately. A comparison between the SNH and SWE models indicates the importance of considering the wave dispersion effect in simulations when the wave amplitude to water depth ratio is large.

  16. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters - III. Removing the hydrostatic mass bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters leads to underestimation of the mass of galaxy clusters based on hydrostatic equilibrium with thermal gas pressure. This occurs even for dynamically relaxed clusters that are used for calibrating the mass-observable scaling relations. We show that the analytical model for non-thermal pressure developed in Shi & Komatsu can correct for this so-called `hydrostatic mass bias', if most of the non-thermal pressure comes from bulk and turbulent motions of gas in the intracluster medium. Our correction works for the sample average irrespective of the mass estimation method, or the dynamical state of the clusters. This makes it possible to correct for the bias in the hydrostatic mass estimates from X-ray surface brightness and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations that will be available for clusters in a wide range of redshifts and dynamical states.

  17. On variable hydrostatic transmission for road vehicles, powered by supply of fluid at constant pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, M.; Freivald, A.; Andersson, I.; Ericsson, U.

    1981-01-01

    Various hydrostatic power transmission systems for automotive applications with power supply at constant pressure and unrestricted flow and with a Volvo Flygmotor variable displacement motor as the principal unit were investigated. Two most promising concepts were analyzed in detail and their main components optimized for minimum power loss at the EPA Urban Driving Cycle. The best fuel consumption is less than 10 lit. per 100 kM for a 1542 kG vehicle with a hydrostatic motor and a two speed gear box in series (braking power not recovered). Realistic system pressure affects the fuel consumption just slightly, but the package volume/weight drastically. Back pressure increases losses significantly. Special attention was paid to description of the behavior and modeling of the losses of variable displacement hydrostatic machines.

  18. Antagonistic effects of hydrostatic pressure and osmotic pressure on cytochrome P-450cam spin transition.

    PubMed Central

    Di Primo, C; Deprez, E; Hoa, G H; Douzou, P

    1995-01-01

    The combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and osmotic pressure, generated by polyols, on the spin equilibrium of fenchone-bound cytochrome P-450cam were investigated. Hydrostatic pressure indices a high spin to low spin transition, whereas polyols induce the reversed reaction. Of the four solutes used, glycerol, glucose, stachyose, and sucrose, only the last two would act on the spin transition by osmotic stress. The spin volume changes measured by both techniques are different, 29 and -350 ml/mol for hydrostatic pressure and osmotic pressure, respectively. It suggests that even if the two are perturbing water molecules, different properties are probed. From the volume change induced by osmotic stress, 19 water molecules are deduced that would be implicated in the spin transition of the fenchone-bound protein. This result suggests that water molecules other than the well defined ones located in the active site play a key role in modulating the spin equilibrium of cytochrome P-450cam. PMID:7612848

  19. Primary cilia modulate Ihh signal transduction in response to hydrostatic loading of growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yvonne Y; Wang, Lai; Welter, Jean F; Ballock, R Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is a key component of the regulatory apparatus governing chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in the growth plate. Recent studies have demonstrated that the primary cilium is the site of Ihh signaling within the cell, and that primary cilia are essential for bone and cartilage formation. Primary cilia are also postulated to act as mechanosensory organelles that transduce mechanical forces acting on the cell into biological signals. In this study, we used a hydrostatic compression system to examine Ihh signal transduction under the influence of mechanical load. Our results demonstrate that hydrostatic compression increased both Ihh gene expression and Ihh-responsive Gli-luciferase activity. These increases were aborted by disrupting the primary cilia structure with chloral hydrate. These results suggest that growth plate chondrocytes respond to hydrostatic loading by increasing Ihh signaling, and that the primary cilium is required for this mechano-biological signal transduction to occur. PMID:21930256

  20. High hydrostatic pressure improves the swimming efficiency of European migrating silver eel.

    PubMed

    Sébert, P; Scaion, D; Belhomme, M

    2009-01-01

    To reproduce, European eels must undergo a long migration without feeding. During this migration they have to cope with many environmental factor changes, one of them being hydrostatic pressure. We focus on the effects of hydrostatic pressure on swimming energetics: does the pressure exposure modify swimming efficiency? By using a specially designed Blazka type swimming tunnel able to work under pressure, we have measured oxygen consumption of migrating male silver eels at different swimming speeds (from 0.2 to 1.0 BL/s) first at atmospheric pressure then at 101 ATA hydrostatic pressure. The results show that pressure increases the energetic swimming efficiency by decreasing oxygen consumption for a given swimming speed. Such a pressure effect could represent a remarkable adaptation enabling eels to spare their energy stores and swim for a long time. PMID:18952012

  1. Hydrogenic donor impurity in parallel-triangular quantum wires: Hydrostatic pressure and applied electric field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, R. L.; Giraldo, E.; Miranda, G. L.; Ospina, W.; Duque, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    The combined effects of the hydrostatic pressure and in-growth direction applied electric field on the binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity states in parallel-coupled-GaAs- Ga1-xAlxAs-quantum-well wires are calculated using a variational procedure within the effective-mass and parabolic-band approximations. Results are obtained for several dimensions of the structure, shallow-donor impurity positions, hydrostatic pressure, and applied electric field. Our results suggest that external inputs such us hydrostatic pressure and in-growth direction electric field are two useful tools in order to modify the binding energy of a donor impurity in parallel-coupled-quantum-well wires.

  2. An Investigation on the Performance of Hydrostatic Pumps Using Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canbulut, Fazil; Sinano?lu, Cem

    In this paper, an analysis of volumetric efficiency of hydrostatic pumps in a variety conditions is investigated by using a proposed neural network. The effects of the parameters, such as the number of revolution, hydraulic oil temperature and exit pressures, which act on performances of hydrostatic pumps like gear pumps, vane pumps, and axial reciprocal pumps with swash plate, on the volumetric efficiency have been examined. The revolution number of the pumps, exit pressure of the system and the hydraulic oil temperatures are greatly affected by the leakage flowrate. The neural network structure is very suitable for this kind of system. The network is capable of predicting the leakage flowrate of the experimental system. The network has a parallel structure and fast learning capacity. As it can be seen from the results for both approaches, neural network could be modeled hydrostatic pump systems in real time applications.

  3. Using infrared thermography to study hydrostatic stress networks in granular materials.

    PubMed

    Jongchansitto, Pawarut; Balandraud, Xavier; Grdiac, Michel; Beitone, Clment; Preechawuttipong, Itthichai

    2014-11-21

    The macroscopic mechanical behaviour of granular materials is governed by microscopic features at the particle scale. Photoelasticimetry is a powerful method for measuring shear stresses in particles made from birefringent materials. As a complementary method, we here identify the hydrostatic stress networks through thermoelastic stress analysis using infrared thermographic measurements. Experiments are performed on two-dimensional cohesionless monodisperse granular materials composed of about 1200 cylinders comprising two constitutive materials. We show that the experimental hydrostatic stress distributions follow statistical laws which are in agreement with simulations performed using molecular dynamics, except in one case exhibiting piecewise periodic stacking. Polydisperse cases are then processed. The measurement of hydrostatic stress networks using this technique opens new prospects for the analysis of granular materials. PMID:25249195

  4. Antagonistic effects of hydrostatic pressure and osmotic pressure on cytochrome P-450cam spin transition.

    PubMed

    Di Primo, C; Deprez, E; Hoa, G H; Douzou, P

    1995-05-01

    The combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and osmotic pressure, generated by polyols, on the spin equilibrium of fenchone-bound cytochrome P-450cam were investigated. Hydrostatic pressure indices a high spin to low spin transition, whereas polyols induce the reversed reaction. Of the four solutes used, glycerol, glucose, stachyose, and sucrose, only the last two would act on the spin transition by osmotic stress. The spin volume changes measured by both techniques are different, 29 and -350 ml/mol for hydrostatic pressure and osmotic pressure, respectively. It suggests that even if the two are perturbing water molecules, different properties are probed. From the volume change induced by osmotic stress, 19 water molecules are deduced that would be implicated in the spin transition of the fenchone-bound protein. This result suggests that water molecules other than the well defined ones located in the active site play a key role in modulating the spin equilibrium of cytochrome P-450cam. PMID:7612848

  5. Reduction in bearing size due to superconductors in magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dantam K.; Lewis, Paul; Dill, James F.

    1991-01-01

    A design concept that reduces the size of magnetic bearings is assessed. The small size will enable magnetic bearings to fit into limited available bearing volume of cryogenic machinery. The design concept, called SUPERC, uses (high Tc) superconductors or high-purity aluminum conductors in windings instead of copper. The relatively high-current density of these conductors reduces the slot radial thickness for windings, which reduces the size of the bearings. MTI developed a sizing program called SUPERC that translates the high-current density of these conductors into smaller sized bearings. This program was used to size a superconducting bearing to carry a 500 lb. load. The sizes of magnetic bearings needed by various design concepts are as follows: SUPERC design concept = 3.75 in.; magnet-bias design concept = 5.25 in.; and all electromagnet design concept = 7.0 in. These results indicate that the SUPERC design concept can significantly reduce the size of the bearing. This reduction, in turn, reduces the weight and yields a lighter bearing. Since the superconductors have inherently near-zero resistance, they are also expected to save power needed for operation considerably.

  6. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy Raymond; Thom, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC ) based solvents, such as Freon and 1,1,1, Trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanisms. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change to new ODC-free cleaners for the precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0* 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  7. Totally frictionless magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodakian, Wayne; Bulman, John

    2000-11-01

    A totally frictionless magnetic bearing has been developed which supports a rotor in a contactless manner. The rotor is held in a magnetic potential well via repulsive forces only. Vertical and lateral restoring forces are provided to the rotor passively via permanent magnets in such an arrangement so as to support the weight of the rotor and provide it with a high degree of lateral stability. Axial stability of the rotor is provided by the use of an electromagnet which is controlled by a PID control loop. Information on the axial position of the rotor is provided to the circuit by use of an infrared LED and IR phototransistor. To prevent unwanted oscillations of the rotors axial position from occurring, an oscillation sensor in the form of an inductive pick-up coil of high impedance provides signals to the oscillation sensing portion of the circuit, which in turn feeds the oscillation dampening circuit. The use of only repulsive forces in stabilizing the rotor means that there will be no eddy current losses or hysterisis losses. Such a frictionless magnetic bearing can, for example be used in rotational oscillation experiments and ultra low loss watt-hour meters, which are of great importance to utility companies. When properly tuned, the total power requirements of the circuit is a mere 40mW, which is less than the 80 mW used by present day watt-hour meters.

  8. Constraints on Enceladus' Internal Structure from Cassini Gravity: Beyond Hydrostatic Cores and Uniformly Compensated Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Bland, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini has determined three important gravitational coefficients for Enceladus, J2, C22 and J3 (Iess et al., Science 344, 78). The gravity field is non-hydrostatic to 3σ (J2/C22 = 3.38-3.63, as opposed to 10/3). Iess et al. interpret these in terms of a hydrostatic interior (core) and isostatic (not hydrostatic) floating ice shell. The hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic contributions are separated by assuming the isostatic compensation depth is the same for each gravity term, although this can't be strictly true in the case of a regional south polar sea. The inferred normalized moment-of-inertia (0.335) implies a core density of 2340-2400 kg/m3, consistent with a highly hydrated and oxidized (sulfate-rich) core, or more plausibly (in a cosmochemical sense), a porous, water-saturated core. The long-term stability of such porosity is questionable, however. Modest topography on a more indurated core could significantly contribute to the gravity signal. For example, if Enceladus' core density were 3000 kg/m3, excess topography of only 1 km amplitude could provide the same "hydrostatic" J2 component as modeled in Iess et al. (and requires only 0.1 MPa of stress support). There is also the question of compensation depth of the ice shell. Different formalisms for spherical shells exist in the literature (e.g., Lambeck vs. Turcotte); Iess et al. follow the former and derive a 30-to-40-km thick shell at the south pole, whereas the Turcotte formalism gives a shell only 18-25-km thick. We pay particular attention to this issue, and note a thinner shell would be more mechanically compatible with the spacing of the "tiger stripes," if the fissures are indeed crevasses open to the ocean below.

  9. Combined use of infrared and Raman spectra in the characterization of orthoclase under various hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Yu, Na; Cao, Miao-Cong

    2014-02-01

    Colorless and pink orthoclase from Balikun granite body, East Zhunger in Xinjiang, served as the samples for the research on hydrostatic pressure experiment. The in-situ hydrostatic pressure test for orthoclases was conducted at the room temperature and pressures from 100 to 600 MPa using cubic zirconia anvil cell, with quartz as pressure gauge. The water located in the orthoclases for the conditions of different hydrostatic pressures was characterized through the methods of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra. The results showed that there was a linear correlation between the shifting of Raman bands and hydrostatic pressure applied to the feldspar. All of vibration peaks of M-O structural groups in orthoclases, the bending vibration peaks of Si(Al(IV))-O-Si bond and tetrahedron groups of [SiO4] in Raman spectra shifted toward the higher frequency regularly, the drift distance is 2, 2.19 and less than 2 cm(-1) respectively. The spectra of FTIR suggested that there was more water in colorless orthoclases than the pink one under certain conditions of hydrostatic pressure. The intensity and integral area centered at 3420 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra increased with the rising of hydrostatic pressure. The integral area for colorless and pink feldspar in FTIR spectra rose from 120, 1383 cm(-1) under normal pressure to 1570, 2001 cm(-1) at 600 MPa respectively. The experimental results might indicate that the water in the earth crust could enter the orthoclases in certain condition of the aqueous confining pressure. PMID:24822414

  10. Enema reduction of intussusception: the success rate of hydrostatic and pneumatic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khorana, Jiraporn; Singhavejsakul, Jesda; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Laohapensang, Mongkol; Wakhanrittee, Junsujee; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intussusception is a common surgical emergency in infants and children. The incidence of intussusception is from one to four per 2,000 infants and children. If there is no peritonitis, perforation sign on abdominal radiographic studies, and nonresponsive shock, nonoperative reduction by pneumatic or hydrostatic enema can be performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the success rates of both the methods. Methods Two institutional retrospective cohort studies were performed. All intussusception patients (ICD-10 code K56.1) who had visited Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital from January 2006 to December 2012 were included in the study. The data were obtained by chart reviews and electronic databases, which included demographic data, symptoms, signs, and investigations. The patients were grouped according to the method of reduction followed into pneumatic reduction and hydrostatic reduction groups with the outcome being the success of the reduction technique. Results One hundred and seventy episodes of intussusception occurring in the patients of Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital were included in this study. The success rate of pneumatic reduction was 61% and that of hydrostatic reduction was 44% (P=0.036). Multivariable analysis and adjusting of the factors by propensity scores were performed; the success rate of pneumatic reduction was 1.48 times more than that of hydrostatic reduction (P=0.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.03–2.13). Conclusion Both pneumatic and hydrostatic reduction can be performed safely according to the experience of the radiologist or pediatric surgeon and hospital setting. This study showed that pneumatic reduction had a higher success rate than hydrostatic reduction. PMID:26719697

  11. Nonlinear Control of Wind Turbines with Hydrostatic Transmission Based on Takagi-Sugeno Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Horst; Georg, Soren

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear model-based control concept for wind turbines with hydrostatic transmission is proposed. The complete mathematical model of a wind turbine drive train with variable displacement pump and variable displacement motor is presented. The controller design takes into consideration the nonlinearity of the aerodynamic maps and hydrostatic drive train by an convex combination of state space controller with measurable generator speed and hydraulic motor displacement as scheduling parameters. The objectives are the set point control of generator speed and tracking control of the rotor speed to reach the maximum power according to the power curve in the partial-load region.

  12. Hydrostatic equilibrium equation and Newtonian limit of the singular f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustelo, A. J.; Barraco, D. E.

    2007-05-01

    We derive the hydrostatic equilibrium equation of a spherical star for any gravitational Lagrangian density of the form L=\\sqrt{-g}f(R) . The Palatini variational principle for the Helmholtz Lagrangian in the Einstein gauge is used to obtain the field equations in this gauge. The equilibrium hydrostatic equation is obtained and is used to study the Newtonian limit for f(R)=R-\\frac{a^{2}}{3R} . The same procedure is carried out for the more generally case f(R)=R-\\frac{1}{n+2}\\frac{a^{n+1}}{R^{n}} giving a good Newtonian limit.

  13. Experimental investigation of the flow in a simplified model of water lubricated axial thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2014-03-01

    In hydropower plants the axial thrust bearing takes up the hydraulic axial thrust of the runner and, in case of vertical shafts, the entire weight of all rotating masses. The use of water lubricated bearings can eliminate the oil leakage risk possibly contaminating the environment. A complex flow is generated by the smaller film thickness due to the lower viscosity of water compared with oil. Measurements on a simplified hydrostatic axial trust bearing model were accomplished for validating CFD analysis of water lubricated bearings. In this simplified model, fixed pads are implemented and the width of the gap was enlarged to create a higher resolution in space for the measurements. Most parts of the model were manufactured from acrylic glass to get optical access for measurement with PIV. The focus of these measurements is on the flow within the space between two pads. Additional to the PIV- measurement, the pressure on the wall of the rotating disk is captured by pressure transducers. The model bearing measurement results are presented for varied operating conditions.

  14. Robust and intelligent bearing estimation

    DOEpatents

    Claassen, John P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method of bearing estimation comprising quadrature digital filtering of event observations, constructing a plurality of observation matrices each centered on a time-frequency interval, determining for each observation matrix a parameter such as degree of polarization, linearity of particle motion, degree of dyadicy, or signal-to-noise ratio, choosing observation matrices most likely to produce a set of best available bearing estimates, and estimating a bearing for each observation matrix of the chosen set.

  15. Spin bearing retainer design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.; Warner, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics behavior of spin bearings for momentum wheels (control-moment gyroscope, reaction wheel assembly) is critical to satellite stability and life. Repeated bearing retainer instabilities hasten lubricant deterioration and can lead to premature bearing failure and/or unacceptable vibration. These instabilities are typically distinguished by increases in torque, temperature, audible noise, and vibration induced by increases into the bearing cartridge. Ball retainer design can be optimized to minimize these occurrences. A retainer was designed using a previously successful smaller retainer as an example. Analytical methods were then employed to predict its behavior and optimize its configuration.

