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Sample records for hypercalcemia

  1. Hypercalcemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... nephrocalcinosis ) Dehydration High blood pressure Kidney failure Kidney stones Psychological: Depression Difficulty concentrating or thinking Skeletal: Bone cysts Fractures Osteoporosis These complications of long-term hypercalcemia are uncommon today.

  2. Hypercalcemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or health problems such as, Paget's disease and sarcoidosis. An inherited condition that affects the body's ability ... hypercalcemia due to conditions such as cancer or sarcoidosis may not do well. This is most often ...

  3. Problems in medicine: hypercalcemia

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1985-06-01

    The pathophysiologic mechanisms for hypercalcemia are reviewed and a diagnostic approach to determining the cause of hypercalcemia in clinical cases in dogs and cats is recommended. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (ACR)

  4. Immobilization induced hypercalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Torres, Edgar Alonso; González-Cantú, Arnulfo; Hinojosa-Garza, Gabriela; Castilleja-Leal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immobilization hypercalcemia is an uncommon diagnosis associated with increased bone remodeling disorders and conditions associated with limited movement such as medullar lesions or vascular events. Diagnosis requires an extensive evaluation to rule out other causes of hypercalcemia. This is a report of a woman with prolonged immobilization who presented with severe hypercalcemia. This case contributes to identification of severe hypercalcemia as a result of immobility and the description of bone metabolism during this state. PMID:27252745

  5. Hypercalcemia. Pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Žofková, I

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathways that contribute to maintain serum calcium concentration in narrow physiological range include the bone remodeling process, intestinal absorption and renal tubule resorption. Dysbalance in these regulations may lead to hyper- or hypocalcemia. Hypercalcemia is a potentionally life-threatening and relatively common clinical problem, which is mostly associated with hyperparathyroidism and/or malignant diseases (90 %). Scarce causes of hypercalcemia involve renal failure, kidney transplantation, endocrinopathies, granulomatous diseases, and the long-term treatment with some pharmaceuticals (vitamin D, retinoic acid, lithium). Genetic causes of hypercalcemia involve familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia associated with an inactivation mutation in the calcium sensing receptor gene and/or a mutation in the CYP24A1 gene. Furthermore, hypercalcemia accompanying primary hyperparathyroidism, which develops as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1 and MEN2), is also genetically determined. In this review mechanisms of hypercalcemia are discussed. The objective of this article is a review of hypercalcemia obtained from a Medline bibliographic search. PMID:26596315

  6. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sarcoidosis • Hormone disorders, such as overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) • A genetic condition called familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia • Kidney ... topics: www.hormone.org (search for PHPT, calcium, hyperthyroidism, or osteoporosis) • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of Health-NIH): ...

  7. Imaging studies in hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Cecchin, D; Motta, R; Zucchetta, P; Bui, F; Basso, S M M; Lumachi, F

    2011-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a relatively common clinical problem, mainly (>90%) related to primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) and malignancies. The anatomical and functional imaging techniques available for locating enlarged parathyroid glands include ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and nuclear medicine imaging techniques. The most commonly employed are US and parathyroid scintigraphy, while CT, MRI, positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, and selective venous sampling are generally used in patients with persistent or recurrent HPT, or when findings of non-invasive studies are negative or conflicting. The reported accuracy is 57-93%, 54-93%, and up to 95% for US, (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy, and the two modalities combined, respectively. A multimodality approach (x-ray, whole-body scintigraphy, CT, MRI, and PET) is usually recommended for whole body assessment in cases of cancer-induced hypercalcemia (CIH). Imaging studies should evaluate each organ (i.e. breast, kidney, prostate, parathyroid) potentially involved in the pathogenesis of hypercalcemia in patients with CIH. In cases of skeletal metastases, when findings on plain x-ray or bone scans are uncertain, any unexplained region of abnormal uptake should be examined by MRI and/or ¹⁸F-fluoro-2- deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT, which has proved more accurate than classical bone scintigraphy, especially for dealing with hematologic malignancies. A number of radionuclide tracers, other than ¹⁸F-FDG, are available for use in selected cases to locate specific tumors (i.e. ⁶⁸Ga for neuroendocrine tumors). This is a review of recently published information on the imaging techniques currently available for patients with hypercalcemia. PMID:21756234

  8. Severe hypercalcemia due to teriparatide

    PubMed Central

    Karatoprak, Cumali; Kayatas, Kadir; Kilicaslan, Hanifi; Yolbas, Servet; Yazimci, Nurhan Aliye; Gümüskemer, Tolga; Demirtunç, Refik

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis that is by far the most common metabolic bone disease, has been defined as a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength predisposing a person to an increased risk of fracture. Anabolic therapy with teriparatide, recombinant human parathyroid hormone (PTH 1-34), stimulates bone formation and resorption and improves trabecular and cortical microarchitecture. Teriparatide is indicated for the treatment of men and postmenopausal women with osteoporosis who are at high risk for fracture, including those who have failed or are intolerant of previous osteoporosis therapy. In conclusion, although teriparatide seems quite effective in the treatment of osteoporosis, it may cause life-threatening hypercalcemia. Therefore, patients should be closely monitored if symptoms of hypercalcemia are present during teriparatide treatment. Sustained hypercalcemia due to teriparatide treatment can not be seen in literature so we wanted to emphasize that severe hypercalcemia may develop due to teriperatide. PMID:22529492

  9. Artifactual hypercalcemia in multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Annesley, T.M.; Burritt, M.F.; Kyle, R.A.

    1982-09-01

    A calcium-binding IgG K monoclonal protein in a patient with multiple myeloma and asymptomatic hypercalcemia was recognized, isolated, and characterized. In addition to binding by the whole IgG molecules, calcium was bound by purified Fab fragments and recombined heavy and light chains. In a competitive binding study, the isolated myeloma protein did not bind magnesium. Recognition of calcium-binding myeloma proteins is important in order to avoid therapy for hypercalcemia.

  10. [Hypercalcemia revealing sarcoidosis in a child].

    PubMed

    Kinné, M; Filleron, A; Salet, R; Saumet, L; Baron Joly, S; Tran, T A

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatosis disease with a classic triad of presentation: typical clinical and radiological signs, presence of tuberculoid granuloma without caseum in histopathology, and exclusion of other causes of granulomatosis, especially tuberculosis. Sarcoidosis is rare in the general population, and even more so in children. In the literature, few cases of sarcoidosis associated with hypercalcemia have been reported in children. We report here the case of a 14-year-old boy with bone marrow and lymph node sarcoidosis suspected, based on poor general condition with hypercalcemia. The patient was treated with hydration, diuretics, and bisphosphonates with good results. We also performed a literature review of published cases of hypercalcemia since 1990 with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis in children, comparing 23 cases (including ours) on clinical and epidemiological, biological, imaging, and histopathological diagnosis. When hypercalcemia is present in the initial clinical presentation, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis is usually made in younger children. Classical locations of the lesions, including lung, skin, and lymph nodes, were highly suggestive of sarcoidosis. Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat sarcoidosis lesions including hypercalcemia. In conclusion, sarcoidosis in children remains difficult to diagnose because the disease is rare and it is common to have nonspecific symptoms in the clinical picture (with diagnosis delayed between 3 months and several years). The classic triad is not always present. Sarcoidosis should be systematically considered and investigated in case of hypercalcemia of unknown cause in children. PMID:27021884

  11. Studies on the pathogenesis of cancer hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Laird Myers, W. P.; Bockman, R.

    1977-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypercalcemia in cancer continues to challenge the clinical investigator. Some aspects of this subject have been reviewed, notably with respect to the possible roles of prostaglandins and osteoclast activating factor, with particular reference to breast cancer. There is considerable evidence that the former humoral factor is operative and beginning evidence that the latter may be also. The hope in this continued work is that with better understanding of the mechanisms of hypercalcemia and bone loclization of tumors we will be in a far better position to control and interdict this localization. Images Fig. 3 PMID:898535

  12. [Hypercalcemia of T-cell leukemia in adults].

