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Sample records for hygrothermorheologically simple linear

  1. A geometrically nonlinear shell element for hygrothermorheologically simple linear viscoelastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERAND,DANIEL C.; KAPANIA,RAKESH K.

    2000-05-01

    A triangular flat shell element for large deformation analysis of linear viscoelastic laminated composites is presented. Hygrothermorheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Recurrence relations are developed and implemented for the evaluation of the viscoelastic memory loads. The nonlinear deformation process is computed using an incremental/iterative approach with the Newton-Raphson Method used to find the incremental displacements in each step. The presented numerical examples consider the large deformation and stability of linear viscoelastic structures under deformation-independent mechanical loads, deformation-dependent pressure loads, and thermal loads. Unlike elastic structures that have a single critical load value associated with a given snapping of buckling instability phenomenon, viscoelastic structures will usually exhibit a particular instability for a range of applied loads over a range of critical times. Both creep buckling and snap-through examples are presented here. In some cases, viscoelastic results are also obtained using the quasielastic method in which load-history effects are ignored, and time-varying viscoelastic properties are simply used in a series of elastic problems. The presented numerical examples demonstrate the capability and accuracy of the formulation.

  2. Correlation and simple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Lynn E

    2007-01-01

    This chapter highlights important steps in using correlation and simple linear regression to address scientific questions about the association of two continuous variables with each other. These steps include estimation and inference, assessing model fit, the connection between regression and ANOVA, and study design. Examples in microbiology are used throughout. This chapter provides a framework that is helpful in understanding more complex statistical techniques, such as multiple linear regression, linear mixed effects models, logistic regression, and proportional hazards regression. PMID:18450049

  3. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  4. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  5. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  6. Mental chronometry with simple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Y

    1997-10-01

    Typically, mental chronometry is performed by means of introducing an independent variable postulated to affect selectively some stage of a presumed multistage process. However, the effect could be a global one that spreads proportionally over all stages of the process. Currently, there is no method to test this possibility although simple linear regression might serve the purpose. In the present study, the regression approach was tested with tasks (memory scanning and mental rotation) that involved a selective effect and with a task (word superiority effect) that involved a global effect, by the dominant theories. The results indicate (1) the manipulation of the size of a memory set or of angular disparity affects the intercept of the regression function that relates the times for memory scanning with different set sizes or for mental rotation with different angular disparities and (2) the manipulation of context affects the slope of the regression function that relates the times for detecting a target character under word and nonword conditions. These ratify the regression approach as a useful method for doing mental chronometry. PMID:9347535

  7. A VBA-based Simulation for Teaching Simple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gregory Todd; Hagtvedt, Reidar; Jones, Kari

    2004-01-01

    In spite of the name, simple linear regression presents a number of conceptual difficulties, particularly for introductory students. This article describes a simulation tool that provides a hands-on method for illuminating the relationship between parameters and sample statistics.

  8. Classification of linearly compact simple Nambu-Poisson algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarini, Nicoletta; Kac, Victor G.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the notion of a universal odd generalized Poisson superalgebra associated with an associative algebra A, by generalizing a construction made in the work of De Sole and Kac [Jpn. J. Math. 8, 1-145 (2013)]. By making use of this notion we give a complete classification of simple linearly compact (generalized) n-Nambu-Poisson algebras over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero.

  9. Using Simple Linear Regression to Assess the Success of the Montreal Protocol in Reducing Atmospheric Chlorofluorocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Following the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) recommendation to use real data, an example is presented in which simple linear regression is used to evaluate the effect of the Montreal Protocol on atmospheric concentration of chlorofluorocarbons. This simple set of data, obtained from a public archive, can…

  10. A Comparison of Robust and Nonparametric Estimators under the Simple Linear Regression Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevitt, Jonathan; Tam, Hak P.

    This study investigates parameter estimation under the simple linear regression model for situations in which the underlying assumptions of ordinary least squares estimation are untenable. Classical nonparametric estimation methods are directly compared against some robust estimation methods for conditions in which varying degrees of outliers are…

  11. A Simple Reduction Process for the Normal Vibrational Modes Occurring in Linear Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerny, William

    2005-01-01

    The students in molecular spectroscopy courses are often required to determine the permitted normal vibrations for linear molecules that belong to particular groups. The reducible group representations generated by the use of Cartesian coordinates can be reduced by the use of a simple algebraic process applied to the group representations. The…

  12. SERF: A Simple, Effective, Robust, and Fast Image Super-Resolver From Cascaded Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanting; Wang, Nannan; Tao, Dacheng; Gao, Xinbo; Li, Xuelong

    2016-09-01

    Example learning-based image super-resolution techniques estimate a high-resolution image from a low-resolution input image by relying on high- and low-resolution image pairs. An important issue for these techniques is how to model the relationship between high- and low-resolution image patches: most existing complex models either generalize hard to diverse natural images or require a lot of time for model training, while simple models have limited representation capability. In this paper, we propose a simple, effective, robust, and fast (SERF) image super-resolver for image super-resolution. The proposed super-resolver is based on a series of linear least squares functions, namely, cascaded linear regression. It has few parameters to control the model and is thus able to robustly adapt to different image data sets and experimental settings. The linear least square functions lead to closed form solutions and therefore achieve computationally efficient implementations. To effectively decrease these gaps, we group image patches into clusters via k-means algorithm and learn a linear regressor for each cluster at each iteration. The cascaded learning process gradually decreases the gap of high-frequency detail between the estimated high-resolution image patch and the ground truth image patch and simultaneously obtains the linear regression parameters. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves superior performance with lower time consumption than the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27323364

  13. Mining Distance Based Outliers in Near Linear Time with Randomization and a Simple Pruning Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bay, Stephen D.; Schwabacher, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Defining outliers by their distance to neighboring examples is a popular approach to finding unusual examples in a data set. Recently, much work has been conducted with the goal of finding fast algorithms for this task. We show that a simple nested loop algorithm that in the worst case is quadratic can give near linear time performance when the data is in random order and a simple pruning rule is used. We test our algorithm on real high-dimensional data sets with millions of examples and show that the near linear scaling holds over several orders of magnitude. Our average case analysis suggests that much of the efficiency is because the time to process non-outliers, which are the majority of examples, does not depend on the size of the data set.

  14. A simple parameterization for quality factor as a function of linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analytic approximation of the radiation quality factor (Q) as a function of linear energy transfer for use in radiation protection calculations. The paper also presents estimated quality factors in water for protons over a broad range of incident energies. It is shown that the quality factors are less than unity for all proton energies greater than 13 MeV.

  15. About simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of special exact solutions of Veselov-Novikov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovsky, V. G.; Topovsky, A. V.

    2013-03-15

    New exact solutions, nonstationary and stationary, of Veselov-Novikov (VN) equation in the forms of simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of arbitrary number N of exact special solutions u{sup (n)}, n= 1, Horizontal-Ellipsis , N are constructed via Zakharov and Manakov {partial_derivative}-dressing method. Simple nonlinear superpositions are represented up to a constant by the sums of solutions u{sup (n)} and calculated by {partial_derivative}-dressing on nonzero energy level of the first auxiliary linear problem, i.e., 2D stationary Schroedinger equation. It is remarkable that in the zero energy limit simple nonlinear superpositions convert to linear ones in the form of the sums of special solutions u{sup (n)}. It is shown that the sums u=u{sup (k{sub 1})}+...+u{sup (k{sub m})}, 1 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To k{sub 1} < k{sub 2} < Horizontal-Ellipsis < k{sub m} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To N of arbitrary subsets of these solutions are also exact solutions of VN equation. The presented exact solutions include as superpositions of special line solitons and also superpositions of plane wave type singular periodic solutions. By construction these exact solutions represent also new exact transparent potentials of 2D stationary Schroedinger equation and can serve as model potentials for electrons in planar structures of modern electronics.

  16. About simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of special exact solutions of Veselov-Novikov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, V. G.; Topovsky, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    New exact solutions, nonstationary and stationary, of Veselov-Novikov (VN) equation in the forms of simple nonlinear and linear superpositions of arbitrary number N of exact special solutions u(n), n = 1, …, N are constructed via Zakharov and Manakov overline{partial }-dressing method. Simple nonlinear superpositions are represented up to a constant by the sums of solutions u(n) and calculated by overline{partial }-dressing on nonzero energy level of the first auxiliary linear problem, i.e., 2D stationary Schrödinger equation. It is remarkable that in the zero energy limit simple nonlinear superpositions convert to linear ones in the form of the sums of special solutions u(n). It is shown that the sums u= u^{(k_1)}+ldots + u^{(k_m)}, 1 ⩽ k1 < k2 < … < km ⩽ N of arbitrary subsets of these solutions are also exact solutions of VN equation. The presented exact solutions include as superpositions of special line solitons and also superpositions of plane wave type singular periodic solutions. By construction these exact solutions represent also new exact transparent potentials of 2D stationary Schrödinger equation and can serve as model potentials for electrons in planar structures of modern electronics.

  17. Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

  18. Time to change from a simple linear model to a complex systems model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A simple linear model to test the hypothesis based on one-on-one relationship has been used to find the causative factors of diseases. However, we now know that not just one, but many factors from different systems such as chemical exposure, genes, epigenetic changes, and proteins are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. So, with availability of modern technologies to understand the intricate nature of relations among complex systems, we need to move forward to the future by taking complex systems model. PMID:27158003

  19. Simple Expressions for the Design of Linear Tapers in Overmoded Corrugated Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytical formulae are presented for the design of linear tapers with very low mode conversion loss in overmoded corrugated waveguides. For tapers from waveguide radius a 2 to a 1, with a 1< a 2, the optimal length of the taper is 3.198 a 1 a 2/ λ. Here, λ is the wavelength of radiation. The fractional loss of the HE 11 mode in an optimized taper is 0.0293 (a2-a1)4/{a12}{a22}. These formulae are accurate when a 2≲2 a 1. Slightly more complex formulae, accurate for a 2≤4 a 1, are also presented in this paper. The loss in an overmoded corrugated linear taper is less than 1 % when a 2≤2.12 a 1 and less than 0.1 % when a 2≤1.53 a 1. The present analytic results have been benchmarked against a rigorous mode matching code and have been found to be very accurate. The results for linear tapers are compared with the analogous expressions for parabolic tapers. Parabolic tapers may provide lower loss, but linear tapers with moderate values of a 2/ a 1 may be attractive because of their simplicity of fabrication.

  20. Simple Expressions for the Design of Linear Tapers in Overmoded Corrugated Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, S. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytical formulae are presented for the design of linear tapers with very low mode conversion loss in overmoded corrugated waveguides. For tapers from waveguide radius a2 to a1, with a1 < a2, the optimal length of the taper is 3.198a1a2/λ. Here, λ is the wavelength of radiation. The fractional loss of the HE11 mode in an optimized taper is 0.0293(a2−a1)4∕a12a22. These formulae are accurate when a2 ≲ 2a1. Slightly more complex formulae, accurate for a2 ≤ 4a1, are also presented in this paper. The loss in an overmoded corrugated linear taper is less than 1 % when a2 ≤ 2.12a1 and less than 0.1 % when a2 ≤ 1.53a1. The present analytic results have been benchmarked against a rigorous mode matching code and have been found to be very accurate. The results for linear tapers are compared with the analogous expressions for parabolic tapers. Parabolic tapers may provide lower loss, but linear tapers with moderate values of a2/a1 may be attractive because of their simplicity of fabrication. PMID:27053963

  1. Simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces with variable acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D; Rathkopf, J

    1998-12-23

    A simple model is described for predicting the time evolution of the half-width h of a planar mixing layer between two immiscible incompressible fluids driven by an arbitrary time-dependent variable acceleration history a(l)a (t): The model is based on a heuristic expression for the kinetic energy per unit area of the mixing layer. This expression is based on that for the kinetic energy of a linearly perturbed interface, but with a dynamically renormalized wavelength which becomes proportional to h in the nonlinear regime. An equation of motion for h is then derived by means of Lagrange's equations. This model reproduces the known linear growth rates of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities, as well as the quadratic RT and power-law RM growth laws in the nonlinear regime. The time exponent in the RM power law depends on the rate of kinetic energy dissipation. In the case of zero dissipation, this exponent reduces to 2/3 in agreement with elementary scaling arguments. A conservative numerical scheme is proposed to solve the model equations, and is used to perform calculations that agree well with published mixing data from linear electric motor experiments. Considerations involved in implementing the model in hydrodynamics codes are briefly discussed.

  2. Chicken barn climate and hazardous volatile compounds control using simple linear regression and PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. H.; Bakar, M. A. A.; Shukor, S. A. A.; Saad, F. S. A.; Kamis, M. S.; Mustafa, M. H.; Khalid, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    The hazardous volatile compounds from chicken manure in chicken barn are potentially to be a health threat to the farm animals and workers. Ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) produced in chicken barn are influenced by climate changes. The Electronic Nose (e-nose) is used for the barn's air, temperature and humidity data sampling. Simple Linear Regression is used to identify the correlation between temperature-humidity, humidity-ammonia and ammonia-hydrogen sulphide. MATLAB Simulink software was used for the sample data analysis using PID controller. Results shows that the performance of PID controller using the Ziegler-Nichols technique can improve the system controller to control climate in chicken barn.

  3. A simple method for wind tunnel balance calibration including non-linear interaction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, M. A.; Srinivas, T.; Holla, V. S.

    The conventional method for calibrating wind tunnel balances to obtain the coupled linear and nonlinear interaction terms requires the application of combinations of pure components of the loads on the calibration body compensating the deflection of the balance. For a six-component balance, this calls for a complex loading system and an arrangement to translate and tilt the balance support about all three axes. A simple method called the least-square method is illustrated for a three-component balance. The simplicity arises from the fact that application of the pure components of the loads or reorientation of the balance is not required. A single load is applied that has various components whose magnitudes can be easily found knowing the orientation of the calibration body under load and the point of application of the load. The coefficients are obtained by using the least-square-fit approach to match the outputs obtained for various combinations of load.

  4. State-space models' dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems.

    PubMed

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M; Derocher, Andrew E; Lewis, Mark A; Jonsen, Ian D; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results. PMID:27220686

  5. State-space models’ dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems

    PubMed Central

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Lewis, Mark A.; Jonsen, Ian D.; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results. PMID:27220686

  6. Beyond simple linear mixing models: process-based isotope partitioning of ecological processes.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Kiona; Tucker, Colin; Cable, Jessica M

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotopes are valuable tools for partitioning the components contributing to ecological processes of interest, such as animal diets and trophic interactions, plant resource use, ecosystem gas fluxes, streamflow, and many more. Stable isotope data are often analyzed with simple linear mixing (SLM) models to partition the contributions of different sources, but SLM models cannot incorporate a mechanistic understanding of the underlying processes and do not accommodate additional data associated with these processes (e.g., environmental covariates, flux data, gut contents). Thus, SLM models lack predictive ability. We describe a process-based mixing (PBM) model approach for integrating stable isotopes, other data sources, and process models to partition different sources or process components. This is accomplished via a hierarchical Bayesian framework that quantifies multiple sources of uncertainty and enables the incorporation of process models and prior information to help constrain the source-specific proportional contributions, thereby potentially avoiding identifiability issues that plague SLM models applied to "too many" sources. We discuss the application of the PBM model framework to three diverse examples: temporal and spatial partitioning of streamflow, estimation of plant rooting profiles and water uptake profiles (or water sources) with extension to partitioning soil and ecosystem CO2 fluxes, and reconstructing animal diets. These examples illustrate the advantages of the PBM modeling approach, which facilitates incorporation of ecological theory and diverse sources of information into the mixing model framework, thus enabling one to partition key process components across time and space. PMID:24640543

  7. Simple and Robust Indirect Thrust Control for Positioning of Linear Induction Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Iturralde, Miguel; Martínez, Gonzalo; Castelli, Marcelo; Rico, Andrés García; Flórez, Julián

    Dealing with position control of Linear Induction Motors (LIM), most strategies in bibliography are based on Secondary Flux Oriented Control (SFOC) and Direct Thrust Control (DTC). However, SFOC of linear induction motors needs complex identification methods to compensate parameter variation during operation, mainly due to local heating and end-effects. On the other hand, DTC based methods for LIMs present thrust ripple and have problems at low and zero speeds. In this paper, a new Indirect Thrust Control (ITC) based strategy for position control of linear induction motors that makes up for these drawbacks is presented. The position control loop design methodology and the method for automatic adjustment of compensators are described. Experimental results are presented to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the control strategy. Finally, some conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the new algorithm that demonstrate the main advantages versus SFOC and DTC.

  8. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  9. Simple analytical derivation of the fields of an ultrashort tightly focused linearly polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.

    2015-12-01

    Analytic expressions for the electric and magnetic fields of an ultrashort, tightly focused, linearly polarized laser pulse are derived, to lowest order of a truncated power-series expansion, from vector and scalar potentials. Clear steps are described for the analytic and numerical evaluation of higher-order terms in the series, to any desired accuracy.

  10. The Multifaceted Variable Approach: Selection of Method in Solving Simple Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tahir, Salma; Cavanagh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the solution strategies used by two groups of Year 8 students as they solved linear equations. The experimental group studied algebra following a multifaceted variable approach, while the comparison group used a traditional approach. Students in the experimental group employed different solution strategies,…

  11. A simple method of calculating pulse amplitudes and shapes arising from reflection from linear segments

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A. Jr.

    1988-01-02

    A new formulation for the amplitude and pulse shape from reflections from a linear segment for a bistatic planar geometry is presented. The formulation is useful in calculating reverberation from high intensity signals in an deep ocean basin where long range propagation can occur. This reverberation is important in calculating the acoustic interference to sonar arising from the detonation of nuclear or large chemical explosives, and for modeling long range active sonar. The reflections computed with the new formulation are significantly different from those of earlier versions of the reverberation model, with pulses generally shorter and more intense, leading to predictions of louder but more sporadic reverberation than previously estimated. 9 refs

  12. A simple analytic treatment of linear growth of structure with baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    In linear perturbation theory, all information about the growth of structure is contained in the Green's function, or equivalently, transfer function. These functions are generally computed using numerical codes or by phenomenological fitting formula anchored in accurate analytic results in the limits of large and small scale. Here, we present a framework for analytically solving all scales, in particular the intermediate scales relevant for the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We solve for the Green's function and transfer function using spherically averaged overdensities and the approximation that the density of the coupled baryon-photon fluid is constant interior to the sound horizon.

  13. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature–conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility. PMID:26664063

  14. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature-conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility. PMID:26664063

  15. A simple model-free method for direct assessment of fluorescent ligand binding by linear spectral summation.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent tagged ligands are commonly used to determine binding to proteins. However, bound and free ligand concentrations are not directly determined. Instead the response in a fluorescent ligand titration experiment is considered to be proportional to the extent of binding and, therefore, the maximum value of binding is scaled to the total protein concentration. Here, a simple model-free method is presented to be performed in two steps. In the first step, normalized bound and free spectra of the ligand are determined. In the second step, these spectra are used to fit composite spectra as the sum of individual components or linear spectral summation. Using linear spectral summation, free and bound 1-Anilinonaphthalene-8-Sulfonic Acid (ANS) fluorescent ligand concentrations are directly calculated to determine ANS binding to tear lipocalin (TL), an archetypical ligand binding protein. Error analysis shows that the parameters that determine bound and free ligand concentrations were recovered with high certainty. The linear spectral summation method is feasible when fluorescence intensity is accompanied by a spectral shift upon protein binding. Computer simulations of the experiments of ANS binding to TL indicate that the method is feasible when the fluorescence spectral shift between bound and free forms of the ligand is just 8 nm. Ligands tagged with environmentally sensitive fluorescent dyes, e.g., dansyl chromophore, are particularly suitable for this method. PMID:24043458

  16. A Simple Model-Free Method for Direct Assessment of Fluorescent Ligand Binding by Linear Spectral Summation

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent tagged ligands are commonly used to determine binding to proteins. However, bound and free ligand concentrations are not directly determined. Instead the response in a fluorescent ligand titration experiment is considered to be proportional to the extent of binding and, therefore, the maximum value of binding is scaled to the total protein concentration. Here, a simple model-free method is presented to be performed in two steps. In the first step, normalized bound and free spectra of the ligand are determined. In the second step, these spectra are used to fit composite spectra as the sum of individual components or linear spectral summation. Using linear spectral summation, free and bound 1-Anilinonaphthalene-8-Sulfonic Acid (ANS) fluorescent ligand concentrations are directly calculated to determine ANS binding to tear lipocalin (TL), an archetypical ligand binding protein. Error analysis shows that the parameters that determine bound and free ligand concentrations were recovered with high certainty. The linear spectral summation method is feasible when fluorescence intensity is accompanied by a spectral shift upon protein binding. Computer simulations of the experiments of ANS binding to TL indicate that the method is feasible when the fluorescence spectral shift between bound and free forms of the ligand is just 8 nm. Ligands tagged with environmentally sensitive fluorescent dyes, e.g., dansyl chromophore, are particularly suitable for this method. PMID:24043458

  17. A tunable and switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength fiber laser with a simple linear cavity.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoying; Fang, Xia; Liao, Changrui; Wang, D N; Sun, Junqiang

    2009-11-23

    A simple linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser based on a Fabry-Perot filter which consists of a pair of fiber Bragg gratings is proposed for tunable and switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength operation. The single-longitudinal-mode is obtained by the saturable absorption of an unpumed erbium-doped fiber together with a narrow-band fiber Bragg grating. Under the high pump power (>166 mW) condition, the stable dual-wavelength oscillation with uniform amplitude can be realized by carefully adjusting the polarization controller in the cavity. Wavelength selection and switching are achieved by tuning the narrow-band fiber Bragg grating in the system. The spacing of the dual-wavelength can be selected at 0.20 nm (approximately 25.62 GHz), 0.22 nm (approximately 28.19 GHz) and 0.54 nm (approximately 69.19 GHz). PMID:19997420

  18. A simple algorithm improves mass accuracy to 50-100 ppm for delayed extraction linear MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Christopher A.; Benner, W. Henry

    2001-10-31

    A simple mathematical technique for improving mass calibration accuracy of linear delayed extraction matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOF MS) spectra is presented. The method involves fitting a parabola to a plot of Dm vs. mass data where Dm is the difference between the theoretical mass of calibrants and the mass obtained from a linear relationship between the square root of m/z and ion time of flight. The quadratic equation that describes the parabola is then used to correct the mass of unknowns by subtracting the deviation predicted by the quadratic equation from measured data. By subtracting the value of the parabola at each mass from the calibrated data, the accuracy of mass data points can be improved by factors of 10 or more. This method produces highly similar results whether or not initial ion velocity is accounted for in the calibration equation; consequently, there is no need to depend on that uncertain parameter when using the quadratic correction. This method can be used to correct the internally calibrated masses of protein digest peaks. The effect of nitrocellulose as a matrix additive is also briefly discussed, and it is shown that using nitrocellulose as an additive to a CHCA matrix does not significantly change initial ion velocity but does change the average position of ions relative to the sample electrode at the instant the extraction voltage is applied.

  19. A simple technique to increase the linearity and field-of-view in position sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, R.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Robar, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    Crossed anode wire position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMTs) detect the location of a light source and provide the X and Y axis coordinates of the event. These coordinates are typically generated using Anger logic, where a resistor chain divides the current flow into two signals for each coordinate (X{sup +}, X{sup -} & Y{sup +}, Y{sup -}). In the standard readout, identical resistor values are used across the entire resistor chain. While this arrangement provides a linear readout in the central portion of the photomultiplier face, the readout is non-linear and sometimes even double valued near the edges of the PS-PMT due to the truncation of the charge beyond the last anode wire. To counter this effect, we have increased the value of the resistance near the ends of each resistor chain in order to compensate for the charge lost beyond the anode wires. Measurements were made using a Hamamatsu R-3941 PS-PMT coupled to a pixellated BGO matrix of cut crystals with a 2mm pitch in each direction. After changing the end resistors, the usable field-of-view increased by 39%. This simple modification should enhance the operation of PS-PMTs in applications such as positron emission mammography, and small animal PET imaging.

  20. Estimation of Gravity Parameters Related to Simple Geometrical Structures by Developing an Approach Based on Deconvolution and Linear Optimization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfahani, J.; Tlas, M.

    2015-10-01

    An easy and practical method for interpreting residual gravity anomalies due to simple geometrically shaped models such as cylinders and spheres has been proposed in this paper. This proposed method is based on both the deconvolution technique and the simplex algorithm for linear optimization to most effectively estimate the model parameters, e.g., the depth from the surface to the center of a buried structure (sphere or horizontal cylinder) or the depth from the surface to the top of a buried object (vertical cylinder), and the amplitude coefficient from the residual gravity anomaly profile. The method was tested on synthetic data sets corrupted by different white Gaussian random noise levels to demonstrate the capability and reliability of the method. The results acquired show that the estimated parameter values derived by this proposed method are close to the assumed true parameter values. The validity of this method is also demonstrated using real field residual gravity anomalies from Cuba and Sweden. Comparable and acceptable agreement is shown between the results derived by this method and those derived from real field data.

  1. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, Leonardo G.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R.; Witte, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer.

  2. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Leonardo G; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer. PMID:23221479

  3. A Simple Piece of Apparatus to Aid the Understanding of the Relationship between Angular Velocity and Linear Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsal, Yasin

    2011-01-01

    One of the subjects that is confusing and difficult for students to fully comprehend is the concept of angular velocity and linear velocity. It is the relationship between linear and angular velocity that students find difficult; most students understand linear motion in isolation. In this article, we detail the design, construction and…

  4. Implementation of a simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces in hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2000-10-01

    A simple model was recently described for predicting the time evolution of the width of the mixing layer at an unstable fluid interface [J. D. Ramshaw, Phys. Rev. E 58, 5834 (1998); ibid. 61, 5339 (2000)]. The ordinary differential equations of this model have been heuristically generalized into partial differential equations suitable for implementation in multicomponent hydrodynamics codes. The central ingredient in this generalization is a nun-diffusional expression for the species mass fluxes. These fluxes describe the relative motion of the species, and thereby determine the local mixing rate and spatial distribution of mixed fluid as a function of time. The generalized model has been implemented in a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code. The model equations and implementation procedure are summarized, and comparisons with experimental mixing data are presented.

  5. The design and analysis of simple low speed flap systems with the aid of linearized theory computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose here is to show how two linearized theory computer programs in combination may be used for the design of low speed wing flap systems capable of high levels of aerodynamic efficiency. A fundamental premise of the study is that high levels of aerodynamic performance for flap systems can be achieved only if the flow about the wing remains predominantly attached. Based on this premise, a wing design program is used to provide idealized attached flow camber surfaces from which candidate flap systems may be derived, and, in a following step, a wing evaluation program is used to provide estimates of the aerodynamic performance of the candidate systems. Design strategies and techniques that may be employed are illustrated through a series of examples. Applicability of the numerical methods to the analysis of a representative flap system (although not a system designed by the process described here) is demonstrated in a comparison with experimental data.

  6. Position dependence of the particle density in a double-chain section of a linear network in a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesheva, N. C.; Brankov, J. G.

    2013-06-01

    We report here results on the study of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process, defined on an open network, consisting of head and tail simple-chain segments with a double-chain section inserted in between. Results of numerical simulations for relatively short chains reveal an interesting feature of the network. When the current through the system takes its maximum value, a simple translation of the double-chain section forward or backward along the network leads to a sharp change in the shape of the density profiles in the parallel chains, thus affecting the total number of particles in that part of the network. In the symmetric case of equal injection and ejection rates α=β>1/2 and equal lengths of the head and tail sections, the density profiles in the two parallel chains are almost linear, characteristic of the coexistence line (shock phase). Upon moving the section forward (backward), their shape changes to the one typical for the high- (low-) density phases of a simple chain. The total bulk density of particles in a section with a large number of parallel chains is evaluated too. The observed effect might have interesting implications for the traffic flow control as well as for biological transport processes in living cells. An explanation of this phenomenon is offered in terms of a finite-size dependence of the effective injection and ejection rates at the ends of the double-chain section.

  7. Thermally induced dissolution/precipitation--a simple approach for the preparation of macroporous monoliths from linear aliphatic polyamides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Mai; Nordborg, Anna; Shchukarev, Andrei; Irgum, Knut

    2009-08-01

    A versatile way of preparing macroporous monolithic materials from linear aliphatic polyamides is presented. Simply, polyamide pellets were treated in benzyl alcohol (BA) at elevated temperature, causing dissolution by interchain hydrogen bond disruption. Subsequent cooling below the upper critical solution temperature (UCST) resulted in precipitation and partial restoration of the semicrystalline polymer, which is organized into network structures. The final steps were a solvent exchange of BA for methanol, followed by drying to form monolithic entities. A number of polyamides ranging from hydrophilic to hydrophobic were tested and under the experimental conditions, poly(1-aza-2-cycloheptanone (PA6) and (poly-[imino-1,6-hexanediylimino{1,10-dioxo-1,10-decanediyl}] (PA610) yielded entities with macroporous properties that were deemed useful for liquid chromatography. The morphological features and porous properties of the monoliths produced by this dissolution-precipitation procedure were studied by scanning electron microscopy, adsorption/desorption of N(2)(g) according to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) principle, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Degradation of the polymer backbone was noticeable when the dissolution time was extended and shortening of the polymer chains was confirmed by MALDI-MS, viscosity measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and potentiometric titration. When the heating was limited to the time it took to dissolve the polymers, mechanically stable monoliths could be obtained. The dissolution/heat treatment time further seemed to be useful for controlling the macroporous morphology. PMID:19670277

  8. The repair of environmentally relevant DNA double strand breaks caused by high linear energy transfer irradiation--no simple task.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shaun; Stanley, Fintan K T; Goodarzi, Aaron A

    2014-05-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) ionising radiation (IR) such as radon-derived alpha particles and high mass, high energy (HZE) particles of cosmic radiation are the predominant forms of IR to which humanity is exposed throughout life. High-LET forms of IR are established carcinogens relevant to human cancer, and their potent mutagenicity is believed, in part, to be due to a greater incidence of clustered DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and associated lesions, as ionization events occur within a more confined genomic space. The repair of such DNA damage is now well-documented to occur with slower kinetics relative to that induced by low-LET IR, and to be more reliant upon homology-directed repair pathways. Underlying these phenomena is the relative inability of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) to adequately resolve high-LET IR-induced DSBs. Current findings suggest that the functionality of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), comprised of the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer and the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), is particularly perturbed by high-LET IR-induced clustered DSBs, rendering DNA-PK dependent NHEJ less relevant to resolving these lesions. By contrast, the NHEJ-associated DNA processing endonuclease Artemis shows a greater relevance to high-LET IR-induced DSB repair. Here, we will review the cellular response to high-LET irradiation, the implications of the chronic, low-dose modality of this exposure and molecular pathways that respond to high-LET irradiation induced DSBs, with particular emphasis on NHEJ factors. PMID:24565812

  9. A simple model for the rotation of a trapped chiral nematic droplet under the action of a linearly polarized laser beam.

    PubMed

    Mosallaeipour, Marjan; Ananthamurthy, Sharath; Madhusudana, N V

    2013-08-01

    There have been recent reports of continuous rotation of chiral nematic droplets in restricted ranges of diameter/pitch (d /p) values, trapped by a linearly polarized laser beam. We have developed a simple model to calculate the distortion in the helical structure of a set of flat layers, caused by the action of the strong electric field of the propagating laser beam on the dielectric anisotropy of the medium. The resulting change in the polarization state of the beam passing through the sample is then used to calculate the torque on the sample as a function of the azimuthal angle of the first layer. The main results are: i) the torque tends to zero even with circularly polarized beam for samples with thicknesses around integral multiples of 0.5p ; ii) the undistorted sample takes an equilibrium orientation for linearly polarized beam, which jumps by π/2 rad at the same sample thicknesses; iii) these samples will have a nonzero torque at all azimuthal angles of the first slice when the helical structure is distorted by the linearly polarized beam. The calculations show that a propagating accordion mode, in which the helical pitch alternately expands and contracts, gives rise to the nonzero torque. The theoretical predictions are in broad agreement with experimental results. PMID:23989758

  10. Simple Machines Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Andre, Ralph E.

    Simple machines have become a lost point of study in elementary schools as teachers continue to have more material to cover. This manual provides hands-on, cooperative learning activities for grades three through eight concerning the six simple machines: wheel and axle, inclined plane, screw, pulley, wedge, and lever. Most activities can be…

  11. Equivalent linear response spectrum methodology for the seismic response of a simple structural system with a uni-directional support (tension only or compression only)

    SciTech Connect

    Gurdal, R.J.; Maxham, W.D.

    1996-12-01

    Typically, structures with significant non-linear supports are analyzed using either time-history algorithms or response spectrum enveloping techniques, with multiple stiffness values to represent the non-linear supports. However, there are problems associated with these methods: (1) time-history analyses require considerable computer time, and, more importantly, the generated response files can become too large; (2) linear response spectrum analyses, when used to envelop the non-linear solution, are excessively conservative. This paper presents an equivalent linear response spectrum methodology to analyze structural systems with a uni-directional support. The structure is free to move in one direction, and restricted with a support stiffness in the diametrically opposed direction. The mathematical formulas for this application are developed and presented. The results using this methodology are compared with actual results from corresponding time-history non-linear structural analyses. These comparisons, performed for the one-mass structural system, show that the equivalent linear response spectrum method closely approximates the time-history results.

  12. How to calculate linear absorption spectra with lifetime broadening using fewest switches surface hopping trajectories: A simple generalization of ground-state Kubo theory

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Andrew S.; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2014-07-07

    In this paper, we develop a surface hopping approach for calculating linear absorption spectra using ensembles of classical trajectories propagated on both the ground and excited potential energy surfaces. We demonstrate that our method allows the dipole-dipole correlation function to be determined exactly for the model problem of two shifted, uncoupled harmonic potentials with the same harmonic frequency. For systems where nonadiabatic dynamics and electronic relaxation are present, preliminary results show that our method produces spectra in better agreement with the results of exact quantum dynamics calculations than spectra obtained using the standard ground-state Kubo formalism. As such, our proposed surface hopping approach should find immediate use for modeling condensed phase spectra, especially for expensive calculations using ab initio potential energy surfaces.

