Science.gov

Sample records for hydrothermal direct heat

  1. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  2. Geothermal hydrothermal direct heat use: US market size and market penetration estimates

    SciTech Connect

    El Sawy, A.H.; Entingh, D.J.

    1980-09-01

    This study estimates the future regional and national market penetration path of hydrothermal geothermal direct heat applications in the United States. A Technology Substitution Model (MARPEN) is developed and used to estimate the energy market shares captured by low-temperature (50 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal geothermal energy systems over the period 1985 to 2020. The sensitivity of hydrothermal direct heat market shares to various government hydrothermal commercialization policies is examined. Several substantive recommendations to help accelerate commercialization of geothermal direct heat utilization in the United States are indicated and possible additional analyses are discussed.

  3. Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

  4. Hydrothermal research and development assessment. Task Force report: projections for direct-heat applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Low and moderate temperature hydrothermal resources suitable for direct-heat applications have been identified in 37 states. The extent to which three resources might be used over the next 20 years were evaluated and the probable impact of Federal programs on hydrothermal resource utilization was assessed. The use types that comprise the bulk of the market were determined. Representative firms and municipalities were interviewed to determine their willingness to use hydrothermal energy, and to determine the investment decision criteria that would influence their actions. (MHR)

  5. Direct Measurements of Hydrothermal Heat Output at Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; di Iorio, D.; Genc, G.; Hurt, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.; Holden, J. F.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    Heat output and fluid flow are key parameters for characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers. In particular, they are essential for examining partition of heat and geochemical fluxes between discrete and diffuse flow components. Hydrothermal heat output also constrains permeability of young oceanic crust and thickness of the conductive boundary layer separating hydrothermal circulation from the underlying magmatic heat source. Over the past several years, we have deployed a number of relatively simple devices to make direct measurements of focused and diffuse flow. Most recently, we have used cup anemometer and turbine flow meters to measure fluid flow and heat flux at individual high-temperature vents and diffuse flow sites. The turbine flow meter (Figure 1) includes a titanium rotor assembly housed within a stainless steel tube and supported by sapphire bearings. The device can be used at different seafloor settings for measurements of both diffuse and focused flow. The spin of the rotor blades is videotaped to acquire the angular velocity, which is a function of the flow rate determined through calibration. We report data obtained during four cruises to the Main Endeavor and High Rise vent fields, Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), between 2007 and 2009. Overall more than 50 successful measurements of heat flow have been made on a variety of high-, medium-, and low-temperature hydrothermal sites on the Endeavor, Mothra, and High Rise structures. For example, the velocity of diffuse flow at Endeavor ranged from ~1 to ~10 cm/sec. The flow velocity from black smokers varied from ~10 cm/sec to ~1 m/sec, which appears to be similar to EPR 9°N. Typical measurements of heat flux obtained at JdFR ranged from ~1 kW for diffuse flow to ~1 MW for black smokers. Although it is difficult to extrapolate the data and obtain the integrated heat output for a vent field on JdFR, the data are used to characterize the heat fluxes from individual vent

  6. A direct steam heat option for hydrothermal treatment of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-04-12

    A conceptual process for producing a gasifiable slurry from raw municipal solid waste (MSW) using direct steam heating is outlined. The process is based on the hydrothermal decomposition of the organic matter in the MSW, which requires the MSW to be heated to 300-350{degrees}C in the presence of water. A process model is developed and it is shown, based on preliminary estimates of the hydrothermal reaction stoichiometry, that a process using multiple pressure vessels, which allows recovery of waste heat, results in a process capable of producing a product slurry having a 40 wt % solids content with no waste water emissions. Results for a variety of process options and process parameters are presented. It is shown that the addition of auxiliary feedstock to the gasifier, along with the MSW derived slurry, results in more efficient gasification. It is estimated that 2.6 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of MSW and 16 kg/s of heavy oil. Without the additional feedstock, heavy oil in this case, only 0.49 kmol/s of hydrogen would be produced.

  7. Direct synthesis of thermochromic VO2 through hydrothermal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alie, David; Gedvilas, Lynn; Wang, Zhiwei; Tenent, Robert; Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Yan, Yanfa; Shaheen, Sean E.; Dillon, Anne C.; Ban, Chunmei

    2014-04-01

    Thermochromic VO2 was directly synthesized using hydrothermal techniques. The effects of formation conditions on the structure and morphology of the final product were studied through X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Unique hollow sphere morphology was observed for the synthesized VO2 powders. Ex-situ XRD studies after heat treatment confirmed the thermal stability of the VO2 structure. Thermochromic properties, as a consequence of the reversible structural transformation between monoclinic VO2 and tetragonal phases, were observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  8. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  9. Enhanced heat transfer in partially-saturated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The role of capillarity is potentially important for determining heat transfer in hydrothermal regions. Capillarity allows mixing of phases in liquid/vapor systems and results in enhanced two-phase convection. Comparisons involving a numerical model with capillarity and analytical models without indicate that heat transfer can be enhanced by about an order of magnitude. Whether capillarity can be important for a particular hydrothermal region will depend on the nature of mineral precipitation as well as pore and fracture size distributions.

  10. Direct use of hydrothermal energy: a review of environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    O'Banion, K.; Layton, D.

    1981-08-28

    The potential environmental impacts of the exploration, development, and production of hydrothermal geothermal energy for direct use applications are reviewed and evaluated. Mitigation strategies and research and development needs are included. (MHR)

  11. Direct heating surface combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Shire, L. I.; Mroz, T. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The combustor utilizes a non-adiabatic flame to provide low-emission combustion for gas turbines. A fuel-air mixture is directed through a porous wall, the other side of which serves as a combustion surface. A radiant heat sink disposed adjacent to and spaced from the combustion surface controls the combustor flame temperature in order to prevent the formation of oxides of nitrogen. A secondary air flow cools the heat sink. Additionally, up to 100% of secondary air flow is mixed with the combustion products at the direct heating surface combustor to dilute such products thereby reducing exit temperature. However, if less than 100% secondary air is mixed to the combustor, the remainder may be added to the combustion products further downstream.

  12. Heat extraction modeling of the Stanford hydrothermal reservoir model

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lam, S.T.; Kruger, P.; Pruess, K.

    1982-01-01

    Three heat extraction experiments using a known-geometry rock loading and a calibration cooldown experiment for this rock loading yielded a set of useful hydrothermal reservoir production data covering a range of cooldown rates. The one-dimensional sweep model being developed for early use in hydrothermal reservoirs shows good agreement with the experimental data. A numerical model of the experimental system is under development and early predictions indicate reasonable agreement between numerical model output and experimental results. Future efforts will concentrate on improving details of the model particularly those related to experimental system heat loss characteristics. Once completed, a more detailed evaluation of the rock heat transfer process and appropriate simplified modeling approaches for use in the one-dimensional sweep model can be made.

  13. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between the heat flow measured at the seafloor and the higher values predicted by thermal models of the cooling lithosphere. This discrepancy is generally interpreted as indicating that the upper oceanic crust is cooled significantly by hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude of this heat flow discrepancy is the primary datum used to estimate the volume of hydrothermal flow, and the variation in the discrepancy with lithospheric age is the primary constraint on how the hydrothermal flux is divided between near-ridge and off-ridge environments. The resulting estimates are important for investigation of both the thermal structure of the lithosphere and the chemistry of the oceans. We reevaluate the magnitude and age variation of the discrepancy using a global heat flow data set substantially larger than in earlier studies, and the GDHI (Global Depth and Heat Flow) model that better predicts the heat flow. We estimate that of the predicted global oceanic heat flux of 32 x 10(exp 12) W, 34% (11 x 10(exp 12) W) occurs by hydrothermal flow. Approximately 30% of the hydrothermal heat flux occurs in crust younger than 1 Ma, so the majority of this flux is off-ridge. These hydrothermal heat flux estimates are upper bounds, because heat flow measurements require sediment at the site and so are made preferentially at topographic lows, where heat flow may be depressed. Because the water temperature for the near-ridge flow exceeds that for the off-ridge flow, the near-ridge water flow will be even a smaller fraction of the total water flow. As a result, in estimating fluxes from geochemical data, use of the high water temperatures appropriate for the ridge axis may significantly overestimate the heat flux for an assumed water flux or underestimate the water flux for an assumed heat flux. Our data also permit improved estimates of the 'sealing' age, defined as the age where the observed heat flow approximately equals that predicted, suggesting

  14. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  15. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  16. Geothermal direct heat applications program summary

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The use of geothermal energy for direct heat purposes by the private sector within the US has been quite limited to date. However, there is a large potential market for thermal energy in such areas as industrial processing, agribusiness, and space/water heating of commercial and residential buildings. Technical and economic information is needed to assist in identifying prospective direct heat users and to match their energy needs to specific geothermal reservoirs. Technological uncertainties and associated economic risks can influence the user's perception of profitability to the point of limiting private investment in geothermal direct applications. To stimulate development in the direct heat area, the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, issued two Program Opportunity Notices (PON's). These solicitations are part of DOE's national geothermal energy program plan, which has as its goal the near-term commercialization by the private sector of hydrothermal resources. Encouragement is being given to the private sector by DOE cost-sharing a portion of the front-end financial risk in a limited number of demonstration projects. The twenty-two projects summarized herein are direct results of the PON solicitations.

  17. The first measurements of hydrothermal heat output at 9°50‧N, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramondenc, Pierre; Germanovich, Leonid N.; Von Damm, Karen L.; Lowell, Robert P.

    2006-05-01

    Despite the importance of the heat output of seafloor hydrothermal systems for the Earth's energy budget, hydrothermal heat output measurements have been very limited. In this paper, we report the first measurements of hydrothermal heat output at the RIDGE 2000 Integrated Study Site on the East Pacific Rise. We focused our work on the Bio 9 complex, situated at 9°50'N, where there has been an extensive measurement and sampling program since 1991. This site is located along the eruptive fissure of the 1991/1992 event and the site of the 1995 earthquake swarm. We made direct measurements of advective heat output at several individual vents and at one site of diffuse flow (Tica). Although these data do not describe the complete heat flux picture at this vent field, the data yield a total hydrothermal heat output of ˜ 325 ± 160 MW with ˜ 42 ± 21 MW coming from high-temperature vents along this 2 km segment of ridge. This result assumes a diffuse flux similar to that measured at Tica occurs at each high-temperature vent site. Our initial measurements thus suggest that the heat output of the low-temperature diffuse venting is approximately 10 times that of the high-temperature vents, but may also be one or two orders of magnitude greater.

  18. Heat flux from magmatic hydrothermal systems related to availability of fluid recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C. F.; Bloomberg, S.; Hernández, P. A.; Mazot, A.; Viveiros, F.; Werner, C.

    2015-09-01

    Magmatic hydrothermal systems are of increasing interest as a renewable energy source. Surface heat flux indicates system resource potential, and can be inferred from soil CO2 flux measurements and fumarole gas chemistry. Here we compile and reanalyze results from previous CO2 flux surveys worldwide to compare heat flux from a variety of magma-hydrothermal areas. We infer that availability of water to recharge magmatic hydrothermal systems is correlated with heat flux. Recharge availability is in turn governed by permeability, structure, lithology, rainfall, topography, and perhaps unsurprisingly, proximity to a large supply of water such as the ocean. The relationship between recharge and heat flux interpreted by this study is consistent with recent numerical modeling that relates hydrothermal system heat output to rainfall catchment area. This result highlights the importance of recharge as a consideration when evaluating hydrothermal systems for electricity generation, and the utility of CO2 flux as a resource evaluation tool.

  19. Direct synthesis of thermochromic VO{sub 2} through hydrothermal reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alie, David; Gedvilas, Lynn; Wang, Zhiwei; Tenent, Robert; Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Yan, Yanfa; Shaheen, Sean E.; Dillon, Anne C.; Ban, Chunmei

    2014-04-01

    Thermochromic VO{sub 2} was directly synthesized using hydrothermal techniques. The effects of formation conditions on the structure and morphology of the final product were studied through X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Unique hollow sphere morphology was observed for the synthesized VO{sub 2} powders. Ex-situ XRD studies after heat treatment confirmed the thermal stability of the VO{sub 2} structure. Thermochromic properties, as a consequence of the reversible structural transformation between monoclinic VO{sub 2} and tetragonal phases, were observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). - Graphical abstract: Thermochromic VO{sub 2} crystals with hollow spherical and asterisk shape were directly synthesized using hydrothermal techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies confirmed the thermal stability and the reversible thermochromic properties of the VO{sub 2} structure. - Highlights: • One-step synthesis of thermochromic VO{sub 2} monoclinic phase, and VO{sub 2} (A and B phases) using hydrothermal technique. VO{sub 2} (A), VO{sub 2} (B). • Identification of the relationship between synthesis conditions and the morphology/structure of the final products. • Formation of VO{sub 2} monoclinic phase with an interesting hollow sphere shape. • Demonstration of superior thermal stability of the VO{sub 2} monoclinic phase. • Characterizing the thermochromic properties of VO{sub 2} monoclinic phase.

  20. Effect of hydrothermal heat treatment on magnetic properties of copper zinc ferrite rf sputtered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Gadipelly, Thirupathi; Singh, R.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrothermal treatment to the nano-structured films can overcome the destruction of the films. The Cu-Zn Ferrite films were fabricated by RF-sputtering on quartz substrates. Subsequently, the as deposited films were heat treated using hydrothermal process. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-deposited and hydrothermal treated films indicate nano-crystalline cubic spinel structure. The amorphous nature of the films is removed after hydrothermal treatment with decreased crystallite size. The field emission scanning electron micrographs showed merged columnar growth for as deposited films, which changes to well define columns after hydrothermal heating. The homogeneous cluster distribution is observed in surface view of the hydrothermal treated films. Hydrothermal treated films show merging of in-plane and out of plane magnetization plots (M(H)) whereas the M(H) plots of as deposited films show angular dependence. The strong angular dependence is observed in the FMR spectra due to the presence of a uniaxial anisotropy in the films. The ferromagnetic interactions decrease in hydrothermal heated films due to the reduced shape anisotropy and crystallite size.

  1. Availability of Heat to Drive Hydrothermal Systems in Large Martian Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsos, I. E.; Newsom, H. E.; Davies, A. G.

    2001-01-01

    The central uplift in large craters on Mars can provide a substantial source of heat, equivalent to heat produced by the impact melt sheet. The heat generated in large impacts could play a significant role in hydrothermal systems on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Constraints on the Lost City Hydrothermal System from borehole thermal data; 3-D models of heat flow and hydrothermal circulation in an oceanic core complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, S.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    A perennial problem in near-ridge hydrothermal circulation is that the only directly measurable data to test models is often vent fluid temperature. Surface heat flow measurements may be available but without the underlying thermal structure it is not known if they are transient and affected by local hydrothermal flow, or conductive. The Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex at 30 °N on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, offers a unique opportunity to better constrain hydrothermal circulation models. The temperature profile in gabbroic rocks of IODP Hole 1309D was measured in IODPExpedition 340T, and found to be near-conductive, but with a slight inflexion at ~750 mbsf indicating downward advection of fluid above that level. The lack of deep convection is especially remarkable given that the long-lived Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is located only 5km to the south. We have modelled hydrothermal circulation in the Massif using Comsol Multiphysics, comparing 2-D and 3-D topographic models and using temperature-dependent conductivity to give the best estimate of heatflow into the Massif. We can constrain maximum permeability in gabbro below 750 mbsf to 5e-17 m2. The thermal gradient in the upper part of the borehole can be matched with a permeability of 3e-14 m2 in a 750 m thick layer parallel to the surface of the massif, with upflow occurring in areas of high topography and downflow at the location of the borehole. However in 3-D the precise flow pattern is quite model dependent, and the thermal structure can be matched either by downflow centred on the borehole at lower permeability or centred a few hundred metres from the borehole at higher permeability. The borehole gradient is compatible with the longevity (>120 kyr) and outflow temperature (40-90 °C) of the LCHF either with a deep more permeable (1e-14 m2 to 1e-15 m2) domain beneath the vent site in 2-D or a permeable fault slot 500 to 1000m wide and parallel to the transform fault in 3-D. In both cases topography

  3. Mapping Ground Temperature and Radiant Hydrothermal Heat Flux on Mammoth Mountain, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. J.; Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal variability of ground temperatures and hydrothermal heat fluxes in volcanic and geothermal systems is important for monitoring volcanic activity, monitoring the impacts of geothermal development, and assessing resources. We used ground based thermal infrared (TIR) imaging combined with Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry to produce high-resolution (cm scale) DEMs over which images of ground temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux were draped. We apply this methodology to two hydrothermal areas (Mammoth Mountain and South Side fumaroles) on Mammoth Mountain, CA, allowing us to image the detailed topography, map the thermal features at each area and assess the spatial relationships between the two efficiently and at high resolution. Mammoth Mountain is a lava-dome complex located on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, CA. Unrest at Mammoth Mountain is currently manifested by seismic swarms, ground deformation, elevated 3He/4He ratios in gases at the Mammoth Mountain fumarole, and large changes in diffuse magmatic CO2 emissions from the five tree kill areas on the volcano flanks. We augment the extensive dataset collected at this site over the previous decades by quantifying ground temperatures and hydrothermal heat fluxes at the Mammoth Mountain and South Side fumarole sites. This was accomplished using a hand-held FLIR T650sc camera that simultaneously acquires visible and TIR images of the study site. Daytime and nighttime co-located visible and TIR images were acquired over each study area, and image processing was used to orthorectify and mosaic visible and TIR images, calculate radiant hydrothermal heat fluxes, construct 3D imagery of ground surface, overlay maps of ground temperatures and heat fluxes, and establish spatial relationships between topography and heat flow.

  4. Droplet heat transfer and chemical reactions during direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer and chemical reaction has been adapted to evaluate the expected behavior of droplets containing unreacted Zircaloy and stainless steel moving through the containment atmosphere during postulated accidents involving direct containment heating. The model includes internal and external diffusive resistances to reaction. The results indicate that reactions will be incomplete for many conditions characteristic of direct containment heating sequences.

  5. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The report summarizes activities of the Geo-Heat Center (GHC) at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 1995. It describes contacts with parties during this period related to assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, resources and equipment. Research is also being conducted on geothermal energy cost evaluation, low-temperature geothermal resource assessment, use of silica waste from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field as construction materials and geothermal heat pumps. Outreach activities include the publication of a quarterly bulletin on direct heat applications and dissemination of information on low-temperature geothermal resources and utilization.

  6. Finite element analysis of heat transport in a hydrothermal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase heat transport in the vicinity of a heated, subsurface zone is important for evaluation of nuclear waste repository design and estimation of geothermal energy recovery, as well as prediction of magma solidification rates. Finite element analyses of steady, two-phase, heat and mass transport have been performed to determine the relative importance of conduction and convection in a permeable medium adjacent to a hot, impermeable, vertical surface. The model includes the effects of liquid flow due to capillarity and buoyancy and vapor flow due to pressure gradients. Change of phase, with its associated latent heat effects, is also modeled. The mechanism of capillarity allows for the presence of two-phase zones, where both liquid and vapor can coexist, which has not been considered in previous investigations. The numerical method employs the standard Galerkin/finite element method, using eight-node, subparametric or isoparametric quadrilateral elements. In order to handle the extreme nonlinearities inherent in two-phase, nonisothermal, porous-flow problems, steady-state results are computed by integrating transients out to a long time (a method that is highly robust).

  7. The Coupling of the Numerical Heat Transfer Model of the Pauzhetka Hydrothermal System (Kamchatka, USSR) with Hydroisotopic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryukhin, A.V.; Sugrobov, V.M.

    1986-01-21

    The application of the two-dimensional numerical heat-transfer model to the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system allowed us to establish that: (1) a shallow magma body with the anomalous temperature of 700-1000 C and with a volume of 20-30 km{sup 3} may be a heat source for the formation of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system. (2) The water feeding source of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system may be meteoric waters which are infiltrated at an average rate of 5-10 kg/s {center_dot} km{sup 2}. The coupling of the numerical heat-transfer model with hydroisotopic data (D,T,{sup 18}O) obtained from the results of testing of exploitation wells, rivers and springs is the basis to understand more clearly the position of recharge areas and the structure of water flows in the hydrothermal system.

  8. Direct computation of the sensible heat flux.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1980-01-01

    An algorithm to determine the sensible heat flux from simple field measurements (wind speed, air and ground temperatures) has been developed. It provides a direct solution, in parametric form, which can be displayed graphically or tabularly. -from Author

  9. Hydrothermally synthesized titanate nanostructures: impact of heat treatment on particle characteristics and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Kiatkittipong, Kunlanan; Scott, Jason; Amal, Rose

    2011-10-01

    The role titanate particle structure plays in governing its characteristics upon calcining and their ensuing influence on photocatalytic performance was investigated. Titanate nanotubes and nanoribbons were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of Aeroxide P25 and then calcined at temperatures in the range 200 - 800 °C. Heat treatment directly transformed the nanotubes to anatase while nanoribbon transformation to anatase occurred via a TiO(2)(B) intermediate phase. The nanoribbon structure also provided an increased resistance to sintering, allowing for retention of the original {010} facet of the titanate nanosheets up to 800 °C. The changing material properties with calcining were found to influence the capacity of the particles to photodegrade oxalic acid and methanol. The nanotubes provided an optimum photoactivity following calcination at 500 °C with this point representing a transition between the relative dominance of crystal phase and surface area on performance. The comparatively smaller initial surface area of the nanoribbons consigned this characteristic to a secondary role in influencing photoactivity with the changes to crystal phase dominating the continually improving performance with calcination up to 800 °C. The structural stability imparted by the nanoribbon architecture during calcination, in particular its retention of the {010} facet at temperatures >700 °C, advanced its photocatalytic performance compared with the nanotubes. This was especially the case for methanol photooxidation whose primary degradation mechanism relies on hydroxyl radical attack and was facilitated by the {010} facet. The effect was not as pronounced for oxalic acid due to its higher adsorption on TiO(2) and therefore greater susceptibility to oxidation by photogenerated holes. This study demonstrates that, apart from modulating sintering effects and changes to crystal phase, the titanate nanostructure influences particle crystallography which can be beneficial for

  10. Time-series measurement of hydrothermal heat flux at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu; Jackson, Darrell R.; Bemis, Karen G.; Rona, Peter A.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous time-series observations are key to understanding the temporal evolution of a seafloor hydrothermal system and its interplay with thermal and chemical processes in the ocean and Earth interior. In this paper, we present a 26-month time series of the heat flux driving a hydrothermal plume on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge obtained using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). Since 2010, COVIS has been connected to the North East Pacific Time-series Underwater Networked Experiment (NEPTUNE) observatory that provides power and real-time data transmission. The heat flux time series has a mean value of 18.10 MW and a standard deviation of 6.44 MW. The time series has no significant global trend, suggesting the hydrothermal heat source remained steady during the observation period. The steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source coincides with reduced seismic activity at Endeavour observed in the seismic data recorded by an ocean bottom seismometer from 2011 to 2013. Furthermore, first-order estimation of heat flux based on the temperature measurements made by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) at a neighboring vent also supports the steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source.

  11. Hydrothermal carbonization of sugarcane bagasse via wet torrefaction in association with microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Ye, Song-Ching; Sheen, Herng-Kuang

    2012-08-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization of sugarcane bagasse using wet torrefaction is studied. The biomass is torrefied in water or dilute sulfuric acid solution and microwaves are employed to heat the solutions where the reaction temperature is fixed at 180 °C. The effects of acid concentration, heating time and solid-to-liquid ratio on the performance of wet torrefaction are investigated. It is found that the addition of sulfuric acid and increasing heating time are conducive to carbonizing bagasse. The calorific value of bagasse can be increased up to 20.3% from wet torrefaction. With the same improvement in calorific value, the temperature of wet torrefaction is lower than that of dry torrefaction around 100 °C, revealing that wet torrefaction is a promising method to upgrade biomass as fuel. The calorific value of torrefied biomass can be predicted well based on proximate, elemental or fiber analysis, and the last one gives the best estimation. PMID:22705524

  12. Hydrothermal flow regime and magmatic heat source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Williams, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    This detailed three-dimensional model of the natural flow regime of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, before steam production began, is based on patterns of hydrothermal mineral zones and light stable isotopic ratios observed in rock samples from more than 50 deep wells, together with temperature gradients, wireline logs and other data. At the level so far penetrated by drilling, this hydrothermal system was heated by a thermal plume of water close to boiling, inclined at 45/sup 0/, rising from the northeast and discharging to the west. To the east a zone of cold water recharge overlies the inclined thermal plume. Fission track annealing studies show the reservoir reached 170/sup 0/C only 10/sup 4/ years ago. Oxygen isotope exchange data indicate that a 12 km/sup 3/ volume of rock subsequently reacted with three times its volume of water hotter than 200/sup 0/C. Averaged over the duration of the heating event this would require a flow velocity through a typical cross-section of the reservoir of about 6 m/year. The heat in storage in that part of the reservoir hotter than 200/sup 0/C and shallower than 3 km depth is equivalent to that which would be released by the cooling of about 1 or 2 km/sup 3/ of basalt or gabbro magma.

  13. Fine-scale heat flow, shallow heat sources, and decoupled circulation systems at two sea-floor hydrothermal sites, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.S.; Fisher, A.T.; Langseth, M.; Jin, W.; Iturrino, G.; Davis, E.

    1998-12-01

    Fine-scale heat-flow patterns at two areas of active venting in Middle Valley, a sedimented rift on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, provide thermal evidence of shallow hydrothermal reservoirs beneath the vent fields. The extreme variability of heat flow is explained by conductive heating immediately adjacent to vents and shallow circulation within sediments above the reservoir. This secondary circulation is hydrologically separated from the deeper system feeding the vents by a shallow conductive lid within the sediments. A similar separation of shallow and deep circulation may also occur at sediment-free ridge-crest hydrothermal environments.

  14. Direct-Interface, Fusible Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Nonventing, regenerable, and self-contained heat sink absorbs heat in melting of ice by direct contact with forced flow of warm water. Elastic bladder contains water and ice. Connectors designed to prevent leaks easily connectable and disconnectable. Female portions embedded in wall of heat sink. After water frozen, male portions inserted and flow of warm water initiated. Water melts ice in and around female connectors, then flow passes between ice and bladder from inlet to outlet. Component of low-power portable refrigerator to operate for short time in picnic or camp setting.

  15. Guide to the Revised Ground-Water Flow and Heat Transport Simulator: HYDROTHERM - Version 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, Kenneth L.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    The HYDROTHERM computer program simulates multi-phase ground-water flow and associated thermal energy transport in three dimensions. It can handle high fluid pressures, up to 1 ? 109 pascals (104 atmospheres), and high temperatures, up to 1,200 degrees Celsius. This report documents the release of Version 3, which includes various additions, modifications, and corrections that have been made to the original simulator. Primary changes to the simulator include: (1) the ability to simulate unconfined ground-water flow, (2) a precipitation-recharge boundary condition, (3) a seepage-surface boundary condition at the land surface, (4) the removal of the limitation that a specified-pressure boundary also have a specified temperature, (5) a new iterative solver for the linear equations based on a generalized minimum-residual method, (6) the ability to use time- or depth-dependent functions for permeability, (7) the conversion of the program code to Fortran 90 to employ dynamic allocation of arrays, and (8) the incorporation of a graphical user interface (GUI) for input and output. The graphical user interface has been developed for defining a simulation, running the HYDROTHERM simulator interactively, and displaying the results. The combination of the graphical user interface and the HYDROTHERM simulator forms the HYDROTHERM INTERACTIVE (HTI) program. HTI can be used for two-dimensional simulations only. New features in Version 3 of the HYDROTHERM simulator have been verified using four test problems. Three problems come from the published literature and one problem was simulated by another partially saturated flow and thermal transport simulator. The test problems include: transient partially saturated vertical infiltration, transient one-dimensional horizontal infiltration, two-dimensional steady-state drainage with a seepage surface, and two-dimensional drainage with coupled heat transport. An example application to a hypothetical stratovolcano system with unconfined

  16. Heat source for an amagmatic hydrothermal system, Noto Peninsula, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Koji; Ninomiya, Atusi; Negi, Tateyuki

    2009-01-01

    Although there is no evidence of volcanism in the Noto Peninsula since the late Miocene, the peninsula has long been known to be unusual and atypical of non-volcanic regions, as indicated by high-temperature hot springs and a geothermal gradient greater than 50 K/km. In order to provide geochemical constraints on the heat source for amagmatic hydrothermal activity, the chemical and isotopic compositions of 14 gas and water samples from hot springs were measured. The observed 3He/4He ratios of most hot spring gases range from 0.03 to 1.2 RA (RA denotes the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio of 1.4 × 10-6). In these samples, mantle helium composes less than 10% of the total helium, indicating an insignificant contribution of mantle-derived volatiles from, for example, newly ascending magma and/or aqueous fluid generated by dehydration of the subducting slab. The Noto Peninsula mainly consists of Neogene volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks overlying Paleozoic to Mesozoic basement rocks associated with uranium-bearing granite pegmatite containing elevated concentrations of heat generating elements such as uranium, thorium, and potassium. A plausible heat source for the amagmatic hydrothermal activity can be attributed to this distinctive geological environment where high heat producing granitic rocks are buried under Neogene sedimentary rocks with low thermal conductivities that act as thermal blankets. Most Noto Peninsula hot springs are found in areas of active faulting, where stress concentrations since the late Miocene could open an existing fault pathway because the fluid pressure is close to the lithostatic pressure. Meteoric waters circulating through hot basement rock come to the surface along these permeable conduits with minimal mixing with shallow groundwater, resulting in emanation of high-temperature hot springs with low 3He/4He ratio gases along active fault zones.

  17. Compact Directional Microwave Antenna for Localized Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Lin, Gregory Y.; Chu, Andrew W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong

    2008-01-01

    A directional, catheter-sized cylindrical antenna has been developed for localized delivery of microwave radiation for heating (and thus killing) diseased tissue without excessively heating nearby healthy tissue. By "localized" is meant that the antenna radiates much more in a selected azimuthal direction than in the opposite radial direction, so that it heats tissue much more on one side than it does on the opposite side. This antenna can be inserted using either a catheter or a syringe. A 2.4-mm prototype was tested, although smaller antennas are possible. Prior compact, cylindrical antennas designed for therapeutic localized hyperthermia do not exhibit such directionality; that is, they radiate in approximately axisymmetric patterns. Prior directional antennas designed for the same purpose have been, variously, (1) too large to fit within catheters or (2) too large, after deployment from catheters, to fit within the confines of most human organs. In contrast, the present antenna offers a high degree of directionality and is compact enough to be useable as a catheter in some applications.

  18. The scale of hydrothermal circulation of the Iheya-North field inferred from intensive heat flow measurements and ocean drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nakajima, R.; Kumagai, H.; Takai, K.

    2014-12-01

    Iheya-North hydrothermal field situated in the middle Okinawa trough backarc basin is one of the largest ongoing Kuroko deposits in the world. Active chimneys as well as diffuse ventings (maximum fluid temperature 311 °C) have been located and studied in detail through various geological and geophysical surveys. To clarify the spatial scale of the hydrothermal circulation system, intensive heat flow measurements were carried out and ~100 heat flow data in and around the field from 2002 to 2014. In 2010, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 331 was carried out, and subbottom temperature data were obtained around the hydrothermal sites. During the JAMSTEC R/V Kaiyo cruise, KY14-01 in 2014, Iheya-North "Natsu" and "Aki" hydrothermal fields were newly found. The Iheya-Noth "Natsu" and "Aki" sites are located 1.2 km and 2.6 km south from the Iheya-North original site, respectively, and the maximum venting fluid temperature was 317 °C. We obtained one heat flow data at the "Aki" site. The value was 17 W/m2. Currently, the relationship between these hydrothermal sites are not well known. Three distinct zones are identified by heat flow values within 3 km from the active hydrothermal field. They are high-heat flow zone (>1 W/m2; HHZ), moderate-heat-flow zone (1-0.1 W/m2; MHZ); and low-heat-flow zone (<0.1 W/m2; LHZ). With increasing distance east of the HHZ, heat flow gradually decreases towards MHZ and LHZ. In the LHZ, temperature at 37m below the seafloor (mbsf) was 6 °C, that is consistent with the surface low heat flow suggesting the recharge of seawater. However, between 70 and 90 mbsf, the coarser sediments were cored, and temperature increased from 25 °C to 40°C. The temperature was 905°C at 151 mbsf, which was measured with thermoseal strips. The low thermal gradient in the upper 40 m suggests downward fluid flow. We infer that a hydrothermal circulation in the scale of ~1.5 km horizontal vs. ~a few hundred meters vertical.

  19. Evaluation of microbial community in hydrothermal field by direct DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarabayasi, Y.; Maruyama, A.

    2002-12-01

    Many extremophiles have been discovered from terrestrial and marine hydrothermal fields. Some thermophiles can grow beyond 90°C in culture, while direct microscopic analysis occasionally indicates that microbes may survive in much hotter hydrothermal fluids. However, it is very difficult to isolate and cultivate such microbes from the environments, i.e., over 99% of total microbes remains undiscovered. Based on experiences of entire microbial genome analysis (Y.K.) and microbial community analysis (A.M.), we started to find out unique microbes/genes in hydrothermal fields through direct sequencing of environmental DNA fragments. At first, shotgun plasmid libraries were directly constructed with the DNA molecules prepared from mixed microbes collected by an in situ filtration system from low-temperature fluids at RM24 in the Southern East Pacific Rise (S-EPR). A gene amplification (PCR) technique was not used for preventing mutation in the process. The nucleotide sequences of 285 clones indicated that no sequence had identical data in public databases. Among 27 clones determined entire sequences, no ORF was identified on 14 clones like intron in Eukaryote. On four clones, tetra-nucleotide-long multiple tandem repetitive sequences were identified. This type of sequence was identified in some familiar disease in human. The result indicates that living/dead materials with eukaryotic features may exist in this low temperature field. Secondly, shotgun plasmid libraries were constructed from the environmental DNA prepared from Beppu hot springs. In randomly-selected 143 clones used for sequencing, no known sequence was identified. Unlike the clones in S-EPR library, clear ORFs were identified on all nine clones determined the entire sequence. It was found that one clone, H4052, contained the complete Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Phylogenetic analysis using amino acid sequences of this gene indicated that this gene was separated from other Euryarchaea before the

  20. Conductive heat flow at the TAG Active Hydrothermal Mound: Results from 1993-1995 submersible surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.; Kirklin, J.; Evans, R.; Kadko, D.; Kinoshita, M.; Matsubayashi, O.; Mills, R.; Schultz, A.; Rona, P.

    We report 70 measurements of conductive heat flow at the 50-m-high, 200-m-diameter TAG active hydrothermal mound, made during submersible surveys with Alvin in 1993 and 1995 and Shinkai 6500 in 1994. The stations were all measured with 5-thermistor, 0.6- or 1-m-long Alvin heat flow probes, which are capable of determining both gradient and thermal conductivity, and were transponder-navigated to an estimated accuracy of ±5-10 m relative to the 10-m-diameter central complex of black smokers. Within 20 m of this complex, conductive heat flow values are extremely variable (0.1- > 100 W/m²), which can only be due to local spatial and possible temporal variability in the immediate vicinity of the vigorous discharge sites. A similar local variability is suggested in the “Kremlin” area of white smokers to the southeast of the black smoker complex. On the south and southeast side of the mound, there is very high heat flow (3.7- > 25 W/m²) on the sedimented terraces that slope down from the Kremlin area. Heat flow is also high (0.3-3 W/m²) in the pelagic carbonate sediments on the surrounding seafloor within a few tens of meters of the southwest, northwest, and northeast sides of the mound. On the west side of the sulfide rubble plateau that surrounds the central black smoker peak, there is a coherent belt of very low heat flow (<20 mW/m²) 20-50 m west of the smokers, suggestive of local, shallow recharge of bottom water. The three submersible surveys spanned nearly two years, but showed no indication of any temporal variability in conductive heat flow over this time scale, whether natural or induced by ODP drilling in 1994.

  1. The analysis of repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    To safely and permanently store high-level nuclear waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository site must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact the waste package (WP), accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. In a concept called the ``extended-dry repository,`` decay heat arising from radioactive waste extends the time before liquid water can contact a WP. Recent modeling and theoretical advances in nonisothermal, multiphase fracture-matrix flow have demonstrated (1) the critical importance of capillary pressure disequilibrium between fracture and matrix flow, and (2) that radioactive decay heat plays a dominant role in the ability of the engineered and natural barriers to contain and isolate radionuclides. Our analyses indicate that the thermo-hydrological performance of both the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) will be dominated by repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow for tens of thousands of years. For thermal loads resulting in extended-dry repository conditions, UZ performance is primarily sensitive to the thermal properties and thermal loading conditions and much less sensitive to the highly spatially and temporally variable ambient hydrologic properties and conditions. The magnitude of repository-heat-driven buoyancy flow in the SZ is far more dependent on the total mass of emplaced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) than on the details of SNF emplacement, such as the Areal Power Density [(APD) expressed in kill/acre] or SNF age.

  2. Direct hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchically porous siliceous zeolite by using alkoxysilylated nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Mukti, Rino R; Hirahara, Hirotomo; Sugawara, Ayae; Shimojima, Atsushi; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2010-02-16

    A hierarchically porous siliceous MFI zeolite (silicalite-1) with narrow mesoporosity has been hydrothermally synthesized by using trialkoxysilylated alkyl poly(oxyethylene ether) as mesopore-directing agent. A mesostructured silica-surfactant composite was formed at the early stage of the reaction, and zeolite crystallization proceeded during subsequent hydrothermal treatment. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the crystallized products showed that micro- and mesopores were hierarchically assembled in unique particle morphology with rugged surfaces. Solid-state (29)Si and (13)C NMR revealed that the covalent bonds between the zeolite framework and mesopore-directing agent were present in the products before calcination. The use of nonsilylated alkyl poly(oxyethylene ether) or a silylated alkytrimethyl-ammonium-type cationic surfactant for the synthesis of silicalite-1 resulted in a mixture of mesoporous silica and zeolite as the final product, which suggests that the covalent interaction and nonelectrostatic charge matching interaction favor the formation of hierarchically mesoporous siliceous zeolite. This alkoxysilylated nonionic surfactant can also be extended to synthesize aluminosilicate MFI zeolite (ZSM-5). PMID:19817366

  3. Living with the Heat. Submarine Ring of Fire--Grades 5-6. Hydrothermal Vent Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity is designed to teach about hydrothermal vent ecology. Students are expected to describe how hydrothermal vents are formed and characterize the physical conditions at these sites, explain chemosynthesis and contrast this process with photosynthesis, identify autotrophic bacteria as the basis for food webs in hydrothermal vent…

  4. Direct hydrothermal synthesis of ternary Li-Mn-O oxide ion-sieves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin-Hui; Sun, Shu-Ying; Li, Shao-Peng; Yin, Xian-Sheng; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2009-04-01

    Spinel-type ternary LiMn(2)O(4) oxide precursor was synthesized by direct hydrothermal synthesis of Mn(NO(3))(2), LiOH, and H(2)O(2) at 383 K for 8 h, a better technique for controlling the nanocrystalline structure with well-defined pore size distribution and high surface area than the traditional solid state reaction method. The final low-dimensional MnO(2) nanorod ion-sieve with a lithium ion selective adsorption property was further prepared by an acid treatment process to completely extract lithium ions from the Li-Mn-O lattice. The effects of hydrothermal reaction conditions on the nanostructure, chemical stability, and ion-exchange property of the LiMn(2)O(4) precursor and MnO(2) ion-sieve were systematically examined via powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and lithium ion selective adsorption measurements. The results show that this new kind of low-dimensional MnO(2) nanorod can be used for lithium extraction from aqueous environments, including brine, seawater, and waste water. PMID:19426343

  5. Direct solar heating for Space Station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Early investigations have shown that a large percentage of the power generated on the Space Station will be needed in the form of high-temperature thermal energy. The most efficient method of satisfying this requirement is through direct utilization of available solar energy. A system concept for the direct use of solar energy on the Space Station, including its benefits to customers, technologists, and designers of the station, is described. After a brief discussion of energy requirements and some possible applications, results of selective tradeoff studies are discussed, showing area reduction benefits and some possible configurations for the practical use of direct solar heating. Following this is a description of system elements and required technologies. Finally, an assessment of available contributive technologies is presented, and a Space Shuttle Orbiter flight experiment is proposed.

  6. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1987-02-02

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic field which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  7. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, David; Wilde, Stephen B.

    1991-01-01

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic fields which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  8. Heat transfer through the sediments of the Mounds Hydrothermal Area, Galapagos Spreading Center at 86°W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Keir; von Herzen, Richard P.

    1983-01-01

    Heat transfer processes at the mounds area of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 86°W are revealed by temperatures measured at ≈ 10-m intervals in the 30±10m sediment at each of 12 holes at DSDP Leg 70 Sites 506-509 and by temperatures of up to five thermistors on eleven 8-12 m long piston cores. The 325 needle-probe values show a significant linear increase of thermal conductivity with depth in each core. About half of the temperature-thermal resistance profiles are nonlinear and are fit to a steady state, vertical pore water advection model. Results indicate high and variable total heat flow and localized hydrothermal discharge at ≈ 10-8 m/s, associated with individual mounds. Recharge is indicated at similar rates in the low heat flow belt ≈ 5 km south of the mounds and is suggested at slower rates in the intermediate heat flow (0.17-0.42 W/m2) belt surrounding the mounds heat flow high. Possible slow entrained recharge within ≈ 100 m of discharging mounds is suggested. Also suggested is strong local discharge along the major fault bounding the mounds crustal block to the north. About 95 km north of the spreading axis, at DSDP Site 510, temperatures in the 114-m sediment cover on 2.7-m.y. crust are linear, consistent with the suggestion that the hydraulic resistance of this layer is sufficient to seal off free hydrothermal exchange between basement and bottom water. The combination of heat flow data and the physical properties data of Karato and Becker (this issue) suggests that ≈ 50 m of sediment may be a threshold thickness for sealing of hydrothermal circulation within basement, where the topography is smooth. We suggest that the formation of mounds may be associated with the forced localization of hydrothermal discharge through the sediment, as its thickness approaches this threshold value.

  9. Fast wave direct electron heating in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Jaeger, E.F.; Rimini, F.G.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Stevens, J.E.; Wilson, J.R.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Hammett, G.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.C.; Janos, A.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Taylor, G.; Zamstorff, M.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Direct electron heating experiments were carried out in two regimes: B[sub T]=4.6 T with D[sup +] supershots; and B[sub T]=2.3 T with [sup 3]He majority. The electron power deposition profiles measured with modulation of RF power are found to be strongly peaked in the core with the total volume-integrated power of up to 80% of the modulated power. The magnitude and profile shape agree well with those predicted by a full-wave code.

  10. Ongoing hydrothermal heat loss from the 1912 ash-flow sheet, Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogeweg, N.; Keith, T.E.C.; Colvard, E.M.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    The June 1912 eruption of Novarupta filled nearby glacial valleys on the Alaska Peninsula with ash-flow tuff (ignimbrite), and post-eruption observations of thousands of steaming fumaroles led to the name 'Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes' (VTTS). By the late 1980s most fumarolic activity had ceased, but the discovery of thermal springs in mid-valley in 1987 suggested continued cooling of the ash-flow sheet. Data collected at the mid-valley springs between 1987 and 2001 show a statistically significant correlation between maximum observed chloride (Cl) concentration and temperature. These data also show a statistically significant decline in the maximum Cl concentration. The observed variation in stream chemistry across the sheet strongly implies that most solutes, including Cl, originate within the area of the VTTS occupied by the 1912 deposits. Numerous measurements of Cl flux in the Ukak River just below the ash-flow sheet suggest an ongoing heat loss of ???250 MW. This represents one of the largest hydrothermal heat discharges in North America. Other hydrothermal discharges of comparable magnitude are related to heat obtained from silicic magma bodies at depth, and are quasi-steady on a multidecadal time scale. However, the VTTS hydrothermal flux is not obviously related to a magma body and is clearly declining. Available data provide reasonable boundary and initial conditions for simple transient modeling. Both an analytical, conduction-only model and a numerical model predict large rates of heat loss from the sheet 90 years after deposition.

  11. Estimating the Heat and Mass Flux at the ASHES Hydrothermal Vent Field with the Sentry Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Crone, T. J.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Medagoda, L.; Fourie, D.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting influences ocean chemistry, the thermal and chemical structure of the oceanic crust, the style of accretion at mid-ocean ridges, and the evolution of unique and diverse chemosynthetic ecosystems. Surprisingly, only a few studies have attempted to constrain the volume and heat flux of entire hydrothermal vent fields given that axially-hosted hydrothermal systems are estimated to be responsible for ~20-25% of the total heat flux out of the Earth's interior, as well as potentially playing a large role in global and local biogeochemical cycles. However, same-site estimates can vary greatly, such as at the Lucky Strike Field where estimates range from 100 MW to 3800 MW. We report a July 2014 field program with the Sentry AUV that obtains the water velocity and heat measurements necessary to estimate the total heat and mass flux emanating from the ASHES hydrothermal vent field. We equipped Sentry with a Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) with an inertial measurement unit attached, two acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), and two SBE3 temperature probes, to measure the temperature and water velocity. This sensing suite provided more accurate measurements than previous AUV based studies. A control volume approach was employed in which Sentry was pre-programmed to survey a 150m by 150m box centered over the vent field flying a "mowing the lawn" pattern at 5m trackline spacing followed by a survey of the perimeter. During a 40 hour survey, the pattern was repeated 9 times allowing us to obtain observations over multiple tidal cycles. Concurrent lowered ADCP (LADCP) measurements were also obtained. Water velocity data obtained with Sentry was corrected for platform motion and then combined with the temperature measurements to estimate heat flux. Analysis of this data is on-going, however these experiments permit us to quantify the heat and mass exiting the control volume, and potentially provide the most accurate and highest resolution heat

  12. The Response of Two-Phase Hydrothermal Systems to Changing Magmatic Heat Input at Mid Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Lowell, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrothermal processes at oceanic spreading centers are largely influenced by changing magmatic heat input. We use the two-phase NaCl-H2O FISHES code to investigate the evolution of surface temperature and salinity as a function of time-varying heat flux at the base of the hydrothermal system. We consider a two-dimensional rectangular box that is 1.5 km deep and 2 km long with homogeneous permeability of 10-13 m2. Temperature and pressure at top boundary correspond to seafloor conditions of 10°C, 25MPa respectively. Upstream conditions are applied at the top so temperature and salinity of fluids exiting the surface is set equal to that at one cell below the top boundary. Impermeable, insulated conditions are imposed on the left and right hand boundaries. To simulate time-varying heat flux from a sub-axial magma chamber of 500 m long half-width, we considered a variety of basal boundary conditions: (1) a sinusoidal heat flux with a period of 6 years and an amplitude ranging between 100 and 50 W/m2; (2) step function, random function, and exponential function between 200 and 15 W/m2; and (3) an analytical function of temporally decaying heat flux resulting from a simulated cooling, crystallizing magmatic sill. As a result of the investigation we find: (1) changes in bottom temperature and salinity closely follow the temporal variations in magmatic heat inputs; (2) the surface temperature response is severely damped and high frequency variations in heat flow are not detected; (3) in regions where phase separation occurs, surface salinity variations may be recorded in response to changing conditions at depth, but these are smaller in amplitude than the changes at depth. These simulations represent an important forward toward understanding time-dependent behavior of coupled magma-hydrothermal processes at oceanic spreading centers.

  13. Preliminary Hydrothermal Heat Flow Measurements at the 9-10º N East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramondenc, P.; Germanovich, L. N.; von Damm, K. L.; Lowell, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    The March 2004 expedition at 9-10° N East Pacific Rise, part of the RIDGE 2000 program, allowed amongst other things to pursue the monitoring and sampling of a number of vents after the volcanic eruptions that occurred in 1991/2. Earlier observations have shown that the chemical composition and the temperature have not yet stabilized at many of the vents. This expedition also gave us the opportunity to test an experimental device to estimate the velocity of diffuse flow and heat transport at a couple of vents. These experiments represent the first such attempts to measure these parameters for the 9-10° N hydrothermal system. The idea was to focus the fluid flow through an opening and videotape the motion of particles composing the fluid. Though crude, this method should provide an upper estimate of the fluid velocity and the mass flux of the underlying upflow zone. This operation was also done at the same vents just with a scale maintained close to the flow. This approach yields a lower estimate of the velocity. These tests were run on three dives achieved with the deep submergence vehicle Alvin (dives # 3987, 3990 and 3992, respectively at M-vent, TICA-vent, Bio9, Bio9' and Bio9''). Typical results obtained for the total heat flux ranged from Q = 10^5 W to Q = 10^7 W. This experience has provided insight into a new design based on the temperature measurement at different regions in the stream. We hope to develop this new device in the coming months and deploy it in 2005.

  14. Geothermal Direct Heat Applications Program Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-25

    Because of the undefined risk in the development and use of geothermal energy as a thermal energy source, the Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy solicited competitive proposals for field experiments in the direct use of geothermal energy. Twenty-two proposals were selected for cost-shared funding with one additional project co-funded by the State of New Mexico. As expected, the critical parameter was developing a viable resource. So far, of the twenty resources drilled, fourteen have proved to be useful resources. These are: Boise, Idaho; Elko heating Company in Nevada; Pagosa Springs, Colorado; Philip School, Philip, South Dakota; St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota; Utah Roses near Salt Lake City; Utah State Prison, Utah; Warm Springs State Hospital, Montana; T-H-S Hospital, Marlin, Texas; Aquafarms International in the Cochella Valley, California; Klamath County YMCA and Klamath Falls in Oregon; Susanville, California and Monroe, utah. Monroe's 164 F and 600 gpm peak flow was inadequate for the planned project, but is expected to be used in a private development. Three wells encountered a resource insufficient for an economical project. These were Madison County at Rexburg, Idaho; Ore-Ida Foods at Ontario, Oregon and Holly Sugar at Brawley, California. Three projects have yet to confirm their resource. The Navarro College well in Corsicana, Texas is being tested; the Reno, Moana, Nevada well is being drilled and the El Centro, California well is scheduled to be drilled in January 1982. The agribusiness project at Kelly Hot Springs was terminated because a significant archeological find was encountered at the proposed site. The Diamond Ring Ranch in South Dakota, and the additional project, Carrie Tingley Hospital in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico both used existing wells. The projects that encountered viable resources have proceeded to design, construct, and in the most advanced projects, to operate geothermal systems for district

  15. Integrated thermal infrared imaging and structure-from-motion photogrammetry to map apparent temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux at Mammoth Mountain, CA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A.; Hilley, G. E.; Lewicki, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a method to create high-resolution (cm-scale) orthorectified and georeferenced maps of apparent surface temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux and estimate the radiant hydrothermal heat emission rate from a study area. A ground-based thermal infrared (TIR) camera was used to collect (1) a set of overlapping and offset visible imagery around the study area during the daytime and (2) time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one or more sites within the study area from pre-dawn to daytime. Daytime visible imagery was processed using the structure-from-motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which pre-dawn TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Three-dimensional maps of apparent surface temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux were then visualized and analyzed from various computer platforms (e.g., Google Earth, ArcGIS). We demonstrate this method at the Mammoth Mountain fumarole area on Mammoth Mountain, CA. Time-averaged apparent surface temperatures and radiant hydrothermal heat fluxes were observed up to 73.7 °C and 450 W m- 2, respectively, while the estimated radiant hydrothermal heat emission rate from the area was 1.54 kW. Results should provide a basis for monitoring potential volcanic unrest and mitigating hydrothermal heat-related hazards on the volcano.

  16. Integrated thermal infrared imaging and Structure-from-Motion photogrametry to map apparent temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux at Mammoth Mountain, CA USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aaron Lewis; George Hilley; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a method to create high-resolution (cm-scale) orthorectified and georeferenced maps of apparent surface temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux and estimate the radiant hydrothermal heat emission rate from a study area. A ground-based thermal infrared (TIR) camera was used to collect (1) a set of overlapping and offset visible imagery around the study area during the daytime and (2) time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one or more sites within the study area from pre-dawn to daytime. Daytime visible imagery was processed using the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which pre-dawn TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Three-dimensional maps of apparent surface temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux were then visualized and analyzed from various computer platforms (e.g., Google Earth, ArcGIS). We demonstrate this method at the Mammoth Mountain fumarole area on Mammoth Mountain, CA. Time-averaged apparent surface temperatures and radiant hydrothermal heat fluxes were observed up to 73.7 oC and 450 W m-2, respectively, while the estimated radiant hydrothermal heat emission rate from the area was 1.54 kW. Results should provide a basis for monitoring potential volcanic unrest and mitigating hydrothermal heat-related hazards on the volcano.

  17. Direct-contact closed-loop heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature heat exchanger with a closed loop and a heat transfer liquid within the loop, the closed loop having a first horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a first fluid at a first temperature with the heat transfer liquid, a second horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a second fluid at a second temperature with the heat transfer liquid, and means for circulating the heat transfer liquid.

  18. Model of the heat source of the Cerro Prieto magma-hydrothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Williams, A.E.; Schiffman, P.; Cox, B.

    1982-08-10

    Earlier studies at Cerro Prieto by UCR have led to the development of a qualitative model for field flow in the geothermal system before it was drilled and perturbed by production. Current efforts are directed towards numerical modelling of heat and mass transfer in the system in this undisturbed state. A two-dimensional model assumes that the heat sources were a single basalt/gabbro intrusion which provided heat to the system as it cooled. After compiling various information on the physical properties of the reservoir, the enthalpy contained in two 1cm thick section across the reservoir orthogonal to each other was calculated. Next various shapes, sizes and depths for the intrusion as initial conditions and boundary conditions for the calculation of heat transfer were considered. A family of numerical models which so far gives the best matches to the conditions observed in the field today have in common a funnel-shaped intrusion with a top 4km wide emplaced at a depth of 5km some 30,000 to 50,000 years ago, providing heat to the geothermal system. Numerical modelling is still in progress. Although none of the models so far computed may be a perfect match for the thermal history of the reservoir, they all indicate that the intrusive heat source is young, close and large.

  19. Multiple-scale hydrothermal circulation in 135 Ma oceanic crust of the Japan Trench outer rise: Numerical models constrained with heat flow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Labani; Kawada, Yoshifumi; Hamamoto, Hideki; Yamano, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Anomalous high heat flow is observed within 150 km seaward of the trench axis at the Japan Trench offshore of Sanriku, where the old Pacific Plate (˜135 Ma) is subducting. Individual heat flow values range between 42 and 114 mW m-2, with an average of ˜70 mW m-2. These values are higher than those expected from the seafloor age based on thermal models of the oceanic plate, i.e., ˜50 mW m-2. The heat flow exhibits spatial variations at multiple scales: regional high average heat flow (˜100 km) and smaller-scale heat flow peaks (˜1 km). We found that hydrothermal mining of heat from depth due to gradual thickening of an aquifer in the oceanic crust toward the trench axis can yield elevated heat flow of the spatial scale of ˜100 km. Topographic effects combined with hydrothermal circulation may account for the observed smaller-scale heat flow variations. Hydrothermal circulation in high-permeability faults may result in heat flow peaks of a subkilometer spatial scale. Volcanic intrusions are unlikely to be a major source of heat flow variations at any scale because of limited occurrence of young volcanoes in the study area. Hydrothermal heat transport may work at various scales on outer rises of other subduction zones as well, since fractures and faults have been well developed due to bending of the incoming plate.

  20. Hydrothermal mineral deposits and fossil biota from a young (0.1 Ma) abyssal hill on the flank of the fast spreading East Pacific Rise: Evidence for pulsed hydrothermal flow and tectonic tapping of axial heat and fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Sara B.; Haymon, Rachel M.

    2006-05-01

    Heat flow data indicate that most hydrothermal heat loss from ocean lithosphere occurs on the flanks of the mid-ocean ridge, but few ridge flank hydrothermal sites are known. We describe the first nonseamount, abyssal hill hydrothermal mineral deposits to be recovered from the fast spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) flanks. Deposits were sampled at two sites on an abyssal hill ˜5 km east of the EPR axis, just north of Clipperton Fracture Zone at 10°20'N, on ˜0.1 Ma lithosphere. "Tevnia Site" is on the axis-facing fault scarp of the hill, and "Ochre Site" is located ˜950 m farther east near the base of the outward-facing slope. Clusters of fragile, biodegradable Tevnia worm tubes at both sites indicate that hydrothermal fluids carried sufficient H2S to sustain Tevnia worms, and that fluid flow waned too recently to allow time for tube destruction. Presence of microbial mats and other biota also are consistent with recent waning of flow. The deposits are mineralogically zoned, from nontronite-celadonite to hydrous Fe-oxide+opaline silica to Mn-oxide (birnessite and todorokite). This places them into a distinctive class of Fe-Si-Mn hydrothermal deposits found along tectonic cracks and faults in young oceanic crust, and suggests that (1) deposits precipitated along an O2 gradient between ambient seawater and hydrothermal fluid; (2) fluid temperatures were <150°C and (3) undiluted fluids were Mg-depleted, and Fe-, K-, Si- and Mn-enriched. These fluids may derive from high temperature seawater-basalt interaction ± phase separation proximal to the axial melt zone, and lose Cu and Zn before venting due to conductive cooling and/or pH increase. Ochre Site samples are purely hydrothermal; however, Tevnia Site samples incorporate volcanic, sedimentary, and fossil components, and exhibit at least three generations of fracturing and hydrothermal cementation. The Tevnia Site breccias accumulated on the exposed fault scarp, possibly during multiple slip events and

  1. Geothermal direct heat applications program summary

    SciTech Connect

    1982-08-01

    In 1978, the Department of Energy Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies initiated a program to accelerate the direct use of geothermal energy, in which 23 projects were selected. The projects, all in the western part of the US, cover the use of geothermal energy for space conditioning (heating and cooling) and agriculture (aquaculture and greenhouses). Initially, two projects were slated for industrial processing; however, because of lack of geothermal resources, these projects were terminated. Of the 23 projects, seven were successfully completed, ten are scheduled for completion by the end of 1983, and six were terminated for lack of resources. Each of the projects is being documented from its inception through planning, drilling, and resource confirmation, design, construction, and one year of monitoring. The information is being collected, evaluated, and will be reported. Several reports will be produced, including detailed topical reports on economics, institutional and regulatory problems, engineering, and a summary final report. To monitor progress and provide a forum for exchange of information while the program is progressing, semiannual or annual review meetings have been held with all project directors and lead engineers for the past four years. This is the sixth meeting in that series. Several of the projects which have been terminated are not included this year. Overall, the program has been very successful. Valuable information has been gathered. problems have been encountered and resolved concerning technical, regulatory, and institutional constraints. Most projects have been proven to be economical with acceptable pay-back periods. Although some technical problems have emerged, they were resolved with existing off-the-shelf technologies and equipment. The risks involved in drilling for the resource, the regulatory constraints, the high cost of finance, and large front-end cost remain the key obstacles to the broad development of

  2. Model for the heat source of the Cerro Prieto magma-hydrothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Williams, A.E.; Schiffman, P.; Cox, B.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier studies at Cerro Prieto led to the development of a qualitative model for fluid flow in the geothermal system before it was drilled and perturbed by production. Current efforts are directed towards numerical modeling of heat and mass transfer in the system in this undisturbed state. This one-dimensional model assumes that the heat source was a single basalt/gabbro intrusion which provided heat to the system as it cooled. After compilation of various information of the physical properties of the reservoir, the enthalpy contained in two 1 cm thick sections across the reservoir orthogonal to each other was calculated. Various shapes, sizes and depths for the intrusion were considered as initial conditions and boundary conditions for the calculations of heat transfer. A family of numerical models which so far gives the best matches to the conditions observed in the field today have in common a funnel-shaped intrusion with a top 4 km wide emplaced at a depth of 5 km some 30,000 to 50,000 years ago, providing heat to the geothermal system.