  16. Superconducting levitating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Francis C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A superconducting bearing assembly includes a coil field source that may be superconducting and a superconducting structure. The coil field source assembly and superconducting structure are positioned so as to enable relative rotary movement therebetween. The structure and coil field source are brought to a supercooled temperature before a power supply induces a current in the coil field source. A Meissner-like effect is thereby obtained and little or no penetration of the field lines is seen in the superconducting structure. Also, the field that can be obtained from the superconducting coil is 2-8 times higher than that of permanent magnets. Since the magnetic pressure is proportioned to the square of the field, magnetic pressures from 4 to 64 times higher are achieved.

  17. The polar bear phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Maw, P.K. ); Lane, M.T.

    1990-02-01

    Results from measuring the thermal profile of polar bear pelts, reflectiveness of the pelts, and total thermal conversion data lead to the conclusion that the pelts from an ultra-efficient thermal diode for solar-thermal conversion. The transfer of the thermal energy from the surface of the fur to the skin where it is absorbed cannot be thermal, and therefore must be radiative. This process must have an efficiency of better than 90:0090 percent to account for measured values. The radiative transfer process is not known at present. To understand it, a detailed knowledge of the microscopic parameters of the pelts must be obtained. This is the current thrust of the polar solar research. If the process can be understood and synthesized,it will provide a major breakthrough in the area of solar-thermal energy conversion.

  18. Solidification and loss of hydrostaticity in liquid media used for pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikachvili, M. S.; Kim, S. K.; Colombier, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    We carried out a study of the pressure dependence of the solidification temperature in nine pressure transmitting media that are liquid at ambient temperature, under pressures up to 2.3 GPa. These fluids are 1:1 isopentane/n-pentane, 4:6 light mineral oil/n-pentane, 1:1 isoamyl alcohol/n-pentane, 4:1 methanol/ethanol, 1:1 FC72/FC84 (Fluorinert), Daphne 7373, isopentane, and Dow Corning PMX silicone oils 200 and 60 000 cS. We relied on the high sensitivity of the electrical resistivity of Ba(Fe1-xRux)2As2 single crystals to the freezing of the pressure media and cross-checked with corresponding anomalies observed in the resistance of the manganin coil that served as the ambient temperature resistive manometer. In addition to establishing the temperature-pressure line separating the liquid (hydrostatic) and frozen (non-hydrostatic) phases, these data permit rough estimates of the freezing pressure of these media at ambient temperature. This pressure establishes the extreme limit for the medium to be considered hydrostatic. For higher applied pressures, the medium has to be treated as non-hydrostatic.

  19. Transcriptomics Reveal Several Gene Expression Patterns in the Piezophile Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis in Response to Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Amrani, Amira; Bergon, Aurlie; Holota, Hlne; Tamburini, Christian; Garel, Marc; Ollivier, Bernard; Imbert, Jean; Dolla, Alain; Pradel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq was used to study the response of Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal chimney on the East-Pacific Rise at a depth of 2,600 m, to various hydrostatic pressure growth conditions. The transcriptomic datasets obtained after growth at 26, 10 and 0.1 MPa identified only 65 differentially expressed genes that were distributed among four main categories: aromatic amino acid and glutamate metabolisms, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and unknown function. The gene expression patterns suggest that D. hydrothermalis uses at least three different adaptation mechanisms, according to a hydrostatic pressure threshold (HPt) that was estimated to be above 10 MPa. Both glutamate and energy metabolism were found to play crucial roles in these mechanisms. Quantitation of the glutamate levels in cells revealed its accumulation at high hydrostatic pressure, suggesting its role as a piezolyte. ATP measurements showed that the energy metabolism of this bacterium is optimized for deep-sea life conditions. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms linked to hydrostatic pressure adaptation in sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:25215865

  20. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value “S” at the test temperature to the stress value “S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  1. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value “S” at the test temperature to the stress value “S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  2. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of “S” at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value “S” at the test temperature to the stress value “S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  3. Human norovirus inactivation in oysters by high hydrostatic pressure processing: A randomized double-blinded study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This randomized, double-blinded, clinical trial assessed the effect of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) on genogroup I.1 human norovirus (HuNoV) inactivation in virus-seeded oysters when ingested by subjects. The safety and efficacy of HPP treatments were assessed in three study phases wi...

  4. High hydrostatic pressure activates transcription factors involved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bravim, Fernanda; da Silva, Lucas F.; Souza, Diego T.; Lippman, Soyeon I.; Broach, James R.; Fernandes, A. Alberto R.; Fernandes, Patricia M, B.

    2016-01-01

    A number of transcriptional control elements are activated when Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are submitted to various stress conditions, including high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to HHP results in global transcriptional reprogramming, similar to that observed under other industrial stresses, such as temperature, ethanol and oxidative stresses. Moreover, treatment with a mild hydrostatic pressure renders yeast cells multi-stress tolerant. In order to identify transcriptional factors involved in coordinating response to high hydrostatic pressure, we performed a time series microarray expression analysis on a wild S. cerevisiae strain exposed to 50 MPa for 30 min followed by recovery at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) for 5, 10 and 15 min. We identified transcription factors and corresponding DNA and RNA motifs targeted in response to hydrostatic pressure. Moreover, we observed that different motif elements are present in the promoters of induced or repressed genes during HHP treatment. Overall, as we have already published, mild HHP treatment to wild yeast cells provides multiple protection mechanisms, and this study suggests that the TFs and motifs identified as responding to HHP may be informative for a wide range of other biotechnological and industrial applications, such as fermentation, that may utilize HHP treatment. PMID:23072392

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-3, Hydrostatic Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Rick; Espy, John

    This third in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I describes the principles and practices associated with hydrostatic testing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student,

  6. Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure Pulsing on the Inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis in Liquid Whole Egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella in Eggs and egg-containing foods have caused numerous food-borne outbreaks and recalls. Liquid whole egg inoculated with Salmonella enteritidis at 108 CFU/ml were treated with continuous or repeating hydrostatic -pressures (300 MPa to 400 MPa) at 25C, 40C and 50C for up to 40 min. Treatme...

  7. Hydrostatic Pressure Project: Linked-Class Problem-Based Learning in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Freddie J.; Lockwood-Cooke, Pamela; Hunt, Emily M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few years, WTAMU Mathematics, Engineering and Science faculty has used interdisciplinary projects as the basis for implementation of a linked-class approach to Problem-Based Learning (PBL). A project that has significant relevance to engineering statics, fluid mechanics, and calculus is the Hydrostatic Pressure Project. This project…

  8. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  9. Prolonged Exercise and Changes in Percent Fat Determinations by Hydrostatic Weighing and Scintillation Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Tom R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This study, designed to determine the effect of a prolonged running bout on the measurement of percent fat, produced erroneously low readings. It is suggested that previous exercise and state of hydration of subjects should be controlled prior to percent fat determination by hydrostatic weighing or scintillation counting. (MJB)

  10. Solidification and loss of hydrostaticity in liquid media used for pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Torikachvili, M S; Kim, S K; Colombier, E; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C

    2015-12-01

    We carried out a study of the pressure dependence of the solidification temperature in nine pressure transmitting media that are liquid at ambient temperature, under pressures up to 2.3 GPa. These fluids are 1:1 isopentane/n-pentane, 4:6 light mineral oil/n-pentane, 1:1 isoamyl alcohol/n-pentane, 4:1 methanol/ethanol, 1:1 FC72/FC84 (Fluorinert), Daphne 7373, isopentane, and Dow Corning PMX silicone oils 200 and 60?000 cS. We relied on the high sensitivity of the electrical resistivity of Ba(Fe1-xRux)2As2 single crystals to the freezing of the pressure media and cross-checked with corresponding anomalies observed in the resistance of the manganin coil that served as the ambient temperature resistive manometer. In addition to establishing the temperature-pressure line separating the liquid (hydrostatic) and frozen (non-hydrostatic) phases, these data permit rough estimates of the freezing pressure of these media at ambient temperature. This pressure establishes the extreme limit for the medium to be considered hydrostatic. For higher applied pressures, the medium has to be treated as non-hydrostatic. PMID:26724044

  11. Inactivation of human norovirus in contaminated oysters and clams by high-hydrostatic pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human norovirus (NoV) is the most frequent causative agent of foodborne disease associated with shellfish consumption. In this study, the effect of high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on inactivation of NoV was determined. Genogroup I.1 (GI.1) or Genogroup II.4 (GII.4) NoV were inoculated into oyster ho...

  12. Thermal fluid-solid interaction model and experimental validation for hydrostatic mechanical face seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weifeng; Liao, Chuanjun; Liu, Xiangfeng; Suo, Shuangfu; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    Hydrostatic mechanical face seals for reactor coolant pumps are very important for the safety and reliability of pressurized-water reactor power plants. More accurate models on the operating mechanism of the seals are needed to help improve their performance. The thermal fluid-solid interaction (TFSI) mechanism of the hydrostatic seal is investigated in this study. Numerical models of the flow field and seal assembly are developed. Based on the mechanism for the continuity condition of the physical quantities at the fluid-solid interface, an on-line numerical TFSI model for the hydrostatic mechanical seal is proposed using an iterative coupling method. Dynamic mesh technology is adopted to adapt to the changing boundary shape. Experiments were performed on a test rig using a full-size test seal to obtain the leakage rate as a function of the differential pressure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the TFSI model were verified by comparing the simulation results and experimental data. Using the TFSI model, the behavior of the seal is presented, including mechanical and thermal deformation, and the temperature field. The influences of the rotating speed and differential pressure of the sealing device on the temperature field, which occur widely in the actual use of the seal, are studied. This research proposes an on-line and assembly-based TFSI model for hydrostatic mechanical face seals, and the model is validated by full-sized experiments.

  13. Effect of Pulsed Ultraviolet Light and High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Antigenicity of Almond Protein Extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on reducing the IgE binding to the almond extracts, was studied using SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA probed with human plasma containing IgE antibodies to almond allergens, and a polyclonal antibody against almond ...

  14. Hydrostatic pressure effect on the electrical resistivity of Ni 80P 20 amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysov, V. I.; Krysova, S. K.; Maksimov, I. S.; Medvedev, Yu. V.

    1999-04-01

    An influence of hydrostatic pressure on electronic transport in amorphous alloys Ni 80P 20 has been studied. The nonmonotonic behaviour of the pressure resistance coefficient is explained in terms of the Ziman-Faber theory by differences in resistance change velocities at the expansion of the Fermi surface and a topological short-range order.

  15. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure processing on in vitro digestion of milk proteins and fats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) is increasing in popularity in the food industry. Its ability to modify milk proteins and fats suggests that it may be useful in creating foods that suppress appetite; however, its effect on the digestibility of proteins and fats is unclear. The...

  16. Potential for High Hydrostatic Pressure Processing to Control Quarantine Insects in Fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tests were conducted to determine the potential for high hydrostatic pressure (HPP) to control codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) and Western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran. Apples with larvae or eggs of codling moth were treated 24 h and 72 h, respectively, after infestation at a s...

  17. Hydrostatic and uniaxial behavior of a high density polyurethane foam (FR-3720) at various temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.Y.; Korellis, J.S.; Lee, K.L.; Grishaber, R.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes the foam testing program designed to support a constitutive material response model. Experimental techniques were developed for hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial testing of high density polyurethane foam from ambient to 150 C with deformation greater than 50%. Two chambers were developed to perform the tests.

  18. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the physiology of Manila mango.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, M A; De la Cruz-Medina, J; de Los Monteros, J J Espinosa; Oliart-Ros, R M; Rebolledo-Martinez, A; Ramrez, J A; Garca, H S

    2013-06-01

    Manila mangoes (Mangifera indica L.) have sensory characteristics that make them attractive for consumption as a fresh fruit. A large portion of the annual yield of this fruit is infested by the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens), adversely impacting the quality of the crop. Hence, it is necessary to develop economically viable postharvest treatments to reduce the damage caused by this insect. Currently, high hydrostatic pressures are used to guarantee the safety of many processed foods. The objective of this work was to assess the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on mangoes at their physiological maturity. High hydrostatic pressures were applied to mangoes at three levels: 50, 100 and 200 megapascals applied for four different time periods (0, 5, 10 and 20 min). Physiologically mature mangoes were more resistant to changes in response to the pressure of 50 MPa. Reduction of physiological activity by application of high hydrostatic pressure opens a new avenue for the research on treatments intended to enhance preservation of whole fresh fruit. PMID:23504511

  19. Magneto-photoluminescence of GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunctions under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, A. N.; Nicholas, R. J.; Symons, D.; Portal, J. C.; Foxon, C. T.; Harris, J. J.

    1998-12-01

    We report measurements of photoluminescence of GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunctions using hydrostatic pressure to reduce the Zeeman energy. A red-shift is observed near ?=1 which falls with pressure, consistent with theoretical predictions of Skyrmionic exciton recombination energies. When the Zeeman energy is reduced below a critical value the red-shift vanishes.

  20. 46 CFR 54.10-10 - Standard hydrostatic test (modifies UG-99).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1). The value of S at test... vessel, multiplied by the ratio of the stress value S at the test temperature to the stress value S... ratio less than one shall be used. The stress resulting from the hydrostatic test shall not exceed...

  1. Corrosion-Resistant Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdankiewicz, E. M.; Linaburg, E. L.; Lytle, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Self-lubricating bearing system withstands highly corrosive environment of wastewater-recycling unit. New bearings contain cobalt-based-alloy balls and races, graphite/polyimide polymer ball cages, and single integral polytetrafluoroethylene seals on wet sides. Materials and design prevent corrosion by acids and provide lubrication.

  2. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  3. Lubrication of rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a broad survey of the lubrication of rolling-element bearings. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through-the-race are discussed. The paper covers the historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling-element bearing lubrication.

  4. Strength Differential Measured in Inconel 718: Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Wesseling, Paul; Prabhu, Nishad S.; Larose, Joel; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2003-01-01

    Aeropropulsion components, such as disks, blades, and shafts, are commonly subjected to multiaxial stress states at elevated temperatures. Experimental results from loadings as complex as those experienced in service are needed to help guide the development of accurate viscoplastic, multiaxial deformation models that can be used to improve the design of these components. During a recent study on multiaxial deformation (ref. 1) on a common aerospace material, Inconel 718, it was shown that the material in the aged state exhibits a strength differential effect (SDE), whereby the uniaxial compressive yield and subsequent flow behavior are significantly higher than those in uniaxial tension. Thus, this material cannot be described by a standard von Mises yield formulation. There have been other formulations postulated (ref. 2) that involve other combinations of the stress invariants, including the effect of hydrostatic stress. The question remained as to which invariants are necessary in the flow model. To capture the physical mechanisms occurring during deformation and reflect them in the plasticity formulation, researchers examined the flow of Inconel 718 under various amounts of hydrostatic stress to determine whether or not hydrostatic stress is needed in the formulation. Under NASA Grant NCC3-464, monitored by the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of tensile tests were conducted at Case Western Reserve University on aged (precipitation hardened) Inconel 718 at 650 C and with superimposed hydrostatic pressure. Dogbone shaped tensile specimens (3-mm-diameter gauge by 16-mm gauge length) and cylindrical compression specimens (3-mm-diameter gauge by 6-mm gauge length) were strain gauged and loaded in a high-pressure testing apparatus. Hydrostatic pressures were obtained with argon and ranged from 210 to 630 MPa. The aged Inconel 718 showed a pronounced difference in the tension and compression yield strength (i.e., an SDE), as previously observed. Also, there were no significant effects of hydrostatic pressure on either the tensile and compressive yield strength (see the graph) or on the magnitude of the SDE. This behavior is not consistent with the pressure-dependent theory of the SDE, which postulates that the SDE is associated with pressure-dependent and/or internal friction dependent deformation associated with non-Schmid effects at the crystal level (refs. 3 and 4). Flow in Inconel 718 appears to be independent of hydrostatic pressure, suggesting that this invariant may be removed from the phenomenological constitutive model. As part of an ongoing effort to develop advanced constitutive models, Glenn s Life Prediction Branch coordinated this work with that of research on the multiaxial deformation behavior of Inconel 718 being conducted at Pennsylvania State University under NASA Grant NCC597.

  5. Nonlinear control of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradeep, A. K.; Gurumoorthy, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a variety of nonlinear controllers for the magnetic bearing that ensure both stability and robustness. We utilize techniques of discontinuous control to design novel control laws for the magnetic bearing. We present in particular sliding mode controllers, time optimal controllers, winding algorithm based controllers, nested switching controllers, fractional controllers, and synchronous switching controllers for the magnetic bearing. We show existence of solutions to systems governed by discontinuous control laws, and prove stability and robustness of the chosen control laws in a rigorous setting. We design sliding mode observers for the magnetic bearing and prove the convergence of the state estimates to their true values. We present simulation results of the performance of the magnetic bearing subject to the aforementioned control laws, and conclude with comments on design.

  6. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  7. Geophagy by yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.; Green, G.I.; Swalley, R.

    1999-01-01

    We documented 12 sites in the Yellowstone ecosystem where grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) had purposefully consumed soil (an activity known as geophagy). We also documented soil in numerous grizzly bear feces. Geophagy primarily occurred at sites barren of vegetation where surficial geology had been modified by geothermal activity. There was no evidence of ungulate use at most sites. Purposeful consumption of soil by bears peaked first from March to May and again from August to October, synchronous with peaks in consumption of ungulate meat and mushrooms. Geophageous soils were distinguished from ungulate mineral licks and soils in general by exceptionally high concentrations of potassium (K) and high concentrations of magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S). Our results do not support the hypotheses that bears were consuming soil to detoxify secondary compounds in grazed foliage, as postulated for primates, or to supplement dietary sodium, as known for ungulates. Our results suggest that grizzly bears could have been consuming soil as an anti-diarrheal.

  8. Development And Application Of Non-Hydrostatic Model To The Coastal Engineering Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maderych, V.; Brovchenko, I.; Fenical, S.; Nikishov, V.; Terletska, K.