  13. Resistors Improve Ramp Linearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    Simple modification to bootstrap ramp generator gives more linear output over longer sweep times. New circuit adds just two resistors, one of which is adjustable. Modification cancels nonlinearities due to variations in load on charging capacitor and due to changes in charging current as the voltage across capacitor increases.

  14. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  15. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  16. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals.

    PubMed

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Valeev, Edward F; Neese, Frank

    2015-07-21

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  17. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Neese, Frank E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de; Valeev, Edward F. E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de

    2015-07-21

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  18. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  19. A simple, compact, and efficient diode-side-pumped linear intracavity frequency doubled Nd:YAG rod laser with 50 ns pulse width and 124 W green output power.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil K; Mukhopadhyay, Pranab K; Singh, Amarjeet; Kandasamy, Ranganathan; Oak, Shrikant M

    2010-07-01

    We have developed an efficient and high power repetitively Q-switched diode-pumped intracavity frequency doubled Nd:YAG/LiB(3)O(5) based green laser capable of generating 124 W of average green power with 50 ns pulse duration in a highly compact and robust linear cavity configuration. The pump to green beam conversion efficiency is 16.8% and the overall wall-plug efficiency is 8.3%. The long term power stability is excellent with +/-0.4 W variation at the maximum output power and +/-2% amplitude fluctuation with +/-2.9 ns timing jitter. The M(2) parameter of the green beam was measured to be approximately 27. This, combined with the short pulse duration and the high average power, makes this laser ideal for pumping ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser amplifier systems and for micromachining applications. PMID:20687702

  20. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  1. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-10-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA{close_quote}s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Designing linear systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.K.P.; Tsai, Y.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    The authors develop a simple mapping technique to design linear systolic arrays. The basic idea of the technique is to map the computations of a certain class of two-dimensional systolic arrays onto one-dimensional arrays. Using this technique, systolic algorithms are derived for problems such as matrix multiplication and transitive closure on linearly connected arrays of PEs with constant I/O bandwidth. Compared to known designs in the literature, the technique leads to modular systolic arrays with constant hardware in each PE, few control lines, lexicographic data input/output, and improved delay time. The unidirectional flow of control and data in this design assures implementation of the linear array in the known fault models of wafer scale integration.

  3. Linear control design for guaranteed stability of uncertain linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a linear control design algorithm based on the elemental perturbation bounds developed recently is presented for a simple second order linear uncertain system satisfying matching conditions. The proposed method is compared with Guaranteed Cost Control (GCC), Multistep Guaranteed Cost Control (MGCC) and the Matching Condition (MC) methods and is shown to give guaranteed stability with lesser values for the control gains than some of the existing methods for the example considered.

  4. Simple Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Simple Kidney Cysts Page Content On this page: What are simple ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled sacs ...

  5. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  6. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Super-linear Precision in Simple Neural Population Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Fiete, Ila

    2015-03-01

    A widely used tool for quantifying the precision with which a population of noisy sensory neurons encodes the value of an external stimulus is the Fisher Information (FI). Maximizing the FI is also a commonly used objective for constructing optimal neural codes. The primary utility and importance of the FI arises because it gives, through the Cramer-Rao bound, the smallest mean-squared error achievable by any unbiased stimulus estimator. However, it is well-known that when neural firing is sparse, optimizing the FI can result in codes that perform very poorly when considering the resulting mean-squared error, a measure with direct biological relevance. Here we construct optimal population codes by minimizing mean-squared error directly and study the scaling properties of the resulting network, focusing on the optimal tuning curve width. We then extend our results to continuous attractor networks that maintain short-term memory of external stimuli in their dynamics. Here we find similar scaling properties in the structure of the interactions that minimize diffusive information loss.

  8. SIMPLE: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endres, Frank L.

    Symbolic Interactive Matrix Processing Language (SIMPLE) is a conversational matrix-oriented source language suited to a batch or a time-sharing environment. The two modes of operation of SIMPLE are conversational mode and programing mode. This program uses a TAURUS time-sharing system and cathode ray terminals or teletypes. SIMPLE performs all…

  9. Simple theories of complex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrard, Michel

    1998-11-01

    While the theory of solitons has been very successful for continuous systems, very few nonlinear discrete lattices are amenable to an exact analytical treatment. In these “complex lattices” discreteness can be hostile to the solitons, preventing them to move due to the lack of translational invariance or even to exist as localized excitations. On the other hand, lattice discreteness can sometimes be very helpful. It can stabilize solutions that otherwise would split apart as in the discrete sine-Gordon lattice, or even allow the existence of localized oscillatory modes as exact solutions in systems where they would decay in the continuum limit. It is interesting that many of these phenomena can be understood qualitatively, and sometimes quantitatively, with very simple theories that rely on the usual concepts of linear wave propagation, resonances, linear stability of waves, for instance. There are, however, phenomena specific to discrete nonlinear lattices which allow the build up of large amplitude localized excitations, sometimes out of thermal fluctuations, which are more resistant to simple approaches and could deserve further interest because they may be relevant for various physical systems.

  10. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  11. Simple aging in molecular glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niss, Kristine

    2015-03-01

    The glass transition takes place when the structural (alpha) relaxation freezes in and the liquid enters a non-equilibrium solid state. This usually happens when the relaxation time, τ, reaches a timescale of 1000 seconds, and τ = 1000 s is pragmatically used as a definition of the glass transition temperature Tg. However, if the glass is studied on a long enough time scale then relaxation is still seen as physical aging. Aging is a non-linear signature of the alpha relaxation in which the relaxation dynamics changes as a function of how far the system has relaxed. If the system is studied well below Tg then equilibrium will not be achieved, but just below or around Tg it is possible to systematically monitor the non-linear relaxation all the way to equilibrium. We have developed a micro crystat which is optimized for making fast changes in temperature and keeping temperature stable over days and even weeks. Combining this micro cryostat with a small dielectric cell it is possible to monitor non-linear relaxation in a dynamical range of more than 4 decades from 10 seconds to a 105 seconds. The aging is monitored after a fast temperature jump. This means that the aging itself is isotherm, and the data therefore directly shows, how the relaxation-rate changes as volume and structure change on the isotherm. We have studied several molecular liquids and find that the data to a very large extend can be understood in terms of a TNM formalism. This implies time-aging-time superposition and suggests a simple picture where the out of equlibrium ``states'' correspond to equilibrium states - at an other temperature. If the alpha relaxation is dynamically heterogeneous as it is commonly believed, then the aging results show that fast and slow ``modes'' of the relaxation are governed in the same way by structure and volume. We hypothesize that aging according to TNM formalism is an intrinsic property of Roskilde Simple liquids.

  12. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  13. Laparoscopic simple prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Blew, Brian D M; Fazio, Luke M; Pace, Kenneth; D'A Honey, R John

    2005-12-01

    Classically, surgical options for very large prostate glands, not amenable to transurethral resection, include suprapubic or retropubic simple prostatectomy and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). We present a case managed with a laparoscopic simple prostatectomy. Technical considerations are discussed as well as possible advantages of this approach including decreased blood loss, faster patient recovery and improved visualization. PMID:16401375

  14. Simple Machine Junk Cars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2010-01-01

    During the month of May, the author's eighth-grade physical science students study the six simple machines through hands-on activities, reading assignments, videos, and notes. At the end of the month, they can easily identify the six types of simple machine: inclined plane, wheel and axle, pulley, screw, wedge, and lever. To conclude this unit,…

  15. A Simple "Tubeless" Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Bonechi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Two lenses make it possible to create a simple telescope with quite large magnification. The set-up is very simple and can be reproduced in schools, provided the laboratory has a range of lenses with different focal lengths. In this article, the authors adopt the Keplerian configuration, which is composed of two converging lenses. This instrument,…

  16. Non-linear oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, P.

    The mathematical pendulum is used to provide a survey of free and forced oscillations in damped and undamped systems. This simple model is employed to present illustrations for and comparisons between the various approximation schemes. A summary of the Liapunov stability theory is provided. The first and the second method of Liapunov are explained for autonomous as well as for nonautonomous systems. Here, a basic familiarity with the theory of linear oscillations is assumed. La Salle's theorem about the stability of invariant domains is explained in terms of illustrative examples. Self-excited oscillations are examined, taking into account such oscillations in mechanical and electrical systems, analytical approximation methods for the computation of self-excited oscillations, analytical criteria for the existence of limit cycles, forced oscillations in self-excited systems, and self-excited oscillations in systems with several degrees of freedom. Attention is given to Hamiltonian systems and an introduction to the theory of optimal control is provided.

  17. Preconditioned quantum linear system algorithm.

    PubMed

    Clader, B D; Jacobs, B C; Sprouse, C R

    2013-06-21

    We describe a quantum algorithm that generalizes the quantum linear system algorithm [Harrow et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150502 (2009)] to arbitrary problem specifications. We develop a state preparation routine that can initialize generic states, show how simple ancilla measurements can be used to calculate many quantities of interest, and integrate a quantum-compatible preconditioner that greatly expands the number of problems that can achieve exponential speedup over classical linear systems solvers. To demonstrate the algorithm's applicability, we show how it can be used to compute the electromagnetic scattering cross section of an arbitrary target exponentially faster than the best classical algorithm. PMID:23829722

  18. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  19. How simple are 'simple renal cysts'?

    PubMed

    Simms, Roslyn J; Ong, Albert C M

    2014-09-01

    The increasing use of medical imaging as an investigative tool is leading to the incidental and frequent finding of renal cysts in the general population. The presence of a solitary or multiple renal cysts has been generally considered benign in the absence of a family history of renal cystic disease or evidence of chronic kidney disease. Nonetheless, a number of recent studies have questioned this consensus by reported associations with the development of hypertension or malignant change. For these reasons, some clinicians consider the presence of renal cysts to be a contraindication to kidney donation. The situation is complicated by the different usage of the term 'simple' by some radiologists (to indicate non-complex lesions) or nephrologists (to indicate age-related non-hereditary lesions). We propose that the term 'simple' be replaced with the morphological description, Stage I renal cyst (Bosniak Classification). The presence of a Stage I renal cyst should not preclude kidney donation. However, occult renal disease should be excluded and appropriate donor assessment performed. PMID:25165175

  20. Linear OCT Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüttmann, Gereon; Koch, Peter; Birngruber, Reginald

    Linear OCT (L-OCT) employs a parallel detection scheme to measure the interference pattern which is formed by the superposition of sample and reference light. L-OCT is one of four basic measurement implementations for OCT. It operates in the time domain like traditional TD-OCT systems but uses a parallel detection scheme by utilizing an image sensor. Therefore, the detection scheme has similarities with FD-OCT. L-OCT shares the lack of the twin-image and autocorrelation artefacts with FD-OCT and the increased noise with time-domain OCT. No moving parts and a simple optical design make L-OCT attractive for optically stable low-cost instruments. One of the main draw-backs is the large number of detector elements, which are needed to achieve a clinically relevant depth range. Gratings offer an elegant solution to reduce the fringe frequency of the interference pattern without influencing the image information. This chapter discusses, theory, implementation and performance of linear OCT systems, together with possible applications and extension, such as non-continuous depth range or line-field versions.

  1. Early Childhood: Simple Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Clare B.; Shafer, Kathryn E.

    1987-01-01

    Encourages teachers to take advantage of the natural curiosity of young children in enhancing their interest in science. Describes four simple activities involving water, living and non-living things, air pollution, and food. (TW)

  2. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  3. Simple Machines Simply Put.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Students explore the workings of the lever, wheel and axle, and the inclined plane as they build simple toys--a bulldozer and a road grader. The project takes four weeks. Diagrams and procedures are included. (PR)

  4. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  5. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  6. Strategy as simple rules.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Sull, D N

    2001-01-01

    The success of Yahoo!, eBay, Enron, and other companies that have become adept at morphing to meet the demands of changing markets can't be explained using traditional thinking about competitive strategy. These companies have succeeded by pursuing constantly evolving strategies in market spaces that were considered unattractive according to traditional measures. In this article--the third in an HBR series by Kathleen Eisenhardt and Donald Sull on strategy in the new economy--the authors ask, what are the sources of competitive advantage in high-velocity markets? The secret, they say, is strategy as simple rules. The companies know that the greatest opportunities for competitive advantage lie in market confusion, but they recognize the need for a few crucial strategic processes and a few simple rules. In traditional strategy, advantage comes from exploiting resources or stable market positions. In strategy as simple rules, advantage comes from successfully seizing fleeting opportunities. Key strategic processes, such as product innovation, partnering, or spinout creation, place the company where the flow of opportunities is greatest. Simple rules then provide the guidelines within which managers can pursue such opportunities. Simple rules, which grow out of experience, fall into five broad categories: how- to rules, boundary conditions, priority rules, timing rules, and exit rules. Companies with simple-rules strategies must follow the rules religiously and avoid the temptation to change them too frequently. A consistent strategy helps managers sort through opportunities and gain short-term advantage by exploiting the attractive ones. In stable markets, managers rely on complicated strategies built on detailed predictions of the future. But when business is complicated, strategy should be simple. PMID:11189455

  7. The Training Wheel. A Simple Model for Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogoff, Rosalind L.

    1984-01-01

    The author developed an instructional-design model consisting of four simple steps. The model is in a circular format, rather than the usual linear series form, so it is named the training wheel. (SSH)

  8. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layoutmore » system using customized styles.« less

  9. Detection and recognition of simple spatial forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    A model of human visual sensitivity to spatial patterns is constructed. The model predicts the visibility and discriminability of arbitrary two-dimensional monochrome images. The image is analyzed by a large array of linear feature sensors, which differ in spatial frequency, phase, orientation, and position in the visual field. All sensors have one octave frequency bandwidths, and increase in size linearly with eccentricity. Sensor responses are processed by an ideal Bayesian classifier, subject to uncertainty. The performance of the model is compared to that of the human observer in detecting and discriminating some simple images.

  10. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  11. Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that qualitatively, entropy is simple. Entropy increase from a macro viewpoint is a measure of the dispersal of energy from localized to spread out at a temperature T. Fundamentally based on statistical and quantum mechanics, this approach is superior to the non-fundamental "disorder" as a descriptor of entropy change. (MM)

  12. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  13. Simple Library Bookkeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Herbert H.

    A simple and cheap manual double entry continuous transaction posting system with running balances is developed for bookkeeping by small libraries. A very small library may operate without any system of fiscal control but when a library's budget approaches three figures, some kind of bookkeeping must be introduced. To maintain control over his…

  14. Climate Change Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, Dudley E.; Harrison, Tim G.

    2007-01-01

    The newly revised specifications for GCSE science involve greater consideration of climate change. This topic appears in either the chemistry or biology section, depending on the examination board, and is a good example of "How Science Works." It is therefore timely that students are given an opportunity to conduct some simple climate modelling.…

  15. On Simple Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, K.C.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses San Francisco's Exploratorium, a science teaching center with 500 exhibits focusing on human perception, but extending to everything from the mechanics of voice to the art of illusion, from holograms to harmonics. The Exploratorium emphasizes "simple science" (refractions/resonances, sounds/shadows) to tune in the senses and turn on the…

  16. Simple Lookup Service

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-01

    Simple Lookup Service (sLS) is a REST/JSON based lookup service that allows users to publish information in the form of key-value pairs and search for the published information. The lookup service supports both pull and push model. This software can be used to create a distributed architecture/cloud.

  17. Working with Simple Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, John W.

    2006-01-01

    A set of examples is provided that illustrate the use of work as applied to simple machines. The ramp, pulley, lever and hydraulic press are common experiences in the life of a student, and their theoretical analysis therefore makes the abstract concept of work more real. The mechanical advantage of each of these systems is also discussed so that…

  18. Working with simple machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2006-11-01

    A set of examples is provided that illustrate the use of work as applied to simple machines. The ramp, pulley, lever and hydraulic press are common experiences in the life of a student, and their theoretical analysis therefore makes the abstract concept of work more real. The mechanical advantage of each of these systems is also discussed so that students can evaluate their usefulness as machines.

  19. Simple Schlieren Light Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1992-01-01

    Simple light-meter circuit used to position knife edge of schlieren optical system to block exactly half light. Enables operator to check quickly position of knife edge between tunnel runs to ascertain whether or not in alignment. Permanent measuring system made part of each schlieren system. If placed in unused area of image plane, or in monitoring beam from mirror knife edge, provides real-time assessment of alignment of schlieren system.

  20. Probabilistic simple splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2014-06-01

    A splicing system, one of the early theoretical models for DNA computing was introduced by Head in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings of DNA molecules at the specific recognition sites and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string, and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string, thus yielding the new strings. For a specific type of splicing systems, namely the simple splicing systems, the recognition sites are the same for both strings of DNA molecules. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered for splicing systems in order to increase their computational power. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic simple splicing systems are investigated. We prove that probabilistic simple splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the splicing languages generated.

  1. Linear thermal circulator based on Coriolis forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2015-02-01

    We show that the presence of a Coriolis force in a rotating linear lattice imposes a nonreciprocal propagation of the phononic heat carriers. Using this effect we propose the concept of Coriolis linear thermal circulator which can control the circulation of a heat current. A simple model of three coupled harmonic masses on a rotating platform permits us to demonstrate giant circulating rectification effects for moderate values of the angular velocities of the platform. PMID:25768443

  2. Linear capacitive displacement sensor with frequency readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    A simple, inherently linear technique for measuring changes in the separation of the mirrors of an optical cavity is reported. The capacitor, made up of the reflective metallic coatings, is part of a feedback loop which adjusts the frequency of an oscillator to be proportional to the mirror separation. A linearity of 0.2 percent full scale was achieved for separations up to 0.5 mm with a resolution of 10 nm.

  3. Dimensional analysis made simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, Ignacio

    2013-11-01

    An inductive strategy is proposed for teaching dimensional analysis to second- or third-year students of physics, chemistry, or engineering. In this strategy, Buckingham's theorem is seen as a consequence and not as the starting point. In order to concentrate on the basics, the mathematics is kept as elementary as possible. Simple examples are suggested for classroom demonstrations of the power of the technique and others are put forward for homework or experimentation, but instructors are encouraged to produce examples of their own.

  4. Ultrasensitive time-resolved linear dichroism spectral measurements using near-crossed linear polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Diping; Shapiro, Daniel B.; Esquerra, Raymond M.; Kliger, David S.

    1994-07-01

    A simple and sensitive technique is introduced to measure time-resolved linear dichroism of spectral transitions. This technique uses the fact that a linear dichroic sample rotates the polarization plane of linearly polarized light. The theoretical basis of the technique is presented using Mueller calculus and a detailed signal analysis is given to account for the effects of various optical imperfections. The results of this analysis are confirmed with the application of the technique to the time-resolved linear dichroism of bacteriorhodopsin in membrane patches (purple membrane) during its photocycle. These experimental results demonstrate the sentivity of the technique.

  5. Non-linear Models for Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    Serroyen, Jan; Molenberghs, Geert; Verbeke, Geert; Davidian, Marie

    2009-01-01

    While marginal models, random-effects models, and conditional models are routinely considered to be the three main modeling families for continuous and discrete repeated measures with linear and generalized linear mean structures, respectively, it is less common to consider non-linear models, let alone frame them within the above taxonomy. In the latter situation, indeed, when considered at all, the focus is often exclusively on random-effects models. In this paper, we consider all three families, exemplify their great flexibility and relative ease of use, and apply them to a simple but illustrative set of data on tree circumference growth of orange trees. PMID:20160890

  6. A linear programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuey, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Computer solutions of linear programming problems are outlined. Information covers vector spaces, convex sets, and matrix algebra elements for solving simultaneous linear equations. Dual problems, reduced cost analysis, ranges, and error analysis are illustrated.

  7. Linear integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, T.

    This book is intended to be used as a textbook in a one-semester course at a variety of levels. Because of self-study features incorporated, it may also be used by practicing electronic engineers as a formal and thorough introduction to the subject. The distinction between linear and digital integrated circuits is discussed, taking into account digital and linear signal characteristics, linear and digital integrated circuit characteristics, the definitions for linear and digital circuits, applications of digital and linear integrated circuits, aspects of fabrication, packaging, and classification and numbering. Operational amplifiers are considered along with linear integrated circuit (LIC) power requirements and power supplies, voltage and current regulators, linear amplifiers, linear integrated circuit oscillators, wave-shaping circuits, active filters, DA and AD converters, demodulators, comparators, instrument amplifiers, current difference amplifiers, analog circuits and devices, and aspects of troubleshooting.

  8. Simple, efficient UHV manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, P.A.; Anderegg, J.W.

    1984-10-01

    A simple manipulator is described for use in ultrahigh vacuum. Unhindered rotation within vacuum is provided by a commercial differentially pumped adapter to which the entire XYZ stage is attached. The combination of movements provided by the XYZ stage, the rotating vacuum flange, and a gimbal permits alignment of the sample with any of the peripheral view ports. The resistively heated sample support, mounted through a cold finger, permits rapid variation of sample temperature from several hundred degrees Kelvin to near cryogenic. It is anticipated that this design could be easily used with many existing types of commercial vacuum systems, with the consequent advantage of increased ease and simplicity of both mechanical motion and cryogenic cooling.

  9. A simple radon well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahti, Katariina; Graeffe, Gunnar

    The development of a simple radon well, as effective but less expensive and technically easier to put into practice than is usual, was addressed. The wall was accomplished by a drill well technique. A long plastic tube, partly perforated, is put into the ground. To the top end of the tube an exhaust fan is connected to suck the air from the soil to make an underpressure. By this method radon is prevented from entering dwellings. Measurements were carried out in a one family house in four-day periods by a continuously monitoring radon detector. The radon concentration was usually 3000 to 4000 Bq/cu m without the use of the well. When the fan was turned on it reduced the radon concentration below 200 Bq/cu m.

  10. A Simple Harmonic Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter W.; Horn, Bart; Kachru, Shamit; Rajendran, Surjeet; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We explore simple but novel bouncing solutions of general relativity that avoid singularities. These solutions require curvature k = +1, and are supported by a negative cosmological term and matter with -1 < w < -1 = 3. In the case of moderate bounces (where the ratio of the maximal scale factor a{sub +} to the minimal scale factor a{sub -} is {Omicron}(1)), the solutions are shown to be classically stable and cycle through an infinite set of bounces. For more extreme cases with large a{sub +} = a{sub -}, the solutions can still oscillate many times before classical instabilities take them out of the regime of validity of our approximations. In this regime, quantum particle production also leads eventually to a departure from the realm of validity of semiclassical general relativity, likely yielding a singular crunch. We briefly discuss possible applications of these models to realistic cosmology.

  11. The non-linear MSW equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Mark J.; McKellar, Bruce H. J.

    1991-04-01

    A simple, non-linear generalization of the MSW equation is presented and its analytic solution is outlined. The orbits of the polarization vector are shown to be periodic, and to lie on a sphere. Their non-trivial flow patterns fall into two topological categories, the more complex of which can become chaotic if perturbed.

  12. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  13. Two Simple Models for Fracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Jaren Quinn

    Recent developments in fracking have enable the recovery of oil and gas from tight shale reservoirs. These developments have also made fracking one of the most controversial environmental issues in the United States. Despite the growing controversy surrounding fracking, there is relatively little publicly available research. This dissertation introduces two simple models for fracking that were developed using techniques from non-linear and statistical physics. The first model assumes that the volume of induced fractures must be equal to the volume of injected fluid. For simplicity, these fractures are assumed to form a spherically symmetric damage region around the borehole. The predicted volumes of water necessary to create a damage region with a given radius are in good agreement with reported values. The second model is a modification of invasion percolation which was previously introduced to model water flooding. The reservoir rock is represented by a regular lattice of local traps that contain oil and/or gas separated by rock barriers. The barriers are assumed to be highly heterogeneous and are assigned random strengths. Fluid is injected from a central site and the weakest rock barrier breaks allowing fluid to flow into the adjacent site. The process repeats with the weakest barrier breaking and fluid flowing to an adjacent site each time step. Extensive numerical simulations were carried out to obtain statistical properties of the growing fracture network. The network was found to be fractal with fractal dimensions differing slightly from the accepted values for traditional percolation. Additionally, the network follows Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga branching statistics which have been used to characterize river networks. As with other percolation models, the growth of the network occurs in bursts. These bursts follow a power-law size distribution similar to observed microseismic events. Reservoir stress anisotropy is incorporated into the model by assigning

  14. Quasispecies Made Simple

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Quasispecies are clouds of genotypes that appear in a population at mutation–selection balance. This concept has recently attracted the attention of virologists, because many RNA viruses appear to generate high levels of genetic variation that may enhance the evolution of drug resistance and immune escape. The literature on these important evolutionary processes is, however, quite challenging. Here we use simple models to link mutation–selection balance theory to the most novel property of quasispecies: the error threshold—a mutation rate below which populations equilibrate in a traditional mutation–selection balance and above which the population experiences an error catastrophe, that is, the loss of the favored genotype through frequent deleterious mutations. These models show that a single fitness landscape may contain multiple, hierarchically organized error thresholds and that an error threshold is affected by the extent of back mutation and redundancy in the genotype-to-phenotype map. Importantly, an error threshold is distinct from an extinction threshold, which is the complete loss of the population through lethal mutations. Based on this framework, we argue that the lethal mutagenesis of a viral infection by mutation-inducing drugs is not a true error catastophe, but is an extinction catastrophe. PMID:16322763

  15. Feynman's simple quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edwin F.

    1997-03-01

    This sample class presents an alternative to the conventional introduction to quantum mechanics and describes its current use in a credit course. This alternative introduction rests on theory presented in professional and popular writings by Richard Feynman. Feynman showed that Nature gives a simple command to the electron: "Explore all paths." All of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, among other fundamental results, comes from this command. With a desktop computer the student points and clicks to tell a modeled electron which paths to follow. The computer then shows the results, which embody the elemental strangeness and paradoxical behaviors of the world of the very small. Feynman's approach requires few equations and provides a largely non-mathematical introduction to the wave function of conventional quantum mechanics. Draft software and materials already used for two semesters in an e-mail computer conference credit university course show that Feynman's approach works well with a variety of students. The sample class explores computer and written material and describes the next steps in its development.

  16. A simple wave driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kağan Temiz, Burak; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the wheel starts to turn at a constant angular speed. A rod that is fixed on the wheel turns at the same constant angular speed, too. A tight string that the wave will be created on is placed at a distance where the rod can touch the string. During each rotation of the wheel, the rod vibrates the string up and down. The vibration frequency of this rod equals the wheel’s rotation frequency, and this frequency value can be measured easily with a small magnet and a bicycle speedometer. In this way, the frequency of the waves formed in the rope can also be measured.

  17. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  18. Telemedicine kept simple

    PubMed Central

    Vassallo, DJ

    2000-01-01

    Telemedicine (“medicine from a distance”) is about bringing specialist knowledge to a patient from afar, by the use of communication technology. This article is based on personal experience in helping set up a simple, versatile, cheap and effective store-and-forward telemedicine system for the British Defence Medical Services. This system uses readily available still digital cameras to record clinical, radiographic and microscopic images, which are then sent by electronic mail to an organised network of specialists for secondary or tertiary opinion. The system is in use in various countries throughout the world, and has also proven to have civilian and humanitarian uses. The system is now being emulated in civilian practice in the United Kingdom, the United States, and in previously isolated hospitals in the Third World. I also describe the active role played by a telemedicine charity and by medical students on elective in the Third World in setting up telemedicine links using this system. Readers are invited to co-operate in the setting up of a global outreach telemedicine programme, linking elective students, isolated Third World hospitals, and University Teaching Hospitals. PMID:22368578

  19. [Clustering of simple obesity].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Matsuda, H; Kurita, M; Umetada, Y

    1988-05-01

    An attempt was made to classify persons with simple obesity from the viewpoint of health education. Subjects of the study were 1,278 male workers in a financing company who underwent health examination. At the time of health examinations, questionnaire survey concerning their life styles was carried out on all the subjects. The obese group consisted of 127 subjects whose obesity indices were over 15% and the control group consisted of 342 subjects whose obesity indices ranged from -5 to 5%. Subjects in the obese group were classified into four clusters based on cluster analysis using five life-style parameters; that is, frequency of taking breakfast, frequency of taking staple food, drinking habits, smoking habits, and frequency of exercise. The first cluster (N = 10) included inactive persons, the second cluster (N = 46) non smokers, the third cluster (N = 39) smokers and heavy drinkers, and the fourth cluster (N = 32) smokers and non-drinkers. Comparison of the four clusters of obese persons with the control group revealed the following findings: 1) All the four clusters had significantly high frequencies of abnormal values of triglyceride (TG) and fasting blood sugar (FBS). 2) The first cluster had significantly high frequencies of abnormal values of glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT). 3) The second cluster had significantly high frequencies of abnormal values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, TG, FBS, uric acid, GOT, GPT and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3172544

  20. Magnetoelectric effect in simple collinear antiferromagnetic spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Rana; Ghara, Somnath; Suard, Emmanuelle; Jang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Kee Hoon; Ter-Oganessian, N. V.; Sundaresan, A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of the linear magnetoelectric effect in a family of spinel oxides, C o3O4 and Mn B2O4 (B =Al ,Ga) with simple collinear antiferromagnetic spin structure. An external magnetic field induces a dielectric anomaly at TN, accompanied by the generation of electric polarization that varies linearly with magnetic field. Magnetization and magnetoelectric measurements on a single crystal of MnG a2O4 together with a phenomenological theory suggest that the easy axis direction is [111] with the corresponding magnetic symmetry R 3¯'m' . The proposed theoretical model of single-ion contribution of magnetic ions located in a noncentrosymmetric crystal environment stands for a generic mechanism for observing magnetoelectric effects in these and other similar materials.

  1. A Simple Apparatus for Optical Polarization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieble, Kelly; Powlette, Joseph L.

    2003-12-01

    The phenomenon of polarization is usually covered, although very briefly, in most introductory college and high school physics classes. Experiments such as Malus's law are often performed with inexpensive linear polarization filters or lenses from polarized sunglasses. Investigations of more complex forms of polarization, using retarders such as quarter-wave plates (QWPs) and half-wave plates (HWPs), are often omitted because the acquisition of equipment necessary for multiple setups can be cost-prohibitive. We present here a simple rotational apparatus for accurate polarization measurements and applications using inexpensive substitutes of QWP and HWP for use with common laser wavelengths.

  2. Simple effective interaction for dimensional crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Lucian A.

    2016-03-01

    We show that the effective electron-electron interaction veff[n ] (r ,r') =erf [|r - r'|b (n ) ]/|r -r'| , with n being the electronic density and b (n ) fixed from the compressibility sum rule, is remarkably accurate in both three and two dimensions, competing with the actual state-of-the-art exchange-correlation static kernels. Using this result, we propose a simple isotropic approximation for the quasi-two-dimensional regime, which gives a realistic wave vector analysis of the correlation energy, in the context of the linear response time-dependent density functional theory.

  3. Simple inflationary quintessential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry, we present a non-geodesically past complete model of our Universe without the big bang singularity at finite cosmic time, describing its evolution starting from its early inflationary era up to the present accelerating phase. We found that a hydrodynamical fluid with nonlinear equation of state could result in such scenario, which after the end of this inflationary stage, suffers a sudden phase transition and enters into the stiff matter dominated era, and the Universe becomes reheated due to a huge amount of particle production. Finally, it asymptotically enters into the de Sitter phase concluding the present accelerated expansion. Using the reconstruction technique, we also show that this background provides an extremely simple inflationary quintessential potential whose inflationary part is given by the well-known 1-dimensional Higgs potential, i.e., a double well inflationary potential, and the quintessential one by an exponential potential that leads to a deflationary regime after this inflation, and it can depict the current cosmic acceleration at late times. Moreover the Higgs potential leads to a power spectrum of the cosmological perturbations which fit well with the latest Planck estimations. Further, we compared our viable potential with some known inflationary quintessential potential, which shows that our quintessential model, that is, the Higgs potential combined with the exponential one, is an improved version of them because it contains an analytic solution that allows us to perform all analytic calculations. Finally, we have shown that the introduction of a nonzero cosmological constant simplifies the potential considerably with an analytic behavior of the background which again permits us to evaluate all the quantities analytically.

  4. Linear collider: a preview

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  5. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  6. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

  7. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  8. On Estimation of Partially Linear Transformation Models.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenbin; Zhang, Hao Helen

    2010-06-01

    We study a general class of partially linear transformation models, which extend linear transformation models by incorporating nonlinear covariate effects in survival data analysis. A new martingale-based estimating equation approach, consisting of both global and kernel-weighted local estimation equations, is developed for estimating the parametric and nonparametric covariate effects in a unified manner. We show that with a proper choice of the kernel bandwidth parameter, one can obtain the consistent and asymptotically normal parameter estimates for the linear effects. Asymptotic properties of the estimated nonlinear effects are established as well. We further suggest a simple resampling method to estimate the asymptotic variance of the linear estimates and show its effectiveness. To facilitate the implementation of the new procedure, an iterative algorithm is developed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the finite-sample performance of the procedure. PMID:20802823

  9. On Estimation of Partially Linear Transformation Models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenbin; Zhang, Hao Helen

    2010-01-01

    We study a general class of partially linear transformation models, which extend linear transformation models by incorporating nonlinear covariate effects in survival data analysis. A new martingale-based estimating equation approach, consisting of both global and kernel-weighted local estimation equations, is developed for estimating the parametric and nonparametric covariate effects in a unified manner. We show that with a proper choice of the kernel bandwidth parameter, one can obtain the consistent and asymptotically normal parameter estimates for the linear effects. Asymptotic properties of the estimated nonlinear effects are established as well. We further suggest a simple resampling method to estimate the asymptotic variance of the linear estimates and show its effectiveness. To facilitate the implementation of the new procedure, an iterative algorithm is developed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the finite-sample performance of the procedure. PMID:20802823

  10. Linear circuits for neural networks and affective computing.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    1999-01-01

    Biological phenomena are often modeled with software on digital computers, even though the events may be analog in nature. The author describes the use of linear circuitry in two areas of biological simulation: artificial neural networks and affective computing. The operational amplifier, with the assistance of some new analog chips and simple digital microcontrollers, is featured prominently in these linear designs. PMID:11143356

  11. A Linear Theory for Inflatable Plates of Arbitrary Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComb, Harvey G., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    A linear small-deflection theory is developed for the elastic behavior of inflatable plates of which Airmat is an example. Included in the theory are the effects of a small linear taper in the depth of the plate. Solutions are presented for some simple problems in the lateral deflection and vibration of constant-depth rectangular inflatable plates.