  3. Heat transfer through the sediments of the mounds hydrothermal area, Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.P.

    1983-02-10

    Heat transfer processes at the mounds area of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 86 /sup 0/W are revealed by temperatures measured at roughly-equal10-m intervals in the 30 +- 10 m sediment at each of 12 holes at DSDP Leg 70 Sites 506--509 and by temperatures of up to five thermistors on eleven 8--12 m long piston cores. The 325 needle-probe values show a significant linear increase of thermal conductivity with depth in each core. About half of the temperature-thermal resistance profiles are nonlinear and are fit to a steady state, vertical pore water advection model. Results indicate high and variable total heat flow and localized hydrothermal discharge at roughly-equal10/sup -8/ m/s, associated with individual mounds. Recharge is indicated at similar rates in the low heat flow belt roughly-equal5 km south of the mounds and is suggested at slower rates in the intermediate heat flow (0.17--0.42 W/m/sup 2/) belt surrounding the mounds heat flow high. Possible slow entrained recharge within roughly-equal100 m of discharging mounds is suggested. Also suggested is strong local discharge along the major fault bounding the mounds crustal block to the north. About 95 km north of the spreading axis, at DSDP Site 510, temperatures in the 114-m sediment cover on 2.7-m.y. crust are linear, consistent with the suggestion that the hydraulic resistance of this layer is sufficient to seal off free hydrothermal exchange between basement and bottom water. The combination of heat flow data and the physical properties data of Karato and Becker (this issue) suggests that roughly-equal50 m of sediment may be a threshold thickness for sealing of hydrothermal circulation within basement, where the topography is smooth. We suggest that the formation of mounds may be associated with the forced localization of hydrothermal discharge through the sediment, as its thickness approaches this threshold value.

  4. Direct measurement of asperity contact growth in quartz at hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, N. M.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-05-01

    Earthquake recurrence requires interseismic fault restrengthening which results from solid-state deformation in room temperature friction and indentation experiments. In contrast, exhumed fault zones show solution-transport processes such as pressure solution, and contact overgrowths influence fault zone properties. In the absence of fluid flow, overgrowths are driven by gradients in surface curvature where material is dissolved, diffuses, and precipitates at the contact without convergence normal to the contact. To determine the rate of overgrowth for quartz, we conducted single-contact experiments in an externally heated pressure vessel. Convergence was continuously monitored using reflected light interferometry through a long-working-distance microscope. Contact normal force was constant with an initial effective normal stress of 1.7 MPa, temperature was between 350 and 530°C, and water pressure was constant at 150 MPa. Two control experiments were conducted: one dry at 425°C and one bimaterial (sapphire) at 425°C and 150 MPa water pressure. No contact growth or convergence was observed in the controls. For wet single-phase contacts, growth was initially rapid and then decreased with time. No convergence was observed. Fluid inclusions indicate that the contact is not uniformly wetted. The contact is bounded by small regions of high aperture, reflecting local free-face dissolution as the source for the overgrowth. The apparent activation energy is ~125 kJ/mol. Extrapolation predicts rates of contact area increase orders of magnitude faster than in dry, room temperature and hydrothermal friction experiments, suggesting that natural strength recovery near the base of the seismogenic zone could be dominated by contact overgrowth.

  5. Direct measurement of asperity contact growth in quartz at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, Nicholas M.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake recurrence requires interseismic fault restrengthening which results from solid state deformation in room-temperature friction and indentation experiments. In contrast exhumed fault zones show solution-transport processes such as pressure solution and contact overgrowths influence fault zone properties . In the absence of fluid flow, overgrowths are driven by gradients in surface curvature where material is dissolved, diffuses, and precipitates at the contact without convergence normal to the contact. To determine the rate of overgrowth for quartz, we conducted single contact experiments in an externally heated pressure vessel. Convergence was continuously monitored using reflected-light interferometry through a long-working-distance microscope. Contact normal force was constant with an initial effective normal stress of 1.7 MPa, temperature was between 350 and 530{degree sign}C, and water pressure was constant at 150 MPa. Two control experiments were conducted: one dry at 425{degree sign}C and one bi-material (sapphire) at 425{degree sign}C and 150 MPa water pressure. No contact growth or convergence was observed in the controls. For wet single-phase contacts, growth was initially rapid and then decreased with time. No convergence was observed. Fluid inclusions indicate that the contact is not uniformly wetted. The contact is bounded by small regions of high aperture, reflecting local free-face dissolution as the source for the overgrowth. The apparent activation energy is ~125 kJ/mol. Extrapolation predicts rates of contact area increase orders of magnitude faster than in dry, room-temperature and hydrothermal friction experiments, suggesting that natural strength recovery near the base of the seismogenic zone could be dominated by contact overgrowth.

  6. Hydrothermal processes above the Yellowstone magma chamber: Large hydrothermal systems and large hydrothermal explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, W.C. Pat, III; Pierce, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions are violent and dramatic events resulting in the rapid ejection of boiling water, steam, mud, and rock fragments from source craters that range from a few meters up to more than 2 km in diameter; associated breccia can be emplaced as much as 3 to 4 km from the largest craters. Hydrothermal explosions occur where shallow interconnected reservoirs of steam- and liquid-saturated fluids with temperatures at or near the boiling curve underlie thermal fields. Sudden reduction in confi ning pressure causes fluids to fl ash to steam, resulting in signifi cant expansion, rock fragmentation, and debris ejection. In Yellowstone, hydrothermal explosions are a potentially signifi cant hazard for visitors and facilities and can damage or even destroy thermal features. The breccia deposits and associated craters formed from hydrothermal explosions are mapped as mostly Holocene (the Mary Bay deposit is older) units throughout Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and are spatially related to within the 0.64-Ma Yellowstone caldera and along the active Norris-Mammoth tectonic corridor. In Yellowstone, at least 20 large (>100 m in diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters have been identifi ed; the scale of the individual associated events dwarfs similar features in geothermal areas elsewhere in the world. Large hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone have occurred over the past 16 ka averaging ??1 every 700 yr; similar events are likely in the future. Our studies of large hydrothermal explosion events indicate: (1) none are directly associated with eruptive volcanic or shallow intrusive events; (2) several historical explosions have been triggered by seismic events; (3) lithic clasts and comingled matrix material that form hydrothermal explosion deposits are extensively altered, indicating that explosions occur in areas subjected to intense hydrothermal processes; (4) many lithic clasts contained in explosion breccia deposits preserve evidence of repeated fracturing

  7. Modeling Heat Transfer, Fluid Circulation and Permeability Alteration in Hydrothermal Systems with Loose Coupling to Magmatic Intrusion Modeling in the Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taron, J.; Karakas, O.; Mangan, M.; Dufek, J.; Ingebritsen, S.; Hickman, S. H.; Williams, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of large scale hydrothermal systems entails spatially and temporally evolving permeability fields. During hydrothermal circulation, thermo-elastic stress and fluid pressure changes act upon partially open or hydrothermally altered fracture sets to modify permeability within the system, thereby shifting the patterns of circulation. To explore these interactions we are developing a thermo-hydromechanical (THM) simulator capable of coupling the dominant physics of the hydrothermal system and allowing flexibility in the use of monolithic or staggered numerical schemes. Permeability is allowed to evolve under several constitutive models tailored to both porous media and fractures, considering the influence of thermo-hydromechanical stress, creep, and elasto-plastic shear and dilation in a ubiquitously fractured medium. To expand our understanding of the long-term evolution of these systems, simulations incorporate information gleaned from the modeling of magmatic processes in the lower crust, where characteristics of the heat source are crucial in defining hydrothermal evolution. Results of a stochastic dike intrusion model are fed into the hydrothermal simulator to explore sensitivity relative to characteristics of the magmatic source. This is a first step to examining feedback mechanisms between heat transfer within geothermal fields and heat supply from the lower crust in a rigorous manner. We compare several simulations that elucidate the relative importance of magma intrusion rate and spatial distribution on overall heat transfer characteristics.

  8. Geothermal direct heat use: Market potential/penetration analysis for Federal Region 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, W. (Editor); Tang, K. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the potential for geothermal direct heat use in Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada (Federal Region 9). An analysis was made of each state to: (1) define the resource, based on the latest available data; (2) assess the potential market growth for geothermal energy; and (3) estimate the market penetration, projected to 2020. Findings of the study include the following: (1) Potentially economical hydrothermal resources exist in all four states of the Region: however, the resource data base is largely incomplete, particularly for low to moderate temperature resources. (2) In terms of beneficial heat, the total hydrothermal resource identified so far for the four states is on the order of 43 Quads, including an estimated 34 Quads of high temperature resources which are suitable for direct as well as electrical applications. (3) In California, Hawaii, and Nevada, the industrial market sector has somewhat greater potential for penetration than the residential/commercial sector. In Arizona, however, the situation is reversed, due to the collocation of two major metropolitan areas (Phoenix and Tucson) with potential geothermal resources.

  9. Hydrothermal-flow regime and magmatic heat source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Williams, A.E.; Schiffman, P.

    1982-01-01

    This detailed three-dimensional model of the natural flow regime of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, before steam production began, is based on patterns of hydrothermal mineral zones and light stable isotopic ratios observed in rock samples from more than fifty deep wells, together with temperature gradients, wireline logs and other data. At the level so far penetrated by drilling, this hydrothermal system was heated by a thermal plume of water close to boiling, inclined at 45/sup 0/, rising from the northeast and discharging to the west. To the east a zone of cold water recharge overlies the inclined thermal plume. Fission track annealing studies shows that the reservoir reached 170/sup 0/C only 10/sup 4/ years ago. Oxygen isotope exchange data indicate that a 12 km/sup 3/ volume of rock subsequently reacted with three times its volume of water hotter than 200/sup 0/C. Averaged over the duration of the heating event this would require a flow velocity of about 6 m/year through the pores of a typical cross section of the reservoir having an average porosity of 10%. Although this is an extensional tectonic environment of leaky transform faulting in which repeated intrusions of basalt magma are likely, for simplicity of computation possible heat sources were modelled as simple two dimensional basalt intrusions of various sizes, shapes and locations. We have calculated a series of two-dimensional convective heat transfer models, with different heat sources and permeability distributions. The models which produce the best fit for the temperature distributions observed in the field today have in common a heat source which is a funnel-shaped basalt intrusion, 4 km wide at the top, emplaced at a depth of 5 km to 6 km about 40,000 to 50,000 years ago.

  10. Heat Pumps With Direct Expansion Solar Collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Sadasuke

    In this paper, the studies of heat pump systems using solar collectors as the evaporators, which have been done so far by reserchers, are reviwed. Usually, a solar collector without any cover is preferable to one with ac over because of the necessity of absorbing heat from the ambient air when the intensity of the solar energy on the collector is not enough. The performance of the collector depends on its area and the intensity of the convective heat transfer on the surface. Fins are fixed on the backside of the collector-surface or on the tube in which the refrigerant flows in order to increase the convective heat transfer. For the purpose of using a heat pump efficiently throughout year, a compressor with variable capacity is applied. The solar assisted heat pump can be used for air conditioning at night during the summer. Only a few groups of people have studied cooling by using solar assisted heat pump systems. In Japan, a kind of system for hot water supply has been produced commercially in a company and a kind of system for air conditioning has been installed in buildings commercially by another company.

  11. Results from the DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) experiment. [Pressurized melt ejection and direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.; Ross, J.E.; Oliver, M.S.; Lucero, D.A.; Kerley, T.E.; Arellano, F.E.; Gomez, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    The DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) test was the first experiment performed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility. The test involved 20 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected into a 1:10 scale model of the Zion reactor cavity. The melt was produced by a metallothermic reaction of iron oxide and aluminum powders to yield molten iron and alumina. The cavity model was placed so that the emerging debris propagated directly upwards along the vertical centerline of the chamber. Results from the experiment showed that the molten material was ejected from the caviity as a cloud of particles and aerosol. The dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the 103-m/sup 3/ chamber atmosphere. Peak pressure from the six transducers ranged from 0.09 to 0.13 MPa (13.4 to 19.4 psig) above the initial value in the chamber. Posttest debris collection yielded 11.6 kg of material outside the cavity, of which approximately 1.6 kg was attributed to the uptake of oxygen by the iron particles. Mechanical sieving of the recovered debris showed a lognormal size distribution with a mass mean size of 0.55 mm. Aerosol measurements indicated a subsantial portion (2 to 16%) of the ejected mass was in the size range less than 10 m aerodynamic equivalent diameter.

  12. Implication for horizontally-elongated fluid flow inferred from heat flow measurements in the Iheya-North hydrothermal field, Okinawa Trough back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Yuka; Kinoshita, Masataka; Kawada, Yoshifumi

    2010-05-01

    The Okinawa Trough is a back-arc basin located in the southwestern part of Japan. It is considered to be in the initial stage of rifting of continental crust, and the activity generates volcanic edifices in this area, accompanied by hydrothermal circulation. The Iheya-North is one of the most active hydrothermal fields among them. As a proposed drilling site for the Integrated ocean Drilling Program, extensive geophysical surveys have been carried out including single-channel seismic imaging, and precise side-scan sonar imaging by using autonomous underwater vehicle 'Urashima' of Japan Agency for Marine-Science and Technology. In the recent few years, we have measured heat flow in and around the Iheya-North hydrothermal field to understand the spatial of hydrothermal circulation in detail. 78 measurements show that heat flow is higher than 10 W/m2 with in 0.5 km of the hydrothermal vent complex, that it gradually decrease eastward to < 1 W/m2, and that very low heat flow around 0.01 W/m2 is observed at 1.5 km east from the hydrothermal field. The average heat flow outside of Iheya-North is ~0.1 W/m2. The low heat flow to the east is most likely caused by an inward flow of seawater into the formation. Seismic and side-scan sonar images as well as piston core samples suggest an impermeable sediment layer to a few hundreds meters below the seafloor in this area. This sediment layer should work as a hydrological barrier to suppress flow through the seafloor, whereas seawater can penetrate into the formation at 1.5 km east of the hydrothermal field, where sidescan images suggest coars sediments on the seafloor. We infer that the hydrothermal circulation within the Iheya-North involves one with a horizontally-elongated scale (~1.5 km horizontal vs. ~a few hundreds meters vertical). We performed numerical calculations of fluid flow and heat transportation to give constraints on the depth of hydrothermal circulation, the magnitude of darcy velocity, and the permeability at

  13. Direct-contact closed-loop heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, G.F.; Minkov, V.; Petrick, M.

    1981-11-02

    A high temperature heat exchanger is disclosed which has a closed loop and a heat transfer liquid within the loop, the closed loop having a first horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a first fluid at a first temperature with the heat transfer liquid, a second horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a second fluid at a second temperature with the heat transfer liquid, and means for circulating the heat transfer liquid.

  14. Mechanical properties of anodic titanium films containing ions of Ca and P submitted to heat and hydrothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Gabriel G; de Souza, Gelson B; Lepienski, Carlos M; Kuromoto, Neide K

    2016-12-01

    Anodic oxidation is a technique widely used to improve the bioactivity of Ti surface. In this study, micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was used to obtain an anodic film incorporating Ca and P ions to evaluate the effect of heat and hydrothermal treatment on the mechanical and in vitro bioactivity properties of these new layers. The MAO process was carried out using (CH3COO)2Ca·H2O and NaH2PO4·2H2O electrolytes under galvanostatic mode (150mA/cm(2)). The thermal treatments were made at 400°C and 600°C in air atmosphere while hydrothermal treatment was made in an alkaline water solution at 130°C. These surfaces presented desired mechanical properties for biomedical applications owing to the rutile and anatase phases in the anodic film that are more crystalline after thermal treatments; which provided an increase in hardness values and lower elastic modulus. The dry sliding wear resistance increased by performing thermal treatments on the surfaces with one condition still maintaining the film after the test. Bioactivity was investigated by immersion in simulated body fluid during 21 days and hydroxyapatite was formed on all samples. Finally, lower values of contact angle were obtained for heat treated samples. PMID:27479891

  15. Semiconductor junction formation by directed heat

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Robert B.

    1988-03-24

    The process of the invention includes applying precursors 6 with N- and P-type dopants therein to a silicon web 2, with the web 2 then being baked in an oven 10 to drive off excessive solvents, and the web 2 is then heated using a pulsed high intensity light in a mechanism 12 at 1100.degree.-1150.degree. C. for about 10 seconds to simultaneously form semiconductor junctions in both faces of the web.

  16. The response of two-phase hydrothermal systems to changing magmatic heat input at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaewoon; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-11-01

    We develop numerical simulations of two-phase flow in a NaCl-H2O fluid subject to time varying basal heat flux boundary conditions in order to understand the response of hydrothermal vent temperature and salinity to changing magmatic heat input. The results show that periodic changes in basal heat input on a time scale of several years will not be detected in a continuous time series record of temperature measurements. Fluctuations in vent salinity may be recorded, however. For models with monotonic decay of the magmatic heat flux, a decline in vent temperature may not be observed for several years; however, once single phase conditions are established at the base of the system, a pulse of brine-derived fluid is expected to appear at the surface, followed by a gradual decline of salinity to the seawater value. The pulse of brine salinity is expected to occur before an observed decline in vent temperature. Observed rapid changes in vent temperature and salinity associated with either eruptive or non-eruptive magmatic events are not likely a result of changes in basal heat flux.

  17. First evidence for high-temperature off-axis venting of deep crustal/mantle heat: The Nibelungen hydrothermal field, southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, B.; Devey, C. W.; German, C. R.; Lackschewitz, K. S.; Seifert, R.; Walter, M.; Mertens, C.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Paulick, H.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-10-01

    During segment-scale studies of the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), 7-12° S, we found evidence in the water column for high-temperature hydrothermal activity, off-axis, east of Ascension Island. Extensive water column and seafloor work using both standard CTD and deep submergence AUV and ROV deployments led to the discovery and sampling of the "Drachenschlund" ("Dragon Throat") black smoker vent at 8°17.87' S/13°30.45' W in 2915 m water depth. The vent is flanked by several inactive chimney structures in a field we have named "Nibelungen". The site is located 6 km south of a non-transform offset between two adjacent 2nd-order ridge-segments and 9 km east of the presently-active, northward-propagating A2 ridge-segment, on a prominent outward-facing fault scarp. Both vent-fluid compositions and host-rock analyses show this site to be an ultramafic-hosted system, the first of its kind to be found on the southern MAR. The thermal output of this single vent, based on plume rise-height information, is estimated to be 60 ± 15 MW. This value is high for a single "black smoker" vent but small for an entire field. The tectonic setting and low He content of the vent fluids imply that high-temperature off-axis venting at "Drachenschlund" is driven not by magmatic processes, as at the majority of on-axis hydrothermal systems, but by residual heat "mined" from the deeper lithosphere. Whether this heat is being extracted from high-temperature mantle peridotites or deep crustal cumulates formed at the "duelling" non-transfrom offset is unclear, in either case the Drachenschlund vent provides the first direct observations of how cooling of deeper parts of the lithosphere, at least at slow-spreading ridges, may be occurring.

  18. Heat Flow and Segregation in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    This research is composed of three major components: (1) development of interface morphology control for automated Bridgman growth of semiconductor systems; (2) comparative analysis of segregation during crystal growth in a reduced gravity environment and in the presence of magnetic fields; and (3) consequences of seeding by meltback in Bridgman growth under reduced gravity conditions. In attempts to optimize furnace design for crystal growth in a reduced gravity environment, an analytical approach to heat transfer was developed. It was thus found that charge confining crucibles diminish the ability to control the growth interface morphology through its position within the gradient zone. A heat pipe hot zone system for Bridgman growth, in reduced gravity environment, of crystal with diameters up to 16 mm was developed. For growth of Ga-doped germanium in the multipurpose (ASTP) furnace, it was found that the application of transverse magnetic fields (up to 36 kg) does not substantially increase the effective distribution coefficient; i.e., diffusion-controlled segregation observed in reduced gravity environment cannot be reached nor approached by magnetic field induced melt stabilization.

  19. Direct heating of imploded plasma in the fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahara, Atsushi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Mima, Kunioki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mori, Yohitaga; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi

    2016-03-01

    We propose the direct heating of an imploded plasma core by ultra-intense lasers in inertial confinement fusion, to increase the heating coupling efficiency. In this scheme, both fast-electrons and fast-ions heat the plasma core. Experiments using this direct heating scheme has been carried out at GXII and LFEX laser facility at Osaka Univeristy. To model this direct heating scheme, we developed the 1D simulation model and carried out simulations using the experimental conditions. Comparison between results of the simulation and the experimental observations validates the simulation model. We show that even in the unoptimized experimental conditions used in simulations, our calculations show that the maximum temperature, 1.6 keV, of the CD plasma.

  20. Hydrogeologic controls on saturation profiles in heat-pipe-like hydrothermal systems: numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervin, Mollika; Ghergut, Iulia; Graf, Thomas; Peche, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    work, we explore some mechanisms and geologic controls that can lead to the formation of extensive vapor-dominated zones within a two-phase system. In particular, we investigate the effect of vertical heterogeneity of permeability (stratified reservoir, containing a permeability barrier) on the liquid water saturation profile within a modified HP model. Though in field observations liquid water has been directly encountered only within the condensation zone at reservoir top, it was speculated that large amounts of liquid water might also exist below the condensation zone. This is of great practical significance to the exploitation of vapor-dominated reservoirs, as their longevity depends on the fluid reserves in place. Within this work, we demonstrate by numerical simulations of a modified HP model that high values of liquid water saturation (>0.8) can prevail even far below the condensation zone. Such findings are useful as a baseline for future calculations regarding the economic exploitation of vapor-dominated systems, where premature productivity drop (or dry-out) is the main issue of concern. References: Eastman, G. Y:, 1968: The heat pipe. Scientific American, 218(5):38-46. Preuss, K. A., 1985: A quantitative model of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs as heat pipes in fractured porous rock, Transactions, Geothermal Resources. Council, 9(2), 353-361. Truesdell, A. H., and White, D.E. 1973: Production of superheated Steam from Vapor- dominated geothermal reservoirs. Geothermics, 2(3-4), 154-173

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of anatase nanoleaves and size dependence of anatase-rutile transformation upon heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisnycha, T. V.; Kirillov, S. A.; Potapenko, A. V.; Terikovska, T. E.; Kosilov, V. V.; Vyshnevskiy, O. A.

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous TiO2 obtained by adding TiCl4 to an alkaline medium crystallizes slowly and upon 3 years ageing transforms to nanosized anatase containing an admixture of brookite. The hydrothermal treatment of this sample in solutions of lithium hydroxide leads to anatase nanoleaves, and the more concentrated LiOH solution, the greater the nanoleaves and the smaller their specific surface area. The thermal treatment of nanoleaves leads to the bulk rutile, and the greater the specific surface area of anatase nanoleaves, the lower the anatase-rutile transition temperature. This is in line with conclusions based on the thermodynamic stability of nanosized anatase over the bulk rutile.

  2. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (<1%) to pre-production CO 2

  3. Reconciling Volatile Outputs with Heat Flow and Magma Intrusion Rates at the Yellowstone Magma-Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Hurwitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Yellowstone hydrothermal system releases hundreds of millions of liters of water on a daily basis. Gigawatts of heat and kilotons of magmatic volatiles (CO2, S, Cl, F and He) are discharged by these waters. By quantifying the relative contributions of crustal, meteoric, and mantle-derived components, we can estimate the rate at which magma is fed to the crust from below (1). Combining isotopic studies with mass discharge rates of geothermal gases and aqueous dissolved solids, we recognize that over 20,000 tons of CO2 is released from basaltic magmas ponding beneath any silicic magma reservoir in the mid to shallow crust (1,2). In contrast, silicic magma provides significantly less volatiles than what emerges from the hydrothermal system. Estimates of heat flow range from ~3 to 8 GW (1,3,4), derived from satellite, surface geophysics and geochemical methods. Such values, combined with estimates from gas flux, imply prolific basalt intrusion rates between 0.05 and 0.3 cubic kilometers per year (1). Over the history of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, a picture emerges where the lower crust is converted from Precambrian metasediments and silicic intrusions into a thick gabbroic batholith similar to that envisioned by some to reside beneath the Snake River Plain along the ancestral track of the Yellowstone Hot Spot (5). (1) Lowenstern and Hurwitz, 2008, Elements 4: 35-40. (2) Werner and Brantley, 2003, G-Cubed 4;7: 1061 (3) Vaughan and others, 2012, JVGR 233-234: 72-89. (4) Hurwitz and others, in press, JGR (5) Shervais and others, 2006, Geology 34:365-368.

  4. Investigation of direct expansion in ground source heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, M. D.

    A fully instrumented subscale ground coupled heat pump system was developed, and built, and used to test and obtain data on three different earth heat exchanger configurations under heating conditions (ground cooling). Various refrigerant flow control and compressor protection devices were tested for their applicability to the direct expansion system. Undistributed Earth temperature data were acquired at various depths. The problem of oil return at low evaporator temperatures and low refrigerant velocities was addressed. An analysis was performed to theoretically determine what evaporator temperature can be expected with an isolated ground pipe configuration with given length, pipe size, soil conditions and constant heat load. Technical accomplishments to data are summarized.

  5. A facile vapor-phase hydrothermal method for direct growth of titanate nanotubes on a titanium substrate via a distinctive nanosheet roll-up mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Porun; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Hongwei; Wang, Yun; Yao, Xiangdong; Zhu, Guangshan; Zhang, Shanqing; Zhao, Huijun

    2011-11-30

    We present a facile vapor-phase hydrothermal approach for direct growth of vertically aligned titanate nanotubes on a titanium foil substrate. The resultant nanotubes display external diameters of 50-80 nm and walls with an average thickness of 10 nm that consist of more than 10 titanate layers. This is in strong contrast to the titanate nanotubes obtained from alkaline liquid-phase hydrothermal methods, which are generally smaller than 12 nm in external diameter and have walls consisting of less than five titanate layers. Importantly, the investigation confirmed that under vapor-phase hydrothermal conditions, the nanotubes were formed via a distinctive nanosheet roll-up mechanism that differs remarkably from those of conventional liquid-phase hydrothermal processes. For the first time, a coaxial circular cylinder crystal structure of the resultant nanotubes was confirmed. PMID:22035232

  6. Absorption type water chiller fired directly by waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K. L.; Kalwar, K.

    1982-08-01

    The direct use of waste heat as heating element in a water chiller of the absorption type was studied. The chilled water is used as cooling element in the industrial process, producing the waste heat or for conditioning the workplace or further located places. The heat source is gaseous or liquid. The cooling capacity is in the range from 10 to 120 kW. After reviewing the different absorption systems, LiBr/H20 proved to be the most suitable. The process retained for experimenting was the manufacturing of synthetic materials polymer industry and was tested in two different factories. It is proved that the use of absorption type water chillers is practicable with an efficiency of 10% to 25% of the waste heat energy, but that the existing chillers need extensive conversion for obtaining economical operation when using a low temperature heating source.

  7. A Galerkin, finite-element analysis of steady-state flow and heat transport in the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    A steady-state simulation model was applied to the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area of Imperial Valley, Calif. The steady-state equations of flow and heat transport were solved by use of a Galerkin, finite-element method. A solution was obtained by iterating between the temperature and pressure equations, using updated densities and viscosities. Temperature and pressure were obtained for each node, and corresponding head values were calculated. The simulated temperature and pressure patterns correlated well with the observed patterns. Additional data, mainly from test drilling, would be required for construction of a similar model of the deep hydrothermal system.

  8. Direct contact melting process on a porous heating wall

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, M.; Hasegawa, E.

    1995-12-31

    Direct contact melting process takes place in many natural and technological processes. One of the important application of this process is thermal storage system. Phase change material (PCM) is stored in a small capsule. It melts by heating peripherally. This paper presents a theoretical study of direct contact melting process in a capsule. Inner wall surface of the capsule is made of porous material. In this melting process, melting rate is important factor for the efficiency of the system. In this paper, the authors propose utilization of porous material as a heating wall. This is one of the effective way to accelerate melting rate. Melted liquid goes through into the porous heating wall. As a result, the solid PCM can reach closer to the heating wall. The authors also discussed conductivity of the porous wall.

  9. Boundary Layer Flow, Heat, and Chemical Transfer near Vertical Heated Boreholes in Water-Saturated Rock: A Mechanism for Developing a Large Scale Underground Hydrothermal Experiment (DUSEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, D. M.; Lowell, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate a means of developing a large-scale hydrothermal experiment at the DUSEL site in the Homestake Mine, South Dakota, or elsewhere, by considering boundary layer flow, heat, and chemical transfer near an internally heated vertical borehole or borehole array emplaced in a water-saturated porous medium with homogeneous permeability. We use scale analysis to determine the relationships between vertical fluid velocity u, boundary layer thickness δ and the Rayleigh number Ra for both a single borehole maintained at constant temperature and a linear array of boreholes maintained at constant heat flux. For a single borehole, u ~ (a/y)Ra and δ ~ yRa^-1/2, whereas for the borehole array u ~(a/y) Ra^-1/3 and δ ~ yRa^-1/3, where y is the borehole height and a is the thermal diffusivity. We find that for y = 100 m, optimum initial permeability lies between ~ 10^-10 -10^-12 m^2 and the optimum heat flux is ~ 60 W/m^2. We also use scale analysis to determine the permeability change resulting from thermoelastic stresses generated by heating the rock near the boreholes and find that these stresses do not significantly impact the permeability so long as the initial porosity is ~ 5%, or the initial crack aspect ratios are less than or equal to 10^-2. Finally, we use scale analysis to investigate mineral dissolution within the boundary layer flow adjacent to the boreholes. Using the above velocity scaling and assuming linear reaction kinetics, and a crustal porosity of 5%, thermodynamic equilibrium may be obtained at the top of a 100 m high borehole provided reaction rate constants are in the range of ~ 10^-7 - 10^-8 s-1.

  10. Direct contact heat exchange interfacial phenomena for liquid metal reactors : Part I - heat transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, D.H.; Page, R.J.; Hurtault, D.; Abdulla, S.; Liu, X.; Anderson, M.H.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.

    2002-02-26

    Experiments on direct-contact heat exchange between molten metal and water for steam production were conducted. These experiments involved the injection of water into molten lead-bismuth eutectic for heat transfer measurements in a 1-D geometry. Based on the initial results of the experiments, the effects of the water flow rate and the molten metal superheat (temperature difference between molten metal and saturated water) on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient were discussed.

  11. Heat flow along the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project drilling transect: Implications for hydrothermal and seismic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, Bridget; Harris, Robert N.

    2016-06-01

    Heat flow analysis of the Costa Rica convergent margin is carried out for seven sites drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 334 and 344 as part of the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP). These expeditions are designed to better understand erosional subduction zones. Heat flow measurements were made to improve estimates of the thermal structure of this erosive margin and are located on the incoming plate, toe, lower, middle, and upper slopes of the margin. Heat flow values corrected for the effects of seafloor bathymetry and sedimentation are on average 15% higher than uncorrected values and range from approximately 158-200 mW/m2 on the incoming plate to values of approximately 50 mW/m2 on the middle and upper slopes of the margin. These values are consistent with previous estimates of heat flow showing a landward decrease in heat flow consistent with subduction of the Cocos plate. Preferred thermal models of the shallow subduction zone successfully predicting observed values of heat flow incorporate fluid flow within the upper oceanic aquifer have an uppermost permeability of 10-9.5 m2 and a plate boundary effective coefficient of friction of 0.06. These models suggest that temperatures on the subduction thrust reach 100°C at distances between 30 and 35 km landward of the deformation front. The updip limit of seismicity, as defined by aftershocks events of ML 1-4 recorded following the Mw 6.9 Quepos earthquake, occurs at 25 km landward of the deformation front at temperatures cooler than the 100-150°C typically predicted.

  12. Hydrothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; von Damm, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    What is Hydrothermal Circulation?Hydrothermal circulation occurs when seawater percolates downward through fractured ocean crust along the volcanic mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. The seawater is first heated and then undergoes chemical modification through reaction with the host rock as it continues downward, reaching maximum temperatures that can exceed 400 °C. At these temperatures the fluids become extremely buoyant and rise rapidly back to the seafloor where they are expelled into the overlying water column. Seafloor hydrothermal circulation plays a significant role in the cycling of energy and mass between the solid earth and the oceans; the first identification of submarine hydrothermal venting and their accompanying chemosynthetically based communities in the late 1970s remains one of the most exciting discoveries in modern science. The existence of some form of hydrothermal circulation had been predicted almost as soon as the significance of ridges themselves was first recognized, with the emergence of plate tectonic theory. Magma wells up from the Earth's interior along "spreading centers" or "MORs" to produce fresh ocean crust at a rate of ˜20 km3 yr-1, forming new seafloor at a rate of ˜3.3 km2 yr-1 (Parsons, 1981; White et al., 1992). The young oceanic lithosphere formed in this way cools as it moves away from the ridge crest. Although much of this cooling occurs by upward conduction of heat through the lithosphere, early heat-flow studies quickly established that a significant proportion of the total heat flux must also occur via some additional convective process (Figure 1), i.e., through circulation of cold seawater within the upper ocean crust (Anderson and Silbeck, 1981). (2K)Figure 1. Oceanic heat flow versus age of ocean crust. Data from the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans, averaged over 2 Ma intervals (circles) depart from the theoretical cooling curve (solid line) indicating convective cooling of young ocean crust by circulating seawater

  13. Geothermal direct-heat study: Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Potential applications of geothermal energy which would be compatible with the agricultural activities in the county were identified and a plan to attract potential users to the area was developed. The intent of the first effort was to identify general classifications of industries which could utilize geothermal heat in production processes. Two levels of analyses were utilized for this effort. Initially, activities relying on previously developed engineering and industrial concepts were investigated to determine capital costs, employment, and potential energy savings. Second, innovative concepts not yet fully developed were investigated to determine their potential applicability to the agricultural base of the county. These investigations indicated that the major potential applications of geothermal heat would involve industries related to food processing or other direct agriculture-related uses of raw materials produced or imported to the county. An implementation plan which can be utilized by the county to market direct heat applications was developed. A socioeconomics analysis examined the potential effects on the county from development of direct heat projects. The county's planning and permitting requirements for dirct heat projects were also examined.

  14. Consolidation of lunar regolith: Microwave versus direct solar heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunitzer, J.; Strenski, D. G.; Yankee, S. J.; Pletka, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The production of construction materials on the lunar surface will require an appropriate fabrication technique. Two processing methods considered as being suitable for producing dense, consolidated products such as bricks are direct solar heating and microwave heating. An analysis was performed to compare the two processes in terms of the amount of power and time required to fabricate bricks of various size. The regolith was considered to be a mare basalt with an overall density of 60 pct. of theoretical. Densification was assumed to take place by vitrification since this process requires moderate amounts of energy and time while still producing dense products. Microwave heating was shown to be significantly faster compared to solar furnace heating for rapid production of realistic-size bricks.

  15. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials. PMID:27161186

  16. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials.

  17. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene.

    PubMed

    Vera-Marun, I J; van den Berg, J J; Dejene, F K; van Wees, B J

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials. PMID:27161186

  18. Direct heating of compressed core by ultra-intense laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahara, A.; Johzaki, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Mima, K.; Abe, Y.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.; Mori, Y.; Sentoku, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new scheme for heating an imploded core in the fast-ignition scheme. In this method, a heating laser irradiates an imploded core plasma directly. The accelerated fast-ions as well as fast-electrons heat the core. Two-dimensional particle in cell (PIC) simulation confirmed that carbon C6+ and deuteron D+ ions were accelerated as well as fast electrons when ultra-intense laser irradiates the CD plasma. In order to estimate the temperature scaling of the heated core in this scheme, we conducted transport simulations in the one-dimensional conical geometry. Our results show that 5 keV of ignition temperature can be achieved at the intensity of 1021 W/cm2, and 1.5 ps pulse for the compressed CD plasma with 10g/cm3 density.

  19. Induced Seismicity Related to Hydrothermal Operation of Geothermal Projects in Southern Germany - Observations and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megies, T.; Kraft, T.; Wassermann, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal power plants in Southern Germany are operated hydrothermally and at low injection pressures in a seismically inactive region considered very low seismic hazard. For that reason, permit authorities initially enforced no monitoring requirements on the operating companies. After a series of events perceived by local residents, a scientific monitoring survey was conducted over several years, revealing several hundred induced earthquakes at one project site.We summarize results from monitoring at this site, including absolute locations in a local 3D velocity model, relocations using double-difference and master-event methods and focal mechanism determinations that show a clear association with fault structures in the reservoir which extend down into the underlying crystalline basement. To better constrain the shear wave velocity models that have a strong influence on hypocentral depth estimates, several different approaches to estimate layered vp/vs models are employed.Results from these studies have prompted permit authorities to start imposing minimal monitoring requirements. Since in some cases these geothermal projects are only separated by a few kilometers, we investigate the capabilities of an optimized network combining the monitoring resources of six neighboring well doublets in a joint network. Optimization is taking into account the -- on this local scale, urban environment -- highly heterogeneous background noise conditions and the feasibility of potential monitoring sites, removing non-viable sites before the optimization procedure. First results from the actual network realization show good detection capabilities for small microearthquakes despite the minimum instrumentational effort, demonstrating the benefits of good coordination of monitoring efforts.

  20. 10 CFR 429.22 - Direct heating equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Direct heating equipment. 429.22 Section 429.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND... annual operating cost, energy consumption or other measure of energy consumption of a basic model...

  1. 10 CFR 429.22 - Direct heating equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Direct heating equipment. 429.22 Section 429.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND... annual operating cost, energy consumption or other measure of energy consumption of a basic model...

  2. 10 CFR 429.22 - Direct heating equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Direct heating equipment. 429.22 Section 429.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND... annual operating cost, energy consumption or other measure of energy consumption of a basic model...

  3. Exterior direct view of (nonoriginal), solar heating panels, and top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior direct view of (non-original), solar heating panels, and top of typical rectangular trash-dump tower at roof of Building 6, looking north - North Beach Place, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Decontamination of drinking water by direct heating in solar panels.

    PubMed

    Fjendbo Jørgensen, A J; Nøhr, K; Sørensen, H; Boisen, F

    1998-09-01

    A device was developed for direct heating of water by solar radiation in a flow-through system of copper pipes. An adjustable thermostat valve prevents water below the chosen temperature from being withdrawn. The results show that it is possible to eliminate coliform and thermotolerant coliform bacteria from naturally contaminated river water by heating to temperatures of 65 degrees C or above. Artificial additions of Salmonella typhimurium, Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli to contaminated river water were also inactivated after heating to 65 degrees C and above. The total viable count could be reduced by a factor of 1000. The heat-resistant bacteria isolated from the Mlalakuva River (Tanzania) were spore-forming bacteria which exhibited greater heat resistance than commonly used test bacteria originating from countries with colder climates. To provide a good safety margin it is recommended that an outlet water temperature of 75 degrees C be used. At that temperature the daily production was about 501 of decontaminated water per m2 of solar panel, an amount that could be doubled by using a heat exchanger to recycle the heat. PMID:9750274

  5. Geothermal Frontier: Penetrate a boundary between hydrothermal convection and heat conduction zones to create 'Beyond Brittle Geothermal Reservoir'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, N.; Asanuma, H.; Sakaguchi, K.; Okamoto, A.; Hirano, N.; Watanabe, N.; Kizaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    EGS has been highlightened as a most promising method of geothermal development recently because of applicability to sites which have been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties to establish universal design/development methodology, and occurrence of large induced seismicity. Future geothermal target is supercritical and superheated geothermal fluids in and around ductile rock bodies under high temperatures. Ductile regime which is estimated beyond brittle zone is target region for future geothermal development due to high enthalpy fluids and relatively weak water-rock interaction. It is very difficult to determine exact depth of Brittle-Ductile boundary due to strong dependence of temperature (geotherm) and strain rate, however, ductile zone is considered to be developed above 400C and below 3 km in geothermal fields in Tohoku District. Hydrothermal experiments associated with additional advanced technology will be conducting to understand ';Beyond brittle World' and to develop deeper and hotter geothermal reservoir. We propose a new concept of the engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement, expecting the following advantages: (a)simpler design and control the reservoir, (b)nearly full recovery of injected water, (c)sustainable production, (d)cost reduction by development of relatively shallower ductile zone in compression tectonic zones, (e)large quantity of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f)establishment of universal and conceptual design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. In ductile regime, Mesh-like fracture cloud has great potential for heat extraction between injection and production wells in spite of single and simple mega-fracture. Based on field observation and high performance hydrothermal

  6. Heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.; Rohsenow, W. M.; Houpt, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    Optimization of the vertical Bridgman technique for growth of electronic materials in single crystal form was investigated. The limitations of the crystal growth configuration were experimentally determined and heat transfer related deficiencies identified. Design of an alternate system was based on the use of heat pipes separated by a gradient region. Heat transfer analyses based on one and two dimensional models indicated the necessity of a flexible gradient zone configuration. Directional melting of binary systems as encountered during seeding in melt growth was analysed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-metal interface, and the theoretical treatment numerically applied to HgCdTe and Ga doped germanium. A theoretical and experimental study of the thermal effects associated with current flow was conducted. It was found that experimental measurements of dc induced growth during crystal pulling can be used for the precise determination of the Peltier coefficient.

  7. Countercurrent direct contact heat exchange process and system

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, III, Edward F.; Boucher, Frederic B.

    1979-01-01

    Recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources by direct contact heat exchange with a working fluid, such as a hydrocarbon working fluid, e.g. isobutane. The process and system consists of a plurality of stages, each stage including mixing and settling units. In the first stage, hot brine and arm working fluid are intimately mixed and passed into a settler wherein the brine settles to the bottom of the settler and the hot working fluid rises to the top. The hot working fluid is passed to a heat engine or turbine to produce work and the working fluid is then recycled back into the system. The system is comprised of a series of stages each containing a settler and mixer, and wherein the working fluid and the brine flow in a countercurrent manner through the stages to recover the heat from the brine in increments and raise the temperature of the working fluid in increments.

  8. Depth-dependent permeability of hydrothermal discharge zones: measurements through tidal modulation and implications for mid-ocean ridge heat budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreyre, T.; Crone, T. J.; Olive, J. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency of hydrothermal circulation as a heat and mass exchanger is strongly modulated by the permeability structure of newly formed oceanic crust, which is known to vary spatially and temporally. Here we use the modulation of discharge temperatures by oscillatory tidal loading to estimate permeability vs. depth profiles beneath hydrothermal discharge zones at three basalt-hosted hydrothermal fields. Phase lags between fluctuations in discharge temperature and seafloor tidal loading have previously been inverted for the permeability of the underlying discharge zone using the poroelastic modulation model of Jupp and Schulz [2004]. This has yielded a wide range of permeability estimates ranging from 10-13­-10-9 m2. Here we extend the model to a stratified medium comprising a top layer (2A) of permeability k2A overlying a bottom layer (2B) of permeability k2B. We apply it to three basalt-hosted hydrothermal fields on a slow- (Lucky Strike), intermediate- (Main Endeavour Field), and fast-spreading (East Pacific Rise, EPR-9ºN) ridge, where stratification is well known from seismic studies. We estimate a layer 2A permeability of ~10-10 m2 at Lucky Strike, in sharp contrast with EPR-9ºN, where k2A ~ 10-13 m2. At the Main Endeavour field, two different sites located above different distinct discharge zones (as indicated by magnetic studies) yield a high and a low permeability. The permeability of layer 2B is not as well constrained as that of layer 2A, with possible values ranging from 10-14-10-12 m2. We note, however, that the variability in measured phase lags across hydrothermal fields is compatible with a uniform layer 2B permeability of ~10-13 m2. Using theoretical scalings for high-Rayleigh porous convection, we demonstrate that the permeability of layer 2B sets the "effective permeability" of the entire convective system, and therefore the efficiency of heat extraction through young oceanic crust. A uniform layer 2B permeability would thus reconcile the

  9. Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Heat Source of an Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal System (Rainbow, Mid-Atlantic Ridge 36° 10-17'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Dunn, R. A.; Sohn, R. A.; Horning, G.; Arai, R.; Paulatto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Most of our understanding of hydrothermal systems and the nature of their heat sources comes from models and observations at fast and intermediate spreading ridges. In these settings, hydrothermal systems are mainly located within the axial zone of a spreading segment, hosted in basaltic rock, and primarily driven by heat extracted from crystallization of crustal melt sills. In contrast, hydrothermal systems at slow-spreading ridges like the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) show a great variety of venting styles and host-rock lithology, and are located in diverse tectonic settings like axial volcanic ridges, non-transform discontinuities (NTDs), the foot of ridge valley walls, and off-axis inside corner highs. Among MAR systems, the Rainbow hydrothermal field (RHF) stands out as an end-member of this diversity: an ultramafic-hosted system emitting H2 and CH4-rich fluids at high temperatures and high flow rates, which suggests a magmatic heat source despite the lack of evidence for recent volcanism and its location within an NTD with presumably low magma budget. We present 2D multichannel seismic reflection images across the Rainbow massif from the NSF-funded MARINER multidisciplinary geophysical study that reveal, for the first time, the magmatic system driving hydrothermal circulation in an ultramafic setting. Data were acquired in 2013 onboard the RV M. Langseth with an 8-km-long hydrophone streamer. The images have been obtained from pre-stack depth migrations using a regional 3D P-wave velocity model from a coincident controlled-source seismic tomography experiment using ocean bottom seismometers. Our images show a complex magmatic system centered beneath the RHF occupying an areal extent of ~3.7x6 km2, with partially molten sills ranging in depth between ~3.4 km and ~6.9 km below the seafloor. Our data also image high-amplitude dipping reflections within the massif coincident with strong lateral velocity gradients that may arise from detachment fault planes

  10. Measuring and Monitoring Heat Flow and Hydrothermal Changes in the Yellowstone Geothermal System using ASTER and MODIS Thermal Infrared Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use satellite thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to monitor geothermal activity within Yellowstone geothermal area (YGA) to meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service. Specific goals were to 1) address the challenges of monitoring the surface thermal characteristics of the >10,000 spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in the YGA (including hot springs, pools, geysers, fumaroles, and mud pots), by using satellite TIR remote sensing tools (e.g., ASTER and MODIS), 2) to estimate the radiant geothermal heat flux for individual thermal areas and for the entire YGA, and 3) to identify normal, background thermal changes so that significant, abnormal changes can be recognized, should they ever occur (e.g., thermal changes related to tectonic or hydrothermal activity, volcanic unrest, or geothermal development). Frequent, low-spatial resolution night time TIR observations from the MODIS instrument (1-km pixels) were used to quantify the background thermal flux of the whole YGA and all individual thermal areas. The MODIS Terra archive covering the previous decade (2000-2010) was analyzed and a background subtraction method was developed to automatically remove seasonal variations and extract TIR spectral radiance values. It was determined that the thermal change detection limit was equivalent to a 3-5 °C change over the entire (3x3 pixel) measured area, which is equivalent to a 9-17 °C change over a 29% fraction of the area (the sub-pixel fraction occupied by the thermal area). Alternatively, an area of static warm temperature (e.g., 93 °C) would have to increase from 100 to 36,500 m2 (11 to 216 m-diameter) to be clearly detected above scatter in the data. All of the thermal areas have been relatively stable within these limits for the last decade, although there are some thermal variations, near the limits of detection, which may reflect thermal disturbances that occur episodically in

  11. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps because black-smoker chimneys make tremendous subjects for magazine covers, the proposal that submarine hydrothermal systems were involved in the origin of life has caused many investigators to focus on the eye-catching hydrothermal vents. In much the same way that tourists rush to watch the spectacular eruptions of Old Faithful geyser with little regard for the hydrology of the Yellowstone basin, attention is focused on the spectacular, high-temperature hydrothermal vents to the near exclusion of the enormous underlying hydrothermal systems. Nevertheless, the magnitude and complexity of geologic structures, heat flow, and hydrologic parameters which characterize the geyser basins at Yellowstone also characterize submarine hydrothermal systems. However, in the submarine systems the scale can be considerably more vast. Like Old Faithful, submarine hydrothermal vents have a spectacular quality, but they are only one fascinating aspect of enormous geologic systems operating at seafloor spreading centers throughout all of the ocean basins. A critical study of the possible role of hydrothermal processes in the origin of life should include the full spectrum of probable environments. The goals of this chapter are to synthesize diverse information about the inorganic geochemistry of submarine hydrothermal systems, assemble a description of the fundamental physical and chemical attributes of these systems, and consider the implications of high-temperature, fluid-driven processes for organic synthesis. Information about submarine hydrothermal systems comes from many directions. Measurements made directly on venting fluids provide useful, but remarkably limited, clues about processes operating at depth. The oceanic crust has been drilled to approximately 2.0 km depth providing many other pieces of information, but drilling technology has not allowed the bore holes and core samples to reach the maximum depths to which aqueous fluids circulate in oceanic crust. Such

  12. Geothermal Direct-Heat Utilization Assistance - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Lund

    1999-07-14

    The Geo-Heat Center provided (1) direct-use technical assistance, (2) research, and (3) information dissemination on geothermal energy over an 8 1/2 year period. The center published a quarterly bulletin, developed a web site and maintained a technical library. Staff members made 145 oral presentations, published 170 technical papers, completed 28 applied research projects, and gave 108 tours of local geothermal installations to 500 persons.

  13. Incremental cooling load determination for passive direct gain heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.W.; Mahone, D.; Fuller, W.; Gruber, J.; Kammerud, R.; Place, W.; Andersson, B.

    1981-05-01

    This paper examines the applicability of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) full load compressor hour method for predicting the cooling load increase in a residence, attributable to direct gain passive heating systems. The NAHB method predictions are compared with the results of 200 hour-by-hour simulations using BLAST and the two methods show reasonable agreement. The degree of agreement and the limitations of the NAHB method are discussed.

  14. ON THE DIRECT IMAGING OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin L.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the ability of existing and planned telescopes, on the ground and in space, to directly image tidally heated exomoons orbiting gas-giant exoplanets. Tidally heated exomoons can plausibly be far more luminous than their host exoplanet and as much as 0.1% as bright as the system's stellar primary if it is a low mass star. Because emission from exomoons can be powered by tidal forces, they can shine brightly at arbitrarily large separations from the system's stellar primary with temperatures of several hundreds degrees Kelvin or even higher in extreme cases. Furthermore, these high temperatures can occur in systems that are billions of years old. Tidally heated exomoons may thus be far easier targets for direct imaging studies than giant exoplanets which must be both young and at a large projected separation (typically at least tens of AU) from their primary to be accessible to current generation direct imaging studies. For example, the (warm) Spitzer Space Telescope and the next generation of ground based instruments could detect an exomoon roughly the size of the Earth at a temperature Almost-Equal-To 600 K and a distance Almost-Equal-To 5 pc in the K, L, and M bands at the 5{sigma} confidence level with a one hour exposure; in more favorable but still plausible cases, detection at distances of tens of parsecs is feasible. Future mid-infrared space telescopes, such as James Webb Space Telescope and SPICA, will be capable of directly imaging tidally heated exomoons around the nearest two dozen stars with a brightness temperature {>=}300 K and R {>=} 1 R{sub Circled-Plus} orbiting at {>=}12 AU from the primary star at a 5{sigma} confidence level in a 10{sup 4} s integration. In addition it is possible that some of the exoplanets which have already been directly imaged are actually tidally heated exomoons or blends of such objects with hot young planets. If such exomoons exist and are sufficiently common (i.e., nearby), it may well be far easier to

  15. Heat-flow and hydrothermal circulation at the ocean-continent transition of the eastern gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucazeau, Francis; Leroy, Sylvie; Rolandone, Frédérique; d'Acremont, Elia; Watremez, Louise; Bonneville, Alain; Goutorbe, Bruno; Düsünur, Doga

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the importance of fluid circulation associated with the formation of ocean-continent transitions (OCT), we examine 162 new heat-flow (HF) measurements in the eastern Gulf of Aden, obtained at close locations along eight seismic profiles and with multi-beam bathymetry. The average HF values in the OCT and in the oceanic domain (~ 18 m.y.) are very close to the predictions of cooling models, showing that the overall importance of fluids remains small at the present time compared to oceanic ridge flanks of the same age. However, local HF anomalies are observed, although not systematically, in the vicinity of the unsedimented basement and are interpreted by the thermal effect of meteoric fluids flowing laterally. We propose a possible interpretation of hydrothermal paths based on the shape of HF anomalies and on the surface morphology: fluids can circulate either along-dip or along-strike, but are apparently focussed in narrow "pipes". In several locations in the OCT, there is no detectable HF anomaly while the seismic velocity structure suggests serpentinization and therefore past circulation. We relate the existence of the present day fluid circulation in the eastern Gulf of Aden to the presence of unsedimented basement and to the local extensional stress in the vicinity of the Socotra-Hadbeen fault zone. At the scale of rifted-margins, fluid circulation is probably not as important as in the oceanic domain because it can be inhibited rapidly with high sedimentation rates, serpentinization and stress release after the break-up.

  16. Directly Measured Heating Rates of a Tropical Subvisible Cirrus Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucholtz, Anthongy; Hlavka, Dennis L.; McGill, Matthew J.; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Pilewskie, Peter; Davis, Sean M.; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Walker, Annette L.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first direct measurements of the infrared and solar heating rates of a tropical subvisible cirrus (SVC) cloud sampled off the east coast of Nicaragua on 25 July 2007 by the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4). On this day a persistent thin cirrus layer, with mostly clear skies underneath, was detected in real time by the cloud lidar on the ER-2, and the aircraft was directed to profile down through the SVC. Measurements of the net broadband infrared irradiance and spectrally integrated solar irradiance above, below, and through the SVC are used to determine the infrared and solar heating rates of the cloud. The lidar measurements show that the variable SVC layer was located between approximately 13 and 15 km. Its midvisible optical depth varied from 0.01 to 0.10 with a mean of 0.034 +/- 0.033. Its depolarization ratio was approximately 0.4, indicative of ice clouds. From the divergence of the measured net irradiances the infrared heating rate of the SVC was determined to be approximately 2.50 - 3.24 K/d and the solar heating rate was found to be negligible. These values are consistent with previous indirect observations of other SVC and with model-generated heating rates of SVC with similar optical depths. This study illustrates the utility and potential of the profiling sampling strategy employed here. A more fully instrumented high-altitude aircraft that also included in situ cloud and aerosol probes would provide a comprehensive data set for characterizing both the radiative and microphysical properties of these ubiquitous tropical clouds

  17. Use of ASTER and MODIS thermal infrared data to quantify heat flow and hydrothermal change at Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Heasler, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to use satellite thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to monitor geothermal activity within the Yellowstone geothermal area to meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey and the Yellowstone National Park Geology Program. Specific goals were to: 1) address the challenges of monitoring the surface thermal characteristics of the > 10,000 spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in the Park (including hot springs, pools, geysers, fumaroles, and mud pots) that are spread out over ~ 5000 km2, by using satellite TIR remote sensing tools (e.g., ASTER and MODIS), 2) to estimate the radiant geothermal heat flux (GHF) for Yellowstone's thermal areas, and 3) to identify normal, background thermal changes so that significant, abnormal changes can be recognized, should they ever occur (e.g., changes related to tectonic, hydrothermal, impending volcanic processes, or human activities, such as nearby geothermal development). ASTER TIR data (90-m pixels) were used to estimate the radiant GHF from all of Yellowstone's thermal features and update maps of thermal areas. MODIS TIR data (1-km pixels) were used to record background thermal radiance variations from March 2000 through December 2010 and establish thermal change detection limits. A lower limit for the radiant GHF estimated from ASTER TIR temperature data was established at ~ 2.0 GW, which is ~ 30–45% of the heat flux estimated through geochemical thermometry. Also, about 5 km2 of thermal areas was added to the geodatabase of mapped thermal areas. A decade-long time-series of MODIS TIR radiance data was dominated by seasonal cycles. A background subtraction technique was used in an attempt to isolate variations due to geothermal changes. Several statistically significant perturbations were noted in the time-series from Norris Geyser Basin, however many of these did not correspond to documented thermal disturbances. This study provides concrete examples of the

  18. Use of ASTER and MODIS thermal infrared data to quantify heat flow and hydrothermal change at Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Heasler, Henry

    2012-07-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to use satellite thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to monitor geothermal activity within the Yellowstone geothermal area to meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey and the Yellowstone National Park Geology Program. Specific goals were to: 1) address the challenges of monitoring the surface thermal characteristics of the > 10,000 spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in the Park (including hot springs, pools, geysers, fumaroles, and mud pots) that are spread out over ~ 5000 km2, by using satellite TIR remote sensing tools (e.g., ASTER and MODIS), 2) to estimate the radiant geothermal heat flux (GHF) for Yellowstone's thermal areas, and 3) to identify normal, background thermal changes so that significant, abnormal changes can be recognized, should they ever occur (e.g., changes related to tectonic, hydrothermal, impending volcanic processes, or human activities, such as nearby geothermal development). ASTER TIR data (90-m pixels) were used to estimate the radiant GHF from all of Yellowstone's thermal features and update maps of thermal areas. MODIS TIR data (1-km pixels) were used to record background thermal radiance variations from March 2000 through December 2010 and establish thermal change detection limits. A lower limit for the radiant GHF estimated from ASTER TIR temperature data was established at ~ 2.0 GW, which is ~ 30-45% of the heat flux estimated through geochemical thermometry. Also, about 5 km2 of thermal areas was added to the geodatabase of mapped thermal areas. A decade-long time-series of MODIS TIR radiance data was dominated by seasonal cycles. A background subtraction technique was used in an attempt to isolate variations due to geothermal changes. Several statistically significant perturbations were noted in the time-series from Norris Geyser Basin, however many of these did not correspond to documented thermal disturbances. This study provides concrete examples of the strengths

  19. Detectability of Tidally Heated Exomoons Using Direct Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Mary Anne; Turner, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the capability of ground and space-based observatories, both existing and planned, to directly image tidally heated exomoons orbiting exoplanets. Tidally heated exomoons, or THEMs, can conceivably be much more luminous than their host exoplanet and as little as 1000 times dimmer than the system's primary star. Tidal forces can heat THEMs at arbitrarily large angular separations from the host star, in both young and old star systems, to temperatures of hundreds or even thousands of degrees Kelvin. THEMs may thus be far easier targets for direct imaging studies than giant exoplanets which must be both young and at a large projected angular separation from their host star to be imaged with existing high contrast instrumentation. Current instruments are capable of detecting nearby THEMs with Teff ≥ 600K and R ≥ Rearth in K-band. Future mid-infrared space telescopes, such as JWST and SPICA, will be capable of directly imaging THEMs around ~25 nearby stars with Teff ≥ 300K and R≥Rearth orbiting at angular separations ≥ 12AU at a 5σ confidence level in a 10,000 second integration. It is feasible that previously imaged exoplanets are actually THEMs or blends of such objects with hot young planets; we speculate that Fomalhaut b could be such a case. If THEMs exist and are common (i.e., nearby), it may be far easier to directly image a THEM with surface conditions that allow for liquid water than it will be to image an Earth-like planet in the classical Habitable Zone of its primary star.