    PubMed

    Jean-Baptiste, G; Arfi, S; Plumelle, Y; Panelatti, G; Mangin, J L; Pascaline, N

    1993-04-01

    A retrospective study of 26 adults with acute T-cell leukemia showed that 14 patients (54%) had hypercalcemia at some point of the disease. Hypercalcemia was found at presentation in nine patients and revealed the disease in one. Eight patients had hypercalcemia at the time of death. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone levels were normal. All patients with hypercalcemia tested positive for the HTLV-1 by Elisa and Western blot. Six patients had focalized or diffuse lytic roentgenographic bone lesions. Hypercalcemia in acute T-cell leukemia may involve production of interleukin-1-alpha and parathyroid hormone-related protein by HTLV-1-infected cells. PMID:8167627

  13. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed Central

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them. PMID:27252737

  14. Hypercalcemia of Malignancy: An Update on Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common finding typically found in patients with advanced stage cancers. We aimed to provide an updated review on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of malignancy-related hypercalcemia. We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science for original articles, case reports, and case series articles focused on hypercalcemia of malignancy published from 1950 to December 2014. Hypercalcemia of malignancy usually presents with markedly elevated calcium levels and therefore, usually severely symptomatic. Several major mechanisms are responsible for the development of hypercalcemia of malignancy including parathyroid hormone-related peptide-mediated humoral hypercalcemia, osteolytic metastases-related hypercalcemia, 1,25 Vitamin D-mediated hypercalcemia, and parathyroid hormone-mediated hypercalcemia in patients with parathyroid carcinoma and extra parathyroid cancers. Diagnosis should include the history and physical examination as well as measurement of the above mediators of hypercalcemia. Management includes hydration, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, denosumab, and in certain patients, prednisone and cinacalcet. Patients with advanced underlying kidney disease and refractory severe hypercalcemia should be considered for hemodialysis. Hematology or oncology and palliative care specialists should be involved early to guide the options of cancer targeted therapies and help the patients and their closed ones with the discussion of comfort-oriented care. PMID:26713296

  15. Hypercalcemia in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, J; Querusio, L; Burchard, K W; Gann, D S

    1985-01-01

    Critical surgical illness, commonly accompanied by shock, sepsis, multiple transfusions, and renal failure, is usually associated with low total calcium and/or low or normal ionized calcium. A seminal case of hypercalcemia in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patient prompted the review of 100 patients with longer than average SICU days (greater than 12) to determine the incidence, associated factors, and possible etiologies of this condition. Ten patients had elevated measured, and five others had elevated calculated, ionized calcium (5.9 +/- 0.25 mg%), an incidence of 15%. Compared to the 85 patients who did not develop hypercalcemia, this population had a significantly higher frequency of the following: renal failure, dialysis, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) usage greater than 21 days, bacteremic days greater than 1, transfusions greater than 24 units, shock greater than 1 day, SICU days greater than 36, and antibiotics used greater than 7. In addition, this group had significantly more days of hypocalcemia early in their hospital course. There was no difference in sex, age, mortality, or incidence of respiratory failure. Two patients studied in depth had renal failure requiring dialysis and no malignancy, milk-alkali syndrome, hyperthyroidism, or hypoadrenalism. Parathormone (PTH) concentrations were high normal or elevated (N terminal 20 and 21 pg/ml; C terminal 130 microliters Eq/ml and 1009 pg/ml) at the time of elevated calcium (total 9.2 to 14.6 mg%; ionized 4.9 to 8.2 mg%). Immobilization does not increase PTH. In renal failure, PTH elevation is a consequence of hypocalcemia rather than hypercalcemia. Moreover, five patients did not have renal failure. Shock, sepsis, and multiple transfusions containing citrate may lower total and/or ionized calcium and thus stimulate PTH secretion. Whatever the mechanism, approximately 15% of critically ill surgical patients develop hypercalcemia, which may represent a new form of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:3931594

  16. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Kim, Tong Yoon; Lee, Sangmin; Jeong, Jeong Yeon; Shim, Hojoon; Han, Yu min; Choi, Kyu Eun; Shin, Seok Joon; Yoon, Hye Eun

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is an uncommon cause of hypercalcemia and not easily considered as an etiology of adrenal insufficiency in clinical practice, as not all cases of adrenal insufficiency manifest as hypercalcemia. We report a case of secondary adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury in a 66-year-old female. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with general weakness and poor oral intake. Hypercalcemia (11.5 mg/dL) and moderate renal dysfunction (serum creatinine 4.9 mg/dL) were shown in her initial laboratory findings. Studies for malignancy and hyperparathyroidism showed negative results. Basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. With the administration of oral hydrocortisone, hypercalcemia was dramatically resolved within 3 days. This case shows that adrenal insufficiency may manifest as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury, which implicates that adrenal insufficiency should be considered a cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice. PMID:27536162

  17. Denosumab for Treatment of Hypercalcemia of Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Glezerman, Ilya G.; Leboulleux, Sophie; Insogna, Karl; Gucalp, Rasim; Misiorowski, Waldemar; Yu, Bennett; Zorsky, Paul; Tosi, Diego; Bessudo, Alberto; Jaccard, Arnaud; Tonini, Giuseppe; Ying, Wendy; Braun, Ada; Jain, Rajul K.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM) in patients with advanced cancer is often caused by excessive osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Patients may not respond to or may relapse after iv bisphosphonate therapy. Objective: We investigated whether denosumab, a potent inhibitor of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, reduces serum calcium in patients with bisphosphonate-refractory HCM. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this single-arm international study, participants had serum calcium levels corrected for albumin (CSC) >12.5 mg/dL (3.1 mmol/L) despite bisphosphonates given >7 and ≤30 days before screening. Intervention: Patients received 120 mg sc denosumab on days 1, 8, 15, and 29 and then every 4 weeks. Main Outcome Measures: The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with CSC ≤11.5 mg/dL (2.9 mmol/L) (response) by day 10. Secondary endpoints included response by visit, duration of response, and the proportion of patients with a complete response (CSC ≤10.8 mg/dL [2.7 mmol/L]) by day 10 and during the study. Results: Patients (N = 33) had solid tumors or hematologic malignancies. By day 10, 21 patients (64%) reached CSC ≤11.5 mg/dL, and 12 patients (33%) reached CSC ≤10.8 mg/dL. During the study, 23 patients (70%) reached CSC ≤11.5 mg/dL, and 21 patients (64%) reached CSC ≤10.8 mg/dL. Estimated median response duration was 104 days. The most common serious adverse events were hypercalcemia worsening (5 patients, 15%) and dyspnea (3 patients, 9%). Conclusions: In patients with HCM despite recent iv bisphosphonate treatment, denosumab lowered serum calcium in 64% of patients within 10 days, inducing durable responses. Denosumab may offer a new treatment option for HCM. PMID:24915117

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus-related hypercalcemia with ectopic calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lidan; Huang, Linfang; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old female with active systemic lupus erythematosus who complained of lethargy and weakness with a moderate renal impairment. Hypercalcemia was confirmed by laboratory examination. Her X-ray revealed significant ectopic calcinosis in subcutaneous tissue of bilateral hands, and Tc-99(m) methylene diphosphonate bone scan revealed a remarkably intense uptake of bilateral lungs. She had no evidence suggestive of other diseases related to hypercalcemia such as hyperparathyroidism and malignancy. She had abnormally high serum parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) which fell to normal after treatment. Glucocorticoid, cyclophosphamide plus calcitonin and etidronate were administered and the patient improved greatly. Literature review demonstrated that lupus-related hypercalcemia with ectopic calcinosis is a rare complication and increased PTHrP is probably one of the main mechanisms. Lung uptake in bone scan may be a special and reliable clue suggestive of hypercalcemia. PMID:27136920

  19. Rhabdomyosarcoma-induced hypercalcemia in a nude mouse.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Takeuchi, H; Hoshino, R; Ohmi, K

    1982-07-01

    Hypercalcemia in nude mice with a rhabdomyosarcoma transplanted from a hypercalcemic patient is reported. The tumor had been transplanted to nude mice from a 15-year-old girl with hypercalcemia which appeared as the rhabdomyosarcoma developed and metastasized to the peritoneal and pleural cavities. The tumor was successfully transplanted to nude mice, which presented an elevated serum calcium level. No remarkable elevation of serum parathyroid hormone or 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D was found in the mouse with rhabdomyosarcoma. Injection of indomethacin restored the elevated serum calcium level to the normal range. The prostaglandin E2 level was approximately 15 times higher in the tumor-bearing mouse serum than in the control mouse serum. These data indicate that hypercalcemia in this patient can be ascribed to prostaglandin E2 produced by the rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:6952956

  20. Catastrophic hypercalcemia as a technical complication in home hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Murlidharan, Praveen; Chan, Christopher T; Bargman, Joanne M

    2011-08-01

    Life-threatening hypercalcemia in dialysis patients is very unusual. We present a case where life-threatening hypercalcemia in a home hemodialysis patient resulted from a technical mistake. A 46-year-old woman, on home nocturnal hemodialysis, presented to the emergency room with history of altered sensorium, vomiting and sweating, which started 1 h after initiation of dialysis the previous night. Serum calcium was 6.5 mmol/L. She improved with 10 h of low-calcium hemodialysis. Investigation revealed that the drain port of the reverse osmosis machine was connected to the dialysis machine and the product water was connected to the drain leading to acute hypercalcemia. PMID:25949494