    2007-12-01

    The 3D non-hydrostatic free surface model developed by Kanarska and Maderich (2003) for stratified flows was further improved and has been used to simulate coastal processes. In the model the surface elevation, hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic components of pressure and velocity are calculated at sequential stages. Unlike most non-hydrostatic models, the 2-D depth-averaged momentum and continuity equations were integrated explicitly, whereas the 3-D equations were solved semi-implicitly at subsequent stages. The RANS and subgrid- scale eddy viscosity and diffusivity parameterization were implemented in the model to parameterize small-scale mixing. The model was applied to three coastal engineering problems. First, we used the model coupled with a 3D Lagrangian sediment transport model to predict scour caused by propeller jets of slowly maneuvering ships. The results of the simulations show good agreement with laboratory experiments and field ADCP measurements with tug boats. Second, the model was applied, while nested into the hydrostatic far-field counterpart model, for near-field simulation of cooling water discharge through submerged outfalls. Third, laboratory experiments and simulations were performed to estimate effects of large-amplitude internal solitary waves (ISW) on submerged structures and coastal bottom sediments. In the first series of experiments and simulations, the interaction of ISW-depressions with a rectangular bottom obstacle was investigated. In the second series, the ISW-depression was studied passing through a smooth local lateral constriction. The third series of laboratory experiments and simulations was conducted to investigate the dynamics of ISW of depressions reflecting from a steep slope. Contribution of V. Maderych in this work was supported by Hankuk University of Foreign Studies Research Fund of 2007.

  9. On the relevance of non-hydrostatic modeling in the Gibraltar Strait region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannino, Gianmaria; Sanchez-Garrido, Jose Carlos; Liberti, Luca; Pratt, Larry; Bellafiore, Debora; Carniel, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    For more than 15 years the exchange flows through the Strait of Gibraltar has been investigated by means of numerical models of different complexity. However, among these models, none was fully three dimensional, non-hydrostatic, tidally forced, initialized with realistic climatology and run with very high resolution. To fill this gap, here we present a state-of-the-art model for the Strait of Gibraltar that can be considered as a benchmark for simulating the dynamics of the Strait. The model is based on the MITgcm; it is non-hydrostatic and has a horizontal resolution of about 30m . We investigate the effects produced by the non-hydrostatic assumption, physical parameterization and resolution on the simulated hydraulic regime. To this purpose, a comparison between MITgcm, and the sigma-coordinate hydrostatic POM model implemented by Sannino et al. [2009] is carried out. It is found that while POM captures most of the hydraulic features, some important differences emerge with respect to the z-level model. The most important difference is the reduction of the frequency of appearance of supercritical flow in the eastern end of the Strait simulated by the MITgcm. This difference is due to the excess of spurious diapycnal mixing produced by POM that strongly affects the three-layer thickness and, in turn, modifies the simulated hydraulic regime. On the contrary, non-hydrostaticity has no effect on the hydraulic regime, as well as the increased horizontal resolution adopted in MITgcm. The comparison method applied in this study proved to be particularly useful to test the robustness of the models, the parameterization and the maximum resolution adopted. A similar comparison methods will be adopted in the test areas selected within the national flagship RITMARE.

  10. Effects of bearing cleaning and lube environment on bearing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    Running torque data of SR6 ball bearings are presented for different temperatures and speeds. The data are discussed in contrast to generally used torque prediction models and point out the need to obtain empirical data in critical applications. Also, the effects of changing bearing washing techniques from old, universally used CFC-based systems to CFC-free aqueous/alkaline solutions are discussed. Data on wettability, torque and lubricant life using SR3 ball bearings are presented. In general, performance is improved using the new aqueous washing techniques.

  11. SSME turbopump bearing analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T.

    1980-01-01

    Three shuttle pump bearings operating under severe overspeed and shut-down conditions are evaluated. The specific parameters investigated include outer race stresses, cage stresses, cage-race drag, bearing heating, and crush loading. A quasi-dynamic version of the BASDAP computer code was utilized which involved the calculation of ball-race forces (inner and outer), contact pressures, contact dimensions, and contact angles as a function of (1) axial load, (2) radial load, and (3) centrifugal load on the bearing. Generally, radial loads on the order of 13,300 N (3000 pounds) per bearing or 26,700 N (6000 pounds) per bearing pair, could be expected to cause severe problems to any of the bearings with a 17,800 N (4000 pounds) axial load. Further, when possible temperature excursions are considered, even a load of 8900 N (2000 pounds) may be excessive. However, high momentary radial loads with a 3800 N (850 pounds) axial load would not be anticipated to cause catastrophic failure of the fuel pump bearing.

  12. Magnetic Bearings at Draper Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondoleon, Anthony S.; Kelleher, William P.; Possel, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings, unlike traditional mechanical bearings, consist of a series of components mated together to form a stabilized system. The correct design of the actuator and sensor will provide a cost effective device with low power requirements. The proper choice of a control system utilizes the variables necessary to control the system in an efficient manner. The specific application will determine the optimum design of the magnetic bearing system including the touch down bearing. Draper for the past 30 years has been a leader in all these fields. This paper summarizes the results carried out at Draper in the field of magnetic bearing development. A 3-D radial magnetic bearing is detailed in this paper. Data obtained from recently completed projects using this design are included. One project was a high radial load (1000 pound) application. The second was a high speed (35,000 rpm), low loss flywheel application. The development of a low loss axial magnetic bearing is also included in this paper.

  13. USGS Scientist Taking Measurements Along Bear Creek

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS Scientist Taking Measurements Along Bear Creek - Photo taken by Heidi Koontz, USGS Communications, Friday, Sept. 13. USGS scientist Ben Glass conducting current profiler measurements along Bear Creek near Bear Creek Lake in Morrison, Colo....

  14. HYDROSTATIC GAS CONSTRAINTS ON SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMICAL MODELING IN A SAMPLE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Philip J.; Buote, David A.; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Gebhardt, Karl; Mathews, William G.

    2009-10-01

    We present new mass measurements for the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the centers of three early-type galaxies. The gas pressure in the surrounding, hot interstellar medium (ISM) is measured through spatially resolved spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, allowing the SMBH mass (M {sub BH}) to be inferred directly under the hydrostatic approximation. This technique does not require calibration against other SMBH measurement methods and its accuracy depends only on the ISM being close to hydrostatic, which is supported by the smooth X-ray isophotes of the galaxies. Combined with results from our recent study of the elliptical galaxy NGC 4649, this brings the number of galaxies with SMBHs measured in this way to four. Of these, three already have mass determinations from the kinematics of either the stars or a central gas disk, and hence join only a handful of galaxies with M {sub BH} measured by more than one technique. We find good agreement between the different methods, providing support for the assumptions implicit in both the hydrostatic and the dynamical models. The stellar mass-to-light ratios for each galaxy inferred by our technique are in agreement with the predictions of stellar population synthesis models assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF). This concurrence implies that no more than {approx}10%-20% of the ISM pressure is nonthermal, unless there is a conspiracy between the shape of the IMF and nonthermal pressure. Finally, we compute Bondi accretion rates (M-dot{sub bondi}), finding that the two galaxies with the highest M-dot{sub bondi} exhibit little evidence of X-ray cavities, suggesting that the correlation with the active galactic nuclei jet power takes time to be established.

  15. Nurse retention: outrunning the bear.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Did you hear the one about the hospital CEO who was hiking in the forest with the director of nursing? As they were heading down a trail, suddenly a bear jumped out of a bush and started chasing them. Both hikers started running for their lives when all of a sudden the CEO stopped, sat down on a rock and started to put on running shoes. The director of nursing said, "What are you doing? You can't outrun a bear!" The CEO replied, "I don't have to outrun the bear. I only have to outrun you." PMID:12886657

  16. Bears, Big and Little. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeffer, Pierre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume describes: (1) the eight species of bears, including black bear, brown bear, grizzly bear, spectacled bear, sun bear, sloth bear, polar bear, and giant panda; (2) geographical habitats of bears; (3)…

  17. Bears, Big and Little. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeffer, Pierre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume describes: (1) the eight species of bears, including black bear, brown bear, grizzly bear, spectacled bear, sun bear, sloth bear, polar bear, and giant panda; (2) geographical habitats of bears; (3)

  18. Numerical modeling of multidimensional flow in seals and bearings used in rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Tam, L. T.; Przekwas, A.; Muszynska, A.; Braun, M. J.; Mullen, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The rotordynamic behavior of turbomachinery is critically dependent on fluid dynamic rotor forces developed by various types of seals and bearings. The occurrence of self-excited vibrations often depends on the rotor speed and load. Misalignment and rotor wobbling motion associated with differential clearance were often attributed to stability problems. In general, the rotative character of the flowfield is a complex three dimensional system with secondary flow patterns that significantly alter the average fluid circumferential velocity. A multidimensional, nonorthogonal, body-fitted-grid fluid flow model is presented that describes the fluid dynamic forces and the secondary flow pattern development in seals and bearings. Several numerical experiments were carried out to demonstrate the characteristics of this complex flowfield. Analyses were performed by solving a conservation form of the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations transformed to those for a rotating observer and using the general-purpose computer code PHOENICS with the assumptions that the rotor orbit is circular and that static eccentricity is zero. These assumptions have enabled a precise steady-state analysis to be used. Fluid injection from ports near the seal or bearing center increased fluid-film direct dynamic stiffness and, in some cases, significantly increased quadrature dynamic stiffness. Injection angle and velocity could be used for active rotordynamic control; for example, injection, when compared with no injection, increased direct dynamic stiffness, which is an important factor for hydrostatic bearings.

  19. Numerical modeling of multidimensional flow in seals and bearings used in rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Tam, L. T.; Przekwas, A.; Muszynska, A.; Braun, M. J.; Mullen, R. L.

    The rotordynamic behavior of turbomachinery is critically dependent on fluid dynamic rotor forces developed by various types of seals and bearings. The occurrence of self-excited vibrations often depends on the rotor speed and load. Misalignment and rotor wobbling motion associated with differential clearance were often attributed to stability problems. In general, the rotative character of the flowfield is a complex three dimensional system with secondary flow patterns that significantly alter the average fluid circumferential velocity. A multidimensional, nonorthogonal, body-fitted-grid fluid flow model is presented that describes the fluid dynamic forces and the secondary flow pattern development in seals and bearings. Several numerical experiments were carried out to demonstrate the characteristics of this complex flowfield. Analyses were performed by solving a conservation form of the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations transformed to those for a rotating observer and using the general-purpose computer code PHOENICS with the assumptions that the rotor orbit is circular and that static eccentricity is zero. These assumptions have enabled a precise steady-state analysis to be used. Fluid injection from ports near the seal or bearing center increased fluid-film direct dynamic stiffness and, in some cases, significantly increased quadrature dynamic stiffness. Injection angle and velocity could be used for active rotordynamic control; for example, injection, when compared with no injection, increased direct dynamic stiffness, which is an important factor for hydrostatic bearings.

  20. Conformational changes in human Hsp70 induced by high hydrostatic pressure produce oligomers with ATPase activity but without chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Thas L S; Borges, Julio Cesar; Ramos, Carlos H; Meyer-Fernandes, Jos Roberto; Oliveira Jnior, Reinaldo S; Pascutti, Pedro G; Foguel, Debora; Palhano, Fernando L

    2014-05-13

    We investigated the folding of the 70 kDa human cytosolic inducible protein (Hsp70) in vitro using high hydrostatic pressure as a denaturing agent. We followed the structural changes in Hsp70 induced by high hydrostatic pressure using tryptophan fluorescence, molecular dynamics, circular dichroism, high-performance liquid chromatography gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, ATPase activity, and chaperone activity. Although monomeric, Hsp70 is very sensitive to hydrostatic pressure; after pressure had been removed, the protein did not return to its native sate but instead formed oligomeric species that lost chaperone activity but retained ATPase activity. PMID:24739062

  1. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  2. Making Connections with Teddy Bears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beougher, Cecile

    1994-01-01

    Presents a hands-on approach to developing connections between mathematics and other subject areas by using thematic webbing. Includes a sample brainstorming aid plus a sample web and thematic unit on teddy bears. (Contains 36 references.) (MKR)

  3. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  4. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  5. Flex bearing UUEC, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapper, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    This volume, Volume 2, of this Flex Bearing UUEC Final Report documents findings and data pertaining to Team B's tasks. Team B was organized as one of two sub-teams of the Unplanned/Unintended Event or Condition (UUEC) board established per InterOffice Memorandum (IOM) A100-FY93-072. Team A determined the cause of the unacceptable unbonds (referred to as 'heat-affect' unbonds), including the initial, light rust film, in the FSM #3 flex bearing was overheating of the Forward End Ring (FER) during cure, specifically in zone 8 of the mold. Team A's findings are documented in Volume 1 of this report. Team B developed flight rationale for existing bearings, based on absence or presence of an unpropitious unbond condition like that in FSM #3's flex bearing.

  6. Bearing capacity of desiccated tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Rassam, D.W.; Williams, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    The development of matric suctions in soils contributes to their shear strength, resulting in an enhanced factor of safety against bearing-capacity failure. In this paper, matric suction profiles of desiccated mine tailings are predicted from a steady-state solution for evaporative conditions, and from an isothermal mathematical model that simulates liquid and vapor water flow through soils. The shear-strength envelope with respect to matric suction is established by testing reconstituted tailings samples in a modified triaxial cell, in which matric suction can be controlled. The contribution of matric suction to the shear strength is interpreted as an additional apparent cohesion for use in bearing-capacity calculations. Because of the nonlinearity of the shear-strength profile, a numerical method of analysis is adopted to predict the ultimate bearing capacity of the desiccated tailings. A subsequent decrease in bearing capacity following 2D water infiltration into a partially capped tailings deposit and accompanying suction loss is investigated.

  7. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  8. Myrmecophagy by Yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    I used data collected during a study of radio-marked grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region from 1977 to 1992 to investigate myrmecophagy by this population. Although generally not an important source of energy for the bears (averaging 8 mm long) nested in logs over small ants (6 mm long) nested under stones. Optimal conditions for consumption of ants occurred on the warmest sites with ample substrate suitable for ant nests. For ants in mounds, this occurred at low elevations at non-forested sites. For ants in logs, this occurred at low elevations or on southerly aspects where there was abundant, large-diameter, well-decomposed woody debris under an open forest canopy. Grizzly bears selected moderately decomposed logs 4a??5 dm in diameter at midpoint. Ants will likely become a more important food for Yellowstone's grizzly bears as currently important foods decline, owing to disease and warming of the regional climate.

  9. ATM CMG bearing failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The cause or causes for the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2) were investigated. Skylab telemetry data were reviewed and presented in the form of parameter distributions. The theory that the problems were caused by marginal bearing lubrication was studied along with the effects of orbital conditions on lubricants. Bearing tests were performed to investigate the effect of lubricant or lack of lubricant in the ATM CMG bearings and the dispersion and migration of the lubricant. The vacuum and weightless conditions of space were simulated in the bearing tests. Analysis of the results of the tests conducted points to inadequate lubrication as the predominant factor causing the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2).

  10. Teddy bear in the heart.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, K Mahadevan; Krishnamanohar, S Rema

    2004-08-01

    In a patient with native aortic valve endocarditis, transoesphageal echocardiography yielded a teddy bear appearance which is not reported so far. A perivalvular abscess (right ear), the superior vena cava in cross section (left ear) and the dilated (post-stenotic) aortic root (face) made up the teddy bear. This was not a cuddlesome toy but an ominous sign. The genesis of perivalvular abscess as well as the role of transoesphageal echocardiography in its diagnosis and treatment are briefly reviewed. PMID:15529904

  11. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  12. Designing Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James D., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Bearing Analysis Tool (BAT) is a computer program for designing rolling-element bearings for cryogenic turbomachines. BAT provides a graphical user interface (GUI) that guides the entry of data to develop mathematical models of bearings. The GUI breaks model data into logical subsets that are entered through logic-driven input screens. The software generates a threedimensional graphical model of a bearing as the data are entered. Most dataentry errors become immediately obvious in the graphical model. BAT provides for storage of all the data on a shaft/bearing system, enabling the creation of a library of proven designs. Data from the library can be transferred to subsequent projects by use of simple cut-and-paste routines. BAT includes a library of temperature- dependent cryogenic bearing-material properties for use in the mathematical models. BAT implements algorithms that (1) enable the user to select combinations of design and/or operating-condition parameters, and then (2) automatically optimize the design by performing trade studies over all of the parameter combinations. This feature enables optimization over a large trade space in a fraction of the time taken when using prior bearingmodel software.

  13. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  14. Impact of hydrostatic pressure on modal birefringence in photonic crystal holey fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynkien, Tadeusz; Szpulak, Marcin; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper we analyzed the influence of hydrostatic pressure on modal birefringence in photonic crystal holey fibers. We calculated the spectral dependence of modal birefringence B(?) and its sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure dB(?)/dp in the holy fiber with birefringence induced by the lack of hexagonal symmetry in the cladding. The contribution of geometrical effect related to deformation of the holey structure as well as the stress-related contribution to the overall pressure sensitivity were analyzed separately. Our results show that both factors decrease modal birefringence, which results in negative sign of pressure sensitivity. Furthermore, we show that the pressure sensitivity of the analyzed structure is of the same order as sensitivities of the commercially available highly birefringent fibers with stress applying elements like Panda or Bow-Tie.

  15. The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure and Temperature on Sonoluminescence of Metal Atoms from Aqueous Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeychuk, Tatyana V.; Kazachek, Mikhail V.

    2008-06-01

    We have measured the spectra of multi-bubble sonoluminescence from aqueous LiCl, NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, CuSO4 solutions, saturated with argon, at the frequency 22 kHz. The spectra were collected at different hydrostatic pressures for all salts and in the ambient temperature range of 1-20 C for NaCl solutions. Total absorbed ultrasonic power was 41 W. The results show that line emission from exited state metal atoms grows rapidly with the increase of hydrostatic pressure and at low ambient temperature. In all cases the increase of the intensity of underlying continuum and OH-radical emission was much lower than that of atomic emission at the same experimental conditions. The observed effects can be explained assuming higher temperature inside the cavitation bubbles during collapse in case of increased static pressure or decreased vapor pressure.

  16. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on model membrane domain composition and lateral compressibility.