  12. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  13. SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1985-12-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The status of the machine and the detectors are discussed and an overview is given of the physics which can be done at this new facility. Some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built are given.

  14. Linear Equations: Equivalence = Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The ability to solve linear equations sets students up for success in many areas of mathematics and other disciplines requiring formula manipulations. There are many reasons why solving linear equations is a challenging skill for students to master. One major barrier for students is the inability to interpret the equals sign as anything other than…

  15. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  16. Linear models: permutation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    Permutation tests (see Permutation Based Inference) for the linear model have applications in behavioral studies when traditional parametric assumptions about the error term in a linear model are not tenable. Improved validity of Type I error rates can be achieved with properly constructed permutation tests. Perhaps more importantly, increased statistical power, improved robustness to effects of outliers, and detection of alternative distributional differences can be achieved by coupling permutation inference with alternative linear model estimators. For example, it is well-known that estimates of the mean in linear model are extremely sensitive to even a single outlying value of the dependent variable compared to estimates of the median [7, 19]. Traditionally, linear modeling focused on estimating changes in the center of distributions (means or medians). However, quantile regression allows distributional changes to be estimated in all or any selected part of a distribution or responses, providing a more complete statistical picture that has relevance to many biological questions [6]...

  17. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  18. Gadgets, approximation, and linear programming

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, L.; Sudan, M.; Sorkin, G.B.; Williamson, D.P.

    1996-12-31

    We present a linear-programming based method for finding {open_quotes}gadgets{close_quotes}, i.e., combinatorial structures reducing constraints of one optimization problems to constraints of another. A key step in this method is a simple observation which limits the search space to a finite one. Using this new method we present a number of new, computer-constructed gadgets for several different reductions. This method also answers a question posed by on how to prove the optimality of gadgets-we show how LP duality gives such proofs. The new gadgets improve hardness results for MAX CUT and MAX DICUT, showing that approximating these problems to within factors of 60/61 and 44/45 respectively is N P-hard. We also use the gadgets to obtain an improved approximation algorithm for MAX 3SAT which guarantees an approximation ratio of .801. This improves upon the previous best bound of .7704.

  19. Practical Session: Multiple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Three exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. In the first one investigates the influence of several factors on atmospheric pollution. It has been proposed by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr33.pdf) and is based on data coming from 20 cities of U.S. Exercise 2 is an introduction to model selection whereas Exercise 3 provides a first example of analysis of variance. Exercises 2 and 3 have been proposed by A. Dalalyan at ENPC (see Exercises 2 and 3 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_5.pdf).

  20. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  1. A Simple Method to Estimate Harvest Index in Grain Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several methods have been proposed to simulate yield in crop simulation models. In this work we present a simple method to estimate harvest index (HI) of grain crops based on fractional post-anthesis growth (fG = fraction of growth that occurred post-anthesis). We propose that there is a linear or c...

  2. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  3. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the device most commonly used for external beam radiation treatments for patients with cancer. The linear ... shape of the patient's tumor and the customized beam is directed to the patient's tumor. The beam ...

  4. Inpainting with sparse linear combinations of exemplars

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a new exemplar-based inpainting algorithm based on representing the region to be inpainted as a sparse linear combination of blocks extracted from similar parts of the image being inpainted. This method is conceptually simple, being computed by functional minimization, and avoids the complexity of correctly ordering the filling in of missing regions of other exemplar-based methods. Initial performance comparisons on small inpainting regions indicate that this method provides similar or better performance than other recent methods.

  5. Linear system theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callier, Frank M.; Desoer, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a systematic and rigorous access to the main topics of linear state-space system theory in both the continuous-time case and the discrete-time case; and the I/O description of linear systems. The main thrusts of the work are the analysis of system descriptions and derivations of their properties, LQ-optimal control, state feedback and state estimation, and MIMO unity-feedback systems.

  6. Linear Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shricharith; Rao, Raghavendra; Kudva, R Ranjini; Subramanian, Kumudhini

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) over scalp is known to present in various shapes and extents of hair loss. Typically it presents as circumscribed patches of alopecia with underlying skin remaining normal. We describe a rare variant of AA presenting in linear band-like form. Only four cases of linear alopecia have been reported in medical literature till today, all four being diagnosed as lupus erythematosus profundus. PMID:27625568

  7. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  8. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  9. Linear optoacoustic underwater communication.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Fletcher; Estes, Lee; Fain, Gilbert

    2005-06-20

    The linear mechanism for optical-to-acoustic energy conversion is explored for optoacoustic communication from an in-air platform or surface vessel to a submerged vessel such as a submarine or unmanned undersea vehicle. The communication range that can be achieved is addressed. A number of conventional signals used in underwater acoustic telemetry applications are shown to be capable of being generated experimentally through the linear optoacoustic regime conversion process. These results are in agreement with simulation based on current theoretical models. A number of practical issues concerning linear optoacoustic communication are addressed that lead to a formulation of a linear-regime optoacoustic communication scheme. The use of oblique laser beam incidence at the air-water interface to obtain considerable in-air range from the laser source to the in-water receiver is addressed. Also, the effect of oblique incidence on in-water range is examined. Next, the optimum and suboptimum linear optoacoustic sound-generation techniques for selecting the optical wavelength and signaling frequency for optimizing in-water range are addressed and discussed. Optoacoustic communication techniques employing M-ary frequency shift keying and multifrequency shift keying are then compared with regard to communication parameters such as bandwidth, data rate, range coverage, and number of lasers employed. PMID:15989059

  10. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  11. Science Notebook: A Simple Seismometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Describes how to construct a simple pendulum seismometer. Includes schematic drawing of the electronic circuitry, a working drawing of the apparatus, and typical seismometer outputs caused by nearby trains and various earthquake-generated waves. (JJK)

  12. Student Conceptions of Simple Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredette, Norman; Lochhead, John

    1980-01-01

    Investigates some conceptual difficulties which college students have with regard to simple direct current circuits. The clinical interview technique was used with 57 students in a freshman level engineering course. (HM)

  13. Simple device measures solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Simple inexpensive thermometer, insolated from surroundings by transparent glass or plastic encasement, measures intensities of solar radiation, or radiation from other sources such as furnaces or ovens. Unit can be further modified to accomplish readings from remote locations.

  14. Simple formulation of magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sasoh, A. )

    1994-03-01

    A simple formulation of magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration has been made based on energy conservation relations and a generalized Ohm's law. An exhaust velocity is expressed using three characteristic parameters: (1) a dimensionless characteristic velocity [ital [tilde U

  15. Simple Interval Timers for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.; Burgess, G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses simple interval timers for microcomputers, including (1) the Jiffy clock; (2) CPU count timers; (3) screen count timers; (4) light pen timers; and (5) chip timers. Also examines some of the general characteristics of all types of timers. (JN)

  16. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  17. Linear quantum feedback networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, J. E.; Gohm, R.; Yanagisawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    The mathematical theory of quantum feedback networks has recently been developed [J. Gough and M. R. James, e-print arXiv:0804.3442v2] for general open quantum dynamical systems interacting with bosonic input fields. In this article we show, for the special case of linear dynamical Markovian systems with instantaneous feedback connections, that the transfer functions can be deduced and agree with the algebraic rules obtained in the nonlinear case. Using these rules, we derive the transfer functions for linear quantum systems in series, in cascade, and in feedback arrangements mediated by beam splitter devices.

  18. Linearly Adjustable International Portfolios

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, R. J.; Kuhn, D.; Rustem, B.

    2010-09-30

    We present an approach to multi-stage international portfolio optimization based on the imposition of a linear structure on the recourse decisions. Multiperiod decision problems are traditionally formulated as stochastic programs. Scenario tree based solutions however can become intractable as the number of stages increases. By restricting the space of decision policies to linear rules, we obtain a conservative tractable approximation to the original problem. Local asset prices and foreign exchange rates are modelled separately, which allows for a direct measure of their impact on the final portfolio value.

  19. Linear polarization of rapidly rotating ultracool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles-Páez, P. A.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Pallé, E.; Peña Ramírez, K.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the near-infrared linear polarization signal of rapidly rotating ultracool dwarfs with spectral types ranging from M7 through T2 and projected rotational velocities of v sin i ≳ 30 km s-1. These dwarfs are believed to have dusty atmospheres and oblate shapes, which is an appropriate scenario to produce measurable linear polarization of the continuum light. Methods: Linear polarimetric images were collected in the J-band for a sample of 18 fast-rotating ultracool dwarfs, of which five were also observed in the Z-band using the Long-slit Intermediate Resolution Infrared Spectrograph (LIRIS) on the Cassegrain focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. The measured median uncertainty in the linear polarization degree is ±0.13% for our sample, which allowed us to detect polarization signatures above ~0.39% with a confidence interval of ≥3σ. Results: About 40 ± 15% of the sample is linearly polarized in the Z- and J-bands. All positive detections have linear polarization degrees ranging from 0.4% to 0.8% in both filters independent of spectral type and spectroscopic rotational velocity. However, simple statistics point at the fastest rotators (v sin i ≳ 60 km s-1) having a larger fraction of positive detections and a larger averaged linear polarization degree than the moderately rotating dwarfs (v sin i = 30-60 km s-1). Our data suggest little linear polarimetric variability on short timescales (i.e., observations separated by a few ten rotation periods), and significant variability on long timescales (i.e., hundred to thousand rotation cycles), supporting the presence of long-term weather in ultracool dwarf atmospheres.

  20. Genealogies in simple models of evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Éric; Derrida, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We review the statistical properties of the genealogies of a few models of evolution. In the asexual case, selection leads to coalescence times which grow logarithmically with the size of the population, in contrast with the linear growth of the neutral case. Moreover for a whole class of models, the statistics of the genealogies are those of the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent rather than the Kingman coalescent in the neutral case. For sexual reproduction in the neutral case, the time to reach the first common ancestors for the whole population and the time for all individuals to have all their ancestors in common are also logarithmic in the population size, as predicted by Chang in 1999. We discuss how these times are modified by introducing selection in a simple way.

  1. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  2. On Solving Linear Recurrences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A direct method is given for solving first-order linear recurrences with constant coefficients. The limiting value of that solution is studied as "n to infinity." This classroom note could serve as enrichment material for the typical introductory course on discrete mathematics that follows a calculus course.

  3. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  4. Linear Classification Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.; Smith, Jerry D.

    Linear classification functions (LCFs) arise in a predictive discriminant analysis for the purpose of classifying experimental units into criterion groups. The relative contribution of the response variables to classification accuracy may be based on LCF-variable correlations for each group. It is proved that, if the raw response measures are…

  5. Linear motion valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The linear motion valve is described. The valve spool employs magnetically permeable rings, spaced apart axially, which engage a sealing assembly having magnetically permeable pole pieces in magnetic relationship with a magnet. The gap between the ring and the pole pieces is sealed with a ferrofluid. Depletion of the ferrofluid is minimized.

  6. Simple models for reading neuronal population codes.

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H S; Sompolinsky, H

    1993-01-01

    In many neural systems, sensory information is distributed throughout a population of neurons. We study simple neural network models for extracting this information. The inputs to the networks are the stochastic responses of a population of sensory neurons tuned to directional stimuli. The performance of each network model in psychophysical tasks is compared with that of the optimal maximum likelihood procedure. As a model of direction estimation in two dimensions, we consider a linear network that computes a population vector. Its performance depends on the width of the population tuning curves and is maximal for width, which increases with the level of background activity. Although for narrowly tuned neurons the performance of the population vector is significantly inferior to that of maximum likelihood estimation, the difference between the two is small when the tuning is broad. For direction discrimination, we consider two models: a perceptron with fully adaptive weights and a network made by adding an adaptive second layer to the population vector network. We calculate the error rates of these networks after exhaustive training to a particular direction. By testing on the full range of possible directions, the extent of transfer of training to novel stimuli can be calculated. It is found that for threshold linear networks the transfer of perceptual learning is nonmonotonic. Although performance deteriorates away from the training stimulus, it peaks again at an intermediate angle. This nonmonotonicity provides an important psychophysical test of these models. PMID:8248166

  7. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR QUASAR DEMOGRAPHICS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; White, Martin

    2013-01-10

    We present a simple model for the relationship between quasars, galaxies, and dark matter halos from 0.5 < z < 6. In the model, black hole (BH) mass is linearly related to galaxy mass, and galaxies are connected to dark matter halos via empirically constrained relations. A simple 'scattered' light bulb model for quasars is adopted, wherein BHs shine at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity during accretion episodes, and Eddington ratios are drawn from a lognormal distribution that is redshift independent. This model has two free, physically meaningful parameters at each redshift: the normalization of the M {sub BH}-M {sub gal} relation and the quasar duty cycle; these parameters are fit to the observed quasar luminosity function (LF) over the interval 0.5 < z < 6. This simple model provides an excellent fit to the LF at all epochs and also successfully predicts the observed projected two-point correlation of quasars from 0.5 < z < 2.5. It is significant that a single quasar duty cycle at each redshift is capable of reproducing the extant observations. The data are therefore consistent with a scenario wherein quasars are equally likely to exist in galaxies, and therefore dark matter halos, over a wide range in masses. The knee in the quasar LF is a reflection of the knee in the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. Future constraints on the quasar LF and quasar clustering at high redshift will provide strong constraints on the model. In the model, the autocorrelation function of quasars becomes a strong function of luminosity only at the very highest luminosities and will be difficult to observe because such quasars are so rare. Cross-correlation techniques may provide useful constraints on the bias of such rare objects. The simplicity of the model allows for rapid generation of quasar mock catalogs from N-body simulations that match the observed LF and clustering to high redshift.

  8. Externally resonated linear microvibromotor for microassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Kazuhiro; Wou, Soungjin J.

    1998-10-01

    A new design of a linear micro vibromotor for on-substrate fine positioning of micro-scale components is presented where a micro linear slider is actuated by vibratory impacts exerted by micro cantilever impacters. These micro cantilever impacters are selectively resonated by shaking the entire substrate with a piezoelectric vibrator, requiring no need for built-in driving mechanisms such as electrostatic comb actuators as reported previously. This selective resonance of the micro cantilever impacters via an external vibration energy field provides with a very simple means of controlling forward and backward motion of the micro linear slider, facilitating assembly and disassembly of a micro component on a substrate. The double-V beam suspension design is employed in the micro cantilever impacters for larger displacement in the lateral direction while achieving higher stiffness in the transversal direction. An analytical model of the device is derived in order to obtain, through the Simulated Annealing algorithm, an optimal design which maximizes translation speed of the linear slider at desired external input frequencies. Prototypes of the externally-resonated linear micro vibromotor are fabricated using the three-layer polysilicon surface micro machining process provided by the MCNC MUMPS service.

  9. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  10. Is the Simple View of Reading Too Simple?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoien-Tengesdal, Ingjerd

    2010-01-01

    According to the Simple View of Reading (SVR), reading comprehension is the product of word decoding ability and linguistic comprehension (R = D x C). However, there is also evidence showing that an additive model (R = D + C) explains just as much or even more of the variance in reading comprehension than the product model. To further evaluate…

  11. Futur "simple" et futur "proche" ("Simple" Future and "Immediate" Future).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franckel, Jean-Jacques

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the use of simple and immediate future tenses in French shows that the expression of time is controlled more by context and modals than by specifically temporal cues. The role of negation in this situation is discussed. (MSE)

  12. How Simple is the Simple View of Reading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Stefan; Samuelsson, Christina; Johansson, Ellinor; Wallmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    According to the Simple View of Reading, reading ability can be divided into decoding and language comprehension. In the present study, decoding and comprehension's contribution to reading ability was studied both in children with reading difficulties and in children with typical reading ability. Decoding and comprehension was further divided…

  13. Oscillations of a simple pendulum with extremely large amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2012-11-01

    Large oscillations of a simple rigid pendulum with amplitudes close to 180° are treated on the basis of a physically justified approach in which the cycle of oscillation is divided into several stages. The major part of the almost closed circular path of the pendulum is approximated by the limiting motion, while the motion in the vicinity of the inverted position is described on the basis of the linearized equation. The accepted approach provides additional insight into the dynamics of nonlinear physical systems. The final simple analytical expression gives values for the period of large oscillations that coincide with high precision with the values given by the exact formula.

  14. A simple hindlimb suspension apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, E.; Schultz, E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the assembly of a simple, inexpensive apparatus for application of the hindlimb suspension model to studies of the effects of unloading on mammalian physiology. Construction of a cage and suspension assembly is described using materials that can be obtained from most hardware stores. The design is kept simple for easy assembly and disassembly to facilitate cleaning and storage. The suspension assembly allows the animals full access to all portions of the floor area and provides an effective environment to study the effects of unloading.

  15. The International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Benno

    2014-04-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed e+e- linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200-500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  16. Linear output nitinol engine

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.M.

    1986-01-14

    This patent describes a linear output nitinol engine consisting of a number of integrated communicating parts. The engine has an external support framework which is described in detail. The patent further describes a wire transport mechanism, a pair of linkage levers with a loom secured to them, a number of nitinol wires strung between the looms, and a power takeoff block secured to the linkage levers. A pulley positioned in a flip-flop supporting bracket and a power takeoff modality including a tension member connected to a power output cable in order to provide linear power output transmission is described. A method for biasing the timing and the mechanism for timing the synchronization of the throw over arms and the flip-flop of the pulley are also described.

  17. Reciprocating linear motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reciprocating linear motor is formed with a pair of ring-shaped permanent magnets having opposite radial polarizations, held axially apart by a nonmagnetic yoke, which serves as an axially displaceable armature assembly. A pair of annularly wound coils having axial lengths which differ from the axial lengths of the permanent magnets are serially coupled together in mutual opposition and positioned with an outer cylindrical core in axial symmetry about the armature assembly. One embodiment includes a second pair of annularly wound coils serially coupled together in mutual opposition and an inner cylindrical core positioned in axial symmetry inside the armature radially opposite to the first pair of coils. Application of a potential difference across a serial connection of the two pairs of coils creates a current flow perpendicular to the magnetic field created by the armature magnets, thereby causing limited linear displacement of the magnets relative to the coils.

  18. General linear chirplet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Gang; Zhou, Yiqi

    2016-03-01

    Time-frequency (TF) analysis (TFA) method is an effective tool to characterize the time-varying feature of a signal, which has drawn many attentions in a fairly long period. With the development of TFA, many advanced methods are proposed, which can provide more precise TF results. However, some restrictions are introduced inevitably. In this paper, we introduce a novel TFA method, termed as general linear chirplet transform (GLCT), which can overcome some limitations existed in current TFA methods. In numerical and experimental validations, by comparing with current TFA methods, some advantages of GLCT are demonstrated, which consist of well-characterizing the signal of multi-component with distinct non-linear features, being independent to the mathematical model and initial TFA method, allowing for the reconstruction of the interested component, and being non-sensitivity to noise.

  19. A Simple and Fast Spline Filtering Algorithm for Surface Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Ott, Daniel; Song, John; Tong, Mingsi; Chu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Spline filters and their corresponding robust filters are commonly used filters recommended in ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) standards for surface evaluation. Generally, these linear and non-linear spline filters, composed of symmetric, positive-definite matrices, are solved in an iterative fashion based on a Cholesky decomposition. They have been demonstrated to be relatively efficient, but complicated and inconvenient to implement. A new spline-filter algorithm is proposed by means of the discrete cosine transform or the discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is conceptually simple and very convenient to implement. PMID:26958443

  20. Multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Lynn E

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes multiple linear regression, a statistical approach used to describe the simultaneous associations of several variables with one continuous outcome. Important steps in using this approach include estimation and inference, variable selection in model building, and assessing model fit. The special cases of regression with interactions among the variables, polynomial regression, regressions with categorical (grouping) variables, and separate slopes models are also covered. Examples in microbiology are used throughout. PMID:18450050

  1. Precise linear sun sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of the precise linear sun sensor relating to future mission applications was performed. The test procedures, data, and results of the dual-axis, solid-state system are included. Brief descriptions of the sensing head and of the system's operational characteristics are presented. A unique feature of the system is that multiple sensor heads with various fields of view may be used with the same electronics.

  2. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  3. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  4. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  5. Sensors for linear referencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Cecil W. H.; Lau, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Two solutions to the vehicle location problem are commonly discussed for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS): active roadside beacons and global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This paper present requirements for new linear referencing sensors, defined as sensors that will identify a vehicle's location along a roadway in terms of distance along the roadway from known points or by the automatic identification of known points. Requirements for linear referencing sensors come from new national location referencing standards being developed by initiatives of the US Department of Transportation, and from international location referencing standardization activities. Linear referencing sensors can extract information from the visual scene presented by the roadside environment, or from the environment illuminated by laser or microwave radiation. They can also be based on new, low cost techniques for labeling roads or by modulating lane reflectors or other regular road infrastructure components. Such sensors, singly and in combination, avoid the map matching problem common to vehicle navigation systems that rely on GPS, and can be deployed at much lower cost than roadside beacons, particularly when designed as one function of multi-purpose in-vehicle sensors and computers.

  6. LINEAR SOLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Villante, F. L.; Ricci, B.

    2010-05-01

    We present a new approach to studying the properties of the Sun. We consider small variations of the physical and chemical properties of the Sun with respect to standard solar model predictions and we linearize the structure equations to relate them to the properties of the solar plasma. By assuming that the (variation of) present solar composition can be estimated from the (variation of) nuclear reaction rates and elemental diffusion efficiency in the present Sun, we obtain a linear system of ordinary differential equations which can be used to calculate the response of the Sun to an arbitrary modification of the input parameters (opacity, cross sections, etc.). This new approach is intended to be a complement to the traditional methods for solar model (SM) calculation and allows us to investigate in a more efficient and transparent way the role of parameters and assumptions in SM construction. We verify that these linear solar models recover the predictions of the traditional SMs with a high level of accuracy.

  7. Linearized Kernel Dictionary Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golts, Alona; Elad, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a new approach of incorporating kernels into dictionary learning. The kernel K-SVD algorithm (KKSVD), which has been introduced recently, shows an improvement in classification performance, with relation to its linear counterpart K-SVD. However, this algorithm requires the storage and handling of a very large kernel matrix, which leads to high computational cost, while also limiting its use to setups with small number of training examples. We address these problems by combining two ideas: first we approximate the kernel matrix using a cleverly sampled subset of its columns using the Nystr\\"{o}m method; secondly, as we wish to avoid using this matrix altogether, we decompose it by SVD to form new "virtual samples," on which any linear dictionary learning can be employed. Our method, termed "Linearized Kernel Dictionary Learning" (LKDL) can be seamlessly applied as a pre-processing stage on top of any efficient off-the-shelf dictionary learning scheme, effectively "kernelizing" it. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on several tasks of both supervised and unsupervised classification and show the efficiency of the proposed scheme, its easy integration and performance boosting properties.

  8. Anti- (conjugate) linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Armin

    2016-03-01

    This is an introduction to antilinear operators. In following Wigner the terminus antilinear is used as it is standard in Physics. Mathematicians prefer to say conjugate linear. By restricting to finite-dimensional complex-linear spaces, the exposition becomes elementary in the functional analytic sense. Nevertheless it shows the amazing differences to the linear case. Basics of antilinearity is explained in sects. 2, 3, 4, 7 and in sect. 1.2: Spectrum, canonical Hermitian form, antilinear rank one and two operators, the Hermitian adjoint, classification of antilinear normal operators, (skew) conjugations, involutions, and acq-lines, the antilinear counterparts of 1-parameter operator groups. Applications include the representation of the Lagrangian Grassmannian by conjugations, its covering by acq-lines. As well as results on equivalence relations. After remembering elementary Tomita-Takesaki theory, antilinear maps, associated to a vector of a two-partite quantum system, are defined. By allowing to write modular objects as twisted products of pairs of them, they open some new ways to express EPR and teleportation tasks. The appendix presents a look onto the rich structure of antilinear operator spaces.

  9. Asymptotic Linear Spectral Statistics for Spiked Hermitian Random Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passemier, Damien; McKay, Matthew R.; Chen, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Using the Coulomb Fluid method, this paper derives central limit theorems (CLTs) for linear spectral statistics of three "spiked" Hermitian random matrix ensembles. These include Johnstone's spiked model (i.e., central Wishart with spiked correlation), non-central Wishart with rank-one non-centrality, and a related class of non-central matrices. For a generic linear statistic, we derive simple and explicit CLT expressions as the matrix dimensions grow large. For all three ensembles under consideration, we find that the primary effect of the spike is to introduce an correction term to the asymptotic mean of the linear spectral statistic, which we characterize with simple formulas. The utility of our proposed framework is demonstrated through application to three different linear statistics problems: the classical likelihood ratio test for a population covariance, the capacity analysis of multi-antenna wireless communication systems with a line-of-sight transmission path, and a classical multiple sample significance testing problem.

  10. A failsafe analysis using NASTRAN's piecewise linear analysis and a nine node linear crack element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, R. F.; Kelley, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    A two-dimensional crack element was implemented into NASTRAN as a user dummy element and used to study failsafe characteristics of the C5A fuselage. The element is formulated from Reitsner's functional requiring that it satisfy compatability with the linear boundary displacement elements in NASTRAN. Its accuracy is demonstrated by analyzing for the stress intensity factors of two simple crack configurations for which there are classic solutions.

  11. Simple Machines in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Robert; Laroder, Aris; Tippins, Deborah; Emaz, Meliza; Fox, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The community can be a powerful context and mini-laboratory for cultivating students' common understandings of science and mathematics. On the island of Panay in the Philippines, the community was the starting place for a group of fifth- and sixth-grade students to explore simple machines in their daily lives. What students learned in the process…

  12. Simple modeling of hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charlie

    2014-07-01

    Hydrostatic bearings are a key component for many large telescopes due to their high load bearing capacity, stiffness and low friction. A simple technique is presented to model these bearings to understand the effects of geometry, oil viscosity, flow control, temperature, etc. on the bearings behavior.

  13. Solving Simple Kinetics without Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Pen~a, Lisandro Herna´ndez

    2016-01-01

    The solution of simple kinetic equations is analyzed without referencing any topic from differential equations or integral calculus. Guided by the physical meaning of the rate equation, a systematic procedure is used to generate an approximate solution that converges uniformly to the exact solution in the case of zero, first, and second order…

  14. Simple Astronomical Theory of Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1979-01-01

    The author derives, applying perturbation theory, from a simple astronomical model the approximate periods of secular variation of some of the parameters of the Earth's orbit and relates these periods to the past climate of the Earth, indicating the difficulties in predicting the climate of the future. (GA)

  15. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  16. Simple manipulator for rotating spheres.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, B W; Hendricks, C D; Ward, C M; Willenborg, D L

    1978-06-01

    We describe a simple device for rapidly rotating a small sphere to any orientation for inspection of the surface. The ball is held between two small, flat surfaces and rolls as the surfaces are moved differentially parallel to one another. PMID:18699214

  17. Simple Games . . . or Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arn, Susan Kyle

    2006-01-01

    Students today begin using computers and playing video games as early as two years old. The technology behind these games is more complicated than most people can imagine. In this article, the author presents some simple number games which seem easy at the beginning, but as the games are repeated, mathematical content becomes more of the focus…

  18. Simple Stringy Dynamical SUSY Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Aharony, Ofer; Kachru, Shamit; Silverstein, Eva; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2007-08-08

    We present simple string models which dynamically break supersymmetry without non-Abelian gauge dynamics. The Fayet model, the Polonyi model, and the O'Raifeartaigh model each arise from D-branes at a specific type of singularity. D-brane instanton effects generate the requisite exponentially small scale of supersymmetry breaking.

  19. Simple Techniques for Microclimate Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes simple ways of measuring the very local climate near the ground, and explains what these measurements mean. Equipment included a solar radiometer, a dew point instrument, and a thermocouple psychrometer. Examples are given of field measurements taken with some of the equipment and the results and their interpretation are discussed.…

  20. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  1. Simple Machines Curriculum. [Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Independent School District No. 11, Coon Rapids, MN.

    This manual provides suggestions for investigating simple machines and the teaching of certain basic concepts which pertain to them. Many of the lessons are designed to be used with the commercially available LEGO kits, in an effort to teach concepts in a way in which students must translate pictures shown in two dimension into three-dimensional…

  2. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  3. Correcting Slightly Less Simple Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivar, M. P.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets…

  4. A Simple Plant Growth Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxlade, E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the analysis of dandelion peduncle growth based on peduncle length, epidermal cell dimensions, and fresh/dry mass. Methods are simple and require no special apparatus or materials. Suggests that limited practical work in this area may contribute to students' lack of knowledge on plant growth. (Author/DH)

  5. Grief: Difficult Times, Simple Steps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waszak, Emily Lane

    This guide presents techniques to assist others in coping with the loss of a loved one. Using the language of 9 layperson, the book contains more than 100 tips for caregivers or loved ones. A simple step is presented on each page, followed by reasons and instructions for each step. Chapters include: "What to Say"; "Helpful Things to Do"; "Dealing…

  6. A Simple Audio Conductivity Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berenato, Gregory; Maynard, David F.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a simple audio conductivity device built to address the problem of the lack of sensitivity needed to measure small differences in conductivity in crude conductivity devices. Uses a 9-V battery as a power supply and allows the relative resistance differences between substances to be detected by the frequency of its audible tones. Presents…

  7. A Simple Demonstration of Atomic and Molecular Orbitals Using Circular Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Maharudra; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata; Das, Ranendu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    A quite simple and inexpensive technique is described here to represent the approximate shapes of atomic orbitals and the molecular orbitals formed by them following the principles of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Molecular orbitals of a few simple molecules can also be pictorially represented. Instructors can employ the…

  8. Temporal and spatial stability in translation invariant linear resistive networks.

    PubMed

    Solak, M K

    1997-01-01

    Simple algebraic methods are proposed to evaluate the temporal and spatial stability of translation invariant linear resistive networks. Temporal stability is discussed for a finite number of nodes n. The proposed method evaluates stability of a Toeplitz pencil A(n)(a)+muB(n)(b) in terms of parameters a(i ) and b(i). In many cases a simple method allows one to verify positive definition of B(n)(b) in terms of b(i) only. PMID:18255673

  9. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  10. Modelling a Simple Mechanical System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morland, Tim

    1999-01-01

    Provides an example of the modeling power of Mathematics, demonstrated in a piece of A-Level student coursework which was undertaken as part of the MEI Structured Mathematics scheme. A system of two masses and two springs oscillating in one dimension is found to be accurately modeled by a system of linear differential equations. (Author/ASK)

  11. Simple Numerical Schemes for the Korteweg-deVries Equation

    SciTech Connect

    C. J. McKinstrie; M. V. Kozlov

    2000-12-01

    Two numerical schemes, which simulate the propagation of dispersive non-linear waves, are described. The first is a split-step Fourier scheme for the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The second is a finite-difference scheme for the modified KdV equation. The stability and accuracy of both schemes are discussed. These simple schemes can be used to study a wide variety of physical processes that involve dispersive nonlinear waves.

  12. Pseudospectral Methods of Solution of the Linear and Linearized Boltzmann Equations; Transport and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2011-05-01

    The study of the solution of the linearized Boltzmann equation has a very long history arising from the classic work by Chapman and Cowling. For small departures from a Maxwellian, the nonlinear Boltzmann equation can be linearized and the transport coefficients calculated with the Chapman-Enskog approach. This procedure leads to a set of linear integral equations which are generally solved with the expansion of the departure from Maxwellian in Sonine polynomials. The method has been used successfully for many decades to compare experimental transport data in atomic gases with theory generally carried out for realistic atom-atom differential cross sections. There are alternate pseudospectral methods which involve the discretization of the distribution function on a discrete grid. This paper considers a pseudospectral method of solution of the linearized hard sphere Boltzmann equation for the viscosity in a simple gas. The relaxation of a small departure from a Maxwellian is also considered for the linear test particle problem with unit mass ratio which is compared with the relaxation for the linearized one component Boltzmann equation.

  13. Nonlinear Modeling by Assembling Piecewise Linear Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2013-01-01

    To preserve nonlinearity of a full order system over a parameters range of interest, we propose a simple modeling approach by assembling a set of piecewise local solutions, including the first-order Taylor series terms expanded about some sampling states. The work by Rewienski and White inspired our use of piecewise linear local solutions. The assembly of these local approximations is accomplished by assigning nonlinear weights, through radial basis functions in this study. The efficacy of the proposed procedure is validated for a two-dimensional airfoil moving at different Mach numbers and pitching motions, under which the flow exhibits prominent nonlinear behaviors. All results confirm that our nonlinear model is accurate and stable for predicting not only aerodynamic forces but also detailed flowfields. Moreover, the model is robustness-accurate for inputs considerably different from the base trajectory in form and magnitude. This modeling preserves nonlinearity of the problems considered in a rather simple and accurate manner.

  14. SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described.

  15. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  16. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  17. Sparse linear programming subprogram

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.J.; Hiebert, K.L.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes a subprogram, SPLP(), for solving linear programming problems. The package of subprogram units comprising SPLP() is written in Fortran 77. The subprogram SPLP() is intended for problems involving at most a few thousand constraints and variables. The subprograms are written to take advantage of sparsity in the constraint matrix. A very general problem statement is accepted by SPLP(). It allows upper, lower, or no bounds on the variables. Both the primal and dual solutions are returned as output parameters. The package has many optional features. Among them is the ability to save partial results and then use them to continue the computation at a later time.

  18. Linear control of the flywheel inverted pendulum.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Albertos, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    The flywheel inverted pendulum is an underactuated mechanical system with a nonlinear model but admitting a linear approximation around the unstable equilibrium point in the upper position. Although underactuated systems usually require nonlinear controllers, the easy tuning and understanding of linear controllers make them more attractive for designers and final users. In a recent paper, a simple PID controller was proposed by the authors, leading to an internally unstable controlled plant. To achieve global stability, two options are developed here: first by introducing an internal stabilizing controller and second by replacing the PID controller by an observer-based state feedback control. Simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the design. PMID:24480638

  19. Mutual inductance between piecewise-linear loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristina Barroso, Ana; Silva, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    We consider a current-carrying wire loop made out of linear segments of arbitrary sizes and directions in three-dimensional space. We develop expressions to calculate its vector potential and magnetic field at all points in space. We then calculate the mutual inductance between two such (non-intersecting) piecewise-linear loops. As simple applications, we consider in detail the mutual inductance between two square wires of equal length that either lie in the same plane or lie in parallel horizontal planes with their centers on the same vertical axis. Our expressions can also be used to obtain approximations to the mutual inductance between wires of arbitrary three-dimensional shapes.