  1. Granulomatous Interstitial Nephritis Presenting as Hypercalcemia and Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharmeen, Saika; Kalkan, Esra; Yi, Chunhui; Smith, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute kidney injury as the initial manifestation of sarcoidosis. A 55-year-old male was sent from his primary care physician's office with incidental lab findings significant for hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury with past medical history significant for nephrolithiasis. Initial treatment with intravenous hydration did not improve his condition. The renal biopsy subsequently revealed granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN). Treatment with the appropriate dose of glucocorticoids improved both the hypercalcemia and renal function. Our case demonstrates that renal limited GIN due to sarcoidosis, although a rare entity, can cause severe acute kidney injury and progressive renal failure unless promptly diagnosed and treated. PMID:26904327

  2. All-Trans-Retinoic-Acid Unmasking Hypercalcemia of Hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Uday; Sahu, Kamal Kant; Khadwal, Alka; Prakash, Gaurav; Varma, Subhash Chander; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2016-06-01

    We present a patient of acute promyelocytic leukaemia managed with all-trans-retinoic-acid and arsenic trioxide who developed hypercalcemia with target organ damage. The patient also was simultaneously discovered to be symptomatic from hyperparathyroidism, which was unmasked after ATRA administration. Patient was successfully managed without any interruption of ATRA therapy and parathyroidectomy. We discuss the mechanisms of ATRA in causing hypercalcemia and its possible role in index case in unmasking hyperparathyroidism. Present case refutes Occam's razor and emphasise that known adverse effects shouldn't withhold clinicians from working up for other common causes for a given condition. PMID:27408352

  3. Paraneoplastic hypercalcemia in a dog with thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Amy E.; Wyatt, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes a dog with thyroid carcinoma and paraneoplastic hypercalcemia. Following thyroidectomy the dog became hypocalcemic and required supplementation with calcitriol and calcium carbonate. During the following 2 years, attempts to reduce the supplementation resulted in hypocalcemia. The dog died from renal failure with no evidence of thyroid carcinoma. PMID:23543930

  4. [Hypercalcemia in malignancies of the female genital tract].

    PubMed

    Piura, Benjamin

    2008-03-01

    Hypercalcemia is the most common paraneoplastic syndrome in adult malignancies (10%-30%) and rare in pediatric cancers (0.5%-1.3%). Hypercalcemia in malignancies is categorized into two groups: 1) Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM)-caused by substances that are produced by the tumor cells and secreted into the blood circulation such as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-rP), parathyroid hormone-intact (PTH-i), the enzyme 1-alpha-hydroxylase that catalyzes the synthesis of the active form of vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3), and other substances; 2) Hypercalcemia due to bone destruction by metastases. Hypercalcemia occurs in less than 5% of female genital tract malignancies and virtually in all cases (95%) it is HHM. Female genital tract malignancy-associated HHM is caused most often (80%) by PTH-rP. Ovarian cancer is the most common female genital tract malignancy that is associated with HHM. Although HHM occurs in only 5% of ovarian cancers, it occurs in a relatively high percentage in the following rare ovarian tumors: a). Small cell carcinoma of the ovary - a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all ovarian cancers and is associated with HHM in 66% of the cases; b). Clear cell carcinoma of the ovary - an uncommon tumor that accounts for 5% of all ovarian cancers and is associated with HHM in 5%-10% of the cases. Since dysgerminoma is the most common malignant ovarian tumor in children, in girls it is the second most common ovarian neoplasm, after ovarian small cell carcinoma, to be associated with HHM. PMID:18488865

  5. Hypercalcemia in a Dog with Chronic Ingestion of Maxacalcitol Ointment.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kensuke; Tohyama, Nobuo; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Morishita, Keitaro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A miniature dachshund male with severe azotemia of unknown cause was referred. Serum biochemistry revealed severe azotemia and hypercalcemia, but serum intact parathormone and parathormone-related protein were normal. Although the owner reported that the dog had never ingested any drugs or supplements, it was revealed that the owner's son used antipsoriatic ointment, maxacalcitol, which contained an active vitamin D3 analogue, daily and the dog often ate the son's dander and licked his skin, especially after he applied the maxacalcitol ointment. After the dog was insulated from the maxacalcitol ointment and the son as much as possible, the hypercalcemia and azotemia improved gradually and had mostly resolved at 3 mo. The dog has been generally free of clinical signs without any treatment for over 2 yr. PMID:27259026

  6. Hypercalcemia as a Cause of Kidney Failure: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Taneva, Borjanka; Selim, Gjulsen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypercalcemia is a common manifestation in clinical practice and occurs as a result of primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, milk-alkali syndrome, hyper or hypothyroidism, sarcoidosis and other known and unknown causes. Patients with milk-alkali syndrome typically are presented with renal failure, hypercalcemia, and metabolic alkalosis caused by the ingestion of calcium and absorbable alkali. This syndrome is caused by high intake of milk and sodium bicarbonate. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a 28-year old male admitted to hospital with a one-month history of nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, increased blood pressure and worsening of renal function with hypercalcemia. His serum PTH level was almost undetectable; he had mild alkalosis, renal failure with eGFR of 42 ml/min, anemia, hypertension and abnormal ECG with shortened QT interval and ST elevation in V1-V4. He had a positive medical history for calcium-containing antacids intake and after ruling out primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, multiple myelomas, sarcoidosis, and thyroid dysfunction, it seemed plausible to diagnose him as having the milk-alkali syndrome. CONCLUSION: Although milk-alkali syndrome currently may be more probably a result of calcium and vitamin D intake in postmenopausal women, or in elderly men with reduced kidney function taking calcium-containing medications, one should not exclude the possibility of its appearance in younger patients taking calcium-containing medications and consider it a serious condition taking into account its possibility of inducing renal insufficiency. PMID:27335601

  7. Multiple myeloma with hypercalcemia and chloride resistant metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Alshayeb, Hala; Patel, Vikul; Naseer, Adnan; Mangold, Therese A; Wall, Barry M

    2011-10-01

    This report describes a novel presentation of chloride resistant metabolic alkalosis in a patient with hypercalcemia related to Multiple Myeloma (MM). A 51-year-old male with newly diagnosed MM presented with widespread skeletal involvement, calcium (Ca(+2)) of 18 mg/dL, phosphorous (PO4) of 6 mg/dL, serum bicarbonate (HCO3) of 37 mEq/L, and serum creatinine (Cr) of 2.6 mg/dL Other causes of metabolic alkalosis such as vomiting, diuretics, alkali ingestion, mineralocorticoid excess and hypokalemia were excluded. Hypercalcemia and metabolic alkalosis were only partially corrected after rehydration, calcitonin and steroids. Subsequent treatment with zoledronic acid resulted in resolution of hypercalcemia and correction of metabolic alkalosis.The chloride resistant component of metabolic alkalosis was most likely related to extensive release of Ca(+2), carbonate and phosphate from bone by activated osteoclasts with inhibited osteoblastic activity. The additional reduction in glomerular filtration rate due to MM, contributed to a triad mimicking Calcium-Alkali syndrome. PMID:22073517

  8. Hypercalcemia and renal failure in the course of sarcoidosis--case report.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Anna; Kuś, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances of calcium metabolism such as hypercalcemia or/and hypercalciuria in the course of sarcoidosis can be a cause of renal failure in some patients. Life threatening hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis patients is not very frequent. Severe hypercalcemia leading to renal insufficiency is a very rare condition. We present a case of 53-year old man who was admitted to Department of Lung Diseases because of hypercalcemic syndrome and renal failure, and in whom diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made. He was successfully treated with systemic corticosteroids. In this article we present physiological mechanism of hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis patients, mechanism of renal damage and management of these difficult problems. PMID:23109211

  9. Dangerous nutrition? Calcium, vitamin D, and shark cartilage nutritional supplements and cancer-related hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan

    2003-04-01

    The use of nutritional supplements in the general population and in cancer patients has become very popular. These supplements are not perceived as medications and are presumed to be safe by cancer patients, who may however be at risk for hypercalcemia. We note that many of our patients who have developed symptomatic hypercalcemia were taking vitamin D, calcium, or shark cartilage supplements. We report eight cases of hypercalcemia in cancer patients seen at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in whom these nutritional supplements may have contributed to the prevalence or severity of hypercalcemia. PMID:12673461

  10. [Hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis--case report, prevalence, pathophysiology and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D