    PubMed

    Barriga, H M G; Law, R V; Seddon, J M; Ces, O; Brooks, N J

    2016-01-01

    Phase separation in ternary model membranes is known to occur over a range of temperatures and compositions and can be induced by increasing hydrostatic pressure. We have used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to study phase separation along pre-determined tie lines in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures. We can unequivocally distinguish the liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phases in diffraction patterns from biphasic mixtures and compare their lateral compressibility. The variation of tie line endpoints with increasing hydrostatic pressure was determined, at atmospheric pressure and up to 100 MPa. We find an extension and shift of the tie lines towards the DOPC rich region of the phase diagram at increased pressure, this behaviour differs slightly from that reported for decreasing temperature. PMID:26601888

  17. Soda-lime silicate glass under hydrostatic pressure and indentation: a micro-Raman study.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, T; Martinet, C; Bruneel, J L; Champagnon, B

    2011-01-26

    Raman micro-spectroscopy is used to analyse the plastic behaviour of window glass (a soda-lime silicate glass) under high hydrostatic pressure and Vickers indentation. We show pressure-induced irreversible structural changes, notably an increase of Q(2) species at the expense of Q(3). For the first time, a very accurate [Formula: see text] calibration curve has been established. Local density variations of a Vickers indented window glass have been characterized by micro-Raman mapping using a high spatial resolution device. The effects of glass depolymerization on indentation and hydrostatic compression are discussed. Differences between window glass and pure SiO(2) glass behaviour under high stresses are also highlighted and analysed at a local scale. PMID:21406864

  18. A semi-implicit finite difference method for non-hydrostatic, free-surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casulli, Vincenzo

    1999-06-01

    In this paper a semi-implicit finite difference model for non-hydrostatic, free-surface flows is analyzed and discussed. It is shown that the present algorithm is generally more accurate than recently developed models for quasi-hydrostatic flows. The governing equations are the free-surface Navier-Stokes equations defined on a general, irregular domain of arbitrary scale. The momentum equations, the incompressibility condition and the equation for the free-surface are integrated by a semi-implicit algorithm in such a fashion that the resulting numerical solution is mass conservative and unconditionally stable with respect to the gravity wave speed, wind stress, vertical viscosity and bottom friction. Copyright

  19. Function and hydrostatics in the telson of the Burgess Shale arthropod Burgessia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jih-Pai

    2009-01-01

    Burgessia bella is a characteristic Burgess Shale arthropod (508 Ma), but the unusual preservation of its telson in both straight and bent modes leads to contradictory interpretations of its function. A reinvestigation of the fossil material, including burial attitudes, combined with a comparison with the decay sequence and mechanics of the telson in living Limulus, demonstrates that the telson of Burgessia was flexible in its relaxed state but could be stiffened in life. Evidence of fluid within the telson indicates that this manoeuvrability was achieved by changes in hydrostatic pressure and muscular control. The dual mode in the Burgessia telson is, to my knowledge, the first documented among fossil arthropods. It indicates that the requirement for a rigid telson, which is resolved by a thick sclerotized cuticle in most arthropods, may first have been achieved by hydrostatic means. PMID:19324649

  20. Effect of hydrostatic pressure and polaronic mass of the binding energy in a spherical quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. Rejo Jeice Gerardin, Jayam, Sr.; S. Joseph Wilson, K.

    2015-11-01

    Simultaneous effect of hydrostatic pressure and polaronic mass on the binding energies of the ground and excited states of an on-center hydrogenic impurity confined in a GaAs/GaAlAs spherical quantum dot are theoretically investigated by the variational method within the effective mass approximation. The binding energy is calculated as a function of dot radius and pressure. Our findings proved that the hydrostatic pressure led to the decrease of confined energy and the increase of donor binding energy. Conduction band non-parabolicity and the polaron masses are effective in the donor binding energy which is significant for narrow dots not in the confined energy. The maximum donor binding energy achieved by the polaronic mass in the ground and excited states are 2%19% for the narrow dots. The confined and donor binding energies approach zero as the dot size approaches infinity.

  1. Controlled hydrostatic sinus elevation: a novel method of elevating the sinus membrane.

    PubMed

    Kao, Daniel W K; DeHaven, Harold A

    2011-12-01

    Maxillary sinus elevation surgery has been practiced successfully over the past several decades with good outcomes, but tears and perforations still occur in significant numbers. The presumed cause of these problems is the fact that all methods currently used place "point sources" of lifting pressure on the Schneiderian membrane. A new procedure, controlled hydrostatic sinus lift, is presented herein as a safer, more controlled "lifting pressure" which simultaneously places equal force per square millimeter of bone-membrane interface. Hydraulic pressure in a closed system places equal pressure on all surfaces within the system, thereby eliminating "point sources" of pressure and gently elevating the Schneiderian membrane equally at all points of attachment. This controlled hydrostatic sinus lift procedure is accomplished by using a calibrated, hand-controlled pump and in-line pressure sensor meter. PMID:22067599

  2. 77 FR 70423 - Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC; Notice of Application for Partial Transfer of Licenses, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On October 25, 2012, Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC, sole licensee (transferor)...

  3. DETECTION OF A BIPOLAR MOLECULAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY A CANDIDATE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Michael M.; Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Schnee, Scott; Enoch, Melissa L.

    2011-11-20

    We present new 230 GHz Submillimeter Array observations of the candidate first hydrostatic core Per-Bolo 58. We report the detection of a 1.3 mm continuum source and a bipolar molecular outflow, both centered on the position of the candidate first hydrostatic core. The continuum detection has a total flux density of 26.6 {+-} 4.0 mJy, from which we calculate a total (gas and dust) mass of 0.11 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} and a mean number density of 2.0 {+-} 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. There is some evidence for the existence of an unresolved component in the continuum detection, but longer-baseline observations are required in order to confirm the presence of this component and determine whether its origin lies in a circumstellar disk or in the dense inner envelope. The bipolar molecular outflow is observed along a nearly due east-west axis. The outflow is slow (characteristic velocity of 2.9 km s{sup -1}), shows a jet-like morphology (opening semi-angles {approx}8 Degree-Sign for both lobes), and extends to the edges of the primary beam. We calculate the kinematic and dynamic properties of the outflow in the standard manner and compare them to several other protostars and candidate first hydrostatic cores with similarly low luminosities. We discuss the evidence both in support of and against the possibility that Per-Bolo 58 is a first hydrostatic core, and we outline future work needed to further evaluate the evolutionary status of this object.

  4. Hydrostatic Vibratory Drive of the Test Stand for Excitation of the Amplitude-Modulated Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizhegorodov, A. I.; Gavrilin, A. N.; Moyzes, B. B.

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the problems arising during the development of the test stand hydrostatic vibratory drive, which synthesize controlled amplitude-modulated vibrations required testing of vibration strength and vibrostability of technological devices. The newly developed modification can adequately simulate the transport vibration and vibration of the operating power-supply units of technological machinery vibration by means of implementing of a continuous frequency spectrum of the vibration exposure in the desired frequency range.

  5. The effects of defects on copper melting under hydrostatic and shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; An, Qi; Germann, Timothy C; Han, Li - Bo

    2009-07-24

    With molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigate the effects of defects on Cu melting under hydrostatic and shock wave loading. We explore preexistent defects including vacancies, stacking faults and grain boundaries, as well as shock-induced defects. Depending on defect characteristics (energy and concentration), defects may have negligible or considerable effects on melting at MD scales However, it is expected that defects have more pronounced effects at heating rates lower than the MD rates.

  6. Simulation of Storm Surge by a Depth-integrated Non-hydrostatic Nested-gird Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Wu, Tso-Ren; Terng, Chuen-Teyr; Cheung, Mei-Hui

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents COMCOT-SS (COrnell Multi-grid Coupled of Tsunami Model - Storm Surge) operational model, a depth integrated non-hydrostatic storm surge model developed for the Central Weather Bureau (CWB) in Taiwan. This model is based on the widely-validated COMCOT tsunami model. However, the governing equations were modified to be a depth-integrated vertical momentum equation, and the nonlinear shallow water equations including extra terms, such as the non-hydrostatic pressure, weather forcing, and tidal terms. The non-hydrostatic term enables the model to simulate relatively steep waves in the near-shore region. The conventional features in COMCOT, such as the nested-grid system, spherical and Cartesian coordinate systems, and the moving boundary scheme for inundation prediction were preserved. In this study, we carefully validated the model with analytic solutions for wind shear stress and pressure gradient terms. TWRF (Typhoon Weather Research and Forecasting) model was coupled for providing the meteorological forces generated by typhoons. Besides, parametric typhoon models such as Holland model (1980) and CWB model were also coupled with COMCOT-SS in which the drag coefficient was advised by Large and Pond (1981) and Powell (2003). Astronomical tide provided by the TPXO global tidal model was imported from the domain boundaries. As for the model performance, COMCOT-SS spends less than 30 minutes to finish a 48-hrs forecasting with a large computational domain which covers Taiwan Strait and most parts of Western Pacific Ocean and South China Sea and satisfies the requirement of early warning. In this paper, we also presented the results of nine typical typhoon routes defined by CWB in Taiwan for the model verification. The simulation results accompanied with the non-hydrostatic effect presented good agreement with observation data. Detailed results and discussion will be presented in EGU, 2015.

  7. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - IV. Robustly calibrating hydrostatic masses with weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, D. E.; Mantz, A.; Allen, S. W.; der Linden, A. von; Morris, R. Glenn; Hilbert, S.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Burke, D. L.; Ebeling, H.; Rapetti, D. A.; Schmidt, R. W.

    2016-04-01

    This is the fourth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Here, we use measurements of weak gravitational lensing from the Weighing the Giants project to calibrate Chandra X-ray measurements of total mass that rely on the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium. This comparison of X-ray and lensing masses measures the combined bias of X-ray hydrostatic masses from both astrophysical and instrumental sources. While we cannot disentangle the two sources of bias, only the combined bias is relevant for calibrating cosmological measurements using relaxed clusters. Assuming a fixed cosmology, and within a characteristic radius (r2500) determined from the X-ray data, we measure a lensing to X-ray mass ratio of 0.96 ± 9 per cent (stat) ± 9 per cent (sys). We find no significant trends of this ratio with mass, redshift or the morphological indicators used to select the sample. Our results imply that any departures from hydrostatic equilibrium at these radii are offset by calibration errors of comparable magnitude, with large departures of tens-of-percent unlikely. In addition, we find a mean concentration of the sample measured from lensing data of c_{200} = 3.0_{-1.8}^{+4.4}. Anticipated short-term improvements in lensing systematics, and a modest expansion of the relaxed lensing sample, can easily increase the measurement precision by 30-50 per cent, leading to similar improvements in cosmological constraints that employ X-ray hydrostatic mass estimates, such as on Ωm from the cluster gas mass fraction.

  8. WEIGHING GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH GAS. I. ON THE METHODS OF COMPUTING HYDROSTATIC MASS BIAS

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Nelson, Kaylea

    2013-11-10

    Mass estimates of galaxy clusters from X-ray and Sunyeav-Zel'dovich observations assume the intracluster gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium with their gravitational potential. However, since galaxy clusters are dynamically active objects whose dynamical states can deviate significantly from the equilibrium configuration, the departure from the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption is one of the largest sources of systematic uncertainties in cluster cosmology. In the literature there have been two methods for computing the hydrostatic mass bias based on the Euler and the modified Jeans equations, respectively, and there has been some confusion about the validity of these two methods. The word 'Jeans' was a misnomer, which incorrectly implies that the gas is collisionless. To avoid further confusion, we instead refer these methods as 'summation' and 'averaging' methods respectively. In this work, we show that these two methods for computing the hydrostatic mass bias are equivalent by demonstrating that the equation used in the second method can be derived from taking spatial averages of the Euler equation. Specifically, we identify the correspondences of individual terms in these two methods mathematically and show that these correspondences are valid to within a few percent level using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. In addition, we compute the mass bias associated with the acceleration of gas and show that its contribution is small in the virialized regions in the interior of galaxy clusters, but becomes non-negligible in the outskirts of massive galaxy clusters. We discuss future prospects of understanding and characterizing biases in the mass estimate of galaxy clusters using both hydrodynamical simulations and observations and their implications for cluster cosmology.

  9. A novel technique towards deployment of hydrostatic pressure based level sensor in nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, K.; Rajiniganth, M. P.; Arun, A. D.; Sahoo, P.; Satya Murty, S. A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach towards deployment of a hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device is presented for continuous monitoring of liquid level in a reservoir with high resolution and precision. Some of the major drawbacks such as spurious information of measured level due to change in ambient temperature, requirement of high resolution pressure sensor, and bubbling effect by passing air or any gaseous fluid into the liquid are overcome by using such a newly designed hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device. The technique involves precise measurement of hydrostatic pressure exerted by the process liquid using a high sensitive pulsating-type differential pressure sensor (capacitive type differential pressure sensor using a specially designed oil manometer) and correlating it to the liquid level. In order to avoid strong influence of temperature on liquid level, a temperature compensation methodology is derived and used in the system. A wireless data acquisition feature has also been provided in the level monitoring device in order to work in a remote area such as a radioactive environment. At the outset, a prototype level measurement system for a 1 m tank is constructed and its test performance has been well studied. The precision, accuracy, resolution, uncertainty, sensitivity, and response time of the prototype level measurement system are found to be less than 1.1 mm in the entire range, 1%, 3 mm, <1%, 10 Hz/mm, and ˜4 s, respectively.

  10. Pressure Decimation and Interpolation (PDI) method for a baroclinic non-hydrostatic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jian; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.; Ma, Gangfeng; Wu, Guoxiang; Tong, Chaofeng; Zheng, Jinhai

    2015-12-01

    Non-hydrostatic models are computationally expensive in simulating density flows and mass transport problems due to the requirement of sufficient grid resolution to resolve density and flow structures. Numerical tests based on the Non-Hydrostatic Wave Model, NHWAVE (Ma etal., 2012), indicated that up to 70% of the total computational cost may be born by the pressure Poisson solver in cases with high grid resolution in both vertical and horizontal directions. However, recent studies using Poisson solver-based non-hydrostatic models have shown that an accurate prediction of wave dispersion does not require a large number of vertical layers if the dynamic pressure is properly discretized. In this study, we explore the possibility that the solution for the dynamic pressure field may, in general, be decimated to a resolution far coarser than that used in representing velocities and other transported quantities, without sacrificing accuracy of solutions. Following van Reeuwijk (2002), we determine the dynamic pressure field by solving the Poisson equation on a coarser grid and then interpolate the pressure field onto a finer grid used for solving for the remaining dynamic variables. With the Pressure Decimation and Interpolation (PDI) method, computational efficiency is greatly improved. We use three test cases to demonstrate the model's accuracy and efficiency in modeling density flows.

  11. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on steelhead survival in air-supersaturated water

    SciTech Connect

    Knittel, M.D.; Chapman, G.A.; Garton, R.R.

    1980-11-01

    Juvenile steelheads (Salmo gairdneri) were placed in cages and suspended at various depths in water supersaturated with air at levels from 120 to 140% of normal atmospheric gas pressure. Survival times of fish held at 10, 50, and 100 cm depth increased with increasing depth at a given level of supersaturation. When the hydrostatic pressure (7.4 mm Hg per 10 cm of water depth) was subtracted from the excess gas pressure (relative to surface barometric pressure) mortality curves (times to 50% mortality versus excess gas pressure) for fish at all three depths essentially coincided. The significant measure of supersaturation appears to be the pressure of dissolved gases in excess of the sum of barometric and hydrostatic pressures. Steelheads held near the surface in supersaturated water for a near-lethal period and then lowered to a depth providing total hydrostatic compensation appeared to recover completely in about 2 hours. The longer fish remained at depth, the longer their survival time when they subsequently were reexposed to surface conditions.

  12. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on coastal bacterial community abundance and diversity.

    PubMed

    Marietou, Angeliki; Bartlett, Douglas H

    2014-10-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is an important parameter influencing the distribution of microbial life in the ocean. In this study, the response of marine bacterial populations from surface waters to pressures representative of those under deep-sea conditions was examined. Southern California coastal seawater collected 5 m below the sea surface was incubated in microcosms, using a range of temperatures (16 to 3°C) and hydrostatic pressure conditions (0.1 to 80 MPa). Cell abundance decreased in response to pressure, while diversity increased. The morphology of the community also changed with pressurization to a predominant morphotype of small cocci. The pressure-induced community changes included an increase in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Flavobacteria largely at the expense of Epsilonproteobacteria. Culturable high-pressure-surviving bacteria were obtained and found to be phylogenetically similar to isolates from cold and/or deep-sea environments. These results provide novel insights into the response of surface water bacteria to changes in hydrostatic pressure. PMID:25063663

  13. Calpain: a molecule to induce AIF-mediated necroptosis in RGC-5 following elevated hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RIP3 (Receptor-interacting protein 3) pathway was mainly described as the molecular mechanism of necroptosis (programmed necrosis). But recently, non-RIP3 pathways were found to mediate necroptosis. We deliberate to investigate the effect of calpain, a molecule to induce necroptosis as reported (Cell Death Differ 19:245256, 2012), in RGC-5 following elevated hydrostatic pressure. Results First, we identified the existence of necroptosis of RGC-5 after insult by using necrostatin-1 (Nec-1, necroptosis inhibitor) detected by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescence staining and western blot were used to detect the expression of calpain. Western blot analysis was carried out to describe the truncated AIF (tAIF) expression with or without pretreatment of ALLN (calpain activity inhibitor). Following elevated hydrostatic pressure, necroptotic cells pretreated with or without ALLN was stained by Annexin V/PI, The activity of calpain was also examined to confirm the inhibition effect of ALLN. The results showed that after cell injury there was an upregulation of calpain expression. Upon adding ALLN, the calpain activity was inhibited, and tAIF production was reduced upon injury along with the decreased number of necroptosis cells. Conclusion Our study found that calpain may induce necroptosis via tAIF-modulation in RGC-5 following elevated hydrostatic pressure. PMID:24884644

  14. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Coastal Bacterial Community Abundance and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2014-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is an important parameter influencing the distribution of microbial life in the ocean. In this study, the response of marine bacterial populations from surface waters to pressures representative of those under deep-sea conditions was examined. Southern California coastal seawater collected 5 m below the sea surface was incubated in microcosms, using a range of temperatures (16 to 3C) and hydrostatic pressure conditions (0.1 to 80 MPa). Cell abundance decreased in response to pressure, while diversity increased. The morphology of the community also changed with pressurization to a predominant morphotype of small cocci. The pressure-induced community changes included an increase in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Flavobacteria largely at the expense of Epsilonproteobacteria. Culturable high-pressure-surviving bacteria were obtained and found to be phylogenetically similar to isolates from cold and/or deep-sea environments. These results provide novel insights into the response of surface water bacteria to changes in hydrostatic pressure. PMID:25063663

  15. A novel technique towards deployment of hydrostatic pressure based level sensor in nuclear fuel reprocessing facility.