  20. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  1. Simple model of hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Lukšič, Miha; Urbic, Tomaz; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A

    2012-05-31

    Water is an unusual liquid in its solvation properties. Here, we model the process of transferring a nonpolar solute into water. Our goal was to capture the physical balance between water's hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions in a model that is simple enough to be nearly analytical and not heavily computational. We develop a 2-dimensional Mercedes-Benz-like model of water with which we compute the free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and the heat capacity of transfer as a function of temperature, pressure, and solute size. As validation, we find that this model gives the same trends as Monte Carlo simulations of the underlying 2D model and gives qualitative agreement with experiments. The advantages of this model are that it gives simple insights and that computational time is negligible. It may provide a useful starting point for developing more efficient and more realistic 3D models of aqueous solvation. PMID:22564051

  2. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer

    PubMed Central

    Sarawgi, Aditi; Marwah, Nikhil; Gumber, Parvind; Dutta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Premature loss of a primary tooth is one of the most common etiology for malocclusion. Space maintainers are employed to prevent this complication. In anterior region, esthetics is an important concern along with function and space management. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retained space maintainer solves all these purposes ef ficiently and ef fectively. In addition, the technique is simple and the appliance is very comfortable inside the oral cavity. Here is a case of premature loss of anterior primary tooth which was replaced by FRC retained esthetic functional space maintainer. The appliance was found to be functioning satisfactorily inside the oral cavity till the last visit (1 Year). How to cite this article: Goenka P, Sarawgi A, Marwah N, Gumber P, Dutta S. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):225-228. PMID:25709309

  3. Webcam classification using simple features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramoun, Thitiporn; Choe, Jeehyun; Li, He; Chen, Qingshuang; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat; Lu, Yung-Hsiang; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Thousands of sensors are connected to the Internet and many of these sensors are cameras. The "Internet of Things" will contain many "things" that are image sensors. This vast network of distributed cameras (i.e. web cams) will continue to exponentially grow. In this paper we examine simple methods to classify an image from a web cam as "indoor/outdoor" and having "people/no people" based on simple features. We use four types of image features to classify an image as indoor/outdoor: color, edge, line, and text. To classify an image as having people/no people we use HOG and texture features. The features are weighted based on their significance and combined. A support vector machine is used for classification. Our system with feature weighting and feature combination yields 95.5% accuracy.

  4. The Simple Science of Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennekes, Henk

    1997-05-01

    From the smallest gnat to the largest aircraft, all things that fly obey the same aerodynamic principles. The Simple Science of Flight offers a leisurely introduction to the mechanics of flight and, beyond that, to the scientific attitude that finds wonder in simple calculations, forging connections between, say, the energy efficiency of a peanut butter sandwich and that of the kerosene that fuels a jumbo jet. It is the product of a lifetime of watching and investigating the way flight happens. The hero of the book is the Boeing 747, which Tennekes sees as the current pinnacle of human ingenuity in mastering the science of flight. Also covered are paper airplanes, kites, gliders, and human-powered flying machines as well as birds and insects. Tennekes explains concepts like lift, drag, wing loading, and cruising speed through many fascinating comparisons, anecdotes, and examples.

  5. Four simple ocean carbon models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the key processes that determine oceanic CO2 uptake and sets this description within the context of four simple ocean carbon models. These models capture, in varying degrees, these key processes and establish a clear foundation for more realistic models that incorporate more directly the underlying physics and biology of the ocean rather than relying on simple parametric schemes. The purpose of this paper is more pedagogical than purely scientific. The problems encountered by current attempts to understand the global carbon cycle not only require our efforts but set a demand for a new generation of scientist, and it is hoped that this paper and the text in which it appears will help in this development.

  6. Simple echoes and subtle reverberations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2010-03-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can be used for the study of reverberation are suggested. Additionally, methods of adding reverberation to recorded sound are discussed.

  7. Spontaneous chirality in simple systems

    PubMed

    Pickett; Gross; Okuyama

    2000-10-23

    Two simple examples of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are presented. The first is close-packed cylindrically confined spheres. As the cylinder diameter is varied, one obtains a variety of chiral phases. The second example involves unconfined dipolar particles with an isotropic attraction, which also exhibits chiral ground states. We speculate that a dilute magnetorheological fluid film, with the addition of smaller particles to provide an attractive entropic interaction, will exhibit a chiral columnar ground state. PMID:11030973

  8. Pseudo Linear Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    Previous high fidelity onboard attitude algorithms estimated only the spacecraft attitude and gyro bias. The desire to promote spacecraft and ground autonomy and improvements in onboard computing power has spurred development of more sophisticated calibration algorithms. Namely, there is a desire to provide for sensor calibration through calibration parameter estimation onboard the spacecraft as well as autonomous estimation on the ground. Gyro calibration is a particularly challenging area of research. There are a variety of gyro devices available for any prospective mission ranging from inexpensive low fidelity gyros with potentially unstable scale factors to much more expensive extremely stable high fidelity units. Much research has been devoted to designing dedicated estimators such as particular Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithms or Square Root Information Filters. This paper builds upon previous attitude, rate, and specialized gyro parameter estimation work performed with Pseudo Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). The PSELIKA advantage is the use of the standard linear Kalman Filter algorithm. A PSELIKA algorithm for an orthogonal gyro set which includes estimates of attitude, rate, gyro misalignments, gyro scale factors, and gyro bias is developed and tested using simulated and flight data. The measurements PSELIKA uses include gyro and quaternion tracker data.

  9. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  10. Tracking simple and complex sequences.

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Fink, Philip; Kelso, J A Scott

    2002-02-01

    We address issues of synchronization to rhythms of musical complexity. In two experiments, synchronization to simple and more complex rhythmic sequences was investigated. Experiment 1 examined responses to phase and tempo perturbations within simple, structurally isochronous sequences, presented at different base rates. Experiment 2 investigated responses to similar perturbations embedded within more complex, metrically structured sequences; participants were explicitly instructed to synchronize at different metrical levels (i.e., tap at different rates to the same rhythmic patterns) on different trials. We found evidence that (1) the intrinsic tapping frequency adapts in response to temporal perturbations in both simple (isochronous) and complex (metrically structured) rhythms, (2) people can synchronize with unpredictable, metrically structured rhythms at different metrical levels, with qualitatively different patterns of synchronization seen at higher versus lower levels of metrical structure, and (3) synchronization at each tapping level reflects information from other metrical levels. The latter finding provides evidence for a dynamic and flexible internal representation of the sequence's metrical structure. PMID:11963276

  11. The Simple Spectral Access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, Markus; Tody, Doug

    2004-09-01

    The goal of the Simple Spectral Access (SSA) specification is to define a uniform interface to spectral data including spectral energy distributions (SEDs), 1D spectra, and time series data. In contrast to 2D images, spectra are stored in a wide variety of formats and there is no widely used standard in astronomy for representing spectral data, hence part of the challenge of specifying SSA was defining a general spectrophotometric data model as well as definitions of standard serializations in a variety of data formats including XML and FITS. Access is provided to both atlas (pre-computed) data and to virtual data which is computed on demand. The term simple in Simple Spectrum Access refers to the design goal of simplicity in both implementing spectral data services and in retrieving spectroscopic data from distributed data collections. SSA is a product of the data access layer (DAL) working group of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The requirements were derived from a survey among spectral data providers and data consumers and were further refined in a broad discussion in meetings and electronic forums as well as by prototyping efforts within the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and the US National Virtual Observatory (NVO).

  12. Discovering simple DNA sequences by the algorithmic significance method.

    PubMed

    Milosavljević, A; Jurka, J

    1993-08-01

    A new method, 'algorithmic significance', is proposed as a tool for discovery of patterns in DNA sequences. The main idea is that patterns can be discovered by finding ways to encode the observed data concisely. In this sense, the method can be viewed as a formal version of the Occam's Razor principle. In this paper the method is applied to discover significantly simple DNA sequences. We define DNA sequences to be simple if they contain repeated occurrences of certain 'words' and thus can be encoded in a small number of bits. Such definition includes minisatellites and microsatellites. A standard dynamic programming algorithm for data compression is applied to compute the minimal encoding lengths of sequences in linear time. An electronic mail server for identification of simple sequences based on the proposed method has been installed at the Internet address pythia/anl.gov. PMID:8402207

  13. Bonding a linearly piezoelectric patch on a linearly elastic body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, Christian; Orankitjaroen, Somsak; Viriyasrisuwattana, Patcharakorn; Weller, Thibaut

    2014-04-01

    A rigorous study of the asymptotic behavior of the system constituted by a very thin linearly piezoelectric plate bonded on a linearly elastic body supplies various models for an elastic body monitored by a piezoelectric patch. xml:lang="fr"

  14. Computer modeling of batteries from non-linear circuit elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waaben, S.; Federico, J.; Moskowitz, I.

    1983-01-01

    A simple non-linear circuit model for battery behavior is given. It is based on time-dependent features of the well-known PIN change storage diode, whose behavior is described by equations similar to those associated with electrochemical cells. The circuit simulation computer program ADVICE was used to predict non-linear response from a topological description of the battery analog built from advice components. By a reasonable choice of one set of parameters, the circuit accurately simulates a wide spectrum of measured non-linear battery responses to within a few millivolts.

  15. Linear radiation model for phase of thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Ted D.; Yu, Fengling

    2005-11-01

    A linear radiation model is developed that overcomes the analytical complexity in phase of thermal emission spectroscopy. It is shown that the linear radiation model can result in a simple algebraic relation between the phase of thermal emission and four coating properties, enabling these properties to be determined by nonlinear regression analysis of experimental measurements. Suitability of the linear radiation model to various measurement conditions is explored, and the model is applied to the phase of thermal emission measurements performed on a thermal barrier coating.

  16. Simple Models for Polymeric and Anisotropic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Martin

    We hope that the complexity of the world is neither in contrast with the simplicity of the basic laws of physics [1] nor with the simple physical models to be reviewed or proposed in the following. However, physical phenomena occurring in complex materials cannot be encapsulated within a single numerical paradigm. In fact, they should be described within hierarchical, multi-level numerical models in which each sub-model is responsible for different spatio-temporal behavior and passes out the averaged parameters to the model, which is next in the hierarchy (Fig. 1.1). Polymeric liquids far from equilibrium belong to the class of anisotropic liquids.1 This monograph is devoted to the understanding of the anisotropic properties of polymeric and complex fluids such as viscoelastic and orientational behavior of polymeric liquids, the rheological properties of ferrofluids and liquid crystals subjected to external fields, based on the architecture of their molecular constituents. The topic is of considerable concern in basic research for which models should be as simple as possible, but not simpler. Certainly, it is also of technological relevance. Statistical physics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics are challenged by the desired structure-property relationships. Experiments such as static and dynamic light and neutron scattering, particle tracking, flow birefringence etc. together with rheological measurements have been essential to adjust or test basic theoretical concepts, such as a ‘linear stressoptic rule’ which connects orientation and stress, or the effect of molecular weight, solvent conditions, and external field parameters on shape, diffusion, degradation, and alignment of molecules.

  17. The SIMPLE Phase II dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Marques, R.; Simple Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Phase II of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) searched for astroparticle dark matter using superheated liquid C2ClF5 droplet detectors. Each droplet generally requires an energy deposition with linear energy transfer (LET) ≳150 keV/μm for a liquid-to-gas phase transition, providing an intrinsic rejection against minimum ionizing particles of order 10-10, and reducing the backgrounds to primarily α and neutron-induced recoil events. The droplet phase transition generates a millimetric-sized gas bubble that is recorded by acoustic means. We describe the SIMPLE detectors, their acoustic instrumentation, and the characterizations, signal analysis and data selection, which yield a particle-induced, "true nucleation" event detection efficiency of better than 97% at a 95% C.L. The recoil-α event discrimination, determined using detectors first irradiated with neutrons and then doped with alpha emitters, provides a recoil identification of better than 99%; it differs from those of COUPP and PICASSO primarily as a result of their different liquids with lower critical LETs. The science measurements, comprising two shielded arrays of fifteen detectors each and a total exposure of 27.77 kgd, are detailed. Removal of the 1.94 kgd Stage 1 installation period data, which had previously been mistakenly included in the data, reduces the science exposure from 20.18 to 18.24 kgd and provides new contour minima of σp=4.3×10-3 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-dependent sector of astroparticle dark matter-proton interactions and σN=3.6×10-6 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-independent sector. These results are examined with respect to the fluorine spin and halo parameters used in the previous data analysis.

  18. Non Linear Conjugate Gradient

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-11-17

    Software that simulates and inverts electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a time harmonic source field excitation arising from the following antenna geometery: loops and grounded bipoles, as well as point electric and magnetic dioples. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code NLCGCS_MP ver 1.0. The upgrade includes the following components: Incorporation of new 1 D field sourcing routines to more accurately simulate the 3D electromagnetic field for arbitrary geologic& media, treatment for generalized finite length transmitting antenna geometry (antennas with vertical and horizontal component directions). In addition, the software has been upgraded to treat transverse anisotropy in electrical conductivity.« less

  19. [Linear accelerator radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brandt, R A; Salvajoli, J V; Oliveira, V C; Carmignani, M; da Cruz, J C; Leal, H D; Ferraz, L

    1995-03-01

    Radiosurgery is the precise radiation of a known intracranial target with a high dose of energy, sparing the adjacent nervous tissue. Technological advances in the construction of linear accelerators, stereotactic instruments and in computer sciences made this technique easier to perform and affordable. The main indications for radiosurgery are inoperable cerebral vascular malformations, vestibular and other cranial schwannomas, skull base meningiomas, deep seated gliomas and cerebral metastases. More recently, the development of fraccionated stereotactic radiotherapy increased the spectrum of indications to bigger lesions and to those adjacent to critical nervous structures. We present our initial experience in the treatment of 31 patients. An adequate control of the neoplastic lesions was obtained and the adequate time of observation is still needed to evaluate the results in arteriovenous malformations. PMID:7575207

  20. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  1. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  2. Fast Censored Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YIJIAN

    2013-01-01

    Weighted log-rank estimating function has become a standard estimation method for the censored linear regression model, or the accelerated failure time model. Well established statistically, the estimator defined as a consistent root has, however, rather poor computational properties because the estimating function is neither continuous nor, in general, monotone. We propose a computationally efficient estimator through an asymptotics-guided Newton algorithm, in which censored quantile regression methods are tailored to yield an initial consistent estimate and a consistent derivative estimate of the limiting estimating function. We also develop fast interval estimation with a new proposal for sandwich variance estimation. The proposed estimator is asymptotically equivalent to the consistent root estimator and barely distinguishable in samples of practical size. However, computation time is typically reduced by two to three orders of magnitude for point estimation alone. Illustrations with clinical applications are provided. PMID:24347802

  3. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  4. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  5. Cooee bitumen. II. Stability of linear asphaltene nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Lemarchand, Claire A; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

    2014-10-14

    Asphaltene and smaller aromatic molecules tend to form linear nanoaggregates in bitumen. Over the years bitumen undergoes chemical aging and during this process, the size of the nanoaggregate increases. This increase is associated with an increase in viscosity and brittleness of the bitumen, eventually leading to road deterioration. This paper focuses on understanding the mechanisms behind nanoaggregate size and stability. We used molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the probability of having a nanoaggregate of a given size in the stationary regime. To model this complicated behavior, we chose first to consider the simple case where only asphaltene molecules are counted in a nanoaggregate. We used a master equation approach and a related statistical mechanics model. The linear asphaltene nanoaggregates behave as a rigid linear chain. The most complicated case where all aromatic molecules are counted in a nanoaggregate is then discussed. The linear aggregates where all aromatic molecules are counted seem to behave as a flexible linear chain. PMID:25318723

  6. Cooee bitumen. II. Stability of linear asphaltene nanoaggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Claire A.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Hansen, Jesper S.

    2014-10-01

    Asphaltene and smaller aromatic molecules tend to form linear nanoaggregates in bitumen. Over the years bitumen undergoes chemical aging and during this process, the size of the nanoaggregate increases. This increase is associated with an increase in viscosity and brittleness of the bitumen, eventually leading to road deterioration. This paper focuses on understanding the mechanisms behind nanoaggregate size and stability. We used molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the probability of having a nanoaggregate of a given size in the stationary regime. To model this complicated behavior, we chose first to consider the simple case where only asphaltene molecules are counted in a nanoaggregate. We used a master equation approach and a related statistical mechanics model. The linear asphaltene nanoaggregates behave as a rigid linear chain. The most complicated case where all aromatic molecules are counted in a nanoaggregate is then discussed. The linear aggregates where all aromatic molecules are counted seem to behave as a flexible linear chain.

  7. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  8. Recursive Algorithm For Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, S. V.

    1988-01-01

    Order of model determined easily. Linear-regression algorithhm includes recursive equations for coefficients of model of increased order. Algorithm eliminates duplicative calculations, facilitates search for minimum order of linear-regression model fitting set of data satisfactory.

  9. What Is a Simple Liquid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to identify the real essence of simplicity of liquids in John Locke’s understanding of the term. Simple liquids are traditionally defined as many-body systems of classical particles interacting via radially symmetric pair potentials. We suggest that a simple liquid should be defined instead by the property of having strong correlations between virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble. There is considerable overlap between the two definitions, but also some notable differences. For instance, in the new definition simplicity is not a direct property of the intermolecular potential because a liquid is usually only strongly correlating in part of its phase diagram. Moreover, not all simple liquids are atomic (i.e., with radially symmetric pair potentials) and not all atomic liquids are simple. The main part of the paper motivates the new definition of liquid simplicity by presenting evidence that a liquid is strongly correlating if and only if its intermolecular interactions may be ignored beyond the first coordination shell (FCS). This is demonstrated by NVT simulations of the structure and dynamics of several atomic and three molecular model liquids with a shifted-forces cutoff placed at the first minimum of the radial distribution function. The liquids studied are inverse power-law systems (r-n pair potentials with n=18,6,4), Lennard-Jones (LJ) models (the standard LJ model, two generalized Kob-Andersen binary LJ mixtures, and the Wahnstrom binary LJ mixture), the Buckingham model, the Dzugutov model, the LJ Gaussian model, the Gaussian core model, the Hansen-McDonald molten salt model, the Lewis-Wahnstrom ortho-terphenyl model, the asymmetric dumbbell model, and the single-point charge water model. The final part of the paper summarizes properties of strongly correlating liquids, emphasizing that these are simpler than liquids in general. Simple liquids, as defined here, may be characterized in three quite

  10. Multidirectional direct simple shear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, D.J.; Germaine, J.T.; Ladd, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The paper describes a new simple shear testing device, the multidirectional direct simple shear (MDSS) apparatus, for testing soil specimens under conditions that simulate, at the element level, the state of stress acting within the foundation soil of an offshore Arctic gravity structure. The MDSS uses a circular specimen that is consolidated under both a vertical effective stress ({sigma}{sub vc}{prime}) and a horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 1}). The specimen is subsequently sheared undrained by applying a second independent horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 2}) at an angle {theta} relative to the horizontal consolidation shear stress {tau}{sub 1}. Evaluation of the MDSS first compares conventional K{sub D}-consolidated undrained direct simple shear (CK{sub 0}UDSS) test data ({tau}{sub 1} = 0) on normally consolidated Boston blue clay (BBC) with results obtained in the Geonor DSS device. The MDSS gives lower secant Young`s modulus values and on average 8% lower strengths, but produces remarkably less scatter in the test results than the Geonor DSS. Kinematic proof tests with an elastic material (rubber) confirm that the setup procedure, application of forces, and strain measurement systems in the MDSS work properly and produce repeatable results. Results from a MDSS test program on BBC wherein specimens were first normally consolidated with {sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and {tau}{sub 1} = 0.2{sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and then sheared undrained at {theta} varing in 30{degree} increments from zero (shear in same direction) to 150{degree} show dramatic differences in the response of the soil as a function of {theta}. The peak undrained strength varies almost twofold from 0 = 0 to 120{degree}, while the deformation behavior varies from very brittle at low {theta} angles to becoming ductile at higher angles. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  11. BF Models in Dual Formulations of Linearized Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bizdadea, Constantin; Cioroianu, Eugen M.; Danehkar, Ashbiz; Iordache, Marius; Saliu, Solange O.; Sararu, Silviu C.

    2009-05-22

    The case of couplings in D = 5 between a simple, maximal BF model and the dual formulation of linearized gravity is considered. All the possible interactions are exhausted by means of computing the 'free' local BRST cohomology in ghost number zero.

  12. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  13. On the derivation of linear irreversible thermodynamics for classical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Theodosopulu, M.; Grecos, A.; Prigogine, I.

    1978-01-01

    We consider the microscopic derivation of the linearized hydrodynamic equations for an arbitrary simple fluid. Our discussion is based on the concept of hydrodynamical modes, and use is made of the ideas and methods of the theory of subdynamics. We also show that this analysis leads to the Gibbs relation for the entropy of the system. PMID:16592516

  14. Continuous Quantitative Measurements on a Linear Air Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Eric

    1973-01-01

    Describes the construction and operational procedures of a spark-timing apparatus which is designed to record the back and forth motion of one or two carts on linear air tracks. Applications to measurements of velocity, acceleration, simple harmonic motion, and collision problems are illustrated. (CC)

  15. The Pendulum: A Paradigm for the Linear Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    The simple pendulum is a model for the linear oscillator. The usual mathematical treatment of the problem begins with a differential equation that one solves with the techniques of the differential calculus, a formal process that tends to obscure the physics. In this paper we begin with a kinematic description of the motion obtained by experiment…

  16. A simple theory of condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, S.

    2011-04-15

    A simple assumption of the emergence in gas of small atomic clusters consisting of c particles each leads to a phase separation (first-order transition). It reveals itself by the emergence of a 'forbidden' density range starting at a certain temperature. Defining this latter value as the critical temperature predicts the existence of an interval with the anomalous heat capacity behavior c{sub p} {proportional_to} {Delta}T{sup -1/c}. The value c = 13 suggested in the literature yields the heat capacity exponent {alpha} = 0.077.

  17. A simple Cavendish experimental apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossler, W. J.; Klein, Susann; Morrow, Dominick; Juliao, Andre

    2016-03-01

    A simple Cavendish apparatus is described that allows measurement of the gravitational constant G and makes observable the gravitational attraction between commonplace objects. The apparatus consists of a torsion balance constructed from readily available materials, including lead bricks and fishing weights ("sinkers"). A computer program is used to determine the gravitational field at the location of the small mass due to a nearby lead brick, which allows students to gain experience with numerical methods. Experimental results obtained are compatible with the accepted value of G.

  18. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  19. Controlling chaos with simple limiters

    PubMed

    Corron; Pethel; Hopper

    2000-04-24

    New experimental results demonstrate that chaos control can be accomplished using controllers that are very simple relative to the system being controlled. Chaotic dynamics in a driven pendulum and a double scroll circuit are controlled using an adjustable, passive limiter-a weight for the pendulum and a diode for the circuit. For both experiments, multiple unstable periodic orbits are selectively controlled using minimal perturbations. These physical examples suggest that chaos control can be practically applied to a much wider array of important problems than initially thought possible. PMID:11019218

  20. A Simple Boyle's Law Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Don L.

    1997-02-01

    Student-conducted experiments over a range of pressures from about 14 psi to about 120 psi can safely and accurately be made utilizing a 60 ml syringe and an ordinary bathroom scale. No pressure gauge is required and no value for initial pressure in the syringe (near atmospheric pressure) need be assumed. Volume is measured in ml and pressures are recorded in pound/square inch. While data analysis does not require computer assistance, it is convenient to utilize spreadsheet programs which can perform linear regression calculations. The constant, c, in PV = c typically exhibits an uncertainty of about 5% (standard deviation/average).

  1. Adaptive Control of Linear Modal Systems Using Residual Mode Filters and a Simple Disturbance Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark; Frost, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible structures containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques which are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend our adaptive control theory to accommodate troublesome modal subsystems of a plant that might inhibit the adaptive controller. In some cases the plant does not satisfy the requirements of Almost Strict Positive Realness. Instead, there maybe be a modal subsystem that inhibits this property. This section will present new results for our adaptive control theory. We will modify the adaptive controller with a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for the troublesome modal subsystem, or the Q modes. Here we present the theory for adaptive controllers modified by RMFs, with attention to the issue of disturbances propagating through the Q modes. We apply the theoretical results to a flexible structure example to illustrate the behavior with and without the residual mode filter.

  2. The Prediction Properties of Inverse and Reverse Regression for the Simple Linear Calibration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A.; Geoffrey, Vining G.; Wilson, Sara R.; Szarka, John L., III; Johnson, Nels G.

    2010-01-01

    The calibration of measurement systems is a fundamental but under-studied problem within industrial statistics. The origins of this problem go back to basic chemical analysis based on NIST standards. In today's world these issues extend to mechanical, electrical, and materials engineering. Often, these new scenarios do not provide "gold standards" such as the standard weights provided by NIST. This paper considers the classic "forward regression followed by inverse regression" approach. In this approach the initial experiment treats the "standards" as the regressor and the observed values as the response to calibrate the instrument. The analyst then must invert the resulting regression model in order to use the instrument to make actual measurements in practice. This paper compares this classical approach to "reverse regression," which treats the standards as the response and the observed measurements as the regressor in the calibration experiment. Such an approach is intuitively appealing because it avoids the need for the inverse regression. However, it also violates some of the basic regression assumptions.

  3. Simple Cassegrain scanning system for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apt, J.; Goody, R.; Mertz, L.

    1980-01-01

    To meet the need for a reliable, fast imaging system capable of being taken rapidly on and off the telescope, a simple, inexpensive, and compact Cassegrain reimaging system for scanning IR images was constructed. Using commercially available components without requiring close mechanical tolerances, the design solves the problem of beam stability pointed out by Koornneef and van Overbeeke (1976). For the moving-iron galvanometer scanner, it is noted that at the imaging frequency of 0.5 Hz, hysteresis in image plane motion was found to be less than 0.2 arc sec for a 64-arc sec scan, and the deviation from linearity with a triangular wave input was found to be less than 0.3 arc sec. This system and a scanning secondary were used to image Venus at 11.5 microns, and compared with the scanning secondary, the reimaging system did not appear to contribute any additional noise, considerably improved mechanical reliability, and eliminated cross-scan motion

  4. Simple kinetic sensor to structural transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandni, U.; Ghosh, Arindam

    2010-04-01

    Driven nonequilibrium structural phase transformation has been probed using time-varying resistance fluctuations or noise. We demonstrate that the non-Gaussian component (NGC) of noise obtained by evaluating the higher-order statistics of fluctuations, serves as a simple kinetic detector of these phase transitions. Using the Martensite transformation in free-standing wires of nickel-titanium binary alloys as a prototype, we observe clear deviations from the Gaussian background in the transformation zone, indicative of the long-range correlations in the system as the phase transforms. The viability of non-Gaussian statistics as a robust probe to structural phase transition was also confirmed by comparing the results from differential scanning calorimetry measurements. We further studied the response of the NGC to the modifications in the microstructure on repeated thermal cycling, as well as the variations in the temperature-drive rate, and explained the results using established simplistic models based on the different competing time scales. Our experiments (i) suggest an alternative method to estimate the transformation temperature scales with high accuracy and (ii) establish a connection between the material-specific evolution of microstructure to the statistics of its linear response. Since the method depends on an in-built long-range correlation during transformation, it could be portable to other structural transitions, as well as to materials of different physical origin and size.

  5. Simple Broadband Circular Polarizer in Oversized Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a possibility is shown to realize a simple waveguide polarizer producing nearly the same circular polarization over a broad frequency range up to an octave. It is based upon the combination of two smoothly squeezed oversized waveguides with different diameters. The principle is similar to an achromatic lens in optics, where two counteracting lenses with differently sloped wavelength dependencies of the refractive index are combined to compensate the dispersion in the desired wavelength range. Consequently, two different wavelengths of light are brought into focus at the same plane. A waveguide for the transmission of microwaves has a similar frequency dependence of the refractive index resulting in a frequency-dependent phase shift between two propagating waves polarized along the symmetry axes of a waveguide with an elliptical cross section. For this reason, an incident wave with a linear polarization between the axes of symmetry can be only converted into a circularly polarized wave over a limited frequency range. However, the diameter and the shape along two counteracting squeezed waveguides can be adjusted in such a way that the frequency dependence of the resultant phase shift is finally canceled out.

  6. A Simple Theory for Waterspouts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennó, Nilton O.; Bluestein, Howard B.

    2001-04-01

    It is shown that the simple thermodynamic theory for dust devils, proposed by Rennó et al., also applies to waterspouts. The theory is based on the thermodynamics of heat engines and predicts the central pressure and the wind speed of these convective vortices. Moreover, it provides a simple physical interpretation of their general characteristics. In particular, the heat engine theory shows that convective vortices are more likely to form in the regions where the occurrence of the warmest and moistest updrafts and the coldest and driest downdrafts are supported by the local environment. These are the regions where both the heat input into the convective heat engine is maximum and the solenoidal generation of vorticity is the greatest. This explains why waterspouts are frequently observed near the boundaries between relatively warm and relatively cold waters. Moreover, since the work done by the convective heat engine is equal to the total heat input multiplied by the thermodynamic efficiency, the theory shows that another necessary condition for the formation of intense vortices is the presence of intense convection.

  7. LINEAR - DERIVATION AND DEFINITION OF A LINEAR AIRCRAFT MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Derivation and Definition of a Linear Model program, LINEAR, provides the user with a powerful and flexible tool for the linearization of aircraft aerodynamic models. LINEAR was developed to provide a standard, documented, and verified tool to derive linear models for aircraft stability analysis and control law design. Linear system models define the aircraft system in the neighborhood of an analysis point and are determined by the linearization of the nonlinear equations defining vehicle dynamics and sensors. LINEAR numerically determines a linear system model using nonlinear equations of motion and a user supplied linear or nonlinear aerodynamic model. The nonlinear equations of motion used are six-degree-of-freedom equations with stationary atmosphere and flat, nonrotating earth assumptions. LINEAR is capable of extracting both linearized engine effects, such as net thrust, torque, and gyroscopic effects and including these effects in the linear system model. The point at which this linear model is defined is determined either by completely specifying the state and control variables, or by specifying an analysis point on a trajectory and directing the program to determine the control variables and the remaining state variables. The system model determined by LINEAR consists of matrices for both the state and observation equations. The program has been designed to provide easy selection of state, control, and observation variables to be used in a particular model. Thus, the order of the system model is completely under user control. Further, the program provides the flexibility of allowing alternate formulations of both the state and observation equations. Data describing the aircraft and the test case is input to the program through a terminal or formatted data files. All data can be modified interactively from case to case. The aerodynamic model can be defined in two ways: a set of nondimensional stability and control derivatives for the flight point of

  8. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  9. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F. Landis

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents a comprehensive approach to filter modeling for generalized covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work that allowed for partitioning of the state space into solve-for'' and consider'' parameters, accounted for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and textita priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator's epoch time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the variance sandpile'' and the sensitivity mosaic,'' and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  10. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  11. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  12. Isospaced linear ion strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We describe the statical and dynamical properties of strings of ions stored in segmented electrodynamical Paul traps with a uniform ion separation. In this work, this specific ion arrangement is achieved by a smooth anharmonic effective potential generated by suitable voltages applied to segmented dc electrodes or by appropriate electrode shaping. We find analytic expressions for the required field, potential and normal mode matrix and find that even finite systems closely reproduce the critical radial binding strength of an infinite size system at the transition from linear to zigzag configuration. From the normal mode matrix, we find that such strings exhibit a solid-state-like band of normal modes and determine the effective spin-spin coupling when the ion string is exposed to a magnetic gradient. We show how the potential, modes and couplings can be altered while still maintaining a homogeneous spacing and present numerical examples, for how this potential can be achieved in either segmented Paul traps or by using an optimized electrode geometry.

  13. Linear induction pump

    DOEpatents

    Meisner, John W.; Moore, Robert M.; Bienvenue, Louis L.

    1985-03-19

    Electromagnetic linear induction pump for liquid metal which includes a unitary pump duct. The duct comprises two substantially flat parallel spaced-apart wall members, one being located above the other and two parallel opposing side members interconnecting the wall members. Located within the duct are a plurality of web members interconnecting the wall members and extending parallel to the side members whereby the wall members, side members and web members define a plurality of fluid passageways, each of the fluid passageways having substantially the same cross-sectional flow area. Attached to an outer surface of each side member is an electrically conductive end bar for the passage of an induced current therethrough. A multi-phase, electrical stator is located adjacent each of the wall members. The duct, stators, and end bars are enclosed in a housing which is provided with an inlet and outlet in fluid communication with opposite ends of the fluid passageways in the pump duct. In accordance with a preferred embodiment, the inlet and outlet includes a transition means which provides for a transition from a round cross-sectional flow path to a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow path defined by the pump duct.

  14. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2008-01-01

    We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work on generalized covariance analysis methods. This prior work allowed for partitioning of the state space into "solve-for" and "consider" parameters, allowed for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and a priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and a priori solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator s anchor time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the "variance sandpile" and the "sensitivity mosaic," and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  15. Global Linear Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofilis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews linear instability analysis of flows over or through complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D geometries. In the three decades since it first appeared in the literature, global instability analysis, based on the solution of the multidimensional eigenvalue and/or initial value problem, is continuously broadening both in scope and in depth. To date it has dealt successfully with a wide range of applications arising in aerospace engineering, physiological flows, food processing, and nuclear-reactor safety. In recent years, nonmodal analysis has complemented the more traditional modal approach and increased knowledge of flow instability physics. Recent highlights delivered by the application of either modal or nonmodal global analysis are briefly discussed. A conscious effort is made to demystify both the tools currently utilized and the jargon employed to describe them, demonstrating the simplicity of the analysis. Hopefully this will provide new impulses for the creation of next-generation algorithms capable of coping with the main open research areas in which step-change progress can be expected by the application of the theory: instability analysis of fully inhomogeneous, 3D flows and control thereof.