    2007-05-01

    Hypercalcemia is a highly prevalent complication of sarcoidosis. A medical history of a patient with sarcoidosis is shown as case report. Depending on the population studied about 2-63% of sarcoidosis patients show hypercalcemia. The major difference in the prevalence of hypercalcemia may be in part due to the undulating course of subacute sarcoidosis, so hypercalcemia may be missed when serum calcium is not frequently measured. Hypercalciuria appears to be twice as prevalent then hypercalcemia and should be looked for in every sarcoidosis patient. Hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis is due to the uncontrolled synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by macrophages. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 leads to an increased absorption of calcium in the intestine and to an increased resorption of calcium in the bone. Immunoregulatory properties have been ascribed to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. It is an important inhibitor of interleukin-2 and of interferon-gamma-synthesis, two cytokines that are important in granuloma formation in sarcoidosis. It is thought that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 counterregulates uncontrolled granuloma formation. Treatment of hypercalcemia depends on the serum level of hypercalcemia and its persistence. Generally sarcoidotic patients should be advised to avoid sun exposition to reduce vitamin D3 synthesis in the skin, to omit fish oils that are rich of vitamin D and to produce more than two liters urine a day by adapting fluid intake. Although severe hypercalcemia seems to be rare, glucocorticosteroid treatment should be started if corrected total calcium level rises beyond 3 mmol/l. If hypercalcemia is symptomatic, treatment should be started even at lower levels. Glucocorticosteroids act by inhibition of the overly 1alpha-hydroxylase activity of macrophages. Alternatively, treatment with chloroquine or ketoconazole can be established. If isolated hypercalciuria without hypercalcemia is present with evidence for recurrent nephrolithiasis, patients can be treated

  11. Serum parathyroid hormone-related protein concentration in a dog with a thymoma and persistent hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, P; Shaw, D; Runyon, C; McConkey, S; Ikede, B

    2000-01-01

    A thymoma was tentatively diagnosed by radiographic and cytologic examination in a dog with hypercalcemia and elevated serum parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) concentration. Following surgical excision, the diagnosis of thymoma was confirmed via histopathologic examination, the hypercalcemia resolved, and the PTHrP concentration decreased to below detectable limits. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:11126493

  12. Severe hypercalcemia unmasked by Vitamin D in a patient with sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Nayak-Rao, S

    2013-01-01

    Severe hypercalcemia is uncommon in clinical practice and is usually due to primary hperparathyroidism or malignancy. We present a patient who presented with severe hypercalcemia with renal failure; further evaluation of which revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This case is presented in view of the rarity of presentation of sarcoidosis with hypercalcemic crisis. PMID:24049278

  13. Hypercalcemia and parathyroid hormone-related protein in a dog with undifferentiated nasal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G M; Lane, I; Fischer, J; Lopez, A

    1999-01-01

    Hypercalcemia was discovered in a 7-year-old, castrated male basset hound with a suspected nasal tumor. The dog died the day after admission and nasal carcinoma and disseminated intravascular coagulation were diagnosed on postmortem. Detectable levels of serum PTHrP support a diagnosis of hypercalcemia of malignancy. PMID:10340096

  14. An interesting case of systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with hypercalcemia: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Gafor, Abdul Halim; Cader, Rizna Abdul; Das, Srijit; Masir, Noraidah; Wahid, Fadilah Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypercalcemia is common in primary hyperparathyroidism malignancies and even in tuberculosis. Interestingly, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) rarely presents with hypercalcemia. Case Report: We describe an interesting case of SLE in a patient who was otherwise thought to have either tuberculosis or a malignancy. The patient initially presented with feeling unwell, with generalized lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and bilateral corneal calcium deposits secondary to severe hypercalcemia. The diagnosis of SLE was made based on positivity of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA, the presence of serositis, lymphadenopathy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and constitutional symptoms. She was treated with steroids, with tremendous improvement in her general well-being, resolution of lymphadenopathy and pleural effusion, and normalization of her hemoglobin and serum calcium. The atypical presentation of SLE with hypercalcemia with pleural effusion is discussed. Conclusions: SLE should be one of the differential diagnoses in patients presenting with severe hypercalcemia. PMID:23569551

  15. A successful treatment of hypercalcemia with zoledronic acid in a 15-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Jin; Choi, Eun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Severe hypercalcemia in children is a rare medical emergency. We present a case of a 15-year-old boy with hypercalcemia (total calcium level, 14.2 mg/dL) with a normal complete blood count, no circulating blasts in the peripheral blood film, and no other signs of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), including no signs of lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly. The hypercalcemia was successfully treated with zoledronic acid. As hypercalcemia can be the only presenting symptom of ALL in children, the diagnosis is often delayed. In children presenting with hypercalcemia, malignancies must be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:27462588

  16. Case of hypercalcemia secondary to hypervitaminosis a in a 6-year-old boy with autism.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Arpita Kalla; White, Neil H

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A intoxication secondary to over-the-counter nutritional supplements and from its use in acne treatment has been described. However, there have been very few case reports of chronic hypervitaminosis A leading to hypercalcemia in the pediatric population. This paper describes a boy with hypercalcemia secondary to chronic vitamin A intoxication in the context of vitamin A usage for therapy of autism. In addition to discontinuation of vitamin A, hyperhydration, and furosemide, the hypercalcemia in this patient required the use of prednisone and pamidronate to normalize the calcium. PMID:22937283

  17. [65-year old female patient with persistent hypercalcemia].

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, M; Kassahun, W; Deckert, F; Tröltzsch, M; Sturmvoll, M; Führer, D

    2007-12-01

    A 65-year old patient presented with newly diagnosed hypercalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone levels. Exploration of parathyroid glands was performed under the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism and was combined with thyreoidectomy due to concomittant multinodular goiter. However, no parathyroid adenoma was identified despite careful exploration. Therefore, the operation was terminated and an ectopic adenoma was suspected. A (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy with SPECT, neck ultrasound, neck CT scan with contrast media and selective venous sampling were performed for further localization of the adenoma. A single adenoma localized in the submandibular area of the left jaw was suspected and confirmed during surgical reexploration. Postoperatively, parathyroid hormone levels were below detection level and the patient required short-term calcium supplementation for symptomatic hypocalcemia. PMID:17965847

  18. Gallbladder adenocarcinoma and paraneoplastic parathyroid hormone mediated hypercalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Yogarajah, Meera; Sivasambu, Bhradeev; Shiferaw-Deribe, Zewge

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone mediated hypercalcemia is not always exclusively primary hyperparathyroidism and rarely could be due to ectopic parathyroid hormone secretion from tumor cells. We present a case of 86-year-old female with metastatic gall bladder adenocarcinoma diagnosed eight months back who presented with generalized fatigue and poor oral intake and was found to be hypercalcemic with elevated parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging with technetium 99 m sestamibi scintigraphy with dual phase, subtraction thyroid scan (dual isotope scintigraphy), magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography did not demonstrate any parathyroid lesion in normal or ectopic sites. We believe that the tumor cells were the source of ectopic parathyroid hormone secretion as we had excluded all the other possibilities with extensive combined imaging thereby increasing the sensitivity of our testing. We report the first case of metastatic gall bladder adenocarcinoma with paraneoplastic ectopic parathyroid hormone secretion. PMID:27081650

  19. Gallbladder adenocarcinoma and paraneoplastic parathyroid hormone mediated hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Yogarajah, Meera; Sivasambu, Bhradeev; Shiferaw-Deribe, Zewge

    2016-04-10

    Parathyroid hormone mediated hypercalcemia is not always exclusively primary hyperparathyroidism and rarely could be due to ectopic parathyroid hormone secretion from tumor cells. We present a case of 86-year-old female with metastatic gall bladder adenocarcinoma diagnosed eight months back who presented with generalized fatigue and poor oral intake and was found to be hypercalcemic with elevated parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging with technetium 99 m sestamibi scintigraphy with dual phase, subtraction thyroid scan (dual isotope scintigraphy), magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography did not demonstrate any parathyroid lesion in normal or ectopic sites. We believe that the tumor cells were the source of ectopic parathyroid hormone secretion as we had excluded all the other possibilities with extensive combined imaging thereby increasing the sensitivity of our testing. We report the first case of metastatic gall bladder adenocarcinoma with paraneoplastic ectopic parathyroid hormone secretion. PMID:27081650

  20. [Subcutaneous fat necrosis in the newborn: a risk for severe hypercalcemia].