    PubMed

    Praveen, K; Rajiniganth, M P; Arun, A D; Sahoo, P; Satya Murty, S A V

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach towards deployment of a hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device is presented for continuous monitoring of liquid level in a reservoir with high resolution and precision. Some of the major drawbacks such as spurious information of measured level due to change in ambient temperature, requirement of high resolution pressure sensor, and bubbling effect by passing air or any gaseous fluid into the liquid are overcome by using such a newly designed hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device. The technique involves precise measurement of hydrostatic pressure exerted by the process liquid using a high sensitive pulsating-type differential pressure sensor (capacitive type differential pressure sensor using a specially designed oil manometer) and correlating it to the liquid level. In order to avoid strong influence of temperature on liquid level, a temperature compensation methodology is derived and used in the system. A wireless data acquisition feature has also been provided in the level monitoring device in order to work in a remote area such as a radioactive environment. At the outset, a prototype level measurement system for a 1 m tank is constructed and its test performance has been well studied. The precision, accuracy, resolution, uncertainty, sensitivity, and response time of the prototype level measurement system are found to be less than 1.1 mm in the entire range, 1%, 3 mm, <1%, 10 Hz/mm, and ?4 s, respectively. PMID:26931895

  16. Hydrostatic and shear consolidation tests with permeability measurements on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant crushed salt

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, N.S.

    1994-03-01

    Crushed natural rock salt is a primary candidate for use as backfill and barrier material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been pursuing a laboratory program designed to quantify its consolidation properties and permeability. Variables that influence consolidation rate that have been examined include stress state and moisture content. The experimental results presented in this report complement existing studies and work in progress conducted by SNL. The experiments described in this report were designed to (1) measure permeabilities of consolidated specimens of crushed salt, (2) determine the influence of brine saturation on consolidation under hydrostatic loads, and 3) measure the effects of small applied shear stresses on consolidation properties. The laboratory effort consisted of 18 individual tests: three permeability tests conducted on specimens that had been consolidated at Sandia, six hydrostatic consolidation and permeability tests conducted on specimens of brine-saturated crushed WIPP salt, and nine shear consolidation and permeability tests performed on crushed WIPP salt specimens containing 3 percent brine by weight. For hydrostatic consolidation tests, pressures ranged from 1.72 MPa to 6.90 MPa. For the shear consolidation tests, confining pressures were between 3.45 MPa and 6.90 MPa and applied axial stress differences were between 0.69 and 4.14 MPa. All tests were run under drained conditions at 25{degrees}C.

  17. High hydrostatic pressure increases amino acid requirements in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus.

    PubMed

    Cario, Anaïs; Lormières, Florence; Xiang, Xiao; Oger, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We have established a defined growth medium for the piezophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, which allows growth yields of ca. 10(8) cells/ml under both atmospheric and high hydrostatic pressure. Our results demonstrate a major impact of hydrostatic pressure on amino acid metabolism, with increases from 3 amino acids required at atmospheric pressure to 17 at 40 MPa. We observe in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales a similar discrepancy between the presence/absence of amino acid synthesis pathways and amino acid requirements, which supports the existence of alternate, but yet unknown, amino acid synthesis pathways, and may explain the low number of essential amino acids observed in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales. T. barophilus displays a strong metabolic preference for organic polymers such as polypeptides and chitin, which may constitute a more readily available resource of carbon and energy in situ in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We hypothesize that the low energy yields of fermentation of organic polymers, together with energetic constraints imposed by high hydrostatic pressure, may render de novo synthesis of amino acids ecologically unfavorable. Induction of this metabolic switch to amino acid recycling can explain the requirement for non-essential amino acids by Thermococcales for efficient growth in defined medium. PMID:26226334

  18. Comparing analytical and numerical solution of nonlinear two and three-dimensional hydrostatic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casulli, Vincenzo; Zanolli, Paola

    2007-02-01

    New test cases for frictionless, three-dimensional hydrostatic flows have been derived from some known analytical solutions of the two-dimensional shallow water equations. The flow domain is a paraboloid of revolution and the flow is determined by the initial conditions, the nonlinear advective terms, the Coriolis acceleration and by the hydrostatic pressure. Wetting and drying is also included.Some specific properties of the exact solutions are discussed under different hypothesis and relative importance of the forcing terms. These solutions are proposed for testing the stability, the accuracy and the efficiency of numerical models to be used for simulating environmental hydrostatic flows.The computed solutions obtained with a semi-implicit finite difference - finite volume algorithm on unstructured grid are compared with the corresponding analytical solutions in both two and three space dimension. Excellent agreement are obtained for the velocity and for the resulting water surface elevation. Comparison of the computed inundation area also shows a good agreement with the analytical solution with degrading accuracy observed when the inundation area becomes relatively large and for long simulation time.

  19. Comparing effects of perfusion and hydrostatic pressure on gene profiles of human chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ge; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schrder, Christian; Woiczinski, Matthias; Blum, Helmut; Lavagi, Ilaria; Krebs, Stefan; Redeker, Julia I; Hlzer, Andreas; Jansson, Volkmar; Betz, Oliver; Mller, Peter E

    2015-09-20

    Hydrostatic pressure and perfusion have been shown to regulate the chondrogenic potential of articular chondrocytes. In order to compare the effects of hydrostatic pressure plus perfusion (HPP) and perfusion (P) we investigated the complete gene expression profiles of human chondrocytes under HPP and P. A simplified bioreactor was constructed to apply loading (0.1 MPa for 2 h) and perfusion (2 ml) through the same piping by pressurizing the medium directly. High-density monolayer cultures of human chondrocytes were exposed to HPP or P for 4 days. Controls (C) were maintained in static cultures. Gene expression was evaluated by sequencing (RNAseq) and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Both treatments changed gene expression levels of human chondrocytes significantly. Specifically, HPP and P increased COL2A1 expression and decreased COL1A1 and MMP-13 expression. Despite of these similarities, RNAseq revealed a list of cartilage genes including ACAN, ITGA10 and TNC, which were differentially expressed by HPP and P. Of these candidates, adhesion related molecules were found to be upregulated in HPP. Both HPP and P treatment had beneficial effects on chondrocyte differentiation and decreased catabolic enzyme expression. The study provides new insight into how hydrostatic pressure and perfusion enhance cartilage differentiation and inhibit catabolic effects. PMID:26133928

  20. Hydrostatic pressure effect on micro air bubbles deposited on surfaces with a retreating tip.

    PubMed

    Huynh, So Hung; Wang, Jingming; Yu, Yang; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-06-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on 6 ?L air bubbles formed on micropillar structured PDMS and silicone surfaces using a 2 mm diameter stainless steel tip retreated at 1 mm/s was investigated. Dimensional analysis of the tip retraction process showed the experiments to be conducted in the condition where fluid inertial forces are comparable in magnitude with surface tension forces, while viscous forces were lower. Larger bubbles could be left behind on the structured PDMS surface. For hydrostatic pressures in excess of 20 mm H2O (196 Pa), the volume of bubble deposited was found to decrease progressively with pressure increase. The differences in width of the deposited bubbles (in contact with the substrate) were significant at any particular pressure but marginal in height. The attainable height before rupture reduced with pressure increase, thereby accounting for the reducing dispensed volume characteristic. On structured PDMS, the gaseous bridge width (in contact with the substrate) was invariant with tip retraction, while on silicone it was initially reducing before becoming invariant in the lead up to rupture. With silicone, hence, reductions in the contact width and height were both responsible for reduced volumes with pressure increase. Increased hydrostatic pressure was also found to restrict the growth in contact width on silicone during the stage when air was injected in through the tip. The ability to effect bubble size in such a simple manner may already be harnessed in nature and suggests possibilities in technological applications. PMID:24810460

  1. Artificial induction of mito-gynogenetic diploids in large yellow croaker ( Pseudosciaena crocea) by hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mingyi; Wu, Qingming; Liu, Xiande; Yao, Cuiluan; Chen, Qingkai; Wang, Zhiyong

    2010-07-01

    The present study investigated conditions for inducing mito-gynogenetic (endomitosis) diploids by hydrostatic pressure in the large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea. In haploid control groups, the development of eggs was activated with ultraviolet radiated semen. All fry presented typical haploid syndrome in the haploid control groups, and were verified as haploids using cytometry. After hydrostatic pressure treatment, morphologically normal fry reappeared at different frequencies according to the intensity and time of pressure shock. Fry with normal appearance in the pressure treated groups were verified as gynogenetic double haploids (GDHs), containing only one allele from the female parent at all four diagnostic microsatellite loci. For a fixed duration of 3 min, the optimal intensity of blocking the first mitosis was determined to be 40 Mpa, which was similar to that of blocking the second meiosis. There was a “window” of starting time, from 36.1 min to 38.1 min post-insemination at 25.0±1.0°C, within which the production of GDHs was not significantly different. Maximum production of morphologically normal fries, 9.36%±2.97% of developed eggs, was found when the eggs were shocked with hydrostatic pressure at 40 Mpa for 3 min, starting from 38.1 min post insemination at 25.0±1.0°C.

  2. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  3. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area § 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  4. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  5. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  6. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  7. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  8. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  9. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  10. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  11. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  12. Journal gas bearing for curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J. W.

    1969-01-01

    Optimizing bearing length and permissible axis curvature alleviates distortion of film gap of gas lubricated journal bearing in deployment mechanisms. Required bearing length is divided into two shorter bearings interconnected by links which allow satisfactory conformity with the bent, load-carrying member.

  13. Investigations of a bearing fault detector for railroad bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Frarey, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The laboratory tests are described which were conducted on new and damaged bearings to determine the feasibility of using high-frequency vibration as a diagnostic tool. A high-frequency band pass filter and demodulator was assembled to permit field measurements of the high-frequency vibrations. Field tests were conducted on an actual truck and on an axle assembly run in a grease test rig. These field tests were directed toward demonstration of the suitability and capabilities of the high-frequency technique for field application. Two specific areas of field application were identified as being cost effective for railroad use. One area is the examination of railroad roller bearings at a derailment site, and the second is as a wayside detector to supplement present hot box detectors for defective roller bearings.

  14. Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF) was designed and built to evaluate compact, lightweight magnetic bearings for use in the SSME's (space shuttle main engine) liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen turbopumps. State of the art and tradeoff studies were conducted which indicated that a hybrid permanent magnet bias homopolar magnetic bearing design would be smaller, lighter, and much more efficient than conventional industrial bearings. A test bearing of this type was designed for the test rig for use at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (-320 F). The bearing was fabricated from state-of-the-art materials and incorporated into the CMBTF. Testing at room temperature was accomplished at Avcon's facility. These preliminary tests indicated that this magnetic bearing is a feasible alternative to older bearing technologies. Analyses showed that the hybrid magnetic bearing is one-third the weight, considerably smaller, and uses less power than previous generations of magnetic bearings.

  15. Modeling of Coronal EUV Loops Observed with TRACE. I. Hydrostatic Solutions with Nonuniform Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Alexander, David

    2001-04-01

    Recent observations of coronal loops in EUV wavelengths with the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) demonstrated three new results that cannot be explained by most of the existing loop models: (1) EUV loops are near-isothermal along their coronal segments, (2) they show an overpressure or overdensity compared with the requirements of steady state loops with uniform heating, and (3) the brightest EUV loops exhibit extended scale heights up to 4 times the hydrostatic scale height. These observations cannot be reconciled with the classical RTV (Rosner, Tucker, & Vaiana) model, they do not support models with uniform heating, and they even partially violate the requirements of hydrostatic equilibrium. In this study we are fitting for the first time steady state solutions of the hydrodynamic equations to observed intensity profiles, permitting a detailed consistency test of the observed temperature T(s) and density profiles ne(s) with steady state models, which was not possible in previous studies based on scaling laws. We calculate some 500 hydrostatic solutions, which cover a large parameter space of loop lengths (L~4-300 Mm), of nonuniform heating functions (with heating scale heights in the range of ?H~1-300 Mm), approaching also the limit of uniform heating (?H>>L). The parameter space can be subdivided into three regimes, which contain (1) solutions of stably stratified loops, (2) solutions of unstably stratified loops (in the case of short heating scale heights, ?H,Mm~LMm), and (3) a regime in which we find no numerical solutions (when ?H,Mm<~LMm). Fitting the hydrostatic solutions to 41 EUV loops observed with TRACE (selected by the criterion of detectability over their entire length), we find that only 30% of the loops are consistent with hydrostatic steady state solutions. None of the observed EUV loops is consistent with a uniform heating function while in quasi-steady state. Those loops compatible with a steady state are found to be heated near the footpoints, with a heating scale height of ?H=12+/-5 Mm, covering a fraction ?H/L=0.2+/-0.1 of the loop length. These results support coronal heating mechanisms operating in or near the chromosphere and transition region.

  16. Superconductor bearings, flywheels and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Floegel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Goebel, B.; Wippich, D.; Schirrmeister, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of high temperature superconductors (HTS) and of bulk superconducting magnet devices, their use in bearings, in flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) and linear transport magnetic levitation (Maglev) systems. We report and review the concepts of multi-seeded REBCO bulk superconductor fabrication. The multi-grain bulks increase the averaged trapped magnetic flux density up to 40% compared to single-grain assembly in large-scale applications. HTS magnetic bearings with permanent magnet (PM) excitation were studied and scaled up to maximum forces of 10 kN axially and 4.5 kN radially. We examine the technology of the high-gradient magnetic bearing concept and verify it experimentally. A large HTS bearing is tested for stabilizing a 600 kg rotor of a 5 kWh/250 kW flywheel system. The flywheel rotor tests show the requirement for additional damping. Our compact flywheel system is compared with similar HTS-FESS projects. A small-scale compact YBCO bearing with in situ Stirling cryocooler is constructed and investigated for mobile applications. Next we show a successfully developed modular linear Maglev system for magnetic train operation. Each module levitates 0.25t at 10 mm distance during one-day operation without refilling LN2. More than 30 vacuum cryostats containing multi-seeded YBCO blocks are fabricated and are tested now in Germany, China and Brazil.

  17. Rolling contact deformation, etching effects, and failure of high-strength bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, V.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1990-07-01

    This paper examines the connections between the continuing cyclic plastic deformation, the etching effects, and the fatigue life of a high-strength bearing steel under rolling contact. Etching effects, called the dark etching regions and the white etching bands, are observed after several million cycles. The inclinations of the white etching bands vary between 20 to 30 deg and 70 to 80 deg to the rolling direction, depending on the loading conditions and geometry of the rolling elements. The principal axes of stress and plastic strain rotate continuously as the rolling element translates over a fixed point below the running surface. At the same time, the cyclic plastic activity varies. A finite element model is used to calculate the inclinations and amounts of cyclic plastic strain as the roller translates over the running surface. The calculations are performed for both elastic linear kinematic-hardening plastic (ELKP) and elastic perfectlyplastic (EPP) material behaviors. Inclinations of concentrated plastic strain activity combined with low hydrostatic pressure are identified. There is a good correlation between the inclinations of the white etching bands and the inclinations of concentrated plastic activity calculated for the ELKP material behavior. No such correlation is obtained for the EPP behavior. Strain concentrations are intensified by the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the kinematic yield strength. While an equal amount of plastic strain activity occurs in the conjugate directions, no etching bands are observed at these inclinations. The reasons for this are not clear. The shakedown limit obtained for the two models is essentially the same. The fatigue lives under rolling contact are compared with the lives obtained in simple cyclic torsion experiments with the same cyclic plastic strain amplitudes. The rotation of the principal shear direction and the high hydrostatic pressure attending rolling contact may be responsible for the seven orders-of-magnitude longer contact lives.

  18. 'Dodo' and 'Baby Bear' Trenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image on Sol 11 (June 5, 2008), the eleventh day after landing. It shows the trenches dug by Phoenix's Robotic Arm. The trench on the left is informally called 'Dodo' and was dug as a test. The trench on the right is informally called 'Baby Bear.' The sample dug from Baby Bear will be delivered to the Phoenix's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The Baby Bear trench is 9 centimeters (3.1 inches) wide and 4 centimeters (1.6 inches) deep.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. [Controlled weight bearing after osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Perren, T; Matter, P

    1993-01-01

    Patient compliance with postoperative partial weight bearing can be a difficult management problem. The problem may be intentional or unintentional. There is no objective way to assess the amount of weight placed on the lower extremity by the patient. It is our clinical suspicion that patients place more weight than is desirable on the effected limb. There are few reports in the literature on this topic. One study has confirmed our suspicion of poor patient compliance with postoperative weight bearing. Our goal is to develop a system to accurately assess weight bearing and to improve this aspect of postoperative fracture care. Through an active feedback device we hope to improve patient education and understanding. We plan to study the clinical applications of using a pressure sensitive shoe insert device. Our ultimate goal is to improve upon the present device and to study the clinical application of there use. PMID:8123330

  20. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  1. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1995-01-01

    A wave journal bearing concept features a waved inner bearing diameter of the non-rotating bearing side and it is an alternative to the plain journal bearing. The wave journal bearing has a significantly increased load capacity in comparison to the plain journal bearing operating at the same eccentricity. It also offers greater stability than the plain circular bearing under all operating conditions. The wave bearing's design is relatively simple and allows the shaft to rotate in either direction. Three wave bearings are sensitive to the direction of an applied stationary side load. Increasing the number of waves reduces the wave bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the wave bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air journal bearing, due to hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  2. Intelligent Engine Systems: Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Arnant P.

    2008-01-01

    The overall requirements necessary for sensing bearing distress and the related criteria to select a particular rotating sensor were established during the phase I. The current phase II efforts performed studies to evaluate the Robustness and Durability Enhancement of the rotating sensors, and to design, and develop the Built-in Telemetry System concepts for an aircraft engine differential sump. A generic test vehicle that can test the proposed bearing diagnostic system was designed, developed, and built. The Timken Company, who also assisted with testing the GE concept of using rotating sensors for the differential bearing diagnostics during previous phase, was selected as a subcontractor to assist General Electric (GE) for the design, and procurement of the test vehicle. A purchase order was prepared to define the different sub-tasks, and deliverables for this task. The University of Akron was selected to provide the necessary support for installing, and integrating the test vehicle with their newly designed test facility capable of simulating the operating environment for the planned testing. The planned testing with good and damaged bearings will be on hold pending further continuation of this effort during next phase.