  16. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. We find that stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, pushing the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible. Results of driven N-body systems by Stuart Robbins: Even unforced rings show large variations; Forcing triggers aggregation; Some limit cycles and phase lags seen, but not always as predicted by predator-prey model. Summary of Halo Results: A predatorprey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw'. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon

  17. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2015-04-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. We find that stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, pushing the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible Results of driven N-body systems by Stuart Robbins: Even unforced rings show large variations; Forcing triggers aggregation; Some limit cycles and phase lags seen, but not always as predicted by predator-prey model. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw'. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon

  18. Simple photoreceptors in Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R; Bradbury, J; Mauro, A

    1966-12-01

    The "olfactory nerve," the endoparietal eye, and the rudimentary lateral eyes of Limulus (polyphemus) contain simple photoreceptor cells that duplicate many of the electrical responses of the retinular cells of the lateral eye; the responses are a receptor potential consisting of aninitial transient phase and a subsequent steady phase,low-amplitude fluctuations, and a small locally regenerative response to pulses of both light and current. Photic stimulation does not induce conducted action potentials, but does increase the membrane conductance. The receptor potentialrequires the presence of sodium ions in the external medium. Measurements of action and absorption spectra indicate a photopigment whose maximum absorption is of light with wavelength of 535 nanometers. The functional significance of these cells has not been ascertained. PMID:5921383

  19. Simple types of anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Hervik, Sigbjoern

    2010-01-15

    We display some simple cosmological solutions of gravity theories with quadratic Ricci curvature terms added to the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian which exhibit anisotropic inflation. The Hubble expansion rates are constant and unequal in three orthogonal directions. We describe the evolution of the simplest of these homogeneous and anisotropic cosmological models from its natural initial state and evaluate the deviations they will create from statistical isotropy in the fluctuations produced during a period of anisotropic inflation. The anisotropic inflation is not a late-time attractor in these models but the rate of approach to a final isotropic de Sitter state is slow and is conducive to the creation of observable anisotropic statistical effects in the microwave background. The statistical anisotropy would not be scale invariant and the level of statistical anisotropy will grow with scale.

  20. Quantized Cosmology: A Simple Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, M

    2004-06-03

    I discuss the problem of inflation in the context of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Cosmology and show how, after a simple change of variables, to quantize the problem in a way which parallels the classical discussion. The result is that two of the Einstein equations arise as exact equations of motion and one of the usual Einstein equations (suitably quantized) survives as a constraint equation to be imposed on the space of physical states. However, the Friedmann equation, which is also a constraint equation and which is the basis of the Wheeler-deWitt equation, acquires a welcome quantum correction that becomes significant for small scale factors. To clarify how things work in this formalism I briefly outline the way in which our formalism works for the exactly solvable case of de-Sitter space.

  1. Simple lattice model of macroevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Wojciech

    2009-04-01

    In future astrobiology, like in modern astrophysics, the numerical simulations can be a very important tool for proving theories. In this paper, I propose a simple lattice model of a multi-species ecosystem suitable for the study of emergent properties of macroevolution. Unlike the majority of ecological models, the number of species is not fixed - they emerge by "mutation" of existing species, then survive or go extinct depending on the balance between local ecological interactions. The Monte-Carlo numerical simulations show that this model is able to qualitatively reproduce phenomena that have been empirically observed, like the dependence between size of the isolated area and the number of species inhabiting there, primary production and species-diversity. The model allows also studying the causes of mass extinctions and more generally, repeatability, and the role of pure chance in macroevolution.

  2. A Simple Statistical Thermodynamics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2010-03-01

    Comparing the predicted and actual rolls of combinations of both two and three dice can help to introduce many of the basic concepts of statistical thermodynamics, including multiplicity, probability, microstates, and macrostates, and demonstrate that entropy is indeed a measure of randomness, that disordered states (those of higher entropy) are more likely than more ordered ones. It can also show that predictions based on statistics are more accurate with larger samples of data. What follows is a simple experiment introducing some of the basic elements of statistical thermodynamics that can be a light and even fun way to end a unit on thermodynamics, often the end of a challenging first semester of introductory physics.

  3. User's manual for interfacing a leading edge, vortex rollup program with two linear panel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Sufficient instructions are provided for interfacing the Mangler-Smith, leading edge vortex rollup program with a vortex lattice (POTFAN) method and an advanced higher order, singularity linear analysis for computing the vortex effects for simple canard wing combinations.

  4. Linear Algebraic Method for Non-Linear Map Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,L.; Nash, B.

    2009-05-04

    We present a newly developed method to analyze some non-linear dynamics problems such as the Henon map using a matrix analysis method from linear algebra. Choosing the Henon map as an example, we analyze the spectral structure, the tune-amplitude dependence, the variation of tune and amplitude during the particle motion, etc., using the method of Jordan decomposition which is widely used in conventional linear algebra.

  5. Simple preconditioning for time-dependent density functional perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, Lauri; Marques, Miguel A L

    2011-07-01

    By far, the most common use of time-dependent density functional theory is in the linear-reponse regime, where it provides information about electronic excitations. Ideally, the linear-response equations should be solved by a method that avoids the use of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham states--such as the Sternheimer method--as this reduces the complexity and increases the precision of the calculation. However, the Sternheimer equation becomes ill-conditioned near and indefinite above the first resonant frequency, seriously hindering the use of efficient iterative solution methods. To overcome this serious limitation, and to improve the general convergence properties of the iterative techniques, we propose a simple preconditioning strategy. In our method, the Sternheimer equation is solved directly as a linear equation using an iterative Krylov subspace method, i.e., no self-consistent cycle is required. Furthermore, the preconditioner uses the information of just a few unoccupied states and requires simple and minimal modifications to existing implementations. In this way, convergence can be reached faster and in a considerably wider frequency range than the traditional approach. PMID:21744884

  6. Linear collider development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1993-08-01

    Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

  7. Quantization of general linear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-03-15

    General linear electrodynamics allow for an arbitrary linear constitutive relation between the field strength 2-form and induction 2-form density if crucial hyperbolicity and energy conditions are satisfied, which render the theory predictive and physically interpretable. Taking into account the higher-order polynomial dispersion relation and associated causal structure of general linear electrodynamics, we carefully develop its Hamiltonian formulation from first principles. Canonical quantization of the resulting constrained system then results in a quantum vacuum which is sensitive to the constitutive tensor of the classical theory. As an application we calculate the Casimir effect in a birefringent linear optical medium.

  8. Simple method for model reference adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method is presented for combined signal synthesis and parameter adaptation within the framework of model reference adaptive control theory. The results are obtained using a simple derivation based on an improved Liapunov function.

  9. Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth Clinicians: Please make as many copies of this ... Philadelphia, for authoring “Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth.” Ask your family doctor to discontinue or provide ...

  10. Self-Configuring Universal Linear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, it was not clear whether we could make or even design arbitrary linear optical devices or transforms on light fields. A single thin dielectric structure or meta material layer is not sufficiently general, for example. The canonical arbitrary linear problem is to separate and separately modulate arbitrary overlapping orthogonal light beams at a given wavelength without fundamental loss and then transform them into other arbitrary orthogonal beams; such a mode conversion corresponds to multiplying by an arbitrary matrix, so solving this problem in general enables arbitrary linear transforms (unitary or non-unitary). Recently we showed constructively how to implement any such linear transform, thereby solving the design problem in principle. Furthermore, we showed that this could be done entirely by training a mesh of interferometers and modulators with desired inputs and outputs, without any calculations and without any calibration of components. This approach relies on simple single-parameter feedback loops that minimize power on detectors, in completely progressive algorithms, and could be implemented in silicon photonics. It could solve practical problems such as separating spatial modes in telecommunications, automatically aligning beams, and finding optimal channels through scatterers. It offers new possibilities for self-configuring and self-stabilizing optical systems, and could enable complicated optics, such as for quantum networks and information, well beyond current capabilities. One interesting open question is how to exploit such approaches with nanoscale optics. This project was supported by DARPA InPho program, and by MURI grants (AFOSR, FA9550-10-1-0264 and FA9550-09-0704).

  11. Simple molecules as complex systems.

    PubMed

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Arendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H2(16)O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an "ultra-small-world" property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  12. Simple Substrates for Complex Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Complex cognitive tasks present a range of computational and algorithmic challenges for neural accounts of both learning and inference. In particular, it is extremely hard to solve them using the sort of simple policies that have been extensively studied as solutions to elementary Markov decision problems. There has thus been recent interest in architectures for the instantiation and even learning of policies that are formally more complicated than these, involving operations such as gated working memory. However, the focus of these ideas and methods has largely been on what might best be considered as automatized, routine or, in the sense of animal conditioning, habitual, performance. Thus, they have yet to provide a route towards understanding the workings of rule-based control, which is critical for cognitively sophisticated competence. Here, we review a recent suggestion for a uniform architecture for habitual and rule-based execution, discuss some of the habitual mechanisms that underpin the use of rules, and consider a statistical relationship between rules and habits. PMID:19225599

  13. Simple molecules as complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H216O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an “ultra-small-world” property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  14. Asymptotic safety: A simple example

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Jens; Gies, Holger; Scherer, Daniel D.

    2011-04-15

    We use the Gross-Neveu model in 2simple fermionic example for Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario: despite being perturbatively nonrenormalizable, the model defines an interacting quantum field theory being valid to arbitrarily high momentum scales owing to the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point. Using the functional renormalization group, we study the uv behavior of the model in both the purely fermionic as well as a partially bosonized language. We show that asymptotic safety is realized at non-Gaussian fixed points in both formulations, the universal critical exponents of which we determine quantitatively. The partially bosonized formulation allows to make contact to the large-N{sub f} expansion where the model is known to be renormalizable to all orders. In this limit, the fixed-point action as well as all universal critical exponents can be computed analytically. As asymptotic safety has become an important scenario for quantizing gravity, our description of a well-understood model is meant to provide for an easily accessible and controllable example of modern nonperturbative quantum field theory.

  15. Simple cost model for EV traction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenca, R. M.

    1995-02-01

    A simple cost model has been developed that allows the calculation of the OEM (original equipment manufacturer) cost of electric traction motors of three different types, normalized as a function of power in order to accommodate different power and size. The model includes enough information on the various elements integrated in the motors to allow analysis of individual components and to factor-in the effects of changes in commodities prices. A scalable cost model for each of the main components of an electric vehicle (EV) is a useful tool that can have direct application in computer simulation or in parametric studies. For the cost model to have wide usefulness, it needs to be valid for a range of values of some parameter that determines the magnitude or size of the component. For instance, in the case of batteries, size may be determined by energy capacity, usually expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), while in the case of traction motors, size is better determined by rated power, usually expressed in kilowatts (kW). The simplest case is when the cost of the component in question is a direct function of its size; then cost is simply the product of its specific cost ($/unit size) and the number of units (size) in the vehicle in question. Batteries usually fall in this category (cost = energy capacity x $/kWh). But cost is not always linear with size or magnitude; motors (and controllers), for instance, become relatively less expensive as power rating increases. Traction motors, one of the main components for EV powertrains, are examined in this paper, and a simplified cost model is developed for the three most popular design variations.

  16. Motion of a vortex ring in a simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2009-08-01

    The motion and deformation of a vortex ring in a linear or simple shear flow have been simulated numerically by using the lattice Boltzmann method with multiple relaxation times. The study is motivated by a recent experiment [T. T. Lim, K. B. Lua, and K. Thet, Phys. Fluids 20, 051701 (2008)], which shows that a vortex ring propagating in a uniform cross flow does not experience Kutta lift and undergo tilting and deformation. The focus of the present study is to examine the effect of a simple shear in a cross flow on the motion of a vortex ring. Numerical approach is adopted here because a truly simple shear flow is difficult to generate experimentally. Our computation shows that a vortex ring tilts and deforms in a simple shear flow, and the tilting can be attributed to the modification of the vorticity distribution of the vortex ring as a result of the entrainment of background vorticity by the vortex core. It is further shown that although the shear in the flow has the tendency to elongate the vortex ring, the tilting angle of the ring increases with the shear ratio.

  17. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Kenneth; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne; Adams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) using analytic representations of cloud and aerosol distributions and processes. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of AIEs that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates by the simple model are sensitive to preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, preindustrial accumulation mode radius, width of the accumulation mode, size of primary particles, cloud thickness, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Estimates of present-day AIEs as low as 5 W/sq m and as high as 0.3 W/sq m are obtained for plausible sets of parameter values. Estimates are surprisingly linear in emissions. The estimates depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models, which adds to understanding of the dependence on AIE uncertainty on uncertainty in parameter values.

  18. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne E.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-06-28

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth’s energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically-based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect using analytic representations of droplet nucleation, cloud and aerosol vertical structure, and horizontal variability in cloud water and aerosol concentration. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of aerosol indirect effects that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates are found to be sensitive to several uncertain parameters, including the preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the size of the primary particles, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Aerosol indirect effects are surprisingly linear in emissions. This simple model provides a much stronger physical basis for representing aerosol indirect effects than previous representations in integrated assessment models designed to quickly explore the parameter space of emissions-climate interactions. The model also produces estimates that depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models.

  19. SSL - THE SIMPLE SOCKETS LIBRARY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Simple Sockets Library (SSL) allows C programmers to develop systems of cooperating programs using Berkeley streaming Sockets running under the TCP/IP protocol over Ethernet. The SSL provides a simple way to move information between programs running on the same or different machines and does so with little overhead. The SSL can create three types of Sockets: namely a server, a client, and an accept Socket. The SSL's Sockets are designed to be used in a fashion reminiscent of the use of FILE pointers so that a C programmer who is familiar with reading and writing files will immediately feel comfortable with reading and writing with Sockets. The SSL consists of three parts: the library, PortMaster, and utilities. The user of the SSL accesses it by linking programs to the SSL library. The PortMaster initializes connections between clients and servers. The PortMaster also supports a "firewall" facility to keep out socket requests from unapproved machines. The "firewall" is a file which contains Internet addresses for all approved machines. There are three utilities provided with the SSL. SKTDBG can be used to debug programs that make use of the SSL. SPMTABLE lists the servers and port numbers on requested machine(s). SRMSRVR tells the PortMaster to forcibly remove a server name from its list. The package also includes two example programs: multiskt.c, which makes multiple accepts on one server, and sktpoll.c, which repeatedly attempts to connect a client to some server at one second intervals. SSL is a machine independent library written in the C-language for computers connected via Ethernet using the TCP/IP protocol. It has been successfully compiled and implemented on a variety of platforms, including Sun series computers running SunOS, DEC VAX series computers running VMS, SGI computers running IRIX, DECstations running ULTRIX, DEC alpha AXPs running OSF/1, IBM RS/6000 computers running AIX, IBM PC and compatibles running BSD/386 UNIX and HP Apollo 3000

  20. Are polar liquids less simple?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    Strong correlation between equilibrium fluctuations under isochoric conditions of the potential energy, U, and the virial, W, is a characteristic of liquids that implies the presence of certain dynamic properties, such as density scaling of the relaxation times and isochronal superpositioning of the relaxation function. In this work we employ molecular dynamics simulations on methanol and two variations, lacking hydrogen bonds and a dipole moment, to assess the connection between the correlation of U and W and these dynamic properties. We show, in accord with prior results of others [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, Phys. Rev. X 2, 011011 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevX.2.011011], that simple van der Waals liquids exhibit both strong correlations and the expected dynamic behavior. However, for polar liquids this correspondence breaks down—weaker correlation between U and W is not associated with worse conformance to density scaling or isochronal superpositioning. The reason for this is that strong correlation between U and W only requires their proportionality, whereas the expected dynamic behavior depends primarily on constancy of the proportionality constant for all state points. For hydrogen-bonded liquids, neither strong correlation nor adherence to the dynamic properties is observed; however, this nonconformance is not directly related to the concentration of hydrogen bonds, but rather to the greater deviation of the intermolecular potential from an inverse power law (IPL). Only (hypothetical) liquids having interactions governed strictly by an IPL are perfectly correlating and exhibit the consequent dynamic properties over all thermodynamic conditions.

  1. Colligative properties of simple solutions.

    PubMed

    Andrews, F C

    1976-11-01

    Vapor pressure lowering, osmotic pressure, boiling point elevation, and freezing point depression are all related quantitatively to the decrease in micro(1)(soln) upon the addition of solute in forming a solution. In any equilibrium system, regardless of whether it is in a gravitational field or whether it contains walls, semipermeable membranes, phase transitions, or solutes, all equilibria are maintained locally, in the small region of the equilibrium, by the equality of micro(1)(soln). If there are several subsystems in a gravitational field, at any fixed height, microi will have the same value in each subsystem into which substance i can get, and microi + M(i)gh is constant throughout the entire system. In a solution, there is no mechanism by which solvent and solute molecules could sustain different pressures. Both the solvent and solute are always under identical pressures in a region of solution, namely, the pressure of the solution in that region. Since nature does not know which component we call the solvent and which the solute, equations should be symmetric in the two (acknowledging that the nonvolatile component, if any, is commonly chosen to be solute). Simple molecular pictures illustrate what is happening to cause pressure (positive or negative) in liquids, vapor pressure of liquids, and the various colligative properties of solutions. The only effect of solute involved in these properties is that it dilutes the solvent, with the resulting increase in S and decrease in micro(1)(soln). Water can be driven passively up a tree to enormous heights by the difference between its chemical potential in the roots and the ambient air. There is nothing mysterious about the molecular bases for any of these phenomena. Biologists can use the well-understood pictures of these phenomena with confidence to study what is happening in the complicated living systems they consider. PMID:17818408

  2. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  3. Linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation and its reversible control using a rational rotaxane strategy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Usuki, Naoya; Nakazono, Kazuko; Koyama, Yasuhito; Takata, Toshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation and its reversibility are demonstrated by a simple but rational strategy using the structural characteristics of crown ether-based rotaxanes. The structure of a polymer containing a [1]rotaxane unit at one end was controlled by conventional protection-deprotection reactions, giving rise to a reversible linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation. PMID:25531061

  4. Optical Scanner for Linear Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Optical scanner instantaneously reads contiguous lines forming scene or target in object plane. Reading active or passive and scans, continuous or discrete. Scans essentially linear with scan angle and symmetric about axial ray. Nominal focal error, resulting from curvature of scan, well within Rayleigh limit. Scanner specifically designed to be fully compatible with general requirements of linear arrays.

  5. Passive linearization of nonlinear resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, G.; Grappasonni, C.; Kerschen, G.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that the addition of properly tuned nonlinearities to a nonlinear system can increase the range over which a specific resonance responds linearly. Specifically, we seek to enforce two important properties of linear systems, namely, the force-displacement proportionality and the invariance of resonance frequencies. Numerical simulations and experiments are used to validate the theoretical findings.

  6. Linear Algebra and Image Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty. (Contains 2 tables and 11 figures.)

  7. Linear Programming across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, S. Elizabeth; Kurz, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Linear programming (LP) is taught in different departments across college campuses with engineering and management curricula. Modeling an LP problem is taught in every linear programming class. As faculty teaching in Engineering and Management departments, the depth to which teachers should expect students to master this particular type of…

  8. Spatial Processes in Linear Ordering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hecker, Ulrich; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Wolf, Lukas; Fazilat-Pour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Memory performance in linear order reasoning tasks (A > B, B > C, C > D, etc.) shows quicker, and more accurate responses to queries on wider (AD) than narrower (AB) pairs on a hypothetical linear mental model (A -- B -- C -- D). While indicative of an analogue representation, research so far did not provide positive evidence for spatial…

  9. Some results concerning linear iterative (systolic) arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, O.H.; Palis, M.A.; Kim, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have shown some new interesting results concerning the properties, power, and limitations of various types of linear iterative (systolic) arrays. The method they employed consisted of finding sequential machine characterizations of these array models, and then using the characterizations to prove the results. Because of the absence of any concurrency and synchronization problems, the authors obtained simple proofs to results which when proved directly on the arrays would seem very difficult. The characterizations, therefore, provide a novel and promising method which can be used to analyze other systolic systems. In the future they hope to extend this methodology to the study of two-dimensional and multidimensional systolic arrays, and other systolic systems with different interconnection networks.

  10. Stochastic robustness of linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Ryan, Laura E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple numerical procedure for estimating the stochastic robustness of a linear, time-invariant system is described. Monte Carlo evaluation of the system's eigenvalues allows the probability of instability and the related stochastic root locus to be estimated. This definition of robustness is an alternative to existing deterministic definitions that address both structured and unstructured parameter variations directly. This analysis approach treats not only Gaussian parameter uncertainties but non-Gaussian cases, including uncertain-but-bounded variations. Trivial extensions of the procedure admit alternate discriminants to be considered. Thus, the probabilities that stipulated degrees of instability will be exceeded or that closed-loop roots will leave desirable regions also can be estimated. Results are particularly amenable to graphical presentation.

  11. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Thiago V; Bonança, Marcus V S; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found-quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times. PMID:26565209

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  13. Micro digital sun sensor with linear detector.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao-Yun; Peng, Jia-Wen; Gao, Xin-Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the design of a novel micro digital sun sensor is described. It relies on V-shaped slit and linear array CCD to measure sun-ray angle against two axes. A highly integrated microprogram control unit) is used to make a very simple and compact system. V-shaped slit can simplify algorithm and achieve a wider field of view. Error compensation and accurate calibration are employed to improve accuracy. Adaptive threshold and adjustable expose time further improve reliability. Experiments and flight validation show that the FOV (Field of View) of the sun sensor is ±65°  ×   ± 65° and the accuracy is 0.1° in the whole FOV. It can work reliably at an update rate of 25 Hz, while the consumption is only 200 mW. This sun sensor is proved to have a good prospect in micro/nanosatellites. PMID:27475588

  14. Micro digital sun sensor with linear detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qiao-yun; Peng, Jia-wen; Gao, Xin-yang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the design of a novel micro digital sun sensor is described. It relies on V-shaped slit and linear array CCD to measure sun-ray angle against two axes. A highly integrated microprogram control unit) is used to make a very simple and compact system. V-shaped slit can simplify algorithm and achieve a wider field of view. Error compensation and accurate calibration are employed to improve accuracy. Adaptive threshold and adjustable expose time further improve reliability. Experiments and flight validation show that the FOV (Field of View) of the sun sensor is ±65° × ± 65° and the accuracy is 0.1° in the whole FOV. It can work reliably at an update rate of 25 Hz, while the consumption is only 200 mW. This sun sensor is proved to have a good prospect in micro/nanosatellites.

  15. On the order of general linear methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinescu, E. M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-09-01

    General linear (GL) methods are numerical algorithms used to solve ODEs. The standard order conditions analysis involves the GL matrix itself and a starting procedure; however, a finishing method (F) is required to extract the actual ODE solution. The standard order analysis and stability are sufficient for the convergence of any GL method. Nonetheless, using a simple GL scheme, we show that the order definition may be too restrictive. Specifically, the order for GL methods with low order intermediate components may be underestimated. In this note we explore the order conditions for GL schemes and propose a new definition for characterizing the order of GL methods, which is focused on the final result--the outcome of F--and can provide more effective algebraic order conditions.

  16. A magnetically suspended linearly driven cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolfi, F.; Goldowsky, M.; Ricciardelli, J.; Shapiro, P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper described a novel Stirling cycle cryogenic refrigerator which was designed, fabricated and successfully tested at Philips Laboratories. The prominent features of the machine are an electro-magnetic bearing system, a pair of moving magnet linear motors, and clearance seals with a 25 mu m radial gap. The all-metal and ceramic construction eliminates long-term organic contamination of the helium working fluid. The axial positions of the piston and displacer are electronically controlled, permitting independent adjustment of the amplitude of each and their relative phase relationship during operation. A simple passive counterbalance reduces axial vibrations. The design of the refrigerator system components is discussed and a comparison is made between performance estimates and measured results.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  19. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  20. Information metric from a linear sigma model.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, U; Yahikozawa, S

    2012-05-01

    The idea that a space-time metric emerges as a Fisher-Rao "information metric" of instanton moduli space has been examined in several field theories, such as the Yang-Mills theories and nonlinear σ models. In this paper, we report that the flat Euclidean or Minkowskian metric, rather than an anti-de Sitter metric that generically emerges from instanton moduli spaces, can be obtained as the Fisher-Rao metric from a nontrivial solution of the massive Klein-Gordon field (a linear σ model). This realization of the flat space from the simple field theory would be useful to investigate the ideas that relate the space-time geometry with the information geometry. PMID:23004729

  1. "You Can't Always Get What You Want" - Linearity as the Golden Ratio of Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Bast, Aalt; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2014-12-01

    Referring to the Golden Ratio (i.e. expressed in the Fibonacci sequence) in nature and art, we conclude that toxicology knows its own Golden Ration, namely linearity. The latter seems imposed on pharmaco-toxicological processes that in fact show far more complexity than simple linearity could hope to elucidate. Understanding physiological and pharmaco-toxicological processes as primarily linear is challenged in this contribution based on very straightforward principles and examples. PMID:25552963

  2. Novel linear piezoelectric motor for precision position stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Shi, Yunlai; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Junshan

    2016-03-01

    Conventional servomotor and stepping motor face challenges in nanometer positioning stages due to the complex structure, motion transformation mechanism, and slow dynamic response, especially directly driven by linear motor. A new butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric motor for linear motion is presented. A two-degree precision position stage driven by the proposed linear ultrasonic motor possesses a simple and compact configuration, which makes the system obtain shorter driving chain. Firstly, the working principle of the linear ultrasonic motor is analyzed. The oscillation orbits of two driving feet on the stator are produced successively by using the anti-symmetric and symmetric vibration modes of the piezoelectric composite structure, and the slider pressed on the driving feet can be propelled twice in only one vibration cycle. Then with the derivation of the dynamic equation of the piezoelectric actuator and transient response model, start-upstart-up and settling state characteristics of the proposed linear actuator is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and is applicable to evaluate step resolution of the precision platform driven by the actuator. Moreover the structure of the two-degree position stage system is described and a special precision displacement measurement system is built. Finally, the characteristics of the two-degree position stage are studied. In the closed-loop condition the positioning accuracy of plus or minus <0.5 μm is experimentally obtained for the stage propelled by the piezoelectric motor. A precision position stage based the proposed butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric is theoretically and experimentally investigated.

  3. Linear and nonlinear Zeno effects in an optical coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Konotop, V. V.; Shchesnovich, V. S.

    2011-04-15

    It is shown that, in a simple coupler where one of the waveguides is subject to controlled losses of the electric field, it is possible to observe an optical analog of the linear and nonlinear quantum Zeno effects. The phenomenon consists in a counterintuitive enhancement of transparency of the coupler with an increase of the dissipation and represents an optical analog of the quantum Zeno effect. Experimental realization of the phenomenon based on the use of chalcogenide glasses is proposed. The system allows for observation of the crossover between the linear and nonlinear Zeno effects, as well as the effective manipulation of light transmission through the coupler.

  4. INTEGRATING A LINEAR INTERPOLATION FUNCTION ACROSS TRIANGULAR CELL BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. WISEMAN; J. S. BROCK

    2000-04-01

    Computational models of particle dynamics often exchange solution data with discretized continuum-fields using interpolation functions. These particle methods require a series expansion of the interpolation function for two purposes: numerical analysis used to establish the model's consistency and accuracy, and logical-coordinate evaluation used to locate particles within a grid. This report presents discrete-expansions for a linear interpolation function commonly used within triangular cell geometries. Discrete-expansions, unlike a Taylor's series, account for interpolation discontinuities across cell boundaries and, therefore, are valid throughout a discretized domain. Verification of linear discrete-expansions is demonstrated on a simple test problem.

  5. Non-linearity in Bayesian 1-D magnetotelluric inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rongwen; Dosso, Stan E.; Liu, Jianxin; Dettmer, Jan; Tong, Xiaozhong

    2011-05-01

    This paper applies a Bayesian approach to examine non-linearity for the 1-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse problem. In a Bayesian formulation the posterior probability density (PPD), which combines data and prior information, is interpreted in terms of parameter estimates and uncertainties, which requires optimizing and integrating the PPD. Much work on 1-D MT inversion has been based on (approximate) linearized solutions, but more recently fully non-linear (numerical) approaches have been applied. This paper directly compares results of linearized and non-linear uncertainty estimation for 1-D MT inversion; to do so, advanced methods for both approaches are applied. In the non-linear formulation used here, numerical optimization is carried out using an adaptive-hybrid algorithm. Numerical integration applies Metropolis-Hastings sampling, rotated to a principal-component parameter space for efficient sampling of correlated parameters, and employing non-unity sampling temperatures to ensure global sampling. Since appropriate model parametrizations are generally not known a priori, both under- and overparametrized approaches are considered. For underparametrization, the Bayesian information criterion is applied to determine the number of layers consistent with the resolving power of the data. For overparametrization, prior information is included which favours simple structure in a manner similar to regularized inversion. The data variance and/or trade-off parameter regulating data and prior information are treated in several ways, including applying fixed optimal estimates (an empirical Bayesian approach) or including them as hyperparameters in the sampling (hierarchical Bayesian). The latter approach has the benefit of accounting for the uncertainty in the hyperparameters in estimating model parameter uncertainties. Non-linear and linearized inversion results are compared for synthetic test cases and for the measured COPROD1 MT data by considering marginal probability

  6. ALPS: A Linear Program Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferencz, Donald C.; Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    ALPS is a computer program which can be used to solve general linear program (optimization) problems. ALPS was designed for those who have minimal linear programming (LP) knowledge and features a menu-driven scheme to guide the user through the process of creating and solving LP formulations. Once created, the problems can be edited and stored in standard DOS ASCII files to provide portability to various word processors or even other linear programming packages. Unlike many math-oriented LP solvers, ALPS contains an LP parser that reads through the LP formulation and reports several types of errors to the user. ALPS provides a large amount of solution data which is often useful in problem solving. In addition to pure linear programs, ALPS can solve for integer, mixed integer, and binary type problems. Pure linear programs are solved with the revised simplex method. Integer or mixed integer programs are solved initially with the revised simplex, and the completed using the branch-and-bound technique. Binary programs are solved with the method of implicit enumeration. This manual describes how to use ALPS to create, edit, and solve linear programming problems. Instructions for installing ALPS on a PC compatible computer are included in the appendices along with a general introduction to linear programming. A programmers guide is also included for assistance in modifying and maintaining the program.

  7. On Sub-linear Convergence for Linearly Degenerate Waves in Capturing Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J W; Aslam, T; Rider, W J

    2008-03-17

    A common attribute of capturing schemes used to find approximate solutions to the Euler equations is a sub-linear rate of convergence with respect to mesh resolution. Purely nonlinear jumps, such as shock waves produce a first-order convergence rate, but linearly degenerate discontinuous waves, where present, produce sub-linear convergence rates which eventually dominate the global rate of convergence. The classical explanation for this phenomenon investigates the behavior of the exact solution to the numerical method in combination with the finite error terms, often referred to as the modified equation. For a first-order method, the modified equation produces the hyperbolic evolution equation with second-order diffusive terms. In the frame of reference of the traveling wave, the solution of a discontinuous wave consists of a diffusive layer that grows with a rate of t{sup 1/2}, yielding a convergence rate of 1/2. Self-similar heuristics for higher order discretizations produce a growth rate for the layer thickness of {Delta}t{sup 1/(p+1)} which yields an estimate for the convergence rate as p/(p+1) where p is the order of the discretization. In this paper we show that this estimated convergence rate can be derived with greater rigor for both dissipative and dispersive forms of the discrete error. In particular, the form of the analytical solution for linear modified equations can be solved exactly. These estimates and forms for the error are confirmed in a variety of demonstrations ranging from simple linear waves to multidimensional solutions of the Euler equations.

  8. Manipulator control by exact linearization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruetz, K.

    1987-01-01

    Comments on the application to rigid link manipulators of geometric control theory, resolved acceleration control, operational space control, and nonlinear decoupling theory are given, and the essential unity of these techniques for externally linearizing and decoupling end effector dynamics is discussed. Exploiting the fact that the mass matrix of a rigid link manipulator is positive definite, a consequence of rigid link manipulators belonging to the class of natural physical systems, it is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for a locally externally linearizing and output decoupling feedback law to exist is that the end effector Jacobian matrix be nonsingular. Furthermore, this linearizing feedback is easy to produce.

  9. Precision magnetic suspension linear bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumper, David L.; Queen, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    We have shown the design and analyzed the electromechanics of a linear motor suitable for independently controlling two suspension degrees of freedom. This motor, at least on paper, meets the requirements for driving an X-Y stage of 10 Kg mass with about 4 m/sq sec acceleration, with travel of several hundred millimeters in X and Y, and with reasonable power dissipation. A conceptual design for such a stage is presented. The theoretical feasibility of linear and planar bearings using single or multiple magnetic suspension linear motors is demonstrated.

  10. Linearization algorithms for line transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H.A.

    1990-11-06

    Complete linearization is a very powerful technique for solving multi-line transfer problems that can be used efficiently with a variety of transfer formalisms. The linearization algorithm we describe is computationally very similar to ETLA, but allows an effective treatment of strongly-interacting lines. This algorithm has been implemented (in several codes) with two different transfer formalisms in all three one-dimensional geometries. We also describe a variation of the algorithm that handles saturable laser transport. Finally, we present a combination of linearization with a local approximate operator formalism, which has been implemented in two dimensions and is being developed in three dimensions. 11 refs.

  11. Double linear regression classification for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qingxiang; Zhu, Qi; Tang, Lin-Lin; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2015-02-01

    A new classifier designed based on linear regression classification (LRC) classifier and simple-fast representation-based classifier (SFR), named double linear regression classification (DLRC) classifier, is proposed for image recognition in this paper. As we all know, the traditional LRC classifier only uses the distance between test image vectors and predicted image vectors of the class subspace for classification. And the SFR classifier uses the test image vectors and the nearest image vectors of the class subspace to classify the test sample. However, the DLRC classifier computes out the predicted image vectors of each class subspace and uses all the predicted vectors to construct a novel robust global space. Then, the DLRC utilizes the novel global space to get the novel predicted vectors of each class for classification. A mass number of experiments on AR face database, JAFFE face database, Yale face database, Extended YaleB face database, and PIE face database are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed classifier. The experimental results show that the proposed classifier achieves better recognition rate than the LRC classifier, SFR classifier, and several other classifiers.