    PubMed

    Barbier, C; Cneude, F; Deliège, R; El Kohen, R; Kremy, O; Leclerc, F

    2003-08-01

    Hypercalcemia associated with subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCN) is a well known but rare event in the newborn. A newborn infant with a history of SCN was admitted because of anorexia, adynamia, polyuria and polydipsia at 6 weeks of age. Serum calcium was markedly increased on admission, while it was normal on the first day of life. Evolution was favourable after treatment including isotonic saline solution, furosemide, corticosteroids, calcitonin and a low calcium and vitamin D diet. Hypercalcemia was severe enough to potentially induces fatal complications in this case. Neonates who develop skin lesions consistent with SCN should be followed-up for possible onset of hypercalcemia and treated in due time. The treatment of hypercalcemia in SCN is reviewed. PMID:12922005

  1. A case of hypercalcemia and gastric necrosis from hot pack ingestion.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Pradeep; Spiller, Henry A; Bosse, George M

    2010-06-01

    Hot packs (instant hot compresses) are frequently used to relieve pain. We report a patient who had significant complications from ingestion of a hot pack containing calcium salts. A 35-year-old male swallowed three hot packs, and developed hematemesis, severe abdominal pain, and hypercalcemia (21.1 mg/dl). He developed diffuse gastric necrosis requiring gastrectomy and colonic interposition. Hypercalcemia was treated with intravenous fluids, pamidronate, and calcitonin. A Medline search revealed no prior report on hot pack ingestion though ingestion of calcium salts has been reported. Hot packs can potentially cause significant injury both from an exothermic reaction and hypercalcemia. Ingestions of calcium salts can result in necrosis of the stomach. Management includes aggressive treatment of hypercalcemia, supportive care and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:20376594

  2. Study of Denosumab in the Treatment of Hypercalcemia of Malignancy in Subjects With Elevated Serum Calcium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Breast Cancer; Hypercalcemia of Malignancy; Colon Cancer; Endocrine Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Metastatic Cancer; Multiple Myeloma; Parathyroid Neoplasms; Renal Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. An unexpected cause of severe and refractory PTH-independent hypercalcemia: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rados, Dimitris Varvaki; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2015-06-01

    Hypercalcemia is a common condition in the internal medicine practice. Sometimes its cause is not readily apparent, so extensive investigation is appropriate. Here we report an unexpected cause for hypercalcemia in an elderly woman. The case of an 82-years old woman with PTH-independent hypercalcemia, lymphocytosis, normal serum 1,25 (OH)vitamin D levels, and low serum PTHrp levels, is described. Medical history and complementary investigation were unremarkable, except for increased metabolic activity in the glutei regions, as measured by whole body 18F-FDG PET-CT. Reviewing her medical history, her sister recalled that she had been submitted to intramuscular methylmethacrylate injections, for cosmetic purposes, five years before presentation, which was confirmed by muscle biopsy. Low calcium intake, parenteral bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and glucocorticoids were used to control serum calcium levels. Methylmethacrylate injections, used cosmetically, are a new cause for hypercalcemia, even after many years. Hypercalcemia was probably due to calcitriol overproduction in foreign body granulomas. Persistent reactive lymphocytosis could be a clue for this inflammatory cause of hypercalcemia. PMID:26154099

  4. [Primary hyperparathyroidism as a cause of hypercalcemia in a patient with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Zajícková, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Hypercalcemia associated with breast cancer arises either from metastatic bone disease or from paraneoplastic secretion of parathyroid hormone-related peptide. We report a female 69-year-old patient with invasive intraductal breast cancer and hypercalcemia (3,4 mmol/l) referred to endocrinologist. Standard care in oncology was refused and with respect to the presence of estrogenic receptors the patient accepted only antiestrogenic treatment. Bone scan revealed no skeletal metastasis. Entry laboratory exam confirmed hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia and significantly elevated parathyroid hormone (793 ng/l). The patient complained of bone pain and dyspepsia. Neck ultrasound showed a multinodular goiter with particularly enlarged left lobe. Parathyroid gland scintigraphy revealed a possible parathyroid adenoma behind the lower pole of the left thyroid lobe. The patient underwent thyroidectomy with an excision of the parathyroid mass. Microscopic examination identified a benign adenomatous goitre and benign parathyroid adenoma. Postoperatively, both serum calcium and parathyroid hormone normalized. Replacement of calcium and vitamin D were initiated both with bisphosphonate with regard to newly diagnosed osteoporosis. This case demonstrates a patient with breast cancer and hypercalcemia unrelated to the malignant disease. Primary hyperparathyroidism should be considered as a possible cause of hypercalcemia in breast cancer patients in the setting of negative bone scan, elevated parathyroid hormone and mildly deteriorated bone mineral density. PMID:21391355

  5. Prevalence of hypercalcemia among cancer patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gastanaga, Victor M; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Jain, Rajul K; Pirolli, Melissa; Quach, David; Quigley, Jane M; Mu, George; Scott Stryker, W; Liede, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM) is a serious metabolic complication whose population-based prevalence has not been quantified. Rates of HCM differ by tumor type, with highest rates reported in multiple myeloma and lowest among colorectal and prostate cancer patients. This analysis estimates HCM prevalence in the US. This retrospective study used the Oncology Services Comprehensive Electronic Records (OSCER) warehouse of electronic health records (EHR) including laboratory values from 569000 patients treated at 565 oncology outpatient sites. OSCER data were projected to the national level by linking EHR to claims data. Cancer patients included were ≥18 years, and had serum calcium (Ca) and albumin (for corrected serum Ca [CSC]) records. Period prevalence was estimated by HCM CTCAE grade, tumor type, and year (2009-2013). Estimates were adjusted to capture patients diagnosed with HCM outside oncology practices based on a subset of patients linkable to office and hospital data. The analysis included 68023 (2009) to 121482 (2013) cancer patients. In 2013, patients with HCM had a median of six Ca tests, 69.7% had chemotherapy, and 34% received bone modifying agents. HCM rates were highest for multiple myeloma patients (7.5% [2012]-10.2% [2010]), lowest for prostate cancer (1.4% [2012]-2.1% [2011]).The estimated adjusted annual prevalence of HCM from 2009 to 2013 was 95441, 96281, 89797, 70158, and 71744, respectively. HCM affected 2.0-2.8% of all cancer patients. EHR data from oncology clinics were critical for this study because these data contain results from laboratory studies (i.e., serum calcium values) that are routinely ordered in that setting. We estimated that the prevalence of HCM in the US in 2013 is 71744, affecting approximately 2% of cancer patients overall. This percentage differs by tumor type and appears to have decreased over the five-year study period. PMID:27263488

  6. Hypercalcemia from metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor secreting 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Viola; de las Morenas, Antonio; Janicek, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hypercalcemia occurs in about 20-30% of patients with cancer, both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. The secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-rP) is the most common cause and has been shown to be the etiology of hypercalcemia associated with neuroendocrine tumors. Here we report the case of a patient with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor who developed hypercalcemia more than 4 years after the initial diagnosis as a result of secretion of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, a mechanism only commonly seen in lymphomas. The successful control of the patient’s disease with capecitabine and temozolomide led to the alleviation of this paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:25083313

  7. Hypercalcemia, Anemia, and Acute Kidney Injury: A Rare Presentation of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Tariq, Hassan; Uday, Kalpana; Skaradinskiy, Yevgeniy; Niazi, Masooma; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with substernal chest pain. She was found to have elevated calcium levels, anemia, and acute kidney injury. The hypercalcemia persisted despite therapy with fluids and bisphosphonates. She was found to have nonparathyroid hormone (PTH) mediated hypercalcemia. The chest X-ray did not reveal any pathology. Our Initial impression was likely underlying hematologic malignancy such as lymphoma or multiple myeloma. A bone marrow biopsy was performed that revealed nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Further workup revealed elevated vitamin 1,25 dihydroxy level, beta-two microglobulin level, and ACE levels. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan of chest showed bilateral apical bronchiectasis, but did not show any lymphadenopathy or evidence of malignancy. Subsequently, a fiber optic bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy showed nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation consistent with sarcoidosis. After initiating glucocorticoid therapy, the patient's hypercalcemia improved and her kidney function returned to baseline. PMID:26199627

  8. Hypercalcemia of malignancy associated with renal cell carcinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Christine H; Schleis, Stephanie E; Smith, Annette N; Mallett, Courtney L; Graff, Emily C; Johnson, Calvin

    2013-01-01

    A 10 yr old castrated male Siberian husky was evaluated for polyuria, polydipsia, a retroperitoneal mass, and urolithiasis. A marked elevation in Ca was noted on initial blood work, and results of additional testing were consistent with hypercalcemia of malignancy, including an elevated parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrp) value. Based on clinical signs, blood work, diagnostic imaging, and cytology results, unilateral renal neoplasia was suspected. Following a complete right nephrectomy and cystotomy, histopathologic examination confirmed a diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Five days postoperatively, the hypercalcemia had nearly resolved and the PTHrp was zero. This is the first reported case of hypercalcemia of malignancy associated with RCC in a dog. PMID:23861266

  9. Carcinoma of Lung with Adrenal Hyperfunction and Hypercalcemia Treated by Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gault, M. Henry; Kinsella, T. Douglas