  20. A direct-interface fusible heat sink for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, B. W.

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut cooling during extravehicular activity is a critical design issue in developing a portable life support system that meets the requirements of a space station mission. Some the requirements are that the cooling device can be easily regenerable and nonventing during operation. In response to this, a direct-interface, fusible heat sink prototpye with freezable quick-disconnects was developed. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and tested that consists of an elastic container filled with normal tap water and having two quick-disconnects embedded in a wall. These quick-disconnects are designed so that they may be frozen with the ice and yet still be joined to the cooling system, allowing an immediate flow path. The inherent difficulties in a direct-interface heat sink have been overcome, i.e., (1) establishing an initial flow path; (2) avoiding low-flow freeze-up; and (3) achieving adequate heat-transfer rates at the end of the melting process. The requirements, design, fabrication, and testing are discussed.

  1. A direct-interface, fusible heat sink for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, B. W.

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut cooling during extravehicular activity is a critical design issue in developing a portable life support system that meets the requirements of a space station mission. Some of the requirements are that the cooling device can be easily regenerable and nonventing during operation. In response to this, a direct-interface, fusible heat sink prototype with freezable quick-disconnects was developed. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and tested that consists of an elastic container filled with normal tap water and having two quick-disconnects embedded in a wall. These quick-disconnects are designed so that they may be frozen with the ice and yet still be joined to the cooling system, allowing an immediate flow path. The inherent difficulties in a direct-interface heat sink have been overcome, i.e., (1) establishing an initial flow path; (2) avoiding low-flow freeze-up; and (3) achieving adequate heat-transfer rates at the end of the melting process. The requirements, design, fabrication, and testing are discussed.

  2. Direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.; Williams, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    The potential exists in a nuclear reactor core melt severe accident for molten core debris to be dispersed under high pressure into the containment building. If this occurs, the set of phenomena that result in the transfer of energy to the containment atmosphere and its surroundings is referred to as direct containment heating (DCH). Because of the potential for DCH to lead to early containment failure, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has sponsored an extensive research program consisting of experimental, analytical, and risk integration components. An important element of the analytical research has been the development and assessment of direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code. This report documents the DCH models in the CONTAIN code. DCH models in CONTAIN for representing debris transport, trapping, chemical reactions, and heat transfer from debris to the containment atmosphere and surroundings are described. The descriptions include the governing equations and input instructions in CONTAIN unique to performing DCH calculations. Modifications made to the combustion models in CONTAIN for representing the combustion of DCH-produced and pre-existing hydrogen under DCH conditions are also described. Input table options for representing the discharge of debris from the RPV and the entrainment phase of the DCH process are also described. A sample calculation is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the models. The results show that reasonable behavior is obtained when the models are used to predict the sixth Zion geometry integral effects test at 1/10th scale.

  3. Performance of direct contact latent heat storage unit

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, M.; Yacoub, K. )

    1989-01-01

    The performance of direct contact latent heat storage unit has been investigated in a glass column having an inside diameter and length of 0.2 m and 1.5 m respectively. Kerosene, as a heat transfer fluid, was bubbled through the continuous phase which was a solution of one of the hydrated salts: Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{center dot}10H{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center dot}10H{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}{center dot}12H{sub 2}O. The continuous phase temperature at different heights together with the kerosene inlet and outlet temperatures were measured with time during both heat charge and discharge. Theoretical prediction of the performance of the unit has been achieved employing the model for drop with internal circulation which was used to evaluate the transfer efficiency. Thermal efficiency of the nit was found to increase with the larger column. A sharp decrease in the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient was observed soon after crystallization started. The coefficient increased significantly at higher kerosene flow rates due to the information of smaller bubbles.

  4. Hydrothermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2011-03-11

    This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

  5. Hawaiian direct-heat grants encourage geothermal creativity

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, A.G. )

    1988-12-01

    The Hawaiian Community Geothermal Technology Program is unique. Under its auspices, heat and other by-products of Hawaii's high-temperature HGP-A geothermal well and power plant are not wasted. Instead, they form the backbone of a direct-heat grant program that reaches into the local community and encourages community members to develop creative uses for geothermal energy. A by-product of this approach is a broadened local base of support for geothermal energy development. With the experimental and precommercial work completed, most of the original grantees are looking for ways to continue their projects on a commercial scale by studying the economics of using geothermal heat in a full-scale business and researching potential markets. A geothermal mini-park may be built near the research center. In 1988, a second round of projects was funded under the program. The five new projects are: Geothermal Aquaculture Project - an experiment with low-cost propagation of catfish species in geothermally heated tanks with a biofilter; Media Steam Sterilization and Drying - an application of raw geothermal steam to shredded, locally-available materials such as coconut husks, which would be used as certified nursery growing media; Bottom-Heating System Using Geothermal Power for Propagation - a continuation of Leilani Foliage's project from the first round of grants, focusing on new species of ornamental palms; Silica Bronze - the use of geothermal silica as a refractory material in casting bronze artwork; and Electro-deposition of Minerals in Geothermal Brine - the nature and possible utility of minerals deposited from the hot fluid.

  6. Time Series Measurements of Diffuse Hydrothermal Flow at the ASHES Vent Field Reveal Tidally Modulated Heat and Volume Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Fornari, D. J.; Crone, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Existing time-series measurements of temperature and velocity of diffuse hydrothermal fluids exhibit variability over a range of periods from seconds to days. Frequency analysis of these measurements reveals differences between studies and field locations including nearly white spectra, as well as spectra with peaks at tidal and inertial periods. Based upon these results, previous authors have suggested several processes that may control diffuse flow rates, including tidally induced currents and 'tidal pumping', and have also suggested that there are no systematic controls. To further investigate the processes that control variability in diffuse flow, we use data from a new, deep-sea camera and temperature measurement system, the Diffuse Effluent Measurement System (DEMS), deployed during the July, 2014 cruise of the R/V Atlantis. The DEMS was deployed with DSV Alvin above a fracture network at the Phoenix vent within the ASHES vent field (Axial Seamount, 1541 mbsl). The system collected 20 seconds of imagery at 20 Hz and 24 seconds of temperature measurements at 1 Hz each hour over the period between July 22 and August 2nd. Velocities of the upwelling fluids were calculated using Diffuse Fluid Velocimetry (DFV; Mittelstaedt et al., 2010). DFV is a cross correlation technique that tracks moving index of refraction anomalies (i.e., hot parcels of fluid) through time. Over the ~12 day deployment, median flow rates ranged from 0.5 cm/s to 6 cm/s and mean fluid temperature anomalies from 0°C up to ~6.5°C, yielding an average heat flux density of 0.23 MW/m2. Spectral analysis of both the measured temperatures and calculated velocities yield a peak in normalized power at the semi-diurnal lunar period (M2, 12.4hrs), but no other spectral peaks above the 95% confidence level. Here, we present these results and discuss their implications for the tidal current and tidal pressure models of diffuse flow variability at the ASHES vent field.

  7. Direct heating rates associated with gravity wave saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Erich

    2004-04-01

    Analysis of filtering out subscale motions is applied for internal gravity waves. This leads to a new perspective of the planetary-scale sensible heat budget of the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In line with previous results of Becker and Schmitz, the present paper recapitulates that the dissipation of gravity wave kinetic energy and the local adiabatic conversion of mean enthalpy into gravity wave kinetic energy cannot be neglected, and that the net effect of both cools the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In addition, the importance of the wave entropy flux-an effect which is ignored in customary gravity wave parameterizations for global circulation models-is stressed. We show that, when evaluated on the basis of Lindzen's saturation assumption, the wave entropy flux convergence behaves like a vertical diffusion of the mean stratification, where the wave-induced diffusion coefficient is involved with a Prandtl number of 2. This result imposes an upper bound of 2 for the effective Prandtl number which scales the combined entropy flux owing to turbulence and gravity waves. The direct heating rates generated by gravity wave saturation are assessed quantitatively, using an idealized general circulation model completed by a Lindzen-type gravity wave parameterization.

  8. Market penetration analysis for direct heat geothermal energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.J.; Nelson, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    This study is concerned with the estimation of the National geothermal market potential and penetration in direct heat applications for residences and certain industry segments. An important aspect of this study is that the analysis considers both known and anticipated goethermal resources. This allows for an estimation of the longer-range potential for geothermal applications. Thus the approach and results of this study provide new insights and valuable information not obtained from more limited, site-specific types of analyses. Estimates made in this study track geothermal market potential and projected penetration from the present to the year 2020. Private sector commercialization of geothermal energy over this period requires assistance in the identification of markets and market sizes, potential users, and appropriate technical applications.

  9. Diffuse venting at the ASHES hydrothermal field: Heat flux and tidally modulated flow variability derived from in situ time-series measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; Fornari, Daniel J.; Crone, Timothy J.; Kinsey, James; Kelley, Deborah; Elend, Mitch

    2016-04-01

    Time-series measurements of diffuse exit-fluid temperature and velocity collected with a new, deep-sea camera, and temperature measurement system, the Diffuse Effluent Measurement System (DEMS), were examined from a fracture network within the ASHES hydrothermal field located in the caldera of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The DEMS was installed using the HOV Alvin above a fracture near the Phoenix vent. The system collected 20 s of 20 Hz video imagery and 24 s of 1 Hz temperature measurements each hour between 22 July and 2 August 2014. Fluid velocities were calculated using the Diffuse Fluid Velocimetry (DFV) technique. Over the ˜12 day deployment, median upwelling rates and mean fluid temperature anomalies ranged from 0.5 to 6 cm/s and 0°C to ˜6.5°C above ambient, yielding a heat flux of 0.29 ± 0.22 MW m-2 and heat output of 3.1± 2.5 kW. Using a photo mosaic to measure fracture dimensions, the total diffuse heat output from cracks across ASHES field is estimated to be 2.05 ± 1.95 MW. Variability in temperatures and velocities are strongest at semidiurnal periods and show significant coherence with tidal height variations. These data indicate that periodic variability near Phoenix vent is modulated both by tidally controlled bottom currents and seafloor pressure, with seafloor pressures being the dominant influence. These results emphasize the importance of local permeability on diffuse hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridges and the need to better quantify heat flux associated with young oceanic crust.

  10. Age alters the cardiovascular response to direct passive heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Cardell, A. F.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    During direct passive heating in young men, a dramatic increase in skin blood flow is achieved by a rise in cardiac output (Qc) and redistribution of flow from the splanchnic and renal vascular beds. To examine the effect of age on these responses, seven young (Y; 23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (O; 70 +/- 3 yr) men were passively heated with water-perfused suits to their individual limit of thermal tolerance. Measurements included heart rate (HR), Qc (by acetylene rebreathing), central venous pressure (via peripherally inserted central catheter), blood pressures (by brachial auscultation), skin blood flow (from increases in forearm blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic blood flow (by indocyanine green clearance), renal blood flow (by p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. Qc was significantly lower in the older than in the young men (11.1 +/- 0.7 and 7.4 +/- 0.2 l/min in Y and O, respectively, at the limit of thermal tolerance; P < 0. 05), despite similar increases in esophageal and mean skin temperatures and time to reach the limit of thermal tolerance. A lower stroke volume (99 +/- 7 and 68 +/- 4 ml/beat in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05), most likely due to an attenuated increase in inotropic function during heating, was the primary factor for the lower Qc observed in the older men. Increases in HR were similar in the young and older men; however, when expressed as a percentage of maximal HR, the older men relied on a greater proportion of their chronotropic reserve to obtain the same HR response (62 +/- 3 and 75 +/- 4% maximal HR in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the older men redistributed less blood flow from the combined splanchnic and renal circulations at the limit of thermal tolerance (960 +/- 80 and 720 +/- 100 ml/min in Y and O, respectively, P < 0. 05). As a result of these combined attenuated responses, the older men had a significantly lower increase in total blood flow directed to

  11. Age alters the cardiovascular response to direct passive heating.

    PubMed

    Minson, C T; Wladkowski, S L; Cardell, A F; Pawelczyk, J A; Kenney, W L

    1998-04-01

    During direct passive heating in young men, a dramatic increase in skin blood flow is achieved by a rise in cardiac output (Qc) and redistribution of flow from the splanchnic and renal vascular beds. To examine the effect of age on these responses, seven young (Y; 23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (O; 70 +/- 3 yr) men were passively heated with water-perfused suits to their individual limit of thermal tolerance. Measurements included heart rate (HR), Qc (by acetylene rebreathing), central venous pressure (via peripherally inserted central catheter), blood pressures (by brachial auscultation), skin blood flow (from increases in forearm blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic blood flow (by indocyanine green clearance), renal blood flow (by p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. Qc was significantly lower in the older than in the young men (11.1 +/- 0.7 and 7.4 +/- 0.2 l/min in Y and O, respectively, at the limit of thermal tolerance; P < 0. 05), despite similar increases in esophageal and mean skin temperatures and time to reach the limit of thermal tolerance. A lower stroke volume (99 +/- 7 and 68 +/- 4 ml/beat in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05), most likely due to an attenuated increase in inotropic function during heating, was the primary factor for the lower Qc observed in the older men. Increases in HR were similar in the young and older men; however, when expressed as a percentage of maximal HR, the older men relied on a greater proportion of their chronotropic reserve to obtain the same HR response (62 +/- 3 and 75 +/- 4% maximal HR in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the older men redistributed less blood flow from the combined splanchnic and renal circulations at the limit of thermal tolerance (960 +/- 80 and 720 +/- 100 ml/min in Y and O, respectively, P < 0. 05). As a result of these combined attenuated responses, the older men had a significantly lower increase in total blood flow directed to

  12. Hydrothermal waves under microgravity in a differentially heated long liquid bridge with aspect ratio near the Rayleigh-limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, D.

    2005-08-01

    A liquid bridge of 15.0 mm length L and 3.0 mm radius r (aspect ratio A = L/r = 5) from 2 cSt silicone oil (Pr = 28) was established under microgravity during the flight of the sounding rocket MAXUS-4. Four different temperature differences ΔT = 7K, 9K, 10K, 12K have been applied between the ends, each for sufficient time to reach steady state thermocapillary flow conditions. The aim of the experiment - to observe the onset of hydrothermal waves and to measure their features like the waves phase speed and the angle between the wave vector and the applied temperature gradient - was reached. We used microgravity in this experiment in a twofold manner; (1) a liquid bridge with A = 5 can be established only under microgravity; (2) it was possible to study hydrothermal waves without the influence of gravity and without the aspect ratio restrictions at normal gravity.

  13. State of technology of direct contact heat exchanging

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, R.W.; DeBellis, D.E.

    1984-05-01

    Specific objectives of this study were to assess the state of technology development and to identify and evaluate the constraints to wider use of direct contact heat exchanger (DCHE) technology in the U.S. The scope of this study is relatively broad; it includes many types of generic systems and end-use applications, both current and future. Domestic and foreign experience with DCHE technology are compared, although the primary focus is on domestic experience. Twenty-two distinct applications of DCHE technology were identified in this study and are examined in this report. The general format is to describe each system, explore its potential applications, discuss current and past research activities and identify major implementation barriers. Finally, as a result of discussions with principal users of DCHE systems and with other knowledgeable sources, generic and specific R and D needs to overcome specific implementation barriers have been identified. The following list of DCHE systems/concepts has been classified into four major end-uses; there is also a category for specialized (other) applications.

  14. Hydrothermal Activity on ultraslow Spreading Ridge: new hydrothermal fields found on the Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Deng, X.; Lei, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Zhou, J.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridge makes up about 25% of global mid-ocean ridge length. Previous studies believed that hydrothermal activity is not widespread on the ultraslow spreading ridge owing to lower magma supply. Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with the spreading rate between 1.2cm/a to 1.4cm/a, represents the ultraslow spreading ridge. In 2007, Chinese Cruise (CC) 19th discovered the Dragon Flag deposit (DFD) on the SWIR, which is the first active hydrothermal field found on the ultraslow spreading ridge. In recent years, over 10 hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR between Indomed and Gallieni transform faults by the Chinese team. Tao et al. (2012) implied that the segment sections with excess heat from enhanced magmatism and suitable crustal permeability along slow and ultraslow ridges might be the most promising areas for searching for hydrothermal activities. In 2014, CC 30thdiscovered five hydrothermal fields and several hydrothermal anomalies on the SWIR. Dragon Horn Area (DHA). The DHA is located on the southern of segment 27 SWIR, with an area of about 400 km2. The geophysical studies indicated that the DHA belongs to the oceanic core complex (OCC), which is widespread on the slow spreading ridges (Zhao et al., 2013). The rocks, such as gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and consolidated carbonate were collected in the DHA, which provide the direct evidence with the existence of the OCC. However, all rock samples gathered by three TV-grab stations are basalts on the top of the OCC. A hydrothermal anomaly area, centered at 49.66°E,37.80° S with a range of several kms, is detected in the DHA. It is probably comprised of several hydrothermal fields and controlled by a NW fault. New discovery of hydrothermal fields. From January to April 2014, five hydrothermal fields were discovered on the SWIR between 48°E to 50°E during the leg 2&3 of the CC 30th, which are the Su Causeway field (48.6°E, 38.1°S), Bai Causeway field (48.8°E, 37.9 °S), Dragon

  15. Direct use of sunflower oil as a heating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.; Kurt, G.

    1998-11-01

    Vegetable oils in particular have exceptional importance since they can be used as a fuel oil (heating oil type) alternative. In this research evaluation, the possibilities of sunflower oil as a heating oil candidate have been investigated. The fuel oil property tests of sunflower oil were performed according to standard methods. An overall evaluation of data indicates that sunflower oil can be proposed as a possible substitute for heating oil.

  16. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance: Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The report summarizes geothermal activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the second quarter of FY-95. It describes 92 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, resources and equipment. Research activities are summarized on geothermal energy cost evaluation, low temperature resource assessment and ground-source heat pump case studies and utility programs. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct heat Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  17. Environmental Assessment: geothermal direct heat project, Marlin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Federal action addressed by this Environmental Assessment (EA) is joint funding the retrofitting of a heating and hot water system in a hospital at Marlin, Texas, with a geothermal preheat system. The project will be located within the existing hospital boiler room. One supply well was drilled in an existing adjacent parking lot. It was necessary to drill the well prior to completion of this environmental assessment in order to confirm the reservoir and to obtain fluids for analysis in order to assess the environmental effects of fluid disposal. Fluid from operation will be disposed of by discharging it directly into existing street drains, which will carry the fluid to Park Lake and eventually the Brazos River. Fluid disposal activities are regulated by the Texas Railroad Commission. The local geology is determined by past displacements in the East Texas Basin. Boundaries are marked by the Balcones and the Mexia-Talco fault systems. All important water-bearing formations are in the cretaceous sedimentary rocks and are slightly to highly saline. Geothermal fluids are produced from the Trinity Group; they range from approximately 3600 to 4000 ppM TDS. Temperatures are expected to be above 64/sup 0/C (147/sup 0/F). Surface water flows southeastward as a part of the Brazos River Basin. The nearest perennial stream is the Brazos River 5.6 km (3.5 miles) away, to which surface fluids will eventually discharge. Environmental impacts of construction were small because of the existing structures and paved areas. Construction run-off and geothermal flow-test fluid passed through a small pond in the city park, lowering its water quality, at least temporarily. Construction noise was not out of character with existing noises around the hospital.

  18. Template-directed preparation of two-layer porous NiO film via hydrothermal synthesis for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Xiao, A.; Chen, Y.; Zuo, C.; Zhou, S.; Li, L.

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: A two-layer porous NiO film is prepared via hydrothermal synthesis method based on monolayer polystyrene sphere template and shows noticeable Li battery performance with good cycle life and high capacity. Highlights: ► Two-layer porous NiO film is prepared via monolayer polystyrene spheres template. ► NiO film with high capacity as anode material for lithium ion batteries. ► Two-layer porous structure is favorable for fast lithium ion and electron transfer. -- Abstract: A two-layer porous NiO film is prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method through self-assembled monolayer polystyrene spheres template. The substructure of the NiO film is composed of ordered close-packed hollow-sphere array and the superstructure is made up of randomly NiO nanoflakes. The electrochemical properties are measured by galvanostatic charge/discharge tests and cyclic voltammetric analysis (CV). As anode material for lithium ion batteries, the two-layer porous NiO film exhibits high initial coulombic efficiency of 75%, high reversible capacity and rather good cycling performance. The discharge capacity of the two-layer porous NiO film is 501 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.5 C after 50 cycles. The two-layer porous architecture is responsible for the enhancement of electrochemical properties.

  19. Numerical analysis of magnetic field effects on hydro-thermal behavior of a magnetic nanofluid in a double pipe heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, Ali; Vahedi, Khodadad

    2016-03-01

    This study attempts to numerically investigate the hydro-thermal characteristics of a ferrofluid (water and 4 vol% Fe3O4) in a counter-current horizontal double pipe heat exchanger, which is exposed to a non-uniform transverse magnetic field with different intensities. The magnetic field is generated by an electric current going through a wire located parallel to the inner tube and between two pipes. The single phase model and the control volume technique have been used to study the flow. The effects of magnetic field have been added to momentum equation by applying C++ codes in Ansys Fluent 14. The results show that applying this kind of magnetic field causes kelvin force to be produced perpendicular to the ferrofluid flow, changing axial velocity profile and creating a pair of vortices which leads to an increase in Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop. Comparing the enhancement percentage of Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop demonstrates that the optimum value of magnetic number for Reff=50 is between Mn=1.33×106 and Mn=2.37×106. So applying non-uniform transverse magnetic field can control the flow of ferrofluid and improve heat transfer process of double pipe heat exchanger.

  20. Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-10

    The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

  1. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1993-02-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H{sub 2}S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H{sub 2}S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10{degree} or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft{sup 2} heat transfer surface area.

  2. Serpentinization-assisted deformation processes and characterization of hydrothermal fluxes at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, Gence

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems play a significantly important role in Earth’s energy and geochemical budgets and support the existence and development of complex biological ecosystems by providing nutrient and energy to microbial and macrafaunal ecosystems through geochemical fluxes. Heat output and fluid flow are key parameters which characterize hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers by constraining models of hydrothermal circulation. Although integrated measurements of heat flux in plumes are critically important as well, quantification of heat flux at discrete sources (vent orifices versus patches of seafloor shimmering diffuse flow) from direct measurements is particularly essential for examining the partitioning of heat flow into focused and diffuse components of venting and determining geochemical fluxes from these two modes of flow. Hydrothermal heat output also constrains the permeability of young oceanic crust and thickness of the conductive boundary layer that separates magmatic heat source from overlying hydrothermal circulation. This dissertation will be fundamentally focused on three main inter-connected topics: (1) the design and development of direct high- or low-temperature heat flow measuring devices for hydrothermal systems, (2) the collection of new heat output results on four cruises between 2008 and 2010 at several distinct hydrothermal sites along mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to estimate total heat output from individual vent structures such as Dante, Hulk or the whole vent field (e.g., Main Endeavour Vent Field (MEF)), the partitioning between focused and diffuse hydrothermal venting in MEF, and determination of initial estimates of geochemical flux from diffuse hydrothermal fluids which may be influenced by the activity in subsurface biosphere and finally (3) the deformation and uplift associated with serpentinization at MORs and subduction zones. Despite extensive efforts spent for the last couple of decades on heat flow measurement

  3. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.

    1995-12-01

    The report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-95. It describes 80 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment and resources. Research activities are summarized on low-temperature resource assessment, geothermal energy cost evaluation and marketing strategy for geothermal district heating. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  4. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D, and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center. It describes 95 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with goethermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics, and resources. Research activities are summarized on geothermal district heating system cost evaluation and silica waste utilization project. Outreach activities include publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, goethermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  5. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-12-19

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  6. Response of a hydrothermal system to magmatic heat inferred from temporal variations in the complex frequencies of long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate temporal variations in the complex frequencies (frequency and quality factor Q) of long-period (LP) events that occurred at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, central Japan. We analyze LP waveforms observed at this volcano in the period between 1988 and 1995, which covers a seismically active period between 1989 and 1993. Systematic temporal variations in the complex frequencies are observed in October-November 1989, July-October 1991, and September 1992-January 1993. We use acoustic properties of a crack filled with hydrothermal fluids to interpret the observed temporal variations in the complex frequencies. The temporal variations in October-November 1989 can be divided into two periods, which are explained by a gradual decrease and increase of a gas-volume fraction in a water-steam mixture in a crack, respectively. The temporal variations in July-October 1991 can be also divided into two periods. These variations in the first and second periods are similar to those observed in November 1989 and in September-November 1992, respectively, and are interpreted as drying of a water-steam mixture and misty gas in a crack, respectively. The repeated nature of the temporal variations observed in similar seasons between July and November suggests the existence of seasonality in the occurrence of LP events. This may be caused by a seasonally variable meteoritic water supply to a hydrothermal system, which may have been heated by the flux of volcanic gases from magma beneath this volcano. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical Analysis of Lead-Bismuth-Water Direct Contact Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yumi; Takahashi, Minoru

    Direct contact boiling heat transfer of sub-cooled water with lead-bismuth eutectic (Pb-Bi) was investigated for the evaluation of the performance of steam generation in direct contact of feed water with primary Pb-Bi coolant in upper plenum above the core in Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water fast reactor. An analytical two-fluid model was developed to estimate the heat transfer numerically. Numerical results were compared with experimental ones for verification of the model. The overall volumetric heat transfer coefficient was calculated from heat exchange rate in the chimney. It was confirmed that the calculated results agreed well with the experimental result.

  8. 76 FR 71835 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... definitions and energy conservation standards for vented gas hearth direct heating equipment. 75 FR 20112. \\1... are excluded from DOE's regulations.'' 75 FR 20112, 20234 (April 16, 2010). In this final rule, DOE is... energy conservation standards for direct heating equipment manufactured on or after April 16, 2013. 75...

  9. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This paper is a third quarter 1994 report of activities of the Geo-Heat Center of Oregon Institute of Technology. It describes contacts with parties during this period related to assistance with geothermal direct heat applications. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, resources, and equipment. Research is also being conducted on failures of vertical lineshaft turbines in geothermal wells.

  10. Direct Electron Heating at Moderate Harmonic Number for Compact Ignition Devices

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski

    1999-07-01

    Direct electron heating of compact ignition devices by radio-frequency power in the 300-400 MHz,range is discussed. The possible advantage of this approach to heating an ignition device, as opposed to resonant heating of an ion population, is the insensitivity to the exact value of the magnitude field. Heating with central power deposition during a toroidal field ramp is therefore possible.

  11. Direct synthesis of Al-SBA-15 containing aluminosilicate species plugs in an acid-free medium and structural adjustment by hydrothermal post-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Lei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Na; Lin, Sen; Li, Xiangping; Guo, Peng; Li, Xuebing

    2013-07-15

    A series of Al-SBA-15 with controllable aluminosilicate plug structures inside straight mesopores has been hydrothermally synthesized in a one-step synthesis in an environmentally friendly acid-free medium, using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a structure-directing agent, water as solvent, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and aluminum nitrate (Al(NO){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O) as silica and aluminum sources, respectively. The effects of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution and aging temperature on the structural properties of the resulting materials were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), FT-IR spectra and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses. The nature of the Al species and the acidity of the resultant samples were studied by solid state {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and pyridine adsorption measurements. The specific surface area (935–755 m{sup 2}g{sup −1}), pore volume (1.03–0.56 cm{sup 3}g{sup −1}) and especially the concentration and distribution of open type mesopores (0–68% to the total pores) of the synthesized Al-SBA-15 can be controlled by a simple adjustment of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution. Moreover, increasing the aging temperature higher than 363 K can remarkably decrease the formation of plug structures to obtain “open” form mesopores. The observation by TEM of alternate defined gray and white areas inside the mesopores gives the strong evidence of isolated microporous aluminosilicate plugs inside the channels. In addition, a moderate hydrothermal post-treatment can finely modify the mesostructures through the partial or complete dissolution of the aluminosilicate plugs. - Graphical abstract: The plugs-containing structures can be interpreted as the distribution of individual isolated plugs along the mesoporous channel. - Highlights: • Al-SBA-15 with controllable

  12. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  13. Genesis and preservation of a uranium-rich paleozoic epithermal system with a surface expression (Northern Flinders Ranges, South Australia): radiogenic heat driving regional hydrothermal circulation over geological timescales.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Joël; Wülser, Pierre-Alain; Foden, John

    2011-01-01

    The surface expressions of hydrothermal systems are prime targets for astrobiological exploration, and fossil systems on Earth provide an analogue to guide this endeavor. The Paleozoic Mt. Gee-Mt. Painter system (MGPS) in the Northern Flinders Ranges of South Australia is exceptionally well preserved and displays both a subsurface quartz sinter (boiling horizon) and remnants of aerial sinter pools that lie in near-original position. The energy source for the MGPS is not related to volcanism but to radiogenic heat produced by U-Th-K-rich host rocks. This radiogenic heat source drove hydrothermal circulation over a long period of time (hundreds of millions of years, from Permian to present), with peaks in hydrothermal activity during periods of uplift and high water supply. This process is reflected by ongoing hot spring activity along a nearby fault. The exceptional preservation of the MGPS resulted from the lack of proximal volcanism, coupled with tectonics driven by an oscillating far-field stress that resulted in episodic basement uplift. Hydrothermal activity caused the remobilization of U and rare earth elements (REE) in host rocks into (sub)economic concentrations. Radiogenic-heat-driven systems are attractive analogues for environments that can sustain life over geological times; the MGPS preserves evidence of episodic fluid flow for the past ∼300 million years. During periods of reduced hydrothermal activity (e.g., limited water supply, quiet tectonics), radiolytic H(2) production has the potential to support an ecosystem indefinitely. Remote exploration for deposits similar to those at the MGPS systems can be achieved by combining hyperspectral and gamma-ray spectroscopy. PMID:21774682

  14. Template-directed hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite as a drug delivery system for the poorly water-soluble drug carvedilol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Tianyi; Wang, Jing; Zheng, Li; Jiang, Tongying; Cheng, Gang; Wang, Siling

    2011-09-01

    In order to improve the dissolution rate and increase the bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble drug, intended to be administered orally, the biocompatible and bioactive mesoporous hydroxyapatite (HA) was successfully synthesized. In the present study, mesoporous HA nanoparticles were produced using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as templates by the hydrothermal method. The obtained mesoporous HA was employed as a drug delivery carrier to investigate the drug storage/release properties using carvedilol (CAR) as a model drug. Characterizations of the raw CAR powder, mesoporous HA and CAR-loaded HA were carried out by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and UV-VIS spectrophotometry. The results demonstrated that CAR was successfully incorporated into the mesoporous HA host. In vitro drug release studies showed that mesoporous HA had a high drug load efficiency and provided immediate release of CAR compared with micronized raw drug in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) and intestinal fluid (pH 6.8). Consequently, mesoporous HA is a good candidate as a drug carrier for the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  15. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Bock; Ross, D.S.

    1990-08-14

    We are examining the effects on composition and behavior of Argonne-supplied Wyodak coal under both thermal (no added water/N{sub 2}) and hydrothermal (liquid water/N{sub 2}) conditions at 350{degree}C for periods of 30 min and 5 hr, with emphasis during this period on the longer treatment. Field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) of the untreated, thermally treated, and hydrothermally treated coals is conducted at conditions where the samples are heated from ambient to 500{degree}C at 2.5{degree}/min. In the 5 hr work the volatilities of the coals are 24%, 16%, and 25% respectively. Solvent swelling studies with the recovered coals do not demonstrate the expected lower degree of crosslinking in the hydrothermal case. Both the thermal and hydrothermal treatments yield products with a decreased swelling ratio, but the ratio for the product from the aqueous treatment is slightly lower than that from thermal treatment. At present we cannot reconcile this result with our other data. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  17. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-97. It describes 174 contracts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  18. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Geo-Heat Center provides technical assistance on geothermal direct heat applications to developers, consultants and the public which could include: data and information on low-temperature (< 1500 C) resources, space and district heating, geothermal heat pumps, greenhouses, aquaculture, industrial processes and other technologies. This assistance could include preliminary engineering feasibility studies, review of direct-use project plans, assistance in project material and equipment selection, analysis and solutions of project operating problems, and information on resources and utilization. The following are brief descriptions of technical assistance provided during the second quarter of the program.

  19. Direct synthesis of Al-SBA-15 containing aluminosilicate species plugs in an acid-free medium and structural adjustment by hydrothermal post-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Na; Lin, Sen; Li, Xiangping; Guo, Peng; Li, Xuebing

    2013-07-01

    A series of Al-SBA-15 with controllable aluminosilicate plug structures inside straight mesopores has been hydrothermally synthesized in a one-step synthesis in an environmentally friendly acid-free medium, using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a structure-directing agent, water as solvent, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and aluminum nitrate (Al(NO)3·9H2O) as silica and aluminum sources, respectively. The effects of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution and aging temperature on the structural properties of the resulting materials were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), FT-IR spectra and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses. The nature of the Al species and the acidity of the resultant samples were studied by solid state 27Al MAS NMR and pyridine adsorption measurements. The specific surface area (935-755 m2g-1), pore volume (1.03-0.56 cm3g-1) and especially the concentration and distribution of open type mesopores (0-68% to the total pores) of the synthesized Al-SBA-15 can be controlled by a simple adjustment of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution. Moreover, increasing the aging temperature higher than 363 K can remarkably decrease the formation of plug structures to obtain “open” form mesopores. The observation by TEM of alternate defined gray and white areas inside the mesopores gives the strong evidence of isolated microporous aluminosilicate plugs inside the channels. In addition, a moderate hydrothermal post-treatment can finely modify the mesostructures through the partial or complete dissolution of the aluminosilicate plugs.

  20. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  1. COVIS Detects Interconnections Between Atmospheric, Oceanic and Geologic systems at a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Lee, R.

    2015-12-01

    COVIS (Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar) is an innovative sonar system designed to quantitatively monitor focused and diffuse flows from deep-sea hydrothermal vent clusters. From 9/2010 to 9/2015, COVIS was connected to the NEPTUNE observatory at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour Field, JdFR. COVIS monitored plumes and diffuse discharge by transmitting high-frequency (200-400 kHz), pulsed acoustic waves and recording the backscattered signals to yield time series of plume heat and volume transports, plume bending, and diffuse flow area. Temporal variations indicate the rate of hydrothermal plume mixing with the ambient seawater increases with the magnitude of ocean currents. Such current-driven entrainment links the dynamics of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume with oceanic and atmospheric processes. We estimate the direction and relative amplitude of the local bottom currents from the bending angles of the plumes. A comparison with currents from an ADCP (~80 m south of Grotto) reveals significant complexity in the mean bottom flow structure within a hydrothermal vent field. Diffuse flow area, temperature, and faunal densities vary periodically reflecting some combination of tidal pressure and current interactions. The heat transport time series suggests the heat source driving the plume remained relatively steady for 41 months. Local seismic data reveals that increased heat transport in 2000 followed seismic events in 1999 and 2000 and the steady heat flux from 10/2011 to 2/2015 coincided with quiescent seismicity. Such a correlation points to the close linkage of a seafloor hydrothermal system with geological processes. These findings demonstrate the intimate interconnections of seafloor hydrothermal systems with processes spanning the Earth's interior to the sea surface. Further, they (and the time-series acquired by COVIS) testify to the effectiveness and robustness of employing an acoustic-imaging sonar for long-term monitoring of a seafloor hydrothermal

  2. Heat transfer enhancement and vortex flow structure over a heated cylinder oscillating in the crossflow direction

    SciTech Connect

    Gau, C.; Wu, J.M.; Liang, C.Y.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments are performed to study the flow structure and heat transfer over a heated oscillating cylinder. Both flow visualization using a smoke wire and local heat transfer measurements around the cylinder were made. The excitation frequencies of the cylinder are selected at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3. These include excitations at harmonic, subharmonic, superharmonic, and non harmonic frequencies. Synchronization of vortex shedding with the cylinder excitation occurs not only at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 1 but also at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 3, which can greatly enhance the heat transfer. The simultaneous enhancement of heat transfer at the stagnation point, its downstream region, and the wake region of the flow suggests that different modes of instabilities occurring in the shear layer of the near wake are actually initiated and amplified far upstream in the stagnation point, which were suppressed in the accelerated flow region and re-amplified in the decelerated flow region. As long as the dominant mode of the instability is amplified by the excitation of cylinder, enhancement of heat transfer can be obtained. During the experiments, the Reynolds numbers vary from 1,600 to 4,800, the ratios of oscillation amplitude to diameter of the cylinder from 0.064 to 0.016.

  3. Geothermal technology transfer for direct heat applications: Final report, 1983--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes a geothermal technology transfer program, performed by Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, used to aid in the development of geothermal energy for direct heat applications. It provides a summary of 88 technical assistance projects performed in 10 states for space heating, district heating, green-houses, aquaculture, industrial processing, small scale binary electric power generation and heat pump applications. It describes an inventory compiled for over 100 direct heat projects that contains information on project site, resource and engineering data. An overview of information services is provided to users of the program which includes; advisory, referrals, literature distribution, geothermal technology library, quarterly Bulletin, training programs, presentations and tours, and reporting of activities for the USDOE Geothermal Progress Monitor.

  4. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  5. Economic assessment of geothermal direct heat technology: A review of five DOE demonstration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Hederman, William F. Jr.; Cohen, Laura A.

    1981-06-01

    In this report the cost of using low temperature geothermal energy resources for direct heating applications is compared to the costs associated with conventional heating fuels. The projects compared all involved replacing conventional fuels (e.g., natural gas and fuel oils) with geothermal energy in existing heating systems. The cost of using geothermal energy in existing systems was also compared with the cost of new coal-fired equipment.

  6. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-03-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  7. Effect of the magnetic field direction on forced convection heat transfer enhancements in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherief, Wahid; Avenas, Yvan; Ferrouillat, Sébastien; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Jossic, Laurent; Berard, Jean; Petit, Mickael

    2015-07-01

    Applying a magnetic field on a ferrofluid flow induces a large increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of two commercial ferrofluids are compared. The variations of both the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient due to the magnetic field are measured in the following conditions: square duct, laminar flow and uniform wall heat flux. The square section with two insulated walls allows for the characterization of the effect of the magnetic field direction. The experimental results show that the heat transfer is better enhanced when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. In the best case, the local heat transfer coefficient increase is about 75%. On the contrary, another experimental setup shows no enhancement of thermal conductivity when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014) - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  8. Field-structured composites for efficient, directed heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Gulley, G.

    2009-10-01

    Thermally conductive composites are needed for a variety of applications, especially as thermal interface materials. Unfortunately, the addition of even highly conductive particles to a polymer raises its conductivity only slightly and incurs a commensurate increase in the viscosity of the prepolymer resin. Meaningful increases in the thermal conductivity of the final composite require a filled resin that has the rheology of a typical paste. In this paper, we report on the use of uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial ac magnetic fields to organize thermally conductive magnetic particles into structures that conduct heat more efficiently. Experimental results are compared to an extension of the Maxwell-Eucken theory that takes into account spatial correlations between particles. Both theory and experiment show that the thermal conductivity of field-structured composites increases essentially linearly with particle loading, and that the enhancement is significantly greater than that of unstructured composites. The measured conductivity enhancements are found to be comparable to the enhancements in magnetic permeability of these composites and are far less than the enhancements in the electrical conductivity. These results indicate the value of field structuring in enhancing the performance of a thermal interface material and show that particle percolation is not a critical factor in achieving high performance.

  9. Sustainability and dynamics of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Dustin M.; Fisher, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Most seafloor hydrothermal circulation occurs far from the magmatic influence of mid-ocean ridges, driving large flows of water, heat and solutes through volcanic rock outcrops on ridge flanks. Here we create three-dimensional simulations of ridge–flank hydrothermal circulation, flowing between and through seamounts, to determine what controls hydrogeological sustainability, flow rate and preferred flow direction in these systems. We find that sustaining flow between outcrops that penetrate less-permeable sediment depends on a contrast in transmittance (the product of outcrop permeability and the area of outcrop exposure) between recharging and discharging sites, with discharge favoured through less-transmissive outcrops. Many simulations include local discharge through outcrops at the recharge end of an outcrop-to-outcrop system. Both of these characteristics are observed in the field. In addition, smaller discharging outcrops sustain higher flow rates than larger outcrops, which may help to explain how so much lithospheric heat is extracted globally by this process. PMID:26113260

  10. Sustainability and dynamics of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Dustin M; Fisher, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Most seafloor hydrothermal circulation occurs far from the magmatic influence of mid-ocean ridges, driving large flows of water, heat and solutes through volcanic rock outcrops on ridge flanks. Here we create three-dimensional simulations of ridge-flank hydrothermal circulation, flowing between and through seamounts, to determine what controls hydrogeological sustainability, flow rate and preferred flow direction in these systems. We find that sustaining flow between outcrops that penetrate less-permeable sediment depends on a contrast in transmittance (the product of outcrop permeability and the area of outcrop exposure) between recharging and discharging sites, with discharge favoured through less-transmissive outcrops. Many simulations include local discharge through outcrops at the recharge end of an outcrop-to-outcrop system. Both of these characteristics are observed in the field. In addition, smaller discharging outcrops sustain higher flow rates than larger outcrops, which may help to explain how so much lithospheric heat is extracted globally by this process. PMID:26113260

  11. Sustainability and dynamics of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Dustin M.; Fisher, Andrew T.

    2015-06-01

    Most seafloor hydrothermal circulation occurs far from the magmatic influence of mid-ocean ridges, driving large flows of water, heat and solutes through volcanic rock outcrops on ridge flanks. Here we create three-dimensional simulations of ridge-flank hydrothermal circulation, flowing between and through seamounts, to determine what controls hydrogeological sustainability, flow rate and preferred flow direction in these systems. We find that sustaining flow between outcrops that penetrate less-permeable sediment depends on a contrast in transmittance (the product of outcrop permeability and the area of outcrop exposure) between recharging and discharging sites, with discharge favoured through less-transmissive outcrops. Many simulations include local discharge through outcrops at the recharge end of an outcrop-to-outcrop system. Both of these characteristics are observed in the field. In addition, smaller discharging outcrops sustain higher flow rates than larger outcrops, which may help to explain how so much lithospheric heat is extracted globally by this process.

  12. A comparison of microwave versus direct solar heating for lunar brick production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yankee, S. J.; Strenski, D. G.; Pletka, B. J.; Patil, D. S.; Mutsuddy, B. C.

    1990-01-01

    Two processing techniques considered suitable for producing bricks from lunar regolith are examined: direct solar heating and microwave heating. An analysis was performed to compare the two processes in terms of the amount of power and time required to fabricate bricks of various sizes. Microwave heating was shown to be significantly faster than solar heating for rapid production of realistic-size bricks. However, the relative simplicity of the solar collector(s) used for the solar furnace compared to the equipment necessary for microwave generation may present an economic tradeoff.

  13. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly report, January - March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the second quarter of FY-97. It describes 176 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on well pumping in commercial groundwater heat pump systems. A memorandum of understanding between the GHC and EIA is described. Work accomplishments on the Guidebook are discussed. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  14. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-97 (July--September 1997). It describes 213 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps, geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, acquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, and industrial applications. Research activities include the completion of a Comprehensive Greenhouse Developer Package. Work accomplished on the revision of the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook are discussed. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 3), dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses, and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  15. The computer model Hydrotherm, a three-dimensional finite-difference model to simulate ground-water flow and heat transport in the temperature range of 0 to 1,200 degrees C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative modeling of the deep parts of magmatic- hydrothermal systems has been limited by the lack of publicly available, documented computer models for multiphase, high-temperature flow. This report documents HYDROTHERM, a finite-difference model for three-dimensional, multiphase flow of pure water and heat over a temperature range of 0 to 1,200 degrees Celsius and a pressure range of 0.5 *0 10,000 bars.HYDROTHEP*M is an extension of multiphase geothermal models developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in the 1970's. It solves numerical approximations to mass- and energy-balance equations that are posed in terms of pressure and enthalpy. Major assumptions are that the rock matrix can be treated as a porous medium; that water and rock are in thermal equilibrium; and that capillary pressure is negligible.

  16. Comparison of Direct Solar Energy to Resistance Heating for Carbothermal Reduction of Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Gustafson, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of two methods of delivering thermal energy to regolith for the carbo thermal reduction process has been performed. The comparison concludes that electrical resistance heating is superior to direct solar energy via solar concentrators for the following reasons: (1) the resistance heating method can process approximately 12 times as much regolith using the same amount of thermal energy as the direct solar energy method because of superior thermal insulation; (2) the resistance heating method is more adaptable to nearer-term robotic exploration precursor missions because it does not require a solar concentrator system; (3) crucible-based methods are more easily adapted to separation of iron metal and glass by-products than direct solar energy because the melt can be poured directly after processing instead of being remelted; and (4) even with projected improvements in the mass of solar concentrators, projected photovoltaic system masses are expected to be even lower.

  17. The effect of direct heating and cooling of heat regulation centers on body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbour, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were done on 28 rabbits in which puncture instruments were left in the brain for 1-2 days until the calori-puncture hyperthermia had passed and the body temperature was again normal. The instrument remaining in the brain was then used as a galvanic electrode and a second fever was produced, this time due to the electrical stimulus. It was concluded that heat is a centrally acting antipyretic and that cold is a centrally acting stimulus which produces hyperpyrexia cold-induced fever.

  18. Stability analysis of direct contact heat exchangers subject to system perturbations. Final report, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes a project summary, copies of two papers resulting from the work and the Ph.D. Dissertation of Dr. Mehdi Golafshani entitled, ''Stability of a Direct Contact Heat Exchanger''. Specifically, the work deals with the operational stability of a spray column type heat exchanger subject to disturbances typical of those which can occur for geothermal applications. A computer program was developed to solve the one-dimensional transient two-phase flow problem and it was applied to the design of a spray column. The operation and design of the East Mesa 500kW/sub e/ direct contactor was assessed. It is shown that the heat transfer is governed by the internal resistance of the dispersed phase. In fact, the performance is well-represented by diffusion of heat within the drops. 5 refs.

  19. The Lost City hydrothermal system: Constraints imposed by vent fluid chemistry and reaction path models on subseafloor heat and mass transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Pester, Nicholas J.; Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Ding, Kang

    2015-08-01

    Since the first reported discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal system in 2001, it was recognized that seawater alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a key role in the composition of the coexisting vent fluids. The unusually high pH and high concentrations of H2 and CH4 provide compelling evidence for this. Here we report the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids sampled from two vent structures (Beehive: ∼90-116 °C, and M6: ∼75 °C) at Lost City in 2008 during cruise KNOX18RR using ROV Jason 2 and R/V Revelle assets. The vent fluid chemistry at both sites reveals considerable overlap in concentrations of dissolved gases (H2, CH4), trace elements (Cs, Rb, Li, B and Sr), and major elements (SO4, Ca, K, Na, Cl), including a surprising decrease in dissolved Cl, suggesting a common source fluid is feeding both sites. The absence of Mg and relatively high concentrations of Ca and sulfate suggest solubility control by serpentine-diopside-anhydrite, while trace alkali concentrations, especially Rb and Cs, are high, assuming a depleted mantle protolith. In both cases, but especially for Beehive vent fluid, the silica concentrations are well in excess of those expected for peridotite alteration and the coexistence of serpentine-brucite at all reasonable temperatures. However, both the measured pH and silica values are in better agreement with serpentine-diopside-tremolite-equilibria. Geochemical modeling demonstrates that reaction of plagioclase with serpentinized peridotite can shift the chemical system away from brucite and into the tremolite stability field. This is consistent with the complex intermingling of peridotite and gabbroic bodies commonly observed within the Atlantis Massif. We speculate the existence of such plagioclase bearing peridotite may also account for the highly enriched trace alkali (Cs, Rb) concentrations in the Lost City vent fluids. Additionally, reactive transport modeling taking explicit account of temperature dependent rates of mineral

  20. Development of Rapid Pipe Moulding Process for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics by Direct Resistance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuto; Harada, Ryuki; Uemura, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutao; Kuwahara, Hideyuki

    To deal with environmental issues, the gasoline mileage of passenger cars can be improved by reduction of the car weight. The use of car components made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) is increasing because of its superior mechanical properties and relatively low density. Many vehicle structural parts are pipe-shaped, such as suspension arms, torsion beams, door guard bars and impact beams. A reduction of the car weight is expected by using CFRP for these parts. Especially, when considering the recyclability and ease of production, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics are a prime candidate. On the other hand, the moulding process of CFRTP pipes for mass production has not been well established yet. For this pipe moulding process an induction heating method has been investigated already, however, this method requires a complicated coil system. To reduce the production cost, another system without such complicated equipment is to be developed. In this study, the pipe moulding process of CFRTP using direct resistance heating was developed. This heating method heats up the mould by Joule heating using skin effect of high-frequency current. The direct resistance heating method is desirable from a cost perspective, because this method can heat the mould directly without using any coils. Formerly developed Non-woven Stitched Multi-axial Cloth (NSMC) was used as semi-product material. NSMC is very suitable for the lamination process due to the fact that non-crimp stitched carbon fiber of [0°/+45°/90°/-45°] and polyamide 6 non-woven fabric are stitched to one sheet, resulting in a short production cycle time. The use of the pipe moulding process with the direct resistance heating method in combination with the NSMC, has resulted in the successful moulding of a CFRTP pipe of 300 mm in length, 40 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness.

  1. Development of a Direct Contact Heat Exchanger, Phase 1 Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1978-01-01

    Electric power generation from geothermal brine requires, first, bringing the hot brine to the surface and then converting the heat to electric power. Binary conversion schemes were proposed, with the heat transfer between the brine and the working organic fluid taking place in a conventional tube and shell heat exchanger. If the brine is heavily laden with dissolved solids, however, solids buildup on the heat exchanger surfaces leads to a considerable degree of fouling and an accompanying drop in performance is experienced. A possible solution to this problem is the use of a direct contact exchanger with the secondary fluid power cycle. The proposed concept involves the formation of fluid sheets and bells as heat angles. Results of a study concerning the fluid mechanics of such surfaces are given.

  2. Heat waves and morbidity: current knowledge and further direction-a comprehensive literature review.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Gu, Shaohua; Bi, Peng; Yang, Jun; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-05-01

    In the past few decades, several devastating heat wave events have significantly challenged public health. As these events are projected to increase in both severity and frequency in the future, it is important to assess the relationship between heat waves and the health indicators that can be used in the early warning systems to guide the public health response. Yet there is a knowledge gap in the impact of heat waves on morbidity. In this study, a comprehensive review was conducted to assess the relationship between heat waves and different morbidity indicators, and to identify the vulnerable populations. The PubMed and ScienceDirect database were used to retrieve published literature in English from 1985 to 2014 on the relationship between heat waves and morbidity, and the following MeSH terms and keywords were used: heat wave, heat wave, morbidity, hospital admission, hospitalization, emergency call, emergency medical services, and outpatient visit. Thirty-three studies were included in the final analysis. Most studies found a short-term negative health impact of heat waves on morbidity. The elderly, children, and males were more vulnerable during heat waves, and the medical care demand increased for those with existing chronic diseases. Some social factors, such as lower socioeconomic status, can contribute to heat-susceptibility. In terms of study methods and heat wave definitions, there remain inconsistencies and uncertainties. Relevant policies and guidelines need to be developed to protect vulnerable populations. Morbidity indicators should be adopted in heat wave early warning systems in order to guide the effective implementation of public health actions. PMID:25993103

  3. Heat Waves and Morbidity: Current Knowledge and Further Direction-A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengmeng; Gu, Shaohua; Bi, Peng; Yang, Jun; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    In the past few decades, several devastating heat wave events have significantly challenged public health. As these events are projected to increase in both severity and frequency in the future, it is important to assess the relationship between heat waves and the health indicators that can be used in the early warning systems to guide the public health response. Yet there is a knowledge gap in the impact of heat waves on morbidity. In this study, a comprehensive review was conducted to assess the relationship between heat waves and different morbidity indicators, and to identify the vulnerable populations. The PubMed and ScienceDirect database were used to retrieve published literature in English from 1985 to 2014 on the relationship between heat waves and morbidity, and the following MeSH terms and keywords were used: heat wave, heat wave, morbidity, hospital admission, hospitalization, emergency call, emergency medical services, and outpatient visit. Thirty-three studies were included in the final analysis. Most studies found a short-term negative health impact of heat waves on morbidity. The elderly, children, and males were more vulnerable during heat waves, and the medical care demand increased for those with existing chronic diseases. Some social factors, such as lower socioeconomic status, can contribute to heat-susceptibility. In terms of study methods and heat wave definitions, there remain inconsistencies and uncertainties. Relevant policies and guidelines need to be developed to protect vulnerable populations. Morbidity indicators should be adopted in heat wave early warning systems in order to guide the effective implementation of public health actions. PMID:25993103

  4. Chemical and biochemical transformations in hydrothermal plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Marvin D.; Feely, Richard A.; Trefry, John H.

    Hydrothermal plumes integrate the heat and mass flux originating at seafloor hydrothermal vents thereby providing both a means of detecting hydrothermal activity and estimating hydrothermal fluxes. Many chemical species are introduced into the deep sea via hydrothermal plumes (Figure 1) in concentrations many orders of magnitude higher than that existing in background seawater (e.g. H2, CH4 3He, Mn, Fe) while others are scavenged from seawater by hydrothermal particles (e.g. PO4-3, V, As, rare earth elements, Th). Dilution by entrainment of background seawater in the buoyant portion of the plume is very rapid (see chapters by Lupton and McDuff, this volume) such that the hydrothermal component in the near-field portion of the neutrally buoyant plume represents only about 0.01% of the mixture. Nevertheless, chemical tracers such as 3He, CH4, and Mn are widely utilized in addition to temperature, salinity, and light transmission anomalies to detect hydrothermal venting and to draw inferences about the nature of the underlying geochemistry of the hydrothermal system. Many other chemical tracers can be utilized during plume studies to provide additional information about the nature of the venting. These include particles, H2, Al, and radioisotopes, among others.

  5. Performance of direct contact latent heat storage units with two hydrated salts

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, M.M. ); Khalaf, A.N. )

    1994-02-01

    The performance of a direct contact latent heat storage unit, that consists of two columns with different hydrated salts, has been investigated. Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3]-10H[sub 2]O (sodium carbonate decahydrate) and Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 3][center dot]5H[sub 2]O (sodium thiosulphate pentahydrate) were contained in separate columns both having an inside diameter and total length of 0.184 m and 1.0 m, respectively. During heat charge, the hot keresone as a heat transfer fluid was bubbled through the sodium thiosulfate solution first. The partially cooled kerosene was then pumped to the second column containing the sodium thiosulfate solution first. The partially cooled kerosene was then pumped to the second column containing the sodium carbonate solution, discharging most of its heat content. Flow direction was reversed during heat discharge. The continuous phase temperature in the two columns, as well as kerosene inlet and outlet temperatures, were measured continuously. Results showed significant improvement in heat transfer rates by using two separate columns containing similar or different salts. The use of a combination of two different salts, having different crystallization temperatures, and contained in different columns connected in series, may provide better means of heat storage by allowing the system to operate as a phase change storage for longer periods of operation. This is particularly suitable for solar energy applications in which the collector temperature may vary significantly during the day.

  6. Fluid flow rate, temperature and heat flux at Mohns Ridge vent fields: evidence from isosampler measurements for phase separated hydrothermal circulation along the arctic ridge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A.; Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.; Taylor, P.; Flynn, M.

    2005-12-01

    An expedition to the Mohns Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland sea was carried out in July-August 2005 as part of BIODEEP, lead by University of Bergen (UoB). UoB had previously detected water column methane along this very slow spreading ridge. Previous ROV observations along the ridge (71 deg 18'N, 5 deg 47'W, 605 mbsl) near Jan Mayen had uncovered a broad area of ferric hydroxide-rich bacterial/mineral assemblages, comprising large populations of gallionella bacteria. This area was revisted in 2005. Characteristic of sections of this area ("Gallionella Garden") are chimney-like structures standing ~15 cm tall, often topped by a sea lily (heliometra glacialis). The interior of the structures comprised quasi-concentric bands with vertically-oriented channels. The Oregon State University/Cardiff University Isosampler sensor determined that some of these assemblages support fluid flow through their interior. The outflow from the chimney structures was typically +0.5 deg C, against background temperatures of -0.3 deg C. Flow anomalies were also identified atop extensive bacterial mats. Gallionella Gardens is several km in extent with active, albeit extremely low temperature hydrothermal flow. A field of active high temperature smoker chimney structures was located near Gallionella Garden at 540 mbsl. This field extends ~500 m along a scarp wall, with hydrothermal mounds extending along faults running perpendicular to the scarp, each of which has multiple smoker vents and areas of diffuse flow. There was evidence for phase separation, with a negatively buoyant fluid phase exiting some vent orifices and descending along the vent wall; and evidence for gas phase condensing after leaving some vent orifices. Gas bubble emissions were not uncommon. Isosampler sensors were available that were configured for lower temperature measurements at Gallionella Garden. While capable of detecting variations in effluent at the 4 millidegree level, the temperature ceiling for the sensor

  7. Research and Development of Information on Geothermal Direct Heat Application Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Hederman, William F., Jr.; Cohen, Laura A.

    1981-10-01

    This is the first annual report of ICF's geothermal R&D project for the Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. The overall objective of this project is to compile, analyze, and report on data from geothermal direct heat application projects. Ultimately, this research should convey the information developed through DOE's and Program Opportunity Notice (PON) activities as well as through other pioneering geothermal direct heat application projects to audiences which can use the early results in new, independent initiatives. A key audience is potential geothermal investors.

  8. Introduction to Atlantic Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.; Thompson, Geoffrey

    1993-06-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal research has advanced rapidly from local to global scope through a sequence of discoveries. Hydrothermal research at seafloor spreading centers began in the mid-1960s with the discovery of hot metalliferous brines and sediments ponded in deeps along the slow spreading (half rate 1 cm yr-1) axis of the Red Sea [Chamock, 1964; Miller, 1964; Swallow and Crease, 1965; Miller et al., 1966; Hunt et al., 1967; Bischoff, 1969]. At the same time a hydrothermal metalliferous component was identified in sediments of the East Pacific Rise [Skomyakova, 1965; Arrhenins and Bonatti, 1965; Boström and Peterson, 1966]. Geophysicists recognized that heat flow measurements at spreading centers could only be explained by convective cooling of the crust with circulating seawater [Elder, 1967; Lister, 1972].

  9. Description and operation of Haakon School geothermal-heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, F.W.; Kirol, L.D.; Sanders, R.D.; McLatchy, M.J.

    1983-10-01

    To encourage the development of hydrothermal energy, twenty-three demonstration projects were funded. The Haakon School project is one of twelve such projects. The geothermal direct-use heating system at the Haakon School complex in Philip, South Dakota is described and information gained during approximately three heating seasons of operation is presented.

  10. A Comparison of Direct Heating During Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation in Ex Vivo Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Andreano, Anita; Brace, Christopher L.