  12. Estimating population trends with a linear model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, J.; Collins, B.; Morrison, R.I.G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a simple and robust method for estimating trends in population size. The method may be used with Breeding Bird Survey data, aerial surveys, point counts, or any other program of repeated surveys at permanent locations. Surveys need not be made at each location during each survey period. The method differs from most existing methods in being design based, rather than model based. The only assumptions are that the nominal sampling plan is followed and that sample size is large enough for use of the t-distribution. Simulations based on two bird data sets from natural populations showed that the point estimate produced by the linear model was essentially unbiased even when counts varied substantially and 25% of the complete data set was missing. The estimating-equation approach, often used to analyze Breeding Bird Survey data, performed similarly on one data set but had substantial bias on the second data set, in which counts were highly variable. The advantages of the linear model are its simplicity, flexibility, and that it is self-weighting. A user-friendly computer program to carry out the calculations is available from the senior author.

  13. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Huang, Wenqian R; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Miller, R J Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X

    2015-01-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30-50 MeV m(-1) gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. These ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams. PMID:26439410

  14. Color space conversion for linear color grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye

    2000-10-01

    Color grading is an important process for various industries such as food processing, fruit and vegetable grading, etc. Quality and price are often determined by the color of product. For example, darker red color for apples means higher price. In color machine vision applications, image is acquired with a color CCD camera that outputs color information in three channels, red, gree, and blue. When grading color, these three primary colors must be processed to determine the color level for separation. A very popular color space conversion technique for color image processing is RGB-to-HSI, where HSI represents hue, saturation, and intensity, respectively. However, the conversion result is still 3D information that makes determining color grades very difficult. A new color space conversion technique that can be implemented for high-speed real-time processing for color grading is introduced in this paper. Depending on the application, different color space conversion equations must be used. The result of this technique is a simple one-dimensional array that represents different color levels. This linear array makes linear color grading adjustment possible.

  15. Local linear viscoelasticity of confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, P. J.; Todd, B. D.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper the authors propose a novel method to study the local linear viscoelasticity of fluids confined between two walls. The method is based on the linear constitutive equation and provides details about the real and imaginary parts of the local complex viscosity. They apply the method to a simple atomic fluid undergoing zero mean oscillatory flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The method shows that the viscoelastic properties of the fluid exhibit dramatic spatial changes near the wall-fluid boundary due to the high density in this region. It is also shown that the real part of the viscosity converges to the frequency dependent local shear viscosity sufficiently far away from the wall. This also provides valuable information about the transport properties in the fluid, in general. The viscosity is compared with predictions from the local average density model. The two methods disagree in that the local average density model predicts larger viscosity variations near the wall-fluid boundary than what is observed through the method presented here.

  16. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-10-06

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeVm-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton acceleratorsmore » with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. As a result, these ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.« less

  17. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-10-06

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeVm-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. As a result, these ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.

  18. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeV m−1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. These ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams. PMID:26439410

  19. Reduced Order ODE Model for Linear Contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, A. R.; Lele, S. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the large uncertainties in predictions of climate impact of linear contrails stem from inadequate parametrization of contrails in GCMs. But, the parameter space on which contrail dynamics and optical properties depend is very large and spanning it using high fidelity LES is prohibitively expensive. This study leverages the large dataset of LES done so far to understand the most important physical process that governs the evolution of contrails in different stages of its life and proposes a simple, low-cost and robust ODE model to capture the evolution of quantities of interest such as ice mass, vortex downwash and contrail cross-sectional dimensions. A direct consequence of modeling the contrail using parameters impacting the most important physical process is the reduction of the original parameter space to only those groupings of parameters that impact linear contrails independently. We are able to capture the most prominent features of the contrail at every stage of the life of the contrail - the induction of the jet exhaust by the trailing vortex pair, the vortex downwash and eventual destruction and the subsequent spreading of the contrail by ambient turbulence. A simplified version of GATOR-GCMOM - a GCM - is initialized using inputs from the new ODE model to test if the inclusion of the impact of the aforementioned parameter groups has significant persistent effects. Results from the GATOR-GCMOM box model calculations show which parameter groupings show persistent effects.

  20. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-10-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30-50 MeV m-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. These ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.

  1. Speech synthesis by glottal excited linear prediction.

    PubMed

    Childers, D G; Hu, H T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a linear predictive (LP) speech synthesis procedure that resynthesizes speech using a 6th-order polynomial waveform to model the glottal excitation. The coefficients of the polynomial model form a vector that represents the glottal excitation waveform for one pitch period. A glottal excitation code book with 32 entries for voiced excitation is designed and trained using two sentences spoken by different speakers. The purpose for using this approach is to demonstrate that quantization of the glottal excitation waveform does not significantly degrade the quality of speech synthesized with a glottal excitation linear predictive (GELP) synthesizer. This implementation of the LP synthesizer is patterned after both a pitch-excited LP speech synthesizer and a code excited linear predictive (CELP) speech coder. In addition to the glottal excitation codebook, we use a stochastic codebook with 256 entries for unvoiced noise excitation. Analysis techniques are described for constructing both codebooks. The GELP synthesizer, which resynthesizes speech with high quality, provides the speech scientist a simple speech synthesis procedure that uses established analysis techniques, that is able to reproduce all speed sounds, and yet also has an excitation model waveform that is related to the derivative of the glottal flow and the integral of the residue. It is conjectured that the glottal excitation codebook approach could provide a mechanism for quantitatively comparing the differences in glottal excitation codebooks for male and female speakers and for speakers with vocal disorders and for speakers with different voice types such as breathy and vocal fry voices. Conceivably, one could also convert the voice of a speaker with one voice type, e.g., breathy, to the voice of a speaker with another voice type, e.g., vocal fry, by synthesizing speech using the vocal tract LP parameters for the speaker with the breathy voice excited by the glottal excitation

  2. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  3. Overdetermined Systems of Linear Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gareth

    1990-01-01

    Explored is an overdetermined system of linear equations to find an appropriate least squares solution. A geometrical interpretation of this solution is given. Included is a least squares point discussion. (KR)

  4. [New technology for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  5. Ada Linear-Algebra Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.; Lawson, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Routines provided for common scalar, vector, matrix, and quaternion operations. Computer program extends Ada programming language to include linear-algebra capabilities similar to HAS/S programming language. Designed for such avionics applications as software for Space Station.

  6. Spacetime metric from linear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Hehl, Friedrich W.

    1999-07-01

    The Maxwell equations are formulated on an arbitrary (1+3)-dimensional manifold. Then, imposing a (constrained) linear constitutive relation between electromagnetic field (E,B) and excitation (D,ℌ), we derive the metric of spacetime therefrom.

  7. A simple formula for predicting claw volume of cattle.

    PubMed

    Scott, T D; Naylor, J M; Greenough, P R

    1999-11-01

    The object of this study was to develop a simple method for accurately calculating the volume of bovine claws under field conditions. The digits of 30 slaughterhouse beef cattle were examined and the following four linear measurements taken from each pair of claws: (1) the length of the dorsal surface of the claw (Toe); (2) the length of the coronary band (CorBand); (3) the length of the bearing surface (Base); and (4) the height of the claw at the abaxial groove (AbaxGr). Measurements of claw volume using a simple hydrometer were highly repeatable (r(2)= 0.999) and could be calculated from linear measurements using the formula:Claw Volume (cm(3)) = (17.192 x Base) + (7.467 x AbaxGr) + 45.270 x (CorBand) - 798.5This formula was found to be accurate (r(2)= 0.88) when compared to volume data derived from a hydrometer displacement procedure. The front claws occupied 54% of the total volume compared to 46% for the hind claws. PMID:10558838

  8. Linear Back-Drive Differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Linear back-drive differentials have been proposed as alternatives to conventional gear differentials for applications in which there is only limited rotational motion (e.g., oscillation). The finite nature of the rotation makes it possible to optimize a linear back-drive differential in ways that would not be possible for gear differentials or other differentials that are required to be capable of unlimited rotation. As a result, relative to gear differentials, linear back-drive differentials could be more compact and less massive, could contain fewer complex parts, and could be less sensitive to variations in the viscosities of lubricants. Linear back-drive differentials would operate according to established principles of power ball screws and linear-motion drives, but would utilize these principles in an innovative way. One major characteristic of such mechanisms that would be exploited in linear back-drive differentials is the possibility of designing them to drive or back-drive with similar efficiency and energy input: in other words, such a mechanism can be designed so that a rotating screw can drive a nut linearly or the linear motion of the nut can cause the screw to rotate. A linear back-drive differential (see figure) would include two collinear shafts connected to two parts that are intended to engage in limited opposing rotations. The linear back-drive differential would also include a nut that would be free to translate along its axis but not to rotate. The inner surface of the nut would be right-hand threaded at one end and left-hand threaded at the opposite end to engage corresponding right- and left-handed threads on the shafts. A rotation and torque introduced into the system via one shaft would drive the nut in linear motion. The nut, in turn, would back-drive the other shaft, creating a reaction torque. Balls would reduce friction, making it possible for the shaft/nut coupling on each side to operate with 90 percent efficiency.

  9. Affine Vertex Operator Algebras and Modular Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arike, Yusuke; Kaneko, Masanobu; Nagatomo, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we list all affine vertex operator algebras of positive integral levels whose dimensions of spaces of characters are at most 5 and show that a basis of the space of characters of each affine vertex operator algebra in the list gives a fundamental system of solutions of a modular linear differential equation. Further, we determine the dimensions of the spaces of characters of affine vertex operator algebras whose numbers of inequivalent simple modules are not exceeding 20.

  10. LINEAR SCANNING METHOD BASED ON THE SAFT COARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C. J.; Martinez-Graullera, O.; Romero, D.; Ullate, L. G.; Higuti, R. T.

    2010-02-22

    This work presents a method to obtain B-scan images based on linear array scanning and 2R-SAFT. Using this technique some advantages are obtained: the ultrasonic system is very simple; it avoids the grating lobes formation, characteristic in conventional SAFT; and subaperture size and focussing lens (to compensate emission-reception) can be adapted dynamically to every image point. The proposed method has been experimentally tested in the inspection of CFRP samples.

  11. Linear superposition in nonlinear equations.

    PubMed

    Khare, Avinash; Sukhatme, Uday

    2002-06-17

    Several nonlinear systems such as the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified KdV equations and lambda phi(4) theory possess periodic traveling wave solutions involving Jacobi elliptic functions. We show that suitable linear combinations of these known periodic solutions yield many additional solutions with different periods and velocities. This linear superposition procedure works by virtue of some remarkable new identities involving elliptic functions. PMID:12059300

  12. Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, D. E., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Simple transparent overlay with interpolation scale facilitates accurate, rapid reading of graph coordinate points. This device can be used for enlarging drawings and locating points on perspective drawings.

  13. Comparison of Linear and Non-Linear Regression Models to Estimate Leaf Area Index of Dryland Shrubs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashti, H.; Glenn, N. F.; Ilangakoon, N. T.; Mitchell, J.; Dhakal, S.; Spaete, L.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a key parameter in global ecosystem studies. LAI is considered a forcing variable in land surface processing models since ecosystem dynamics are highly correlated to LAI. In response to environmental limitations, plants in semiarid ecosystems have smaller leaf area, making accurate estimation of LAI by remote sensing a challenging issue. Optical remote sensing (400-2500 nm) techniques to estimate LAI are based either on radiative transfer models (RTMs) or statistical approaches. Considering the complex radiation field of dry ecosystems, simple 1-D RTMs lead to poor results, and on the other hand, inversion of more complex 3-D RTMs is a demanding task which requires the specification of many variables. A good alternative to physical approaches is using methods based on statistics. Similar to many natural phenomena, there is a non-linear relationship between LAI and top of canopy electromagnetic waves reflected to optical sensors. Non-linear regression models can better capture this relationship. However, considering the problem of a few numbers of observations in comparison to the feature space (nsimple linear models. In this study linear versus non-linear regression techniques were investigated to estimate LAI. Our study area is located in southwestern Idaho, Great Basin. Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp) serves a critical role in maintaining the structure of this ecosystem. Using a leaf area meter (Accupar LP-80), LAI values were measured in the field. Linear Partial Least Square regression and non-linear, tree based Random Forest regression have been implemented to estimate the LAI of sagebrush from hyperspectral data (AVIRIS-ng) collected in late summer 2014. Cross validation of results indicate that PLS can provide comparable results to Random Forest.

  14. Non-linear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-06-01

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a non-linear, stochastic relation between θ = nabla \\cdot v({x},t)/aH and δ. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean <θ|δ>, together with the fluctuations of θ around this mean. We measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ˜10 per cent at k < 0.2 h Mpc-1 to 25 per cent at k ˜ 0.45 h Mpc-1 at z = 0. Both the stochastic relation and non-linearity are more pronounced for haloes, M ≤ 5 × 1012 M⊙ h-1, compared to the dark matter at z = 0 and 1. Non-linear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean <θ|δ> away from the linear theory prediction -fLTδ, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) for k < 0.1 h Mpc-1. The stochasticity in the θ-δ relation is not so simply described by 2LPT, and we discuss its impact on measurements of fLT from two-point statistics in redshift space. Given that the relationship between δ and θ is stochastic and non-linear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.

  15. Neural network modelling of non-linear hydrological relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahart, R. J.; See, L. M.

    2007-09-01

    Two recent studies have suggested that neural network modelling offers no worthwhile improvements in comparison to the application of weighted linear transfer functions for capturing the non-linear nature of hydrological relationships. The potential of an artificial neural network to perform simple non-linear hydrological transformations under controlled conditions is examined in this paper. Eight neural network models were developed: four full or partial emulations of a recognised non-linear hydrological rainfall-runoff model; four solutions developed on an identical set of inputs and a calculated runoff coefficient output. The use of different input combinations enabled the competencies of solutions developed on a reduced number of parameters to be assessed. The selected hydrological model had a limited number of inputs and contained no temporal component. The modelling process was based on a set of random inputs that had a uniform distribution and spanned a modest range of possibilities. The initial cloning operations permitted a direct comparison to be performed with the equation-based relationship. It also provided more general information about the power of a neural network to replicate mathematical equations and model modest non-linear relationships. The second group of experiments explored a different relationship that is of hydrological interest; the target surface contained a stronger set of non-linear properties and was more challenging. Linear modelling comparisons were performed against traditional least squares multiple linear regression solutions developed on identical datasets. The reported results demonstrate that neural networks are capable of modelling non-linear hydrological processes and are therefore appropriate tools for hydrological modelling.

  16. Non-linear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-04-09

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a non-linear, stochastic relation between θ = ∇ ∙ v(x,t)/aH and δ. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean <θ|δ>, together with the fluctuations of θ around this mean. We also measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ~10 per cent at k < 0.2 h Mpc-1 to 25 per cent at k ~ 0.45 h Mpc-1 at z = 0. Both the stochastic relation and non-linearity are more pronounced for haloes, M ≤ 5 × 1012 M h-1, compared to the dark matter at z = 0 and 1. Non-linear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean <θ|δ> away from the linear theory prediction -fLTδ, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) fork < 0.1 h Mpc-1. Furthermore, the stochasticity in the θ – δ relation is not so simply described by 2LPT, and we discuss its impact on measurements of fLT from two-point statistics in redshift space. Furthermore, given that the relationship between δ and θ is stochastic and non-linear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.

  17. Non-linear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-04-09

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a non-linear, stochastic relation between θ = ∇ ∙ v(x,t)/aH and δ. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean <θ|δ>, together with the fluctuations of θ around this mean. We also measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ~10 per cent at k < 0.2 h Mpc-1 to 25 per cent at kmore » ~ 0.45 h Mpc-1 at z = 0. Both the stochastic relation and non-linearity are more pronounced for haloes, M ≤ 5 × 1012 M⊙ h-1, compared to the dark matter at z = 0 and 1. Non-linear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean <θ|δ> away from the linear theory prediction -fLTδ, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) fork < 0.1 h Mpc-1. Furthermore, the stochasticity in the θ – δ relation is not so simply described by 2LPT, and we discuss its impact on measurements of fLT from two-point statistics in redshift space. Furthermore, given that the relationship between δ and θ is stochastic and non-linear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.« less

  18. Transformation matrices between non-linear and linear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartain, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    In the linearization of systems of non-linear differential equations, those systems which can be exactly transformed into the second order linear differential equation Y"-AY'-BY=0 where Y, Y', and Y" are n x 1 vectors and A and B are constant n x n matrices of real numbers were considered. The 2n x 2n matrix was used to transform the above matrix equation into the first order matrix equation X' = MX. Specially the matrix M and the conditions which will diagonalize or triangularize M were studied. Transformation matrices P and P sub -1 were used to accomplish this diagonalization or triangularization to return to the solution of the second order matrix differential equation system from the first order system.

  19. Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-27

    The "Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances" (SCORPEUN) code is a simple r-z 1-group neutron diffusion code where each r-mesh is coupled to a single-flow-channel model that represents all flow-channels in that r-mesh. This 1-D model assesses q=m*Cp*deletaT for each z-mesh in that channel. This flow channel model is then coupled to a simple 1-D heat conduction model for ascertaining the peak center-line fuel temperature in a hypothetical pin assigned to thatmore » flow channel. The code has property lookup capability for water, Na, Zirc, HT9, metalic fuel, oxide fuel, etc. It has linear interpolation features for micro-scopic cross-sections with respect to coolant density and fuel temperature. ***This last feature has not been fully tested and may need development***. The interpolated microscopic cross-sections are then combined (using the water density from the T/H calculation) to generate macroscopic diffusion coefficient, removal cross-section and nu-sigmaF for each r-z mesh of the neutron diffusion code.« less

  20. Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances

    SciTech Connect

    Bays, Samuel

    2012-08-27

    The "Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances" (SCORPEUN) code is a simple r-z 1-group neutron diffusion code where each r-mesh is coupled to a single-flow-channel model that represents all flow-channels in that r-mesh. This 1-D model assesses q=m*Cp*deletaT for each z-mesh in that channel. This flow channel model is then coupled to a simple 1-D heat conduction model for ascertaining the peak center-line fuel temperature in a hypothetical pin assigned to that flow channel. The code has property lookup capability for water, Na, Zirc, HT9, metalic fuel, oxide fuel, etc. It has linear interpolation features for micro-scopic cross-sections with respect to coolant density and fuel temperature. ***This last feature has not been fully tested and may need development***. The interpolated microscopic cross-sections are then combined (using the water density from the T/H calculation) to generate macroscopic diffusion coefficient, removal cross-section and nu-sigmaF for each r-z mesh of the neutron diffusion code.

  1. A nanoscale linear-to-linear motion converter of graphene.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chunchun; Guo, Zhengrong; Zhang, Hongwei; Chang, Tienchong

    2016-08-14

    Motion conversion plays an irreplaceable role in a variety of machinery. Although many macroscopic motion converters have been widely used, it remains a challenge to convert motion at the nanoscale. Here we propose a nanoscale linear-to-linear motion converter, made of a flake-substrate system of graphene, which can convert the out-of-plane motion of the substrate into the in-plane motion of the flake. The curvature gradient induced van der Waals potential gradient between the flake and the substrate provides the driving force to achieve motion conversion. The proposed motion converter may have general implications for the design of nanomachinery and nanosensors. PMID:27335206

  2. A nanoscale linear-to-linear motion converter of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Chunchun; Guo, Zhengrong; Zhang, Hongwei; Chang, Tienchong

    2016-07-01

    Motion conversion plays an irreplaceable role in a variety of machinery. Although many macroscopic motion converters have been widely used, it remains a challenge to convert motion at the nanoscale. Here we propose a nanoscale linear-to-linear motion converter, made of a flake-substrate system of graphene, which can convert the out-of-plane motion of the substrate into the in-plane motion of the flake. The curvature gradient induced van der Waals potential gradient between the flake and the substrate provides the driving force to achieve motion conversion. The proposed motion converter may have general implications for the design of nanomachinery and nanosensors.

  3. A Simple and Effective Protein Folding Activity Suitable for Large Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive hands-on simulation of protein folding suitable for use in large lecture classes. This activity uses a minimum of parts, tools, and skill to simulate some of the fundamental principles of protein folding. The major concepts targeted are that proteins begin as linear polypeptides and fold to…

  4. A Simple Equation to Predict a Subscore's Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Wainer, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Subscores are often used to indicate test-takers' relative strengths and weaknesses and so help focus remediation. But a subscore is not worth reporting if it is too unreliable to believe or if it contains no information that is not already contained in the total score. It is possible, through the use of a simple linear equation provided in…

  5. The Double-Well Potential in Quantum Mechanics: A Simple, Numerically Exact Formulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelic, V.; Marsiglio, F.

    2012-01-01

    The double-well potential is arguably one of the most important potentials in quantum mechanics, because the solution contains the notion of a state as a linear superposition of "classical" states, a concept which has become very important in quantum information theory. It is therefore desirable to have solutions to simple double-well potentials…

  6. An Anharmonic Solution to the Equation of Motion for the Simple Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannessen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    An anharmonic solution to the differential equation describing the oscillations of a simple pendulum at large angles is discussed. The solution is expressed in terms of functions not involving the Jacobi elliptic functions. In the derivation, a sinusoidal expression, including a linear and a Fourier sine series in the argument, has been applied.…

  7. Inhomogeneous electric field effects in a linear RF quadruple trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melborne, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The exact potential corresponding to confining fields inside a linear rf quadrupole particle trap of finite length is presented. The analytic expressions for the trapping potential is derived by introducing a linear trap employing a relatively simple cylindrical geometry and solving Laplace's equation for the trap electrodes. The finite length of linear traps results in field distortion near the trap ends. An exact analytic determination of the fields is useful because the profile of the trapped ion cloud is highly dependent on the fields confining it. It is shown that near the ends of the trap, the effective potential arising from the rf fields acts to propel particles out of the trap, and further, that the addition of a dc bias generates an inhomogeneous in the trap that influences the particles both perpendicularly to and along the trap's long axis.

  8. Linear mixing rule in screened binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabrier, G.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the linear mixing rule is examined for the following two cases (1) when the response of the electron gas is taken into account in the effective ionic interaction and (2) when finite-temperature effects are included in the dielectric response of the electrons, i.e., when the ions interact with both temperature- and density-dependent screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that the linear mixing rule remains valid when the electron response is taken into account in the interionic potential at any density, even though the departure from linearity can reach a few percent for the asymmetric mixtures in the region of weak degeneracy for the electron gas. A physical explanation of this behavior is proposed which is based on a simple additional length scale.

  9. Precision Motion Control of Linear DC Solenoid Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeharu; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    High speed and high precision control has been required in various cases. Hence, a new linear actuator based on Linear DC Solenoid Motor (LDSM), is developed for that purpose. In addition, we propose a precision motion control for LDSM. LDSM is composed of solenoid stator and moving permanent magnet. It has simple and light structure. Moreover, the solenoid form provides small leakage and generates more power than non-linear motor. Nevertheless, the nonlinear disturbance force such as friction force prevents LDSM from controlling precisely. In this paper, the high gain disturbance observer is applied to LDSM to suppress the force. The observer is able to estimate and compensate the nonlinear disturbance force. It is confirmed that the proposed precision motion control provides LDSM with precise observer control position and force through the experiments.

  10. Linear minimum variance filters applied to carrier tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, D. E.; Speyer, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A new approach is taken to the problem of tracking a fixed amplitude signal with a Brownian-motion phase process. Classically, a first-order phase-lock loop (PLL) is used; here, the problem is treated via estimation of the quadrature signal components. In this space, the state dynamics are linear with white multiplicative noise. Therefore, linear minimum-variance filters, which have a particularly simple mechanization, are suggested. The resulting error dynamics are linear at any signal/noise ratio, unlike the classical PLL. During synchronization, and above threshold, this filter with constant gains degrades by 3 per cent in output rms phase error with respect to the classical loop. However, up to 80 per cent of the maximum possible noise improvement is obtained below threshold, where the classical loop is nonoptimum, as demonstrated by a Monte Carlo analysis. Filter mechanizations are presented for both carrier and baseband operation.

  11. Convergence of linear programming using a Hopfield net

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-11-01

    Hopfield nets are interconnected networks of simple analog Processors. Such networks have been applied to a variety of optimization problems including linear programming problems. We revised the energy function used in a Hopfield net such that the network can be implemented on a digital computer to solve linearing programming problems. We also proved that the revised discrete Hopfield net coverages, and gave the conditions of convergence. The approach is tested on two large and sparse linear programming problems. In both cases we could not reach the optimal solutions, but solutions with 1% error can be attained in less than 3 minutes of CPU time on a SUN SPARC station. The optimal solutions can be obtained by the simplex method, but required five times more CPU time. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  12. A simple approach to nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong-Fu; He, Ji-Huan

    2009-10-01

    A very simple and effective approach to nonlinear oscillators is suggested. Anyone with basic knowledge of advanced calculus can apply the method to finding approximately the amplitude-frequency relationship of a nonlinear oscillator. Some examples are given to illustrate its extremely simple solution procedure and an acceptable accuracy of the obtained solutions.

  13. Simple Numerical Analysis of Longboard Speedometer Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Simple numerical data analysis is described, using a standard spreadsheet program, to determine distance, velocity (speed) and acceleration from voltage data generated by a skateboard/longboard speedometer (Hare 2012 "Phys. Educ." 47 409-17). This simple analysis is an introduction to data processing including scaling data as well as…

  14. Sunspots and Their Simple Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, C. I.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an example of a simple harmonic motion, the apparent motion of sunspots due to the Sun's rotation, is described, which can be used to teach this subject to high-school students. Using real images of the Sun, students can calculate the star's rotation period with the simple harmonic motion mathematical expression.

  15. Restoration Monitoring - A Simple Photo Monitoring Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.K.

    2000-02-14

    Through the use of a simple photo monitoring design, it is possible to visually document, with both landscape and ground views, the progression of a restoration/revegetation project in a repeatable, cost-effective manner. The use of web browser technology can display the results in a simple, informative, professional manner, suitable for presentations and displays.

  16. The Fluid Foil: The Seventh Simple Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple machine does one of two things: create a mechanical advantage (lever) or change the direction of an applied force (pulley). Fluid foils are unique among simple machines because they not only change the direction of an applied force (wheel and axle); they convert fluid energy into mechanical energy (wind and Kaplan turbines) or vice versa,…

  17. Linear conversion of pressure into concentration, rapid switching of concentration, and generation of linear ramps of concentration in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Micha; Groisman, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Mixing of liquids to produce solutions with different concentrations is one of the basic functionalities of microfluidic devices. Generation of specific temporal patterns of concentration in microfluidic devices is an important technique to study responses of cells and model organisms to variations in the chemical composition of their environment. Here, we present a simple microfluidic network that linearly converts pressure at an inlet into concentration of a soluble reagent in an observation region and also enables independent concurrent linear control of concentrations of two reagents. The microfluidic device has an integrated mixer channel with chaotic three-dimensional flow that facilitates rapid switching of concentrations in a continuous range. A simple pneumatic setup generating linear ramps of pressure is used to produce smooth linear ramps and triangular waves of concentration with different slopes. The use of chaotic vs. laminar mixers is discussed in the context of microfluidic devices providing rapid switching and generating temporal waves of concentration. PMID:22550555

  18. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  19. LINEAR COUNT-RATE METER

    DOEpatents

    Henry, J.J.

    1961-09-01

    A linear count-rate meter is designed to provide a highly linear output while receiving counting rates from one cycle per second to 100,000 cycles per second. Input pulses enter a linear discriminator and then are fed to a trigger circuit which produces positive pulses of uniform width and amplitude. The trigger circuit is connected to a one-shot multivibrator. The multivibrator output pulses have a selected width. Feedback means are provided for preventing transistor saturation in the multivibrator which improves the rise and decay times of the output pulses. The multivibrator is connected to a diode-switched, constant current metering circuit. A selected constant current is switched to an averaging circuit for each pulse received, and for a time determined by the received pulse width. The average output meter current is proportional to the product of the counting rate, the constant current, and the multivibrator output pulse width.

  20. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-10-18

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility.

  1. QUANTUM OPTICS. Universal linear optics.

    PubMed

    Carolan, Jacques; Harrold, Christopher; Sparrow, Chris; Martín-López, Enrique; Russell, Nicholas J; Silverstone, Joshua W; Shadbolt, Peter J; Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Oguma, Manabu; Itoh, Mikitaka; Marshall, Graham D; Thompson, Mark G; Matthews, Jonathan C F; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Laing, Anthony

    2015-08-14

    Linear optics underpins fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and quantum technologies. We demonstrate a single reprogrammable optical circuit that is sufficient to implement all possible linear optical protocols up to the size of that circuit. Our six-mode universal system consists of a cascade of 15 Mach-Zehnder interferometers with 30 thermo-optic phase shifters integrated into a single photonic chip that is electrically and optically interfaced for arbitrary setting of all phase shifters, input of up to six photons, and their measurement with a 12-single-photon detector system. We programmed this system to implement heralded quantum logic and entangling gates, boson sampling with verification tests, and six-dimensional complex Hadamards. We implemented 100 Haar random unitaries with an average fidelity of 0.999 ± 0.001. Our system can be rapidly reprogrammed to implement these and any other linear optical protocol, pointing the way to applications across fundamental science and quantum technologies. PMID:26160375

  2. Belos Block Linear Solvers Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    Belos is an extensible and interoperable framework for large-scale, iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations with multiple right-hand sides. The motivation for this framework is to provide a generic interface to a collection of algorithms for solving large-scale linear systems. Belos is interoperable because both the matrix and vectors are considered to be opaque objects--only knowledge of the matrix and vectors via elementary operations is necessary. An implementation of Balos is accomplished viamore » the use of interfaces. One of the goals of Belos is to allow the user flexibility in specifying the data representation for the matrix and vectors and so leverage any existing software investment. The algorithms that will be included in package are Krylov-based linear solvers, like Block GMRES (Generalized Minimal RESidual) and Block CG (Conjugate-Gradient).« less

  3. The linear multiplet and ectoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butter, Daniel; Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Novak, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of the superconformal tensor calculus for 4D {N} = {2} super-gravity, locally supersymmetric actions are often constructed using the linear multiplet. We provide a superform formulation for the linear multiplet and derive the corresponding action functional using the ectoplasm method (also known as the superform approach to the construction of supersymmetric invariants). We propose a new locally supersymmetric action which makes use of a deformed linear multiplet. The novel feature of this multiplet is that it corresponds to the case of a gauged central charge using a one-form potential not annihilated by the central charge (unlike the standard {N} = {2} vector multiplet). Such a gauge one-form can be chosen to describe a variant nonlinear vector-tensor multiplet. As a byproduct of our construction, we also find a variant realization of the tensor multiplet in supergravity where one of the auxiliaries is replaced by the field strength of a gauge three-form.

  4. Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, A.; Henry, B.; Hood, D.

    1966-01-01

    Set of cards with scale divisions and a scale finder permits accurate reading of the coordinates of points on linear or logarithmic graphs plotted on rectangular grids. The set contains 34 different scales for linear plotting and 28 single cycle scales for log plots.

  5. A simple and direct method for generating travelling wave solutions for nonlinear equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bazeia, D. Das, Ashok; Silva, A.

    2008-05-15

    We propose a simple and direct method for generating travelling wave solutions for nonlinear integrable equations. We illustrate how nontrivial solutions for the KdV, the mKdV and the Boussinesq equations can be obtained from simple solutions of linear equations. We describe how using this method, a soliton solution of the KdV equation can yield soliton solutions for the mKdV as well as the Boussinesq equations. Similarly, starting with cnoidal solutions of the KdV equation, we can obtain the corresponding solutions for the mKdV as well as the Boussinesq equations. Simple solutions of linear equations can also lead to cnoidal solutions of nonlinear systems. Finally, we propose and solve some new families of KdV equations and show how soliton solutions are also obtained for the higher order equations of the KdV hierarchy using this method.

  6. Non-Linear Luminescent Coupling in Series-Connected Multijunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, M. A.; Geisz, J. F.

    2012-06-18

    The assumption of superposition or linearity of photocurrent with solar flux is widespread for calculations and measurements of solar cells. The well-known effect of luminescent coupling in multijunction solar cells has also been assumed to be linear with excess current. Here we show significant non-linearities in luminescent coupling in III-V multijunction solar cells and propose a simple model based on competition between radiative and nonradiative processes in the luminescent junction to explain these non-linearities. We demonstrate a technique for accurately measuring the junction photocurrents under a specified reference spectrum, that accounts for and quantifies luminescent coupling effects.

  7. Permafrost Hazards and Linear Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanilovskaya, Julia; Sergeev, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    The international experience of linear infrastructure planning, construction and exploitation in permafrost zone is being directly tied to the permafrost hazard assessment. That procedure should also consider the factors of climate impact and infrastructure protection. The current global climate change hotspots are currently polar and mountain areas. Temperature rise, precipitation and land ice conditions change, early springs occur more often. The big linear infrastructure objects cross the territories with different permafrost conditions which are sensitive to the changes in air temperature, hydrology, and snow accumulation which are connected to climatic dynamics. One of the most extensive linear structures built on permafrost worldwide are Trans Alaskan Pipeline (USA), Alaska Highway (Canada), Qinghai-Xizang Railway (China) and Eastern Siberia - Pacific Ocean Oil Pipeline (Russia). Those are currently being influenced by the regional climate change and permafrost impact which may act differently from place to place. Thermokarst is deemed to be the most dangerous process for linear engineering structures. Its formation and development depend on the linear structure type: road or pipeline, elevated or buried one. Zonal climate and geocryological conditions are also of the determining importance here. All the projects are of the different age and some of them were implemented under different climatic conditions. The effects of permafrost thawing have been recorded every year since then. The exploration and transportation companies from different countries maintain the linear infrastructure from permafrost degradation in different ways. The highways in Alaska are in a good condition due to governmental expenses on annual reconstructions. The Chara-China Railroad in Russia is under non-standard condition due to intensive permafrost response. Standards for engineering and construction should be reviewed and updated to account for permafrost hazards caused by the

  8. Vanilla technicolor at linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Järvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    We analyze the reach of linear colliders for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that linear colliders can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, until the maximum energy in the center of mass of the colliding leptons. In particular we analyze the Drell-Yan processes involving spin-one intermediate heavy bosons decaying either leptonically or into two standard model gauge bosons. We also analyze the light Higgs production in association with a standard model gauge boson stemming also from an intermediate spin-one heavy vector.