    1965-01-01

    A case of severe hypercalcemia secondary to carcinoma of the lung is described in which hypokalemic alkalosis, renal failure and pancreatitis were also present. The relative importance of the few bone metastases found at autopsy is considered, and a probable endocrine-like effect of the tumour in the development of the hypercalcemia is postulated. Treatment of the hypercalcemia included administration of corticosteroids and disodium EDTA, peritoneal dialysis and subtotal parathyroidectomy; the most effective of these was peritoneal dialysis. Subtotal parathyroidectomy failed to produce a further decrease in serum calcium values. The occurrence of hypokalemic alkalosis in the presence of increased adrenocortical function and its relationship to the carcinoma of the lung are discussed. The possibility that this neoplasm produced two factors which caused systemic effects ordinarily associated with the function of endocrine glands must be considered. PMID:14243867

  10. Hypophosphatasia Presenting with Pyridoxine-Responsive Seizures, Hypercalcemia, and Pseudotumor Cerebri: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alanay, Yasemin; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Topçu, Meral; Mornet, Etienne; Özön, Alev; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2012-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by defective bone mineralization caused by a deficiency in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity due to mutations in the tissue-nonspecific ALP (TNALP) gene. The clinical expression of the disease is variable. Six forms of HPP are identified according to age at presentation and clinical features. Patients with the infantile form are normal at birth. First symptoms appear within the first 6 months of life. Along with skeletal findings, HPP patients may present with hypercalcemia, seizures, pseudotumor cerebri, and pulmonary insufficiency. Seizures in HPP are refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs, but are responsive to pyridoxine. Herein, we report a case of HPP who presented with pyridoxine-responsive seizures in the early neonatal period and was found to have hypercalcemia, skeletal demineralization and increased intracranial pressure. Key words: Hypophosphatasia, pyridoxine-responsive seizures, bisphosphonates, alkaline phosphatase, bone resorption, hypercalcemia Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22394703

  11. “Excess gooD can be Dangerous”. A case series of iatrogenic symptomatic hypercalcemia due to hypervitaminosis D

    PubMed Central

    Pandita, Kamal Kishore; Razdan, Sushil; Kudyar, Rattan Parkash; Beigh, Aadil; Kuchay, Shafi; Banday, Tanveer

    2012-01-01

    Summary Vitamin D is increasingly recognized to have several beneficial effects. Its toxicity, causing hypercalcemia, is considered as extremely rare. We report case series of 15 patients (most of them being elderly subjects) with iatrogenic symptomatic hypercalcemia in whom toxicity occurred due to empirical excessive administration of vitamin D by oral and parenteral route. PMID:23087723

  12. Genetic defect in CYP24A1, the vitamin D 24-hydroxylase gene, in a patient with severe infantile hypercalcemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia (IIH) is a disorder the genetic etiology and physiological basis of which are not well understood. The objective of the study was to describe the underlying physiology and genetic cause of hypercalcemia in an infant with severe IIH and to extend these genetic findi...

  13. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and PTHrP mediated malignant hypercalcemia in a seminoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seminomas have been rarely associated with malignant hypercalcemia. The responsible mechanism of hypercalcemia in this setting has been described to be secondary to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D secretion. The relationship with PTHrP has not been determined or studied. The aim of this study is to describe and discuss the case and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in a malignant hypercalcemia mediated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and PTHrP cosecretion in a patient with seminoma. Case presentation A 35-year-old man was consulted for assessment and management of severe hypercalcemia related to an abdominal mass. Nausea, polyuria, polydipsia, lethargy and confusion led him to the emergency department. An abdominal and pelvic enhanced CT confirmed a calcified pelvic mass, along with multiple retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. Chest x-ray revealed “cannon ball” pulmonary metastases. The histopathology result was consistent with a seminoma. Serum calcium was 14.7 mg/dl, PTH was undetectable, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D was within normal values and PTHrP and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin were elevated (35.0 pg/ml, and 212 pg/ml, respectively). After the first cycle of chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, normocalcemia was restored. Both PTHrP and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, dropped dramatically to 9.0 pg/ml and 8.0 pg/ml, respectively. Conclusion The association of seminoma and malignant hypercalcemia is extremely rare. We describe a case of a patient with a seminoma and malignant hypercalcemia related to paraneoplastic cosecretion of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and PTHrP. After successful chemotherapy, calcium, PTHrP and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D returned to normal values. PMID:24721620

  14. Ketotic Hypercalcemia: A Case Series and Description of a Novel Entity

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Colin Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Context: The ketogenic diet is increasingly used in refractory epilepsy and is associated with clinically significant effects on bone and mineral metabolism. Although hypercalciuria and loss of bone mineral density are common in patients on the ketogenic diet, hypercalcemia has not previously been described. Objective: The aim of the study was to describe three children who developed hypercalcemia while on the ketogenic diet. Design: A retrospective chart review of three children on the ketogenic with severe hypercalcemia was conducted. Results: We describe three children on the ketogenic diet for refractory seizures who presented with hypercalcemia. Case 1 was a 5.5-year-old male with an undiagnosed, rapidly progressive seizure disorder associated with developmental regression. Case 2 was a 2.5-year-old male with a chromosomal deletion of 2q24.3, and case 3 was a 4.6-year-old male with cerebral cortex dysplasia. Patients had been on a ketogenic diet for 6 to 12 months before presentation. Daily intake of calcium and vitamin D was not excessive, and all three patients were not acidotic because they were taking supplemental bicarbonate. Each child had elevated serum levels of calcium and normal serum phosphate levels, moderately elevated urinary calcium excretion, and low levels of serum alkaline phosphatase, PTH, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. All patients responded to calcitonin. Conclusions: Hypercalcemia is an uncommon complication of the ketogenic diet, and these children may represent the severe end of a clinical spectrum of disordered mineral metabolism. The mechanism for hypercalcemia is unknown but is consistent with excess bone resorption and impaired calcium excretion. PMID:24606099

  15. Hypercalcemia due to latrogenic secondary hypoadrenocorticism and diabetes mellitus in a cat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephanie A; Freeman, Lisa C; Bagladi-Swanson, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A 9-year-old, spayed female domestic shorthair cat presented for polyphagia, polydipsia, and polyuria following chronic methylprednisolone acetate therapy for pruritus. Initial diagnostics were consistent with uncomplicated diabetes mellitus. Serum calcium was within reference range. Within 12 hours the cat developed depression, anorexia, vomiting, and severe dehydration. Laboratory analysis indicated marked hypercalcemia as measured by both ionized and total calcium concentration. No underlying neoplastic or inflammatory process was identified. An adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was indicative of adrenocortical insufficiency. The hypercalcemia resolved with glucocorticoid supplementation and correction of the dehydration. The diabetes mellitus and adrenal insufficiency both resolved within 9 weeks. PMID:11804313

  16. Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency presenting with failure to thrive, hypercalcemia, and nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, John W; Reid, Barbara; Taylor, William; Baker, Susan S; Moore, Warren H; Morriss, Michael C; Podrebarac, Susan M; Glass, Nancy; Schwartz, I David

    2002-01-01

    Background Disaccharide Intolerance Type I (Mendelian Interance in Man database: *222900) is a rare inborn error of metabolism resulting from mutation in sucrase-isomaltase (Enzyme Catalyzed 3.2.1.48). Usually, infants with SI deficiency come to attention because of chronic diarrhea and nutritional evidence of malabsorption. Case Presentation We describe an atypical presentation of this disorder in a 10-month-old infant. In addition to chronic diarrhea, the child displayed severe and chronic hypercalcemia, the evaluation of which was negative. An apparently coincidental right orbital hemangioma was detected. Following identification of the SI deficiency, an appropriately sucrose-restricted, but normal calcium diet regimen was instituted which led to cessation of diarrhea, substantial weight gain, and resolution of hypercalcemia. Conclusions This case illustrates that, similar to congenital lactase deficiency (Mendelian Interance in Man database: *223000, Alactasia, Hereditary Disaccharide Intolerance Type II), hypercalcemia may complicate neonatal Sucrase-Isomaltase deficiency. Hypercalcemia in the presence of chronic diarrhea should suggest disaccharide intolerance in young infants. PMID:12014995

  17. Rare Occurrence of 3 "H": Hypercalcemia, Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankur; Malhotra, Pankaj; Prakash, Gaurav; Varma, Subhash; Kumar, Narender; Das, Asim