  3. Fuzzy control of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, J. J.; Niederauer, G. M.; Ahlstrom, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of an adaptive fuzzy control algorithm implemented on a VLSI chip for the control of a magnetic bearing was considered. The architecture of the adaptive fuzzy controller is similar to that of a neural network. The performance of the fuzzy controller is compared to that of a conventional controller by computer simulation.

  4. Gradient Tempering Of Bearing Races

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, Richardson A.

    1991-01-01

    Gradient-tempering process increases fracture toughness and resistance to stress-corrosion cracking of ball-bearing races made of hard, strong steels and subject to high installation stresses and operation in corrosive media. Also used in other applications in which local toughening of high-strength/low-toughness materials required.

  5. Polar Bear Along Alaska's Coast

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A polar bear stands on a low-lying barrier shoal near the Huluhula River on the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska. Coastal erosion along the Arctic coast is chronic, widespread and potentially accelerating, posing threats to infrastructure important for defense and energy purposes, natural shoreline habi...

  6. Grizzly Bears Along Alaska's Coast

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This photograph shows two grizzly bears frolic on the tundra near the Avak River on the Chukchi Sea coast of Alaska. Coastal erosion along the Arctic coast is chronic, widespread and potentially accelerating, posing threats to infrastructure important for defense and energy purposes, natural shoreli...

  7. High performance rolling element bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursey, Jr., Roger W. (Inventor); Olinger, Jr., John B. (Inventor); Owen, Samuel S. (Inventor); Poole, William E. (Inventor); Haluck, David A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A high performance rolling element bearing (5) which is particularly suitable for use in a cryogenically cooled environment, comprises a composite cage (45) formed from glass fibers disposed in a solid lubricant matrix of a fluorocarbon polymer. The cage includes inserts (50) formed from a mixture of a soft metal and a solid lubricant such as a fluorocarbon polymer.

  8. Losses of Superconductor Journal Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Hull, J. R.; Han, S. C.; Jeong, N. H.; Oh, J. M.; Sung, T. H.

    2004-06-01

    A high-temperature superconductor (HTS) journal bearing was studied for rotational loss. Two HTS bearings support the rotor at top and bottom. The rotor weight is 4 kg and the length is about 300 mm. Both the top and bottom bearings have two permanent magnet (PM) rings with an iron pole piece separating them. Each HTS journal bearing is composed of six pieces of superconductor blocks of size 352510 mm. The HTS blocks are encased in a cryochamber through which liquid nitrogen flows. The inner spool of the cryochamber is made from G-10 to reduce eddy current loss, and the rest of the cryochamber is stainless steel. The magnetic field from the PM rings is < 10 mT on the stainless part. The rotational drag was measured over the same speed range at several chamber pressures. Results indicate that a chamber pressure of 0.4 mtorr is sufficiently low to minimize windage loss, and the 10 mT design criterion for the magnetic field on the stainless part of the cryochamber is too high.

  9. Satellite monitoring of black bear.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, J. J.; Craighead, F. C., Jr.; Varney, J. R.; Cote, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a feasibility experiment recently performed to test the use of a satellite system for telemetering environmental and physiological data from the winter den of a 'hibernating' black bear, Ursus americanus. The instrumentation procedure and evaluations of the equipment performance and sensory data obtained are discussed in detail.

  10. Robust and intelligent bearing estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Claassen, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    As the monitoring thresholds of global and regional networks are lowered, bearing estimates become more important to the processes which associate (sparse) detections and which locate events. Current methods of estimating bearings from observations by 3-component stations and arrays lack both accuracy and precision. Methods are required which will develop all the precision inherently available in the arrival, determine the measurability of the arrival, provide better estimates of the bias induced by the medium, permit estimates at lower SNRs, and provide physical insight into the effects of the medium on the estimates. Initial efforts have focused on 3-component stations since the precision is poorest there. An intelligent estimation process for 3-component stations has been developed and explored. The method, called SEE for Search, Estimate, and Evaluation, adaptively exploits all the inherent information in the arrival at every step of the process to achieve optimal results. In particular, the approach uses a consistent and robust mathematical framework to define the optimal time-frequency windows on which to make estimates, to make the bearing estimates themselves, and to withdraw metrics helpful in choosing the best estimate(s) or admitting that the bearing is immeasurable. The approach is conceptually superior to current methods, particular those which rely on real values signals. The method has been evaluated to a considerable extent in a seismically active region and has demonstrated remarkable utility by providing not only the best estimates possible but also insight into the physical processes affecting the estimates. It has been shown, for example, that the best frequency at which to make an estimate seldom corresponds to the frequency having the best detection SNR and sometimes the best time interval is not at the onset of the signal. The method is capable of measuring bearing dispersion, thereby withdrawing the bearing bias as a function of frequency. The lowest measurable frequency in the dispersion pattern is often a near error free bearing. These latter features should be helpful in calibrating the stations for frequency dependent biases induced by the earth. Future efforts will enhance the SEE algorithm and will also evaluate it using larger station data sets.

  11. Characteristics of high-stiffness superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, M.; Tamada, N.; Fuchino, S.; Ishii, I.

    1996-07-01

    Magnetic bearings using a high-Tc superconductor have been studied. Generally the bearing makes use of the pinning effects to get the levitation force. The stiffness of the bearing, however, is extremely low as compared with industrial-scale conventional one. To improve the bearing stiffness the authors propose a disc-type repulsive superconducting thrust bearing with a slit for the restraint of the flux. Both theoretical and experimental evaluation on the load performance was carried out, and it is clarified that the proposed superconducting bearing has higher stiffness.

  12. Active magnetic bearings give systems a lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Leo

    1992-07-01

    While the active magnetic bearings currently being used in such specialized applications as centrifugal compressors for natural gas pumps are more expensive than conventional bearings, they furnish improved machine service life, controlled damping of high-speed rotors to eliminate critical-speed vibrations, and the obviation of lubrication systems. Attention is presently given to magnetic bearings used by the electric power industry, homopolar magnetic radial and thrust bearings, weapon-system and gas turbine engine applications of magnetic bearings, and the benefits of magnetic bearings for energy-storage flywheels.

  13. Volumetric Growth of the Liver in the Human Fetus: An Anatomical, Hydrostatic, and Statistical Study

    PubMed Central

    Szpinda, Michał; Paruszewska-Achtel, Monika; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Elminowska-Wenda, Gabriela; Dombek, Małgorzata; Szpinda, Anna; Badura, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Using anatomical, hydrostatic, and statistical methods, liver volumes were assessed in 69 human fetuses of both sexes aged 18–30 weeks. No sex differences were found. The median of liver volume achieved by hydrostatic measurements increased from 6.57 cm3 at 18–21 weeks through 14.36 cm3 at 22–25 weeks to 20.77 cm3 at 26–30 weeks, according to the following regression: y = −26.95 + 1.74 × age ± Z  × (−3.15 + 0.27 × age). The median of liver volume calculated indirectly according to the formula liver volume = 0.55 × liver length × liver transverse diameter × liver sagittal diameter increased from 12.41 cm3 at 18–21 weeks through 28.21 cm3 at 22–25 weeks to 49.69 cm3 at 26–30 weeks. There was a strong relationship (r = 0.91, p < 0.001) between the liver volumes achieved by hydrostatic (x) and indirect (y) methods, expressed by y = −0.05 + 2.16x  ± 7.26. The liver volume should be calculated as follows liver volume = 0.26 × liver length × liver transverse diameter × liver sagittal diameter. The age-specific liver volumes are of great relevance in the evaluation of the normal hepatic growth and the early diagnosis of fetal micro- and macrosomias. PMID:26413551

  14. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on biosynthetic activity during chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs in hybrid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Karkhaneh, Akbar; Naghizadeh, Ziba; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin; Solouk, Atefeh; Haghighipour, Nooshin

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of hydrostatic pressure (HP) on the biochemical properties and gene expression of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering composed of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gelatin (GEL) semi interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN). The MSCs were cultured on PCL-PVA-GEL semi-IPN scaffolds in two groups (A and B) for 7 and 21 days, respectively, and then loaded with hydrostatic pressure (5 MPa, 0.5 Hz) for 2 h per day for the period of 7 days and compared with two non-loaded groups (C and D) as controls. DMMB and real-time PCR analysis for assaying cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) gene markers were carried out. According to the results, there were no significant differences in GAG amounts between the loaded and non-loaded constructs were observed after 14 days. However, significant and considerable increases in the expression amount of type II collagen mRNA levels in group A ( from 2.43 10-4 5.32 10-5 to 2.09 10-3 1.07 10-4 time), and in group B (from 3.04 10-4 4.31 10-5 to 2.08 10-3 1.59 10-4 time) in comparison with non-loaded groups (C and D) were observed, respectively. Results showed the beneficial role of hydrostatic pressure on the increase of type II collagen mRNA levels in articular cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:24619897

  15. Therapeutic Vaccination against Adjuvant Arthritis Using Autoimmune T Cells Treated with Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, Ofer; Karin, Nathan; Shinitzky, Meir; Cohen, Irun R.

    1987-07-01

    An ideal treatment for autoimmune diseases would be a nontoxic means of specifically neutralizing the autoreactive lymphocytes responsible for the disease. This goal has been realized in experimental autoimmunity models by immunizing rats or mice against their own autoimmune cells such that the animals generate an immune response specifically repressive to the disease-producing lymphocytes. This maneuver, termed lymphocyte vaccination, was demonstrated to be effective using some, but not all, autoimmune helper T-lymphocyte lines. We now report that T lymphocytes, otherwise incapable of triggering an immune response, can be transformed into effective immunogens by treating the cells in vitro with hydrostatic pressure. Clone A2b, as effector clone that recognized cartilage proteoglycan and caused adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats, is such a cell. Untreated A2b could not trigger an immune response, but inoculating rats with pressure-treated A2b induced early remission of established adjuvant arthritis as well as resistance to subsequent disease. Specific resistance to arthritis was associated with anti-idiotypic T-cell reactivity to clone A2b and could be transferred from vaccinated rats to naive recipients using donor lymphoid cells. Aggregation of T-lymphocyte membrane components appeared to be important for an immune response because the effects of hydrostatic pressure could be reproduced by treatment of A2b with chemical cross-linkers or with agents disrupting the cytoskeleton. Populations of lymph node cells from antigen-primed rats, when treated with hydrostatic pressure, could also induce suppression of disease. Thus, effective vaccines can be developed without having to isolate the autoimmune T lymphocytes as lines or clones. These results demonstrate that effector T lymphocytes suitably treated may serve as agents for specifically controlling the immune system.

  16. Thermal influence of the Couette flow in a hydrostatic spindle on the machining precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongju; Fan, Jinwei; Li, Haiyong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Feihu

    2013-05-01

    Hydrostatic spindles are increasingly used in precision machine tools. Thermal error is the key factor affecting the machining accuracy of the spindle, and research has focused on spindle thermal errors through examination of the influence of the temperature distribution, thermal deformation and spindle mode. However, seldom has any research investigated the thermal effects of the associated Couette flow. To study the heat transfer mechanism in spindle systems, the criterion of the heat transfer direction according to the temperature distribution of the Couette flow at different temperatures is deduced. The method is able to deal accurately with the significant phenomena occurring at every place where thermal energy flowed in such a spindle system. The variation of the motion error induced by thermal effects on a machine work-table during machining is predicated by establishing the thermo-mechanical error model of the hydrostatic spindle for a high precision machine tool. The flow state and thermal behavior of a hydrostatic spindle is analyzed with the evaluated heat power and the coefficients of the convective heat transfer over outer surface of the spindle are calculated, and the thermal influence on the oil film stiffness is evaluated. Thermal drift of the spindle nose is measured with an inductance micrometer, the thermal deformation data 1.35 μm after running for 4 h is consistent with the value predicted by the finite element analysis's simulated result 1.28 μm, and this demonstrates that the simulation method is feasible. The thermal effects on the processing accuracy from the flow characteristics of the fluid inside the spindle are analyzed for the first time.

  17. Evaluating the role of hydrostatic gradient and structural dip on subsurface dissolution of evaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechner, E.; Konz, M.; Younes, A.; Huggenberger, P.

    2009-04-01

    Typically, four basic requirements are defined for subsurface dissolution of salt (NaCl), or gypsum (CaSO4): (1) a deposit of salt or gypsum against which, or through which water can flow, (2) a supply of water undersaturated with NaCl, or CaSO4, (3) an outlet where the resulting brine can escape, and (4) energy, such as provided by a hydrostatic head, or density gradient, which causes groundwater flow through the system. Based on an approximately 1000m long, and 150m deep 2D field scale model, which represents a setup of two aquifers connected by subvertical fault zones, a series of 2D density-coupled solute transport simulations were conducted. Hydraulic boundary conditions were assigned according to a regional 3D groundwater flow model. The maintained hydrostatic gradient in the 2D model section is a result of both a natural hydrostatic gradient and a superimposed anthropogenic large-scale groundwater withdrawal in the upper aquifer. A numerical model based on Mixed Finite Elements for the fluid flow problem and a combination of Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element and Multi-Point Flux Approximation methods for the transport turned out to be adequate for the simulation of density driven flow. Results indicate that the upconing process of saline groundwater from the deeper aquifer above the halite formation to the upper aquifer occurs under different sets of subsurface parameter constellations and hydraulic boundary conditions. Steady-state of the concentration distribution in the upper aquifer is reached in most simulations after relative short time span, and increased salinities are affecting most parts of the aquifer. The resulting salinity stratification with increase towards the bottom of the upper aquifer corresponds both to field observation data and measurements in laboratory scale flow tank experiments. Moreover, the effect of the anthropogenic groundwater withdrawal on salt dissolution rate is significantly lower than expected. Considerably more sensitive to the dissolution rate, however, is the structure, or dip of the halite formation. An increase of dissolution rate can be observed with increasing dips. The dissolved salt moves along the dip and initiates a local flow field driven by gravitation which is decoupled from the regional hydrostatic gradient. Therefore, we propose to add structural dip as additional basic requirement for subsurface dissolution of evaporites.

  18. Wormgear geometry adopted for implementing hydrostatic lubrication and formulation of the lubrication problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1995-01-01

    The geometrical parameters for a wormgear intended to be used as the transmission in advanced helicopters are finalized. The resulting contact pattern of the meshing tooth surfaces is suitable for the implementation of hydrostatic lubrication Fluid film lubrication of the contact is formulated considering external pressurization as well as hydrodynamic wedge and squeeze actions. The lubrication analysis is aimed at obtaining the oil supply pressure needed to separate the worm and gear surfaces by a prescribed minimum film thickness. The procedure of solving the mathematical problem is outlined.

  19. Optical fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of hydrostatic pressure and temperature in soil embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneesh, R.; Schenato, L.; Palmieri, L.; Pasuto, A.; Galtarossa, A.

    2015-09-01

    An optical fiber sensor for the simultaneous measurement of hydrostatic pressure and temperature in soil embankments is presented. The sensor exploits a dual chambers transduction mechanism and is based on the optical measurement of the differential strain induced in the fiber by temperature and pressure in the two chambers. A prototype has been built and interrogated by means of optical coherent frequency domain reflectometry and the results of a preliminary experimental characterization are presented and discussed. Temperature and pressure sensitivities are approximately -7.1 GHz/°C and -4.4 GHz/kPa, respectively.

  20. Hydrostatic pressure in the inner ear fluid compartments and its effects on inner ear function.

    PubMed

    Bhmer, A

    1993-01-01

    The present study summarizes the experimental findings obtained on the pressure in the inner ear fluids and on the effects of pressure changes on cochlear function in the guinea pig. Two types of pressures have to be distinguished in the inner ear fluid compartments: (i) hydrostatic fluid pressure and (ii) superimposed hydrodynamic high frequency (> 100 Hz) sound pressure oscillations. Hydrostatic pressure in the inner ear fluids in guinea pigs is in the order of 200 Pa (2 cm H2O) and shows slow (< 5 Hz) respiratory and pulsatory oscillations as well as considerable physiological variations in the range of -100 to +700 Pa. In normal ears, hydrostatic pressure in the perilymph equals pressure in the endolymph, and pressure changes applied to one compartment are immediately transmitted to the other one. A high compliance of Reissner's membrane seems to be the cause of this endolymphatic-perilymphatic pressure equalization. In experimental endolymphatic hydrops, a unique animal model for Meniere's disease, endolymphatic pressure is higher (100 Pa and above) than perilymphatic pressure. These pressure gradients occur only in late stages of hydrops, probably when Reissner's membrane has lost its high compliance after long standing distension. Positive endolymphatic-perilymphatic pressure gradients are secondary to and not the primary cause of hydrops formation. Changes of hydrostatic pressure do not affect auditory function as long as they stay in the physiological range. This includes the sudden loss of positive inner ear pressure that occurs in perilymph fistulas. The rationale for surgical repair of perilymph fistulas in patients in order to restore the hearing function thus becomes questionable. Other aspects of surgical repair, however, as e.g. prevention of labyrinthitis due to permanently open fistula, could not be investigated in this model, because in guinea pigs even large fistulas heal spontaneously within a few days. In experimental endolymphatic hydrops, deterioration of auditory thresholds was partially correlated to the presence of positive endolymphatic-perilymphatic pressure gradients. A change in pressure, however, occurred later than the first deterioration in auditory function. Therefore positive endo-perilymphatic pressure gradients may contribute to, but are not the only cause of hearing impairment. PMID:8273452

  1. A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline by using distributed optical fiber vibration sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Sun, Zhenshi; Qian, Ya; Zhang, Tao; Rao, Yunjiang

    2015-07-01

    A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline with a distributed optical fiber vibration sensing (DOVS) system based on the phase-sensitive OTDR technology is studied in this paper. By monitoring one end of a common communication optical fiber cable, which is laid in the inner wall of the pipe, we can detect and locate the water leakages easily. Different apertures under different pressures are tested and it shows that the DOVS has good responses when the aperture is equal or larger than 4 mm and the inner pressure reaches 0.2 Mpa for a steel pipe with DN 91cm×EN 2cm.