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of temperature elevations when using 480 kHz RF and 2.45 GHz microwave energy in ex vivo liver models. A total of 60 heating cycles (20 s at 90 W) were performed in normal, RF-ablated, and microwave-ablated liver tissues (n = 10 RF and n = 10 microwave in each tissue type). Heating cycles were performed using a 480-kHz generator and 3-cm cooled-tip electrode (RF) or a 2.45-GHz generator and 14-gauge monopole (microwave) and were designed to isolate direct heating from each energy type. Tissue temperatures were measured by using fiberoptic thermosensors 5, 10, and 15 mm radially from the ablation applicator at the depth of maximal heating. Power delivered, sensor location, heating rates, and maximal temperatures were compared using mixed effects regression models. No significant differences were noted in mean power delivered or thermosensor locations between RF and microwave heating groups (P > 0.05). Microwaves produced significantly more rapid heating than RF at 5, 10, and 15 mm in normal tissue (3.0 vs. 0.73, 0.85 vs. 0.21, and 0.17 vs. 0.09 Degree-Sign C/s; P < 0.05); and at 5 and 10 mm in ablated tissues (2.3 {+-} 1.4 vs. 0.7 {+-} 0.3, 0.5 {+-} 0.3 vs. 0.2 {+-} 0 Degree-Sign C/s, P < 0.05). The radial depth of heating was {approx}5 mm greater for microwaves than RF. Direct heating obtained with 2.45-GHz microwave energy using a single needle-like applicator is faster and covers a larger volume of tissue than 480-kHz RF energy.

  11. Heat exchange model in absorption chamber of water-direct-absorption-typed laser energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Wei, Ji; Qun Sun, Li; Zhang, Kai; Hu, XiaoYang; Zhou, Shan

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between laser and water flow is very complicated in the absorption chamber of a high energy laser (HEL) energy meter which directly uses water as an absorbing medium. Therefore, the heat exchange model cannot be studied through traditional methods, but it is the most important factor to improve heat exchange efficiency in the absorption chamber. After the exchanges of heat and mass were deeply analyzed, experimental study and numerical fitting were brought out. The original testing data of laser power and water flow temperature at one moment were utilized to calculate those at the next moment, and then the calculated temperature curve was compared with the measured one. If the two curves matched well, the corresponding coefficient was obtained. Meanwhile, numerous experiments were performed to study the effects of laser power, duration, focal spot scale, and water flow rate on heat exchange coefficient. In addition, the relationship between water phase change and heat exchange was analyzed. The heat exchange coefficient was increased by optimizing the construction of the absorption chamber or increasing water flow rate. The results provide the reference for design of water-direct-absorption-typed HEL energy meters, as well as for analysis of the interaction between other similar lasers and water flow.

  12. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-98 (October--December 1997). It describes 216 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications of lineshaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, a comprehensive aquaculture developer package and revisions to the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 4) which was devoted entirely to geothermal activities in South Dakota, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  13. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of particulate flows with heat transfer in a rotating cylindrical cavity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robin; Nikrityuk, Petr A

    2011-06-28

    The purpose of this work was the direct numerical simulation of heat and fluid flow by granular mixing in a horizontal rotating kiln. To model particle behaviour and the heat and fluid flow in the drum, we solve the mass conservation, momentum and energy conservation equations directly on a fixed Eulerian grid for the whole domain including particles. At the same time the particle dynamics and their collisions are solved on a Lagrangian grid for each particle. To calculate the heat transfer inside the particles we use two models: the first is the direct solution of the energy conservation equation in the Lagrangian and Eulerian space, and the second is our so-called linear model that assumes homogeneous distribution of the temperature inside each particle. Numerical simulations showed that, if the thermal diffusivity of the gas phase significantly exceeds the same parameter of the particles, the linear model overpredicts the heating rate of the particles. The influence of the particle size and the angular velocity of the drum on the heating rates of particles is studied and discussed. PMID:21576173

  15. U.S. Heat Demand by Sector for Potential Application of Direct Use Geothermal

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-23

    This dataset includes heat demand for potential application of direct use geothermal broken down into 4 sectors: agricultural, commercial, manufacturing and residential. The data for each sector are organized by county, were disaggregated specifically to assess the market demand for geothermal direct use, and were derived using methodologies customized for each sector based on the availability of data and other sector-specific factors. This dataset also includes a paper containing a full explanation of the methodologies used.

  16. A method for quantitatively estimating diffuse and discrete hydrothermal discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Massoth, Gary J.; Walker, Sharon L.; Embley, Robert W.

    1993-07-01

    Submarine hydrothermal fluids discharge as undiluted, high-temperature jets and as diffuse, highly diluted, low-temperature percolation. Estimates of the relative contribution of each discharge type, which are important for the accurate determination of local and global hydrothermal budgets, are difficult to obtain directly. In this paper we describe a new method of using measurements of hydrothermal tracers such as Fe/Mn, Fe/heat, and Mn/heat in high-temperature fluids, low-temperature fluids, and the neutrally buoyant plume to deduce the relative contribution of each discharge type. We sampled vent fluids from the north Cleft vent field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 1988, 1989 and 1991, and plume samples every year from 1986 to 1991. The tracers were, on average, 3 to 90 times greater in high-temperature than in low-temperature fluids, with plume values intermediate. A mixing model calculates that high-temperature fluids contribute only ˜ 3% of the fluid mass flux but > 90% of the hydrothermal Fe and > 60% of the hydrothermal Mn to the overlying plume. Three years of extensive camera-CTD sled tows through the vent field show that diffuse venting is restricted to a narrow fissure zone extending for 18 km along the axial strike. Linear plume theory applied to the temperature plumes detected when the sled crossed this zone yields a maximum likelihood estimate for the diffuse heat flux of8.9 × 10 4 W/m, for a total flux of 534 MW, considering that diffuse venting is active along only one-third of the fissure system. For mean low- and high-temperature discharge of 25°C and 319°C, respectively, the discrete heat flux must be 266 MW to satisfy the mass flux partitioning. If the north Cleft vent field is globally representative, the assumption that high-temperature discharge dominates the mass flux in axial vent fields leads to an overestimation of the flux of many non-conservative hydrothermal species by about an order of magnitude.

  17. A direct heating model to overcome the edge effect in microplates.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chun Yat; Zahidi, Alifa Afiah Ahmad; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2015-01-01

    Array-based tests in a microplate format are complicated by the regional variation in results of the outer against the inner wells of the plate. Analysis of the evaporation mechanics of sessile drops showed that evaporation rate increase with temperature was due to changes in the heat of vaporization, density and diffusion coefficient. In simulations of direct bottom heating of standard microplates, considerable heat transfer via conduction from the side walls was found to be responsible for lower temperatures in the liquid in wells close to the edge. Applying a two temperature heating mode, 304 K at the side compared to 310 K at the bottom, allowed for a more uniform temperature distribution. Transparency microplates were found to inherently possess immunity to the edge effect problem due to the presence of air between the liquid and solid wall. PMID:25289516

  18. 76 FR 43941 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... number of product offerings. 75 FR 20112, 20231 (April 16, 2010). In order to comply with the energy... found at: http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail ;dct=FR+PR+N+O+SR+PS;rpp=250;so=DESC;sb=postedDate... vented gas hearth direct heating equipment. 75 FR 20112. \\1\\ For editorial reasons, upon codification...

  19. Direct Observation of a Majorana Quasiparticle Heat Capacity in 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkov, Y. M.

    2014-04-01

    The Majorana fermion, which acts as its own antiparticle, was suggested by Majorana in 1937 (Nuovo Cimento 14:171). While no stable particle with Majorana properties has yet been observed, Majorana quasiparticles (QP) may exist at the boundaries of topological insulators. Here we report the preliminary results of direct observation of Majorana QPs by a precise measurements of superfluid 3He heat capacity. The bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity falls exponentially with cooling at the temperatures significantly below the energy gap. Owing to the zero energy gap mode the Majorana heat capacity falls in a power law. The Majorana heat capacity can be larger than bulk one at some temperature, which depends on surface to volume ratio of the experimental cell. Some times ago we developed the Dark matter particles detector (DMD) on a basis of superfluid 3He which is working at the frontier of extremely low temperatures (Winkelmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 559:384-386, 2006). Here we report the observation of zero gap mode of Majorana, follows from the new analyses of DMD heat capacity, published early. We have found a 10 % deviation from the bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity at the temperature of 135 μK. This deviation corresponds well to the theoretical value for Majorana heat capacity at such low temperature. (Note, there were no fitting parameters).

  20. Direct heating of a laser-imploded core by ultraintense laser-driven ions.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Y; Mori, Y; Komeda, O; Ishii, K; Hanayama, R; Fujita, K; Okihara, S; Sekine, T; Satoh, N; Kurita, T; Takagi, M; Watari, T; Kawashima, T; Kan, H; Nishimura, Y; Sunahara, A; Sentoku, Y; Nakamura, N; Kondo, T; Fujine, M; Azuma, H; Motohiro, T; Hioki, T; Kakeno, M; Miura, E; Arikawa, Y; Nagai, T; Abe, Y; Ozaki, S; Noda, A

    2015-05-15

    A novel direct core heating fusion process is introduced, in which a preimploded core is predominantly heated by energetic ions driven by LFEX, an extremely energetic ultrashort pulse laser. Consequently, we have observed the D(d,n)^{3}He-reacted neutrons (DD beam-fusion neutrons) with the yield of 5×10^{8} n/4π sr. Examination of the beam-fusion neutrons verified that the ions directly collide with the core plasma. While the hot electrons heat the whole core volume, the energetic ions deposit their energies locally in the core, forming hot spots for fuel ignition. As evidenced in the spectrum, the process simultaneously excited thermal neutrons with the yield of 6×10^{7} n/4π sr, raising the local core temperature from 0.8 to 1.8 keV. A one-dimensional hydrocode STAR 1D explains the shell implosion dynamics including the beam fusion and thermal fusion initiated by fast deuterons and carbon ions. A two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell code predicts the core heating due to resistive processes driven by hot electrons, and also the generation of fast ions, which could be an additional heating source when they reach the core. Since the core density is limited to 2 g/cm^{3} in the current experiment, neither hot electrons nor fast ions can efficiently deposit their energy and the neutron yield remains low. In future work, we will achieve the higher core density (>10 g/cm^{3}); then hot electrons could contribute more to the core heating via drag heating. Together with hot electrons, the ion contribution to fast ignition is indispensable for realizing high-gain fusion. By virtue of its core heating and ignition, the proposed scheme can potentially achieve high gain fusion. PMID:26024175

  1. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Federal Assistance Program, Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    The report summarizes activities of the Geo-Heat Center (GHC) at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 1995. It describes contacts with parties during this period related to assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, resources and equipment. Research is also being conducted on geothermal energy cost evaluation, low-temperature geothermal resource assessment, use of silica waste from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field as construction materials and geothermal heat pumps. Outreach activities include the publication of a quarterly Bulletin on direct heat applications and dissemination of information on low-temperature geothermal resources and utilization.

  2. Probing Hydrothermal Organic Reaction Mechanisms with Hydrothermal Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Gould, I.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    In most hydrothermal organic experiments the emphasis is on reaction product distributions and kinetic measurements, with mechanistic information or the direct evidence of proposed reaction intermediates rare or lacking. We believe that greater mechanistic insight will yield greater predictive power. Previously, we studied the reactions of a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK) in aqueous media at 300°C and 700 bars for durations up to several days [1], and found that many of the reaction products arise from coupling of benzyl and related radicals generated through homolytic bond cleavage of DBK. In the present work, we find that in situ photochemical generation of the radicals can provide independent evidence for radical intermediates in the hydrothermal reaction of DBK, yielding valuable insights into the thermal reactions. Hydrothermal photochemical experiments of DBK were conducted in water in sealed fused silica glass tubes at 300°C and 86 bars under UV irradiation for minutes. The short timescale of the experiments allows the primary radical coupling products of DBK to be generated and identified, and their follow-up reactions to be monitored directly. The primary hydrothermal photolysis products include toluene, bibenzyl, a three-benzene-ring product (with isomers), and two four-benzene-ring products (with isomers), which represent a much simpler version of the products obtained through thermal reactions under similar conversions. Most of the observed photolysis products were identical to the ones in the thermal reactions, and those not observed in thermal reactions were found to be the short-lived precursors of the thermal products. As an example, the transformation of one four-ring product to the other was attained and monitored by experiments in which hydrothermal photolysis of DBK was followed by thermolysis at 300°C for a further few hours. The transformation steps included dehydration and isomerization, which were known to be thermodynamically

  3. Hydrothermal Fluxes at the Turtle Pits Vent Site, southern MAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Walter, M.; Mertens, C.; Sültenfuß, J.; Rhein, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Turtle Pits vent fields are located in a north-south orientated rift valley at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) near 5oS. The site consists of three known hydrothermal fields: Turtle Pits, Comfortless Cove, and Red Lion. Data collected during a Meteor cruise in May 2006 and a L' Atalante cruise in January 2008 are used to calculate the total emission of volume, heat, and helium of the site. The data sets consist of vertical profiles and towed transsects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity, as well as direct velocity measurements with a lowered acoustic Doppler current profiler (LADCP) and water samples for Helium isotope analysis. Vent fluid samples for noble gas analysis where taken with an ROV. The particle plume is confined to the rift valley since the depth of the valley exceeds the rise height of the plume. Therefore the fluxes of heat and volume can be estimated from the helium fluxes at the vent sites in comparison with the horizontal helium transport in the valley. The comparison of the 3He concentration measured south of the hydrothermal vents with the 3He signal north of the hydrothermal vents suggests a rather strong northward flow. This is confirmed by the tide corrected velocities observed with the LADCP during the Meteor cruise. The northward volume transport has been calculated using the local bathymetry and tide corrected velocities from the Meteor cruise. In combination with the 3He concentrations and an average 3He end member concentration a flux of 900 l/s is estimated, which corresponds to a heat flux of 450 MW. The rise height of the particle plume estimated from the turbidity data combined with the known background stratification yields an estimate of the total flux of the hydrothermal vents which is one order of magnitude lower.

  4. What Defines a Separate Hydrothermal System

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, J.V.; Bogie, I.; Bignall, G.

    1995-01-01

    Separate hydrothermal systems can be defined in a variety of ways. Criteria which have been applied include separation of heat source, upflow, economic resource and geophysical anomaly. Alternatively, connections have been defined by the effects of withdrawal of economically useful fluid and subsidence, effects of reinjection, changes in thermal features, or by a hydrological connection of groundwaters. It is proposed here that: ''A separate hydrothermal system is one that is fed by a separate convective upflow of fluid, at a depth above the brittle-ductile transition for the host rocks, while acknowledging that separate hydrothermal systems can be hydrologically interconnected at shallower levels''.

  5. Heat-Transfer Measurements in the Primary Cooling Phase of the Direct-Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Baserinia, Amir R.; Ng, Harry; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal modeling of the direct-chill casting process requires accurate knowledge of (1) the different boundary conditions in the primary mold and secondary direct water-spray cooling regimes and (2) their variability with respect to process parameters. In this study, heat transfer in the primary cooling zone was investigated by using temperature measurements made with subsurface thermocouples in the mold as input to an inverse heat conduction algorithm. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to investigate the primary cooling of AA3003 and AA4045 aluminum alloy ingots cast at speeds ranging between 1.58 and 2.10 mm/s. The average heat flux values were calculated for the steady-state phase of the casting process, and an effective heat-transfer coefficient for the global primary cooling process was derived that included convection at the mold surfaces and conduction through the mold wall. Effective heat-transfer coefficients were evaluated at different points along the mold height and compared with values from a previously derived computational fluid dynamics model of the direct-chill casting process that were based on predictions of the air gap thickness between the mold and ingot. The current experimental results closely matched the values previously predicted by the air gap models. The effective heat-transfer coefficient for primary cooling was also found to increase slightly with the casting speed and was higher near the mold top (up to 824 W/m2·K) where the molten aluminum first comes in contact with the mold than near the bottom (as low as 242 W/m2·K) where an air gap forms between the ingot and mold because of thermal contraction of the ingot. These results are consistent with previous studies.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in a fluid-porous domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandesris, M.; D'Hueppe, A.; Mathieu, B.; Jamet, D.; Goyeau, B.

    2013-12-01

    Turbulent heat transfer in a channel partially filled by a porous medium is investigated using a direct numerical simulation of an incompressible flow. The porous medium consists of a three-dimensional Cartesian grid of cubes, which has a relatively high permeability. The energy equation is not solved in the cubes. Three different heating configurations are studied. The simulation is performed for a bulk Reynolds number Reb = 5500 and a Prandtl number Pr = 0.1. The turbulent flow quantities are compared with the results of Breugem and Boersma ["Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow over a permeable wall using a direct and a continuum approach," Phys. Fluids 17, 025103 (2005)] to validate the numerical approach and macroscopic turbulent quantities are analyzed. Regarding the temperature fields, original results are obtained. The temperature fields show an enhanced turbulent heat transfer just above the porous region compared to the solid top wall, which can be related to the large vortical structures that develop in this region. Furthermore, these large structures induce pressure waves inside the porous domain which are responsible of large temperature fluctuations deep inside the porous region where the flow is laminar. Finally, macroscopic turbulent quantities are computed to get reference results for the development of macroscopic turbulent heat transfer models in fluid-porous domain.

  7. A RECIPROCATING SOLAR HEATED ENGINE UTILIZING DIRECT ABSORPTION BY SMALL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Patricia G.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1981-05-01

    A new type of reciprocating solar engine utilizing small particles to absorb concentrated sunlight directly within the cylinders is described. The engine operates by drawing an air particle mixture into the cylinder, compressing the mixture, opening an optical valve to allow concentrated sunlight to enter through a window in the top of the cylinder head, absorbing the solar flux with the particles, and converting the heat trapped by the air-particle mixture into mechanical energy with the downward stroke of piston. It differs from other gas driven heat engines using solar energy in three main respects. First, the radiant flux is deposited directly in the working fluid inside the cylinder; second, the heat is directed to the appropriate cylinder by controlling the solar flux by an optical system; third, the gas is heated during a significant portion of the compression stroke. The thermodynamic efficiency of the engine is calculated using an analytical model and is compared to several other engine cycles of interest.

  8. The direct simulation of high-speed mixing-layers without and with chemical heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekar, B.; Mukunda, H. S.; Carpenter, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation of high speed reacting and non-reacting flows for H2-air systems is presented. The calculations are made for a convective Mach number of 0.38 with hyperbolic tangent initial profile and finite rate chemical reactions. A higher-order numerical method is used in time accurate mode to time advance the solution to a statistical steady state. About 600 time slices of all the variables are then stored for statistical analysis. It is shown that most of the problems of high-speed combustion with air are characterized by relatively weak heat release. The present study shows that: (1) the convective speed is reduced by heat release by about 10 percent at this convective Mach number M(sub c) = 0.38; (2) the variation of the mean and rms fluctuation of temperature can be explained on the basis of temperature fluctuation between the flame temperature and the ambient; (3) the growth rate with heat release is reduced by 7 percent; and (4) the entrainment is reduced by 25 percent with heat release. These differences are small in comparison with incompressible flow dynamics, and are argued to be due to the reduced importance of heat release in comparison with the large enthalpy gradients resulting from the large-scale vortex dynamics. It is finally suggested that the problems of reduced mixing in high-speed flows are not severely complicated by heat release.

  9. Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer and phase changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juric, D.; Tryggvason, G.; Han, J.

    1997-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer, and phase changes are presented. The simulations are made possible by a recently developed finite difference/front tracking method based on the one-field formulation of the governing equations where a single set of conservation equations is written for all the phases involved. The conservation equations are solved on a fixed rectangular grid, but the phase boundaries are kept sharp by tracking them explicitly by a moving grid of lower dimension. The method is discussed and applications to boiling heat transfer and the solidification of drops colliding with a wall are shown.

  10. A consistent direct discretization scheme on Cartesian grids for convective and conjugate heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norikazu; Takeuchi, Shintaro; Kajishima, Takeo; Inagaki, Masahide; Horinouchi, Nariaki

    2016-09-01

    A new discretization scheme on Cartesian grids, namely, a "consistent direct discretization scheme", is proposed for solving incompressible flows with convective and conjugate heat transfer around a solid object. The Navier-Stokes and the pressure Poisson equations are discretized directly even in the immediate vicinity of a solid boundary with the aid of the consistency between the face-velocity and the pressure gradient. From verifications in fundamental flow problems, the present method is found to significantly improve the accuracy of the velocity and the wall shear stress. It is also confirmed that the numerical results are less sensitive to the Courant number owing to the consistency between the velocity and pressure fields. The concept of the consistent direct discretization scheme is also explored for the thermal field; the energy equations for the fluid and solid phases are discretized directly while satisfying the thermal relations that should be valid at their interface. It takes different forms depending on the thermal boundary conditions: Dirichlet (isothermal) and Neumann (adiabatic/iso-heat-flux) boundary conditions for convective heat transfer and a fluid-solid thermal interaction for conjugate heat transfer. The validity of these discretizations is assessed by comparing the simulated results with analytical solutions for the respective thermal boundary conditions, and it is confirmed that the present schemes also show high accuracy for the thermal field. A significant improvement for the conjugate heat transfer problems is that the second-order spatial accuracy and numerical stability are maintained even under severe conditions of near-practical physical properties for the fluid and solid phases.

  11. Petawatt-laser direct heating of uniformly imploded deuterated-polystyrene shell target.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Akamatsu, Shin; Sakamoto, Wataru; Tanaka, Kazuo A; Kodama, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Watari, Takeshi; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    A uniformly imploded deuterated polystyrene (CD) shell target is fast-heated by a Petawatt (PW) laser without cone guide. The best illumination timing is found to be in a narrow region around 80+/-20 picoseconds from the onset of the stagnation phase, where thermal neutrons are enhanced four to five times by the PW laser of energy less than 10% of the implosion laser. The timing agrees with the timings of enhancement of the x-ray emission from the core and reduction of the bremsstrahlung radiation from scattered hot electrons. The PW laser, focused to the critical density point, generates the energetic electrons within as narrow an angle as 30 degrees , which then heats the imploded CD shell to enhance thermal neutrons. These results first demonstrate that the PW laser directly heats the imploded core without any conelike laser guide. PMID:15697731

  12. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting mixing layer with chemical heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, P. A.; Jou, W.-H.; Metcalfe, R. W.; Riley, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the coupling between chemical heat release and fluid dynamics, direct numerical simulations of a chemically reacting mixing layer with heat release are performed. The fully compressible equations as well as an approximate set of equations that is asymptotically valid for low-Mach-number flows are treated. These latter equations have the computational advantage that high-frequency acoustic waves have been filtered out, allowing much larger time steps to be taken in the numerical solution procedure. A detailed derivation of these equations along with an outline of the numerical solution technique is given. Simulation results indicate that the rate of chemical product formed, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release.

  13. Novel metallic alloys as phase change materials for heat storage in direct steam generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Maestre, J.; Iparraguirre-Torres, I.; Velasco, Z. Amondarain; Kaltzakorta, I.; Zubieta, M. Merchan

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is one of the key electricity production renewable energy technologies with a clear distinguishing advantage: the possibility to store the heat generated during the sunny periods, turning it into a dispatchable technology. Current CSP Plants use an intermediate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF), thermal oil or inorganic salt, to transfer heat from the Solar Field (SF) either to the heat exchanger (HX) unit to produce high pressure steam that can be leaded to a turbine for electricity production, or to the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. In recent years, a novel CSP technology is attracting great interest: Direct Steam Generation (DSG). The direct use of water/steam as HTF would lead to lower investment costs for CSP Plants by the suppression of the HX unit. Moreover, water is more environmentally friendly than thermal oils or salts, not flammable and compatible with container materials (pipes, tanks). However, this technology also has some important challenges, being one of the major the need for optimized TES systems. In DSG, from the exergy point of view, optimized TES systems based on two sensible heat TES systems (for preheating of water and superheating vapour) and a latent heat TES system for the evaporation of water (around the 70% of energy) is the preferred solution. This concept has been extensively tested [1, 2, 3] using mainly NaNO3 as latent heat storage medium. Its interesting melting temperature (Tm) of 306°C, considering a driving temperature difference of 10°C, means TES charging steam conditions of 107 bar at 316°C and discharging conditions of 81bar at 296°C. The average value for the heat of fusion (ΔHf) of NaNO3 from literature data is 178 J/g [4]. The main disadvantage of inorganic salts is their very low thermal conductivity (0.5 W/m.K) requiring sophisticated heat exchanging designs. The use of high thermal conductivity eutectic metal alloys has been recently proposed [5, 6, 7] as a feasible alternative. Tms

  14. Heat transfer in an industrial directional solidification furnace with multi-heaters for silicon ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zaoyang; Liu, Lijun; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yunfeng; Xiong, Jingfeng

    2014-01-01

    We carried out transient global simulations of melting, growing and annealing processes in an industrial directional solidification furnace with a top and side heater. The power distribution between the two heaters was set to 3:7, 5:5 and 7:3 to investigate its effect on global heat transfer and silicon crystal growth. Quantitative comparisons of temperature distributions are presented. Increasing the top heating power slightly increases the melting time and changes the melting sequence. In the crystal growth process, adjusting the power distribution from 3:7 to 7:3 can lead to an 8-12 K change in axial temperature difference in the silicon domain. Both the intensity and pattern of the silicon melt flow are influenced by the change in power distribution. The melt-crystal interface is less convex to the melt with an increase in top heating power, especially at the final stage of solidification. In the annealing process, the ingot temperature decreases to approximately 1600 K to reduce the thermal stress and dislocation density. Isotherm shapes are different at this stage and may lead to different thermal stress and dislocation density distributions in the silicon ingot. The numerical results provide a basic understanding of the heat transfer characteristics due to power distribution in an industrial multi-heater directional solidification furnace.

  15. Design Options for Polar-Direct-Drive Targets: From Alpha Heating to Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-11-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) makes it possible to perform direct-drive-ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility while the facility is configured for x-ray drive. We present the first PDD ignition-relevant target designs to include the physical effects of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and nonlocal heat transport, both of which substantially affect the target drive. These effects are complementary: CBET reduces target drive, while nonlocal heat transport increases the drive (relative to flux-limited models). Previous ignition designs incorporated these processes in only an approximate way through use of an ad-hoc flux limiter applied to the classical expression for heat conduction. In the PDD configuration, a multiwavelength detuning strategy was found to be effective in mitigating the loss of coupling caused by CBET, allowing for implosion speeds comparable to those of previous designs. Target designs are found that span the region from alpha-particle heating to ignition. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

  17. Direct Actuation of Small-Scale Motions for Enhanced Heat Transfer in a Straight Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    Heat transfer enhancement by small-scale flow interactions that are induced within the core flow of a heated, high-aspect ratio straight channel are investigated experimentally. Direct actuation of small scale motions is provided by streamwise-embedded piezoelectrically-driven cantilevered reeds that span the entire channel height. Deliberate interactions between the reeds and a given core flow lead to the formation of time-periodic vorticity concentrations over a range of vibration frequencies that are advected with the core flow and induce small-scale motions near the channel's surfaces. Heat transfer measurements are obtained using novel, microfabricated heaters with integrated temperature sensors that are deposited on a silicon substrate. It is shown that the actuation disrupts the thermal boundary layers and result in a significant enhancement of the local and global heat transfer along the channel compared to the baseline (unactuated) flow. The interactions between the reed-induced motions and the channel internal surfaces and mixing within the core flow are investigated in detail using high resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) with emphasis on local and global heat transfer across the channel boundaries.

  18. Heat Flux and Wall Temperature Estimates for the NASA Langley HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuda, Vincent, Jr.; Hass, Neal E.

    2010-01-01

    An objective of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program Flight 2 is to provide validation data for high enthalpy scramjet prediction tools through a single flight test and accompanying ground tests of the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) tested in the NASA LaRC Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HDCR is a full-scale, copper heat sink structure designed to simulate the isolator entrance conditions and isolator, pilot, and combustor section of the HIFiRE flight test experiment flowpath and is fully instrumented to assess combustion performance over a range of operating conditions simulating flight from Mach 5.5 to 8.5 and for various fueling schemes. As part of the instrumentation package, temperature and heat flux sensors were provided along the flowpath surface and also imbedded in the structure. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the surface heat flux and wall temperature of the Zirconia coated copper wall can be obtained with a water-cooled heat flux gage and a sub-surface temperature measurement. An algorithm was developed which used these two measurements to reconstruct the surface conditions along the flowpath. Determinations of the surface conditions of the Zirconia coating were conducted for a variety of conditions.

  19. Direct Measurement of the Adsorbed Film Volume for Estimating Heats of Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Rash, Tyler; Stalla, David; Knight, Ernest; Seydel, Florian; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    Compressed hydrogen and methane require extremely high pressures or low temperatures in order to compete with the energy density of conventional fossil fuels. Adsorbent materials provide a means to increase the energy density of these gasses up to 6 times that of compressed gas at the same temperature and pressure. One major concern in engineering adsorbed gas systems is thermal management during charging and discharging. Adsorption is an exothermic process, releasing heat during charging and absorbing heat during discharging. To estimate the heat of adsorption, it is common to analyze excess adsorption isotherms by converting to absolute adsorption and employ the Clausius Clapeyron relation. However, this method requires an assumed volume of the adsorbed state. It is common for researchers to assume that the adsorbed film occupies the entire pore volume of the adsorbent material. However, the adsorbed film only occupies a fraction of the total pore volume. This yields heats of adsorption that are underestimated by as much as 10kJ/mol at high coverage. In this talk, we present a method to directly measure the adsorbed film volume as a function of temperature and present the resulting heats of adsorption for both methane and hydrogen.

  20. Direct initiation of gaseous detonation via radiative heating of microparticles volumetrically suspended in the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, V. P.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new conceptual approach for direct detonation initiation in the gaseous mixtures seeded with micro particles via the radiative heating from the external energy source. The basic mechanisms of energy absorption, ignition and detonation formation are analyzed numerically on the example of hydrogen-oxygen mixture. Obtained data is very promising and allows us to formulate conditions for the source power to ignite detonation in certain system geometry.

  1. A concentrated solar cavity absorber with direct heat transfer through recirculating metallic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, M. R. I.; Saha, Manabendra; Beg, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A recirculating flow solar particle cavity absorber (receiver) is modeled to investigate the flow behavior and heat transfer characteristics of a novel developing concept. It features a continuous recirculating flow of non-reacting metallic particles (black silicon carbide) with air which are used as a thermal enhancement medium. The aim of the present study is to numerically investigate the thermal behavior and flow characteristics of the proposed concept. The proposed solar particle receiver is modeled using two phase discrete particle model (DPM), RNG k-flow model and discrete ordinate (DO) radiation model. Numerical analysis is carried out considering a solar receiver with only air and the mixture of non-reacting particles and air as a heat transfer as well as heat carrying medium. The parametric investigation is conducted considering the incident solar flux on the receiver aperture and changing air flow rate and recirculation rate inside the receiver. A stand-alone feature of the recirculating flow solar particle receiver concept is that the particles are directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation monotonously through recirculating flow inside the receiver and results in efficient irradiation absorption and convective heat transfer to air that help to achieve high temperature air and consequently increase in thermal efficiency. This paper presents, results from the developed concept and highlights its flow behavior and potential to enhance the heat transfer from metallic particles to air by maximizing heat carrying capacity of the heat transfer medium. The imposed milestones for the present system will be helpful to understand the radiation absorption mechanism of the particles in a recirculating flow based receiver, the thermal transport between the particles, the air and the cavity, and the fluid dynamics of the air and particle in the cavity.

  2. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J.; James, R.A.; Kawashima, H.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, {pi}, 0, {pi}) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,{pi}/2,{pi},3{pi}/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T{sub e}(0) {approx_lt} 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  3. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J. ); James, R.A. (Lawrence Livermor

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, [pi], 0, [pi]) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,[pi]/2,[pi],3[pi]/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T[sub e](0) [approx lt] 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  4. Direct selective growth of ZnO nanowire arrays from inkjet-printed zinc acetate precursor on a heated substrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional materials has drawn tremendous interest as an alternative to the conventional photolithography-based microelectronics fabrication process development. We introduce direct selective nanowire array growth by inkjet printing of Zn acetate precursor ink patterning and subsequent hydrothermal ZnO local growth without nozzle clogging problem which frequently happens in nanoparticle inkjet printing. The proposed process can directly grow ZnO nanowires in any arbitrary patterned shape, and it is basically very fast, low cost, environmentally benign, and low temperature. Therefore, Zn acetate precursor inkjet printing-based direct nanowire local growth is expected to give extremely high flexibility in nanomaterial patterning for high-performance electronics fabrication especially at the development stage. As a proof of concept of the proposed method, ZnO nanowire network-based field effect transistors and ultraviolet photo-detectors were demonstrated by direct patterned grown ZnO nanowires as active layer. PMID:24252130

  5. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-09-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  6. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  7. Parabolic solar cooker: Cooking with heat pipe vs direct spiral copper tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Omotoyosi O.; Dobson, Robert T.

    2016-05-01

    Cooking with solar energy has been seen by many researchers as a solution to the challenges of poverty and hunger in the world. This is no exception in Africa, as solar coking is viewed as an avenue to eliminate the problem of food insecurity, insufficient energy supply for household and industrial cooking. There are several types of solar cookers that have been manufactured and highlighted in literature. The parabolic types of solar cookers are known to reach higher temperatures and therefore cook faster. These cookers are currently being developed for indoor cooking. This technology has however suffered low cooking efficiency and thus leads to underutilization of the high heat energy captured from the sun in the cooking. This has made parabolic solar cookers unable to compete with other conventional types of cookers. Several methods to maximize heat from the sun for indirect cooking has been developed, and the need to improve on them of utmost urgency. This paper investigates how to optimize the heat collected from the concentrating types of cookers by proposing and comparing two types of cooking sections: the spiral hot plate copper tube and the heat pipe plate. The system uses the concentrating solar parabolic dish technology to focus the sun on a conical cavity of copper tubes and the heat is stored inside an insulated tank which acts both as storage and cooking plate. The use of heat pipes to transfer heat between the oil storage and the cooking pot was compared to the use of a direct natural syphon principle which is achieved using copper tubes in spiral form like electric stove. An accurate theoretical analysis for the heat pipe cooker was achieved by solving the boiling and vaporization in the evaporator side and then balancing it with the condensation and liquid-vapour interaction in the condenser part while correct heat transfer, pressure and height balancing was calculated in the second experiment. The results show and compare the cooking time, boiling

  8. Direct electron heating by 60 MHz fast waves on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. . Plasma Fusion Center); de Haas, J.C.M.; James, R.A. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United St

    1991-10-01

    Efficient direct electron heating by fast waves has been observed on the DIII-D tokamak. A four strap antenna with (0,{pi},0,{pi}) phasing launched up to 1.6 MW of fast wave power with {vert bar}n{sub {parallel}}{vert bar} {approx} 11. This {vert bar}n{sub {parallel}}{vert bar} is suitable for strong electron interaction in ohmic target plasmas (T{sub e} {le} 2 keV). Ion cyclotron absorption was minimized by keeping the hydrogen fraction low ({lt}3%) in deuterium discharges and by operating at high ion cyclotron harmonics ({omega} = 4{Omega}{sub H} = 8{Omega}{sub D} at 1T). The fast wave electron heating was weak for central electron temperatures below 1 keV, but improved substantially with increasing T{sub e}. Although linear theory predicts a strong inverse magnetic field scaling of the first pass absorption, the measured fast-wave heating efficiency was independent of magnetic field. Multiple pass absorption of the fast waves appears to be occurring since at 2.1 T nearly 100% efficient plasma heating is observed while the calculated first pass absorption is 6% to 8%. The central electron temperature during fast wave heating also increased with magnetic field. The improved electron heating at higher magnetic fields may be due in part to a peaking of the ohmic plasma current and the ohmic electron temperature profiles. Centrally peaked deposition profiles were measured by modulating the fast wave power at 10 Hz and observing the local electron temperature response across the plasma. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Converting ultrasonic induction heating deposited monetite coating to Na-doped HA coating on H 2O 2-treated C/C composites by a two-step hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin-bo, Xiong; Jian-feng, Hung; Xie-rong, Zeng; Cen-cen, Chu

    2011-10-01

    a monetite coating on H 2O 2-treated C/C composites was prepared by ultrasonic induction heating (UIH) technology. Subsequently, this coating was subjected to an ammonia hydrothermal treatment to form a undoped hydroxyapatite (U-HA) coating. Finally, the as-prepared U-HA coating was placed in a NaOH solution and hydrothermally treated to produce the other hydroxyapatite (Na-HA) coating. The structure, morphology and chemical composition of the two HA coatings were characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM and EDS, the adhesiveness and local mechanical properties, e.g. nanohardness and Young's modulus of the two HA coatings to C/C composites was evaluated by a scratch test and nanoindentation technique respectively. The results showed that the two HA coatings had the alike morphology and crystallization. But, compared with the U-HA coating, the Na-HA coating was doped with Na ions, and gave a Ca/P ratio close to a stoichiometric hydroxyapatite, and thus showed a higher nano-indentation value, Young's modulus, and larger bonding strength. These results verified the strengthened effect of Na ion in hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon (C/C) composities.

  10. The hydrothermal power of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, C. J.; Afonso, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We have estimated the power of ventilated hydrothermal heat transport, and its spatial distribution, using a set of recently developed plate models which highlight the effects of axial hydrothermal circulation and thermal insulation by oceanic crust. Testing lithospheric cooling models with these two effects, we estimate that global advective heat transport is about 6.6 TW, significantly lower than most previous estimates, and that the fraction of that extracted by vigorous circulation on the ridge axes (< 1 My old) is about 50 % of the total, significantly higher than previous estimates. These new estimates originate from the thermally insulating properties of oceanic crust in relation to the mantle. Since the crust is relatively insulating, the effective properties of the lithosphere are "crust dominated" near ridge axes (a thermal blanketing effect yielding lower heat flow) and gradually approach mantle values over time. Thus, cooling models with crustal insulation predict low heat flow over young seafloor, implying that the difference of modeled and measured heat flow is due to the heat transport properties of the lithosphere, in addition to ventilated hydrothermal circulation as generally accepted. These estimates may bear on important problems in the physics and chemistry of the Earth because the magnitude of ventilated hydrothermal power affects chemical exchanges between the oceans and the lithosphere, thereby affecting both thermal and chemical budgets in the oceanic crust and lithosphere, the subduction factory, and the convective mantle.

  11. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, G.F.; Minkov, V.; Petrick, M.

    1981-11-02

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system is described in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  12. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  13. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1988-01-05

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  14. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  15. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  16. Hydrothermal Redox Dynamics in the Central Crater at White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Win, N. A.; Oze, C.

    2014-12-01

    The White Island stratovolcano of New Zealand has an active shallow S-rich hydrothermal system present in the Central Crater. In this hydrothermal system, subsurface Fe-rich mineralization is prevalent in the unconsolidated volcaniclastic sediments. Development of these laterally coherent Fe-rich layers may alter the fluid and gas flow and mineralization dynamics of the hydrothermal system. Here we assess the redox chemistry and pathways leading to the formation of the subsurface Fe-rich layer(s). Based on fluid chemistry, mineralogical analyses and geochemical modeling, the subsurface Fe-rich layers are mainly composed of jarosite and goethite and form at the interface between the atmospheric (O2-rich) and hydrothermal (reduced) systems. Cyclic mixing of volcanically-related fluid/gas pulses and precipitation is conducive to both jarosite and goethite forming in the same layer. Macroscopically, the formation of these Fe-rich layers decreases the permeability and porosity in the crater fill directly affecting fluid and gas flux and heat released throughout sections of the crater. Microbial communities are present in the Fe-rich layers, but how and to what extent microbial activity is interacting within these layers requires further investigation. Overall, the subsurface Fe-rich layers present at White Island represent a confined and small scale version (a few centimeters) of a redox interface potentially applicable to larger hydrothermal and ore forming systems.

  17. Reaction of thermal laminar boundary layer to stepwise change in heat conduction and specific heat of the wall in the direction of flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sapelkin, V.A.; Sergeev, Yu.V.

    1988-03-01

    The conjugate problem of nonsteady heat transfer between a laminar boundary layer with a pressure gradient and a wall with stepwise change in its thermophysical properties (heat conduction and volume specific heat) in the longitudinal direction is solved by the finite-difference method for an incompressible liquid and a wall whose internal surface is heat insulated. The results of the calculations show that the reaction of the thermal boundary layer to discontinuity in the thermophysical properties of the wall is nonunique and multi-parametric. Since these parameters determine the thickness of the thermal boundary layer it may be concluded that thin thermal boundary layers react more strongly than thick layers.

  18. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1996--September 1996. Federal Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-96. It describes 152 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  19. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; et al

    2016-07-07

    Here, it is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.more » 117, 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.« less

  20. Design of plate directional heat transmission structure based on layered thermal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. K.; Yu, Z. F.; Huang, J.

    2016-02-01

    Invisibility cloaks based on transformation optics are often closed structures; however, such a structure limits the kinds of objects that can be placed in the cloak. In this work, we adopt a transformation thermodynamics approach to design an "open cloak", called a plate directional heat transmission structure, which is capable of guiding heat fluxes to the flank region of the metamaterial device. The most fascinating and unique feature of the device is that the lower surface can remain at a lower temperature compared with the SiO2 aerogel thermal insulation material. Our results are expected to markedly enhance capabilities in thermal protection, thermal-energy utilization, and domains beyond. In addition to the theoretical analysis, the present design is demonstrated in numerical simulations based on finite element calculations.

  1. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  2. Reactive transport modeling of hydrothermal circulation in oceanic crust: effect of anhydrite precipitation on the dynamics of submarine hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermal fluid circulation represents an extremely efficient mechanism for the exchange of heat and matter between seawater and oceanic crust. Precipitation and dissolution of minerals associated with hydrothermal flow at ridge axes can alter the crustal porosity and permeability and hence influence the dynamics of hydrothermal systems. In this study, a fully coupled fluid flow, heat transfer and reactive mass transport model was developed using TOUGHREACT to evaluate the role of mineral precipitation and dissolution on the evolution of hydrothermal flow systems, with a particular attention focused on anhydrite precipitation upon heating of seawater in recharge zones and the resultant change in the crustal porosity and permeability. A series of numerical case studies were carried out to assess the effect of temperature and aqueous phase inflow concentrations on the reactive geochemical system. The impact of chemically induced porosity and permeability changes on the dynamics of hydrothermal systems was also addressed.

  3. Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; McCollom, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The speciation of carbon in subseafloor hydrothermal systems has direct implications for the maintenance of life in present-day vent ecosystems and possibly the origin of life on early Earth. Carbon monoxide is of particular interest because it represents a key reactant during the abiotic synthesis of reduced carbon compounds via Fischer-Tropsch-type processes. Laboratory experiments were conducted to constrain reactions that regulate the speciation of aqueous single carbon species under hydrothermal conditions and determine kinetic parameters for the oxidation of CO according to the water water-gas shift reaction (CO 2 + H 2 = CO + H 2O). Aqueous fluids containing added CO 2, CO, HCOOH, NaHCO 3, NaHCOO, and H 2 were heated at 150, 200, and 300 °C and 350 bar in flexible-cell hydrothermal apparatus, and the abundances of carbon compounds was monitored as a function of time. Variations in fluid chemistry suggest that the reduction of CO 2 to CH 3OH under aqueous conditions occurs via a stepwise process that involves the formation of HCOOH, CO, and possibly CH 2O, as reaction intermediaries. Kinetic barriers that inhibit the reduction of CH 3OH to CH 4 allow the accumulation of reaction intermediaries in solution at high concentrations regulated by metastable thermodynamic equilibrium. Reaction of CO 2 to CO involves a two-step process in which CO 2 initially undergoes a reduction step to HCOOH which subsequently dehydrates to form CO. Both reactions proceed readily in either direction. A preexponential factor of 1.35 × 10 6 s -1 and an activation energy of 102 kJ/mol were retrieved from the experimental results for the oxidation of CO to CO 2. Reaction rates amongst single carbon compounds during the experiments suggest that ΣCO 2 (CO 2 + HCO 3- + CO 32-), CO, ΣHCOOH (HCOOH + HCOO -), and CH 3OH may reach states of redox-dependent metastable thermodynamic equilibrium in subseafloor and other hydrothermal systems. The abundance of CO under equilibrium conditions

  4. Direct numerical simulation of flow and heat transfer in a turbine cascade with incoming wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissink, Jan G.; Rodi, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow in a turbine cascade with heat transfer have been performed. The set-up of the simulations was chosen in close accordance with previous experiments. Three of the experimental situations were simulated: one without free-stream turbulence and two with periodically incoming wakes of different frequency and with different levels of background fluctuation. Hence, the calculations allow us to study the influence of impinging wakes and background fluctuations on the development of the boundary layers and the local Nusselt number along the surfaces of the heated blade. Along the suction side, the pressure gradient is first favourable and then turns adverse near the trailing edge and the boundary layer remains laminar for the case without free-stream turbulence with the Nusselt number showing the typical decay from the leading to the trailing edge. With periodic wakes and background turbulence, transition occurs when the pressure gradient turns adverse, but intermittency persists so that the boundary layer is not fully turbulent when the trailing edge is reached. In this region, the heat transfer is increased significantly by an amount comparable to that found in the experiments. In the pre-transitional region with favourable pressure gradient, the flow acceleration stretches the free-stream vortices, aligning their axis with the flow direction, thereby forming streamwise vortical structures. These increase the laminar heat transfer in this region by 20 30%, which is, however, much less than observed in the experiments. On the pressure side, the pressure gradient is favourable along the entire blade so that the boundary layer remains laminar. Here, the wakes, through their impingement, also generate streamwise vortical structures which, because of the low convection speed on this side, have a very long lifetime compared to the structures along the suction side. Also these structures increase the laminar heat transfer by about 30

  5. Direct observation of heat dissipation in individual suspended carbon nanotubes using a two-laser technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, I.-Kai; Pettes, Michael T.; Aykol, Mehmet; Chang, Chia-Chi; Hung, Wei-Hsuan; Theiss, Jesse; Shi, Li; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2011-08-01

    A two-laser technique is used to investigate heat spreading along individual single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles in vacuum and air environments. A 532 nm laser focused on the center of a suspended SWCNT bundle is used as a local heat source, and a 633 nm laser is used to measure the spatial temperature profile along the SWCNT bundle by monitoring the G band downshifts in the Raman spectra. A constant temperature gradient is observed when the SWCNT bundle is irradiated in vacuum, giving direct evidence of diffusive transport of the phonons probed by the Raman laser. In air, however, we observe an exponentially decaying temperature profile with a decay length of about 7 μm, due to heat dissipation from the SWCNT bundle to the surrounding gas molecules. The thermal conductivity of the suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) is determined from its electrical heating temperature profile as measured in vacuum and the nanotube bundle diameter measured via transmission electron microscopy. Based on the exponential decay curves measured in three different CNTs in air, the heat transfer coefficient between the SWCNTs and the surrounding air molecules is found to range from 1.5 × 103 to 7.9 × 104 W/m2 K, which is smaller than the 1 × 105 W/m2 K thermal boundary conductance value calculated using the kinetic theory of gases. This measurement is insensitive to the thermal contact resistance, as no temperature drops occur at the ends of the nanotube. It is also insensitive to errors in the calibration of the G band temperature coefficient. The optical absorption is also obtained from these results and is on the order of 10-5.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid turbulent channel flow with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan-Cheng; Li, Feng-Chen; Cai, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Na; Yu, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Our previous experimental studies have confirmed that viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid (VFBN) prepared by suspending nanoparticles in a viscoelastic base fluid (VBF, behaves drag reduction at turbulent flow state) can reduce turbulent flow resistance as compared with water and enhance heat transfer as compared with VBF. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed in this study to explore the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement (HTE) and flow drag reduction (DR) for the VFBN turbulent flow. The Giesekus model is used as the constitutive equation for VFBN. Our previously proposed thermal dispersion model is adopted to take into account the thermal dispersion effects of nanoparticles in the VFBN turbulent flow. The DNS results show similar behaviors for flow resistance and heat transfer to those obtained in our previous experiments. Detailed analyses are conducted for the turbulent velocity, temperature, and conformation fields obtained by DNSs for different fluid cases, and for the friction factor with viscous, turbulent, and elastic contributions and heat transfer rate with conductive, turbulent and thermal dispersion contributions of nanoparticles, respectively. The mechanisms of HTE and DR of VFBN turbulent flows are then discussed. Based on analogy theory, the ratios of Chilton-Colburn factor to friction factor for different fluid flow cases are investigated, which from another aspect show the significant enhancement in heat transfer performance for some cases of water-based nanofluid and VFBN turbulent flows. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51276046), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20112302110020), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561037), and the President Fund of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y3510213N00).

  7. A Chebyshev Collocation Method for Moving Boundaries, Heat Transfer, and Convection During Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Alexander, J. I. D.; Ouazzani, J.

    1994-01-01

    Free and moving boundary problems require the simultaneous solution of unknown field variables and the boundaries of the domains on which these variables are defined. There are many technologically important processes that lead to moving boundary problems associated with fluid surfaces and solid-fluid boundaries. These include crystal growth, metal alloy and glass solidification, melting and name propagation. The directional solidification of semi-conductor crystals by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method is a typical example of such a complex process. A numerical model of this growth method must solve the appropriate heat, mass and momentum transfer equations and determine the location of the melt-solid interface. In this work, a Chebyshev pseudospectra collocation method is adapted to the problem of directional solidification. Implementation involves a solution algorithm that combines domain decomposition, finite-difference preconditioned conjugate minimum residual method and a Picard type iterative scheme.

  8. CONTAIN code analyses of direct containment heating (DCH) experiments: Model assessment and phenomenological interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Tadios, E.L.; Washington, K.E.

    1995-05-12

    Models for direct containment heating (DCH) in the CONTAIN code for severe accident analysis have been reviewed and a standard input prescription for their use has been defined. The code has been exercised against a large subset of the available DCH data base. Generally good agreement with the experimental results for containment pressurization ({Delta}P) and hydrogen generation has been obtained. Extensive sensitivity studies have been performed which permit assessment of many of the strengths and weaknesses of specific model features. These include models for debris transport and trapping, DCH heat transfer and chemistry, atmosphere-structure heat transfer, interactions between nonairborne debris and blowdown steam, potential effects of debris-water interactions, and hydrogen combustion under DCH conditions. Containment compartmentalization is an important DCH mitigator in the calculations, in agreement with experimental results. The CONTAIN model includes partially parametric treatments for some processes that are not well understood. The importance of the associated uncertainties depends upon the details of the DCH scenario being analyzed. Recommended sensitivity studies are summarized that allow the user to obtain a reasonable estimate of the uncertainties in the calculated results.

  9. A direct approach to finding unknown boundary conditions in steady heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Thomas J.; Dulikravich, George S.

    1993-01-01

    The capability of the boundary element method (BEM) in determining thermal boundary conditions on surfaces of a conducting solid where such quantities are unknown was demonstrated. The method uses a non-iterative direct approach in solving what is usually called the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP). Given any over-specified thermal boundary conditions such as a combination of temperature and heat flux on a surface where such data is readily available, the algorithm computes the temperature field within the object and any unknown thermal boundary conditions on surfaces where thermal boundary values are unavailable. A two-dimensional, steady-state BEM program was developed and was tested on several simple geometries where the analytic solution was known. Results obtained with the BEM were in excellent agreement with the analytic values. The algorithm is highly flexible in treating complex geometries, mixed thermal boundary conditions, and temperature-dependent material properties and is presently being extended to three-dimensional and unsteady heat conduction problems. The accuracy and reliability of this technique was very good but tended to deteriorate when the known surface conditions were only slightly over-specified and far from the inaccessible surface.

  10. Direct utilization of geothermal energy for space and water heating at Marlin, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, M.F.; Green, T.F.; Keeney, R.C.; Ellis, P.F. II; Davis, R.J.; Wallace, R.C.; Blood, F.B.

    1983-05-01

    The Torbett-Hutchings-Smith Memorial Hospital geothermal heating project, which is one of nineteen direct-use geothermal projects funded principally by DOE, is documented. The five-year project encompassed a broad range of technical, institutional, and economic activities including: resource and environmental assessments; well drilling and completion; system design, construction, and monitoring; economic analyses; public awareness programs; materials testing; and environmental monitoring. Some of the project conclusions are that: (1) the 155/sup 0/F Central Texas geothermal resource can support additional geothermal development; (2) private-sector economic incentives currently exist, especially for profit-making organizations, to develop and use this geothermal resource; (3) potential uses for this geothermal resource include water and space heating, poultry dressing, natural cheese making, fruit and vegetable dehydrating, soft-drink bottling, synthetic-rubber manufacturing, and furniture manufacturing; (4) high maintenance costs arising from the geofluid's scaling and corrosion tendencies can be avoided through proper analysis and design; (5) a production system which uses a variable-frequency drive system to control production rate is an attractive means of conserving parasitic pumping power, controlling production rate to match heating demand, conserving the geothermal resource, and minimizing environmental impacts.

  11. Numerical modeling of heat transfer in molten silicon during directional solidification process

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, M.; Ramasamy, P.

    2015-06-24

    Numerical investigation is performed for some of the thermal and fluid flow properties of silicon melt during directional solidification by numerical modeling. Dimensionless numbers are extremely useful to understand the heat and mass transfer of fluid flow on Si melt and control the flow patterns during crystal growth processes. The average grain size of whole crystal would increase when the melt flow is laminar. In the silicon growth process, the melt flow is mainly driven by the buoyancy force resulting from the horizontal temperature gradient. The thermal and flow pattern influences the quality of the crystal through the convective heat and mass transport. The computations are carried out in a 2D axisymmetric model using the finite-element technique. The buoyancy effect is observed in the melt domain for a constant Rayleigh number and for different Prandtl numbers. The convective heat flux and Reynolds numbers are studied in the five parallel horizontal cross section of melt silicon region. And also, velocity field is simulated for whole melt domain with limited thermal boundaries. The results indicate that buoyancy forces have a dramatic effect on the most of melt region except central part.

  12. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1994-06-01

    The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

  13. Regressed relations for forced convection heat transfer in a direct injection stratified charge rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi M.; Schock, Harold J.

    1988-01-01

    Currently, the heat transfer equation used in the rotary combustion engine (RCE) simulation model is taken from piston engine studies. These relations have been empirically developed by the experimental input coming from piston engines whose geometry differs considerably from that of the RCE. The objective of this work was to derive equations to estimate heat transfer coefficients in the combustion chamber of an RCE. This was accomplished by making detailed temperature and pressure measurements in a direct injection stratified charge (DISC) RCE under a range of conditions. For each specific measurement point, the local gas velocity was assumed equal to the local rotor tip speed. Local physical properties of the fluids were then calculated. Two types of correlation equations were derived and are described in this paper. The first correlation expresses the Nusselt number as a function of the Prandtl number, Reynolds number, and characteristic temperature ratio; the second correlation expresses the forced convection heat transfer coefficient as a function of fluid temperature, pressure and velocity.

  14. Novel Direct Steelmaking by Combining Microwave, Electric Arc, and Exothermal Heating Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Xiaodi Huang; Dr. J. Y. Hwang

    2005-03-28

    Steel is a basic material broadly used by perhaps every industry and individual. It is critical to our nation's economy and national security. Unfortunately, the American steel industry is losing competitiveness in the world steel production field. There is an urgent need to develop the next generation of steelmaking technology for the American steel industry. Direct steelmaking through the combination of microwave, electric arc, and exothermal heating is a revolutionary change from current steelmaking technology. This technology can produce molten steel directly from a shippable agglomerate, consisting of iron oxide fines, powdered coal, and ground limestone. This technology is projected to eliminate many current intermediate steelmaking steps including coking, pellet sintering, blast furnace (BF) ironmaking, and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking. This technology has the potential to (a) save up to 45% of the energy consumed by conventional steelmaking; (b) dramatically reduce the emission of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, VOCs, fine particulates, and air toxics; (c) substantially reduce waste and emission control costs; (d) greatly lower capital cost; and (e) considerably reduce steel production costs. This technology is based on the unique capability of microwaves to rapidly heat steelmaking raw materials to elevated temperature, then rapidly reduce iron oxides to metal by volumetric heating. Microwave heating, augmented with electric arc and exothermal reactions, is capable of producing molten steel. This technology has the components necessary to establish the ''future'' domestic steel industry as a technology leader with a strong economically competitive position in world markets. The project goals were to assess the utilization of a new steelmaking technology for its potential to achieve better overall energy efficiency, minimize pollutants and wastes, lower capital and operating costs, and increase the competitiveness of the U.S. steel industry. The

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Heat Transfer Behind a Rectangular Orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Soihiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer with a rectangular orifice has been performed for Reτ0(=uτ0δ⁄ν) = 300, where uτ0 is the friction velocity calculated from the mean pressure gradient imposed to drive the flow, δ the channel half width and ν the kinematic viscosity. The Prandtl number is 0.71. The ratio of slit height to channel height is assumed to be β=0.3,0.4,0.5,0.6 and 0.7. For β=0.3-0.6, the mean flow becomes asymmetric in the wall-normal direction by the Coanda effect behind the orifice. In the case of β=0.7, however, the mean flow is symmetry. The Nusselt number profiles over the bottom and top walls are different significantly for the asymmetric cases. Large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz(K-H) vortices are generated at the orifice edges. An entrainment process is observed in the temperature field around these vortices. Subsequently, these K-H vortices become deformed and break up into disordered small-scale structures in the shear layers behind the orifice. In this scenario, the turbulent transport is promoted in the temperature field. In addition, the separation, the reattachment and also the contraction effects are discussed on the profiles of the mean temperature, the temperature variance and the turbulent heat fluxes.

  16. Flow through reactors for organic chemistry: directly electrically heated tubular mini reactors as an enabling technology for organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Summary Until recently traditional heating in organic chemistry has been done with oil heating baths or using electric heat exchangers. With the advent of microwave equipment, heating by microwaves was rapidly introduced as standard method in organic chemistry laboratories, mainly because of the convenient possibility to operate at high temperature accompanied by accelerated reaction rates. In the present contribution we discuss the method of heating small, continuously operated reactors by passing electric current directly through the reactor wall as an enabling technology in organic chemistry. The benefit of this method is that the heat is generated directly inside the reactor wall. By this means high heating rates comparable to microwave ovens can be reached but at much lower cost for the equipment. A tool for the comparison of microwave heating and traditional heating is provided. As an example kinetic data for the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of methyl formate were measured using this heating concept. The reaction is not only a suitable model but also one of industrial importance since this is the main production process for formic acid. PMID:20300506

  17. Manual for the thermal and hdyraulic design of direct contract spray columns for use in extracting heat from geothermal brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, H. R.

    1985-06-01

    This report outlines the current methods being used in the thermal and hydraulic design of spray column type, direct contact heat exchangers. It provides appropriate referenced equations for both preliminary design and detailed performance. The design methods are primarily empirical and are applicable for use in the design of such units for geothermal application and for application with solar ponds. Methods for design, for both preheater and boiler sections of the primary heat exchangers, for direct contact binary powers plants are included.

  18. Dynamic behavior of Kilauea Volcano and its relation to hydrothermal systems and geothermal energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauhikaua, Jim; Moore, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Exploitation of hydrothermal systems on active basaltic volcanoes poses some unique questions about the role of volcanism and hydrothermal system evolution. Volcanic activity creates and maintains hydrothermal systems while earthquakes create permeable fractures that, at least temporarily, enhance circulation. Magma and water, possibly hydrothermal water, can interact violently to produce explosive eruptions. Finally, we speculate on whether volcanic behavior can be affected by high rates of heat extraction.