    2016-06-01

    Clinicians in hematology practice commonly encounter anemia, hypercalcemia and renal failure, which when present in combination evoke a diagnostic workup for multiple myeloma. We report a 71-years old lady who presented to our hematology clinic with fever and easy fatiguability of 3 months duration and on investigations was found to have anemia and hypercalcemia. Direct Coomb's test characterized the anemia as complement mediated (anti-C3d) hemolysis. Biochemical investigations revealed normal 25(OH) Vitamin D3 and suppressed Parathormone levels and a negative workup for plasma cell dyscrasias, sarcoidosis and autoimmune disorders. CT scan revealed a paravertebral mass with cervical, supraclavicular and abdominal lymphadenopathy along with splenomegaly and left pleural effusion. Biopsy from the paravertebral mass confirmed the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease (nodular sclerosis) using immunohistochemistry. Bone marrow examination suggested infiltration by lymphoma. Hypercalcemia was managed with saline and zoledronic acid. Administration of prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) along with chemotherapy (ABVD regimen) led to normalization of calcium and hemoglobin levels. However, hemolysis recurred 2 weeks later and hence, Rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) was administered on a weekly schedule for 4 doses and ABVD (2 weekly) was continued, which brought hemolysis under control. Co-occurrence of two paraneoplastic manifestations (complement mediated hemolytic anemia and hypercalcemia) in Hodgkin's lymphoma is very unusual. Present report aims not only to highlight a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma but also focus on the role of Rituximab in controlling hemolysis associated with this disease. PMID:27408382

  18. Case Report: Severe Hypercalcemia Mimicking St-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, Robert C.; Bibawy, John; Elnemr, Mina; Lehnert, Amy L.; Putney, David; Thomas, Anusha S.; Barker, Colin M.; Pratt, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of ST-segment elevation on the electrocardiogram is an integral part of decision making in patients who present with suspected ischemia. Unfortunately, ST-segment elevation is nonspecific and may be caused by noncardiac causes such as electrolyte abnormalities. We present a case of ST-segment elevation secondary to hypercalcemia in a patient with metastatic cancer. PMID:25574349

  19. Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia in a patient with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma case report

    PubMed Central

    Abaroa-Salvatierra, Ana; Shaikh, Bilal; Deshmukh, Mrunalini; Alweis, Richard; Patel, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia is a frequent manifestation of hematological malignancies. However, there are a few reports of cases presenting with increased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level, which suggests a possible mechanism similar to that of granulomatous diseases. We present a patient with hypercalcemia, normal parathyroid hormone, and parathyroid hormone-related protein levels but high calcitriol and ACE levels that, after further investigation, was diagnosed with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. Primary adrenal lymphoma represents only 1% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and is usually asymptomatic but should be considered by clinicians among the malignancies that cause calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia. PMID:27124160

  20. A patient with primary hyperparathyroidism associated with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia induced by a novel germline CaSR gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Yabuta, Tomonori; Miyauchi, Akira; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Amino, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-01

    We report a patient with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) associated with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and incidental papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient showed hypercalcemia, high parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and low urinary calcium excretion. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed an enlarged parathyroid gland. Ultrasonography (US) and aspiration cytology revealed microcarcinoma of the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Screening studies of his family revealed that four of five family members had hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and normal PTH level. Sequencing analysis of the calcium sensing receptor gene revealed a novel heterozygous mutation (3193delA) in the patient and his family members with hypercalcemia, but one with normocalcemia. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy, central node dissection and extirpation of the enlarged parathyroid gland. Surgery is not indicated for FHH; however, FHH may be accompanied with parathyroid adenoma causing PHPT, as reported here, for which surgical treatment is indicated. PMID:19423460

  1. Life-Threatening Hypercalcemia Revealing Diffuse and Isolated Acute Sarcoid-Like Myositis: A New Entity? (A Case-Series).

    PubMed

    Mageau, Arthur; Rigolet, Aude; Benali, Khadija; Chauchard, Maria; Ladjeroud, Salima; Mahe, Isabelle; Maisonobe, Thierry; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Papo, Thomas; Sacre, Karim

    2016-03-01

    Up to 50% patients with sarcoidosis display extra-pulmonary disease. However, initial and isolated (ie, without lung disease) acute muscular involvement associated with pseudo-malignant hypercalcemia is very uncommon. We report on 3 cases of life-threatening hypercalcemia revealing florid and isolated acute sarcoid-like myositis.All patients complained of fatigue, progressive general muscle weakness, and weight loss. Laboratory tests showed a severe life-threatening hypercalcemia (>3.4 mmol/L). Hypercalcemia was associated with increased serum level of 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D and complicated with acute renal failure. One patient displayed acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia.In all cases, PET-scan, performed for malignancy screening, incidentally revealed an intense, diffuse, and isolated muscular fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake consistent with diffuse non-necrotizing giant cells granulomatous myositis demonstrated by muscle biopsy. Of note, creatine phosphokinase blood level was normal in all cases. No patients displayed the usual thoracic features of sarcoidosis.All patients were treated with high dose steroids and achieved rapid, complete, and sustained remission. A review of English and French publications in Medline revealed 5 similar published cases.Steroid-sensitive acute sarcoid-like myositis causing high calcitriol levels and life-threatening hypercalcemia should be recognized as a separate entity. PMID:26962842

  2. Production of hypercalcemia in the chick embryo by an extract of Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Narbaitz, R; Carrillo, B J

    1976-12-01

    White Leghorn eggs were injected on the 15th day of incubation with various doses of an acqueous extract of Solanum malacoxylon (SME). Most of the embryos died after the injection of 0.2 ml but the dose of 0.1 ml was well tolerated. The concentration of calcium in the sera from 15-day embryos injected with 0.1 ml SME was determined. Three hr after the injection the concentration of calcium had increased significantly; this increase lasted for at least 3 hr more but had disappeared 12 hr after the injection. It is suggested that this hypercalcemia may be produced by a water-soluble analog of 1,25-(OH)2D3 the presence of which has been demonstrated in the SME by other authors. It is also assumed that the mortality produced by the higher doses may be related to the hypercalcemia. PMID:1030814

  3. [Abnormal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and hypercalcemia in children with tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Saggese, G; Bertelloni, S; Baroncelli, G I; Fusaro, C; Gualtieri, M

    1989-01-01

    Three children with tuberculosis and hypercalcemia are reported. Before antitubercular treatment 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D serum levels and urinary calcium excretion were elevated for age in all patients; vitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were in normal range whereas serum intact parathyroid hormone concentrations were suppressed. Low calcium diet and antitubercular treatment caused a normalization of serum calcium levels and urinary calcium excretion; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations returned in normal range after three months of antituberculosis therapy. When 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was normal, a reintroduction of a diet with normal calcium content did not determine new hypercalcemic episodes. These data suggest that an abnormal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D production sustains the hypercalcemia of children with tuberculosis. An ectopic and unregulated synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D by macrophages of granulomatous tissue is proposed. PMID:2631059

  4. Hypophosphatasia presenting with pyridoxine-responsive seizures, hypercalcemia, and pseudotumor cerebri: case report.

    PubMed

    Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Alanay, Yasemin; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Topçu, Meral; Mornet, Etienne; Gönç, Nazlı; Özön, Alev; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2012-03-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by defective bone mineralization caused by a deficiency in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity due to mutations in the tissue-nonspecific ALP (TNALP) gene. The clinical expression of the disease is variable. Six forms of HPP are identified according to age at presentation and clinical features. Patients with the infantile form are normal at birth. First symptoms appear within the first 6 months of life. Along with skeletal findings, HPP patients may present with hypercalcemia, seizures, pseudotumor cerebri, and pulmonary insufficiency. Seizures in HPP are refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs, but are responsive to pyridoxine. Herein, we report a case of HPP who presented with pyridoxine-responsive seizures in the early neonatal period and was found to have hypercalcemia, skeletal demineralization and increased intracranial pressure. PMID:22394703

  5. Anti-arrhythmic effects of hypercalcemia in hyperkalemic, Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Sun, Bing; Wong, Sheung Ting; Tse, Vivian; Yeo, Jie Ming

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the ventricular arrhythmic and electrophysiological properties during hyperkalemia (6.3 mM [K+] vs. 4 mM in normokalemia) and anti-arrhythmic effects of hypercalcemia (2.2 mM [Ca2+]) in Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. Monophasic action potential recordings were obtained from the left ventricle during right ventricular pacing. Hyperkalemia increased the proportion of hearts showing provoked ventricular tachycardia (VT) from 0 to 6 of 7 hearts during programmed electrical stimulation (Fisher's exact test, P<0.05). It shortened the epicardial action potential durations (APDx) at 90, 70, 50 and 30% repolarization and ventricular effective refractory periods (VERPs) (analysis of variance, P<0.05) without altering activation latencies. Endocardial APDx and VERPs were unaltered. Consequently, ∆APDx (endocardial APDx-epicardial APDx) was increased, VERP/latency ratio was decreased and critical intervals for reexcitation (APD90-VERP) were unchanged. Hypercalcemia treatment exerted anti-arrhythmic effects during hyperkalemia, reducing the proportion of hearts showing VT to 1 of 7 hearts. It increased epicardial VERPs without further altering the remaining parameters, returning VERP/latency ratio to normokalemic values and also decreased the critical intervals. In conclusion, hyperkalemia exerted pro-arrhythmic effects by shortening APDs and VERPs. Hypercalcemia exerted anti-arrhythmic effects by reversing VERP changes, which scaled the VERP/latency ratio and critical intervals. PMID:27588173