  2. Development of a Smart Bicycle Based on a Hydrostatic Automatic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Dinh Quang; Ahn, Kyoung Kwan; Khoa, Le Duy; Thinh, Do Hoang

    This paper develops a newly bicycle concept named smart bicycle (SBIC) with automatic transmission and energy recuperating ability. The SBIC operation is based on a hydrostatic transmission (HST). Several HST designs have been proposed. Moreover, a use of energy converting and storing devices is an optional design for the SBIC to recovery energy during the deceleration or going downhill process, and to support this energy to the hydraulic system during the acceleration or going uphill process. The working efficiency of the bicycle is then increased and could become competitive with the roller-chain technology. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the working performances of the proposed SBIC concepts.

  3. Hydrostatic Level Sensors as High Precision Ground Motion Instrumentation for Tevatron and Other Energy Frontier Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, James; Hansen, Sten; Johnson, Todd; Jostlein, Hans; Kiper, Terry; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Chupyra, Andrei; Kondaurov, Mikhail; Medvedko, Anatoly; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Singatulin, Shavkat

    2012-01-01

    Particle accelerators require very tight tolerances on the alignment and stability of their elements: magnets, accelerating cavities, vacuum chambers, etc. In this article we describe the Hydrostatic Level Sensors (HLS) for very low frequency measurements used in a variety of facilities at Fermilab. We present design features of the sensors, outline their technical parameters, describe their test and calibration procedures, discuss different regimes of operation and give few illustrative examples of the experimental data. Detail experimental results of the ground motion measurements with these detectors will be presented in subsequent papers.

  4. In situ tuning the single photon emission from single quantum dots through hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xuefei; Dou, Xiuming; Ding, Kun; Zhou, Pengyu; Ni, Haiqiao; Niu, Zhichuan; Jiang, Desheng; Sun, Baoquan

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate that exciton emission wavelength in InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) can be shifted up to 160 nm using hydrostatic pressure (0.4–4 GPa) in situ in an optical cryostat through an improved diamond anvil cell driven by piezoelectric actuator. It is confirmed that the high pressure does not destroy the photon anti-bunching properties of single QD emitter. Exciton emission intensity is not obviously weakened under the pressure range of 0–4 GPa. Such a tunable QD single photon emitter enables a flexibly tuned source for quantum optical experiments.

  5. Fiber optic liquid crystalline hydrostatic pressure sensor with gradient-index rod lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinski, Tomasz R.; Staronski, Leszek R.; Jarmolik, Aleksandra; Domanski, Andrzej W.

    1994-11-01

    A further development of the fiber optic hydrostatic pressure sensor with a liquid crystal film acting as a sensing element is presented. To enhance the amount of the optical signal entering the liquid crystal optrode gradient index (GRIN) rod lenses have been used in the pressure environment. The paper discusses the effect of stress induced birefringence in a GRIN lens, its influence on defocusing phenomena under pressure and the optimized configuration of the fiber optic liquid crystal sensor preset for a required range of pressure.

  6. Enhancement of the critical current density of YBa2Cu3Ox superconductors under hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Tomita, T; Schilling, J S; Chen, L; Veal, B W; Claus, H

    2006-02-24

    The dependence of the critical current density Jc on hydrostatic pressure to 0.6 GPa is determined for a single 25 degrees [001]-tilt grain boundary in a bicrystalline ring of nearly optimally doped melt-textured YBa2Cu3Ox. Jc is found to increase rapidly under pressure at +20%/GPa. A new diagnostic method is introduced (pressure-induced Jc relaxation) which reveals a sizable concentration of vacant oxygen sites in the grain boundary region. Completely filling such sites with oxygen anions should lead to significant enhancements in Jc. PMID:16606126

  7. A High Precision Double Tubed Hydrostatic Leveling System for Accelerator Alignment Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Singatulin, Shavkat; Volk, J.; Shiltsev, V.; Chupyra, A.; Medvedko, A.; Kondaurov, M.

    2006-09-01

    Since 1998 several hydrostatic leveling systems (HLS) have been installed in different locations at Fermilab. This work was in collaboration with Budker Institute and SLAC. All systems were either half-filled pipe (HF) or full-filled pipe (FF). Issues assembling HLS are covered in this article. An improved and cost-effective water system with temperature stabilized of water media is presented. This proposal is a double-tube full-filled DT-FF system. Examples of hardware configurations are included for systems located at Fermilab.

  8. Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel During Hydrostatic Pressure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Thesken, John C.; Schmidt, Timothy E.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization tests were conducted on a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) to understand the fiber stresses in COPV components. Two three-dimensional digital image correlation systems with high speed cameras were used in the evaluation to provide full field displacement and strain data for each pressurization test. A few of the key findings will be discussed including how the principal strains provided better insight into system behavior than traditional gauges, a high localized strain that was measured where gages were not present and the challenges of measuring curved surfaces with the use of a 1.25 in. thick layered polycarbonate panel that protected the cameras.

  9. Effect of the hydrostatic pressure on otolith growth of early juveniles of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Correia, A T; Coimbra, A M; Damasceno-Oliveira, A

    2012-07-01

    Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus early juveniles were maintained for 2 weeks in a pressurized system under a controlled photoperiod, at constant salinity and temperature. Groups of fish were exposed to one of three absolute hydrostatic pressure (HP) regimes: (1) a constant normal atmospheric pressure (100 kPa), (2) a constant 40 m pressure (500 kPa) or (3) a semi-diurnal cyclic vertical migration (100-500 kPa). No significant differences were detected in otolith size and incremental periodicity among the three HP treatments, suggesting that HP does not affect otolith growth of early juveniles O. niloticus. PMID:22747823

  10. Journal and Wave Bearing Impedance Calculation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Amanda; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The wave bearing software suite is a MALTA application that computes bearing properties for user-specified wave bearing conditions, as well as plain journal bearings. Wave bearings are fluid film journal bearings with multi-lobed wave patterns around the circumference of the bearing surface. In this software suite, the dynamic coefficients are outputted in a way for easy implementation in a finite element model used in rotor dynamics analysis. The software has a graphical user interface (GUI) for inputting bearing geometry parameters, and uses MATLAB s structure interface for ease of interpreting data. This innovation was developed to provide the stiffness and damping components of wave bearing impedances. The computational method for computing bearing coefficients was originally designed for plain journal bearings and tilting pad bearings. Modifications to include a wave bearing profile consisted of changing the film thickness profile given by an equation, and writing an algorithm to locate the integration limits for each fluid region. Careful consideration was needed to implement the correct integration limits while computing the dynamic coefficients, depending on the form of the input/output variables specified in the algorithm.

  11. Theoretical studies of optical gain tuning by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2014-01-21

    In order to describe theoretically the tuning of the optical gain by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), the optical gain calculations within kp approach were developed and applied for N-containing and N-free QWs. The electronic band structure and the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW were calculated within the 10-band kp model which takes into account the interaction of electron levels in the QW with the nitrogen resonant level in GaInNAs. It has been shown that this interaction increases with the hydrostatic pressure and as a result the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW decreases by about 40% and 80% for transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes, respectively, for the hydrostatic pressure change from 0 to 40 kilobars. Such an effect is not observed for N-free QWs where the dispersion of electron and hole energies remains unchanged with the hydrostatic pressure. This is due to the fact that the conduction and valence band potentials in GaInAs/GaAs QW scale linearly with the hydrostatic pressure.

  12. Bear-inflicted human injury and fatality.

    PubMed

    Floyd, T

    1999-01-01

    This review attempts to summarize credible scientific information, and to dispel myths, regarding bear attacks. Publications in the scientific literature were sought through a Medline search and by reviewing the bibliographies of related books and scientific articles. Personal experience and interviews with authorities were also used in preparation of this review, although only published articles or books are cited. This is a summary of case series reported or observed elsewhere. Bear-inflicted human injury and death is rare. Brown bear attacks tend to be severe and to occur suddenly, without provocation. Black bear attacks usually result in minor injuries and tend to be predacious. Polar bear attacks are exceedingly rare, and the ferocity of polar bears has probably been overemphasized. Bear-inflicted wounds should be treated as major trauma in accordance with advanced trauma life support guidelines. This information may be useful in counseling patients with regard to prevention of injury or death from bear attack. PMID:10442155

  13. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  14. A Preliminary Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.; Bruckner, Robert J.; Howard, S. Adam

    2006-01-01

    Recent breakthrough improvements in foil gas bearing load capacity, high temperature tribological coatings and computer based modeling have enabled the development of increasingly larger and more advanced Oil-Free Turbomachinery systems. Successful integration of foil gas bearings into turbomachinery requires a step wise approach that includes conceptual design and feasibility studies, bearing testing, and rotor testing prior to full scale system level demonstrations. Unfortunately, the current level of understanding of foil gas bearings and especially their tribological behavior is often insufficient to avoid developmental problems thereby hampering commercialization of new applications. In this paper, a new approach loosely based upon accepted hydrodynamic theory, is developed which results in a "Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map" to guide the integration process. This performance map, which resembles a Stribeck curve for bearing friction, is useful in describing bearing operating regimes, performance safety margins, the effects of load on performance and limiting factors for foil gas bearings.

  15. Stable isotopes to detect food-conditioned bears and to evaluate human-bear management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, John B., III; Koch, Paul L.; Schwartz, Charles C.; Ferguson, Jake M.; Greenleaf, Schuyler S.; Kalinowski, Steven T.

    2012-01-01

    We used genetic and stable isotope analysis of hair from free-ranging black bears (Ursus americanus) in Yosemite National Park, California, USA to: 1) identify bears that consume human food, 2) estimate the diets of these bears, and 3) evaluate the Yosemite humanbear management program. Specifically, we analyzed the isotopic composition of hair from bears known a priori to be food-conditioned or non-food-conditioned and used these data to predict whether bears with an unknown management status were food-conditioned (FC) or non-food-conditioned (NFC). We used a stable isotope mixing model to estimate the proportional contribution of natural foods (plants and animals) versus human food in the diets of FC bears. We then used results from both analyses to evaluate proactive (population-level) and reactive (individual-level) humanbear management, and discussed new metrics to evaluate the overall humanbear management program in Yosemite. Our results indicated that 19 out of 145 (13%) unknown bears sampled from 2005 to 2007 were food-conditioned. The proportion of human food in the diets of known FC bears likely declined from 20012003 to 20052007, suggesting proactive management was successful in reducing the amount of human food available to bears. In contrast, reactive management was not successful in changing the management status of known FC bears to NFC bears, or in reducing the contribution of human food to the diets of FC bears. Nine known FC bears were recaptured on 14 occasions from 2001 to 2007; all bears were classified as FC during subsequent recaptures, and humanbear management did not reduce the amount of human food in the diets of FC bears. Based on our results, we suggest Yosemite continue implementing proactive humanbear management, reevaluate reactive management, and consider removing problem bears (those involved in repeated bear incidents) from the population.

  16. Human impacts on bear habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, David J.

    1990-01-01

    : Human effects on bear habitat use are mediated through food biomass changes, bear tolerance of humans and their impacts, and human tolerance of bears. Large-scale changes in bear food biomass have been caused by conversion of wildlands and waterways to intensive human use, and by the introduction of exotic pathogens. Bears consume virtually all human foods that have been established in former wildlands, but bear use has been limited by access. Air pollution has also affected bear food biomass on a small scale and is likely to have major future impacts on bear habitat through climatic warming. Major changes in disturbance cycles and landscape mosaics wrought by humans have further altered temporal and spatial pulses of bear food production. These changes have brought short-term benefits in places, but have also added long-term stresses to most bear populations. Although bears tend to avoid humans, they will also use exotic and native foods in close proximity to humans. Subadult males and adult females are more often impelled to forage closer to humans because of their energetic predicament and because more secure sites are often preempted by adult males. Although male bears are typically responsible for most livestock predation, adult females and subadult males are more likely to be habituated to humans because they tend to forage closer to humans. Elimination of human-habituated bears predictably reduces effective carrying capacity and is more likely to be a factor in preserving bear populations where humans are present in moderate-to-high densities. If humans desire to preserve viable bear populations, they will either have to accept increased risk of injury associated with preserving habituated animals, or continue to crop habituated bears while at the same time preserving large tracts of wildlands free from significant human intrusion.

  17. Research In Diagnosing Bearing Defects From Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes research in bearing-defect signature analysis - use of vibration-signal analysis to diagnose defects in roller and ball bearings. Experiments performed on bearings in good condition and other bearings in which various parts scratched to provide known defects correlated with vibration signals. Experiments performed on highly instrumented motor-driven rotor assembly at speeds up to 10,050 r/min, using accelerometers, velocity probes, and proximity sensors mounted at various locations on assembly to measure vibrations.

  18. Mercury in polar bears from Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Lentfer, J.W.; Galster, W.A.

    1987-04-01

    Alaskan polar bear (Ursus maritimus) muscle and liver samples collected in 1972 were analyzed for total mercury. Bears north of Alaska had more mercury than bears west of Alaska. The only difference between young and adult animals was in the northern area where adults had more mercury in liver tissue than young animals. Levels were probably not high enough to be a serious threat to bears.

  19. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Bernard R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

  20. Sedimentation behaviour of sludge particles in a biogas tower reactor and the function of a hydrostatically pressurized sedimenter.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Torsten; Mehrwald, Ralf; Grajetzki, Ralf; Sens, Jan; Mrkl, Herbert

    2003-03-01

    It was found that anaerobic sludge particles contain gas bubbles. Due to the compressibility of the bubbles, which are entrapped in the sludge agglomerates, a pressure-dependent sedimentation characteristic of the sludge particles was found and mathematically described. Enhanced hydrostatic pressure results in a considerable increase of the settling velocity of sludge particles. On this basis the concept of a hydrostatically pressurized sedimenter is presented and its performance analyzed. Due to the hydrostatical pressurization of the sedimenter the produced gas is kept in the liquid phase until the liquid phase is saturated. To avoid a degassing of the liquid which results in the undesired release of gas bubbles a maximum liquid dwell time in the sedimenter must not be exceeded. PMID:12553982

  1. Effect of chemical pressure, misfit strain and hydrostatic pressure on structural and magnetic behaviors of rare-earth orthochromates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Ren, Wei; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L

    2013-09-25

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate structural and magnetic behaviors of rare-earth orthochromates as a function of 'chemical' pressure (that is, the rare-earth ionic radius), epitaxial misfit strain and hydrostatic pressure. From a structural point of view, (i) 'chemical' pressure significantly modifies antipolar displacements, Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the resulting oxygen octahedral tiltings; (ii) hydrostatic pressure mostly changes Cr-O bond lengths; and (iii) misfit strain affects all these quantities. The correlations between magnetic properties (Néel temperature and weak ferromagnetic moments) and unit cell volume are similar when varying the misfit strain or hydrostatic pressure, but differ from those associated with the 'chemical' pressure. Origins of such effects are also discussed. PMID:23995139

  2. Cuticle expansion during feeding in the tick Amblyomma hebraeum (Acari: Ixodidae): The role of hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, W Reuben; Kaufman, S; Flynn, Peter C

    2016-05-01

    Female Amblyomma hebraeum ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) increase their weight ∼10-fold during a 'slow phase of engorgement' (7-9days), and a further 10-fold during the 'rapid phase' (12-24h). During the rapid phase, the cuticle thins by half, with a plastic (permanent) deformation of greater than 40% in two orthogonal directions. A stress of 2.5MPa or higher is required to achieve this degree of deformation (Flynn and Kaufman, 2015). Using a dimensional analysis of the tick body and applying the Laplace equation, we calculated that the tick must achieve high internal hydrostatic pressures in order to engorge fully: greater than 55kPa at a fed:unfed mass ratio of ∼20:1, when cuticle thinning commences (Flynn and Kaufman, 2011). In this study we used a telemetric pressure transducer system to measure the internal hydrostatic pressure of ticks during feeding. Sustained periods of irregular high frequency (>20Hz) pulsatile bursts of high pressure (>55kPa) were observed in two ticks: they had been cannulated just prior to the rapid phase of engorgement, and given access to a host rabbit for completion of the feeding cycle. The pattern of periods of high pressure generation varied over the feeding cycle and between the two specimens. We believe that these pressures exceed those reported so far for any other animal. PMID:26872533

  3. Dispersion and kinematics of multi-layer non-hydrostatic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yefei; Cheung, Kwok Fai

    2015-08-01

    Multi-layer non-hydrostatic models are gaining popularity in studies of coastal wave processes owing to the resolution of the flow kinematics, but the linear dispersion relation remains the primary criterion for assessment of model convergence. In this paper, we reformulate the linear governing equations of an N-layer model into Boussinesq form by writing the non-hydrostatic terms as high-order derivatives of the horizontal flow velocity. The equation structure allows implementation of Fourier analysis to provide a [2 N - 2, 2N] expansion of the velocity at each layer. A variable transformation converts the governing equations into separate flux- and dispersion-dominated systems, which explicitly give an equivalent Pade expansion of the wave celerity for examination of the convergence and asymptotic properties. Flow continuity equates the depth-integrated horizontal velocity to the celerity and verifies the analytical solution. The surface-layer velocity, which is driven by the kinematic free surface boundary condition, shows a positive error and converges monotonically to the solution of Airy wave theory. When the depth parameter kd > 2N, flow reversal occurs in the sub-surface layers to offset overestimation of the surface velocity and to better approximate the flux. This model internal mechanism facilitates convergence of the celerity at large kd and benefits applications on wave transformation. Such non-physical flow reversal, however, might complicate studies that require detailed wave kinematics.

  4. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment of plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustey, A.; Leighs, J. A.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Hazael, R.; McMillan, P. F.; Hazell, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds has been investigated antecedently, primarily driven by interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia, respectively. However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods ofapplying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in collected data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder setup and shock compression via employment of a 50 mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set. Data collected has shown that cress seeds are extremely resilient to static loading, whereas the difference in the two forms of loading is negligible for lettuce seeds. Germination time has been seen to extend dramatically following static loading of cress seeds to greater than 0.4 GPa. In addition, the cut-off pressure previously seen to cause 0% germination in dynamic experiments performed on cress seeds has now also been seen in lettuce seeds.