  9. PCANet: A Simple Deep Learning Baseline for Image Classification?

    PubMed

    Chan, Tsung-Han; Jia, Kui; Gao, Shenghua; Lu, Jiwen; Zeng, Zinan; Ma, Yi

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a very simple deep learning network for image classification that is based on very basic data processing components: 1) cascaded principal component analysis (PCA); 2) binary hashing; and 3) blockwise histograms. In the proposed architecture, the PCA is employed to learn multistage filter banks. This is followed by simple binary hashing and block histograms for indexing and pooling. This architecture is thus called the PCA network (PCANet) and can be extremely easily and efficiently designed and learned. For comparison and to provide a better understanding, we also introduce and study two simple variations of PCANet: 1) RandNet and 2) LDANet. They share the same topology as PCANet, but their cascaded filters are either randomly selected or learned from linear discriminant analysis. We have extensively tested these basic networks on many benchmark visual data sets for different tasks, including Labeled Faces in the Wild (LFW) for face verification; the MultiPIE, Extended Yale B, AR, Facial Recognition Technology (FERET) data sets for face recognition; and MNIST for hand-written digit recognition. Surprisingly, for all tasks, such a seemingly naive PCANet model is on par with the state-of-the-art features either prefixed, highly hand-crafted, or carefully learned [by deep neural networks (DNNs)]. Even more surprisingly, the model sets new records for many classification tasks on the Extended Yale B, AR, and FERET data sets and on MNIST variations. Additional experiments on other public data sets also demonstrate the potential of PCANet to serve as a simple but highly competitive baseline for texture classification and object recognition. PMID:26340772

  10. Kinetics of DSB rejoining and formation of simple chromosome exchange aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; O'Neill, P.; Goodhead, D. T.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the role of kinetics in the processing of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), and the formation of simple chromosome exchange aberrations following X-ray exposures to mammalian cells based on an enzymatic approach. METHODS: Using computer simulations based on a biochemical approach, rate-equations that describe the processing of DSB through the formation of a DNA-enzyme complex were formulated. A second model that allows for competition between two processing pathways was also formulated. The formation of simple exchange aberrations was modelled as misrepair during the recombination of single DSB with undamaged DNA. Non-linear coupled differential equations corresponding to biochemical pathways were solved numerically by fitting to experimental data. RESULTS: When mediated by a DSB repair enzyme complex, the processing of single DSB showed a complex behaviour that gives the appearance of fast and slow components of rejoining. This is due to the time-delay caused by the action time of enzymes in biomolecular reactions. It is shown that the kinetic- and dose-responses of simple chromosome exchange aberrations are well described by a recombination model of DSB interacting with undamaged DNA when aberration formation increases with linear dose-dependence. Competition between two or more recombination processes is shown to lead to the formation of simple exchange aberrations with a dose-dependence similar to that of a linear quadratic model. CONCLUSIONS: Using a minimal number of assumptions, the kinetics and dose response observed experimentally for DSB rejoining and the formation of simple chromosome exchange aberrations are shown to be consistent with kinetic models based on enzymatic reaction approaches. A non-linear dose response for simple exchange aberrations is possible in a model of recombination of DNA containing a DSB with undamaged DNA when two or more pathways compete for DSB repair.

  11. Parameterized Linear Longitudinal Airship Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric; Elfes, Alberto; Bayard, David; Quadrelli, Marco; Johnson, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A parameterized linear mathematical model of the longitudinal dynamics of an airship is undergoing development. This model is intended to be used in designing control systems for future airships that would operate in the atmospheres of Earth and remote planets. Heretofore, the development of linearized models of the longitudinal dynamics of airships has been costly in that it has been necessary to perform extensive flight testing and to use system-identification techniques to construct models that fit the flight-test data. The present model is a generic one that can be relatively easily specialized to approximate the dynamics of specific airships at specific operating points, without need for further system identification, and with significantly less flight testing. The approach taken in the present development is to merge the linearized dynamical equations of an airship with techniques for estimation of aircraft stability derivatives, and to thereby make it possible to construct a linearized dynamical model of the longitudinal dynamics of a specific airship from geometric and aerodynamic data pertaining to that airship. (It is also planned to develop a model of the lateral dynamics by use of the same methods.) All of the aerodynamic data needed to construct the model of a specific airship can be obtained from wind-tunnel testing and computational fluid dynamics

  12. Linear accelerators of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.

    1986-07-01

    Some of the requirements imposed on future linear accelerators to be used in electron-positron colliders are reviewed, as well as some approaches presently being examined for meeting those requirements. RF sources for use in these linacs are described, as well as wakefields, single bunches, and multiple-bunch trains. (LEW)

  13. Phycotoxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, G.; Viswanathan, P.N.; Devi, S.

    1988-04-01

    Dose- and time-dependent effects of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate, a major component of synthetic detergent, to the blue-green alga Nostoc muscorum, were studied under laboratory conditions. Toxicity was evident, at doses above 0.001%, from the decrease in biomass, heterocyst number, and protein content and pathomorphological alterations.

  14. LINEAR HYDROLOGY COVERAGE AND DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This coverage contains linear hydrology (streams, creeks, rivers, etc.) for EPA Region 8. These data were derived from the USGS Digital Line Graph (DLG) files. For a complete copy of the USGS metadata for the DLG information at the 1:100,000 scale refer to http://edcwww.cr.usgs....

  15. A novel linear displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji-sen; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xi-hou; Zhang, Tian-heng

    2011-12-01

    With development of time grating technology in the past 10 years, the theory of using time to measure spatial displacement has been completed greatly. In the study of time grating, one novel linear displacement sensor is proposed based on the measurement principles of time grating. The measurement principles of linear displacement are similar to that of angular displacement. Both of them need one endless coordinate with uniform velocity. The theory of linear AC motor is used, and the three-phase winding with equal division space of 120° and three-phase exciting signal with uniform time are utilized to generate the endless moving coordinate with uniform velocity. The magnetic traveling wave arises from the left endpoint and disappears in the right endpoint, and it travels pole pitch distance of W during the periodic time of T with the uniform velocity. When magnetic traveling wave passes by the static probe and the moving probe, the electric signals will be induced on the winding, respectively. Therefore, the linear displacement can be achieved by comparing the phase between the two output induced signals from he static probe and the moving probe. Furthermore, in order to improve the machining technique, four kinds of winding framework are designed to employ. The experimental results show that advantages and disadvantages both exist in the design methods and the precision of experiment results reaches +/-2µm. The next study plan is to choose the most excellent design method through further experiments and improve the precision of displacement sensor greatly.

  16. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  17. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  18. Linear or Exponential Number Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Pat

    2011-01-01

    Having decided to spend some time looking at one's understanding of numbers, the author was inspired by "Alex's Adventures in Numberland," by Alex Bellos to look at one's innate appreciation of number. Bellos quotes research studies suggesting that an individual's natural appreciation of numbers is more likely to be exponential rather than linear,…

  19. Linear and non-linear theory of a parametric instability of hydrodynamic warps in Keplerian discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Goodman, Jeremy; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2000-11-01

    We consider the stability of warping modes in Keplerian discs. We find them to be parametrically unstable using two lines of attack, one based on three-mode couplings and the other on Floquet theory. We confirm the existence of the instability and investigate its non-linear development in three dimensions, via numerical experiment. The most rapidly growing non-axisymmetric disturbances are the most nearly axisymmetric (low-m) ones. Finally, we offer a simple, somewhat speculative model for the interaction of the parametric instability with the warp. We apply this model to the masing disc in NGC 4258 and show that, provided the warp is not forced too strongly, parametric instability can fix the amplitude of the warp.

  20. A tutorial on Bayesian Normal linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauenberg, Katy; Wübbeler, Gerd; Mickan, Bodo; Harris, Peter; Elster, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    Regression is a common task in metrology and often applied to calibrate instruments, evaluate inter-laboratory comparisons or determine fundamental constants, for example. Yet, a regression model cannot be uniquely formulated as a measurement function, and consequently the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and its supplements are not applicable directly. Bayesian inference, however, is well suited to regression tasks, and has the advantage of accounting for additional a priori information, which typically robustifies analyses. Furthermore, it is anticipated that future revisions of the GUM shall also embrace the Bayesian view. Guidance on Bayesian inference for regression tasks is largely lacking in metrology. For linear regression models with Gaussian measurement errors this tutorial gives explicit guidance. Divided into three steps, the tutorial first illustrates how a priori knowledge, which is available from previous experiments, can be translated into prior distributions from a specific class. These prior distributions have the advantage of yielding analytical, closed form results, thus avoiding the need to apply numerical methods such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Secondly, formulas for the posterior results are given, explained and illustrated, and software implementations are provided. In the third step, Bayesian tools are used to assess the assumptions behind the suggested approach. These three steps (prior elicitation, posterior calculation, and robustness to prior uncertainty and model adequacy) are critical to Bayesian inference. The general guidance given here for Normal linear regression tasks is accompanied by a simple, but real-world, metrological example. The calibration of a flow device serves as a running example and illustrates the three steps. It is shown that prior knowledge from previous calibrations of the same sonic nozzle enables robust predictions even for extrapolations.

  1. Simple shear of deformable square objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2003-12-01

    Finite element models of square objects in a contrasting matrix in simple shear show that the objects deform to a variety of shapes. For a range of viscosity contrasts, we catalogue the changing shapes and orientations of objects in progressive simple shear. At moderate simple shear ( γ=1.5), the shapes are virtually indistinguishable from those in equivalent pure shear models with the same bulk strain ( RS=4), examined in a previous study. In theory, differences would be expected, especially for very stiff objects or at very large strain. In all our simple shear models, relatively competent square objects become asymmetric barrel shapes with concave shortened edges, similar to some types of boudin. Incompetent objects develop shapes surprisingly similar to mica fish described in mylonites.

  2. Thirty Simple Ideas for Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    This article presents thirty simple ideas for interactive whiteboards and how IWB can make one's teaching life easier. These teaching ideas for the interactive whiteboard can be used by teachers every day. Tips for classroom management are also presented.

  3. Simple and Clear Proofs of Stirling's Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niizeki, Shozo; Araki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to show two simpler and clearer methods of proving Stirling's formula than the traditional and conventional ones. The distinction of our method is to use the simple trapezoidal formula.

  4. Pendulum: Rich physics from a simple system

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.A.; Olsson, M.G.

    1986-02-01

    We provide a comprehensive discussion of the corrections needed to accurately measure the acceleration of gravity using a plane pendulum. A simple laboratory experiment is described in which g was determined to four significant figures of accuracy.

  5. The Invention Convention: Mind Meets Simple Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadi-Tabassum, Samina

    1997-01-01

    Describes an Earth Day celebration where students had to design an invention made of simple machines that could crush an empty aluminum can through 10 rapid mechanical movements using materials foraged from the students' homes. (JRH)

  6. A simple and inexpensive external fixator.

    PubMed

    Noor, M A

    1988-11-01

    A simple and inexpensive external fixator has been designed. It is constructed of galvanized iron pipe and mild steel bolts and nuts. It can easily be manufactured in a hospital workshop with a minimum of tools. PMID:3267638

  7. Spatial summation in the receptive fields of simple cells in the cat's striate cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Movshon, J A; Thompson, I D; Tolhurst, D J

    1978-01-01

    1. We have examined the responses of simple cells in the cat's atriate cortex to visual patterns that were designed to reveal the extent to which these cells may be considered to sum light-evoked influences linearly across their receptive fields. We used one-dimensional luminance-modulated bars and grating as stimuli; their orientation was always the same as the preferred orientation of the neurone under study. The stimuli were presented on an oscilloscope screen by a digital computer, which also accumulated neuronal responses and controlled a randomized sequence of stimulus presentations. 2. The majority of simple cells respond to sinusoidal gratings that are moving or whose contrast is modulated in time in a manner consistent with the hypothesis that they have linear spatial summation. Their responses to moving gratings of all spatial frequencies are modulated in synchrony with the passage of the gratings' bars across their receptive fields, and they do not produce unmodulated responses even at the highest spatial frequencies. Many of these cells respond to temporally modulated stationary gratings simply by changing their response amplitude sinusoidally as the spatial phase of the grating the grating is varied. Nonetheless, their behavior appears to indicate linear spatial summation, since we show in an Appendix that the absence of a 'null' phase in a visual neurone need not indicate non-linear spatial summation, and further that a linear neurone lacking a 'null' phase should give responses of the form that we have observed in this type of simple cell. 3. A minority of simple cells appears to have significant non-linearities of spatial summation. These neurones respond to moving gratings of high spatial frequency with a partially or totally unmodulated elevation of firing rate. They have no 'null' phases when tested with stationary gratings, and reveal their non-linearity by giving responses to gratings of some spatial phases that are composed partly or wholly of

  8. From Parity and Payoff Games to Linear Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, Sven

    This paper establishes a surprising reduction from parity and mean payoff games to linear programming problems. While such a connection is trivial for solitary games, it is surprising for two player games, because the players have opposing objectives, whose natural translations into an optimisation problem are minimisation and maximisation, respectively. Our reduction to linear programming circumvents the need for concurrent minimisation and maximisation by replacing one of them, the maximisation, by approximation. The resulting optimisation problem can be translated to a linear programme by a simple space transformation, which is inexpensive in the unit cost model, but results in an exponential growth of the coefficients. The discovered connection opens up unexpected applications - like μ-calculus model checking - of linear programming in the unit cost model, and thus turns the intriguing academic problem of finding a polynomial time algorithm for linear programming in this model of computation (and subsequently a strongly polynomial algorithm) into a problem of paramount practical importance: All advancements in this area can immediately be applied to accelerate solving parity and payoff games, or to improve their complexity analysis.

  9. Temperature Errors in Linearizing Resistance Networks for Thermistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that a single negative-temperature-coefficient thermistor can be linearized over a narrow temperature range by connecting a single resistor in parallel with the thermistor. With the linearizing resistor properly chosen for the operating temperature, the residual errors are proportional to the cube of the temperature range and have a peak value of about 0.2° C for a 30° C range. A greater range of temperatures can be covered or greater linearity be achieved by cascading thermistor-resistor combinations. This paper investigates the limits of the linearity performance of such networks by using interpolation to model their behavior. A simple formula is derived for estimating the residual non-linearity as a function of the number of thermistors, the temperature range covered by the network, and the constant characterizing the exponential temperature dependence of the thermistors. Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the validity of the formula. Guidelines are also given for circuit topologies for realizing the networks, for optimizing the design of the networks, and for calculating the sensitivities to relative errors in the component values.

  10. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  11. Simple Derivation of Some Basic Selection Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannigrahi, A. B.; Das, Ranjan

    1980-01-01

    Presents the selection rules for all four quantum numbers of the hydrogen atom and for a linear harmonic oscillator. Suggests that these rules deserve special mention in an elementary course of quantum chemistry. (Author/JN)

  12. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw', as observed ny Cassini cameras. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon-triggered clumping at perturbed regions in Saturn's rings creates both high velocity dispersion and large aggregates at these distances, explaining both small and large particles observed there. This confirms the triple architecture of ring particles: a broad size distribution of particles; these aggregate into temporary rubble piles; coated by a regolith of dust. We calculate the stationary size distribution using a cell-to-cell mapping procedure that converts the phase-plane trajectories to a Markov chain. Approximating the Markov chain as an asymmetric random walk with reflecting boundaries allows us to determine the power law index from

  13. Simple average expression for shear-stress relaxation modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on isotropic elastic networks we propose a simple-average expression G (t ) =μA-h (t ) for the computational determination of the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) of a classical elastic solid or fluid. Here, μA=G (0 ) characterizes the shear transformation of the system at t =0 and h (t ) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress τ ̂(t ) as a function of time t . We discuss sampling time and ensemble effects and emphasize possible pitfalls of alternative expressions using the shear-stress autocorrelation function. We argue finally that our key relation may be readily adapted for more general linear response functions.

  14. Simple average expression for shear-stress relaxation modulus.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on isotropic elastic networks we propose a simple-average expression G(t)=μ_{A}-h(t) for the computational determination of the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t) of a classical elastic solid or fluid. Here, μ_{A}=G(0) characterizes the shear transformation of the system at t=0 and h(t) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress τ[over ̂](t) as a function of time t. We discuss sampling time and ensemble effects and emphasize possible pitfalls of alternative expressions using the shear-stress autocorrelation function. We argue finally that our key relation may be readily adapted for more general linear response functions. PMID:26871020

  15. Radially and azimuthally polarized nonparaxial Bessel beams made simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Aiello, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    We present a method for the realization of radially and azimuthally polarized nonparaxial Bessel beams in a rigorous but simple manner. This result is achieved by using the concept of Hertz vector potential to generate exact vector solutions of Maxwell's equations from scalar Bessel beams. The scalar part of the Hertz potential is built by analogy with the paraxial case as a linear combination of Bessel beams carrying a unit of orbital angular momentum. In this way we are able to obtain spatial and polarization patterns analogous to the ones exhibited by the standard cylindrically polarized paraxial beams. Applications of these beams are discussed. This work has been carried out while this author was still affiliated with Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light.

  16. A simple perturbative tool to calculate plasmonic photonic bandstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Faris; Quandt, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    We use first order perturbation theory to study the effect of surface plasmon polaritons on the photonic band structure of plasmonic photonic crystals. Our results are based on a simple numerical tool that we have developed to extend the standard frequency domain methods to compute the photonic band structure of plasmonic photonic crystals. For a two-dimensional honeycomb photonic crystal with a lattice constant of 500 nm placed on an aluminium substrate, we show that the band gap for TM modes is enhanced by 13%. Thus a slight variation in the effective dielectric function results in a plasmonic band structure that is not scale-invariant, which is reminiscent of the inherent non-linear properties of the effective dielectric constant.

  17. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  18. Spatial processes in linear ordering.

    PubMed

    von Hecker, Ulrich; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Wolf, Lukas; Fazilat-Pour, Masoud

    2016-07-01

    Memory performance in linear order reasoning tasks (A > B, B > C, C > D, etc.) shows quicker, and more accurate responses to queries on wider (AD) than narrower (AB) pairs on a hypothetical linear mental model (A - B - C - D). While indicative of an analogue representation, research so far did not provide positive evidence for spatial processes in the construction of such models. In a series of 7 experiments we report such evidence. Participants respond quicker when the dominant element in a pair is presented on the left (or top) rather than on the right (or bottom). The left-anchoring tendency reverses in a sample with Farsi background (reading/writing from right to left). Alternative explanations and confounds are tested. A theoretical model is proposed that integrates basic assumptions about acquired reading/writing habits as a scaffold for spatial simulation, and primacy/dominance representation within such spatial simulations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26641448

  19. Stereo pairs from linear morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, David F.

    1998-04-01

    Several authors have recently investigated the ability to compute intermediate views of a scene using given 2D images from arbitrary camera positions. The methods fall under the topic of image based rendering. In the case we give here, linear morphing between two parallel views of a scene produces intermediate views that would have been produced by parallel movement of a camera. Hence, the technique produces images computed in a way that is consistent with the standard off-axis perspective projection method for computing stereo pairs. Using available commercial 2D morphing software, linear morphing can be used to produce stereo pairs from a single image with bilateral symmetry such as a human face. In our case, the second image is produced by horizontal reflection. We describe morphing and show how it can be used to provide stereo pairs from single images.

  20. Linear regression in astronomy. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti J.

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of least-squares linear regression procedures used in observational astronomy, particularly investigations of the cosmic distance scale, are presented and discussed. The classes of linear models considered are (1) unweighted regression lines, with bootstrap and jackknife resampling; (2) regression solutions when measurement error, in one or both variables, dominates the scatter; (3) methods to apply a calibration line to new data; (4) truncated regression models, which apply to flux-limited data sets; and (5) censored regression models, which apply when nondetections are present. For the calibration problem we develop two new procedures: a formula for the intercept offset between two parallel data sets, which propagates slope errors from one regression to the other; and a generalization of the Working-Hotelling confidence bands to nonstandard least-squares lines. They can provide improved error analysis for Faber-Jackson, Tully-Fisher, and similar cosmic distance scale relations.

  1. The cerebellum linearly encodes whisker position during voluntary movement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Susu; Augustine, George J; Chadderton, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Active whisking is an important model sensorimotor behavior, but the function of the cerebellum in the rodent whisker system is unknown. We have made patch clamp recordings from Purkinje cells in vivo to identify whether cerebellar output encodes kinematic features of whisking including the phase and set point. We show that Purkinje cell spiking activity changes strongly during whisking bouts. On average, the changes in simple spike rate coincide with or slightly precede movement, indicating that the synaptic drive responsible for these changes is predominantly of efferent (motor) rather than re-afferent (sensory) origin. Remarkably, on-going changes in simple spike rate provide an accurate linear read-out of whisker set point. Thus, despite receiving several hundred thousand discrete synaptic inputs across a non-linear dendritic tree, Purkinje cells integrate parallel fiber input to generate precise information about whisking kinematics through linear changes in firing rate. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10509.001 PMID:26780828

  2. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  3. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W. Bruce; McNeilly, David R.; Thacker, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  4. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  5. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  6. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  7. Mass Distributions of Linear Chain Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Shane L.; Craciun, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    Biochemistry has many examples of linear chain polymers, i.e., molecules formed from a sequence of units from a finite set of possibilities; examples include proteins, RNA, single-stranded DNA, and paired DNA. In the field of mass spectrometry, it is useful to consider the idea of weighted alphabets, with a word inheriting weight from its letters. We describe the distribution of the mass of these words in terms of a simple recurrence relation, the general solution to that relation, and a canonical form that explicitly describes both the exponential form of this distribution and its periodic features, thus explaining a wave pattern that has been observed in protein mass databases. Further, we show that a pure exponential term dominates the distribution and that there is exactly one such purely exponential term. Finally, we illustrate the use of this theorem by describing a formula for the integer mass distribution of peptides and we compare our theoretical results with mass distributions of human and yeast peptides. PMID:23024448

  8. Linearized multipole solutions and their representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pastora, J. L.

    2013-09-01

    The monopole solution of the Einstein vacuum field equations (Schwarzschild’s solution) in Weyl coordinates involves a metric function that can be interpreted as the gravitational potential of a bar of length 2 m with constant linear density. The question addressed in this work is whether similar representations can be constructed for Weyl solutions other than the spherically symmetric one. A new family of static solutions of the axisymmetric vacuum field equations generalizing the M-Q(1) solution (Hernández-Pastora and Martín 1993 Class. Quantum Grav.10 2581) is developed. These represent slight deviations from spherical symmetry in terms of the relativistic multipole moments (RMM) we wish the solution to contain. A Newtonian object referred to as a dumbbell can be used to describe these solutions in a simple form by means of the density of this object, since the physical properties of the relativistic solution are characterized by its behaviour. The density profile of the dumbbell, which is given in terms of the RMM of the solution, allows us to distinguish general multipole Weyl solutions from the constant-density Schwarzschild solution. The range of values of the multipole moments that generate positive-definite density profiles is also calculated. The bounds on the multipole moments that arise from this density condition are identical to those required for a well-behaved infinite-redshift surface g00 = 0.

  9. Linear diffusion into a Faraday cage.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lin, Yau Tang; Merewether, Kimball O.; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2011-11-01

    Linear lightning diffusion into a Faraday cage is studied. An early-time integral valid for large ratios of enclosure size to enclosure thickness and small relative permeability ({mu}/{mu}{sub 0} {le} 10) is used for this study. Existing solutions for nearby lightning impulse responses of electrically thick-wall enclosures are refined and extended to calculate the nearby lightning magnetic field (H) and time-derivative magnetic field (HDOT) inside enclosures of varying thickness caused by a decaying exponential excitation. For a direct strike scenario, the early-time integral for a worst-case line source outside the enclosure caused by an impulse is simplified and numerically integrated to give the interior H and HDOT at the location closest to the source as well as a function of distance from the source. H and HDOT enclosure response functions for decaying exponentials are considered for an enclosure wall of any thickness. Simple formulas are derived to provide a description of enclosure interior H and HDOT as well. Direct strike voltage and current bounds for a single-turn optimally-coupled loop for all three waveforms are also given.

  10. Classical and quantum routes to linear magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingshi; Rosenbaum, T F

    2008-09-01

    The hallmark of materials science is the ability to tailor the microstructure of a given material to provide a desired response. Carbon mixed with iron provides the steel of buildings and bridges; impurities sprinkled in silicon single crystals form the raw materials of the electronics revolution; pinning centres in superconductors let them become powerful magnets. Here, we show that either adding a few parts per million of the proper chemical impurities to indium antimonide, a well-known semiconductor, or redesigning the material's structure on the micrometre scale, can transform its response to an applied magnetic field. The former approach is purely quantum mechanical; the latter a classical outgrowth of disorder, turned to advantage. In both cases, the magnetoresistive response--at the heart of magnetic sensor technology--can be converted to a simple, large and linear function of field that does not saturate. Harnessing the effects of disorder has the further advantage of extending the useful applications range of such a magnetic sensor to very high temperatures by circumventing the usual limitations imposed by phonon scattering. PMID:18719705

  11. BLAS- BASIC LINEAR ALGEBRA SUBPROGRAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is a collection of FORTRAN callable routines for employing standard techniques in performing the basic operations of numerical linear algebra. The BLAS library was developed to provide a portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebraic computations. The subprograms available in the library cover the operations of dot product, multiplication of a scalar and a vector, vector plus a scalar times a vector, Givens transformation, modified Givens transformation, copy, swap, Euclidean norm, sum of magnitudes, and location of the largest magnitude element. Since these subprograms are to be used in an ANSI FORTRAN context, the cases of single precision, double precision, and complex data are provided for. All of the subprograms have been thoroughly tested and produce consistent results even when transported from machine to machine. BLAS contains Assembler versions and FORTRAN test code for any of the following compilers: Lahey F77L, Microsoft FORTRAN, or IBM Professional FORTRAN. It requires the Microsoft Macro Assembler and a math co-processor. The PC implementation allows individual arrays of over 64K. The BLAS library was developed in 1979. The PC version was made available in 1986 and updated in 1988.

  12. The Design of SimpleITK

    PubMed Central

    Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Chen, David T.; Ibáñez, Luis; Blezek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    SimpleITK is a new interface to the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) designed to facilitate rapid prototyping, education and scientific activities via high level programming languages. ITK is a templated C++ library of image processing algorithms and frameworks for biomedical and other applications, and it was designed to be generic, flexible and extensible. Initially, ITK provided a direct wrapping interface to languages such as Python and Tcl through the WrapITK system. Unlike WrapITK, which exposed ITK's complex templated interface, SimpleITK was designed to provide an easy to use and simplified interface to ITK's algorithms. It includes procedural methods, hides ITK's demand driven pipeline, and provides a template-less layer. Also SimpleITK provides practical conveniences such as binary distribution packages and overloaded operators. Our user-friendly design goals dictated a departure from the direct interface wrapping approach of WrapITK, toward a new facade class structure that only exposes the required functionality, hiding ITK's extensive template use. Internally SimpleITK utilizes a manual description of each filter with code-generation and advanced C++ meta-programming to provide the higher-level interface, bringing the capabilities of ITK to a wider audience. SimpleITK is licensed as open source software library under the Apache License Version 2.0 and more information about downloading it can be found at http://www.simpleitk.org. PMID:24416015

  13. The Design of SimpleITK.

    PubMed

    Lowekamp, Bradley C; Chen, David T; Ibáñez, Luis; Blezek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    SimpleITK is a new interface to the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) designed to facilitate rapid prototyping, education and scientific activities via high level programming languages. ITK is a templated C++ library of image processing algorithms and frameworks for biomedical and other applications, and it was designed to be generic, flexible and extensible. Initially, ITK provided a direct wrapping interface to languages such as Python and Tcl through the WrapITK system. Unlike WrapITK, which exposed ITK's complex templated interface, SimpleITK was designed to provide an easy to use and simplified interface to ITK's algorithms. It includes procedural methods, hides ITK's demand driven pipeline, and provides a template-less layer. Also SimpleITK provides practical conveniences such as binary distribution packages and overloaded operators. Our user-friendly design goals dictated a departure from the direct interface wrapping approach of WrapITK, toward a new facade class structure that only exposes the required functionality, hiding ITK's extensive template use. Internally SimpleITK utilizes a manual description of each filter with code-generation and advanced C++ meta-programming to provide the higher-level interface, bringing the capabilities of ITK to a wider audience. SimpleITK is licensed as open source software library under the Apache License Version 2.0 and more information about downloading it can be found at http://www.simpleitk.org. PMID:24416015

  14. A linear regulator in a nonlinear system - Application in a solar central receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sworder, D. D.; Chou, D. S.

    Sworder and Roger's (1983) temperature control regulator for the single panel of a solar powered central receiver, which was designed on the basis of a family of linear models, is presently followed up by a study, using a simple nonlinear thermodynamic model of that panel, which compares the synthesis model's response predictions to those obtained with the nonlinear model. It is found that, for the conditions stipulated in the study, the linear model yields an accurate approximation of the global model's response characteristics.

  15. Localization of the SFT inspired nonlocal linear models and exact solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernov, S. Yu.

    2011-05-01

    A general class of gravitational models driven by a nonlocal scalar field with a linear or quadratic potential is considered. We study the action with an arbitrary analytic function ℱ(□ g ), which has both simple and double roots. The way of localization of nonlocal Einstein equations is generalized on models with linear potentials. Exact solutions in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi I metrics are presented.

  16. Linear relationships in systems with non linear kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fagiolino, P; Savio, E; Stareczek, S

    1991-01-01

    The elimination rate of drug from a capacity-limited one-compartment model can be expressed by equation (1): [formula: see text] Traditionally equation (1) was linearized according to equation (2): [formula: see text] Here, an alternative linear relationships between concentration and the area under the curve of C/(Km + c]) is proposed: [formula: see text] By iteration of Km into equation (3) until the statistic of analysis of variance for the regression is maximized, both Km and Vmax can be obtained. Several cases were considered: a) Intravenous bolus (single dose): Km (mg/L), Vmax (mg/L h), Vd (L) and V (mg/h) can be estimated. b) Extravascular administration (single dose): by the method of residuals it is possible to make additional estimations of FD/Vd (mg/L) and Ka (1/h). c) Bioequivalence studies: with parameters obtained at single dose, the simulated levels at steady-state are considered for the bioequivalence assessments. d) Km, Vmax estimation with two (C,t) points (single dose): double iteration (Km values and interpolated fictitious third points) are needed. e) Multiple dose: [formula: see text] If t2-t1 = T (interval of administration) it is possible to calculate operatives Km, Vmax, FD/Vd and to estimate Css (steady-state concentration). C1 and C2 correspond to different intervals. All the areas were calculated by the trapezoidal rule. PMID:1820928

  17. Simple microfluidic stagnation point flow geometries.

    PubMed

    Dockx, Greet; Verwijlen, Tom; Sempels, Wouter; Nagel, Mathias; Moldenaers, Paula; Hofkens, Johan; Vermant, Jan

    2016-07-01

    A geometrically simple flow cell is proposed to generate different types of stagnation flows, using a separation flow and small variations of the geometric parameters. Flows with high local deformation rates can be changed from purely rotational, over simple shear flow, to extensional flow in a region surrounding a stagnation point. Computational fluid dynamic calculations are used to analyse how variations of the geometrical parameters affect the flow field. These numerical calculations are compared to the experimentally obtained streamlines of different designs, which have been determined by high speed confocal microscopy. As the flow type is dictated predominantly by the geometrical parameters, such simple separating flow devices may alleviate the requirements for flow control, while offering good stability for a wide variety of flow types. PMID:27462382

  18. Maximal temperature in a simple thermodynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-06-01

    Temperature in a simple thermodynamical system is not limited from above. It is also widely believed that it does not make sense talking about temperatures higher than the Planck temperature in the absence of the full theory of quantum gravity. Here, we demonstrate that there exist a maximal achievable temperature in a system where particles obey the laws of quantum mechanics and classical gravity before we reach the realm of quantum gravity. Namely, if two particles with a given center of mass energy come at the distance shorter than the Schwarzschild diameter apart, according to classical gravity they will form a black hole. It is possible to calculate that a simple thermodynamical system will be dominated by black holes at a critical temperature which is about three times lower than the Planck temperature. That represents the maximal achievable temperature in a simple thermodynamical system.

  19. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” – Linearity as the Golden Ratio of Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Aalt; Hanekamp, Jaap C.

    2014-01-01

    Referring to the Golden Ratio (i.e. expressed in the Fibonacci sequence) in nature and art, we conclude that toxicology knows its own Golden Ration, namely linearity. The latter seems imposed on pharmaco-toxicological processes that in fact show far more complexity than simple linearity could hope to elucidate. Understanding physiological and pharmaco-toxicological processes as primarily linear is challenged in this contribution based on very straightforward principles and examples. PMID:25552963

  20. Lunar Simple Crater Impact Melt Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, Jeffrey B.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Impact melt is observed in simple lunar craters having diameters as small as less than 200 m. The presence of ponds of impact melt on the floor of such small craters is interpreted to indicate vertical impacts. Data from the LRO LROC and LOLA experiments allow quantitative estimates of the volume of impact melt in simple crater. Such estimates allow for validation of theoretical models of impact melt generation and examination of target effects. Preliminary data have considerable scatter but are broadly consistent with the models.

  1. Simple cloud chambers using gel ice packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-07-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry ice or liquid nitrogen. The gel can be frozen in normal domestic freezers, and can be used repeatedly by re-freezing. The tracks of alpha-ray particles can be observed continuously for about 20 min, and the operation is simple and easy.

  2. Investigating decoherence in a simple system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    1991-01-01

    The results of some simple calculations designed to study quantum decoherence are presented. The physics of quantum decoherence are briefly reviewed, and a very simple 'toy' model is analyzed. Exact solutions are found using numerical techniques. The type of incoherence exhibited by the model can be changed by varying a coupling strength. The author explains why the conventional approach to studying decoherence by checking the diagonality of the density matrix is not always adequate. Two other approaches, the decoherence functional and the Schmidt paths approach, are applied to the toy model and contrasted to each other. Possible problems with each are discussed.

  3. Simple 2-D navigation for wheeled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Klarer, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a simple algorithm to perform navigation in a two-dimensional world model. The algorithm utilizes a simple geometric approach which is first applied to a bicycle. The equations are then expeanded to apply to 3- and 4-wheeled vehicles with ''conventional'' steering mechanism (such as the Ackerman steering geometry in the 4-wheeled case). Calculations for omnidirectional robots which utilize differential odometry and differential drive are described as well. Practical considerations and sources of error are discussed, as are possible extensions of this method to a three-dimensional world model. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Simple 2-D navigation for wheeled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Klarer, P.R.