  19. Hydrothermal systems in small ocean planets.

    PubMed

    Vance, Steve; Harnmeijer, Jelte; Kimura, Jun; Hussmann, Hauke; Demartin, Brian; Brown, J Michael

    2007-12-01

    We examine means for driving hydrothermal activity in extraterrestrial oceans on planets and satellites of less than one Earth mass, with implications for sustaining a low level of biological activity over geological timescales. Assuming ocean planets have olivine-dominated lithospheres, a model for cooling-induced thermal cracking shows how variation in planet size and internal thermal energy may drive variation in the dominant type of hydrothermal system-for example, high or low temperature system or chemically driven system. As radiogenic heating diminishes over time, progressive exposure of new rock continues to the current epoch. Where fluid-rock interactions propagate slowly into a deep brittle layer, thermal energy from serpentinization may be the primary cause of hydrothermal activity in small ocean planets. We show that the time-varying hydrostatic head of a tidally forced ice shell may drive hydrothermal fluid flow through the seafloor, which can generate moderate but potentially important heat through viscous interaction with the matrix of porous seafloor rock. Considering all presently known potential ocean planets-Mars, a number of icy satellites, Pluto, and other trans-neptunian objects-and applying Earth-like material properties and cooling rates, we find depths of circulation are more than an order of magnitude greater than in Earth. In Europa and Enceladus, tidal flexing may drive hydrothermal circulation and, in Europa, may generate heat on the same order as present-day radiogenic heat flux at Earth's surface. In all objects, progressive serpentinization generates heat on a globally averaged basis at a fraction of a percent of present-day radiogenic heating and hydrogen is produced at rates between 10(9) and 10(10) molecules cm(2) s(1). PMID:18163874

  20. Direct numerical simulation of stagnation region flow and heat transfer with free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sungwon; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2003-06-01

    A direct numerical simulation is performed for stagnation-region flow with free-stream turbulence. A fully implicit second-order time-advancement scheme with fourth-order finite differences and an optimized scheme are employed. The optimized scheme is developed to save computational cost. The free-stream turbulence is a precomputed field of isotropic turbulence. The present DNS results in the "damping" and "attached amplifying" regimes are found to be similar to those of the organized inflow disturbances. Emphasis is placed on the flow and temperature fields in the "detached amplifying" regime. The contours of instantaneous flow field illustrate that streamwise vortices are stretched in the streamwise direction by mean strain rate. The temperature field is also stretched in the streamwise direction near the wall. The surface contours reveal that the temperature field is influenced significantly by streamwise vorticity. Due to the dominance of the mean strain, the log-law region is not observed for ū and T˜, the inner scaling fails, but the outer scaling works. The single-point turbulence statistics and the turbulent statistics budgets are obtained. The flow statistics reflect the typical characteristics of stagnation-region flow which are generically different from those of other canonical shear flows. One of the typical features of the budgets is that the velocity pressure correlation and the turbulent transport play significant roles in the stagnation-region flow. Finally, the present simulation data are compared with experimental results. It is found that the effect of large-scale eddies on the enhancement of wall heat transfer is substantial in the turbulent stagnation-region heat transfer.

  1. Effects of latent heating on driving atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-12-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), such as brightness variability and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of BDs include modeling of convection from the interior and its interactions with stably stratified atmospheres. These models show that such interactions can drive an atmospheric circulation, forming zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry, not including condensation of various chemical species. Latent heating from condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various chemical species are believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of BDs and directly imaged EGPs. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the atmospheres of BDs and EGPs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly. We examine the circulation patterns caused by large-scale latent heating which results from condensation of silicate vapor in hot dwarfs and water vapor in the cold dwarfs. By varying the abundance of condensable vapor and the radiative timescale, we conclude that under normal atmospheric conditions of BDs (hot and thus with relatively short radiative timescale), latent heating alone by silicate vapor is unable to drive a global circulation, leaving a quiescent atmosphere, because of the suppression to moist instability by downward transport of dry air. Models with relatively long radiative timescale, which may be the case for cooler bodies, tend to maintain an active hydrological cycle and develop zonal jets. Once condensation happens, storms driven by

  2. Heating mode transition in a hybrid direct current/dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4} discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Quan-Zhi; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2014-06-14

    Computer simulations based on the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision method are performed to study the plasma characteristics and especially the transition in electron heating mechanisms in a hybrid direct current (dc)/dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled CF{sub 4} discharge. When applying a superposed dc voltage, the plasma density first increases, then decreases, and finally increases again, which is in good agreement with experiments. This trend can be explained by the transition between the four main heating modes, i.e., DF coupling, dc and DF coupling, dc source dominant heating, and secondary electron dominant heating.

  3. Discovery of a Novel Alginate Lyase from Nitratiruptor sp. SB155-2 Thriving at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents and Identification of the Residues Responsible for Its Heat Stability.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akira; Anraku, Moe; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Ojima, Takao

    2016-07-22

    Extremophiles are expected to represent a source of enzymes having unique functional properties. The hypothetical protein NIS_0185, termed NitAly in this study, was identified as an alginate lyase-homolog protein in the genomic database of ϵ-Proteobacteria Nitratiruptor sp. SB155-2, which was isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents at a water depth of 1,000 m. Among the characterized alginate lyases in the polysaccharide lyase family 7 (PL-7), the amino acid sequence of NitAly showed the highest identity (39%) with that of red alga Pyropia yezoensis alginate lyase PyAly. Recombinant NitAly (rNitAly) was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli Purified rNitAly degraded alginate in an endolytic manner. Among alginate block types, polyM was preferable to polyG and polyMG as a substrate, and its end degradation products were mainly tri-, tetra-, and penta-saccharides. The optimum temperature and pH values were 70 °C and around 6, respectively. A high concentration of NaCl (0.8-1.4 m) was required for maximum activity. In addition, a 50% loss of activity was observed after incubation at 67 °C for 30 min. Heat stability was decreased in the presence of 5 mm DTT, and Cys-80 and Cys-232 were identified as the residues responsible for heat stability but not lyase activity. Introducing two cysteines into PyAly based on homology modeling using Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate lyase PA1167 as the template enhanced its heat stability. Thus, NitAly is a functional alginate lyase, with its unique optimum conditions adapted to its environment. These insights into the heat stability of NitAly could be applied to improve that of other PL-7 alginate lyases. PMID:27231344

  4. Characteristics of Hydrothermal Mineralization in Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Yang, Q.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity is a major component of the processes that shape the composition and structure of the ocean crust, providing a major pathway for the exchange of heat and elements between the Earth's crust and oceans, and a locus for intense biological activity on the seafloor and underlying crust. In other hand, the structure and composition of hydrothermal systems are the result of complex interactions between heat sources, fluids, wall rocks, tectonic controls and even biological processes. Ultraslow spreading ridges, including the Southwest Indian Ridge, the Gakkel Ridge, are most remarkable end member in plate-boundary structures (Dick et al., 2003), featured with extensive tectonic amagmatic spreading and frequent exposure of peridotite and gabbro. With intensive surveys in last decades, it is suggested that ultraslow ridges are several times more effective than faster-spreading ridges in sustaining hydrothermal activities. This increased efficiency could attributed to deep mining of heat and even exothermic serpentinisation (Baker et al., 2004). Distinct from in faster spreading ridges, one characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization on seafloor in ultraslow spreading ridges, including the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field at 49.6 degree of the Southwest Indian Ridge, is abundant and pervasive distribution of lower temperature precipitated minerals ( such as Fe-silica or silica, Mn (Fe) oxides, sepiolite, pyrite, marcasite etc. ) in hydrothermal fields. Structures formed by lower temperature activities in active and dead hydrothermal fields are also obviously. High temperature precipitated minerals such as chalcopyrite etc. are rare or very limited in hydrothermal chimneys. Distribution of diverse low temperature hydrothermal activities is consistence with the deep heating mechanisms and hydrothermal circulations in the complex background of ultraslow spreading tectonics. Meanwhile, deeper and larger mineralization at certain locations along the

  5. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance: Federal assistance program. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-96. It describes 90 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment and resources. Research activities are summarized on low-temperature resource assessment, geothermal district heating system cost evaluation and silica waste utilization project. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, development of a webpage, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  6. Physical factors determining the fraction of stored energy recoverable from hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1975-01-01

    This report contains background analyses for the estimates of Nathenson and Muffler (1975) of geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas. The first section discusses heat and fluid recharge potential of geothermal reservoirs. The second section analyzes the physical factors that determine the fraction of stored energy obtainable at the surface from a geothermal reservoir. Conversion of heat to electricity and the use of geothermal energy for direct-heating applications are discussed in the last two sections. Nathenson, Manuel, and Muffler, L.J.P., 1975, Geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction dominated areas, in White, D.E., and Williams, D.L., eds., Assessment of the Geothermal Resources of the United States--1975: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 726, p. 104-121, available at http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/usgspubs/cir/cir726

  7. Experimental study on latent heat storage characteristics of W/O emulsion -Supercooling rate of dispersed water drops by direct contact heat exchange-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Shin-ichi; Hayamizu, Yasutaka; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Inaba, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to investigate the latent heat storage system. Using of ice heat storage system brings an equalization of electric power demand, because it will solved the electric -power-demand-concentration on day-time of summer by the air conditioning. The flowable latent heat storage material, Oil/Water type emulsion, microencapsulated latent heat material-water mixture or ice slurry, etc., is enable to transport the latent heat in a pipe. The flowable latent heat storage material can realize the pipe size reduction and system efficiency improvement. Supercooling phenomenon of the dispersed latent heat storage material in continuous phase brings the obstruction of latent heat storage. The latent heat storage rates of dispersed water drops in W/O (Water/Oil) emulsion are investigated experimentally in this study. The water drops in emulsion has the diameter within 3 ˜ 25μm, the averaged water drop diameter is 7.3μm and the standard deviation is 2.9μm. The direct contact heat exchange method is chosen as the phase change rate evaluation of water drops in W/O emulsion. The supercooled temperature and the cooling rate are set as parameters of this study. The evaluation is performed by comparison between the results of this study and the past research. The obtained experimental result is shown that the 35K or more degree from melting point brings 100% latent heat storage rate of W/O emulsion. It was clarified that the supercooling rate of dispersed water particles in emulsion shows the larger value than that of the bulk water.

  8. Electrically induced shape oscillation of drops as a means of direct-contact heat transfer enhancement: Part 2 - Heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaji, N. ); Mori, Y.H. ); Tochitani, Y. )

    1988-08-01

    The heat transfer enhancement caused by the application of a low-frequency (1 {approximately} 16 Hz) alternating field having the sinusoidal waveform has been studied experimentally with water drops in a medium of silicone oil. The heat transfer coefficients has been found to peak at three particular frequencies. The data newly obtained with the sinusoidal waveform are compared with earlier results obained with electric fields having other waveforms. The waveform and the frequency that yield the largest enhancement of heat transfer are sought.

  9. Integrated simulations of implosion, electron transport, and heating for direct-drive fast-ignition targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-05-01

    A thorough understanding of future integrated fast-ignition experiments combining compression and heating of high-density thermonuclear fuel requires hybrid (fluid+particle) simulations of the implosion and ignition process. Different spatial and temporal scales need to be resolved to model the entire fast-ignition experiment. The two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] and the 2D/three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP [D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] have been integrated to simulate the implosion and heating of direct-drive, fast-ignition fusion targets. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. The results from integrated simulations of cone-in-shell CD targets designed for fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997); C. Stoeckl et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 367 (2006)] are presented. Target heating and neutron yields are computed. The results from LSP simulations of electron transport in solid-density plastic targets are also presented. They confirm an increase in the electron divergence angle with the laser intensity in the current experiments. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam and increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed.

  10. The probability of containment failure by direct containment heating in surry

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Bergeron, K.D.; Tadios, E.L.; Stamps, D.W.; Spencer, B.W.; Quick, K.S.; Knudson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    In a light-water reactor core melt accident, if the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fails while the reactor coolant system (RCS) at high pressure, the expulsion of molten core debris may pressurize the reactor containment building (RCB) beyond its failure pressure. A failure in the bottom head of the RPV, followed by melt expulsion and blowdown of the RCS, will entrain molten core debris in the high-velocity steam blowdown gas. This chain of events is called a high-pressure melt ejection (HPME). Four mechanisms may cause a rapid increase in pressure and temperature in the reactor containment: (1) blowdown of the RCS, (2) efficient debris-to-gas heat transfer, (3) exothermic metal-steam and metal-oxygen reactions, and (4) hydrogen combustion. These processes, which lead to increased loads on the containment building, are collectively referred to as direct containment heating (DCH). It is necessary to understand factors that enhance or mitigate DCH because the pressure load imposed on the RCB may lead to early failure of the containment.

  11. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Woo, K M; Betti, R; Campbell, E M; Mangino, D; Christopherson, A R; McCrory, R L; Nora, R; Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Sangster, T C; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Knauer, J P; Marshall, F J; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions. PMID:27575069

  12. Review of tokamak experiments on direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-12-01

    Results from tokamak experiments on direct electron interaction with the compressional Alfven wave ({open_quote}fast wave{close_quote}) are reviewed. Experiments aimed at electron heating as well as those in which fast wave electron current drive was investigated are discussed. A distinction is drawn between experiments employing the lower hybrid range of frequencies, where both the lower hybrid wave ({open_quote}slow wave{close_quote}) and the fast wave can propagate in much of the plasma, and those experiments using the fast wave in the range of moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics, where only the fast wave can penetrate to the plasma core. Most of the early tokamak experiments were in the lower hybrid frequency regime, and the observed electron interaction appeared to be very similar to that obtained with the slow wave at the same frequency. In particular, electron interaction with the fast wave was observed only below a density limit nearly the same as the well known slow wave density limit. In the more recent lower frequency fast wave experiments, electron interaction (heating and current drive) is observed at the center of the discharge, where slow waves are not present.

  13. Transient natural convection inside rigid drops in a liquid-liquid direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Natural convection was simulated inside spherical container and drops. The transient Navier-Stokes and energy equations were solved by employing finite-difference techniques. Pseudosteady-state natural convection inside spheres was simulated. Pseudosteady state was maintained by keeping the driving force for natural convection constant. To obtain pseudosteady state conditions, the temperature at the inside surface of the sphere was steadily increased so that the temperature difference between the surface and the center remained constant. The results were compared to experimental data found in the literature. It was found that the Nusselt number (Pr > 0.7) for pseudosteady state correlated to the Raleigh number by the following relation: Nu = 1.19Ra{sup .2215}, 10{sup 5} < Ra < 10{sup 8}. The simulation results were compared to experimental data of two other researchers who measured drop-temperature profiles in direct-contact heat-exchange columns. The simulation results demonstrate good correlation to the experimental data.

  14. Direct use of geothermal energy, Elko, Nevada district heating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lattin, M.W.; Hoppe, R.D.

    1983-06-01

    In early 1978 the US Department of Energy, under its Project Opportunity Notice program, granted financial assistance for a project to demonstrate the direct use application of geothermal energy in Elko, Nevada. The project is to provide geothermal energy to three different types of users: a commercial office building, a commercial laundry and a hotel/casino complex, all located in downtown Elko. The project included assessment of the geothermal resource potential, resource exploration drilling, production well drilling, installation of an energy distribution system, spent fluid disposal facility, and connection of the end users buildings. The project was completed in November 1982 and the three end users were brought online in December 1982. Elko Heat Company has been providing continuous service since this time.

  15. Progress in understanding of direct containment heating phenomena in pressurized light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is described in development of a mechanistic understanding of direct containment heating phemonena arising during high-pressure melt ejection accidents in pressurized water reactor systems. The experimental data base is discussed which forms the basis for current assessments of containment pressure response using current lumped-parameter containment analysis methods. The deficiencies in available methods and supporting data base required to describe major phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments and containment dome are highlighted. Code calculation results presented in the literature are cited which demonstrate that the progress in understanding of DCH phenomena has also resulted in current predictions of containment pressure loadings which are significantly lower than are predicted by idealized, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Current methods are, nonetheless, still predicting containment-threatening loadings for large participating melt masses under high-pressure ejection conditions. Recommendations for future research are discussed. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride cathode structure having predetermined emission profile

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gordon, Keith C.; Kippenham, Dean O.; Purgalis, Peter; Moussa, David; Williams, Malcom D.; Wilde, Stephen B.; West, Mark W.

    1989-01-01

    A large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB.sub.6) cathode system (10) is disclosed. The system comprises a LaB.sub.6 cathode element (11) generally circular in shape about a central axis. The cathode element (11) has a head (21) with an upper substantially planar emission surface (23), and a lower downwardly and an intermediate body portion (26) which diminishes in cross-section from the head (21) towards the base (22) of the cathode element (11). A central rod (14) is connected to the base (22) of the cathode element (11) and extends along the central axis. Plural upstanding spring fingers (37) are urged against an outer peripheral contact surface (24) of the head end (21) to provide a mechanical and electrical connection to the cathode element (11).

  17. Large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride cathode structure having predetermined emission profile

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gordon, K.C.; Kippenhan, D.O.; Purgalis, P.; Moussa, D.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.; West, M.W.

    1987-10-16

    A large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) cathode system is disclosed. The system comprises a LaB/sub 6/ cathode element generally circular in shape about a central axis. The cathode element has a head with an upper substantially planar emission surface, and a lower downwardly and an intermediate body portion which diminishes in cross-section from the head towards the base of the cathode element. A central rod is connected to the base of the cathode element and extends along the central axis. Plural upstanding spring fingers are urged against an outer peripheral contact surface of the head end to provide a mechanical and electrical connection to the cathode element. 7 figs

  18. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Estrada, David; Wood, Joshua D.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Eres, Gyula; Lyding, Joseph W; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with 50 nm spatial and 0.2K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8 150 X lm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  19. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Estrada, David; Wood, Joshua D.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Eres, Gyula; Lyding, Joseph W.; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2014-10-01

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with ˜50 nm spatial and ˜0.2 K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (˜100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8-150 Ω μm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  20. Charge and Heat Transfer Mechanism in Directly Coupled CdSe-Metal Nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Anju K.; Girijavallabhan, C. P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-10-01

    The charge and heat energy transfer dynamics of directly coupled mixtures of CdSe quantum dots with metal nanoparticles have been studied using thermal lens and photoluminescence (PL) techniques, respectively. The PL of such nanohybrids is found to be quenched dramatically at a particular threshold. Fluorescence decay curves of the Au-CdSe nanohybrids and Ag-CdSe nanohybrids show distinct decay channels with the fastest one associated with transfer of electrons from the CdSe portion to the metal portion. A study on the influence of this charge transfer on the thermal diffusivity with respect to the emission wavelength of quantum dots has been carried out, which could lead to the design of modern photocatalysts and solar cells constructed from nanoscale metal-semiconductor hybrids.

  1. Tuning magnetic anisotropies of Fe films on Si(111) substrate via direction variation of heating current.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; He, Wei; Liu, Hao-Liang; Ye, Jun; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Yang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Zi-Yu; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    We adopted a novel method to tune the terrace width of Si(111) substrate by varying the direction of heating current. It was observed that the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) of Fe films grown on the Si(111) substrate enhanced with decreasing the terrace width and superimposed on the weak six-fold magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Furthermore, on the basis of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images, self-correlation function calculations confirmed that the UMA was attributed mainly from the long-range dipolar interaction between the spins on the surface. Our work opens a new avenue to manipulate the magnetic anisotropy of magnetic structures on the stepped substrate by the decoration of its atomic steps. PMID:23529097

  2. Direct dating of hydrothermal W mineralization: U-Pb age for hübnerite (MnWO 4), Sweet Home Mine, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Rolf L.; Lüders, Volker

    2006-09-01

    We have investigated the potential of hübnerite for U-Pb dating. Hübnerite forms typically at medium to low-temperatures in a wide range of pneumatolytic-hydrothermal mineral deposits, particularly porphyry molybdenum and Sn-specialized granites. Hübnerite from the Sweet Home Mine (Alma, Colorado) formed in a Pb-rich, U-poor environment, but still developed relatively radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. The low Pb common contents in hübnerite (0.075 to 0.155 ppm) demonstrate that Pb is efficiently excluded from the crystal lattice. In contrast, U may substitute for Mn. The U-Pb data of hübnerite scatter. Most of the scatter originates from samples with 206Pb/ 204Pb values below 50, where Pb blank contributes up to 30% to Pb total. Using the least radiogenic galena Pb, samples with 206Pb/ 204Pb values above 70 have overlapping 206Pb∗/ 238U and 207Pb∗/ 235U values and yield a 206Pb/ 238U age of 25.7 ± 0.3 Ma (2σ). Late stage apatite from the Sweet Home Mine yields a 206Pb/ 204Pb- 238U/ 204Pb isochron corresponding to an age of 24.8 ± 0.5 Ma (2σ). A comparison of the U-Pb hübnerite ages with literature 40Ar/ 39Ar ages on earlier sericite and the U-Pb age on later apatite suggests that (i) hübnerite yields accurate U-Pb ages and (ii) the evolution of the Sweet Home mineralization from greisen-type mineralization to medium-temperature hydrothermal vein mineralization took place in a few hundred thousand years at most. Aqueous low-N 2-bearing and aqueous inclusions in the dated hübnerite have homogenization temperatures between 325 and 356 °C and moderate salinity (up to 6.7 wt% NaCl equiv.). Thus, hübnerite represents one of the rare examples of a mineral that can be dated accurately and carries petrological information.

  3. Magnetic Structure of Backarc Spreading Axis with Hydrothermal Vents; the Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Okino, K.; Mochizuki, N.; Honsho, C.; Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.; Nakamura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are important in relation to global heat and chemical fluxes as well as habitat of microbial communities. The substantial variation of hydrothermal systems in various tectonic settings has important implications for the magnetic structure of oceanic crust. It has been very difficult to detect the geophysical signature of hydrothermal systems from sea-surface data because the small scale of hydrothermal systems is below the limit of resolution. The advance of near-bottom survey methods using a submersible, deep-tow, ROV and AUV has made possible high-resolution geophysical mapping around hydrothermal areas. Near-bottom magnetic surveys can provide direct information on the magnetization of the shallower oceanic crust, implying hydrothermal alteration both in active and fossil vent sites. Near-bottom three component magnetic measurements on submersible Shinkai 6500 were carried out at hydrothermal fields in the Southern Mariana Trough, a slow spreading backarc basin. Fourteen dive surveys were conducted during cruises YK11-10 and YK10-11. We investigated the magnetic structure of four hydrothermal systems located at on- and off-axis to clarify how the geophysical and geological setting controls the fluid circulation at small scale. Recent researches at slow spreading ridges showed a relationship between crustal magnetic structure and host rock around hydrothermal vents (e.g. Tivey and Dyment, 2010), but no observation at backarc spreading axis has been reported so far. We carefully corrected the effects of induced and permanent magnetizations of the submersible by applying the method of Isezaki [1986] with dumped least-square method (Honsho et al., 2009). After subtracting the IGRF from the corrected observed data, we obtained geomagnetic vector anomalies in geographical coordinate. For three transects of the axis, we applied three methods; 2D inversion technique (Parker and Huestis, 1972), 2D forward modeling technique (Honsho et al

  4. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowires-loaded Sb-doped SnO2-ZnO Micrograting Pattern via Direct Imprinting-assisted Hydrothermal Growth and Its Selective Detection of Acetone Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hak-Jong; Choi, Seon-Jin; Choo, Soyoung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Heon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel synthetic route by combining imprinting transfer of a Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO)-ZnO composite micrograting pattern (MP), i.e., microstrip lines, on a sensor substrate and subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) for producing a hierarchical ZnO NW-loaded ATO-ZnO MP as an improved chemo-resistive sensing layer. Here, ATO-ZnO MP structure with 3-μm line width, 9-μm pitch, and 6-μm height was fabricated by direct transfer of mixed ATO and ZnO nanoparticle (NP)-dispersed resists, which are pre-patterned on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. ZnO NWs with an average diameter of less than 50 nm and a height of 250 nm were quasi-vertically grown on the ATO-ZnO MP, leading to markedly enhanced surface area and heterojunction composites between each ATO NP, ZnO NP, and ZnO NW. A ZnO NW-loaded MP sensor with a relative ratio of 1:9 between ATO and ZnO (1:9 ATO-ZnO), exhibited highly sensitive and selective acetone sensing performance with 2.84-fold higher response (Rair/Rgas = 12.8) compared to that (Rair/Rgas = 4.5) of pristine 1:9 ATO-ZnO MP sensor at 5 ppm. Our results demonstrate the processing advantages of direct imprinting-assisted hydrothermal growth for large-scale homogeneous coating of hierarchical oxide layers, particularly for applications in highly sensitive and selective chemical sensors. PMID:26743814

  5. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowires-loaded Sb-doped SnO2-ZnO Micrograting Pattern via Direct Imprinting-assisted Hydrothermal Growth and Its Selective Detection of Acetone Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hak-Jong; Choi, Seon-Jin; Choo, Soyoung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Heon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel synthetic route by combining imprinting transfer of a Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO)-ZnO composite micrograting pattern (MP), i.e., microstrip lines, on a sensor substrate and subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) for producing a hierarchical ZnO NW-loaded ATO-ZnO MP as an improved chemo-resistive sensing layer. Here, ATO-ZnO MP structure with 3-μm line width, 9-μm pitch, and 6-μm height was fabricated by direct transfer of mixed ATO and ZnO nanoparticle (NP)-dispersed resists, which are pre-patterned on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. ZnO NWs with an average diameter of less than 50 nm and a height of 250 nm were quasi-vertically grown on the ATO-ZnO MP, leading to markedly enhanced surface area and heterojunction composites between each ATO NP, ZnO NP, and ZnO NW. A ZnO NW-loaded MP sensor with a relative ratio of 1:9 between ATO and ZnO (1:9 ATO-ZnO), exhibited highly sensitive and selective acetone sensing performance with 2.84-fold higher response (Rair/Rgas = 12.8) compared to that (Rair/Rgas = 4.5) of pristine 1:9 ATO-ZnO MP sensor at 5 ppm. Our results demonstrate the processing advantages of direct imprinting-assisted hydrothermal growth for large-scale homogeneous coating of hierarchical oxide layers, particularly for applications in highly sensitive and selective chemical sensors.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on the fracture behaviour of directionally solidified (gamma/gamma-prime)-alpha alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriramamurthy, A. M.; Tewari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the influence of various heat treatments on the work of fracture and its relation to microstructure for a directionally solidified Ni-33Mo-5.7Al (wt pct) (gamma/gamma-prime)-alpha alloy. The jagged crack propagation observed is due to delamination of the ligaments and associated plastic deformation. Fracture behavior is examined with respect to alloy microstructures and load-deflection curves. The four heat-treatment conditions considered are: (1) as-directionally solidified, (2) solutionized, (3) directionally solidified and thermally cycled, and (4) solutionized and thermally cycled.

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop in a compact pin-fin heat exchanger with pin orientation at 18 deg to the flow direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a novel, compact heat exchanger in helium gas were measured at 3.5 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 450 to 12,000. The pin-fin specimen consisted of pins, 0.51 mm high and spaced 2.03 mm on centers, spanning a channel through which the helium flows; the angle of the row of pins to the flow direction was 18 deg. The specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes up to 74 W/sq cm and insulated on the back side. Correlations were developed for the friction factor and Nusselt number. The Nusselt number compares favorably to those of past studies of staggered pin-fins, when the measured temperatures are extrapolated to the temperature of the wall-fluid interface.

  8. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOEpatents

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  9. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  10. Overview of direct use R&D at the Geo-Heat Center

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.

    1997-12-31

    Geo-Heat Center research, during the past year, on geothermal district heating and greenhouse projects is intended to improve the design and cost effectiveness of these systems. The largest geothermal district heating system in the U.S., proposed at Reno, is describe and is one of 271 collocated sites in western states could benefit from the research. The geothermal district heating research investigated a variety of factors that could reduce development cost for residential areas. Many greenhouse operators prefer the {open_quotes}bare tube{close_quotes} type heating system. As facilities using these types of heating systems expand they could benefit from peaking with fossil fuels. It is possible to design a geothermal heating system for only 60% of the peak heat loss of a greenhouse and still meet over 90% of the annual heat energy needs of the structure. The design and cost effectiveness of this novel approach is summarized.

  11. Hydrothermal processing of radioactive combustible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, L.A.; Buelow, S.J.; Harradine, D.; Le, L.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1998-09-01

    Hydrothermal processing has been demonstrated for the treatment of radioactive combustible materials for the US Department of Energy. A hydrothermal processing system was designed, built and tested for operation in a plutonium glovebox. Presented here are results from the study of the hydrothermal oxidation of plutonium and americium contaminated organic wastes. Experiments show the destruction of the organic component to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, with 30 wt.% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an oxidant, at 540 C and 46.2 MPa. The majority of the actinide component forms insoluble products that are easily separated by filtration. A titanium liner in the reactor and heat exchanger provide corrosion resistance for the oxidation of chlorinated organics. The treatment of solid material is accomplished by particle size reduction and the addition of a viscosity enhancing agent to generate a homogeneous pumpable mixture.

  12. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in an air/molten salt direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of experimental data with a recently published model of heat exchange in irrigated packed beds. Heat transfer and pressure drop were measured in a 150 mm (ID) column with a 610-mm bed of metal Pall rings. Molten nitrate salt and preheated air were the working fluids with a salt inlet temperature of approximately 440{degree}C and air inlet temperatures of approximately 230{degree}C. A comparison between the experimental data and the heat transfer model is made on the basis of heat transfer from the salt. For the range of air and salt flow rates tested, 0.3 to 1.2 kg/m{sup 2} s air flow and 6 to 18 kg/m{sup 2} s salt flow, the data agree with the model within 22% standard deviation. In addition, a model for the column pressure drop was validated, agreeing with the experimental data within 18% standard deviation over the range of column pressure drop from 40 to 1250 Pa/m. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The probability of containment failure by direct containment heating in Zion

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Yan, H.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is the first step in the resolution of the Direct Containment Heating (DCH) issue for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant using the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). This report includes the definition of a probabilistic framework that decomposes the DCH problem into three probability density functions that reflect the most uncertain initial conditions (UO{sub 2} mass, zirconium oxidation fraction, and steel mass). Uncertainties in the initial conditions are significant, but our quantification approach is based on establishing reasonable bounds that are not unnecessarily conservative. To this end, we also make use of the ROAAM ideas of enveloping scenarios and ``splintering.`` Two causal relations (CRs) are used in this framework: CR1 is a model that calculates the peak pressure in the containment as a function of the initial conditions, and CR2 is a model that returns the frequency of containment failure as a function of pressure within the containment. Uncertainty in CR1 is accounted for by the use of two independently developed phenomenological models, the Convection Limited Containment Heating (CLCH) model and the Two-Cell Equilibrium (TCE) model, and by probabilistically distributing the key parameter in both, which is the ratio of the melt entrainment time to the system blowdown time constant. The two phenomenological models have been compared with an extensive database including recent integral simulations at two different physical scales. The containment load distributions do not intersect the containment strength (fragility) curve in any significant way, resulting in containment failure probabilities less than 10{sup {minus}3} for all scenarios considered. Sensitivity analyses did not show any areas of large sensitivity.

  14. Hydrothermal circulation in fast spread ocean crust - where and how much? Insight from ODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M.; Coggon, R. M.; Smith-Duque, C. E.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying hydrothermal circulation is critical to testing models of the accretion of lower ocean crust and quantifying global geochemical cycles. However, our understanding is principally limited by a lack of direct observations from intact ocean crust. Key questions remain about the magnitude of hydrothermal fluid fluxes, the nature and distribution of fluid pathways and their global variability. ODP Hole 1256D in the eastern equatorial Pacific samples a complete section of 15 Myr old upper ocean crust down to the dike/gabbro transition zone. A high spatial resolution Sr isotope profile is integrated with wireline studies, volcanostratigraphy, petrography and mineral geochemistry to document fluid pathways and develop a model for the evolving hydrothermal system during volcanic construction of the crust. Major off-axis fluid conduits in the volcanic sequence are restricted to the flow margins of two anomalously thick (>25 m) massive flows, indicating that massive flows act as a permeability barrier for fluid flow. Dike margins are pathways for both recharge and discharge hydrothermal fluids. Sub-horizontal channeling of high temperature fluids at the dike/gabbro boundary is a common attribute of most cartoons of mid ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Hole 1256D provides the first in situ observations of the dike/gabbro transition zone and records lateral fluid transport along intrusive boundaries. The time-integrated fluid flux in the sheeted dikes of Hole 1256D calculated using Sr isotope mass balance is ~1.8 x 106 kg/m2. This is similar to fluid fluxes from other studies (Hole 504B, Pito Deep, Hess Deep) despite large variations in the thickness and Sr isotope profiles of the sheeted dike complexes, suggesting that hydrothermal fluid fluxes are remarkably uniform and independent of the local structure of the crust. This fluid flux is not large enough to completely remove the heat flux from crystallizing and cooling the lower crust and requires

  15. Performance and efficiency evaluation and heat release study of a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Lee, C. M.; Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation which models engine performance of the Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engines was used to study the effect of variations in engine design and operating parameters on engine performance and efficiency of an Outboard Marine Corporation (OMC) experimental rotary combustion engine. Engine pressure data were used in a heat release analysis to study the effects of heat transfer, leakage, and crevice flows. Predicted engine data were compared with experimental test data over a range of engine speeds and loads. An examination of methods to improve the performance of the rotary engine using advanced heat engine concepts such as faster combustion, reduced leakage, and turbocharging is also presented.

  16. Direct Electron Heating Observed by Fast Waves in ICRF Range on a Low-Density Low Temperature Tokamak ADITYA

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, K.; Kulkarni, S.; Rathi, D.; Varia, A.; Jadav, H.; Parmar, K.; Kadia, B.; Joshi, R.; Srinivas, Y.; Singh, R.; Kumar, S.; Dani, S.; Gayatri, A.; Yogi, R.; Singh, M.; Joisa, Y.; Rao, C.; Kumar, S.; Jha, R.; Manchanda, R.

    2011-12-23

    Fast wave electron heating experiments are carried out on Aditya tokamak [R = 0.75 m, a = 0.25m,Bt = 0.75T,ne{approx}1-3E13/cc,Te{approx}250eV] with the help of indigenously developed 200 kW, 20-40 MHz RF heating system. Significant direct electron heating is observed by fast waves in hydrogen plasma with prompt rise in electron temperature with application of RF power and it increases linearly with RF power. A corresponding increase in plasma beta and hence increase in stored diamagnetic energy is also observed in presence of RF. We observe an improvement of energy confinement time from 2-4msec during ohmic heating phase to 3-6msec in RF heating phase. This improvement is within the ohmic confinement regime for the present experiments. The impurity radiation and electron density do not escalate significantly with RF power. The direct electron heating by fast wave in Aditya is also predicted by ion cyclotron resonance heating code TORIC.

  17. Mantle heat drives hydrothermal fluids responsible for carbonate-hosted base metal deposits: evidence from 3He/4He of ore fluids in the Irish Pb-Zn ore district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Stuart, F. M.; Boyce, A. J.

    2014-06-01

    There is little consensus on whether carbonate-hosted base metal deposits, such as the world-class Irish Zn + Pb ore field, formed in collisional or extensional tectonic settings. Helium isotopes have been analysed in ore fluids trapped in sulphides samples from the major base metal deposits of the Irish Zn-Pb ore field in order to quantify the involvement of mantle-derived volatiles that require melting to be realised, as well as test prevailing models for the genesis of the ore fields. 3He/4He ratios range up to 0.2 R a, indicating that a small but clear mantle helium contribution is present in the mineralising fluids trapped in galena and marcasite. Sulphides from ore deposits with the highest fluid inclusion temperatures (~200 °C) also have the highest 3He/4He (>0.15 R a). Similar 3He/4He are recorded in fluids from modern continental regions that are undergoing active extension. By analogy, we consider that the hydrothermal fluids responsible for the carbonate-hosted Irish base metal mineralization circulated in thinned continental crust undergoing extension and demonstrate that enhanced mantle heat flow is ultimately responsible for driving fluid convection.

  18. Manual for the thermal and hydraulic design of direct contact spray columns for use in extracting heat from geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, H.R.

    1985-06-01

    This report outlines the current methods being used in the thermal and hydraulic design of spray column type, direct contact heat exchangers. It provides appropriate referenced equations for both preliminary design and detailed performance. The design methods are primarily empirical and are applicable for us in the design of such units for geothermal application and for application with solar ponds. Methods for design, for both preheater and boiler sections of the primary heat exchangers, for direct contact binary powers plants are included. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  19. A bi-directional two-phase/two-phase heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design and test of a heat exchanger that transfers heat from one two-phase thermal loop to another with very small drops in temperature and pressure. The heat exchanger condenses the vapor in one loop while evaporating the liquid in the other without mixing of the condensing and evaporating fluids. The heat exchanger is bidirectional in that it can transfer heat in reverse, condensing on the normally evaporating side and vice versa. It is fully compatible with capillary pumped loops and mechanically pumped loops. Test results verified that performance of the heat exchanger met the design requirements. It demonstrated a heat transfer rate of 6800 watts in the normal mode of operation and 1000 watts in the reverse mode with temperature drops of less than 5 C between two thermal loops.

  20. Depressurization as an accident management strategy to minimize the consequences of direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Golden, D.W.; Chambers, R.; Miller, J.D.; Hallbert, B.P.; Dobbe, C.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have identified severe accidents for nuclear power plants that have the potential to cause failure of the containment through direct containment heating (DCH). Prevention of DCH or mitigation of its effects may be possible using accident management strategies that intentionally depressurize the reactor coolant system (RCS). The effectiveness of intentional depressurization during a station blackout TMLB' sequence was evaluated considering the phenomenological behavior, hardware performance, and operational performance. Phenomenological behavior was calculated using the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code. Two strategies to mitigate DCH by depressurization of the RCS were considered. One strategy, called early depressurization, assumed that the reactor head vent and pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) were latched open at steam generator dryout. The second strategy, called late depression, assumed that the head vent and PORVs were latched open at a core exit temperature of {approximately}922 K (1200{degree}F). Depressurization of the RCS to a low value that may mitigate DCH was predicted prior to reactor pressure vessel breach for both early and late depressurization. The strategy of late depressurization is preferred over early depressurization because there are greater opportunities to recover plant functions prior to core damage and because failure uncertainties are lessened. 22 refs., 38 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Photon-noise-limited direct detector based on disorder-controlled electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McGrath, William R.; Gershenson, Michael E.; Sergeev, Andrew V.

    2000-05-01

    We present a concept for a hot-electron direct detector capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a microbridge (1 μm size) transition edge sensor made from a disordered superconducting film. The electron-phonon coupling strength at temperatures of 100-300 mK is proportional to the elastic electron mean free path l and can be reduced by over an order of magnitude by decreasing l. The microbridge contacts are made from a different superconductor with higher critical temperature Nb, which blocks the thermal diffusion of hot carriers into the contacts. The low electron-phonon heat conductance and the high thermal resistance of the contacts determine the noise equivalent power of ˜10-20-10-21 W/√Hz at 100 mK, which is 102-103 times better than that of state-of-the-art bolometers. Due to the effect of disorder, the electron cooling time is ˜10-1-10-2 s at 0.1 K. By exploiting negative electrothermal feedback, the detector time constant can be made as short as 10-3-10-4 s without sacrificing sensitivity.

  2. MELCOR 1.8.2 Assessment: IET direct containment heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.

    1993-10-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code, being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRS. As part of an ongoing assessment program, the MELCOR computer code has been used to analyze several of the IET direct containment heating experiments done at 1:10 linear scale in the Surtsey test facility at Sandia and at 1:40 linear scale in the corium-water thermal interactions (CWTI) COREXIT test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. These MELCOR calculations were done as an open post-test study, with both the experimental data and CONTAIN results available to guide the selection of code input. Basecase MELCOR results are compared to test data in order to evaluate the new HPME DCH model recently added in MELCOR version 1.8.2. The effect of various user-input parameters in the HPME model, which define both the initial debris source and the subsequent debris interaction, were investigated in sensitivity studies. In addition, several other non-default input modelling changes involving other MELCOR code packages were required in our IET assessment analyses in order to reproduce the observed experiment behavior. Several calculations were done to identify whether any numeric effects exist in our DCH IET assessment analyses.

  3. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G.; Lever, Mark A.; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B.; Mendlovitz, Howard P.; MacGregor, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region. PMID:26925032

  4. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J; Tivey, Margaret K; Biddle, Jennifer F; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G; Lever, Mark A; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B; Mendlovitz, Howard P; MacGregor, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region. PMID:26925032

  5. Theoretical constraints of physical and chemical properties of hydrothermal fluids on variations in chemolithotrophic microbial communities in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Takai, Ken

    2014-12-01

    . Particularly in H2-rich ultramafic rock-hosted hydrothermal systems, anaerobic and aerobic hydrogenotrophy is more energetically significant than thiotrophy. The CH4 concentration also has a considerable impact on organisms with aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic metabolisms, particularly in sediment-associated hydrothermal systems. Recently clarified patterns and functions of existing microbial communities and their metabolisms are generally consistent with the results of our thermodynamic modeling of the hydrothermal mixing zones. These relationships provide important directions for future research addressing the origin and early evolution of life on Earth as well as for the search for extraterrestrial life.

  6. An experimental approach to determine the heat transfer coefficient in directional solidification furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banan, Mohsen; Gray, Ross T.; Wilcox, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficient between a molten charge and its surroundings in a Bridgman furnace was experimentally determined using in-situ temperature measurement. The ampoule containing an isothermal melt was suddenly moved from a higher temperature zone to a lower temperature zone. The temperature-time history was used in a lumped-capacity cooling model to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient between the charge and the furnace. The experimentally determined heat transfer coefficient was of the same order of magnitude as the theoretical value estimated by standard heat transfer calculations.

  7. A novel approach to determine the heat transfer coefficient in directional solidification furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banan, Mohsen; Gray, Ross T.; Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficient between a molten charge and its surroundings in a Bridgman furnace was determined using an approach utilizing in-situ temperature measurement. The ampoule containing an isothermal melt was suddenly moved from a higher temperature zone to a lower temperature zone. The temperature-time history was used in a lumped-capacity cooling model to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient between the charge and the furnace. The experimentally determined heat transfer coefficient was of the same order of magnitude as the value estimated by standard heat transfer calculations.

  8. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report consists of brief summaries of the activities of the Geo-Heat Center during the report period. Technical assistance was given to requests from 20 states in the following applications: space and district heating; geothermal heat pumps; greenhouses; aquaculture; industrial plants; electric power; resource/well; equipment; and resort/spa. Research and development activities progressed on (1) compilation of data on low-temperature resources and (2) evaluation of groundwater vs. ground-coupled heat pumps. Also summarized are technology transfer activities and geothermal progress monitoring activities.

  9. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Federal Assistance Program quarterly project progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the third quarter of FY98 (April--June, 1998). It describes 231 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with included requests for general information including material for high school and university students, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, spacing heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, snow melting and electric power. Research activities include work on model construction specifications for line shaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, and a comprehensive aquaculture developers package. A brochure on Geothermal Energy in Klamath County was developed for state and local tourism use. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 19, No. 2) with articles on research at the Geo-Heat Center, sustainability of geothermal resources, injection well drilling in Boise, ID and a greenhouse project in the Azores. Other outreach activities include dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisitions and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  10. Transverse heat transfer coefficient in the dual channel ITER TF CICCs. Part III: Direct method of assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Monika; Malinowski, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    The data resulting from the thermal-hydraulic test of the ITER TF CICC are used to determine the flow partition and the overall effective heat transfer coefficient (hBC) between bundle and central channel in a direct way, i.e. by analysis of the heat transfer between both flow channels, based on the mass and energy balance equations and the readings of thermometers located inside the cable. In cases without a local heat source in the considered cable segment the obtained hBC values were consistent with those obtained in earlier studies by analysis of experimental data using indirect methods. It was also observed that the transverse heat transfer was strongly enhanced in a cable segment heated from outside. This phenomenon results from the mass transfer from the bundle region to the central channel. The experimental hBC data obtained for the case without a heat source in the considered segment were also compared with those calculated using various heat transfer correlations.

  11. Active and relict sea-floor hydrothermal mineralization at the TAG hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A. . Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Labs.); Hannington, M.D. ); Raman, C.V. ); Thompson, G.; Tivey, M.K.; Humphris, S.E. ); Lalou, C. . Lab. CNRS-CEA); Petersen, S. Aachen Univ. of Technology )

    1993-12-01

    The TAG hydrothermal field is a site of major active and inactive volcanic-hosted hydrothermal mineralization in the rift valley of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26[degree]N. The axial high is the principal locus of present magmatic intrusions. The TAG field contains three main areas of present and past hydrothermal activity: (1) an actively venting high-temperature sulfide mound; (2) two former high-temperature vent areas; (3) a zone of low-temperature venting and precipitation of Fe and Mn oxide deposits. The volcanic centers occur at the intersections between ridge axis-parallel normal faults and projected axis-transverse transfer faults. The intersections of these active fault systems may act as conduits both for magmatic intrusions from sources beneath the axial high that build the volcanic centers and for hydrothermal upwelling that taps the heat sources. Radiometric dating of sulfide samples and manganese crusts in the hydrothermal zones and dating of sediments intercalated with pillow lava flows in the volcanic center adjacent to the active sulfide mound indicate multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity throughout the field driven by heat supplied by episodic intrusions over a period of at least 140 [times] 10[sup 3] yr. The sulfide deposits are built by juxtaposition and superposition during relatively long residence times near episodic axial heat sources counterbalanced by mass wasting in the tectonically active rift valley of the slow-spreading oceanic ridge. Hydrothermal reworking of a relict hydrothermal zone by high-temperature hydrothermal episodes has recrystallized sulfides and concentrated the first visible primary gold reported in a deposit at an oceanic ridge.

  12. Geothermal potential for commercial and industrial direct heat applications in Salida, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.; Galloway, M.J.; Gross, J.T.; Meyer, R.T.; Raskin, R.; Zocholl, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    The Salida Geothermal Prospect (Poncha Hot Springs) was evaluated for industrial and commercial direct heat applications at Salida, Colorado, which is located approximately five miles east of Poncha Hot Springs. Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd., holds the geothermal leases on the prospect and the right-of-way for the main pipeline to Salida. The Poncha Hot Springs are located at the intersection of two major structural trends, immediately between the Upper Arkansas graben and the Sangre de Cristo uplift. Prominent east-west faulting occurs at the actual location of the hot springs. Preliminary exploration indicates that 1600 gpm of geothermal fluid as hot as 250/sup 0/F is likely to be found at around 1500 feet in depth. The prospective existing endusers were estimated to require 5.02 x 10/sup 10/ Btu per year, but the total annual amount of geothermal energy available for existing and future endusers is 28.14 x 10/sup 10/ Btu. The engineering design for the study assumed that the 1600 gpm would be fully utilized. Some users would be cascaded and the spent fluid would be cooled and discharged to nearby rivers. The economic analysis assumes that two separate businesses, the energy producer and the energy distributor, are participants in the geothermal project. The producer would be an existing limited partnership, with Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. as one of the partners; the distributor would be a new Colorado corporation without additional income sources. Economic evaluations were performed in full for four cases: the Base Case and three alternate scenarios. Alternate 1 assumes a three-year delay in realizing full production relative to the Base Case; Alternate 2 assumes that the geothermal reservoir is of a higher quality than is assumed for the Base Case; and Alternate 3 assumes a lower quality reservoir. 11 refs., 34 figs., 40 tabs.

  13. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry using prototypic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments have been completed which utilize prototypic core materials. The experiments reported on here are a continuation of the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The experiments incorporated a 1/40 scale model of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant containment structures. The model included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt stimulant in the earlier IET experiments. These earlier IET experiments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena; however, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. Three tests have been completed, DCH-U1A, U1B and U2. DCH-U1A and U1B employed an inerted containment atmosphere and are counterpart to the IET-1RR test with iron/alumina thermite. DCH-U2 employed nominally the same atmosphere composition of its counterpart iron/alumina test, IET-6. All tests, with prototypic material, have produced lower peak containment pressure rises; 45, 111 and 185 kPa in U1A, U1B and U2, compared to 150 and 250 kPa IET-1RR and 6. Hydrogen production, due to metal-steam reactions, was 33% larger in U1B and U2 compared to IET-1RR and IET-6. The pressurization efficiency was consistently lower for the corium tests compared to the IET tests.

  14. 78 FR 63410 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... pool heaters that operate with electricity (including heat pump pool heaters) or oil. 76 FR 63211... electric pool heaters (including heat pump pool heaters). 74 FR 65852, 65866-67 (Dec. 11, 2009). In the... energy consumption of these products, as required under EPCA.\\3\\ 75 FR 52892. DOE published...

  15. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  16. Hydrothermal Preparation of Apatite Composite with Magnetite or Anatase

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Setsuaki; Ishida, Emile H.; Ioku, Koji

    2006-05-15

    Microstructure designed porous hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) composites with magnetite (Fe3O4) particles or anatase (TiO2) dispersion were prepared by hydrothermal treatment. These composites had micro-pores of about 0.1-0.5 {mu}m in size. Magnetite / Hydroxyapatite composites should be suitable for medical treatment of cancer, especially in bones, because HA can bond to bones directly and magnetite can generate heat. They must be used for hyperthermia therapies of cancer in bones. Meanwhile, anatase / Hydroxyapatite composite should be suitable for environmental purification, because HA rod-shape particles expose the specific crystal face, which adsorbs organic contaminants and so on.

  17. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinisation in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinisation in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilise the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilise it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model. Keywords: Hydrothermal systems, volcaniclastic deposits, phase transitions, instability analysis, numerical solutions

  18. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  19. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  20. Direct link between metabolic regulation and the heat-shock response through the transcriptional regulator PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years an extensive effort has been made to elucidate the molecular pathways involved in metabolic signaling in health and disease. Here we show, surprisingly, that metabolic regulation and the heat-shock/stress response are directly linked. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a critical transcriptional coactivator of metabolic genes, acts as a direct transcriptional repressor of heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1), a key regulator of the heat-shock/stress response. Our findings reveal that heat-shock protein (HSP) gene expression is suppressed during fasting in mouse liver and in primary hepatocytes dependent on PGC-1α. HSF1 and PGC-1α associate physically and are colocalized on several HSP promoters. These observations are extended to several cancer cell lines in which PGC-1α is shown to repress the ability of HSF1 to activate gene-expression programs necessary for cancer survival. Our study reveals a surprising direct link between two major cellular transcriptional networks, highlighting a previously unrecognized facet of the activity of the central metabolic regulator PGC-1α beyond its well-established ability to boost metabolic genes via its interactions with nuclear hormone receptors and nuclear respiratory factors. Our data point to PGC-1α as a critical repressor of HSF1-mediated transcriptional programs, a finding with possible implications both for our understanding of the full scope of metabolically regulated target genes in vivo and, conceivably, for therapeutics. PMID:26438876

  1. Pyrite Recrystallization Experiments With Circulating Hydrothermal Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Abe, A.; Tanaka, K.

    2007-12-01

    Pyrite is one of the most common sulfide minerals found in hydrothermal deposits and sea-floor sediments from hydrothermal fumaroles. Hydrothermal fluid flow plays an important role in crystallization of sulfide minerals. In this study, we tried to reproduce pyrite crystallization with one-way flowing hydrothermal fluid. We designed a circuit circulating hydrothermal fluid by thermal convection. A rectangular circuit (42.6 cm by 17.3 cm) of SUS316 pressure tubes with 5 mm in inner diameter was used as a reaction vessel. In the circuit, pyrite dissolves to acidic fluid in upstream region. Then, pyrite will crystallize again in downstream region as temperature decreases. The rectangular plane was held to be 20 degrees inclination to generate thermal convection. One of the long sides of the rectangular was heated by an electric furnace. Starting materials were put in a tube to be heated. Upper half, approximately 20 cm, of the tube was filled with quartz sand. Next quarter was filled with equivalent mass mixture of quartz sand and powdered pyrite crystals. The lowest quarter was filled with mixture of quartz sand, pyrite, anhydrite and sulfur, those mass are equivalent. The solution was a mixture of 0.5mol/l HCl and 3.0mol/l NaCl. Maximum temperature was controlled to approximately 350°C at the center of the heated tube. Experimental durations were up to 9 days. Fluid pressure increased to approximately 6 MPa as heating. After the experiments, the run products were fixed with resin in a sample tube, and vertical sections were observed by SEM. In the run products, pyrite dissolved at the lower part of the starting material. In the upper half of the sample tube, pyrite crystals precipitated on quartz surface. Crystallization density depends on temperature gradient of the fluid. Predominant morphology of the pyrite crystals consists (100) plains. Tiny framboidal aggregates and crystals with (210) plains also occur. In the run products of longer than 3 days run durations

  2. Combined buoyancy and flow direction effects on saturated boiling critical heat flux in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Buoyancy effects on the critical heat flux and general data trends for a liquid nitrogen internal flow system were determined by comparison of upflow and downflow data under identical test conditions. The test section had a 1.28 cm diameter flow passage and a 30.5 cm heated length which was subjected to uniform heat fluxes through resistance heating. Test conditions covered a range of pressures from 3.4 to 10.2 atm, inlet velocities from 0.23 to 3.51 m/sec, with the liquid nitrogen temperature at saturated inlet conditions. Data comparisons showed that the critical heat flux for downflow could be up to 36 percent lower than for upflow. A nonmonotonic relationship between the critical heat flux and velocity was determined for upflow but not for downflow. A limiting inlet velocity of 4.12 m/sec was determined to be the minimum velocity required to completely suppress the influence of buoyancy on the critical heat flux for this saturated inlet flow system. A correlation of this limiting fluid velocity is presented that was developed from previously published subcooled liquid nitrogen data and the saturated data of this investigation.

  3. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  4. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  5. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Porkolab, M.; Turco, F.

    2014-02-12

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ∼2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  6. COMBUSTION OF HYDROTHERMALLY TREATED COALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of: (1) the relationship of the combustion characteristics of hydrothermally treated (HTT) coals to environmental emissions, boiler design, and interchangeability of solid fuels produced by the Hydrothermal Coal Process (HCP) with raw coa...

  7. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.A.; Kennish, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    The present article reviews studies of the past 15 years of active and inactive hydrothermal vents. The focus of the discussion is on the ecology of the biological communities inhabiting hydrothermal vents. These communities exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. The authors attempt to relate the biology of hydrothermal vent systems to geology. Future directions for hydrothermal vent research are suggested. Since many vent populations are dependent on hydrothermal fluids and are consequently unstable, both short- and long-term aspects of the ecology of the vent organisms and the influence of chemical and geological factors on the biology of vent systems need to be established. 200 refs., 28 figs.

  8. Future directions in two-phase flow and heat transfer in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankoff, S. George

    1994-01-01

    Some areas of opportunity for future research in microgravity two-phase flow and heat transfer are pointed out. These satisfy the dual requirements of relevance to current and future needs, and scientific/engineering interest.

  9. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Progress is reported on the following R&D activities: evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, geothermal district heating marketing strategy, and greenhouse peaking analysis. Other activities are reported on technical assistance, technology transfer, and the geothermal progress monitor.

  10. Anhydrite precipitation in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    The composition and metal concentration of hydrothermal fluids venting at the seafloor is strongly temperature-dependent and fluids above 300°C are required to transport metals to the seafloor (Hannington et al. 2010). Ore-forming hydrothermal systems and high temperature vents in general are often associated with faults and fracture zones, i.e. zones of enhanced permeabilities that act as channels for the uprising hydrothermal fluid (Heinrich & Candela, 2014). Previous numerical models (Jupp and Schultz, 2000; Andersen et al. 2015) however have shown that high permeabilities tend to decrease fluid flow temperatures due to mixing with cold seawater and the resulting high fluid fluxes that lead to short residence times of the fluid near the heat source. A possible mechanism to reduce the permeability and thereby to focus high temperature fluid flow are mineral precipitation reactions that clog the pore space. Anhydrite for example precipitates from seawater if it is heated to temperatures above ~150°C or due to mixing of seawater with hydrothermal fluids that usually have high Calcium concentrations. We have implemented anhydrite reactions (precipitation and dissolution) in our finite element numerical models of hydrothermal circulation. The initial results show that the precipitation of anhydrite efficiently alters the permeability field, which affects the hydrothermal flow field as well as the resulting vent temperatures. C. Andersen et al. (2015), Fault geometry and permeability contrast control vent temperatures at the Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Geology, 43(1), 51-54. M. D. Hannington et al. (2010), Modern Sea-Floor Massive Sulfides and Base Metal Resources: Toward an Estimate of Global Sea-Floor Massive Sulfide Potential, in The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Innovative Exploration, and New Discoveries, edited by R. J. Goldfarb, E. E. Marsh and T. Monecke, pp. 317-338, Society of Economic Geologists

  11. Core Cracking and Hydrothermal Circulation Profoundly Affect Ceres' Geophysical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2014-11-01

    The dwarf planet (1)Ceres is about to be visited by the Dawn spacecraft [1]. In addition to a recent report of water vapor emission [2], observations and models of Ceres suggest that its evolution was shaped by interactions between liquid water and silicate rock [3,4].Hydrothermal processes in a heated core require both fractured rock and liquid. Using a new core cracking model coupled to a thermal evolution code [5], we find volumes of fractured rock always large enough for significant interaction to occur. Therefore, liquid persistence is key. It is favored by antifreezes such as ammonia [4], by silicate dehydration which releases liquid, and by hydrothermal circulation itself, which enhances heat transport into the hydrosphere. The heating effect from silicate hydration seems minor. Hydrothermal circulation can profoundly affect Ceres' evolution: it prevents core dehydration via “temperature resets”, global cooling events lasting ~50 Myr, followed by ~1 Gyr periods during which Ceres' interior is nearly isothermal and its hydrosphere largely liquid. Whether Ceres has experienced such extensive hydrothermalism may be determined through examination of its present-day structure. A large, fully hydrated core (radius 420 km) suggests that extensive hydrothermal circulation prevented core dehydration. A small, dry core (radius 350 km) suggests early dehydration from short-lived radionuclides, with shallow hydrothermalism at best. Intermediate structures with a partially dehydrated core seem ambiguous, compatible both with late partial dehydration without hydrothermal circulation, and with early dehydration with extensive hydrothermal circulation. Thus, gravity measurements by the Dawn orbiter [1] could help discriminate between scenarios for Ceres' evolution.References:[1] Russell C. T. & Raymond C. A. (2011) Sp. Sci. Rev. 163, 3-23.[2] Küppers M. et al. (2014) Nature 505, 525-527.[3] Rivkin A. et al. (2011) Sp. Sci. Rev. 163, 95-116.[4] Castillo-Rogez J. C. & Mc

  12. Garnet phosphors prepared via hydrothermal synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Walko, R.J.; Shea, L.E.

    1996-05-01

    This project studied hydrothermal synthesis as a route to producing green-emitting cathodoluminescent phosphorus isostructural with yttrium aluminum garnet (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, or YAG). Aqueous precipitation of Y, Gd, Al, Ga, and Tb salts produced amorphous gels, which were heated with water at 600 C and 3,200 bar to produce crystalline YAG:Tb, Y{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Tb, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}O{sub 12}:Tb, and Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Tb powders. Process parameters were identified that yielded submicron YAG:Tb and Y{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Tb powders without grinding. Cathodoluminescent efficiencies were measured as functions of power density at 600 V, using both the hydrothermal garnets and identical phosphor compositions synthesized at high temperatures. Saturation behavior was independent of synthetic technique, however, the hydrothermal phosphorus were less susceptible to damage (irreversible efficiency loss) at very high power densities (up to 0.1 W/cm{sup 2}). The fine grain sizes available with hydrothermal synthesis make it an attractive method for preparing garnet phosphorus for field emission, projection, and head-up displays.