  5. Non-Hydrostatic Modelling of Waves and Currents over Subtle Bathymetric Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, E.; Mulligan, R. P.; McNinch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Localized areas with high rates of shoreline erosion on beaches, referred to as erosional hotspots, can occur near clusters of relict shore-oblique sandbars. Wave transformation and wave-driven currents over these morphological features could provide an understanding of the hydrodynamic-morphologic coupling mechanism that connects them to the occurrence of erosional hotspots. To investigate this, we use the non-hydrostatic SWASH model that phase-resolves the free surface and fluid motions throughout the water column, allowing for high resolution of wave propagation and breaking processes. In this study we apply a coupled system of nested models including SWAN over a large domain of the North Carolina shelf with smaller nested SWASH domains in areas of interest to determine the hydrodynamic processes occurring over shore oblique bars. In this presentation we focus on a high resolution grid (10 vertical layers, 10 m horizontal resolution) applied to the Duck region with model validation from acoustic wave and current data, and observations from the Coastal Lidar And Radar Imaging System (CLARIS). By altering the bathymetry input for each model run based on bathymetric surveys and comparing the predicted and observed wave heights and current profiles, the effects of subtle bathymetric perturbations have on wave refraction, wave breaking, surf zone currents and vorticity are investigated. The ability to predict wave breaking and hydrodynamics with a non-hydrostatic model may improve our understanding of surf zone dynamics in relation to morphologic conditions.

  6. Dynamic hydrostatic pressure enhances differentially the chondrogenesis of meniscal cells from the inner and outer zone.

    PubMed

    Zellner, J; Mueller, M; Xin, Y; Krutsch, W; Brandl, A; Kujat, R; Nerlich, M; Angele, P

    2015-06-01

    This study analyses the influence of dynamic hydrostatic pressure on chondrogenesis of human meniscus-derived fibrochondrocytes and explores the differences in chondrogenic differentiation under loading conditions between cells derived from the avascular inner zone and vascularized outer region of the meniscus. Aggregates of human fibrochondrocytes with cell origin from the inner region or with cell origin from the outer region were generated. From the two groups of either cell origin, aggregates were treated with dynamic hydrostatic pressure (1Hz for 4h; 0.55-5.03MPa, cyclic sinusoidal) from day 1 to day 7. The other aggregates served as unloaded controls. At day 0, 7, 14 and 21 aggregates were harvested for evaluation including histology, immunostaining and ELISA analysis for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen II. Loaded aggregates were found to be macroscopically larger and revealed immunohistochemically enhanced chondrogenesis compared to the corresponding controls. Loaded or non-loaded meniscal cells from the outer zone showed a higher potential and earlier onset of chondrogenesis compared to the cells from the inner part of the meniscus. This study suggests that intrinsic factors like cell properties in the different areas of the meniscus and their reaction on mechanical load might play important roles in designing Tissue Engineering strategies for meniscal repair in vivo. PMID:25698240

  7. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on yeasts isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Burgaud, Gatan; Hu, Nguyen Thi Minh; Arzur, Danielle; Coton, Monika; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Jebbar, Mohamed; Barbier, Georges

    2015-11-01

    Hydrostatic pressure plays a significant role in the distribution of life in the biosphere. Knowledge of deep-sea piezotolerant and (hyper)piezophilic bacteria and archaea diversity has been well documented, along with their specific adaptations to cope with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Recent investigations of deep-sea microbial community compositions have shown unexpected micro-eukaryotic communities, mainly dominated by fungi. Molecular methods such as next-generation sequencing have been used for SSU rRNA gene sequencing to reveal fungal taxa. Currently, a difficult but fascinating challenge for marine mycologists is to create deep-sea marine fungus culture collections and assess their ability to cope with pressure. Indeed, although there is no universal genetic marker for piezoresistance, physiological analyses provide concrete relevant data for estimating their adaptations and understanding the role of fungal communities in the abyss. The present study investigated morphological and physiological responses of fungi to HHP using a collection of deep-sea yeasts as a model. The aim was to determine whether deep-sea yeasts were able to tolerate different HHP and if they were metabolically active. Here we report an unexpected taxonomic-based dichotomic response to pressure with piezosensitve ascomycetes and piezotolerant basidiomycetes, and distinct morphological switches triggered by pressure for certain strains. PMID:26226336

  8. Physicochemical properties of natural actomyosin from threadfin bream (Nemipterus spp.) induced by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aimei; Lin, Liying; Liang, Yan; Benjakul, Soottawat; Shi, Xiaoling; Liu, Xin

    2014-08-01

    Changes of physicochemical properties in natural actomyosin (NAM) from threadfin bream (Nemipterus spp.) induced by high hydrostatic pressure (200, 400, 600MPa for 10, 30, 50min) were studied. The increase in turbidity of NAM was coincidental with the decrease in protein solubility with increasing pressure and time, suggesting the formation of protein aggregates. SDS-PAGE showed that polymerisation and degradation of myosin heavy chain were induced by high pressure. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of NAM treated by high pressure was lost, suggesting the denaturation of myosin and the dissociation of actomyosin complex. Surface hydrophobicity of NAM increased when the pressure and pressurization time increased, indicating that the exposed hydrophobic residues increased upon application of high pressure. Decrease in total sulfhydryl content and increase in surface-reactive sulfhydryl content of NAM samples were observed with the extension of pressurizing time, indicating the formation of disulphide bonds through oxidation of SH groups or disulphide interchanges. The above changes of physicochemical properties suggested conformational changes of NAM from muscle of threadfin bream induced by high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:24629987

  9. Qualitative novelty in seventeenth-century science: Hydrostatics from Stevin to Pascal.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Alan F

    2015-06-01

    Two works on hydrostatics, by Simon Stevin in 1586 and by Blaise Pascal in 1654, are analysed and compared. The contrast between the two serves to highlight aspects of the qualitative novelty involved in changes within science in the first half of the seventeenth century. Stevin attempted to derive his theory from unproblematic postulates drawn from common sense but failed to achieve his goal insofar as he needed to incorporate assumptions involved in his engineering practice but not sanctioned by his postulates. Pascal's theory went beyond common sense by introducing a novel concept, pressure. Theoretical reflection on novel experiments was involved in the construction of the new concept and experiment also provided important evidence for the theory that deployed it. The new experimental reasoning was qualitatively different from the Euclidean style of reasoning adopted by Stevin. The fact that a conceptualization of a technical sense of pressure adequate for hydrostatics was far from obvious is evident from the work of those, such as Galileo and Descartes, who did not make significant moves in that direction. PMID:26227226

  10. [Effect of hydrostatic pressure on structural organization of the maize root cells].

    PubMed

    Abdrakhimov, F A; Suslov, M A; Anisimov, A V

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of hydrostatic pressure at 24 MPa level on the growth and organization of corn seedlings cells. At pressure value of 2 MPa, we observed the clarification of the mitochondrial matrix, clusterization of endoplasmic reticulum elements with formation of ergastorplasm sites and the increasing number of small vacuoles in the cytoplasm. We detected the accumulation of vesicles with electron-dense content on the trans side of dictyosomes, which indicates a change in the endomembranous system traffic. The reduction of electronic density of tonoplast was accompanied by a reduction of osmiophilic inclusions in the vacuoles. Increasing the pressure up to 4 MPa showed the emergence of destructive alterations in the tonoplast. None of the variants showed any violation of plasmalemma integrity, as confirmed by coloring with Evans blue. When we reset the hydrostatic pressure to atmospheric pressure, the frequency of structural distortions of the tonoplast membrane was proportional to the pressure difference: the minimum was at reset from 2 to 0 MPa and the maximum was at reset from 4 to 0 MPa. Thus, it has been concluded, that the endomembraneous system is among the targets of pressure effect on the plant cells. PMID:25509108

  11. Failure assessment of aluminum liner based filament-wound hybrid riser subjected to internal hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikshit, Vishwesh; Seng, Ong Lin; Maheshwari, Muneesh; Asundi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The present study describes the burst behavior of aluminum liner based prototype filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic pressure. The main objective of present study is to developed an internal pressure test rig set-up for filament-wound hybrid riser and investigate the failure modes of filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic burst pressure loading. The prototype filament-wound hybrid riser used for burst test consists of an internal aluminum liner and outer composite layer. The carbon-epoxy composites as part of the filament-wound hybrid risers were manufactured with [±55o] lay-up pattern with total composite layer thickness of 1.6 mm using a CNC filament-winding machine. The burst test was monitored by video camera which helps to analyze the failure mechanism of the fractured filament-wound hybrid riser. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor was used to monitor and record the strain changes during burst test of prototype filament-wound hybrid riser. This study shows good improvements in burst strength of filament-wound hybrid riser compared to the monolithic metallic riser. Since, strain measurement using FBG sensors has been testified as a reliable method, we aim to further understand in detail using this technique.

  12. Hydrostatically coupled dielectric elastomer actuators for tactile displays and cutaneous stimulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2010-04-01

    Hydrostatic coupling has been recently reported as a means to improve versatility and safety of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators. Hydrostatically coupled DE actuators rely on an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a DE-based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load. In this paper, we present ongoing development of bubble-like versions of such transducers, made of silicone and oil. In particular, the paper describes millimeter-scale actuators, currently being developed as soft, light, acoustically silent and cheap devices for two types of applications: tactile displays and cutaneous stimulators. In both cases, the most significant advantages of the proposed technology are represented by high versatility for design (due to the fluid based transmission mechanism), tailorable stiffness perceived by the user (obtained by adjusting the internal fluid pressure), and suitable electrical safety (enabled by both a passive interface with the user and the insulating internal fluid). Millimeter-scale prototypes showed a resonance frequency of about 250 Hz, which represents the value at which Pacinian cutaneous mechanoreceptors exhibit maximum sensitivity; this provides an optimum condition to eventually code tactile information dynamically, either in combination or as an alternative to static driving.

  13. Polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure and temperature in a side-hole fiber with squeezed microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anuszkiewicz, A.; Martynkien, T.; Olszewski, J.; Mergo, P.; Urba?czyk, W.

    2015-12-01

    We report on sensing characteristics of an endlessly single mode silica fiber with microstructure squeezed by very large side-holes. An elliptical shape of the cladding holes results in high phase and group modal birefringence, equal respectively to B = 3.33 10-4 and G = -6.62 10-4 at 1.55 ?m. Thanks to a large diameter of the side-holes located in the solid part of the cladding, the fiber polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure was increased two times compared to earlier reports and equals K p = -25.6 rad MPa-1 m-1 at 1.55 ?m. Moreover, the fiber has a very low polarimetric sensitivity to temperature K T = -9.18 10-3 rad K-1 m-1 at 1.55 ?m, thus allowing for hydrostatic pressure measurements with little cross-sensitivity to temperature. All measured parameters are in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations conducted using the finite element method.

  14. Development and evaluation of a hydrostatic dynamical core using the spectral element/discontinuous Galerkin methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.-J.; Giraldo, F. X.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamical core for the atmospheric primitive hydrostatic equations using a unified formulation of spectral element (SE) and discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods in the horizontal direction with a finite difference (FD) method in the radial direction. The CG and DG horizontal discretization employs high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) quadrature points, which define the common machinery. The atmospheric primitive hydrostatic equations are solved on the cubed-sphere grid using the flux form governing equations in a three-dimensional (3-D) Cartesian space. By using Cartesian space, we can avoid the pole singularity problem due to spherical coordinates and this also allows us to use any quadrilateral-based grid naturally. In order to consider an easy way for coupling the dynamics with existing physics packages, we use a FD in the radial direction. The models are verified by conducting conventional benchmark test cases: the Rossby-Haurwitz wavenumber 4, Jablonowski-Williamson tests for balanced initial state and baroclinic instability, and Held-Suarez tests. The results from those tests demonstrate that the present dynamical core can produce numerical solutions of good quality comparable to other models.

  15. Two-electrode voltage clamp of Xenopus oocytes under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Schmalwasser, H; Neef, A; Elliott, A A; Heinemann, S H

    1998-06-01

    Functional assays of cloned ion channels and other transport systems under various hydrostatic pressures provide information on the apparent changes in protein volume occurring during conformational rearrangements. Thus, they are valuable tools in the detailed study of the molecular steps underlying the functioning of such proteins. Here we present details of a set-up which can be used for two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments on Xenopus oocytes, commonly used for heterologous protein expression, at hydrostatic (oil) pressures as high as 60 MPa (approximately 600 atm.). The advantages of this set-up over pneumatic systems include the minimization of compression/decompression-induced temperature changes, and an increased safety of handling due to the small volume (< 10 ml) of compression medium (oil) required. The performance of the system is illustrated using experimental data on the effects of high pressure on currents recorded from oocytes expressing a Shaker potassium channel mutant. This set-up is suitable for the investigation of all electrically measurable transport systems expressed in Xenopus oocytes. PMID:9696303

  16. A small chamber for making optical measurements on single living cells at elevated hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Besch, S R; Hogan, P M

    1996-09-01

    A 100-microliters chamber has been developed to facilitate the use of optical techniques for the study of living cells under conditions of high hydrostatic pressure and other environmental manipulations. The chamber attaches to the mechanical stage of an inverted microscope and is capable of sustaining cells under physiologic conditions over a range of hydrostatic pressure from 1 to 150 atmospheres (1 atm = 101.325 kPa). Cells are located directly on the pressure supporting window that forms the bottom of the chamber. This window is made from coverslip glass which is bonded to the chamber using an epoxy adhesive and is thin enough to permit ultraviolet epi-illumination using high magnification, high numerical aperture objectives. Electrodes for stimulating excitable cells are also located on this window. In operation, the chamber is installed in a custom stage mount which provides X, Y, Z, and rotational alignment of chamber contents with respect to the microscope's optical axis. This allows precise registration of the cell specimen with the image sensing devices attached to the microscope. Mechanical and optical alignment can be performed at any pressure over the working range of the chamber. The separate cover that seals the chamber is also fitted with a window to allow for simultaneous transillumination of the specimen. A high pressure liquid chromatography pump is used to continuously perfuse the chamber with a solution that is controlled for temperature, pressure, gas tension, and ionic composition. PMID:8931285

  17. Fourier analysis for hydrostatic pressure sensing in a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Paul; Wong, Allan C. L.; Fu, H. Y.; Liao, Yanbiao; Tam, Hwayaw; Lu Chao; Wai, P. K. A.

    2010-12-20

    .We measured the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the birefringence and birefringent dispersion of a Sagnac interferometric sensor incorporating a length of highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber using Fourier analysis. Sensitivity of both the phase and chirp spectra to hydrostatic pressure is demonstrated. Using this analysis, phase-based measurements showed a good linearity with an effective sensitivity of 9.45nm/MPa and an accuracy of {+-}7.8kPa using wavelength-encoded data and an effective sensitivity of -55.7cm{sup -1}/MPa and an accuracy of {+-}4.4kPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Chirp-based measurements, though nonlinear in response, showed an improvement in accuracy at certain pressure ranges with an accuracy of {+-}5.5kPa for the full range of measured pressures using wavelength-encoded data and dropping to within {+-}2.5kPa in the range of 0.17 to 0.4MPa using wavenumber-encoded data. Improvements of the accuracy demonstrated the usefulness of implementing chirp-based analysis for sensing purposes.

  18. Prediction of acid lactic-bacteria growth in turkey ham processed by high hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, S.P.; Rosenthal, A.; Gaspar, A.; Aragão, G.M.F.; Slongo-Marcusi, A.

    2013-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been investigated and industrially applied to extend shelf life of meat-based products. Traditional ham packaged under microaerophilic conditions may sometimes present high lactic acid bacteria population during refrigerated storage, which limits shelf life due to development of unpleasant odor and greenish and sticky appearance. This study aimed at evaluating the shelf life of turkey ham pressurized at 400 MPa for 15 min and stored at 4, 8 and 12 °C, in comparison to the non pressurized product. The lactic acid bacteria population up to 107 CFU/g of product was set as the criteria to determine the limiting shelf life According to such parameter the pressurized sample achieved a commercial viability within 75 days when stored at 4 °C while the control lasted only 45 days. Predictive microbiology using Gompertz and Baranyi and Roberts models fitted well both for the pressurized and control samples. The results indicated that the high hydrostatic pressure treatment greatly increased the turkey ham commercial viability in comparison to the usual length, by slowing down the growth of microorganisms in the product. PMID:24159279

  19. Some theoretical considerations concerning hydrostatic pressure-induced deformation in anisotropic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Prasolov, P.Ph.; Kuzmenkov, A.A.; Shmakov, A.V.

    1995-06-15

    The macroscopic yielding of solid state may be described by the following yield criterion: f({sigma}{sub ij}) = 0, where f is a function of the components of the stress tensor {sigma}{sub ij}. The Huber-Mises quadratic in the stresses criterion, being predicated upon the assumption that the superposition of hydrostatic loading {sigma}{sub ij} does not influence yielding {partial_derivative}f {sigma}{sub ij}/{partial_derivative}{sigma}{sub 0} = 0 has shown good agreement with most experimental results. Hill`s criterion for anisotropic materials and several other criteria were based upon the same hypothesis. However, the class of experiments do not confirm the assumption. In case of anisotropic materials (especially hexagonal metals), due to the high degree of anisotropy the pressure causing plastic deformation may be quite low as compared to isotropic materials. The present paper examines experimental results and the theoretical connection between the critical hydrostatic pressure and the state of elastic and plastic anisotropy.

  20. True-slime-mould-inspired hydrostatically coupled oscillator system exhibiting versatile behaviours.

    PubMed

    Umedachi, Takuya; Idei, Ryo; Ito, Kentaro; Ishiguro, Akio

    2013-09-01

    Behavioural diversity is an indispensable attribute of living systems, which makes them intrinsically adaptive and responsive to the demands of a dynamically changing environment. In contrast, conventional engineering approaches struggle to suppress behavioural diversity in artificial systems to reach optimal performance in given environments for desired tasks. The goals of this research include understanding the essential mechanism that endows living systems with behavioural diversity and implementing the mechanism in robots to exhibit adaptive behaviours. For this purpose, we have focused on an amoeba-like unicellular organism: the plasmodium of true slime mould. Despite the absence of a central nervous system, the plasmodium exhibits versatile spatiotemporal oscillatory patterns and switches spontaneously among these patterns. By exploiting this behavioural diversity, it is able to exhibit adaptive behaviour according to the situation encountered. Inspired by this organism, we built a real physical robot using hydrostatically coupled oscillators that produce versatile oscillatory patterns and spontaneous transitions among the patterns. The experimental results show that exploiting physical hydrostatic interplay—the physical dynamics of the robot—allows simple phase oscillators to promote versatile behaviours. The results can contribute to an understanding of how a living system generates versatile and adaptive behaviours with physical interplays among body parts. PMID:23981517