    1988-04-01

    This paper describes a simple algorithm to perform navigation in a two-dimensional world model. The algorithm utilizes a simple geometric approach which is first applied to a bicycle. The equations are then expanded to apply to 3- and 4-wheeled vehicles with ''conventional'' steering mechanisms (such as the Ackerman steering geometry in the 4-wheeled case). Calculations for omnidirectional robots which utilize differential odometry and differential drive are described as well. Practical considerations and sources of error are discussed, as are possible extensions of this method to a three-dimensional world model. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J; de la Moya, Santiago

    2015-09-21

    This article aims to show the identity of "circularly polarized luminescent active simple organic molecules" as a new concept in organic chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and non-aggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented. PMID:26136234

  6. TRSkit: A Simple Digital Library Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Esler, Sandra L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper introduces TRSkit, a simple and effective toolkit for building digital libraries on the World Wide Web. The toolkit was developed for the creation of the Langley Technical Report Server and the NASA Technical Report Server, but is applicable to most simple distribution paradigms. TRSkit contains a handful of freely available software components designed to be run under the UNIX operating system and served via the World Wide Web. The intended customer is the person that must continuously and synchronously distribute anywhere from 100 - 100,000's of information units and does not have extensive resources to devote to the problem.

  7. Precision measurements of a simple chaotic circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, Ken; Schmidt, Dory; Sprott, J. C.

    2004-04-01

    We describe a simple nonlinear electrical circuit that can be used to study chaotic phenomena. The circuit employs simple electronic elements such as diodes, resistors, and operational amplifiers, and is easy to construct. A novel feature of the circuit is its use of an almost ideal nonlinear element, which is straightforward to model theoretically and leads to excellent agreement between experiment and theory. For example, comparisons of bifurcation points and power spectra give agreement to within 1%. The circuit yields a broad range of behavior and is well suited for qualitative demonstrations and as a serious research tool.

  8. Introducing CFD in the optical simulation of linear Fresnel collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, M. A.; Rungasamy, A.; Craig, K. J.; Meyer, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper seeks to determine whether the Finite Volume method within a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver (ANSYS Fluent) can model radiation with comparable accuracy to a Monte Carlo ray-tracing software package (SolTrace). A detailed investigation was performed into modeling techniques that can be used to significantly reduce the optical errors traditionally associated with CFD modeling of radiation false scattering and ray effect using a simple optical test case. The strategies formulated in the first part of this paper were used to model a variety of Linear Fresnel Collector Concentrating Solar Power Plants. This paper shows that commercial CFD packages yield accurate results for line focusing concentrating solar applications and simple geometries, validating its use in an integrated environment where both optical and thermal performance of these plants can be simulated and optimized.

  9. Nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, James F.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    1977-06-14

    A nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer for accurately measuring mechanical displacements in the presence of high magnetic fields is provided. The device utilizes a movable primary coil inside a fixed secondary coil that consists of two series-opposed windings. Operation is such that the secondary output voltage is maintained in phase (depending on polarity) with the primary voltage. The transducer is well-suited to long cable runs and is useful for measuring small displacements in the presence of high or alternating magnetic fields.

  10. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Busse, Lawrence J.; Lemon, Douglas K.

    1985-01-01

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  11. Physics at the linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Baer, H.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P. M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bagger, J.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brümmer, F.; Choi, S. Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grünewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Höcker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Mönig, K.; Mühlleitner, M. M.; Pöschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stål, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stöckinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G. W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Brau, J.; Ellis, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Mnich, J.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review of physics at an linear collider in the energy range of GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  12. Linear readout of object manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, SueYeon; Lee, Daniel D.; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2016-06-01

    Objects are represented in sensory systems by continuous manifolds due to sensitivity of neuronal responses to changes in physical features such as location, orientation, and intensity. What makes certain sensory representations better suited for invariant decoding of objects by downstream networks? We present a theory that characterizes the ability of a linear readout network, the perceptron, to classify objects from variable neural responses. We show how the readout perceptron capacity depends on the dimensionality, size, and shape of the object manifolds in its input neural representation.

  13. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. D.; Busse, L. J.; Lemon, D. K.

    1985-07-30

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  14. Linear-time transitive orientation

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.M.; Spinrad, J.P.

    1997-06-01

    The transitive orientation problem is the problem of assigning a direction to each edge of a graph so that the resulting digraph is transitive. A graph is a comparability graph if such an assignment is possible. We describe an O(n + m) algorithm for the transitive orientation problem, where n and m are the number of vertices and edges of the graph; full details are given in. This gives linear time bounds for maximum clique and minimum vertex coloring on comparability graphs, recognition of two-dimensional partial orders, permutation graphs, cointerval graphs, and triangulated comparability graphs, and other combinatorial problems on comparability graphs and their complements.

  15. Elementary principles of linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, G. A.; Talman, R.

    1983-09-01

    A short chronology of important milestones in the field of linear accelerators is presented. Proton linacs are first discussed and elementary concepts such as transit time, shunt impedance, and Q are introduced. Critical issues such as phase stability and transverse forces are addressed. An elementary discussion of waveguide acclerating structures is also provided. Finally, electron accelerators addressed. Taking SLAC as an exmple, various topics are discussed such as structure design, choice of parameters, frequency optmization, beam current, emittance, bunch length and beam loading. Recent developments and future challenges are mentioned briefly.

  16. Dynamic collimation for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, N.; Ruth, R.D.

    1990-06-01

    Experience with the SLC has indicated that backgrounds caused by the tails of the transverse beam distribution will be a serious problem for a next generation linear collider. Mechanical scrapers may not provide the best solution, because they may be damaged by the tiny, intense beams, and also because they may induce wakefield kicks large enough to cause emittance dilution. In this paper, we present a possible solution, which uses several nonlinear lenses to drive the tails of the beam to large amplitudes where they can by more easily scraped mechanically. Simulations of several different schemes are presented and evaluated with respect to effectiveness, tolerances and wakefield effects. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Linearized ray-trace analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Breckenridge, William G.

    1990-01-01

    A new, coordinate-free version of the exact ray-trace equations for optical systems consisting of conic reflecting, refracting and reference surfaces is presented. These equations are differentiated to obtain closed-form optical sensitivity dyadics. For computation, the sensitivities are evaluated in a single global coordinate frame and combined in linearized ray-trace matrix difference equations that propagate the rays and the sensitivities from element to element. One purpose of this analysis is to create optical models that can be directly integrated with models of the instrument structure and control systems for dynamic simulation.

  18. ALPS - A LINEAR PROGRAM SOLVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Linear programming is a widely-used engineering and management tool. Scheduling, resource allocation, and production planning are all well-known applications of linear programs (LP's). Most LP's are too large to be solved by hand, so over the decades many computer codes for solving LP's have been developed. ALPS, A Linear Program Solver, is a full-featured LP analysis program. ALPS can solve plain linear programs as well as more complicated mixed integer and pure integer programs. ALPS also contains an efficient solution technique for pure binary (0-1 integer) programs. One of the many weaknesses of LP solvers is the lack of interaction with the user. ALPS is a menu-driven program with no special commands or keywords to learn. In addition, ALPS contains a full-screen editor to enter and maintain the LP formulation. These formulations can be written to and read from plain ASCII files for portability. For those less experienced in LP formulation, ALPS contains a problem "parser" which checks the formulation for errors. ALPS creates fully formatted, readable reports that can be sent to a printer or output file. ALPS is written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC product, Version 1.01. The APL2 workspace containing all the ALPS code can be run on any APL2/PC system (AT or 386). On a 32-bit system, this configuration can take advantage of all extended memory. The user can also examine and modify the ALPS code. The APL2 workspace has also been "packed" to be run on any DOS system (without APL2) as a stand-alone "EXE" file, but has limited memory capacity on a 640K system. A numeric coprocessor (80X87) is optional but recommended. The standard distribution medium for ALPS is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. IBM, IBM PC and IBM APL2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  19. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  20. Tilted bilayer membranes as simple transmission quarter-wave retardation plates.

    PubMed

    Azzam, R M; Mahmoud, F A

    2001-02-01

    A tilted bilayer membrane, which consists of two thin films of transparent optically isotropic materials of different refractive indices, can function as a transmission quarter-wave retarder (QWR) at a high angle of incidence. A specific design using a cryolite-Si membrane in the infrared is presented, and its tolerances to small shifts of wavelength, incidence angle, and film thickness errors are discussed. Some designs provide a dual QWR in transmission and reflection. Such devices provide simple linear-to-circular (and circular-to-linear) polarization transformers. Bilayer eighth-wave retarders without diattenuation are also introduced. PMID:11205989

  1. Experimental Evaluation of the Free Piston Engine - Linear Alternator (FPLA).

    SciTech Connect

    Leick, Michael T.; Moses, Ronald W.

    2015-03-01

    This report describes the experimental evaluation of a prototype free piston engine - linear alternator (FPLA) system developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The opposed piston design wa developed to investigate its potential for use in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The system is mechanically simple with two - stroke uniflow scavenging for gas exchange and timed port fuel injection for fuel delivery, i.e. no complex valving. Electrical power is extracted from piston motion through linear alternators wh ich also provide a means for passive piston synchronization through electromagnetic coupling. In an HEV application, this electrical power would be used to charge the batteries. The engine - alternator system was designed, assembled and operated over a 2 - year period at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. This report primarily contains a description of the as - built system, modifications to the system to enable better performance, and experimental results from start - up, motoring, and hydrogen combus tion tests.

  2. Attitude control with realization of linear error dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control law is derived to realize linear unforced error dynamics with the attitude error defined in terms of rotation group algebra (rather than vector algebra). Euler parameters are used in the rotational dynamics model because they are globally nonsingular, but only the minimal three Euler parameters are used in the error dynamics model because they have no nonlinear mathematical constraints to prevent the realization of linear error dynamics. The control law is singular only when the attitude error angle is exactly pi rad about any eigenaxis, and a simple intuitive modification at the singularity allows the control law to be used globally. The forced error dynamics are nonlinear but stable. Numerical simulation tests show that the control law performs robustly for both initial attitude acquisition and attitude control.

  3. Multikernel linear mixed models for complex phenotype prediction.

    PubMed

    Weissbrod, Omer; Geiger, Dan; Rosset, Saharon

    2016-07-01

    Linear mixed models (LMMs) and their extensions have recently become the method of choice in phenotype prediction for complex traits. However, LMM use to date has typically been limited by assuming simple genetic architectures. Here, we present multikernel linear mixed model (MKLMM), a predictive modeling framework that extends the standard LMM using multiple-kernel machine learning approaches. MKLMM can model genetic interactions and is particularly suitable for modeling complex local interactions between nearby variants. We additionally present MKLMM-Adapt, which automatically infers interaction types across multiple genomic regions. In an analysis of eight case-control data sets from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium and more than a hundred mouse phenotypes, MKLMM-Adapt consistently outperforms competing methods in phenotype prediction. MKLMM is as computationally efficient as standard LMMs and does not require storage of genotypes, thus achieving state-of-the-art predictive power without compromising computational feasibility or genomic privacy. PMID:27302636

  4. Linear optical coherence tomography system with extended measurement range.

    PubMed

    Koch, Peter; Hellemanns, Volker; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2006-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sensors traditionally use scanning optical delay lines with moving parts and a single detector. OCT systems with a linear detector array (linear OCT or L-OCT) are simple and robust, but a detector with approximately 10,000 pixels is needed for an imaging depth of 2mm, which is necessary for most biomedical applications. We present a new optical setup for L-OCT with an increased measurement range. An additional grating performs a reduction of the spatial frequencies of the fringe pattern on the detector without loss in the signal-to-noise ratio, so the signal can be sampled with a minimal number of pixels. The theory for this approach is addressed and the first measurements are presented. PMID:16969410

  5. A higher order panel method for linearized supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Epton, M. A.; Johnson, F. T.; Magnus, A. E.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    The basic integral equations of linearized supersonic theory for an advanced supersonic panel method are derived. Methods using only linear varying source strength over each panel or only quadratic doublet strength over each panel gave good agreement with analytic solutions over cones and zero thickness cambered wings. For three dimensional bodies and wings of general shape, combined source and doublet panels with interior boundary conditions to eliminate the internal perturbations lead to a stable method providing good agreement experiment. A panel system with all edges contiguous resulted from dividing the basic four point non-planar panel into eight triangular subpanels, and the doublet strength was made continuous at all edges by a quadratic distribution over each subpanel. Superinclined panels were developed and tested on s simple nacelle and on an airplane model having engine inlets, with excellent results.

  6. The wavelength dependence of broadband linear polarization in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven H.; Huovelin, Juhani

    1990-01-01

    A model is developed to investigate the effect of wavelength dependence of magnetically generated broadband linear polarization (BLP) in late-type stars as a function of line blanketing, observation filters, and other variables. Linear polarization is assumed to be a single 'average' line and the line opacity, magnetic area filling factor, and continuum intensity are incorporated to establish an equation for disk-generated BLP. The method is investigated by computing special models for the flare star BY Dra and the sun which are compared to previous calculations. The model is shown to agree with the calculations of BLP, and the magnetic BLP dependent on wavelengths varies significantly from the simple power law dependences on wavelength. The model sets lower limits to the area occupied by magnetic regions, and an upper limit to the expected BLP also results from the formulation.

  7. Transfer of contrast sensitivity in linear visual networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1992-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity is a useful measure of the ability of an observer to distinguish contrast signals from noise. Although usually applied to human observers, contrast sensitivity can also be defined operationally for individual visual neurons. In a model linear neuron consisting of a filter and noise source, this operational measure is a function of filter gain, noise power spectrum, signal duration, and a performance criterion. This definition allows one to relate the sensitivities of linear neurons at different levels in the visual pathway. Mathematical formulas describing these relationships are derived, and the general model is applied to the specific problem of relating the sensitivities of parvocellular LGN neurons and cortical simple cells in the primate.

  8. Steady-state decoupling and design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaler, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A constructive criterion for decoupling the steady states of a linear time-invariant multivariable system is presented. This criterion consists of a set of inequalities which, when satisfied, will cause the steady states of a system to be decoupled. Stability analysis and a new design technique for such systems are given. A new and simple connection between single-loop and multivariable cases is found. These results are then applied to the compensation design for NASA STOL C-8A aircraft. Both steady-state decoupling and stability are justified through computer simulations.

  9. High-Resolution Rotary-To-Linear Motion Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millam, M. Bruce; Studer, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Compact rotary-to-linear motion converter combines high load-carrying ability with finely resolvable movement. Simple and inexpensive to manufacture. Helical coil of metal ribbon wrapped around spool. Bearing supports spool on fixed base. Restraining bar prevents collar from rotating, but allows it to rise and fall. 1,000-turn coil of ribbon 0.010 in. thick provides for translation of collar over distance of 10 inches. Coil made from flattened roll-formed wire. Material inexpensive, strong, and resistant to fatigue.

  10. A RECIPE FOR LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL FOCUS SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-27

    The design of Final Focus systems for linear colliders is challenging because of the large demagnifications needed to produce nanometer-sized beams at the interaction point. Simple first- and second-order matrix matching have proven insufficient for this task, and minimization of third- and higher-order aberrations is essential. An appropriate strategy is required for the latter to be successful. A recipe for Final Focus design, and a set of computational tools used to implement this approach, are described herein. An example of the use of this procedure is given.

  11. A Solution to the Fundamental Linear Fractional Order Differential Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a solution to the fundamental linear fractional order differential equation, namely, (sub c)d(sup q, sub t) + ax(t) = bu(t). The impulse response solution is shown to be a series, named the F-function, which generalizes the normal exponential function. The F-function provides the basis for a qth order "fractional pole". Complex plane behavior is elucidated and a simple example, the inductor terminated semi- infinite lossy line, is used to demonstrate the theory.

  12. Stochastic Satbility and Performance Robustness of Linear Multivariable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Laurie E.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    Stochastic robustness, a simple technique used to estimate the robustness of linear, time invariant systems, is applied to a single-link robot arm control system. Concepts behind stochastic stability robustness are extended to systems with estimators and to stochastic performance robustness. Stochastic performance robustness measures based on classical design specifications are introduced, and the relationship between stochastic robustness measures and control system design parameters are discussed. The application of stochastic performance robustness, and the relationship between performance objectives and design parameters are demonstrated by means of example. The results prove stochastic robustness to be a good overall robustness analysis method that can relate robustness characteristics to control system design parameters.

  13. Comparison of Tracking Codes for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Latina, A.; Schulte, D.; Smith, J.C.; Poirier, F.; Walker, N.J.; Lebrun, P.; Ranjan, K.; Kubo, K.; Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory; Eliasson, P.; /Uppsala U.

    2008-01-23

    In an effort to compare beam dynamics and create a ''benchmark'' for Dispersion Free Steering (DFS) a comparison was made between different International Linear Collider (ILC) simulation programs while performing DFS. This study consisted of three parts. Firstly, a simple betatron oscillation was tracked through each code. Secondly, a set of component misalignments and corrector settings generated from one program was read into the others to confirm similar emittance dilution. Thirdly, given the same set of component misalignments, DFS was performed independently in each program and the resulting emittance dilution was compared. Performance was found to agree exceptionally well in all three studies.

  14. A Thermodynamic Theory Of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part 1: Linear Viscoelasticity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.

    2002-01-01

    The present series of three consecutive papers develops a general theory for linear and finite solid viscoelasticity. Because the most important object for nonlinear studies are rubber-like materials, the general approach is specified in a form convenient for solving problems important for many industries that involve rubber-like materials. General linear and nonlinear theories for non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids are developed based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this, the first paper of the series, we analyze non-isothermal linear viscoelasticity, which is applicable in a range of small strains not only to all synthetic polymers and bio-polymers but also to some non-polymeric materials. Although the linear case seems to be well developed, there still are some reasons to implement a thermodynamic derivation of constitutive equations for solid-like, non-isothermal, linear viscoelasticity. The most important is the thermodynamic modeling of thermo-rheological complexity , i.e. different temperature dependences of relaxation parameters in various parts of relaxation spectrum. A special structure of interaction matrices is established for different physical mechanisms contributed to the normal relaxation modes. This structure seems to be in accord with observations, and creates a simple mathematical framework for both continuum and molecular theories of the thermo-rheological complex relaxation phenomena. Finally, a unified approach is briefly discussed that, in principle, allows combining both the long time (discrete) and short time (continuous) descriptions of relaxation behaviors for polymers in the rubbery and glassy regions.

  15. Testing the assumptions of linear prediction analysis in normal vowels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, M. A.

    This paper develops an improved surrogate data test to show experimental evidence, for all the simple vowels of US English, for both male and female speakers, that Gaussian linear prediction analysis, a ubiquitous technique in current speech technologies, cannot be used to extract all the dynamical structure of real speech time series. The test provides robust evidence undermining the validity of these linear techniques, supporting the assumptions of either dynamical nonlinearity and/or non-Gaussianity common to more recent, complex, efforts at dynamical modelling speech time series. However, an additional finding is that the classical assumptions cannot be ruled out entirely, and plausible evidence is given to explain the success of the linear Gaussian theory as a weak approximation to the true, nonlinear/non-Gaussian dynamics. This supports the use of appropriate hybrid linear/nonlinear/non-Gaussian modelling. With a calibrated calculation of statistic and particular choice of experimental protocol, some of the known systematic problems of the method of surrogate data testing are circumvented to obtain results to support the conclusions to a high level of significance.

  16. Linear and nonlinear effects in detonation wave structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. P.; Kudryavtsev, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    The role of linear and nonlinear effects in the process of formation of detonation wave structure is investigated using linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation. A simple model with a one-step irreversible chemical reaction is considered. For linear stability computations, both the local iterative shooting procedure and the global Chebyshev pseudospectral method are employed. Numerical simulations of 1D pulsating instability are performed using a shock fitting approach based on a 5th order upwind-biased compact-difference discretization and a shock acceleration equation deduced from the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. A shock capturing WENO scheme of the 5th order is used to simulate propagation of detonation wave in a plane channel. It is shown that the linear analysis predicts correctly the mode dominating on early stages of flow evolution and the size of detonation cells which emerge during these stages. Later, however, when a developed self-reproducing cellular structure forms, the cell size is approximately doubled due to nonlinear effects.

  17. The generalized sidelobe canceller based on quaternion widely linear processing.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-wu; Chang, Wen-xiu

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the problem of quaternion beamforming based on widely linear processing. First, a quaternion model of linear symmetric array with two-component electromagnetic (EM) vector sensors is presented. Based on array's quaternion model, we propose the general expression of a quaternion semiwidely linear (QSWL) beamformer. Unlike the complex widely linear beamformer, the QSWL beamformer is based on the simultaneous operation on the quaternion vector, which is composed of two jointly proper complex vectors, and its involution counterpart. Second, we propose a useful implementation of QSWL beamformer, that is, QSWL generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC), and derive the simple expressions of the weight vectors. The QSWL GSC consists of two-stage beamformers. By designing the weight vectors of two-stage beamformers, the interference is completely canceled in the output of QSWL GSC and the desired signal is not distorted. We derive the array's gain expression and analyze the performance of the QSWL GSC in the presence of one type of interference. The advantage of QSWL GSC is that the main beam can always point to the desired signal's direction and the robustness to DOA mismatch is improved. Finally, simulations are used to verify the performance of the proposed QSWL GSC. PMID:24955425

  18. Linearizing Assumptions and Control Design for Spacecraft Formation Flying Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappagantula, K. C.; Crassidis, J. L.

    In this paper the validity of neglecting the relative effect of the gravitational force of the Earth on a formation of spacecraft is studied. This relative effect is treated as an unknown disturbance acting on the system and all control laws are designed using a linear model that neglects this effect. A previously designed simple linear feedback controller is tested under different conditions using the linear model and the full nonlinear model that includes the gravitational force. All tests are carried out in the presence of saturation limits. The results show that the linear controller exhibits oscillations in the transient response and poor robustness under certain conditions. It also exhibits a high saturation tendency, thereby leading to increased fuel consumption. This controller also causes a high rise in the velocity errors at ordinary values of the gains. Based on the behavior of this controller, new controllers are proposed that overcome these drawbacks without any need for modifying the gains. The controllers, when tested under saturation limits exhibit high robustness characteristics due to their low saturation tendency and nearly eliminate oscillations in the transient response. Since these controllers operate under low control forces for a greater duration of the maneuver, they reduce the fuel required for the process. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of these new controllers.

  19. Evolution equation for non-linear cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Brustein, Ram; Riotto, Antonio E-mail: Antonio.Riotto@cern.ch

    2011-11-01

    We present a novel approach, based entirely on the gravitational potential, for studying the evolution of non-linear cosmological matter perturbations. Starting from the perturbed Einstein equations, we integrate out the non-relativistic degrees of freedom of the cosmic fluid and obtain a single closed equation for the gravitational potential. We then verify the validity of the new equation by comparing its approximate solutions to known results in the theory of non-linear cosmological perturbations. First, we show explicitly that the perturbative solution of our equation matches the standard perturbative solutions. Next, using the mean field approximation to the equation, we show that its solution reproduces in a simple way the exponential suppression of the non-linear propagator on small scales due to the velocity dispersion. Our approach can therefore reproduce the main features of the renormalized perturbation theory and (time)-renormalization group approaches to the study of non-linear cosmological perturbations, with some possibly important differences. We conclude by a preliminary discussion of the nature of the full solutions of the equation and their significance.

  20. Toroidal linear force-free magnetic fields with axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are often described as linear force-free fields. To account for their curvature, toroidal configurations must be used. The aim is to find an analytic description of a linear force-free magnetic field of the toroidal geometry in which the cross section of flux ropes can be controlled. Methods: The solution is found as a superposition of fields given by linear force-free cylinders tangential to a generating toroid. The cylindrical field is expressed in a series of terms that are not all cylindrically symmetric. Results: We found the general form of a toroidal linear force-free magnetic field. The field is azimuthally symmetric with respect to the torus axis. It depends on a set of coefficients that enables controlling the flux rope shape (cross section) to some extent. By varying the coefficients, flux ropes with circular and elliptic cross sections were constructed. Numerical comparison suggests that the simple analytic formula for calculating the helicity in toroidal flux ropes of the circular cross section can be used for flux ropes with elliptic cross sections if the minor radius in the formula is set to the geometric mean of the semi-axes of the elliptic cross section.

  1. The Generalized Sidelobe Canceller Based on Quaternion Widely Linear Processing

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jian-wu; Chang, Wen-xiu

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the problem of quaternion beamforming based on widely linear processing. First, a quaternion model of linear symmetric array with two-component electromagnetic (EM) vector sensors is presented. Based on array's quaternion model, we propose the general expression of a quaternion semiwidely linear (QSWL) beamformer. Unlike the complex widely linear beamformer, the QSWL beamformer is based on the simultaneous operation on the quaternion vector, which is composed of two jointly proper complex vectors, and its involution counterpart. Second, we propose a useful implementation of QSWL beamformer, that is, QSWL generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC), and derive the simple expressions of the weight vectors. The QSWL GSC consists of two-stage beamformers. By designing the weight vectors of two-stage beamformers, the interference is completely canceled in the output of QSWL GSC and the desired signal is not distorted. We derive the array's gain expression and analyze the performance of the QSWL GSC in the presence of one type of interference. The advantage of QSWL GSC is that the main beam can always point to the desired signal's direction and the robustness to DOA mismatch is improved. Finally, simulations are used to verify the performance of the proposed QSWL GSC. PMID:24955425

  2. Completely monolithic linearly polarized high-power fiber laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belke, Steffen; Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated a linearly polarized cw all-in-fiber oscillator providing 1 kW of output power and a polarization extinction ratio (PER) of up to 21.7 dB. The design of the laser oscillator is simple and consists of an Ytterbium-doped polarization maintaining large mode area (PLMA) fiber and suitable fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) in matching PLMA fibers. The oscillator has nearly diffraction-limited beam quality (M² < 1.2). Pump power is delivered via a high power 6+1:1 pump coupler. The slope efficiency of the laser is 75 %. The electro/optical efficiency of the complete laser system is ~30 % and hence in the range of Rofin's cw non-polarized fiber lasers. Choosing an adequate bending diameter for the Yb-doped PLMA fiber, one polarization mode as well as higher order modes are sufficiently supressed1. Resulting in a compact and robust linearly polarized high power single mode laser without external polarizing components. Linearly polarized lasers are well established for one dimensional cutting or welding applications. Using beam shaping optics radially polarized laser light can be generated to be independent from the angle of incident to the processing surface. Furthermore, high power linearly polarized laser light is fundamental for nonlinear frequency conversion of nonlinear materials.

  3. Gaussian fluctuations and linear response in an electron transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In response to charge separation or transfer, polar liquids respond in a simple linear fashion. A similar linear response for proteins might be expected from the central limit theorem and is postulated in widely used theories of protein electrostatics, including the Marcus electron transfer theory and dielectric continuum theories. Although these theories are supported by a variety of experimental data, the exact validity of a linear protein dielectric response has been difficult to determine. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented that establish a linear dielectric response of both protein and surrounding solvent over the course of a biologically relevant electron transfer reaction: oxido-reduction of yeast cytochrome c in solution. Using an umbrella-sampling free energy approach with long simulations, an accurate treatment of long-range electrostatics and both classical and quantum models of the heme, good agreement is obtained with experiment for the redox potential relative to a heme–octapeptide complex. We obtain a reorganization free energy that is only half that for heme–octapeptide and is reproduced with a dielectric continuum model where the heme vicinity has a dielectric constant of only 1.1. This value implies that the contribution of protein reorganization to the electron transfer free energy barrier is reduced almost to the theoretical limit (a dielectric of one), and that the fluctuations of the electrostatic potential on the heme have a simple harmonic form, in accord with Marcus theory, even though the fluctuations of many individual protein groups (especially at the protein surface) are anharmonic. PMID:12011418

  4. Linear Response for Intermittent Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Todd, Mike

    2016-02-01

    We consider the one parameter family {α mapsto T_{α}} ({α in [0,1)} ) of Pomeau-Manneville type interval maps {T_{α}(x) = x(1+2^{α} x^{α})} for {x in [0,1/2)} and {T_{α}(x)=2x-1} for {x in [1/2, 1]} , with the associated absolutely continuous invariant probability measure {μ_{α}} . For {α in (0,1)} , Sarig and Gouëzel proved that the system mixes only polynomially with rate {n^{1-1/{α}}} (in particular, there is no spectral gap). We show that for any {ψ in Lq} , the map {α to int_01 ψ d μ_{α}} is differentiable on {[0,1-1/q)} , and we give a (linear response) formula for the value of the derivative. This is the first time that a linear response formula for the SRB measure is obtained in the setting of slowly mixing dynamics. Our argument shows how cone techniques can be used in this context. For {α ≥ 1/2} we need the {n^{-1/{α}}} decorrelation obtained by Gouëzel under additional conditions.

  5. Using Simple Machines to Leverage Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotger, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    What would your students say if you told them they could lift you off the ground using a block and a board? Using a simple machine, they'll find out they can, and they'll learn about work, energy, and motion in the process! In addition, this integrated lesson gives students the opportunity to investigate variables while practicing measurement…

  6. Air: Simple Experiments for Young Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry

    This book contains simple experiments through which students explore air and its properties. Some of the topics discussed include alternative energy, bacteria, carbon dioxide, motion, weather, and flight. Experiments include: blowing a balloon up in a bottle; seeing air in water; making a lunch-bag kite, weather vanes, and paper glider;…

  7. Seismic Safety Of Simple Masonry Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnuolo, Mariateresa; Faella, Giuseppe

    2008-07-08

    Several masonry buildings comply with the rules for simple buildings provided by seismic codes. For these buildings explicit safety verifications are not compulsory if specific code rules are fulfilled. In fact it is assumed that their fulfilment ensures a suitable seismic behaviour of buildings and thus adequate safety under earthquakes. Italian and European seismic codes differ in the requirements for simple masonry buildings, mostly concerning the building typology, the building geometry and the acceleration at site. Obviously, a wide percentage of buildings assumed simple by codes should satisfy the numerical safety verification, so that no confusion and uncertainty have to be given rise to designers who must use the codes. This paper aims at evaluating the seismic response of some simple unreinforced masonry buildings that comply with the provisions of the new Italian seismic code. Two-story buildings, having different geometry, are analysed and results from nonlinear static analyses performed by varying the acceleration at site are presented and discussed. Indications on the congruence between code rules and results of numerical analyses performed according to the code itself are supplied and, in this context, the obtained result can provide a contribution for improving the seismic code requirements.

  8. Simple high-temperature thermal diffusivity apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.

    1984-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive thermal diffusivity apparatus is described for measurement up to 1600 K. The novel features of apparatus include a light pipe, a long furnace, and a differential thermocouple. A low heat-load sample holder for clamping the sample in a vertical position is also described. The results of measurements on AXM-5Q graphite are reported.

  9. Simple Phenomena, Slow Motion, Surprising Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koupil, Jan; Vicha, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a few simple experiments that are worthwhile for slow motion recording and analysis either because of interesting phenomena that can be seen only when slowed down significantly or because of the ability to do precise time measurements. The experiments described in this article are quite commonly done in Czech schools. All…

  10. Richard Kluger's "Simple Justice" after 29 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Although it is obligatory to mark the anniversary of "Brown v. Board of Education," why it deserves to be commemorated is not necessarily obvious at a distance of fifty years. In this article, the author discusses this issue in the light of Richard Kluger's remarkable book--"Simple Justice." He states that, today the widespread existence of…

  11. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  12. Nature versus Nurture: The Simple Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules; Goldstein, Julie; Roberson, Debi

    2009-01-01

    We respond to the commentary of Franklin, Wright, and Davies ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102", 239-245 [2009]) by returning to the simple contrast between nature and nurture. We find no evidence from the toddler data that makes us revise our ideas that color categories are learned and never innate. (Contains 1 figure.)

  13. Experimental Control of Simple Pendulum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper conveys information about a Physics laboratory experiment for students with some theoretical knowledge about oscillatory motion. Students construct a simple pendulum that behaves as an ideal one, and analyze model assumption incidence on its period. The following aspects are quantitatively analyzed: vanishing friction, small amplitude,…

  14. Learning in a Simple Motor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Dianne M.; Kassardjian, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    Motor learning is a very basic, essential form of learning that appears to share common mechanisms across different motor systems. We evaluate and compare a few conceptual models for learning in a relatively simple neural system, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of vertebrates. We also compare the different animal models that have been used to…

  15. Simple Enrichment System for Hydrogen Producers ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tolvanen, Katariina E. S.; Mangayil, Rahul K.; Karp, Matti T.; Santala, Ville P.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a simple enrichment system where gas pressure produced by microbes performs functions that are normally done by labor. The system was tested with Escherichia coli strains with different hydrogen production and growth capabilities. The results show that the system can enrich the best hydrogen producer. PMID:21531834

  16. Building Simple Hidden Markov Models. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Wai-Ki; Ng, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are widely used in bioinformatics, speech recognition and many other areas. This note presents HMMs via the framework of classical Markov chain models. A simple example is given to illustrate the model. An estimation method for the transition probabilities of the hidden states is also discussed.

  17. Revisiting the Simple View of Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendeou, Panayiota; Savage, Robert; van den Broek, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reading component models such as the Simple View of Reading (SVR; Gough & Tunmer, 1986; Hoover & Gough, 1990) provide a concise framework for describing the processes and skills involved when readers comprehend texts. According to the Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading (Rose, 2006) strong evidence for the SVR comes…

  18. A simple urine test for sulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Filho, Juvenal; de Souza, José Maria

    1983-01-01

    The lack of a simple and reliable test for sulfonamides has created a problem because of the increasing use of these drugs in the chemotherapy of malaria. This paper describes a modification of the Bratton-Marshall technique, for which the reagents are easily obtainable and which can be carried out in simply equipped primary health care laboratories. PMID:6601540

  19. [A simple vibratome for brain slice].

    PubMed

    Xia, J H; Xing, B R; Gu, Q; Hua, S Y

    1989-12-01

    A simple vibratome was fabricated using double-function electric shaver and microscopic platform. Spontaneous discharge of neurons in hippocampal and hypothalamic brain slices (in 300-400 microns thick) prepared by the vibratome could kept above 12 hours in artificial cerebro-spinal fluid. PMID:2697084

  20. Simple Demonstration of the Seebeck Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molki, Arman

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose a simple and low-cost experimental set-up through which science educators can demonstrate the Seebeck effect using a thermocouple and an instrumentation amplifier. The experiment can be set up and conducted during a 1-hour laboratory session. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)