  13. Hydrothermal processes at Mount Rainier, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Field studies and thermal-infrared mapping at Mount Rainier indicate areas of active hydrothermal alteration where excess surface heat flux is about 9 megawatts. Three representative settings include: (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82/sup 0/C at East and West Craters on the volcano's summit; (2) A small area (less than 500 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and sub-boiling-point fumaroles at 55-60/sup 0/C on the upper flank at Disappointment Cleaver, and other probably similar areas at Willis Wall, Sunset Amphitheater, and the South Tahoma and Kautz headwalls; (3) Sulfate and carbon dioxide enriched thermal springs at 9-24/sup 0/C on the lower flank of the volcano in valley walls beside the Winthrop and Paradise Glaciers. In addition, chloride- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs issue from thin sediments that overlie Tertiary rocks at, or somewhat beyond, the base of the volcanic edifice in valley bottoms of the Nisqually and Ohanapecosh Rivers where maximum spring temperatures are 19-25/sup 0/C, respectively, and where extensive travertine deposits have developed. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration products indicate that a narrow, central hydrothermal system exists within Mount Rainier forming steam-heated snowmelt at the summit craters and localized leakage of steam-heated fluids within 2 kilometers of the summit. The lateral extent of the hydrothermal system is limited in that only sparse, neutral sulfate-enriched thermal water issues from the lower flank of the cone. Simulations of geochemical mass transfer suggest that the thermal springs may be derived from an acid sulfate-chloride parent fluid which has been neutralized by reaction with andesite and highly diluted with shallow ground water.

  14. Biomass-to-biocrude on a chip via hydrothermal liquefaction of algae.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang; Ooms, Matthew D; Sinton, David

    2016-01-21

    Hydrothermal liquefaction uses high temperatures and pressures to break organic compounds into smaller fractions, and is considered the most promising method to convert wet microalgae feedstock to biofuel. Although, hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae has received much attention, the specific roles of temperature, pressure, heating rate and reaction time remain unclear. We present a microfluidic screening platform to precisely control and observe reaction conditions at high temperature and pressure. In situ observation using fluorescence enables direct, real-time monitoring of this process. A strong shift in the fluorescence signature from the algal slurry at 675 nm (chlorophyll peak) to a post-HTL stream at 510 nm is observed for reaction temperatures at 260 °C, 280 °C, 300 °C and 320 °C (P = 12 MPa), and occurs over a timescale on the order of 10 min. Biocrude formation and separation from the aqueous phase into immiscible droplets is directly observed and occurs over the same timescale. The higher heating values for the sample are observed to increase over shorter timescales on the order of minutes. After only 1 minute at 300 °C, the higher heating value increases from an initial value of 21.97 MJ kg(-1) to 33.63 MJ kg(-1). The microfluidic platform provides unprecedented control and insight into this otherwise opaque process, with resolution that will guide the design of large scale reactors and processes. PMID:26667244

  15. Direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent flow over a heated flat plate using finite-difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    1995-01-01

    This report deals with the direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent flow at low Mach numbers using high-order-accurate finite-difference techniques. A computation of transition to turbulence of the spatially-evolving boundary layer on a heated flat plate in the presence of relatively high freestream turbulence was performed. The geometry and flow conditions were chosen to match earlier experiments. The development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers was documented. Velocity and temperature profiles, as well as distributions of skin friction, surface heat transfer rate, Reynolds shear stress, and turbulent heat flux, were shown to compare well with experiment. The results indicate that the essential features of the transition process have been captured. The numerical method used here can be applied to complex geometries in a straightforward manner.

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transitional and Turbulent Flow Over a Heated Flat Plate Using Finite-Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    1995-01-01

    The work in this report was conducted at NASA Ames Research Center during the period from August 1993 to January 1995 deals with the direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent flow at low Mach numbers using high-order-accurate finite-difference techniques. A computation of transition to turbulence of the spatially-evolving boundary layer on a heated flat plate in the presence of relatively high freestream turbulence was performed. The geometry and flow conditions were chosen to match earlier experiments. The development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers was documented. Velocity and temperature profiles, as well as distributions of skin friction, surface heat transfer rate, Reynolds shear stress, and turbulent heat flux were shown to compare well with experiment. The numerical method used here can be applied to complex geometries in a straightforward manner.

  17. Hot solar-wind helium: direct evidence for local heating by Alfvén-cyclotron dissipation.

    PubMed

    Kasper, J C; Lazarus, A J; Gary, S P

    2008-12-31

    A study of solar-wind hydrogen and helium temperature observations collected by the Wind spacecraft offers compelling evidence of heating by an Alfvén-cyclotron dissipation mechanism. Observations are sorted by the rate of Coulomb interactions, or collisional age, in the plasma and the differential flow between the two species. We show that helium is preferentially heated perpendicular to the magnetic field direction by more than a factor of 6 when the flow between the species is small relative to the Alfvén wave speed and collisions are infrequent. These signatures are consistent with predictions of dissipation in the presence of multiple ion species. We also report an unexpected result: observations of efficient heating of helium parallel to the magnetic field for large differential flow relative to the sound speed. PMID:19113766

  18. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kaszuba, John P.; Sims, Kenneth W.W.; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-06-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  19. Results on the characterization of gas hydrate formation in a direct contact heat pump cool storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1985-07-01

    This report describes an investigation of a latent cool storage system which employs a refrigerant gas hydrate as the storage medium. A refrigerant gas hydrate is a compound consisting of a refrigerant gas molecule contained within a crystalline water molecule cage. In this system, the storage component is incorporated directly into the refrigeration cycle, replacing the conventional evaporator. The refrigerant is used not only to form the gas hydrate, but also as a direct contact heat exchange fluid to remove heat from the storage tank. In this investigation, only the charging phase of the process was examined; that is, only the characteristics of the formation of gas hydrate were studied. The results of the tests showed that liquid refrigerant must be dispersed throughout the water in the storage tank during charging to obtain acceptance.

  20. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.

    1993-03-30

    CHC (Geo-Heated Center) staff provided assistance to 103 requests from 26 states, and from Canada, Egypt, Mexico, China, Poland and Greece. A breakdown of the requests according to application include: space and district heating (19), geothermal heat pumps (24), greenhouses (10), aquaculture (4), industrial (4), equipment (3), resources (27), electric power (2) and other (20). Progress is reported on: (1) evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, (2) pilot fruit drier and (3) geothermal district heating marketing tools and equipment investigation. Four presentations and two tours were conducted during the quarter, GHC Quarterly Bulletin Vol. 14, No. 4 was prepared, 14 volumes were added to the library and information was disseminated to 45 requests. Progress reports are on: (1) GHP Teleconference 93, (2) California Energy Buys Glass Mountain Prospect from Unocal and Makes Deal for Newberry Caldera, (3) New Power Plant Planned, (4) Vale to Get Power Plant, (5) BPA Approves Geothermal Project, (6) Update: San Bernardino Reservoir Study, (7) Twenty-nine Palms Geothermal Resources, (8) Geo-Ag Heat Center, Lake County, and (9) Update: Geothermal Wells at Alturas.

  1. Direct waste heat recovery via thermoelectric materials - chosen issues of the thermodynamic description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasiński, Piotr; Kolasińska, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    The effective waste heat recovery is one of the present-day challenges in the industry and power engineering. The energy systems dedicated for waste heat conversion into electricity are usually characterized by low efficiency and are complicated in the design. The possibility of waste heat recovery via thermoelectric materials may be an interesting alternative to the currently used technologies. In particular, due to their material characteristics, conducting polymers may be competitive when compared with the power machinery and equipment. These materials can be used in a wide range of the geometries e.g. the bulk products, thin films, pristine form or composites and the others. In this article, the authors present selected issues related to the mathematical and thermodynamic description of the heat transfer processes in the thermoelectric materials dedicated for the waste heat recovery. The link of these models with electrical properties of the material and a material solution based on a conducting polymer have also been presented in this paper.

  2. Theoretical thermodynamics connections between Dual (Left-Handed) and Direct (Right Handed) systems: Entropy, temperature, pressure and heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. C.; Palma-Chilla, L.

    2015-11-01

    Spectral frequencies for Dual systems, a subclass of Left Handed materials, are straight connected to their corresponding Direct counterparts (conventional materials). This allows us to link the thermodynamics properties of both. We found analytically these connections for temperature, pressure and heat capacity. Entropies are also correlated being a basic tool to attach thermodynamically both categories of systems. It is explicitly showed that the Dual has negative temperatures and positive pressures.

  3. The ultra-rapid synthesis of 2D graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets via direct microwave heating for field emission.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongzhi; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Jigang

    2016-02-16

    The 2D g-C3N4 nanosheets were ultra-rapidly prepared via a direct microwave heating approach. The as-synthesized g-C3N4 possessed a large surface area, few stacking layers, a large aspect ratio and an enlarged bandgap. As a consequence, the excellent field emission properties of 2D g-C3N4 nanosheets were exhibited with extremely low turn-on fields. PMID:26879135

  4. Direct evidence of strongly inhomogeneous energy deposition in target heating with laser-produced ion beams.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schlegel, T; Malka, G; Amthor, K U; Aléonard, M M; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Nicolai, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V; Audebert, P

    2007-06-01

    We report on strong nonuniformities in target heating with intense, laser-produced proton beams. The observed inhomogeneity in energy deposition can strongly perturb equation of state (EOS) measurements with laser-accelerated ions which are planned in several laboratories. Interferometric measurements of the target expansion show different expansion velocities on the front and rear surfaces, indicating a strong difference in local temperature. The nonuniformity indicates at an additional heating mechanism, which seems to originate from electrons in the keV range. PMID:17677318

  5. Soil heat flux variability influenced by row direction in irrigated cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In applications of micrometeorological techniques for surface energy balance estimation, most often the least attention and effort has been devoted to determining the area-average soil heat flux (G). Although spatial and temporal variability in G under sparse/clumped vegetation conditions is signif...

  6. Hydrothermal minerals and microstructures in the Silangkitang geothermal field along the Great Sumatran fault zone, Sumatra, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, S.; Lockner, D.A.; Dobson, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed study of core samples of silicic tuff recovered from three geothermal wells along the strike-slip Great Sumatran fault zone near Silangkitang, North Sumatra, supports a model for enhanced hydrothermal circulation adjacent to this major plate-boundary fault. Two wells (A and C) were drilled nearly vertically ??1 km southwest of the eastern (i.e., the principal) fault trace, and the third, directional well (B) was drilled eastward from the site of well A to within ??100 m of the principal fault trace. The examined core samples come from depths of 1650-2120 m at measured well temperatures of 180-320 ??C. The samples collected near the principal fault trace have the highest temperatures, the largest amount of secondary pore space that correlates with high secondary permeability, and the most extensive hydrothermal mineral development. Secondary permeability and the degree of hydrothermal alteration decrease toward the southwestern margin of the fault zone. These features indicate episodic, localized flow of hot, possibly CO2-rich fluids within the fault zone. The microstructure populations identified in the core samples correlate to the subsidiary fault patterns typical of strike-slip faults. The geothermal reservoir appears to be centered on the fault zone, with the principal fault strands and adjoining, highly fractured and hydrothermally altered rock serving as the main conduits for vertical fluid flow and advective heat transport from deeper magmatic sources.

  7. Global patterns and vigor of ventilated hydrothermal circulation through young seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.

    2013-10-01

    Using an updated global heat flow dataset with >14 000 oceanic measurements, we revise the estimated global power deficit due to ventilated hydrothermal circulation. This study differs from previous estimates by taking into account (1) non-Gaussian statistics, (2) an improved seafloor age model, (3) a new plate cooling model calibrated directly to heat flow, and (4) the effect of sediment cover on the heat flow deficit and ventilated cutoff age. We obtain the maximum heat flow deficit (difference between predicted and observed) when the data are separated by seafloor areas with <400 m and ⩾400 m of sediment cover. The estimated power deficit (integrated heat flow deficit with respect to area) for areas of thin (<400 m) sediment cover is 7.8 TW and for areas of thick (⩾400 m) is 0.2 TW. The total power deficit, 8.0 TW with 50% of estimates falling between 5.0 and 10.0 TW, represents a ˜30% reduction in magnitude compared with previous heat flow and fluid flow based estimates. Regions with thick, ⩾400 m, sediment cover experience half the heat flow deficit for one-third of the duration (25 Ma) of regions with thin sediment cover (75 Ma). Based on this study, vigorous fluid exchange between the oceans and seafloor redistributes ˜30% of heat lost through young oceanic crust.

  8. Direct impacts of climatic warming on heat stress in endothermic species: seabirds as bioindicators of changing thermoregulatory constraints.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Stephen A; Arnold, Jennifer M

    2012-06-01

    There is now abundant evidence that contemporary climatic change has indirectly affected a wide-range of species by changing trophic interactions, competition, epidemiology and habitat. However, direct physiological impacts of changing climates are rarely reported for endothermic species, despite being commonly reported for ectotherms. We review the evidence for changing physiological constraints on endothermic vertebrates at high temperatures, integrating theoretical and empirical perspectives on the morphology, physiology and behavior of marine birds. Potential for increasing heat stress exposure depends on changes in multiple environmental variables, not just air temperature, as well as organism-specific morphology, physiology and behavior. Endotherms breeding at high latitudes are vulnerable to the forecast, extensive temperature changes because of the adaptations they possess to minimize heat loss. Low-latitude species will also be challenged as they currently live close to their thermal limits and will likely suffer future water shortages. Small, highly-active species, particularly aerial foragers, are acutely vulnerable as they are least able to dissipate heat at high temperatures. Overall, direct physiological impacts of climatic change appear underrepresented in the published literature, but available data suggest they have much potential to shape behavior, morphology and distribution of endothermic species. Coincidence between future heat stress events and other energetic constraints on endotherms remains largely unexplored but will be key in determining the physiological impacts of climatic change. Multi-scale, biophysical modeling, informed by experiments that quantify thermoregulatory responses of endotherms to heat stress, is an essential precursor to urgently-needed analyses at the population or species level. PMID:22691196

  9. The Magmatic-Hydrothermal Transition of The Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, I. S.; Dilles, J. H.; Heinrich, C. A.; Wälle, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand is a rifting arc that produced over the last 2 My over 6000 km3 of caldera-associated volcanic products. About four times as much magma is estimated to be trapped at depth below the central TVZ than is erupted, feeding heat, volatiles and chemicals into 23 geothermal systems with a total of ca. 4.2 GW thermal energy release. We present here a combined study linking melt, hypersaline and dilute fluid inclusion chemistry, surface and reservoir fluid chemistry and whole rock lithochemistry and discuss the magmatic-hydrothermal chemical zoning in large silicic systems. New dataset of full lithogeochemistry in active geothermal systems of the TVZ refine the zoned chemical footprint left by both dilute meteoric-dominated and magmatic-hydrothermal fluids. Altered whole rock trace elements content (including precious metals and volatiles) shows major variation with depth, due to the influence of past hydrothermal activity, magmatic degassing, natural variability of the reservoir rocks, and current active fluid-rock interactions. The concentrations of Li, Cs, Tl, Bi, Sn, Ag, Se, Te, as well as Au, generally increase upward toward the paleosurface, where they are 10-100 times greater than near known or potentially 'active' intrusions. New direct in-situ analyses of trapped fluid inclusions in phenocrysts and hydrothermal veins associated with magmatic subsolidus crystallization are compared with liquid-dominated dilute fluid inclusions and geothermal fluids Li, Cs, B, Na, Cl, K content (and precious metals) providing a unique direct assessment of the role of each component (magma, rock, fluids) in New Zealand's world known geothermal systems.

  10. Energetics of hydrothermal convection in heterogeneous ocean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruepke, Lars; Hasenclever, Joerg; Andersen, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in hydrothermal flow modeling have revealed the key thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic controls on hydrothermal convection and vent temperatures at oceanic spreading centers. The observed upper limit to black smoker vent temperatures of approx. 400°C can be explained by the thermodynamic properties of water (Jupp and Schultz, 2000). Likewise, 3D models of hydrothermal flow at fast-spreading ridges show cylindrical upwellings with closely interwoven recharge flow (Coumou et al., 2008, Hasenclever et al., 2014). While these studies provide a robust theoretical basis for hydrothermal flow observations at fast-spreading ridges, the situation at slow-spreading ridges is different. The slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge produces highly heterogeneous crust along its tectonic and magmatic segments with significant permeability contrasts across structural and lithological interfaces. The sub-seafloor permeability structure has a strong control on vent field location such that off-axis hydrothermal systems are apparently consistently located at outcropping fault zones. We have recently shown that preferential flow along high-permeability conduits inevitably leads to the entrainment of cold ambient seawater (Andersen et al., 2014), which causes a temperature drop that is difficult to reconcile with fault-related high-temperature venting. A fundamental question is therefore how hydrothermal fluids can maintain their high temperature while flowing kilometers from a driving heat source through highly heterogeneous crust to a vent site at the seafloor? We address this question by exploring the energetics of hydrothermal convection in heterogeneous ocean crust using 2D and 3D flow simulations. In our analysis we focus on the energy balance of rising hydrothermal plumes and on mixing processes at permeability boundaries, with the aim to establish a more robust theoretical framework for hydrothermal flow through highly heterogeneous seafloor.

  11. The Hydrothermal System at the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River: Exposed and Hidden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworowski, C.; Heasler, H. P.; Susong, D. D.; Neale, C. M.; Sivarajan, S.; Masih, A.

    2012-12-01

    Combining calibrated and corrected night-time, airborne thermal infrared imaging with field information from the 2008 drilling of the Canyon borehole strainmeter (B206) in Yellowstone National Park emphasizes the extensive nature of Yellowstone's hydrothermal system. Both studies contributed to an understanding of the vertical and horizontal flow of heat and fluids through the bedrock in this area. Night-time, airborne thermal infrared imagery, corrected for emissivity and atmosphere clearly shows north-trending faults and fractures transmitting heat and fluids through the rhyolitic bedrock and into the overlying glacial sediments near the Canyon borehole. Along the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, the Clear Lake hydrothermal area is an example of hydrothermal alteration at the ground surface. The numerous hydrothermal features exposed in the nearby Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River and its hydrothermally altered walls are clear evidence of the exposed hydrothermal system. The bedrock geology, geologic processes, and hydrothermal activity combined to form the dramatic Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. The night-time thermal infrared imagery provides a new view of this exposed hydrothermal system for scientists and visitors. Scientists and Yellowstone Park managers carefully sited the Canyon borehole strainmeter in a green, grassy meadow to insure successful completion of the borehole in a non-hydrothermal area. The closest hydrothermal feature to the drilling site was about 2.5 km to the east. Although excellent exposures of hydrothermal altered bedrock are present about 1.5 km east at the Lower Falls and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, the connection between exposed hydrothermal areas and the borehole site was not obvious. After drilling through 9 m of brown-gray muds and 113 m of rock, a bottom hole temperature of 81.2 degrees Celsius precluded drilling the hole any deeper than 122 m. The post-drilling data collected from B206 and the airborne

  12. Modification of the surface chemistry of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes by HNO3 and H2SO4 hydrothermal oxidation for application in direct contact membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Morales-Torres, Sergio; Silva, Tânia L S; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa M; Brandão, Ana T S C; Figueiredo, José L; Silva, Adrián M T

    2014-06-28

    A specific methodology based on nitric acid hydrothermal oxidation was used to control the surface chemistry of multi-walled (MWCNTs) and single-walled (SWCNTs) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different lengths, and this methodology was adapted to the use of sulphuric acid containing ammonium persulfate as an oxidizing agent. The amount of oxygen-containing surface groups depends on the number and length of the graphene layers of the CNTs, thicker and shorter CNTs having more reactive sites for surface functionalization. In particular, the oxidation of MWCNTs was more pronounced than that of short SWCNTs and less surface groups were introduced into long SWCNTs, regardless of the acid used at any fixed concentration. It was also possible to tailor the surface chemistry of both SWCNTs and MWCNTs by using the adopted methodologies, and the amount of both oxygen- and sulphur-containing functional groups was correlated with the concentration of each oxidizing agent used. Mathematical functions that allow precise control of the amount and type of the surface groups introduced into carbon nanotubes were obtained. Buckypapers were also prepared over a polytetrafluoroethylene commercial membrane. These membranes were tested in direct contact membrane distillation and, under salinity conditions, the membrane prepared using oxidized MWCNTs (instead of SWCNTs) was the most efficient, the permeate flux of the commercial membrane significantly increasing in the presence of these CNTs, while completely rejecting chloride ions. In addition, the permeate flux was precisely correlated with the amount of oxygenated functional surface groups (as well as with the pH of point of zero charge) of the oxidized MWCNTs. PMID:24821484

  13. Effect of structure-directing agents on facile hydrothermal preparation of hierarchical γ-Al2O3 and their adsorption performance toward Cr(VI) and CO2.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinrong; Deng, Kejian; Cai, Weiquan; Yu, Jiaguo; Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Jiabin

    2013-07-01

    Hierarchical flower-like and sphere-like mesoporous γ-Al2O3 microparticles were successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal method followed by a calcination process using sodium aluminate as aluminum source, urea as precipitating agent, and Pluronic F127 (EO106PO70EO106), polyacrylic acid sodium (PAAS), and mixed F127-PAAS as structure-directing agents (SDAs), respectively. Effects of the SDAs on the phase structure, morphology, textural properties, surface alkaline, and the adsorption performance toward Cr(VI) and CO2 of the as-prepared samples were comparatively studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, CO2 temperature programmed desorption (CO2-TPD), and UV-Vis spectrophotometric method. The results indicate that the sphere-like γ-Al2O3 obtained by using F127 as the SDA shows the best adsorption performance toward Cr(VI) with a high adsorption rate of 95% and adsorption capacity of 5.7 mg/g when the adsorption reaches equilibrium for 4h at room temperature. However, the flower-like γ-Al2O3 obtained by using PAAS as the SDA has the biggest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.04 mmol/g at room temperature. This work provides a simple and practical way to prepare potentially bifunctional γ-Al2O3 adsorbent for the removal of pollutants in water and air treatment from cheap sodium aluminate by using different SDAs. PMID:23623408

  14. Direct Electricity from Heat: A Solution to Assist Aircraft Power Demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A thermionic device produces an electrical current with the application of a thermal gradient whereby the temperature at one electrode provides enough thermal energy to eject electrons. The system is totally predicated on the thermal gradient and the work function of the electrode collector relative to the emitter electrode. Combined with a standard thermoelectric device high efficiencies may result, capable of providing electrical energy from the waste heat of gas turbine engines.

  15. Dynamic m6A mRNA methylation directs translational control of heat shock response

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Wan, Ji; Gao, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingqian; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2015-01-01

    The most abundant mRNA post-transcriptional modification is N6-methyladenosine (m6A) that has broad roles in RNA biology1-5. In mammalian cells, the asymmetric distribution of m6A along mRNAs leaves relatively less methylation in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) compared to other regions6,7. However, whether and how 5′UTR methylation is regulated is poorly understood. Despite the crucial role of the 5′UTR in translation initiation, very little is known whether m6A modification influences mRNA translation. Here we show that in response to heat shock stress, m6A is preferentially deposited to the 5′UTR of newly transcribed mRNAs. We found that the dynamic 5′UTR methylation is a result of stress-induced nuclear localization of YTHDF2, a well characterized m6A “reader”. Upon heat shock stress, the nuclear YTHDF2 preserves 5′UTR methylation of stress-induced transcripts by limiting the m6A “eraser” FTO from demethylation. Remarkably, the increased 5′UTR methylation in the form of m6A promotes cap-independent translation initiation, providing a mechanism for selective mRNA translation under heat shock stress. Using Hsp70 mRNA as an example, we demonstrate that a single site m6A modification in the 5′UTR enables translation initiation independent of the 5′ end m7G cap. The elucidation of the dynamic feature of 5′UTR methylation and its critical role in cap-independent translation not only expands the breadth of physiological roles of m6A, but also uncovers a previously unappreciated translational control mechanism in heat shock response. PMID:26458103

  16. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.

    1993-06-01

    Technical assistance was provided to 60 requests from 19 states. R&D progress is reported on: evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, geothermal district heating marketing strategy, and greenhouse peaking analysis. Two presentations and one tour were conducted, and three technical papers were prepared. The Geothermal Progress Monitor reported: USGS Forum on Mineral Resources, Renewable Energy Tax Credits Not Working as Congress Intended, Geothermal Industry Tells House Panel, Newberry Pilot Project, and Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in Nevada.

  17. A portable direct-PV thermoelectric vaccine refrigerator with ice storage through heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiajitsawat, Somchai

    The objective of this research work was to develop a portable solar refrigeration system capable of maintaining vaccine temperatures between 2 °C and 8 °C. The main system under this study consisted of thermoelectric modules as cooling generators with latent heat energy storage (LHES) using water as cooling backup along with heat pipes as passive temperature controllers to avoid freezing the vaccines. The system was fabricated and tested. The results showed that the system can maintain the vaccine storage temperature at 2 °C and 8 °C under ambient temperature up to 30 °C with minimum power consumption of 30 Watt. The proposed heat pipes to maintain the vaccine storage temperature satisfied the design criteria. However, the energy consumption of the TEM was higher than anticipated. A small vapor compressor system was tested and shows promise to replace the TEM for cooling. Inserting the aluminum matrix in the ice chamber not only decreased the charging time but also decreased the discharging time since less phase change material was available for energy storage. Three models of the system were developed under different assumptions. The lumped model was adequate to predict the system performance during charging process. The other distributed models were able to predict the melting and cooling time more accurately than that of the lumped model and provided more detailed on the temperature distribution and change of the water phase in the ice chamber.

  18. Effluent from diffuse hydrothermal venting. 1: A simple model of plumes from diffuse hydrothermal sources

    SciTech Connect

    Trivett, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    This paper focuses on modeling the fate of effluent from diffuse seafloor hydrothermal activity after it has been vented into the water column. The model was formulated using a number of simplifying assumptions which permit direct application of this model to field measurements. I have limited the configurations to those where the hydrothermal outflow velocities are smaller than horizontal current. I assume that the entrainment of ambient seawater into the plume is constant over the length of the plume. This permits formulation of a first-order relation for the rise height and dilution in a diffuse hydrothermal plume as a function of downstream distance. The analytic model is compared with a simple laboratory simulation of the hydrothermal flow. The results suggest that diffuse hydrothermal effluent will penetrate to a height in the water column that is proportional to the overall dimension of the diffuse vent patch, multiplied by a dimensionless plume intensity parameter. I also ahow relations for plume dilution which will be compared with field data in part 2 of this work.

  19. Direct observation of phase transformations in the simulated heat-affected zone of a 9Cr martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Peter; Palmer, T. A.; Elmer, J. W.; Specht, Eliot D

    2008-01-01

    An experimental test melt of a boron alloyed 9Cr-3W-3Co-V,Nb steel for high temperature applications in the thermal power generation industry was produced by vacuum induction melting. This grade of steel typically displays a homogeneous tempered martensitic microstructure in the as-received condition. However, after welding, this microstructure is significantly altered, resulting in a loss of its desired properties. The phase transformations during simulated thermal cycles typical of those experienced in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) were directly observed by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments using synchrotron radiation. Heating rates of 10 C s-1 and 100 C s-1 up to a peak temperature of 1300 C are investigated here. The final microstructures observed after both simulated weld thermal cycles are primarily composed of martensite with approximately 4% retained delta ferrite and 4% retained austenite, by volume. With the temporal resolution of the in situ X-ray diffraction technique, phase transformations from tempered martensite to austenite to delta ferrite during heating and to martensite during cooling were monitored. With this technique, the evolution of the final microstructure through both heating and cooling is monitored, providing additional context to the microstructural observations.

  20. THM modelling of hydrothermal circulation in deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnenet, Vincent; Fond, Christophe; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Genter, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Numerous models have been developped for describing deep geothermal reservoirs. Using the opensource finite element software ASTER developped by EDF R&D, we carried out 2D simulations of the hydrothermal circulation in the deep geothermal reservoir of Soultz-sous-Forêts. The model is based on the effective description of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) coupling at large scale. Such a model has a fourfold interest: a) the physical integration of laboratory measurements (rock physics), well logging, well head parameters, geological description, and geophysics field measurements; b) the construction of a direct model mechanically based for geophysical inversion: fluid flow, fluid pressure, temperature profile, seismicity monitoring, deformation of the ground surface (INSAR/GPS) related to reservoir modification, gravity or electromagnetic geophysical measurements; c) the sensitivity analysis of the parameters involved in the hydrothermal circulation and identification of the dominant ones; d) the development of a decision tool for drilling planning, stimulation and exploitation. In our model, we introduced extended Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical coupling including not only poro-elastic behavior but also the sensitivity of the fluid density, viscosity, and heat capacity to temperature and pressure. The behavior of solid rock grains is assumed to be thermo-elastic and linear. Hydraulic and thermal phenomena are governed by Darcy and Fourier laws respectively, and most rock properties (like the specific heat at constant stress csσ(T), or the thermal conductivity Λ(T,φ)) are assumed to depend on the temperature T and/or porosity φ. The radioactivity of the rocks is taken into account through a heat source term appearing in the balance equation of enthalpy. To characterize as precisely as possible the convective movement of water and the associated heat flow, water properties (specific mass ρw(T,pw), specific enthalpy hmw(T,pw) dynamic viscosity μw(T), thermal dilation

  1. Processing effects of the evolution of the microstructure and preferred orientation of hydrothermal perovskite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hsin-Yu

    Ferroelectric ceramics such as BaTiO3, PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 have been widely studied due to their variety of potential application, including ultrasonic sensors, infrared detectors, and ferroelectric random access memories. Ferroelectric films have been synthesized by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition (MOCVD), laser ablation, sputtering, and sol-gel techniques but all require high temperature treatments to obtain high quality films. However, high temperature processing degrades device performance and thus, a low-temperature route is desirable. The hydrothermal processing method enables the synthesis of ferroelectric thin films at low temperatures (usually below 200°C) which greatly suppress the interdiffusion between substrates, electrodes and thin films. This thesis describes research on the effects of substrate preparation and hydrothermal processing conditions as well as laser post heat treatment on the microstructure and preferred orientation of barium titanate and lead titanate thin films. Post laser treatment is more desirable compared to conventional furnace heating because of its high ramping rate and the ability to heat the sample locally, thereby avoiding potential interdiffusion problems. In previous literature, laser treatment has been applied to amorphous thin films to successfully enhanced the crystallinity, and improve the electrical and ferroelectric properties. In this study, a KrF laser treatment was applied to crystalline hydrothermal barium titanate thin films to investigate the evolution of microstructures, electrical and ferroelectric properties as well as film orientation. The second part of the thesis emphasizes texture analysis on films with the spontaneous polarization direction preferentially-oriented normal to the substrate surface as is necessary to attain a high remanent polarization. PbTiO3 thin films usually undergo phase transformation from a cubic paraelectric structure to a tetragonal ferroelectric structure upon cooling

  2. Geochemistry of hydrothermal plume in the Suiyo Seamount Caldera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitashima, K.; Maeda, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Chemical compounds of the hot basalt origin are discharged into the deep ocean via hydrothermal plume by the deep-sea hydrothermal activity. The hydrothermal plume is widely diffused to the ocean by mixing with ambient seawater. Chemical reactions and interactions with microorganisms in the diffusion process of the hydrothermal plume are important to comprehend the oceanic geochemical cycles. Recently, it has been clarified that the variation of hydrothermal activity is greatly controlled in the tidal current. Not only geochemical observation but also physical observation, such as water current measurement, are necessary for the understanding of the deep-sea hydrothermal systems including the behavior of hydrothermal plume. In order to observe the diffusion process of hydrothermal plumes, sampling and chemical mapping of the hydrothermal plume and measurement of water current were carried out at the Suiyo Seamount Caldera during research cruises under the ?Archaean Park? project funded by MEXT. The three-dimensional acoustic current meters were moored at the height of 13m and 125m above the bottom in the Suiyo Seamount Caldera. At the 13m height, average water current speed and current direction were 10.46 cm/second and 228.1 degrees, respectively, and maximum water current speed was over 40.46 cm/second. On the other hand, average water current speed and current direction at the 125m height were 3.87 cm/second and 57.8 degrees, respectively. The strong water current of the southwest direction in 24 hours periods existed near bottom of the caldera. In addition, downward current and water temperature depreciation were observed, when there was the strong current in 24 hours periods. These results suggest that the low-temperature ocean water around the Suiyo Seamount flows toward the bottom of caldera periodically. The mini CTDT-RMS mounted twelve 1.2L Niskin bottles and the in-situ pH sensor were installed on the ROV or manned submersible. The hydrothermal plume

  3. Idealised modelling of ocean circulation driven by geothermal and hydrothermal fluxes at the seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jowan; Morales Maqueda, Miguel; Polton, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    There are two distinct processes by which heat is transferred from the solid Earth into the abyssal ocean. The first is conductive geothermal heating and the second is hydrothermal heating, involving advection of heated water from within the Earth's crust. Here, the noticeably different impacts of these two physical systems on ocean circulation are investigated. Previous modelling studies have applied geothermal heat fluxes at the seabed and shown discrepancies in circulation compared to cases which neglected heat from the Earth in their boundary conditions. The true heat flux in the ocean, however, is not entirely geothermal. From areas where the crust is younger a significant proportion of the heat input from the Earth could be in the form of fluid flow from hydrothermal vents, introducing forcing to the circulation which has previously been unaccounted for. In this study a set of idealised modelling experiments are run in order to investigate the effects of changing the balance of the total heat flux from purely geothermal to purely hydrothermal, via intermediate states in which the two boundary conditions are combined in different ratios. By performing such experiments it will be shown which of the two processes is dominant in its effects on circulation driven by heating at the seabed, and whether neglecting the hydrothermal advection in favour of a fully conductive geothermal boundary condition is justifiable. The results will inform the construction of boundary conditions for future circulation models involving ocean floor heat fluxes, specifically a regional study of geothermal and hydrothermal contributions within the Panama Basin.

  4. Direct retrieval of ocean surface evaporation and latent heat flux from the spacebased observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, W.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) provides the opportunity to improve the spacebased estimation of evaporation. An algorithm for retrieving evaporation directly from the radiances observed by the TRMM Microwave Imager and its validation results are described.

  5. Photon-Noise Limited Direct Detector Based on Disorder-Controlled Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B.; McGrath, W.; Gershenson, M.; Sergeev, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new concept for a hot-electron direct detector (HEDD) capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a transition edge sensor (1-meu size bridge) made form a disordered superconducting film.

  6. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  7. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2016-03-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  8. An investigation of the crystallization kinetics of zeotype SAPO-34 crystals synthesized by hydrothermal and sonochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Marzpour Shalmani, Fariba; Halladj, Rouein; Askari, Sima

    2016-03-01

    The kinetics study of SAPO-34 crystallization from a gel containing morpholine as a structure directing agent (SDA) was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns in order to determine the kinetics parameters, i.e. induction times, rate constants, frequency factors, and activation energies for the induction and growth stages. The kinetics data of growth period were determined by using the Avrami-Erofeev nucleation growth model. SAPO-34 molecular sieves were synthesized by using both sonochemical-assisted hydrothermal and conventional hydrothermal heating at temperatures of 180, 200, and 220 °C to elucidate the influence of crystallization method on the crystallization kinetics of SAPO-34. The activation energy values indicated that the crystal growth mechanism was enhanced for samples synthesized sonochemically, whereas the induction energy was not greatly affected by using sonication process. Also, the kinetic compensation effect (KCE) was considered in order to obtain the isokinetic temperature. PMID:26585015

  9. Preliminary reactor cavity melt dispersal model for direct containment heating scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of experiments performed to study the effect of initial pressure vessel conditions on the extent of melt dispersal from scaled reactor cavities and describes progress in development of a mathematical model which is designed to predict the melt mass dispersed from reactor cavities as a function of reactor vessel initial conditions and on the vessel breach area. The model, which is being developed to also characterize the heat transfer and chemical reaction phenomena which would take place within the reactor cavity, is designed to be incorporated into a lumped-parameter containment analysis computer code.

  10. Potential biomass in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first discovery of black smoker vents hosting chemosynthetic macrofaunal communities (Spiess et al., 1980), submarine hydrothermal systems and associated biota have attracted interest of many researchers (e.g., Humphris et al., 1995; Van Dover, 2000; Wilcock et al., 2004). In the past couple of decades, particular attention has been paid to chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms that sustain the hydrothermal vent-endemic animal communities as the primary producer. This type of microorganisms obtains energy from inorganic substances (e.g., sulfur, hydrogen, and methane) derived from hydrothermal vent fluids, and is often considered as an important modern analogue to the early ecosystems of the Earth as well as the extraterrestrial life in other planets and moons (e.g., Jannasch and Mottl, 1985; Nealson et al., 2005; Takai et al., 2006). Even today, however, the size of this type of chemosynthetic deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is largely unknown. Here, we present geophysical and geochemical constraints on potential biomass in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem. The estimation of the potential biomass in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is based on hydrothermal fluid flux calculated from heat flux (Elderfield and Schltz, 1996), maximum chemical energy available from metabolic reactions during mixing between hydrothermal vent fluids and seawater (McCollom, 2007), and maintenance energy requirements of the chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms (Hoehler, 2004). The result shows that the most of metabolic energy sustaining the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is produced by oxidation reaction of reduced sulfur, although some parts of the energy are derived from hydrogenotrophic and methanotrophic reactions. The overall total of the potential biomass in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is calculated to be much smaller than that in terrestrial ecosystems including terrestrial plants. The big difference in biomass between the

  11. Non-Newtonian unconfined flow and heat transfer over a heated cylinder using the direct-forcing immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Succi, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method has been used to simulate non-Newtonian fluid flow over a heated circular cylinder. The direct-forcing algorithm has been employed to couple the off-lattice obstacles and on-lattice fluid nodes. To investigate the effect of boundary sharpness, two different diffuse interface schemes are considered to interpolate the velocity and temperature between the boundary and computational grid points. The lattice Boltzmann equation with split-forcing term is applied to consider the effects of the discrete lattice and the body force to the momentum flux, simultaneously. A method for calculating the Nusselt number based on diffuse interface schemes is developed. The rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids are investigated under the different power-law indices and Reynolds numbers. The effect of numerical parameters on the accuracy of the proposed method has been investigated in detail. Results show that the rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids in the presence of a heated immersed body can be suitably captured using the immersed boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method.

  12. The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse hydrothermal field: A hydrothermal system on an active detachment fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphris, Susan E.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2015-11-01

    Over the last ten years, geophysical studies have revealed that the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field (26°08‧N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is located on the hanging wall of an active detachment fault. This is particularly important in light of the recognition that detachment faulting accounts for crustal accretion/extension along a significant portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and that the majority of confirmed vent sites on this slow-spreading ridge are hosted on detachment faults. The TAG hydrothermal field is one of the largest sites of high-temperature hydrothermal activity and mineralization found to date on the seafloor, and is comprised of active and relict deposits in different stages of evolution. The episodic nature of hydrothermal activity over the last 140 ka provides strong evidence that the complex shape and geological structure of the active detachment fault system exerts first order, but poorly understood, influences on the hydrothermal circulation patterns, fluid chemistry, and mineral deposition. While hydrothermal circulation extracts heat from a deep source region, the location of the source region at TAG is unknown. Hydrothermal upflow is likely focused along the relatively permeable detachment fault interface at depth, and then the high temperature fluids leave the low-angle portion of the detachment fault and rise vertically through the highly fissured hanging wall to the seafloor. The presence of abundant anhydrite in the cone on the summit of the TAG active mound and in veins in the crust beneath provides evidence for a fluid circulation system that entrains significant amounts of seawater into the shallow parts of the mound and stockwork. Given the importance of detachment faulting for crustal extension at slow spreading ridges, the fundamental question that still needs to be addressed is: How do detachment fault systems, and the structure at depth associated with these systems (e.g., presence of plutons and/or high

  13. Electrically induced shape oscillation of drops as a means of direct-contact heat transfer enhancement: Part 1 - Drop dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaji, N. ); Mori, Y.H. ); Tochitani, Y. )

    1988-08-01

    The shape oscillation of liquid drops passing through an immiscible liquid medium subject to a low-frequency (1 {approximately} 16 Hz) alternating electric field having a sinusoidal waveform has been studied experimentally with the intention of investigating the enhancement of the direct-contact heat exahange between the two liquids. The authors have found that the field can induce, depending on its frequency, not only the resonant oscillation of the second mode of the drops, but also another peculiar oscillation that is related to the resonant oscillation of the third mode superposed on the second-mode oscillation.

  14. The kinetics of inhibitor production resulting from hydrothermal deconstruction of wheat straw studied using a pressurised microwave reactor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of a microwave synthesis reactor has allowed kinetic data for the hydrothermal reactions of straw biomass to be established from short times, avoiding corrections required for slow heating in conventional reactors, or two-step heating. Access to realistic kinetic data is important for predictions of optimal reaction conditions for the pretreatment of biomass for bioethanol processes, which is required to minimise production of inhibitory compounds and to maximise sugar and ethanol yields. Results The gravimetric loss through solubilisation of straw provided a global measure of the extent of hydrothermal deconstruction. The kinetic profiles of furan and lignin-derived inhibitors were determined in the hydrothermal hydrolysates by UV analysis, with concentrations of formic and acetic acid determined by HPLC. Kinetic analyses were either carried out by direct fitting to simple first order equations or by numerical integration of sequential reactions. Conclusions A classical Arrhenius activation energy of 148 kJmol−1 has been determined for primary solubilisation, which is higher than the activation energy associated with historical measures of reaction severity. The gravimetric loss is primarily due to depolymerisation of the hemicellulose component of straw, but a minor proportion of lignin is solubilised at the same rate and hence may be associated with the more hydrophilic lignin-hemicellulose interface. Acetic acid is liberated primarily from hydrolysis of pendant acetate groups on hemicellulose, although this occurs at a rate that is too slow to provide catalytic enhancement to the primary solubilisation reactions. However, the increase in protons may enhance secondary reactions leading to the production of furans and formic acid. The work has suggested that formic acid may be formed under these hydrothermal conditions via direct reaction of sugar end groups rather than furan breakdown. However, furan degradation is found to be significant

  15. Monte Carlo direct view factor and generalized radiative heat transfer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Williams, J. L.; Scates, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    Computer programs find the direct view factor from one surface segment to another using the Monte carlo technique, and the radioactive-transfer coefficients between surface segments. An advantage of the programs is the great generality of problems treatable and rapidity of solution from problem conception to receipt of results.

  16. Modeling Direct and Inverse Problems in Ferritic Heat-Exchanger Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present examples of direct and inverse problems involving ferritic tubes, using the proprietary eddy-current NDE code, VIC-3D©. We demonstrate conditions that are peculiar to ferritic tubes, and give insight into the optimum methods for characterizing the tubes and flaws within them.

  17. Core cracking and hydrothermal circulation can profoundly affect Ceres' geophysical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2015-02-01

    Observations and models of Ceres suggest that its evolution was shaped by interactions between liquid water and silicate rock. Hydrothermal processes in a heated core require both fractured rock and liquid. Using a new core cracking model coupled to a thermal evolution code, we find volumes of fractured rock always large enough for significant interaction to occur. Therefore, liquid persistence is key. It is favored by antifreezes such as ammonia, by silicate dehydration which releases liquid, and by hydrothermal circulation itself, which enhances heat transport into the hydrosphere. The effect of heating from silicate hydration seems minor. Hydrothermal circulation can profoundly affect Ceres' evolution: it prevents core dehydration via "temperature resets," core cooling events lasting ˜50 Myr during which Ceres' interior temperature profile becomes very shallow and its hydrosphere is largely liquid. Whether Ceres has experienced such extensive hydrothermalism may be determined through examination of its present-day structure. A large, fully hydrated core (radius 420 km) would suggest that extensive hydrothermal circulation prevented core dehydration. A small, dry core (radius 350 km) suggests early dehydration from short-lived radionuclides, with shallow hydrothermalism at best. Intermediate structures with a partially dehydrated core seem ambiguous, compatible both with late partial dehydration without hydrothermal circulation, and with early dehydration with extensive hydrothermal circulation. Thus, gravity measurements by the Dawn orbiter, whose arrival at Ceres is imminent, could help discriminate between scenarios for Ceres' evolution.

  18. Methane and radioactive isotopes in submarine hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: 1) methane and 2) radioactive isotopes, especially radon, in submarine hydrothermal systems. Both parts deal with the use of these gases as tracers for mapping hydrothermal vents at sea, and with their relationships to other sensitive tracers such as helium, manganese, and temperature. Hydrothermal methane was used as a real-time tracer for locating new submarine hydrothermal systems along spreading axes, discovering new hydrothermal systems at two locations in Pacific Ocean: 1) 20/sup 0/S on East Pacific Rise, and 2) Mariana Trough Back-arc Basin. Methane shows good correlations with helium-3 and temperature with similar ratios in various hydrothermal systems, 3 to 42 x 10/sup 6/ for the methane to helium-3 ratio, and 3 to 19 ..mu.. cc/kg/sup 0/C for the methane to temperature anomaly. These similar ratios from different areas provide evidence for chemical homogeneity of submarine hydrothermal waters. A good correlation between methane and manganese appears to be associated only with high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Radioisotopes in the vent waters of 21/sup 0/N high-temperature hydrothermal system have end-member concentrations of 7.5 to 40 dpm/kg for Ra-226, 360 dpm/kg for Rn 222, 62 dpm/kg for Pb-210, and 19 dpm/kg for Po-210. The radon activity for this system is one order of magnitude lower, and the Pb-210 activity is one order or magnitude higher, than those a the low temperature Galapagos system. All these observations suggest that the high radon, and low Pb-210 activity observed in Galapagos system may originate from the extensive subsurface mixing and water-rock interaction in this system (direct injection of radon and scavenging of Pb-210).

  19. Organic thermoelectric materials: emerging green energy materials converting heat to electricity directly and efficiently.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Sun, Yimeng; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2014-10-29

    The abundance of solar thermal energy and the widespread demands for waste heat recovery make thermoelectric generators (TEGs) very attractive in harvesting low-cost energy resources. Meanwhile, thermoelectric refrigeration is promising for local cooling and niche applications. In this context there is currently a growing interest in developing organic thermoelectric materials which are flexible, cost-effective, eco-friendly and potentially energy-efficient. In particular, the past several years have witnessed remarkable progress in organic thermoelectric materials and devices. In this review, thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers and small molecules are summarized, with recent progresses in materials, measurements and devices highlighted. Prospects and suggestions for future research efforts are also presented. The organic thermoelectric materials are emerging candidates for green energy conversion. PMID:24687930

  20. Direct dissolution of wet and saliferous marine microalgae by polar ionic liquids without heating.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Daigo; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    We successfully dissolved wet and saliferous microalgae (WSM) in polar ionic liquids (ILs) under mild conditions. The Kamlet-Taft parameters, especially β for the ILs, were good predictors of the ability to dissolve WSM. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylphosphate ([C2mim][MeO(H)PO(2)]) was the IL that best dissolved WSM without heating. WSM (containing 95 wt% water) was mixed with [C2mim][MeO(H)PO(2)]; the WSM had dissolved completely within 30 min at room temperature with gentle stirring. The IL maintained its chemical structure after removal of the microalgae component, suggesting recyclable use. The concentration of contaminant mineral salts in the [C2mim][MeO(H)PO(2)] did not increase with increasing recycle number. The recycled [C2mim][MeO(H)PO(2)] maintained its ability to dissolve WSM regardless of the number of recycling studied here. PMID:23410933

  1. Directly heated high surface area solid phase microextraction sampler for rapid field forensic analyses.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Scott A; Mustacich, Robert V; Smith, Philip A; Hook, Gary L; Eckenrode, Brian A

    2009-11-01

    A high-surface area solid phase microextraction (HSA-SPME) sampler is described for dynamic sampling at high air velocities (up to several hundred centimeters per second). The sampling device consists of a thin wire coated with carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (carboxen/PDMS) material, wound in the annular space between two concentric glass tubes, providing a large trapping surface from which analytes may then be thermally desorbed with little power consumption upon resistive heating of the wire. Desorbed analytes are focused and reconcentrated on a microtrap that is subsequently resistively heated to introduce analytes for GC or GC/MS analysis. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) included in a 39-component toxic organics (TO-14) gas mixture were used to evaluate the efficiency of the HSA-SPME sampler. Quantitation of trace-level BTEX compounds present during weapons cleaning was completed using stepwise calibration. Detection limits of 0.2-6.9 pptr(v) were observed for these analytes using single ion monitoring GC/MS analysis, and an improvement in sensitivity of several orders of magnitude was achieved when compared to standard dynamic flow SPME with a commercially available 10 mm carboxen/PDMS fiber. The potential for rapid analyte uptake and improved sensitivity using the HSA-SPME design will make it possible to rapidly collect and analyze VOC samples in field settings using a portable hand-held pump and a small, low power GC/MS instrument. This system will be especially useful for situations involving forensics, public safety, and military defensive or intelligence needs where rapid, sensitive detection of airborne analytes is required. PMID:19795869

  2. Organic rankine cycle coupled to a solar pond by direct-contact heat exchange - selection of a working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. D.

    1982-06-01

    Heat from a solar pond may be used to drive an organic Rankine cycle and produce electricity. Due to the inherent low efficiency of low temperature cycles, large amounts of heat must be transferred, and heat exchangers may account for up to 50% of the plant cost. Use of a direct contact boiler, in which the organic fluid is bubbled through a stream of pond brine, may reduce the plant cost by about 25%. The choice of a working fluid affects plant efficiency, turbine cost, and the loss rate of the organic fluid. Low vapor pressure fluids maximize cycle efficiency by minimizing pumping requirements, but require a larger turbine. Efficiency affects the size and cost of the entire plant and low pressure fluids are preferred. The saturated and halogenated hydrocarbons were evaluated for use as working fluids. It is found that the working fluid is best suited to this application, because of high efficiency, low solubility in the pond, and a reasonable turbine cost.

  3. Effects of direct and indirect heating on the validity of rock weathering simulation studies and durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warke, P. A.; Smith, B. J.

    1998-04-01

    Rock surface and subsurface temperature responses in samples exposed to direct heating (insolation) under natural hot desert conditions reveal considerable variability between lithologies related to differences in thermal properties, especially albedo and thermal conductivity. However, when the same samples are heated indirectly by air in an oven-based environmental cabinet, lithological differences in temperature response disappear and all samples attain temperatures similar to the air temperature within the cabinet. Rates and patterns of rock decay produced in such environmental cabinets may not, therefore, reflect those encountered under natural conditions, where breakdown is related to micro-environmental conditions at the rock/air interface and where rock temperature is one of the most important controlling factors. In addition to implications for assessment of weathering effectiveness, use of only indirect forms of heating affects the determination of comparative rock durability because all rock types are cycled through the same temperature regimes. Because temperature exerts such a major control on rock breakdown through its control on physical and chemical weathering processes, all significant factors influencing it must be included in the design of weathering simulations and durability tests.

  4. The potential for prebiotic synthesis in hydrothermal systems. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.

    1994-01-01

    Contemporary hydrothermal systems provide a reducing environment where organic compounds are formed and may react to generate the molecules used in the first living systems. The organic compounds percolate through mineral assemblages at a variety of temperatures so the proposed synthetic reactions are driven by heat and catalyzed by minerals (Ferris, 1992). Some examples of potential prebiotic reactions are discussed.

  5. The hydrothermal alteration of cooling lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica L.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Calder, Eliza S.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration is a recognized cause of volcanic instability and edifice collapse, including that of lava domes or dome complexes. Alteration by percolating fluids transforms primary minerals in dome lavas to weaker secondary products such as clay minerals; moreover, secondary mineral precipitation can affect the porosity and permeability of dome lithologies. The location and intensity of alteration in a dome depend heavily on fluid pathways and availability in conjunction with heat supply. Here we investigate postemplacement lava dome weakening by hydrothermal alteration using a finite element numerical model of water migration in simplified dome geometries. This is combined with the rock alteration index (RAI) to predict zones of alteration and secondary mineral precipitation. Our results show that alteration potential is highest at the interface between the hot core of a lava dome and its clastic talus carapace. The longest lived alteration potential fields occur in domes with persistent heat sources and permeabilities that allow sufficient infiltration of water for alteration processes, but not so much that domes cool quickly. This leads us to conclude that alteration-induced collapses are most likely to be shallow seated and originate in the talus or talus/core interface in domes which have a sustained supply of magmatic heat. Mineral precipitation at these zones of permeability contrast could create barriers to fluid flow, potentially causing gas pressurization which might promote deeper seated and larger volume collapses. This study contributes to our knowledge of how hydrothermal alteration can affect lava domes and provides constraints on potential sites for alteration-related collapses, which can be used to target hazard monitoring.

  6. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Diffuse flow from hydrothermal vents. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Trivett, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    The effluent from a collection of diffuse hydrothermal vents was modelled to determine the fate of the source of flow under typical environmental conditions at seafloor spreading centers. A laboratory simulation was conducted to test an analytic model of diffuse plume rise. The results showed that diffuse plumes are likely to remain near the seafloor, with their maximum rise height scaled with the diameter of the source of diffuse flow. The entrainment of ambient seawater into these plumes is limited by the proximity to the seafloor, thus slowing the rate of dilution. The model of diffuse plume behaviour was used to guide the design and implementation of a scheme for monitoring the flow from diffuse hydrothermal vents in the ocean. A deployment of an array at the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge yielded measurements of a variety of diffuse plume properties, including total heat output. Two distinct sources of hydrothermal flow were detected during the field deployment. The larger source was 1-1.5km north of the instrument array, and its energy output was 450 + or - 270MW. A smaller source was located 100m east of one instrument in the array. The energy output of the source was 12 + or - 8MW. The rise heights of the centerlines of these plumes were 45m and 10m, respectively.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell in combined heat and power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, F.; Dincer, I.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive steady state modelling and thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell integrated with Gas Turbine power cycle (DU-SOFC/GT). The use of urea as direct fuel mitigates public health and safety risks associated with the use of hydrogen and ammonia. The integration scheme in this study covers both oxygen ion-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-O) and hydrogen proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-H). Parametric case studies are carried out to investigate the effects of design and operating parameters on the overall performance of the system. The results reveal that the fuel cell exhibited the highest level of exergy destruction among other system components. Furthermore, the SOFC-O based system offers better overall performance than that with the SOFC-H option mainly due to the detrimental reverse water-gas shift reaction at the SOFC anode as well as the unique configuration of the system.

  9. Characterization of Active Hydrothermal Fluid Discharge and Recharge Zones in the Endeavour Axial Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, M.; Hutnak, M.; Hearn, C.; Tivey, M.; Bjorklund, T.; Johnson, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    Sites where warm hydrothermal fluid vents at mid-ocean spreading centers are important for understanding a wide range of critical oceanic processes, but discharge zones represent a very limited portion of crustal fluid circulation pathways. Mapping the distribution of both fluid recharge and discharge sites within the axial valley provides wider insight into the larger scale features of hydrothermal circulation. Our 2011 survey consisted of 180 conductive heat flow stations within the Endeavour axial valley in roughly a 400 m by 1000 m grid, extending across the entire axial valley from the outer flank of the western boundary ridge to the eastern wall. Data acquisition used thermal blankets which measured conductive heat flow without requiring substantial sediment cover. A surprising result from this survey was zones of high heat flow extending across-strike, from the summit of the west valley wall across the entire axial valley floor. This trend was correlated with anomalously low seafloor magnetization from a near-bottom survey with the ROV JASON. Unexpectedly, over half of the axial valley floor was anomalously low at <50 mW m-2, while a small portion of the sites within the 'warm zone' had heat flow values >1 W m-2. The areas of extremely low heat flow values are interpreted as being directly influenced by recharge zones. Based on MCS estimates of partial melt depth below the axial valley and the assumption of no fluid advection, the purely conductive heat flow for this region should be on the order of 1 W m-2.The observation that conductive heat flux is suppressed over large portions of the axial valley floor suggests that heat transfer within the crustal sub-surface fluid reservoir is widespread, and impacts a large portion of our survey area. The largely bi-modal distribution of high and low conductive heat flow, coupled with geophysical and video observations, suggest current Endeavour axial valley crustal fluid circulation models need to be re-evaluated.

  10. Experimental constraints on hydrothermal activities in Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kuwatani, T.

    2012-12-01

    C). This is because NH3 decomposition proceeds inefficiently due to efficient H2 production via serpentinization. Our experimental results also suggest that SiO2 concentration dissolved in hydrothermal fluids simulating Enceladus' condition would be buffered by the serpentine-brucite system. The presence of NH3 in the hydrothermal conditions keeps pH of the solution high (pH 9-11). We suggest that under such conditions, SiO2 concentrations in the fluids would be 0.1 mmol/L or less for temperature < 350°C. Given the SiO2 solubility of 1-10 mmol/L at 0°C and pH 9-11, direct formation of amorphous SiO2 would not occur in Enceladus' hydrothermal systems. To produce amorphous SiO2, large-scale hydrothermal activities and subsequent concentration of dissolved SiO2 in the ocean (due to freezing and/or evaporation of liquid water) would be required, which is consistent with high concentrations of radiogenic Ar and sodium salts in the plume [2, 6]. [1] Porco et al., Science 311, 1393 (2006). [2] Postberg et al., Nature 459, 1098 (2009). [3] Matson et al., Icarus 187, 569 (2007). [4] Hansen t al., Geophs. Res. Lett. 38, L11202 (2011). [5] Hsu et al., EOS Trans. AGU, (2010). [6] Waite et al., Nature 460, 487 (2009).

  11. Hydrothermal Chimney Distribution from AUV Sentry bathymetry and Alvin at the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Lee, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Drivers of hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridges are crustal permeability and heat derived from magma, but their relative contributions remain enigmatic, thus raising the question why vents occur where they do. Currently, observational data are ambiguous and biased toward actively venting sites. However, new AUV Sentry bathymetric data from the 92W segment of the Galapagos Spreading Center from the 2010 GRUVEE expedition provide 0.5 m gridded maps that resolve individual chimneys, at least 2m tall and 0.75 m wide, directly. Comparing chimney features from the 23 vents found in the Alvin video with the AUV Sentry bathymetry establishes criteria that allow many other vents to be identified in our study area using only bathymetric data and without need for direct visual observation. Thus, we have a nearly complete record of both active and inactive hydrothermal chimneys over the entire length of a mid-ocean ridge segment to correlate with other seafloor features for further analysis. We use lava morphology, extent of mapped lava flow units, and volcanic features such as tumuli and pillow mounds as proxies for volcanic heat. Magmatic heat input, on a longer timescale, may be estimated by using seismic data on the thickness of layer 2A, depth to the magma lens, or crustal thickness as proxies. For permeability proxies, over 350 fault segments and 150+ fissures have been cataloged on this segment. By analyzing the locations of all these features relative to hydrothermal chimneys, it is possible to correlate crustal permeability and lava morphology with the distribution of vents and to provide empirical constraints on whether certain types of seafloor terrain are more conducive to hosting hydrothermal chimneys. Preliminary analysis suggests a strong correlation between chimneys and nearby mounds and major faults. All 23 chimneys seen with Alvin, inactive and active, are within 30 m of mounds. Considering both chimneys seen from Alvin and a partial catalog of those only

  12. A New Estimate for Global Hydrothermal Exchange Between the Oceans and Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    We revise the estimated global power deficit due to ventilated hydrothermal circulation (8.0 TW) using an updated global heat flow dataset with >14000 oceanic measurements and a new conductive cooling model of the oceanic lithosphere. This study differs from previous estimates by taking into account (1) non-Gaussian statistics, (2) an improved seafloor age model, (3) a new plate cooling model calibrated directly to heat flow, and (4) the effect of sediment cover on the heat flow deficit and ventilated cutoff age. We obtain the maximum heat flow deficit (difference between predicted and observed) when the data are separated by seafloor areas with <400 m and 400 m of sediment cover. The estimated power deficit (integrated heat flow deficit with respect to area) for areas of thin (<400 m) sediment cover is 7.8 TW and for areas of thick (400 m) is 0.2 TW. The total power deficit, 8.0 TW with 50% of estimates falling between 5.0 and 10.0 TW, represents a 30% reduction in magnitude compared with previous heat flow and fluid flow based estimates. Regions with thick, 400 m, sediment cover experience half the heat flow deficit for one-third of the duration (25 Ma) of regions with thin sediment cover (75 Ma). Based on this study, vigorous fluid exchange between the oceans and seafloor redistributes 30% of heat lost through young oceanic crust. Spatial variation in heat flow deficit relative to estimated conductive heat loss. Variations are calibrated to observed heat flow and constrained by sediment thickness variations.

  13. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with

  14. Cody hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    The hot springs of Colter's Hell are the surface manifestations of a much larger hydothermal system. That system has been studied to define its extent, maximum temperature, and mechanism of operation. The study area covers 2700 km/sup 2/ (1040 mi/sup 2/) in northwest Wyoming. Research and field work included locating and sampling the hot springs, geologic mapping, thermal logging of available wells, measuring thermal conductivities, analyzing over 200 oil and gas well bottom-hole temperatures, and compiling and analyzing hydrologic data. These data were used to generate a model for the hydrothermal system.

  15. Microbial biofilms associated with fluid chemistry and megafaunal colonization at post-eruptive deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Charles E.; Giovannelli, Donato; Govenar, Breea; Luther, George W.; Lutz, Richard A.; Shank, Timothy M.; Vetriani, Costantino

    2015-11-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, reduced, super-heated hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, oxygenated seawater. This creates temperature and chemical gradients that support chemosynthetic primary production and a biomass-rich community of invertebrates. In late 2005/early 2006 an eruption occurred on the East Pacific Rise at 9°50‧N, 104°17‧W. Direct observations of the post-eruptive diffuse-flow vents indicated that the earliest colonizers were microbial biofilms. Two cruises in 2006 and 2007 allowed us to monitor and sample the early steps of ecosystem recovery. The main objective of this work was to characterize the composition of microbial biofilms in relation to the temperature and chemistry of the hydrothermal fluids and the observed patterns of megafaunal colonization. The area selected for this study had local seafloor habitats of active diffuse flow (in-flow) interrupted by adjacent habitats with no apparent expulsion of hydrothermal fluids (no-flow). The in-flow habitats were characterized by higher temperatures (1.6-25.2 °C) and H2S concentrations (up to 67.3 μM) than the no-flow habitats, and the microbial biofilms were dominated by chemosynthetic Epsilonproteobacteria. The no-flow habitats had much lower temperatures (1.2-5.2 °C) and H2S concentrations (0.3-2.9 μM), and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the biofilms. Siboglinid tubeworms colonized only in-flow habitats, while they were absent at the no-flow areas, suggesting a correlation between siboglinid tubeworm colonization, active hydrothermal flow, and the composition of chemosynthetic microbial biofilms.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of fluid-particle mass, momentum, and heat tranfers in reactive systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, Abdelkader; Wachs, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Many industrial processes like coal combustion, catalytic cracking, gas phase polymerization reactors and more recently biomass gasification and chemical looping involve two-phase reactive flows in which the continuous phase is a fluid and the dispersed phase consists of rigid particles. Improving both the design and the operating conditions of these processes represents a major scientific and industrial challenge in a context of markedly rising energy cost and sustainable development. Thus, it is above all important to better understand the coupling of hydrodynamic, chemical and thermal phenomena in those flows in order to be able to predict them reliably. The aim of our work is to build up a multi-scale modelling approach of reactive particulate flows and at first to focus on the development of a microscopic-scale including heat and mass transfers and chemical reactions for the prediction of particle-laden flows in dense and dilute regimes. A first step is the upgrading and the validation of our numerical tools via analytical solutions or empirical correlations when it is feasible. These couplings are implemented in a massively parallel numerical code that already enable to take a step towards the enhanced design of semi-industrial processes.

  17. Hydrothermal convection and mordenite precipitation in the cooling Bishop Tuff, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Breen, S. J.; Hernandez, A.; Self, S.; Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present field observations of erosional columns in the Bishop Tuff and then use laboratory results and numerical models to argue that these columns are evidence of relict convection in a cooling ignimbrite. Many square kilometers of the Bishop Tuff have evenly-spaced, vertical to semi-vertical erosional columns, a result of hydrothermal alteration. These altered regions are more competent than the surrounding tuff, are 0.1-0.7 m in diameter, are separated by ~ 1 m, and in some cases are more than 8 m in height. JE Bailey (U. of Hawaii, dissertation, 2005) suggested that similar columns in the Bandelier Tuff were formed when slumping allowed water to pool at the surface of the still-cooling ignimbrite. As water percolated downward it boiled generating evenly spaced convection cells similar to heat pipes. We quantify this conceptual model and apply it the Bishop Tuff to understand the physics within ignimbrite-borne hydrothermal systems. We use thin sections to measure changing porosity and use scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses to show that pore spaces in the columns are cemented by the mineral mordenite, a low temperature zeolite that precipitates between 120-200 oC (Bish et al., 1982), also found in the Bandelier Tuff example. We then use scaling to show 1) that water percolating into the cooling Bishop Tuff would convect and 2) that the geometry and spacing of the columns is predicted by the ignimbrite temperature and permeability. We use the computer program HYDROTHERM (Hayba and Ingebritsen, 1994; Kipp et al., 2008) to model 2-phase convection in the Bishop Tuff. By systematically changing permeability, initial temperature, and topography we can identify the pattern of flows that develop when the ignimbrite is cooled by water from above. Hydrothermally altered columns in ignimbrite are the natural product of coupled heat, mass, and chemical transport and have similarities to other geothermal systems, economic ore deposits

  18. Development of acoustic observation method for seafloor hydrothermal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Tamura, H.; Asada, A.; Kinoshita, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2012-12-01

    In October 2009, we conducted seafloor reconnaissance using a manned deep-sea submersible Shinkai6500 in Central Indian Ridge 18-20deg.S, where hydrothermal plume signatures were previously perceived. Acoustic video camera "DIDSON" was equipped on the top of Shinkai6500 in order to get acoustic video images of hydrothermal plumes. The acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes had been captured in three of seven dives. We could identify shadings inside the acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes. Silhouettes of the hydrothermal plumes varied from second to second, and the shadings inside them also varied. These variations corresponded to internal structures and flows of the plumes. DIDSON (Dual-Frequency IDentification SONar) is acoustic lens-based sonar. It has sufficiently high resolution and rapid refresh rate that it can substitute for optical system in turbid or dark water where optical systems fail. Ins. of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo has understood DIDSON's superior performance and tried to develop a new observation method based on DIDSON for hydrothermal discharging from seafloor vent. We expected DIDSON to reveal whole image of hydrothermal plume as well as detail inside the plume. The proposed method to observe and measure hydrothermal flow is the one to utilize a sheet-like acoustic beam. Scanning with concentrated acoustic beam gives distances to the edges of the hydrothermal flows. And then, the shapes of the flows can be identified even in low and zero visibility conditions. Tank experiment was conducted. The purposes of this experiment were to make an attempt at proposed method to delineate underwater hydrothermal flows and to understand relationships among acoustic video image, flow rate and water temperature. Water was heated in the hot tub and pumped to the water tank through the silicon tube. We observed water flows discharging from the tip of the tube with DIDSON. Flow rate had been controlled and temperatures of the

  19. Hydrothermal Occurrences in Gusev Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Milliken, R.; Mills, V. W.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    -rich (~40 wt%) volcaniclastic rocks that show no other phases indicative of significant alteration, such as phyllosilicates. Even the presence of so much olivine in the outcrops attests to minimal alteration. This suggests that the carbonate was not derived from hydrothermal alteration of the local rock. Instead, carbonate-bearing solutions sourced from elsewhere in the region may have precipitated carbonate as cement within the olivine-rich host rock [4]. An alternative hypothesis by [5] suggests that Comanche carbonate resulted from direct precipitation of evaporating brine, perhaps related to the putative ancient lake in Gusev crater, which infiltrated the host rock. In either case, the presence of outcrops of abundant carbonate and opaline silica demonstrates a rich and varied aqueous history in Gusev crater. [1] Squyres, S. W., et al. (2008), Science, 320, 1063-1067. [2] Squyres, S. W., et al. (2007), Science, 316, 738-742. [3] Ruff, S. W., et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., 116, E00F23, 10.1029/2010JE003767. [4] Morris, R. V., et al. (2010), Science, 329, 5990, 421-424, 10.1126/science.1189667. [5] Ruff, S. W. (2011), Lunar Planet. Sci., XLII, abstract #2708.

  20. A MEMS-based heating holder for the direct imaging of simultaneous in-situ heating and biasing experiments in scanning/transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Mele, Luigi; Konings, Stan; Dona, Pleun; Evertz, Francis; Mitterbauer, Christoph; Faber, Pybe; Schampers, Ruud; Jinschek, Joerg R

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of scanning/transmission electron microscopes (S/TEM) with sub-Angstrom resolution as well as fast and sensitive detection solutions support direct observation of dynamic phenomena in-situ at the atomic scale. Thereby, in-situ specimen holders play a crucial role: accurate control of the applied in-situ stimulus on the nanostructure combined with the overall system stability to assure atomic resolution are paramount for a successful in-situ S/TEM experiment. For those reasons, MEMS-based TEM sample holders are becoming one of the preferred choices, also enabling a high precision in measurements of the in-situ parameter for more reproducible data. A newly developed MEMS-based microheater is presented in combination with the new NanoEx™-i/v TEM sample holder. The concept is built on a four-point probe temperature measurement approach allowing active, accurate local temperature control as well as calorimetry. In this paper, it is shown that it provides high temperature stability up to 1,300°C with a peak temperature of 1,500°C (also working accurately in gaseous environments), high temperature measurement accuracy (<4%) and uniform temperature distribution over the heated specimen area (<1%), enabling not only in-situ S/TEM imaging experiments, but also elemental mapping at elevated temperatures using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Moreover, it has the unique capability to enable simultaneous heating and biasing experiments. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:239-250, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26818213

  1. Starting Conditions for Hydrothermal Systems Underneath Martian Craters: Hydrocode Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Artemieva, N. A.; Ivanov, B. A.

    2004-01-01

    Mars is the most Earth-like of the Solar System s planets, and the first place to look for any sign of present or past extraterrestrial life. Its surface shows many features indicative of the presence of surface and sub-surface water, while impact cratering and volcanism have provided temporary and local surface heat sources throughout Mars geologic history. Impact craters are widely used ubiquitous indicators for the presence of sub-surface water or ice on Mars. In particular, the presence of significant amounts of ground ice or water would cause impact-induced hydrothermal alteration at Martian impact sites. The realization that hydrothermal systems are possible sites for the origin and early evolution of life on Earth has given rise to the hypothesis that hydrothermal systems may have had the same role on Mars. Rough estimates of the heat generated in impact events have been based on scaling relations, or thermal data based on terrestrial impacts on crystalline basements. Preliminary studies also suggest that melt sheets and target uplift are equally important heat sources for the development of a hydrothermal system, while its lifetime depends on the volume and cooling rate of the heat source, as well as the permeability of the host rocks. We present initial results of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations of impacts on Mars aimed at constraining the initial conditions for modeling the onset and evolution of a hydrothermal system on the red planet. Simulations of the early stages of impact cratering provide an estimate of the amount of shock melting and the pressure-temperature distribution in the target caused by various impacts on the Martian surface. Modeling of the late stage of crater collapse is necessary to characterize the final thermal state of the target, including crater uplift, and distribution of the heated target material (including the melt pool) and hot ejecta around the crater.

  2. Multiple-scale temporal variations and fluxes near a hydrothermal vent over the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodan; Liang, Chujin; Dong, Changming; Zhou, Beifeng; Liao, Guanghong; Li, Junde

    2015-12-01

    A deep-ocean mooring system was deployed 100 m away from an active hydrothermal vent over the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), where the water depth is about 2,800 m. One year of data on ocean temperature 50 m away from the ocean floor and on velocities at four levels (44 m, 40 m, 36 m, and 32 m away from the ocean floor) were collected by the mooring system. Multiplescale variations were extracted from these data: seasonal, tidal, super-tidal, and eddy scales. The semidiurnal tide was the strongest tidal signal among all the tidal constituents in both currents and temperature. With the multiple-scale variation presented in the data, a new method was developed to decompose the data into five parts in terms of temporal scales: time-mean, seasonal, tidal, super-tidal, and eddy. It was shown that both eddy and tidal heat (momentum) fluxes were characterized by variation in the bottom topography: the tidal fluxes of heat and momentum in the along-isobath direction were much stronger than those in the cross-isobath direction. For the heat flux, eddy heat flux was stronger than tidal heat flux in the cross-isobath direction, while eddy heat flux was weaker in the along-isobath direction. For the momentum flux, the eddy momentum flux was weaker than tidal momentum flux in both directions. The eddy momentum fluxes at the four levels had a good relationship with the magnitude of mean currents: it increased with the mean current in an exponential relationship.

  3. Microbiological production and ecological flux of northwestern subduction hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunamura, M.; Okamura, K.; Noguchi, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukuba, T.; Yanagawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal system is one of the most important sources for heat and chemical flux from the oceanic crust to the global ocean. The rich biological community around the hydrothermal vent shows chemolithoautotrophic microbial production are important in deep sea ecosystems. More than 99% of microbiological available chemical components in hydrothermal vent fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane, hydrogen, Fe2+, and Mn2+, is released into surrounding seawater to construct hydrothermal plume, suggesting that the chemolithoautotrophic-microbial primary production in the hydrothermal plume is huge and important in the whole hydrothermal ecosystems. To understand the impact of hydrothermal plume to a microbial ecosystem and a connectivity with zooplankton, we targeted and investigated a total of 16 hydrothermal fileds (7 sites in Okinawa trough, 3 sites in Ogasawara arc, and 6 sites in Mariana arc and back arc) and investigated in several cruises under the TAIGA project in Japan. Hydrothermal fluids in the subduction system are rich in sulfide. The hydrothermal fluids in the Okinawa trough, Ogasawara arc. and Mariana trough are characterized by rich in methane, poor in other reduced chemicals, and rich in iron, respectively. The major microbial composition was a potential sulfur oxidizing microbes SUP05 in the plume ecosystems, while an aerobic methanotrophic bacteria was secondary major member in methane-rich hydrothermal systems in Okinawa trough. Microbial quantitative and spatial distribution analyses of each plume site showed that the microbial population size and community structures are influenced by original chemical components of hydrothermal fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane and iron concentration. Microbial quantitative data indicated the removal/sedimentation of microbial cells from the plume and effect of phase separation in a same vent field through construction of gas-rich or gas-poor plumes. After the correlation of plume mixing effect, we estimates that the

  4. Multi-ported, internally recuperated burners for direct flame impingement heating applications

    DOEpatents

    Abbasi, Hamid A.; Kurek, Harry; Chudnovsky, Yaroslav; Lisienko, Vladimir G.; Malikov, German K.

    2010-08-03

    A direct flame impingement method and apparatus employing at least one multi-ported, internally recuperated burner. The burner includes an innermost coaxial conduit having a first fluid inlet end and a first fluid outlet end, an outermost coaxial conduit disposed around the innermost coaxial conduit and having a combustion products outlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a combustion products inlet end proximate the first fluid outlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit, and a coaxial intermediate conduit disposed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit, whereby a second fluid annular region is formed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the intermediate coaxial conduit and a combustion products annular region is formed between the intermediate coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit. The intermediate coaxial conduit has a second fluid inlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a second fluid outlet end proximate the combustion products inlet end of the outermost coaxial conduit.

  5. Water column hydrothermal plumes on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, J.E. )

    1990-08-10

    Hydrographic surveys on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) carried out from 1980 to 1987 show a complex pattern of {sup 3}He and Mn-rich water column plumes produced by venting from several submarine hot spring areas. In the vicinity of Axial Volcano at latitude 46{degree}N, distinct plumes were detected in 1980, 1982, and 1983 with {sup 3}He signatures up to {delta}({sup 3}He) = 64% at {approximately} 1,500 m depth at distances of {approximately} 10 km from the seamount summit. However, the same plumes had no detectable thermal signature, a paradox which is attributed to the high {sup 3}He/heat ratios and low salinities of the fluids venting within the caldera of Axial Volcano. Profiles directly over the seamount show hydrothermal {sup 3}He in the water column up to 300 m above the caldera floor, with the {sup 3}He signal increasing with depth to very high and uniform ratios of {delta}({sup 3}He) = 108-150% below the {approximately} 1,500-m caldera sill depth. Another apparent locus of hydrothermal input is Helium Basin, a depression on the northeast flank of Axial Volcano which had {delta}({sup 3}He) = 51% when first sampled in 1980. However, subsequent hydrocasts into Helium Basin in 1982 and 1983 yielded lower helium enrichments, suggesting either a decrease in hydrothermal input or flushing of the basin via a mixing event. To the south of Axial Volcano, high {delta}({sup 3}He) values of {approximately} 40% observed over the ridge axis at 45{degree}18{prime}N and 45{degree}39{prime}N indicate venting on this previously unexplored section of the ridge. The water column plumes over the US Geological Survey vent site at {approximately} 44{degree}40{prime}N on the southern JdFR have very high Mn/{sup 3}He ratios of 4,600 mol/cm{sup 3}, an apparently unique characteristic which can be used to distinguish these plumes from those originating at other JdFR vent fields.

  6. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.

  7. Results of direct containment heating integral experiments at 1/40th scale at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-09-01

    A series of integral tests have been completed that investigate the effect of scale and containment atmosphere initial composition on Direct Containment Heating (DCH) phenomena at 1/40 linear scale. A portion of these experiments were performed as counterparts to integral experiments conducted at 1/10th linear scale at Sandia National Laboratories. The tests investigated DCH phenomena in a 1/40th scale mockup of Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry. The test apparatus was a scaled down version of the SNL apparatus and included models of the reactor vessel lower head, containment cavity, instrument tunnel, lower subcompartment structures and the upper dome. A High Pressure Melt Ejection (HPME) was produced using steam as a blowdown gas and iron-alumina thermite with chromium as a core melt simulant. The results of the counterpart experiments indicated no effect of scale on debris/gas heat transfer and debris metal oxidation with steam. However, the tests indicated a slight effect of scale on hydrogen combustion, the results indicating slightly more efficient combustion with increasing scale. The experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the subcompartment structures in trapping debris exiting the cavity and preventing it from reaching the upper dome. The test results also indicated that a 50% air -- 50% steam atmosphere prevented hydrogen combustion. However, a 50% air - 50% nitrogen did not prevent hydrogen combustion in a HPME with all other conditions being nominally the same.

  8. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. Amore » putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.« less

  9. A mathematical model of the heat and fluid flows in direct-chill casting of aluminum sheet ingots and billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Dag

    1999-02-01

    A finite-element method model for the time-dependent heat and fluid flows that develop during direct-chill (DC) semicontinuous casting of aluminium ingots is presented. Thermal convection and turbulence are included in the model formulation and, in the mushy zone, the momentum equations are modified with a Darcy-type source term dependent on the liquid fraction. The boundary conditions involve calculations of the air gap along the mold wall as well as the heat transfer to the falling water film with forced convection, nucleate boiling, and film boiling. The mold wall and the starting block are included in the computational domain. In the start-up period of the casting, the ingot domain expands over the starting-block level. The numerical method applies a fractional-step method for the dynamic Navier-Stokes equations and the “streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin” (SUPG) method for mixed diffusion and convection in the momentum and energy equations. The modeling of the start-up period of the casting is demonstrated and compared to temperature measurements in an AA1050 200×600 mm sheet ingot.

  10. Experiments to investigate the effect of flight path on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O. ); Nichols, R.T. )

    1991-10-01

    The goal of the Limited Flight Path (LFP) test series was to investigate the effect of reactor subcompartment flight path length on direct containment heating (DCH). The test series consisted of eight experiments with nominal flight paths of 1, 2, or 8 m. A thermitically generated mixture of iron, chromium, and alumina simulated the corium melt of a severe reactor accident. After thermite ignition, superheated steam forcibly ejected the molten debris into a 1:10 linear scale the model of a dry reactor cavity. The blowdown steam entrained the molten debris and dispersed it into the Surtsey vessel. The vessel pressure, gas temperature, debris temperature, hydrogen produced by steam/metal reactions, debris velocity, mass dispersed into the Surtsey vessel, and debris particle size were measured for each experiment. The measured peak pressure for each experiment was normalized by the total amount of energy introduced into the Surtsey vessel; the normalized pressures increased with lengthened flight path. The debris temperature at the cavity exit was about 2320 K. Gas grab samples indicated that steam in the cavity reacted rapidly to form hydrogen, so the driving gas was a mixture of steam and hydrogen. These experiments indicate that debris may be trapped in reactor subcompartments and thus will not efficiently transfer heat to gas in the upper dome of a containment building. The effect of deentrainment by reactor subcompartments may significantly reduce the peak containment load in a severe reactor accident. 8 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1996-03-01

    This report uses the methodology and scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. The methodology calls for an initial screening phase in which the CCFP for each plant is calculated based on loads versus strength evaluations using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if the CCFP calculated in the screening phase is less than 0.01. This value is more stringent than the overall success criterion of 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 in the screening phase calculations, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  12. Scrap tyre recycling process with molten zinc as direct heat transfer and solids separation fluid: A new reactor concept.

    PubMed

    Riedewald, Frank; Goode, Kieran; Sexton, Aidan; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Every year about 1.5 billion tyres are discarded worldwide representing a large amount of solid waste, but also a largely untapped source of raw materials. The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel scrap tyre recycling process which uses molten zinc as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this media to separate the solids products (i.e. steel and rCB) in a sink-float separation at an operating temperature of 450-470 °C. This methodology involved: •construction of the laboratory scale batch reactor,•separation of floating rCB from the zinc,•recovery of the steel from the bottom of the reactor following pyrolysis. PMID:27274458

  13. Feedbacks of Rock Hydration on Hydrothermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, K.; Ruepke, L.

    2009-04-01

    Hydration of the oceanic lithosphere is an important process which alters both the chemical and physical properties of the affected lithologies. Although hydrothermal convection has been extensively researched, little work has been done on the effects of hydration reactions occurring during convection. One of the most important reactions occurring in the oceanic lithosphere is serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. We present a numerical solution for hydrothermal circulation which explores the feedbacks generated during serpentinization of mantle rocks. The model is two dimensional and uses the FEM approach. Three coupled, time-dependent equations are solved: the first equation is mass conserving and is based on Darcy flow. The second equation describes heat transport and accounts for advective and diffusive heat transfer as well as latent heat effects. The final equation describes the serpentinization rate of olivine in ultramafic rocks (Emmanuel and Berkowitz, 2006) and is derived from experimental results (Martin and Fyfe, 1970). Serpentinization is a fluid-consuming process and manifests itself as a sink term in the Darcy flow equation. The exothermic heat of reaction is added as a source term in the heat transport equation. Moreover, serpentinization is associated with a large positive volume change. This large volume change may decrease the porosity of the rock but can also increase permeability by deformation. The rate of serpentinization used in the model is, therefore, also coupled to the porosity and permeability. We investigate the role of hydration in a box model using thermodynamically constrained fluid properties where the lower part is composed of reactive mantle rocks. The effects of serpentinization on the temperatures of the venting fluids and variations in flow pathways are explored. Furthermore, the model is also used in a mid-ocean ridge setting and the amount and depth of serpentinization, in addition to the above mentioned effects, is also

  14. Catalytic hydrothermal processing of microalgae: decomposition and upgrading of lipids.

    PubMed

    Biller, P; Riley, R; Ross, A B

    2011-04-01

    Hydrothermal processing of high lipid feedstock such as microalgae is an alternative method of oil extraction which has obvious benefits for high moisture containing biomass. A range of microalgae and lipids extracted from terrestrial oil seed have been processed at 350 °C, at pressures of 150-200 bar in water. Hydrothermal liquefaction is shown to convert the triglycerides to fatty acids and alkanes in the presence of certain heterogeneous catalysts. This investigation has compared the composition of lipids and free fatty acids from solvent extraction to those from hydrothermal processing. The initial decomposition products include free fatty acids and glycerol, and the potential for de-oxygenation using heterogeneous catalysts has been investigated. The results indicate that the bio-crude yields from the liquefaction of microalgae were increased slightly with the use of heterogeneous catalysts but the higher heating value (HHV) and the level of de-oxygenation increased, by up to 10%. PMID:21295976

  15. CONCEPTUAL MODELS FOR THE LASSEN HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Sorey, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Lassen hydrothermal system, like a number of other systems in regions of moderate to great topographic relief, includes steam-heated features at higher elevations and high-chloride springs at lower elevations, connected to and fed by a single circulation system at depth. Two conceptual models for such systems are presented. They are similar in several ways: however, there are basic differences in terms of the nature and extent of vapor-dominated conditions beneath the steam-heated features. For some Lassen-like systems, these differences could have environmental and economic implications. Available data do not make it possible to establish a single preferred model for the Lassen system, and the actual system is complex enough that both models may apply to different parts of the system.

  16. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the initial entry of hydrothermal seawater into deep levels of the oceanic crust, the effectiveness of hydrothermal circulation in cooling the crust, the geometry of hydrothermal circulation, the relationship between the hydrothermal circulation and the magma chamber, the reaction of the oceanic crust with the seawater, and the identification of the hydrothermal fluid which alters a rock sample. Topics considered include the crack front, observation relevant to the crack front, the limitations of the crack front hypothesis, the observed pattern of hydrothermal alteration, the nature of the hydrothermal fluid, the physics of large scale convection, and convection through crack zones. Knowledge of hydrothermal circulation at the ridge axis is based on sampling of the hydrothermal fluid, indirect geophysical measurements of the oceanic crust, and studies of rocks which are believed to have undergone hydrothermal alteration at the ridge axis. Includes 2 drawings.

  17. Magma to Microbe: Modeling Hydrothermal Processes at Ocean Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Robert P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Metaxas, Anna; Perfit, Michael R.

    Hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers reflect the complex interactions among transport, cooling and crystallization of magma, fluid circulation in the crust, tectonic processes, water-rock interaction, and the utilization of hydrothermal fluids as a metabolic energy source by microbial and macro-biological ecosystems. The development of mathematical and numerical models that address these complex linkages is a fundamental part the RIDGE 2000 program that attempts to quantify and model the transfer of heat and chemicals from "mantle to microbes" at oceanic ridges. This volume presents the first "state of the art" picture of model development in this context. The most outstanding feature of this volume is its emphasis on mathematical and numerical modeling of a broad array of hydrothermal processes associated with oceanic spreading centers. By examining the state of model development in one volume, both cross-fertilization of ideas and integration across the disparate disciplines that study seafloor hydrothermal systems is facilitated. Students and scientists with an interest in oceanic spreading centers in general and more specifically in ridge hydrothermal processes will find this volume to be an up-to-date and indispensable resource.

  18. Baseline Hydrothermal Monitoring Data from Cascade Range Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crankshaw, I. M.; Ingebritsen, S.; Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Newman, A. C.; Evans, W.; Spicer, K. R.; Ledingham, G.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2009 the U.S. Geological Survey has systematically monitored hydrothermal behavior at selected Cascade Range volcanoes in order to define baseline hydrothermal and geochemical conditions. Gas and water data have been collected at 25 monitoring sites on 10 of the highest-risk volcanoes in the Cascade Range. These sites include summit-fumarole groups and springs/streams that show clear evidence of magmatic influence in the form of high 3He/4He ratios and (or) large fluxes of magmatic CO2 or heat. The monitoring data are intended to (1) be suitable for comparison with other continuous geophysical monitoring data and (2) provide baseline data that will be useful during future episodes of volcanic unrest. Site records consist mainly of hourly temperature and (or) hydrothermal solute flux data spanning multiple years. Many of the hydrothermal time series data show considerable variability during quiescent periods, including diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variability. Having established baseline conditions, we are reducing our monitoring frequency, and data are being archived and analyzed with a view to providing useful and succinct summaries of baseline behavior during quiescent periods. The hydrothermal response to recent (November 2014 to present) unrest at Lassen Volcanic Center demonstrates the utility of long-term background data, which has made it straightforward to isolate symptoms of unrest.

  19. Hydrothermal Chemotrophic Biosignatures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, F.; Campbell, K. A.; Gautret, P.; Bréhéret, J.; Foucher, F.; Vago, J.; Kminek, G.; Hubert, A.; Hickman-Lewis, K.; Cockell, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermal chemotrophic biosignatures (morphological and geo-organochemical) were common in shallow water on the anaerobic early Earth, preserved by silicification. They are representative also of shallow crustal biosignatures.

  20. Modeling Crustal-Scale Hydrothermal Flows through a Seamount Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, R. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Winslow, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The current study represents the first efforts to model 3D hydrothermal circulation in fast-spreading oceanic crust, using a network of outcrops patterned after a region of the Cocos plate offshore Costa Rica, where heat extraction is exceptionally high, resulting in heat flow values ~30% of those predicted by conductive lithospheric cooling models. Previous studies of this region attribute the heat deficit to vigorous hydrothermal circulation through basaltic basement outcrops that provide a hydraulic connection between the igneous oceanic crust and the seafloor, resulting in efficient mining of heat by large-scale lateral fluid flow. Seafloor bathymetry indicates that outcrops in this region are spaced 20-50-km apart, although there are likely additional unmapped structures that facilitate recharge and discharge of hydrothermal fluids. The modeled outcrop network consists of 20-km and 40-km square grids, with outcrops located at the corners. We vary the number, size, permeability, and orientation of the outcrops to consider what combination of these parameters achieve the observed pattern and/or quantity of heat loss. Additionally, we consider the effect of aquifer permeability and thickness on the modeled heat flow distribution. Model results suggest that extremely high aquifer permeability is required to match the observed heat loss and low heat flow, together with a heterogeneous outcrop permeability distribution. In particular, we find that an aquifer permeability of 10-9 m2 is required to achieve the measured heat flow distribution in this region, which estimates a mean value of 29 ±13 mW/m2 in areas of flat lying basement, overlain by 400-500-m of sediment. In addition to high aquifer permeability, heterogeneous outcrop permeability is required to initiate the hydraulic connection between outcrops, with higher permeability outcrops acting as recharge sites, and lower permeability outcrops as discharge sites.

  1. Two hydrothermal fields at the southern Central Indian Ridge (CIR) - structural and magnetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, C.; Barckhausen, U.

    2013-12-01

    With the research cruises INDEX in the years 2011 and 2012 we investigated the active ridge system of the southern Central Indian Ridge (CIR) in the Indian Ocean at the Rodriguez Triple Junction (RTJ) in terms of hydrothermal activities. Based on the analysis of structural/bathymetric and magnetic data we found indicators for the activity of hydrothermal vent sites which are related to the geometry of the ridge and the magma chambers. The CIR represents a typical slow spreading rift axis which strikes approximately north-south with an average spreading rate of 4.7 cm/a. An analysis of the spreading velocities from NW to SE illustrates a slight decrease from 4.7 cm/a to 4.5 cm/a at the RTJ. From 21°S to 25°30'S the ridge consists of six sections separated by discontinuities and one transform fault. The rift valley shows an asymmetric behaviour with steep slopes in the east and shallower slopes in the western part. The position of the center of magnetic Anomaly 1 is in some cases influenced by structural features like an overlapping spreading center and bending, along axis updoming, and an oceanic core complex. Furthermore, the spreading velocities show local changes near prominent structural features like the Knorr seamount. In this particular case, recent spreading was almost entirely confined to the western flank of the CIR. While the Knorr seamount blocks spreading in eastern direction. In general, in the mapped area a discrepancy between the center of magnetic Anomaly 1 and the bathymetric expression of the spreading center can be noticed in many places. In the northwestern part of the working area the active spreading axis lies west of the center of magnetic Anomaly 1, whereas in the southeastern part indications for a recent ridge jump to the east are observed. Such tectonic activities in combination with magmatic events are indicators for hydrothermal activity. In terms of structural geology normal faults and detachment faults represent pathways for the

  2. Invariant solutions of the heat-conduction equation describing the directed propagation of combustion and spiral waves in a nonlinear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakirova, M. I.; Dorodnitsyn, V. A.; Kurdiumov, S. P.; Samarskii, A. A.; Dimova, S. N.

    The directed propagation of heat and combustion in an anisotropic medium is analyzed numerically. It is shown that at the asymptotic stage this process is described by an invariant (self-similar) solution obtained by Dorodnitsyn et al. (1983). In the isotropic case, an invariant solution is indicated which can describe circular and spiral combustion waves. The invariant solutions are obtained on the basis of the group properties of the heat-conduction equation.

  3. Characterization of Magma-Driven Hydrothermal Systems at Oceanic Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.; Corrigan, R.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid circulation in high-temperature hydrothermal systems involves complex water-rock chemical reactions and phase separation. Numerical modeling of reactive transport in multi-component, multiphase systems is required to obtain a full understanding of the characteristics and evolution of hydrothermal vent systems. We use a single-pass parameterized model of high-temperature hydrothermal circulation at oceanic spreading centers constrained by observational parameters such as vent temperature, heat output, and vent field area, together with surface area and depth of the sub-axial magma chamber, to deduce fundamental hydrothermal parameters such as mass flow rate, bulk permeability, conductive boundary layer thickness at the base of the system, magma replenishment rate, and residence time in the discharge zone. All of these key subsurface characteristics are known for fewer than 10 sites out of 300 known hydrothermal systems. The principal limitations of this approach stem from the uncertainty in heat output and vent field area. For systems where data are available on partitioning of heat and chemical output between focused and diffuse flow, we determined the fraction of high-temperature vent fluid incorporated into diffuse flow using a two-limb single pass model. For EPR 9°50` N and ASHES, the diffuse flow temperatures calculated assuming conservative mixing are nearly equal to the observed temperatures indicating that approximately 80%-90% of the hydrothermal heat output occurs as high-temperature flow derived from magmatic heat even though most of the heat output appears as low-temperature diffuse discharge. For the Main Endeavour Field and Lucky Strike, diffuse flow fluids show significant conductive cooling and heating respectively. Finally, we calculate the transport of various geochemical constituents in focused and diffuse flow at the vent field scale and compare the results with estimates of geochemical transports from the Rainbow hydrothermal field where

  4. Hydrothermal Growth of Polyscale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Kullaiah

    In this chapter, the importance of the hydrothermal technique for growth of polyscale crystals is discussed with reference to its efficiency in synthesizing high-quality crystals of various sizes for modern technological applications. The historical development of the hydrothermal technique is briefly discussed, to show its evolution over time. Also some of the important types of apparatus used in routine hydrothermal research, including the continuous production of nanosize crystals, are discussed. The latest trends in the hydrothermal growth of crystals, such as thermodynamic modeling and understanding of the solution chemistry, are elucidated with appropriate examples. The growth of some selected bulk, fine, and nanosized crystals of current technological significance, such as quartz, aluminum and gallium berlinites, calcite, gemstones, rare-earth vanadates, electroceramic titanates, and carbon polymorphs, is discussed in detail. Future trends in the hydrothermal technique, required to meet the challenges of fast-growing demand for materials in various technological fields, are described. At the end of this chapter, an Appendix 18.A containing a more or less complete list of the characteristic families of crystals synthesized by the hydrothermal technique is given with the solvent and pressure-temperature (PT) conditions used in their synthesis.

  5. Hydrothermal processing of cometary volatiles--applications to Triton.

    PubMed

    Shock, E L; McKinnon, W B

    1993-01-01

    Subsequent to its capture by Neptune, Triton could have experienced an episode of tidal heating sufficient to melt its icy mantle and possibly its rocky core as well. This heating would have driven hydrothermal circulation at the core-rock/mantle-ocean boundary. We consider the chemical consequences of this hydrothermal reprocessing on Triton's volatile budget by assuming an initial cometary composition for the icy mantle and evaluating the effects of changes in temperature and oxidation state. We assume that the latter would have been controlled by mineral assemblages in the rock. Such reprocessing could explain the lack of carbon monoxide in the atmosphere of Triton and its depletion relative to N2 and (apparently) CO2 in the satellite's surface ices. Our calculations also show that whatever the original source of nitrogen in Triton, N2 and/or NH3 are likely abundant products of hydrothermal reprocessing. Depending on the temperature and prevailing oxidation state, acetic acid, ethanol, urea, methanol, and ethanamine are possible important components, in addition to ammonia, of the resulting mantle material. Triton may thus preserve the organic chemistry that might have led to the origin of life in early terrestrial hydrothermal systems. PMID:11540242

  6. Direct measurement of CO2 solubility and pH in NaCl hydrothermal solutions by combining in-situ potentiometry and Raman spectroscopy up to 280 °C and 150 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truche, Laurent; Bazarkina, Elena F.; Berger, Gilles; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Bessaque, Gilles; Dubessy, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The in-situ monitoring of aqueous solution chemistry at elevated temperatures and pressures is a major challenge in geochemistry. Here, we combined for the first time in-situ Raman spectroscopy for concentration measurements and potentiometry for pH measurement in a single hydrothermal cell equipped with sampling systems and operating under controlled conditions of temperature and pressure. Dissolved CO2 concentration and pH were measured at temperatures up to 280 °C and pressures up to 150 bar in the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CO2-NaCl systems. A Pitzer specific-ion-interaction aqueous model was developed and confirmed the accuracy and consistency of the measurements, at least up to 250 °C. The revised Pitzer parameters for the H2O-CO2-NaCl system were formatted for the Phreeqc geochemical software. Significant changes with respect to the Pitzer.dat database currently associated with Phreeqc were observed. The new model parameters are now available for further applications. The Raman and pH probes tested here may also be applied to field monitoring of hydrothermal springs, geothermal wells, and oil and gas boreholes.

  7. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  8. Hydrothermal systems on Mars: an assessment of present evidence.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J D

    1996-01-01

    Hydrothermal processes have been suggested to explain a number of observations for Mars, including D/H ratios of water extracted from Martian meteorites, as a means for removing CO2 from the Martian atmosphere and sequestering it in the crust as carbonates, and as a possible origin for iron oxide-rich spectral units on the floors of some rifted basins (chasmata). There are numerous examples of Martian channels formed by discharges of subsurface water near potential magmatic heat sources, and hydrothermal processes have also been proposed as a mechanism for aquifer recharge needed to sustain long term erosion of sapping channels. The following geological settings have been identified as targets for ancient hydrothermal systems on Mars: channels located along the margins of impact crater melt sheets and on the slopes of ancient volcanoes; chaotic and fretted terranes where shallow subsurface heat sources are thought to have interacted with ground ice; and the floors of calderas and rifted basins (e.g. chasmata). On Earth, such geological environments are often a locus for hydrothermal mineralization. But we presently lack the mineralogical information needed for a definitive evaluation of hypotheses. A preferred tool for identifying minerals by remote sensing methods on Earth is high spatial resolution, hyperspectral, near-infrared spectroscopy, a technique that has been extensively developed by mineral explorationists. Future efforts to explore Mars for ancient hydrothermal systems would benefit from the application of methods developed by the mining industry to look for similar deposits on Earth. But Earth-based exploration models must be adapted to account for the large differences in the climatic and geological history of Mars. For example, it is likely that the early surface environment of Mars was cool, perhaps consistently below freezing, with the shallow portions of hydrothermal systems being dominated by magma-cryosphere interactions. Given the smaller

  9. Hydrothermal systems on Mars: an assessment of present evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrothermal processes have been suggested to explain a number of observations for Mars, including D/H ratios of water extracted from Martian meteorites, as a means for removing CO2 from the Martian atmosphere and sequestering it in the crust as carbonates, and as a possible origin for iron oxide-rich spectral units on the floors of some rifted basins (chasmata). There are numerous examples of Martian channels formed by discharges of subsurface water near potential magmatic heat sources, and hydrothermal processes have also been proposed as a mechanism for aquifer recharge needed to sustain long term erosion of sapping channels. The following geological settings have been identified as targets for ancient hydrothermal systems on Mars: channels located along the margins of impact crater melt sheets and on the slopes of ancient volcanoes; chaotic and fretted terranes where shallow subsurface heat sources are thought to have interacted with ground ice; and the floors of calderas and rifted basins (e.g. chasmata). On Earth, such geological environments are often a locus for hydrothermal mineralization. But we presently lack the mineralogical information needed for a definitive evaluation of hypotheses. A preferred tool for identifying minerals by remote sensing methods on Earth is high spatial resolution, hyperspectral, near-infrared spectroscopy, a technique that has been extensively developed by mineral explorationists. Future efforts to explore Mars for ancient hydrothermal systems would benefit from the application of methods developed by the mining industry to look for similar deposits on Earth. But Earth-based exploration models must be adapted to account for the large differences in the climatic and geological history of Mars. For example, it is likely that the early surface environment of Mars was cool, perhaps consistently below freezing, with the shallow portions of hydrothermal systems being dominated by magma-cryosphere interactions. Given the smaller

  10. Microbial Activity and Volatile Fluxes in Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding geographically and biologically the production or utilization of volatile chemical species such as CO2, CH4, and H2 is crucial not only for understanding hydrothermal processes but also for understanding life processes in the oceanic crust. To estimate the microbial effect on the transport of these volatiles, we consider a double-loop single pass model as shown in Figure 1 to estimate the mass fluxes shown. We then use a simple mixing formulation: C4Q4 = C3 (Q1 -Q3)+ C2Q2, where C2 is the concentration of the chemical in seawater, C3 is the average concentration of the chemical in high temperature focused flow, C4 is the expected concentration of the chemical as a result of mixing, and the relevant mass flows are as shown in Figure 1. Finally, we compare the calculated values of CO2, CH4, and H2 in diffuse flow fluids to those observed. The required data are available for both the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the East Pacific Rise 9°50' N systems. In both cases we find that, although individual diffuse flow sites have observed concentrations of some elements that are greater than average, the average concentration of these volatiles is smaller in all cases than the concentration that would be expected from simple mixing. This indicates that subsurface microbes are net utilizers of these chemical constituents at the Main Endeavour Field and at EPR 9°50' N on the vent field scale. Figure 1. Schematic of a 'double-loop' single-pass model above a convecting, crystallizing, replenished AMC (not to scale). Heat transfer from the vigorously convecting, cooling, and replenished AMC across the conductive boundary layer δ drives the overlying hydrothermal system. The deep circulation represented by mass flux Q1 and black smoker temperature T3 induces shallow circulation noted by Q2. Some black smoker fluid mixes with seawater resulting in diffuse discharge Q4, T4, while the direct black smoker mass flux with temperature T3 is reduced

  11. Modeling of the fault-controlled hydrothermal ore-forming systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pek, A.A.; Malkovsky, V.I.

    1993-07-01

    A necessary precondition for the formation of hydrothermal ore deposits is a strong focusing of hydrothermal flow as fluids move from the fluid source to the site of ore deposition. The spatial distribution of hydrothermal deposits favors the concept that such fluid flow focusing is controlled, for the most part, by regional faults which provide a low resistance path for hydrothermal solutions. Results of electric analog simulations, analytical solutions, and computer simulations of the fluid flow, in a fault-controlled single-pass advective system, confirm this concept. The influence of the fluid flow focusing on the heat and mass transfer in a single-pass advective system was investigated for a simplified version of the metamorphic model for the genesis of greenstone-hosted gold deposits. The spatial distribution of ore mineralization, predicted by computer simulation, is in reasonable agreement with geological observations. Computer simulations of the fault-controlled thermoconvective system revealed a complex pattern of mixing hydrothermal solutions in the model, which also simulates the development of the modern hydrothermal systems on the ocean floor. The specific feature of the model considered, is the development under certain conditions of an intra-fault convective cell that operates essentially independently of the large scale circulation. These and other results obtained during the study indicate that modeling of natural fault-controlled hydrothermal systems is instructive for the analysis of transport processes in man-made hydrothermal systems that could develop in geologic high-level nuclear waste repositories.

  12. Computer simulation of noncondensible gas behavior in geothermal power plants utilizing direct contact heat exchange. Report of work, February 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Perona, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate the behavior of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in a geothermal power plant using direct contact heat exchange with isobutane as a working fluid. This computer program was modified to simulate the particular equipment characteristics of the 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa. Vapor and liquid compositions and temperatures can be calculated throughout the heat exchangers in the pilot plant. The program is now available for analysis of the pilot plant operation and for design of similar plants.

  13. A Lagrangian view of longwave radiative fluxes for understanding the direct heating response to a CO2 increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejas, Sergio A.; Cai, Ming; Liu, Guosheng; Taylor, Patrick C.; Tung, Ka-Kit

    2016-06-01

    This study puts forward a Lagrangian view of downward and upward longwave (LW) fluxes to improve our physical understanding of the influence of key factors on the downward and upward LW fluxes' response to an increase of CO2. To facilitate such a Lagrangian view, we introduce a new saturation-level concept based on the LW radiative transfer theory. The Lagrangian view and the new saturation-level concept enable us to provide, under a single framework, a general radiative transfer explanation of the spatial variation (e.g., stratospheric cooling and lower tropospheric warming) of the direct radiative heating response to an increase of the CO2 concentration. Following the saturation-level concept, the radiatively unsaturated nature of the downward LW flux in the upper stratosphere, due to the lack of a LW source at the top of the atmosphere, is attributed as the root factor that leads to a cooling of the upper stratosphere in direct response to a CO2 increase. The upward LW flux perturbation further enhances the cooling as a result of the negative lapse rate in the stratosphere but is of secondary importance. Furthermore, this study indicates that ozone is not a necessary ingredient for stratospheric cooling to occur, and the stratospheric cooling is therefore a fundamental consequence of a CO2 increase. The unperturbed vertical profile of water vapor is important only in the lower troposphere, where the relatively large concentration of water vapor leads to a downward LW flux perturbation that warms the lower troposphere at the expense of the surface warming.

  14. Drying grain using a hydrothermally treated liquid lignite fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P.; Bukurov, M.; Ljubicic, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    A shortage of domestic oil and natural gas resources in Yugoslavia, particularly for agricultural and industrial purposes, has motivated the authors to explore the possibility of using liquid lignite as an alternate fuel for drying grain. This paper presents a technical and economic assessment of the possibility of retrofitting grain-drying plants currently fueled by oil or natural gas to liquid lignite fuel. All estimates are based on lignite taken from the Kovin deposit. Proposed technology includes underwater mining techniques, aqueous ash removal, hydrothermal processing, solids concentration, pipeline transport up to 120 km, and liquid lignite direct combustion. For the characterization of Kovin lignite, standard ASTM procedures were used: proximate, ultimate, ash, heating value, and Theological analyses were performed. Results from an extensive economic analysis indicate a delivered cost of US$20/ton for the liquid lignite. For the 70 of the grain-drying plants in the province of Vojvodina, this would mean a total yearly saving of about US $2,500,000. The advantages of this concept are obvious: easy to transport and store, nonflammable, nonexplosive, nontoxic, 30%-40% cheaper than imported oil and gas, domestic fuel is at hand. The authors believe that liquid lignite, rather than an alternative, is becoming more and more an imperative.

  15. Zeolitization of glassy Topopah Spring tuff under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    In support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project experiments were conducted to study the effects of heat generated by a nuclear waste repository in densely welded, devitrified tuff on the underlying, compositionally-equivalent glassy tuff at Yucca Mtn. Solid wafers of glassy tuff were reacted with a dilute ground water for several months at 150{sup 0}C and 250{sup 0}C at 100 bars pressure in Dickson-type, gold-bag rocking autoclaves. The in-situ chemistry of the hydrothermal fluids was modeled and the chemical affinities for all possible mineral precipitation reactions were calculated using the EQ3/6 program. In the 250{sup 0}C experiment the calculations suggest that a zeolite mineral would be expected to form. Analyses of the run products showed that not only had the wafer been extensively corroded and the glass shards replaced by clinoptilolite, but pure clinoptilolite had precipitated directly from solution. In the 150{sup 0}C experiment, although clay minerals were thermodynamically favored to form in the first half of the experiment, by the end of the run a zeolite mineral was predicted to form. Analyses of the run products showed no well-formed secondary minerals (clays or zeolites) had formed. At the lower temperature the effects of precipitation kinetics may preclude the formation of the zeolite within the time span of this experiment. In general the observations are in relatively good agreement with the geochemical model calculations.

  16. Simulation and economic analysis of a liquid-based solar system with a direct-contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger, in comparison to a system with a conventional heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, P.; Karaki, S.

    Using a solar computer simulation package called TRNSYS, simulations of the direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger (DCLLHE) solar system and a system with conventional shell-and-tube heat exchanger were developed, based in part on performance measurements of the actual systems. The two systems were simulated over a full year on an hour-by-hour basis at five locations; Boston, Massachusetts, Charleston, South Carolina, Dodge City, Kansas, Madison, Wisconsin, and Phoenix, Arizona. Typically the direct-contact system supplies slightly more heat for domestic hot water and space heating in all locations and about 5 percentage points more cooling as compared to the conventional system. Using a common set of economic parameters and the appropriate federal and state income tax credits, as well as property tax legislation for solar systems in the corresponding states, the results of the study indicate for heating-only systems, the DCLLHE system has a slight life-cycle cost disadvantage compared to the conventional system. For combined solar heating and cooling systems, the DCLLHE has a slight life-cycle cost advantage which varies with location and amounts to one to three percent difference from the conventional system.

  17. Test results on direct containment heating by high-pressure melt ejection into the Surtsey vessel: The TDS test series

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.

    1994-08-01

    The Technology Development and Scoping (TDS) test series was conducted to test and develop instrumentation and procedures for performing steam-driven, high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) experiments at the Surtsey Test Facility to investigate direct containment heating (DCH). Seven experiments, designated TDS-1 through TDS-7, were performed in this test series. These experiments were conducted using similar initial conditions; the primary variable was the initial pressure in the Surtsey vessel. All experiments in this test series were performed with a steam driving gas pressure of {approx_equal} 4 MPa, 80 kg of lumina/iron/chromium thermite melt simulant, an initial hole diameter of 4.8 cm (which ablated to a final hole diameter of {approx_equal} 6 cm), and a 1/10th linear scale model of the Surry reactor cavity. The Surtsey vessel was purged with argon (<0.25 mol% O{sub 2}) to limit the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen, and gas grab samples were taken to measure the amount of hydrogen produced.

  18. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The Surtsey Test Facility is used to perform scaled experiments simulating High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The experiments investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load. The results from Zion and Surry experiments can be extrapolated to other Westinghouse plants, but predicted containment loads cannot be generalized to all Combustion Engineering (CE) plants. Five CE plants have melt dispersal flow paths which circumvent the main mitigation of containment compartmentalization in most Westinghouse PWRs. Calvert Cliff-like plant geometries and the impact of codispersed water were addressed as part of the DCH issue resolution. Integral effects tests were performed with a scale model of the Calvert Cliffs NPP inside the Surtsey test vessel. The experiments investigated the effects of codispersal of water, steam, and molten core stimulant materials on DCH loads under prototypic accident conditions and plant configurations. The results indicated that large amounts of coejected water reduced the DCH load by a small amount. Large amounts of debris were dispersed from the cavity to the upper dome (via the annular gap). 22 refs., 84 figs., 30 tabs.

  19. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1996-02-01

    This report uses the scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. Loads versus strength evaluations of the CCFP were performed for each plant using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if a screening phase results in a CCFP less than 0.01, which is more stringent than the overall success criterion. If the screening phase CCFP for a plant is greater than 0.01, then refined containment loads evaluations must be performed and/or the probability of high pressure at vessel breach must be analyzed. These analyses could be used separately or could be integrated together to recalculate the CCFP for an individual plant to reduce the CCFP to meet the overall success criterion of less than 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 at the screening phase, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  20. Highly textured fresnoite thin films synthesized in situ by pulsed laser deposition with CO2 laser direct heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Michael; de Pablos-Martin, Araceli; Patzig, Christian; Stölzel, Marko; Brachwitz, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Holger; Grundmann, Marius; Höche, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Fresnoite Ba2TiSi2O8 (BTS) thin films were grown and crystallized in situ using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with CO2 laser direct heating of the a-plane sapphire (1 1 0) substrates up to 1250 °C. Starting with 775 °C growth temperature, (0 0 1)- and (1 1 0)-textured BTS and BaTiO3 phases, respectively, could be assigned in the films, and the typical fern-like BTS crystallization patterns appear. For higher process temperatures of 1100 to 1250 °C, atomically smooth, terraced surface of the films was found, accompanied by crystalline high-temperature phases of Ba-Ti-Si oxides. HAADF micrographs taken in both scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry mode show details of morphology and elemental distribution inside the films and at the interface. To balance the inherent Si deficiency of the BTS films, growth from glassy BTS × 2 SiO2 and BTS × 2.5 SiO2 targets was considered as well. The latter targets are ideal for PLD since the employed glasses possess 100% of the theoretical density and are homogeneous at the atomic scale.

  1. Single Channel Testing for Characterization of the Direct Gas Cooled Reactor and the SAFE-100 Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, S.M.; Kapernick, R.; Godfroy, T.J.

    2004-02-04

    Experiments have been designed to characterize the coolant gas flow in two space reactor concepts that are currently under investigation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory: the direct-drive gas-cooled reactor (DDG) and the SAFE-100 heatpipe-cooled reactor (HPR). For the DDG concept, initial tests have been completed to measure pressure drop versus flow rate for a prototypic core flow channel, with gas exiting to atmospheric pressure conditions. The experimental results of the completed DDG tests presented in this paper validate the predicted results to within a reasonable margin of error. These tests have resulted in a re-design of the flow annulus to reduce the pressure drop. Subsequent tests will be conducted with the re-designed flow channel and with the outlet pressure held at 150 psi (1 MPa). Design of a similar test for a nominal flow channel in the HPR heat exchanger (HPR-HX) has been completed and hardware is currently being assembled for testing this channel at 150 psi. When completed, these test programs will provide the data necessary to validate calculated flow performance for these reactor concepts (pressure drop and film temperature rise)

  2. High temperature thermal conductivity measurements of UO/sub 2/ by Direct Electrical Heating. Final report. [MANTRA-III

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, B

    1980-10-01

    High temperature properties of reactor type UO/sub 2/ pellets were measured using a Direct Electrical Heating (DEH) Facility. Modifications to the experimental apparatus have been made so that successful and reproducible DEH runs may be carried out while protecting the pellets from oxidation at high temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements on the UO/sub 2/ pellets have been made before and after runs to assure that sample oxidation has not occurred. A computer code has been developed that will model the experiment using equations that describe physical properties of the material. This code allows these equations to be checked by comparing the model results to collected data. The thermal conductivity equation for UO/sub 2/ proposed by Weilbacher has been used for this analysis. By adjusting the empirical parameters in Weilbacher's equation, experimental data can be matched by the code. From the several runs analyzed, the resulting thermal conductivity equation is lambda = 1/4.79 + 0.0247T/ + 1.06 x 10/sup -3/ exp(-1.62/kT/) - 4410. exp(-3.71/kT/) where lambda is in w/cm K, k is the Boltzman constant, and T is the temperature in Kelvin.

  3. Printing low-melting-point alloy ink to directly make a solidified circuit or functional device with a heating pen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    A new method to directly print out a solidified electronic circuit through low-melting-point metal ink is proposed. A functional pen with heating capability was fabricated. Several typical thermal properties of the alloy ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 were measured and evaluated. Owing to the specifically selected melting point of the ink, which is slightly higher than room temperature, various electronic devices, graphics or circuits can be manufactured in a short period of time and then rapidly solidified by cooling in the surrounding air. The liquid–solid phase change mechanism of the written lines was experimentally characterized using a scanning electron microscope. In order to determine the matching substrate, wettability between the metal ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 and several materials, including mica plate and silicone rubber, was investigated. The resistance–temperature curve of a printed resistor indicated its potential as a temperature control switch. Furthermore, the measured reflection coefficient of a printed double-diamond antenna accords well with the simulated result. With unique merits such as no pollution, no requirement for encapsulation and easy recycling, the present printing approach is an important supplement to current printed electronics and has enormous practical value in the future. PMID:25484611

  4. Geothermal direct heat use: market potential/penetration analysis for Federal Region IX (Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, W.; Tang, K.

    1980-05-01

    A preliminary study was made of the potential for geothermal direct heat use in Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada (Federal Region IX). The analysis for each state was performed by a different team, located in that state. For each state, the study team was asked to: (1) define the resource, based on the latest available data; (2) assess the potential market growth for geothermal energy; and (3) estimate the market penetration, projected to 2020. Each of the four states of interest in this study is unique in its own way. Rather than impose the same assumptions as to growth rates, capture rates, etc. on all of the study teams, each team was asked to use the most appropriate set of assumptions for its state. The results, therefore, should reflect the currently accepted views within each state. The four state reports comprise the main portion of this document. A brief regional overview section was prepared by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, following completion of the state reports.

  5. Deemed Savings Estimates for Legacy Air Conditioning and WaterHeating Direct Load Control Programs in PJM Region

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Charles

    2007-03-01

    During 2005 and 2006, the PJM Interconnection (PJM) Load Analysis Subcommittee (LAS) examined ways to reduce the costs and improve the effectiveness of its existing measurement and verification (M&V) protocols for Direct Load Control (DLC) programs. The current M&V protocol requires that a PURPA-compliant Load Research study be conducted every five years for each Load-Serving Entity (LSE). The current M&V protocol is expensive to implement and administer particularly for mature load control programs, some of which are marginally cost-effective. There was growing evidence that some LSEs were mothballing or dropping their DLC programs in lieu of incurring the expense associated with the M&V. This project had several objectives: (1) examine the potential for developing deemed savings estimates acceptable to PJM for legacy air conditioning and water heating DLC programs, and (2) explore the development of a collaborative, regional, consensus-based approach for conducting monitoring and verification of load reductions for emerging load management technologies for customers that do not have interval metering capability.

  6. Printing low-melting-point alloy ink to directly make a solidified circuit or functional device with a heating pen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-12-01

    A new method to directly print out a solidified electronic circuit through low-melting-point metal ink is proposed. A functional pen with heating capability was fabricated. Several typical thermal properties of the alloy ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 were measured and evaluated. Owing to the specifically selected melting point of the ink, which is slightly higher than room temperature, various electronic devices, graphics or circuits can be manufactured in a short period of time and then rapidly solidified by cooling in the surrounding air. The liquid-solid phase change mechanism of the written lines was experimentally characterized using a scanning electron microscope. In order to determine the matching substrate, wettability between the metal ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 and several materials, including mica plate and silicone rubber, was investigated. The resistance-temperature curve of a printed resistor indicated its potential as a temperature control switch. Furthermore, the measured reflection coefficient of a printed double-diamond antenna accords well with the simulated result. With unique merits such as no pollution, no requirement for encapsulation and easy recycling, the present printing approach is an important supplement to current printed electronics and has enormous practical value in the future. PMID:25484611

  7. Direct Radiative Effect and Heating Rate of black carbon aerosol: high time resolution measurements and source-identified forcing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Luca; Mocnik, Grisa; Cogliati, Sergio; Comi, Alberto; Degni, Francesca; Di Mauro, Biagio; Colombo, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) absorbs sunlight in the atmosphere heating it. However, up to now, heating rate (HR) calculations from the divergence of the net radiative flux with altitude or from the modelling activity are too sparse. This work fills the aforementioned gap presenting a new methodology based on a full set of physical equations to experimentally determine both the radiative power density absorbed into a ground-based atmospheric layer (ADRE), and the consequent HR induced by the absorptive component of aerosol. In urban context, it is essentially related to the BC. The methodology is also applicable to natural components (i.e. dust) and is obtained solving the first derivative of the main radiative transfer equations. The ADRE and the consequent HR can be determined coupling spectral aerosol absorption measurements with the spectrally resolved measurements of the direct, diffuse downward radiation and the surface reflected radiance components. Moreover, the spectral absorption of BC aerosol allows its source apportionment (traffic and biomass burning (BB)) allowing the same apportionment on HR. This work reports one year of high-time resolution measurements (5 min) of sunlight absorption and HR induced by BC aerosol over Milan. A unique sampling site was set up from March 2015 with: 1) Aethalometer (AE-31, Magee Scientific, 7-λ), 2) the Multiplexer-Radiometer-Irradiometer which detects downward and reflected radiance (350-1000 nm in 3648 spectral bands) coupled with a rotating shadow-band to measure spectrally-resolved global and diffuse radiation (thus direct), 3) a meteorological station (LSI-Lastem) equipped with 3 pyranometers (global, diffuse and refrected radiation; 300-3000 nm), a thermohygrometer, a barometer, an anemometer, 4) condensation and optical particle counters (TSI 3775 and Grimm 1.107), 5) low volume sampler (FAI Hydra dual sampler, PM2.5 and PM10) for sample collection and chemistry determination. Results concerning the radiative power

  8. Natural analogs for enhanced heat recovery from geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    High-temperature hydrothermal systems are physically and chemically zoned with depth. The energy input is from a magmatic zone, intruded by igneous bodies, that may also contribute variable amounts of magmatic fluid to the system. The heat source is directly overlain by a section of rocks, that due to their elevated temperature, respond to stress in a ductile fashion. The ductile zone is, in turn, overlain by a section of rocks that respond to stress in a brittle fashion, where water is able to circulate through fractures (the geothermal reservoir) and will be termed the hydrothermal circulation zone. Ancient and modern high-temperature geothermal systems show a predictable sequence of evolutionary events affecting these stratified zones. Metamorphic core complexes are uplifts, formed in highly extended terrains, that expose fossil brittle-ductile transition zones. Formerly ductile rocks have had brittle fractures superimposed on them, and meteoric hydrothermal systems are associated with the brittle fracturing. Porphyry copper deposits typically evolve from magmatic to meteoric hydrothermal systems. At the Larderello geothermal system, the brittle-ductile transition has been mapped using reflection seismology, and the zone has been penetrated by the San Pompeo 2 well where temperatures >420{degrees}C were encountered. Although neo-granitic dikes have been penetrated by drilling in the Larderello area, the brittle-ductile transition is largely above the inferred plutonic heat source. In the Geysers system, in contrast, the present steam system has been superimposed on young plutonic rocks and the inferred brittle-ductile transition is present at a depth of about 4.7 km within the plutonic rocks. As hydrothermal reservoirs are depleted, or surface facilities are restricted by environmental considerations, interest will turn to the deeper portions of known systems. Japan already has an aggressive program to develop Deep-Seated and Magma-Ambient resources.

  9. Entropy Production in Convective Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersing, Nele; Wellmann, Florian; Niederau, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exploring hydrothermal reservoirs requires reliable estimates of subsurface temperatures to delineate favorable locations of boreholes. It is therefore of fundamental and practical importance to understand the thermodynamic behavior of the system in order to predict its performance with numerical studies. To this end, the thermodynamic measure of entropy production is considered as a useful abstraction tool to characterize the convective state of a system since it accounts for dissipative heat processes and gives insight into the system's average behavior in a statistical sense. Solving the underlying conservation principles of a convective hydrothermal system is sensitive to initial conditions and boundary conditions which in turn are prone to uncertain knowledge in subsurface parameters. There exist multiple numerical solutions to the mathematical description of a convective system and the prediction becomes even more challenging as the vigor of convection increases. Thus, the variety of possible modes contained in such highly non-linear problems needs to be quantified. A synthetic study is carried out to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a finite porous layer heated from below. Various two-dimensional models are created such that their corresponding Rayleigh numbers lie in a range from the sub-critical linear to the supercritical non-linear regime, that is purely conductive to convection-dominated systems. Entropy production is found to describe the transient evolution of convective processes fairly well and can be used to identify thermodynamic equilibrium. Additionally, varying the aspect ratio for each Rayleigh number shows that the variety of realized convection modes increases with both larger aspect ratio and higher Rayleigh number. This phenomenon is also reflected by an enlarged spread of entropy production for the realized modes. Consequently, the Rayleigh number can be correlated to the magnitude of entropy production. In cases of moderate

  10. Variability in the microbial communities and hydrothermal fluid chemistry at the newly discovered Mariner hydrothermal field, southern Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Ken; Nunoura, Takuro; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Lupton, John; Suzuki, Ryohei; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Gamo, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-06-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field on the Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau Basin was explored and characterized with geochemical and microbiological analyses. The hydrothermal fluid discharging from the most vigorous vent (Snow Chimney, maximum discharge temperature 365°C) was boiling at the seafloor at a depth of 1908 m, and two distinct end-member hydrothermal fluids were identified. The fluid chemistry of the typical Cl-enriched and Cl-depleted hydrothermal fluids was analyzed, as was the mineralogy of the host chimney structures. The variability in the fluid chemistry was potentially controlled by the subseafloor phase-separation (vapor loss process) and the microbial community activities. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were investigated using culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities on the chimney surfaces differed among three chimneys. Cultivation analysis demonstrated significant variation in the culturability of various microbial components among the chimneys, particularly of thermophilic H2-oxidizing (and S-oxidizing) chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella. The physical and chemical environments of chimney surface habitats are still unresolved and do not directly extrapolate the environments of possible subseafloor habitats. However, the variability in microbial community found in the chimneys also provides an insight into the different biogeochemical interactions potentially affected by the phase separation of the hydrothermal fluids in the subseafloor hydrothermal habitats. In addition, comparison with other deep-sea hydrothermal systems revealed that the Mariner field microbial communities have unusual characteristics.

  11. Hydrothermal circulation within the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Tivey, Maurice A.; Bjorklund, Tor A.; Salmi, Marie S.

    2010-05-01

    Areas of the seafloor at mid-ocean ridges where hydrothermal vents discharge are easily recognized by the dramatic biological, physical, and chemical processes that characterize such sites. Locations where seawater flows into the seafloor to recharge hydrothermal cells within the crustal reservoir are by contrast almost invisible but can be indirectly identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measurements. An array of conductive heat flow stations in the Endeavour axial valley of the Juan de Fuca Ridge has identified recharge zones that appear to represent a nested system of fluid circulation paths. At the scale of an axial rift valley, conductive heat flow data indicate a general cross-valley fluid flow, where seawater enters the shallow subsurface crustal reservoir at the eastern wall of the Endeavour axial valley and undergoes a kilometer of horizontal transit beneath the valley floor, finally exiting as warm hydrothermal fluid discharge on the western valley bounding wall. Recharge zones also have been identified as located within an annular ring of very cold seafloor around the large Main Endeavour Hydrothermal Field, with seawater inflow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive heat flow data are consistent with previous models where high-temperature fluid circulation cells beneath large hydrothermal vent fields may be composed of narrow vertical cylinders. Subsurface fluid circulation on the Endeavour Segment occurs at various crustal depths in three distinct modes: (1) general east to west flow across the entire valley floor, (2) in narrow cylinders that penetrate deeply to high-temperature heat sources, and (3) supplying low-temperature diffuse vents where seawater is entrained into the shallow uppermost crust by the adjacent high-temperature cylindrical systems. The systematic array of conductive heat flow measurements over the axial valley floor averaged ˜150 mW/m2, suggesting that only about 3% of

  12. Hydrothermal vents in Lake Tanganyika, East African, Rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques; Pflumio, Catherine; Castrec, Maryse; Boulégue, Jacques; Gente, Pascal; Rolet, Joël; Coussement, Christophe; Stetter, Karl O.; Huber, Robert; Buku, Sony; Mifundu, Wafula

    1993-06-01

    Sublacustrine hydrothermal vents with associated massive sulfides were discovered during April 1987 at Pemba and Cape Banza on the Zaire side of the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system. New investigations by a team of ten scuba divers during the multinational (France, Zaire, Germany, and Burundi) TANGANYDRO expedition (August-October 1991) found hydrothermal vents down to a depth of 46 m along north-trending active faults bounding the Tanganyika rift on the western side. Temperatures from 53 to 103 °C were measured in hydrothermal fluids and sediments. Veins of massive sulfides 1-10 cm thick (pyrite and marcasite banding) were found associated with vents at the Pemba site. At Cape Banza,active vents are characterized by 1-70-cm-high aragonite chimneys, and there are microcrystalline pyrite coatings on the walls of hydrothermal pipes. Hydrothermal fluid end members show distinctive compositions at the two sites. The Pemba end member is a NaHCO3-enriched fluid similar to the NaHCO3 thermal fluids from lakes Magadi and Bogoria in the eastern branch off the rift. The Cape Banza end member is a solution enriched in NaCl. Such brines may have a deep-seated basement origin, as do the Uvinza NaCl brines on the eastern flank of the Tanganyika basin. Geothermometric calculations have yielded temperatures of fluid-rock interaction off 219 and 179 °C in the Pemba and Cape Banza systems, respectively. Abundant white or reddish-brown microbial colonies resembling Beggiatoa mats were found surrounding the active vents. Thermal fluid circulation is permitted by opening of cracks related to 130 °N normal-dextral faults that intersect the north- south major rift trend. The source of heat for such hydrothermal systems may relate to the existence of magmatic bodies under the rift, which is suggested by the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide released at Pemba and Cape Banza.

  13. Geologic evolution of the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Alden R.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.

    2016-02-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is a novel serpentinite-hosted vent field located on the Atlantis Massif southern wall. Results of 2 m resolution bathymetry, side scan, and video and still imagery, integrated with direct submersible observations provide the first high-resolution geologic map of the LCHF. These data form the foundation for an evolutionary model for the vent system over the past >120,000 years. The field is located on a down-dropped bench 70 m below the summit of the massif. The bench is capped by breccia and pelagic carbonate deposits underlain by variably deformed and altered serpentinite and gabbroic rocks. Hydrothermal activity is focused at the 60 m tall, 100 m across, massive carbonate edifice "Poseidon," which is venting 91°C fluid. Hydrothermal activity declines south and west of the Poseidon complex and dies off completely at distances greater than 200 m. East of Poseidon, the most recent stage of hydrothermal flow is characterized by egress of diffuse fluids from narrow fissures within a low-angle, anastomosing mylonite zone. South of the area of current hydrothermal activity, there is evidence of two discrete previously unrecognized relict fields. Active venting sites defined by carbonate-filled fissures that cut the carbonate cap rock at the summit of the massif mark the present-day northernmost extent of venting. These spatial relationships reflect multiple stages of field development, the northward migration of venting over time, and the likely development of a nascent field at the massif summit.

  14. Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems. Bruce E Hobbs1,2, Alison Ord1 and Mark A. Munro1. 1. Centre for Exploration Targeting, The University of Western Australia, M006, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. 2. CSIRO Earth and Resource Engineering, Bentley, WA, Australia Hydrothermal mineralising systems are presented as large, open chemical reactors held far from equilibrium during their life-time by the influx of heat, fluid and dissolved chemical species. As such they are nonlinear dynamical systems and need to be analysed using the tools that have been developed for such systems. Hydrothermal systems undergo a number of transitions during their evolution and this paper focuses on methods for characterising these transitions in a quantitative manner and establishing whether they resemble first or second (critical) phase transitions or whether they have some other kind of nature. Critical phase transitions are characterised by long range correlations for some parameter characteristic of the system, power-law probability distributions so that there is no characteristic length scale and a high sensitivity to perturbations; as one approaches criticality, characteristic parameters for the system scale in a power law manner with distance from the critical point. The transitions undergone in mineralised hydrothermal systems are: (i) widespread, non-localised mineral alteration involving exothermic mineral reactions that produce hydrous silicate phases, carbonates and iron-oxides, (ii) strongly localised veining, brecciation and/or stock-work formation, (iii) a series of endothermic mineral reactions involving the formation of non-hydrous silicates, sulphides and metals such as gold, (iv) multiple repetitions of transitions (ii) and (iii). We have quantified aspects of these transitions in gold deposits from the Yilgarn craton of Western Australia using wavelet transforms. This technique is convenient and fast. It enables one to establish if

  15. Hydrothermal and magmatic couplings at mid-ocean ridges : controls on the locations of high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowicz, M.; Fontaine, F. J.; Cannat, M.; Escartin, J.

    2012-12-01

    The heat output and thermal regime of oceanic spreading centers are strongly controlled by boundary layer processes between the hydrothermal system and the underlying crustal magma chamber, which remain to be fully understood. In thermal models, the dynamical interactions between the hydrothermal system and the deeper part of the lithosphere affected by processes such as magma chamber convection, magma crystallization and latent heat release, or simple conduction, is usually not considered and a ad-hoc temperature or heat flux is prescribed at the base of the hydrothermal layer. In this work we develop original two-dimensional numerical models of the interactions between a shallow cellular hydrothermal (porous) system at temperatures <700°C in the upper crust, and a deeper magmatic (viscous) layer at temperatures up to 1200°C representing the lower crust. Our formalism allows for a dynamical interface between the two layers, which is fluctuating according to the dynamics of each layer. We systematically investigate the range of permeability and viscosity that characterized the dynamics of the porous and magmatic systems, respectively. An intriguing and highly debated question that we investigate is about the genesis of focused (i.e., kilometer-wide), hundreds-of-mega-watt (MW) powerfull, high-temperature (300-400°C) hydrothermal fields such as those discovered along the East Pacific Rise at 9°50'N or along the Juan de Fuca ridge/Endeavour segment for example. One hypothesis is that these fields require the formation of "elongated" hydrothermal convection cells that cool the crust on 5-10 kms, but the processes controlling the formation of such large aspect ratio (length/height) are poorly constrain. Our models show that such cells naturally arise from the dynamical coupling between a « low-viscosity », convecting lower-crust and a low-permeability upper hydrothermal layer. They also predict along-axis variations in the depth of the axial magma lens (AMC

  16. Hydrothermal and magmatic couplings at mid-ocean ridges : controls on the locations of high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice; Rabinowicz, Michel; Cannat, Mathilde; Escartin, Javier

    2013-04-01

    The heat output and thermal regime of oceanic spreading centers are strongly controlled by boundary layer processes between the hydrothermal system and the underlying crustal magma chamber, which remain to be fully understood. In thermal models, the dynamical interactions between the hydrothermal system and the deeper part of the lithosphere affected by processes such as magma chamber convection, magma crystallization and latent heat release, or simple conduction, is usually not considered and a ad-hoc temperature or heat flux is prescribed at the base of the hydrothermal layer. In this work we develop original two-dimensional numerical models of the interactions between a shallow cellular hydrothermal (porous) system at temperatures <700°C in the upper crust, and a deeper magmatic (viscous) layer at temperatures up to 1200°C representing the lower crust. Our formalism allows for a dynamical interface between the two layers, which is fluctuating according to the dynamics of each layer. We systematically investigate the range of permeability and viscosity that characterized the dynamics of the porous and magmatic systems, respectively. An intriguing and highly debated question that we investigate is about the genesis of focused (i.e., kilometer-wide), hundreds-of-mega-watt (MW) powerfull, high-temperature (300-400°C) hydrothermal fields such as those discovered along the East Pacific Rise at 9°50'N or along the Juan de Fuca ridge/Endeavour segment for example. One hypothesis is that these fields require the formation of "elongated" hydrothermal convection cells that cool the crust on 5-10 kms, but the processes controlling the formation of such large aspect ratio (length/height) are poorly constrain. Our models show that such cells naturally arise from the dynamical coupling between a « low-viscosity », convecting lower-crust and a low-permeability upper hydrothermal layer. They also predict along-axis variations in the depth of the axial magma lens (AMC

  17. Implications of Chloride, Boron, and Lithium in Hydrothermal Systems of Jamaica, WI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, D.

    2012-12-01

    Chloride (Cl) often termed a "relatively conservative element" served as a very useful tracer (pathfinder element) in fluids from hydrothermal systems by comparing its concentration to those of select ions in solution. The concentrations of major ions of three thermal spring water samples: Bath hot springs (BTHS and BTHN), Milk River (MKR), Windsor (WS) and a cold spring water sample-Salt River spring (SR) of Jamaica were plotted against the Cl concentration. Results of chemical analyses, graphical analyses, and hydrogeochemical modeling confirmed three water types: Na-Cl-SO4, Na-Cl, and Ca-Na-Cl. Whereas chloride concentrations at MKR, WS and SR strongly indicate the influence of sea water mixing, the concentrations at MKR and SR are spatially related to a major tectonic feature, the South Coast Fault Zone (SCFZ). A principal component analysis (PCA) performed for the water samples showed a direct correlation between the concentrations of chloride and other conservative elements: boron (B), lithium (Li), bromide (Br), strontium (Sr), arsenic (As), and cesium (Cs). Isotope results (δ18O, δ2H, 3H) of the water samples implied minimal shallow mixing with deep circulating thermal fluids at the Bath site and the predominance of mixing with deep-circulating brines at the WS, MKR, and SR sites. Ionic ratios (Cl/B, Br/Cl, Li/B, have provided further interesting results for these hydrothermal systems including (1) a power series relationship between Li/B and SO4/Cl ratios; (2) the variation of B/Li versus Cl/SO4 concentrations with relatively prolonged water-rock contact time for these waters occurring at depth; and (3) low enthalpy. A discriminant analysis (DA) aided in the delineation of three independent hydrothermal systems based on processes affecting the chemical compositions of the water samples. Calculated chloride convective heat fluxes range between compared to the boron flux range of 3.41 x 104 - 1.63 x 106 Calories/second.

  18. The hydrothermal system of Long Valley Caldera, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Lewis, Robert Edward; Olmsted, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    for the welded tuff (including fracture porosity) from 0.05 to 0.10. Because of its continuity and depth and the likelihood of significant fracture permeability in the more competent rocks such as the welded tuff, our model of the hydrothermal system assumes that the Bishop Tuff provides the principal hot-water reservoir. However, because very little direct information exists from drill holes below 300 m, this assumption must be considered tentative. Long Valley caldera is drained by the Owens River and several tributaries which flow into Lake Crowley in the southeast end of the caldera. Streamflow and springflow measurements for water years 1964-74 indicate a total inflow to Lake Crowley of about 10,900 L/s. In contrast, the total discharge of hot water from the hydrothermal reservoir is about 300 L/s. For modeling purposes, the ground-water system is considered as comprising a shallow subsystem in the fill above the densely welded Bishop Tuff containing relatively cold ground water, and a deep subsystem or hydrothermal reservoir in the welded tuff containing relatively hot ground water. Hydrologic, isotopic, and thermal data indicate that recharge to the hydrothermal reservoir occurs in the upper Owens River drainage basin along the western periphery of the caldera. Temperature profiles in a 2.11- km-deep test well drilled by private industry in the southeastern part of the caldera suggest that an additional flux of relatively cool ground water recharges the deep subsystem around the northeast rim. Flow in the shallow ground-water subsystem is neglected in the model except in recharge areas and along Hot Creek gorge, where approximately 80 percent of the hot-water discharge from the hydrothermal reservoir moves upward along faults toward springs in the gorge. Heat-flow data from the Long Valley region indicate that the resurgent dome overlies a residual magma chamber more circular in plan than the original magma chamber that supplied the Bishop Tuff

  19. The stability of amino acids at submarine hydrothermal vent temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Stanley L.; Zhao, Meixun

    1995-01-01

    It has been postulated that amino acid stability at hydrothermal vent temperatures is controlled by a metastable thermodynamic equilibrium rather than by kinetics. Experiments reported here demonstrate that the amino acids are irreversibly destroyed by heating at 240 C and that quasi-equilibrium calculations give misleading descriptions of the experimental observations. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are not applicable to organic compounds under high-temperature submarine vent conditions.

  20. The transgenerational effects of heat stress in the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei are negative and rapidly eliminated under direct selection for increased stress resistance in larvae

    PubMed Central

    Sikkink, Kristin L.; Ituarte, Catherine M.; Reynolds, Rose M.; Cresko, William A.; Phillips, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Parents encountering stress environments can influence the phenotype of their offspring in a form of transgenerational phenotypic plasticity that has the potential to be adaptive if offspring are thereby better able deal with future stressors. Here, we test for the existence of anticipatory parental effects in the heat stress response in the highly polymorphic nematode Caenorhabditis remanei. Rather providing an anticipatory response, parents subject to a prior heat stress actually produce offspring that are less able to survive a severe heat shock. Selection on heat shock resistance within the larvae via experimental evolution leads to a loss of sensitivity (robustness) to environmental variation during both the parental and larval periods. Whole genome transcriptional analysis of both ancestor and selected lines shows that there is weak correspondence between genetic pathways induced via temperature shifts during parental and larval periods. Parental effects can evolve very rapidly via selection acting directly on offspring. PMID:25283346

  1. Direct utilization of geothermal heat in cascade application to aquaculture and greenhouse systems at Navarro College. Annual report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    1980-12-30

    Progress is reported on a project for direct use of the 130/sup 0/F central Texas geothermal resource. Well drilling and logging are reported. Work was done on a preliminary design for a heating system for a college building and a hospital. (MHR)

  2. Influence of surface morphology, water flow rate, and sample thermal history on the boiling-water heat transfer during direct-chill casting of commercial aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. A.; Li, D.; Cockcroft, S. L.

    2001-10-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on as-cast samples from three commercially significant aluminum alloys (AA1050, AA3004, and AA5182) to quantify the influence of surface morphology, water flow rate, and sample thermal history on the boiling-water heat transfer under conditions similar to those experienced in the direct-chill (DC) casting process. The study involved characterization of the as-cast surface morphology using a laser profilometer and quantification of the sample surface temperature and heat extraction to the cooling water using a DC casting simulator in combination with an inverse heat-conduction (IHC) analysis. The results from the study indicate that alloy’s thermal conductivity, surface morphology, and sample initial temperature all dramatically influence the calculated “boiling curve.” The intensity of the heat extraction was found to be enhanced at high heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling regime as the thermal conductivity was increased and was also found to increase as the surface of the sample became rougher, presumably through promotion of nucleation, growth, and/or detachment of bubbles. The heat transfer was also found to increase with increasing sample starting temperature, resulting in a series of boiling curves dependent on initial sample temperature. Finally, the effect of the water flow rate on heat transfer was found to be comparatively moderate and was limited to the sample with the smooth (machined) surface.

  3. Temporal monitoring and quantification of hydrothermal activity from photomosaics and 3D video reconstruction: The Lucky Strike hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreyre, T.; Escartin, J.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Seafloor imagery provides detailed and accurate constrain on the distribution, geometry, and nature of hydrothermal outflow, and its links to the ecosystems that they sustain. Repeated surveys allow us to evaluate the temporal variability of these systems. Geo-referenced and co-registered photomosaics of the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field (Mid Atlantic Ridge, 37°N), derived from >60,000 seafloor images acquired in 1996, 2006, 2008 and 2009, using deep-towed and ROV vehicles. Newly-developed image processing techniques, specifically tailored to generate giga-mosaics in the underwater environment, include correction of illumination artifacts and removal of the edges between individual images so as to obtain a continuous and single mosaic image over a surface of up ~800x800 m and with a pixel resolution of 5-10 mm. Photomosaicing is complemented by 3D-reconstruction of hydrothermal edifices from video imagery, with the mapping of image texture over the 3D model surface. These image and video data can also be directly linked with high-resolution microbathymetry acquired near-bottom acoustic systems. Preliminary analysis of these mosaics reveals the distribution of low-temperature hydrothermal outflow, recognizable owing to its association with bacterial mats and hydrothermal deposits easily identifiable in the imagery. These low-temperature venting areas, often associated with high-temperature hydrothermal vents, are irregularly distributed throughout the site, defining clusters. In detail, the outflow geometry is largely controlled by the nature of the substrate (e.g., cracks and fissures, diffuse flow patches, existing hydrothermal constructs). The spatial relationships between the high- and diffuse venting as revealed by the imagery provide constraints on the shallow plumbing structure throughout the site.. Imagery provides constraints on temporal variability at two time-scales. First, we can identify changes in the distribution and presence of actively venting

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn(OH)O nanowires and their thermal conversion to (1D)-manganese oxides nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed Ahmed, Khalid Abdelazez; Abbood, Hayder A.; Huang, Kaixun

    2012-11-01

    Manganite Mn(OH)O nanowires were successfully synthesized using a hydrothermal method based on a mild and direct reaction between potassium permanganate and ethylene glycol. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn(OH)O nanowires in air at 400 °C for 4 h and 900 °C for 2 h, was conducted to prepare pyrolusite MnO2 nanobelts and necklace-like bixbyite-C Mn2O3 nanowires, respectively. A variety of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SA-ED), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analyzer (TG-DTA), were employed to characterize the resulting materials. The ethylene glycol and heating furnace imposed an effect on the morphology evolution of one dimensional (1D) manganese oxides nanocrystals.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sucha, V.; Elsass, F.; Eberl, D.D.; Kuchta, L'.; Madejova, J.; Gates, W.P.; Komadel, P.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic gel and glass of illitic composition, natural kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite were used as starting materials for hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite. Ammonium illite was prepared from synthetic gel by hydrothermal treatment at 300??C. The onset of crystallization began within 3 h, and well-crystallized ammonium illite appeared at 24 h. Increasing reaction time (up to four weeks) led to many illite layers per crystal. In the presence of equivalent proportions of potassium and ammonium, the gel was transformed to illite with equimolar contents of K and NH4. In contrast, synthesis using glass under the same conditions resulted in a mixture of mixed-layer ammonium illite-smectite with large expandability and discrete illite. Hydrothermal treatments of the fine fractions of natural kaolinite and illite-smectite produced ammonium illite from kaolinite but the illite-smectite remained unchanged.

  6. The Interplay of Magmatic and Hydrothermal Convection: Insights From Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, J.; Rupke, L.; Morgan, J. P.; Galerne, C.

    2015-12-01

    At fast spreading mid-ocean ridges, the heat released by an axial magma chamber (AMC) is the main driver of hydrothermal circulation at the ridge axis. Seismic studies at the East Pacific Rise show that the AMC is continuous along-axis and has relatively small depth variations. In contrast, slow spreading ridges have short-lived, discontinuous melt lenses and a much sparser abundance of axial hydrothermal fields. These observations point at a strong link between the abundance of on-axis hydrothermal fields and the spatial and temporal variations of magmatic energy input. To better understand the interplay of magmatic and hydrothermal processes we developed 2D and 3D numerical models that simultaneously solve for crustal accretion processes and hydrothermal convection. Our models cover the oceanic crust from depths below the AMC to the seafloor. The "magmatic" model part simulates the processes within the AMC such as convection of the viscous melt, crystallization and the associated release of latent heat. The "hydrothermal" model part is restricted to the permeable regions of the crust at temperatures below the brittle-ductile transition at ~700 ºC. Here we assume Darcy flow of a super-critical single-phase fluid and account for the thermodynamic properties of water. Boundary conditions allow for free venting of hydrothermal plumes at the top of the model domain. Magmatic and hydrothermal parts are coupled by the crustal temperature field, leading to two dynamic convective systems that are connected by a relatively thin, impermeable conductive boundary layer between ~700 ºC and 1000 ºC. First results indicate that the balance between the rate of energy input from magmatic processes and the rate of heat removal by hydrothermal flow controls the along-ridge depth of the AMC. Hydrothermal upflow and associated venting preferentially forms above "highs" of the AMC roof. Recharge flow surrounds these hot thermal plumes, because the thermodynamic properties of water

  7. Chicxulub: Testing for post-impact hydrothermal input into the Tertiary ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, A. J.; Wilkinson, J. J.; Coles, B. J.; Morgan, J. V.

    2004-07-01

    Studies of large terrestrial impact craters indicate that post-impact hydrothermal activity is a likely consequence of the crustal deformation and heating induced by such events. In the case of the Chicxulub basin, where marine conditions were re-established soon after the impact, significant fluxing of seawater through the crust and hydrothermal venting into the water column might be anticipated. We have carried out geochemical analyses of Tertiary carbonate sediments within the Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) drill hole to test for evidence of such post-impact hydrothermal circulation. Hydrothermal activity is most likely to be found close to thick layers of melt rock inside the collapsed transient cavity, and it is estimated that Yax-1 is located ~20 km outside this cavity. Consequently, the most likely signature of hydrothermal venting into the water column would be geochemical anomalies attributable to fallout of suspended particulate matter from a submarine hydrothermal plume. Samples of Tertiary biomicrites from depths of 794.01 to 777.02 m have high concentrations of manganese, iron, phosphorous, titanium, and aluminium and low iron/manganese ratios relative to samples from higher in the stratigraphic succession. This geochemical anomaly decreases fairly systematically between 793.13 m and 777.02 m, above which an abrupt change in geochemistry is observed. A mass balance calculation suggests that the anomaly is unlikely to be the result of a decreasing detrital input to the carbonate sediments and the nature of the element enrichments is consistent with expectations for fallout from a distal hydrothermal plume. We conclude that a post impact hydrothermal system did develop at Chicxulub, which led to the expulsion of hydrothermal fluids into the Tertiary water column. Preliminary biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic dating on Yax-1 core suggest that this hydrothermal activity lasted for at least 300 ka.

  8. Surface hydrothermal minerals and their distribution in the Tengchong geothermal area, China

    SciTech Connect

    Meixiang, Z.; Wei, T.

    1987-01-01

    In the active hydrothermal areas of Tengchong there is widespread evidence that hydrothermal minerals are deposited directly from the geothermal fluid or from water-rock interactions. X-ray powder diffraction, electron microprobe analyses and classical optical methods were used to identify these hydrothermal minerals. Sulfates (gypsum, alunite, alunogen, halotrichite, etc.), carbonates (calcite, trona, thermonatrite, etc.), clay minerals (kaolinite, illite-smectite mixed layer mineral, etc.) and silica minerals (opal, chalcedony, etc.) are the dominant phases. Native sulfur, pyrite, marcasite and aragonite are next in order of abundance. Some chabazite, analcime, pitchblende, coffinite, hematite, thenardite, rozenite, coquimbite, manganocalcite and rhodochrosite is also present. Although travertine and efflorescences, along with carbonates and simple sulfates, are widespread in the low-temperature hydrothermal areas, siliceous sinters and hydrothermal altered minerals, such as clay minerals, zeolites and efflorescences with complex sulfates containing Fe, Al, are only found in a few high-temperature hydrothermal areas, such as in the Hot Sea and the Ruidian hydrothermal areas. Most of the wall rock was intensely altered by geothermal fluid in the Hot Sea and Ruidian, zoning in the characteristic feature of the altered minerals within the Hot Sea. Pitchblende, coffinite, pyrite, marcasite and hematite, which are all of hydrothermal genesis, as well as the sulfate with Al and Fe, seem to be the result of water-rock interaction.

  9. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    been presented and its validity has been tested against satellite-based retrievals. A detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM), already used in a number of planetary and regional studies, has been used in the present study to calculate the vertically distributed aerosol direct radiative effects (DREs) and the associated aerosol heating/cooling profiles within the troposphere. Specific emphasis is given to assessment of the crucial issue of the differences between modeling the aerosol DREs using either columnar aerosol optical properties, as usually done, or vertically layered information on those properties, which is the state of the art and ideal practice. To address this problem, the following experiment has been performed: the same RTM has been used twice with the same meteorological conditions but in the first run (set1) columnar values for aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been used while using vertically distributed AOD in the second run (set2). In the second run vertically layered information for AOD is considered for 20 layers extending from the surface to 20 km a.m.s.l.. The vertical profile of AOD has been mainly based on ECHAM model. The aerosol DREs are computed at the Earth's surface, at TOA and at various levels in the atmosphere. Apart from AOD, the model also requires single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASY) in 18 different wavelengths, which are obtained by linear interpolation from the available wavelengths in HAC. The comparison between the obtained two sets of DRE (set1 and set2) reveal small, but notable differences which vary from one place to another. Within the atmosphere, the difference -averaged over the four seasons - ranges from -0.3 to 1.7 Wm-2 with a mean value of 0.32 Wm-2. Given the fact that the average column-integrated DREAtm values for the entire Mediterranean region based on columnar aerosol optical properties is 11.44 Wm-2, there is an average variance of 3.7 %, which locally could get to 14

  10. Ice patterns and hydrothermal plumes, Lake Baikal, Russia - Insights from Space Shuttle hand-held photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Helfert, Michael R.; Helms, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Earth photography from the Space Shuttle is used to examine the ice cover on Lake Baikal and correlate the patterns of weakened and melting ice with known hydrothermal areas in the Siberian lake. Particular zones of melted and broken ice may be surface expressions of elevated heat flow in Lake Baikal. The possibility is explored that hydrothermal vents can introduce local convective upwelling and disrupt a stable water column to the extent that the melt zones which are observed in the lake's ice cover are produced. A heat flow map and photographs of the lake are overlaid to compare specific areas of thinned or broken ice with the hot spots. The regions of known hydrothermal activity and high heat flow correlate extremely well with circular regions of thinned ice, and zones of broken and recrystallized ice. Local and regional climate data and other sources of warm water, such as river inlets, are considered.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis as a route to mineralogically-inspired structures.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2016-02-21

    The use of high temperature hydrothermal reactions to prepare crystals having mineralogically-related structures is described. Complex naturally occurring minerals can have fascinating structures and exhibit important features like low dimensionality, noncentrosymmetry, or ion channels that can provide excellent guideposts for the designed synthesis of new materials. Actual minerals, even though they may have intriguing physical properties, are often unsuitable for study because of the persistent impurities inevitably present in natural samples. Hydrothermal fluids at relatively high temperatures provide access to large, high quality single crystals of structures with mineral-like structures. This enables the study of physical properties like ionic conduction, magnetic spin frustration and non-linear optical behavior. Some fundamental considerations of the hydrothermal technique are discussed in the context of synthesizing mineralogically-inspired materials. The metal vanadates provide a surprisingly rich and diversified range of compounds and are selected to illustrate many of the concepts described here. A series of low dimensional mineral analogs featuring isolated units, chains, and layers have been prepared in the laboratory as large single crystals using a high temperature hydrothermal synthetic methods, and their physical properties are under investigation. The metal silicates are also highlighted as another promising field of exploration, since their hydrothermal synthesis surprisingly lags behind the enormous literature of the natural silicate minerals. The introduction of heteroelements, such as boron to make borosilicates, appears to also open the door to additional new materials. Many of these new materials have direct equivalents in the mineral kingdom, while others have no known analogs but are reminiscent of minerals and can be classified in the same ways. From these initial results there appears to be a very rich vein of synthetic minerals waiting

  12. Hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines): Implications to volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Alanis, P. B.; Yamaya, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Bornas, M. V.; Cordon, J. M.; Puertollano, J.; Clarito, C. J.; Hashimoto, T.; Mogi, T.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The first recorded eruption was in 1573. Since then it has erupted 33 times resulting in thousands of casualties and large damages to property. In 1995, it was declared as one of the 15 Decade Volcanoes. Beginning in the early 1990s it has experienced several phases of abnormal activity, including seismic swarms, episodes of ground deformation, ground fissuring and hydrothermal activities, which continues up to the present. However, it has been noted that past historical eruptions of Taal Volcano may be divided into 2 distinct cycles, depending on the location of the eruption center, either at Main Crater or at the flanks. Between 1572-1645, eruptions occurred at the Main Crater, in 1707 to 1731, they occurred at the flanks. In 1749, eruptions moved back to the Main Crater until 1911. During the 1965 and until the end of the 1977 eruptions, eruptive activity once again shifted to the flanks. As part of the PHIVOLCS-JICA-SATREPS Project magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric surveys were conducted on Volcano Island in March 2011 and March 2012. Two-dimensional (2-D) inversion and 3-D forward modeling reveals a prominent and large zone of relatively high resistivity between 1 to 4 kilometers beneath the volcano almost directly beneath the Main Crater, surrounded by zones of relatively low resistivity. This anomalous zone of high resistivity is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir filled with volcanic fluids. The presence of this large hydrothermal reservoir could be related to past activities of Taal Volcano. In particular we believe that the catastrophic explosion described during the 1911 eruption was the result of the hydrothermal reservoir collapsing. During the cycle of Main Crater eruptions, this hydrothermal reservoir is depleted, while during a cycle of flank eruptions this reservoir is replenished with hydrothermal fluids.

  13. Hydrothermal activity in the Lau back-arc basin: Sulfides and water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fouquet, Y.; Charlou, J.L.; Donval, J.P.; Foucher, J.P. ); von Stackelberg, U.; Wiedicke, M. ); Erzinger, J. ); Herzig, P. ); Muhe, R. ); Soakai, S. ); Whitechurch, H. )

    1991-04-01

    The submersible Nautile completed 22 dives during the Nautilau cruise (R/V Nadir, April 17-May 10, 1989) for a detailed investigation of the southern Lau basin near Tonga. The objective of the scientific team from France, Germany, and Tonga was to understand the process of sea-floor ore formation associated with hydrothermal circulation along the Valu Fa back-arc ridge behind the Tonga-Kermadec trench. The four diving areas, between lat21{degree}25'S and 22{degree}40'S in water{approximately}2000 m deep, were selected on the basis of results from cruises of the R/V Jean Charcot and R/V Sonne. The Nadir cruise provided proof of hydrothermal activity-in all for areas, over more than 100 km-as indicated by the widespread occurence of hydrothermal deposits and by heat flow, conductivity, and temperature measurements near the sea bottom. The most spectacular findings were high-temperature white and black smokers and associated fauna and ore deposits. Hydrothermal water chemistry and sulfide composition data presented here indicate that this hydrothermal field is very different from the hydrothermal fields in oceanic ridges. This difference is seen in water chemistry of the hydrothermal fluid (pH=2 and high metal content) and the chemical composition of sulfides (enrichment in Ba, As, and Pb).

  14. Hydrothermal activity in the Lau back-arc basin:Sulfides and water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Yves; von Stackelberg, Ulrich; Charlou, Jean Luc; Donval, Jean Pierre; Foucher, Jean Paul; Erzinger, Jorg; Herzig, Peter; Mühe, Richard; Wiedicke, Michael; Soakai, Sione; Whitechurch, Hubert

    1991-04-01

    The submersible Nautile completed 22 dives during the Nautilau cruise (R/V Nadir, April 17-May 10, 1989) for a detailed investigation of the southern Lau basin near Tonga. The objective of the scientific team from France, Germany, and Tonga was to understand the process of sea-floor ore formation associated with hydrothermal circulation along the Valu Fa back-arc ridge behind the Tonga- Kermadec trench. The four diving areas, between lat 21°25‧S and 22°40‧S in water ˜2000 m deep, were selected on the basis of results from cruises of the R/V JeanCharcot and R/V Sonne. The Nadir cruise provided proof of hydrothermal activity—in all four areas, over more than 100 km—as indicated by the widespread occurrence of hydrothermal deposits and by heat flow, conductivity, and temperature measurements near the sea bottom. The most spectacular findings were high-temperature white and black smokers and associated fauna and ore deposits. Hydrothermal water chemistry and sulfide composition data presented here indicate that this hydrothermal field is very different from the hydrothermal fields in oceanic ridges. This difference is seen in the water chemistry of the hydrothermal fluid (pH = 2 and high metal content) and the chemical composition of sulfides (enrichment in Ba, As, and Pb).

  15. The characteristics of hydrothermal plumes observed in the Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field, the Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Zhou, J.; Deng, X.; Tao, W.; Zhang, G.; Liu, W.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    effected by seafloor topography, the terrain of the PSMHF was relatively flat, so the impact was negligible. Southwest direction bottom current at the speed of 0.05 m/s in PSMHF had a great influence on the distribution and spreading direction of hydrothermal plume. Keyword: hydrothermal plume, Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field, turbidity

  16. Present-day submarine hydrothermal activity in the Taupo-Rotorua Zone (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, A.B.; Egorov, Yu.O.; Fazlullin, S.M.; Gavrilenko, G.M.; Shul`kin, V.I.; Chertkova, L.V.

    1994-09-01

    We made detailed descriptions of the structure and material composition of sedimentary and water columns in the vicinity of active submarine hydrothermal activity in the southern part of the Bay of Plenty (North Island, New Zealand). Geophysical methods revealed that the hydrothermal system is confined to a tectonically distinct zone with a sedimentary cover characterized by complex structure. Chemical and mineralogical investigations confirmed that the activity of underwater vents exerts no substantial regional influence on the composition and features of ore mineralization in these formations. It is shown that essentially hydrothermal formations distinguishable within areas of otherwise monotypic sediments directly coincide with zones of hydrothermal discharge in the ocean floor. The absence of pronounced hydrothermal anomalies, together with the presence of {open_quotes}tongues{close_quotes} of anomalous concentrations of water-soluble gases suggests that the discharges are primarily hydrothermal in character.

  17. FINAL Report on Analysis and direct numerical simulation of RF heating processes and advanced computational methods for fusion application

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R

    2015-02-23

    This completes the description of the work done under the above referenced grant. In brief, we have discovered many nonlinear effects, frequency doubling, nonlinear decays, that can prevent effective use of EBWs for plasma heating.

  18. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry using prototypic core materials, the U2 test

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-05-01

    A third Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments has been completed which utilizes prototypic core materials. The reactor material tests are a follow on to the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The IET series of tests primarily addressed the effect of scale on DCH phenomena. This was accomplished by completing a series of counterpart tests in 1/40 and 1/10th linear scale DCH facilities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), respectively. The IET experiments modeled the Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry. The scale models included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven at nominally 6.2 MPa. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt simulant in the IET experiments. While the IET experiments at ANL and SNL provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. A prototypic core melt was produced for the experiment by first mixing powders of uranium, zirconium, iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and chromium trioxide (CrO{sub 3}). When ignited the powders react exothermically to produce a molten mixture. The amounts of each powder were selected to produce the anticipated composition for a core melt following a station blackout: 57.8 mass% UO{sub 2} 10.5 mass% ZrO{sub 2} 14.3 mass% Fe, 13.7 mass% Zr, and 3.7 mass% Cr. Development tests measured the initial melt temperature to be in the range of 2600 - 2700 K. The total thermal specific energy content of the melt at 2700 K is 1.2 MJ/kg compared to 2.25 MJ/kg for the iron-alumina simulant at its measured initial temperature of 2500 K.

  19. A Map of Heating in MS0735.6+7421: Direct Evidence for ICM Heating in the Most Energetic AGN Outburst Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael; McNamara, Brian; Nulsen, Paul; Cavagnolo, Kenneth; Rafferty, David; Birzan, Laura; Kirkpatrick, Charles

    We report on preliminary results from an analysis of new, deep Chandra observations of the cluster MS0735.6+7421. This cluster has been observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton pre-viously and found to contain signatures of the most energetic AGN outburst currently known. Estimates for the total energy released into the ICM by this outburst approach 1062 ergs. Using a new 500 ksec Chandra observation, we have performed a spatially resolved spectral analysis of the ICM in MS0735+7421. The new data clearly delineates the entire cavity boundary in both the north and south cavities. From previous VLA observations, we know these cavities to contain radio plasma at 330 and 1400 MHz. In our new image, this radio emission is entirely enclosed by the evacuated cavity structure. The immense amount of energy being released in this system and the complete apparent confinement of the radio plasma ejected from the AGN makes this object ideal for studying the energy deposition process. By fitting the gas emission measure distribution as a function of position in the cluster, we have derived a map of the mag-nitude and location of the implied heating in the ICM in MS0735.6+7421. We find that both the X-ray-derived temperature and heating maps show a clear signature of energy deposition along the cavity walls near the head of the radio jet. In the radio, these sites also correspond to a steepening in the spectral index of the emission as seen in the VLA albeit at lower spatial resolution, In this talk, we will present an analysis of the energetics of this interface region between the radio plasma inside the cavities and the X-ray emitting gas along the cavity rims. We will also discuss the constraints these observations place on AGN feedback-based heating models as well as the energy transfer mechanism itself.

  20. Geothermal District Heating Economics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-12

    GEOCITY is a large-scale simulation model which combines both engineering and economic submodels to systematically calculate the cost of geothermal district heating systems for space heating, hot-water heating, and process heating based upon hydrothermal geothermal resources. The GEOCITY program simulates the entire production, distribution, and waste disposal process for geothermal district heating systems, but does not include the cost of radiators, convectors, or other in-house heating systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating basedmore » on the climate, population, and heat demand of the district; characteristics of the geothermal resource and distance from the distribution center; well-drilling costs; design of the distribution system; tax rates; and financial conditions.« less

  1. Shallow water submarine hydrothermal activity - A case study in the assessment of ocean acidification and fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yoshida, K.; Hagiwara, T.; Nagao, K.; Kusakabe, M.; Wang, B.; Chen, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Most natural Shallow Water submarine Hydrothermal activates (SWH) along coastlines are related to hydrothermal eruptions involving heating of groundwater with the volcanic gas. These SWHs supply nutrients such as phosphorus and micro nutrients like iron to the euphotic zone, contributing to the overall natural fertility and primary productivity of coastal waters. However, SWHs also have a negative effect, dispersing toxic materials such as mercury and arsenic, and affecting the acidification of the surrounding waters. In this study, we evaluate the impact of "iron supply" and "ocean acidification" on the primary production in a coastal marine environment, at a SWH area discovered off Gueshandao Island, northeast Taiwan. In the past three years, expeditions were conducted and observations made around this SWH site. Divers, small boats and a research vessel (R/V OR1, Ocean University National Taiwan) were used to survey successively larger areas around the site. Some of the results obtained are as follows. Hydrothermal vents are located in a hilly terrain rich with hot spring water with gas erupting intermittently. There are two types of vents, roughly divided by color, yellow hot spring water with higher temperature >110 degC ejected from sulfur chimneys of various sizes, and colorless water with lower temperature ~80 degC ejected directly from the crevices of the andesitic bedrock. Natural sulfur solidifying in the mouth of a small chimney was captured by a video camera, and explosions were also observed at intervals of a few minutes. Sediment, sand and particles of sulfur were deposited on the sides to a radius of about 50 m condensing around the chimney. The bottom type changes from sand/particles to outcrop/rock away from the vents. Moreover, gas samples were collected from the vents; the ratios of gas concentrations (N2/Ar) and isotopic composition of noble gas (3He/4He) suggest that these volcanic gases are mantle-derived. Hydrothermal fluid with high p

  2. Latent heat contribution to the direct magnetocaloric effect in Ni–Mn–Ga shape memory alloys with coupled martensitic and magnetic transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Flores, R.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J. I.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2016-05-01

    We report the direct magnetocaloric response of materials that present a second-order phase transition in the temperature range where a first-order structural transition also occurs. In particular, the influence of the latent heat on the field-induced adiabatic temperature change has been analyzed in a Ni–Mn–Ga alloy with coupled martensitic and magnetic transformations. It is found that discrepancies around 20% arise depending on whether the latent heat is taken into account or not. From the observed results, a general expression for the indirect determination of the adiabatic temperature change, that takes into account the contributions of both the martensitic and magnetic transformations, is proposed and experimentally confirmed. The observed key role of the latent heat allows us to understand why materials with first-order transformations do not present adiabatic temperature changes as higher as those which would correspond to materials undergoing second-order transformations with similar isothermal entropy change.

  3. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    The serious scientific debate about spontaneous generation which raged for centuries reached a climax in the nineteenth century with the work of Spallanzani, Schwann, Tyndall, and Pasteur. These investigators demonstrated that spontaneous generation from dead organic matter does not occur. Although no aspects of these experiments addressed the issue of whether organic compounds could be synthesized abiotically, the impact of the experiments was great enough to cause many investigators to assume that life and its organic compounds were somehow fundamentally different than inorganic compounds. Meanwhile, other nineteenth-century investigators were showing that organic compounds could indeed be synthesized from inorganic compounds. In 1828 Friedrich Wohler synthesized urea in an attempt to form ammonium cyanate by heating a solution containing ammonia and cyanic acid. This experiment is generally recognized to be the first to bridge the artificial gap between organic and inorganic chemistry, but it also showed the usefulness of heat in organic synthesis. Not only does an increase in temperature enhance the rate of urea synthesis, but Walker and Hambly showed that equilibrium between urea and ammonium cyanate was attainable and reversible at 100 C. Wohler's synthesis of urea, and subsequent syntheses of organic compounds from inorganic compounds over the next several decades dealt serious blows to the 'vital force' concept which held that: (1) organic compounds owe their formation to the action of a special force in living organisms; and (2) forces which determine the behavior of inorganic compounds play no part in living systems. Nevertheless, such progress was overshadowed by Pasteur's refutation of spontaneous generation which nearly extinguished experimental investigations into the origins of life for several decades. Vitalism was dealt a deadly blow in the 1950's with Miller's famous spark-discharge experiments which were undertaken in the framework of the Oparin

  4. Direct measurements of vertical heat flux and Na flux in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere by lidar at Boulder (40°N, 105°W), Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Chu, X.; Gardner, C. S.; Barry, I. F.; Smith, J. A.; Fong, W.; Yu, Z.; Chen, C.

    2014-12-01

    The vertical transport of heat and constituent by gravity waves and tides plays a fundamental role in establishing the thermal and constituent structures of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), but has not been thoroughly investigated by observations. In particular, direct measurements of vertical heat flux and metal constituent flux caused by dissipating waves are extremely rare, which demand precise measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions over a long period. Such requirements are necessary to overcome various uncertainties to reveal the small quantities of the heat and constituent fluxes induced by dissipating waves. So far such direct observations have only been reported for vertical heat and Na fluxes using a Na Doppler lidar at Starfire Optical Range (SOR) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Furthermore, estimate of eddy heat and constituent fluxes from the turbulent mixing generated by breaking waves is even more challenging due to the even smaller temporal and spatial scales of the eddy. Consequently, the associated coefficients of thermal (kH) and constituent (kzz) diffusion have not been well characterized and remain as large uncertainties in models. We attempt to address these issues with direct measurements by a Na Doppler lidar with exceptional high-resolution measurement capabilities. Since summer 2010, we have been operating a Na Doppler lidar at Boulder, Colorado. The efficiency of the lidar has been greatly improved in summer of 2011 and achieved generally over 1000 counts of Na signal per lidar pulse in winter. In 2013, we made extensive Na lidar observations in 98 nights. These data covering each month of a full year will be used to characterize the seasonal variations of heat and Na fluxes and to be compared with the pioneering observations at SOR. In November 2013, we further upgraded the lidar with two new frequency shifters and a new data acquisition scheme, which are optimized for estimating eddy fluxes and reducing the

  5. YELLOWSTONE MAGMATIC-HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM, U. S. A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Pitt, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    At Yellowstone National Park, the deep permeability and fluid circulation are probably controlled and maintained by repeated brittle fracture of rocks in response to local and regional stress. Focal depths of earthquakes beneath the Yellowstone caldera suggest that the transition from brittle fracture to quasi-plastic flow takes place at about 3 to 4 km. The maximum temperature likely to be attained by the hydrothermal system is 350 to 450 degree C, the convective thermal output is about 5. 5 multiplied by 10**9 watts, and the minimum average thermal flux is about 1800 mW/m**2 throughout 2,500 km**2. The average thermal gradient between the heat source and the convecting hydrothermal system must be at least 700 to 1000 degree C/km. Crystallization and partial cooling of about 0. 082 km**3 of basalt or 0. 10 km**3 of rhyolite annually could furnish the heat discharged in the hot-spring system. The Yellowstone magmatic-hydrothermal system as a whole appears to be cooling down, in spite of a relatively large rate of inflation of the Yellowstone caldera.

  6. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  7. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids. PMID:25796392

  8. User manual for GEOCITY: A computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume 1: Main text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, H. D.; Fassbender, L. L.; Bloomster, C. H.

    1982-09-01

    The cost of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir was calculated. The GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, and fan-coil units. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. The life cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end users are calculated by discounted cash flow analysis.

  9. Peptide synthesis under Enceladus hydrothermal condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Takano, Yoshinori; Takai, Ken; Takahagi, Wataru; Adachi, Keito; Shibuya, Takazo; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is one of the moons of Saturn, and it has been known to harbor interior ocean beneath the icy crust. The mass spectrometry data obtained by Cassini spacecraft indicates the presence of salty, and most likely alkaline ocean containing various organic compounds. While geochemical and other radiation related processes for in situ production of organics remain elusive, thermally unaltered carbonaceous chondrites, consisting the main body of Enceladus are known to be enriched with organic matters potentially including the building blocks of life (e.g., amino acids and amino acid precursors). Assuming that abiotic amino acids exist in the Enceladus alkaline seawater, we hypothesized that water-rock interaction may contribute to condensation of localized amino acids leading to peptide formation. In order to test this hypothesis, we have developed the Enceladus hydrothermal reactor based on the chemical constraints obtained through previous experimental and theoretical studies. We have added six different amino acids and introduced a thermal fluctuation system simulating the periodic tidal heating of the interior chondritic core. Total, eight sea water samples were obtained over the course of 147 days of experiment. While detection of peptide using Capillary Electrophoresis Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (CE-TOF/MS) is still at the preliminary stage, so far pH monitoring and H2 and CO2 Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) data clearly indicated the occurrence of serpentinization/carbonation reaction. Here, we discuss the interaction between aqueous alteration reactions and thermal cycling processes for the role of abiotic peptide formation under the Enceladus hydrothermal condition.

  10. Impact of aerosol direct radiative forcing on the radiative budget, surface heat fluxes, and atmospheric dynamics during the heat wave of summer 2003 over western Europe: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRé, J. C.; Mallet, M.; Pont, V.; Bessagnet, B.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, an off-line coupling between the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE (associated with an aerosol optical module) and the meteorological model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) is used to study (1) the direct radiative forcing of pollution aerosols during the heat wave of summer 2003 over western Europe and (2) the possible feedbacks of this direct radiative forcing on the surface-atmosphere system. Simulations performed for the period 7-15 August 2003 reveal a significant decrease of daily mean solar radiation reaching the surface (ΔFBOA = -(10-30) W/m2) because of back scattering at the top of the atmosphere (ΔFTOA = -(1-12) W/m2) and also absorption of solar radiation by polluted particles (ΔFatm = + (5-23) W/m2). During daytime, the aerosol surface dimming induces a mean reduction of both sensible (16 W/m2) and latent (21 W/m2) heat fluxes emitted by the terrestrial surface, resulting in a radiative cooling of the air near the surface (up to 2.9 K/d at noon). Simultaneously, the absorption of solar energy by aerosols causes an atmospheric radiative heating within the planetary boundary layer reaching 1.20 K/d at noon. As a consequence, the direct radiative effect of aerosols is shown to reduce both the planetary boundary layer height (up to 30%) and the horizontal wind speed (up to 6%); that may have contributed to favor the particulate pollution during the heat wave of summer 2003.

  11. GPHS-RTG system explosion test direct course experiment 5000. [General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) has been designed and is being built to provide electrical power for spacecrafts to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The objective of the RTG System Explosion Test was to expose a mock-up of the GPHS-RTG with a simulated heat source to the overpressure and impulse representative of a potential upper magnitude explosion of the Space Shuttle. The test was designed so that the heat source module would experience an overpressure at which the survival of the fuel element cladding would be expected to be marginal. Thus, the mock-up was placed where the predicted incident overpressure would be 1300 psi. The mock-up was mounted in an orientation representative of the launch configuration on the spacecraft to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission. The incident overpressure measured was in the range of 1400 to 2100 psi. The mock-up and simulated heat source were destroyed and only very small fragments were recovered. This damage is believed to have resulted from a combination of the overpressure and impact by very high velocity fragments from the ANFO sphere. Post-test analysis indicated that extreme working of the iridium clad material occurred, indicative of intensive impulsive loading on the metal.

  12. First Survey For Submarine Hydrothermal Vents In NE Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConachy, T.; Binns, R.; Permana, H.

    2001-12-01

    The IASSHA-2001 cruise (Indonesia-Australia Survey for Submarine Hydrothermal Activity) was successfully conducted from June 1 to June 29 on board Baruna Jaya VIII. Preliminary results are reported of the first expedition to locate and study submarine hydrothermal activity in north east Sulawesi. Leg A focussed on Tomini Bay, a virtually unexplored Neogene sedimentary basin. Its objective was to test whether modern sediment-hosted hydrothermal activity occurred on the sea floor. The results of new bathymetric mapping, sediment coring and CTD/transmissometer hydrocasts negate the likely presence in central Tomini Bay of large-scale modern analogues of hydrothermal massive sulfide environments involving hydrothermal venting of basinal or magma-derived fluids into reduced sediments. It is possible that the "heat engine" required to drive circulation of basinal and hydrothermal fluids is today too weak. Surveys around Colo volcano indicate that it may be in its final stage of evolution. Leg B studied the arc and behind-arc sectors of the Sangihe volcanic island chain extending northwards from Quaternary volcanoes on the northeastern tip of Sulawesi's North Arm, near Manado. West of the main active chain and extending northwards from Manado there is a subparallel ridge surmounted by a number of high (>2000 m) seamounts of uncertain age. Fifteen relatively high-standing submarine edifices were crossed during this leg, of which nine were tested for hydrothermal activity by hydrocast and dredging. Eight sites were known from previous bathymetric surveys, and seven are new discoveries made by narrow-beam or multibeam echo sounding. Two submarine edifices at least 1000 m high were discovered in the strait immediately north of Awu volcano on Sangihe Island. One, with crest at 206 m, is surrounded by a circular platform 300m deep which we infer to be a foundered fringing reef to a formerly emergent island. The other, lacking such a platform, appears relatively young and may be

  13. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal-Vent Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthur; Matthews, Jaret B.

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus is being developed for sampling water for signs of microbial life in an ocean hydrothermal vent at a depth of as much as 6.5 km. Heretofore, evidence of microbial life in deep-sea hydrothermal vents has been elusive and difficult to validate. Because of the extreme conditions in these environments (high pressures and temperatures often in excess of 300 C), deep-sea hydrothermal- vent samplers must be robust. Because of the presumed low density of biomass of these environments, samplers must be capable of collecting water samples of significant volume. It is also essential to prevent contamination of samples by microbes entrained from surrounding waters. Prior to the development of the present apparatus, no sampling device was capable of satisfying these requirements. The apparatus (see figure) includes an intake equipped with a temperature probe, plus several other temperature probes located away from the intake. The readings from the temperature probes are utilized in conjunction with readings from flowmeters to determine the position of the intake relative to the hydrothermal plume and, thereby, to position the intake to sample directly from the plume. Because it is necessary to collect large samples of water in order to obtain sufficient microbial biomass but it is not practical to retain all the water from the samples, four filter arrays are used to concentrate the microbial biomass (which is assumed to consist of particles larger than 0.2 m) into smaller volumes. The apparatus can collect multiple samples per dive and is designed to process a total volume of 10 L of vent fluid, of which most passes through the filters, leaving a total possibly-microbe-containing sample volume of 200 mL remaining in filters. A rigid titanium nose at the intake is used for cooling the sample water before it enters a flexible inlet hose connected to a pump. As the water passes through the titanium nose, it must be cooled to a temperature that is above a mineral

  14. Natural analogs for enhanced heat recovery from geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Dennis L.

    1996-01-24

    High-temperature hydrothe