  6. Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Andreia Luís; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro Sampaio; Abadesso, Clara; Loureiro, Helena Cristina; Duarte, Ximo; Almeida, Helena Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare metabolic disorder in children and is potentially fatal. It has a wide differential diagnosis, including cancer. Here, we report the case of a previously healthy 3-year-old who was admitted to the emergency room with fatigue, hyporeactivity, fever and limping gait that had evolved over 5 days and that was progressively worsening. On examination the patient was unconscious (Glasgow coma score: 8). Laboratory tests indicated severe hypercalcemia (total calcium 21.39mg/dL, ionized calcium 2.93mmol/L) and microcytic anemia. Hyperhydration was initiated, and the child was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with calcium-free solution was instituted, which brought progressive normalization of serum calcium and an improved state of consciousness. Zoledronate was administered, and metabolic and infectious causes and poisoning were excluded. The bone marrow smear revealed a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia associated with malignancy in children is rare and occurs as a form of cancer presentation or recurrence. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration should be considered in situations where there is imminent risk to life. PMID:26761480

  7. Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andreia Luís; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro Sampaio; Abadesso, Clara; Loureiro, Helena Cristina; Duarte, Ximo; Almeida, Helena Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare metabolic disorder in children and is potentially fatal. It has a wide differential diagnosis, including cancer. Here, we report the case of a previously healthy 3-year-old who was admitted to the emergency room with fatigue, hyporeactivity, fever and limping gait that had evolved over 5 days and that was progressively worsening. On examination the patient was unconscious (Glasgow coma score: 8). Laboratory tests indicated severe hypercalcemia (total calcium 21.39mg/dL, ionized calcium 2.93mmol/L) and microcytic anemia. Hyperhydration was initiated, and the child was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with calcium-free solution was instituted, which brought progressive normalization of serum calcium and an improved state of consciousness. Zoledronate was administered, and metabolic and infectious causes and poisoning were excluded. The bone marrow smear revealed a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia associated with malignancy in children is rare and occurs as a form of cancer presentation or recurrence. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration should be considered in situations where there is imminent risk to life. PMID:26761480

  8. Reversal of Severe and Refractory Humoral Hypercalcemia With 177Lu-Octreotate Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy for Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Iliuta, Ioan-Andrei; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Couture, Félix; Douville, Pierre; Mac-Way, Fabrice

    2015-09-01

    A 48-year-old Caucasian male patient with newly diagnosed neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas with multiple liver metastases developed severe and refractory hypercalcemia. Complementary investigations were compatible with humoral hypercalcemia with high parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) levels. Hypercalcemia was refractory to medical treatments for more than 2 years. Serum calcium returned to normal values only after 4 cycles of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu-octreotate, with concomitant reduction of PTHrP level and tumor regression. The use of radionuclide therapy could be an option for the management of severe humoral hypercalcemia in patients with inoperable metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:26053724

  9. Vitamin D toxicity presenting as hypercalcemia and complete heart block: An interesting case report

    PubMed Central

    Garg, G; Khadgwat, R; Khandelwal, D; Gupta, N

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent across the globe. This has lead to widespread use of vitamin D supplements in populations. We present our experience of vitamin D toxicity in a subject resulting in hypercalcemia and CHB (Complete Heart Block). A 70-year-old female, known hypertensive for thirty five years and diabetic for seven years underwent total knee replacement (TKR) for osteoarthritis left knee in December 2010. For perioperative glycemic control, multiple subcutaneous injections of insulin were advised. Patient later presented with poor glycemic control, decreased appetite and constipation for last 1 month with history of episodes of transient loss of consciousness for 15 days and recurrent vomiting. Biochemical work-up showed hypercalcemia (Serum calcium 12.4 mg/dL). Sr. albumin, ALP, Sr. phosphorus and PTH levels were normal, thus suggesting PTH independent hypercalcemia. Strong suspicion led us to check vitamin D levels in dilution which were 2016 ng/mL, thus confirming vitamin D toxicity. Retrospective analysis of treatment history revealed patient receiving 4 injections of Architol (6 Lac units im) prior to presentation. Work-up for malignancy was negative, brain imaging and EEG were normal. Holter was suggestive of intermittent CHB. Patient was given hydration, injection calcitonin 100 I.U. subcutaneously, injection pamidronate 60 mg infusion, with serum calcium levels normalizing, with relief in constipation, vomiting and behavioral improvement. However, persistence of rhythm disturbances led to permanent pacemaker placement. The present case highlights the dangers of indiscriminate vitamin D usage, exposing patients to potentially life threatening complications. PMID:23565451

  10. An unusual case of hypercalcemia in a patient of concomitant hypoparathyroidism and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Shrikant; Kotwal, Narendra; Upreti, Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Milk alkali syndrome has shown resurgence with increase in use of (prescription or non prescription) calcium supplements. Cases of iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication has also increased due to increasing use of high doses of injectable vitamin D formulations by physicians, surgeons, orthopaedicians, gynecologists and other specialties inadvertently. Here, we present an unusual case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with iatrogenic hypercalcemia as a result of combination of milk alkali syndrome with vitamin D intoxication despite being a case of hypoparathyroidism and concomitantly suffering from celiac disease. PMID:27252747

  11. Normalization of lithium-induced hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism with cinacalcet hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Sloand, James A; Shelly, Mark A

    2006-11-01

    An underrecognized side effect of long-term lithium carbonate therapy is hyperparathyroidism with associated hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria. Because cessation of lithium carbonate therapy usually does not correct the hyperparathyroidism and associated hypercalcemia, parathyroidectomy frequently is necessary. This is the initial report of 2 patients with lithium carbonate-induced hyperparathyroidism treated with cinacalcet hydrochloride (HCl), which normalized serum calcium levels and reduced intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) secretion. The patients, both with bipolar disease and a 15- to 30-year history of lithium carbonate therapy, were evaluated for stage 3 chronic kidney disease, persistent hypercalcemia, and hyperparathyroidism. A 67-year-old woman was administered cinacalcet HCl, 30 mg/d, for 11 months. Mean serum calcium level decreased from 10.8 +/- 0.4 mg/dL (2.69 +/- 0.10 mmol/L) to 9.9 +/- 0.4 mg/dL (2.47 +/- 0.10 mmol/L; P < 0.001), and iPTH level decreased from 139 +/- 31 pg/mL (139 +/- 31 ng/L) to 114 +/- 39 pg/mL (114 +/- 39 ng/L; P = not significant). A 63-year-old man was administered 30 mg/d of cinacalcet HCl for 8 months, then 60 mg/d for another 2 months. Mean serum calcium and iPTH levels decreased from 11.0 +/- 0.5 mg/dL (2.74 +/- 0.12 mmol/L) to 10.3 +/- 0.4 mg/dL (2.57 +/- 0.10 mmol/L; P < 0.001) and 138 +/- 10 pg/mL (138 +/- 10 ng/L) to 73 +/- 7 pg/mL (73 +/- 7 ng/L; P = 0.03), respectively. Urinary fractional excretion of calcium was low for both patients before (<0.026 and <0.015) and after (0.026 and 0.008) treatment with cinacalcet HCl. These findings suggest that cinacalcet HCl can provide an alternative nonsurgical means to control this disorder in patients with hypercalcemia of variable severity for whom surgical treatment is not a consideration because of perceived mildness of disease or unsuitability of the patient for surgical intervention. PMID:17060004

  12. An unusual case of hypercalcemia in a patient of concomitant hypoparathyroidism and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Somani, Shrikant; Kotwal, Narendra; Upreti, Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Milk alkali syndrome has shown resurgence with increase in use of (prescription or non prescription) calcium supplements. Cases of iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication has also increased due to increasing use of high doses of injectable vitamin D formulations by physicians, surgeons, orthopaedicians, gynecologists and other specialties inadvertently. Here, we present an unusual case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with iatrogenic hypercalcemia as a result of combination of milk alkali syndrome with vitamin D intoxication despite being a case of hypoparathyroidism and concomitantly suffering from celiac disease. PMID:27252747

  13. Hypercalcemia and altered biochemical bone markers in post-bone marrow transplantation osteopetrosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kulpiya, Alisa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Pakakasama, Samart; Hongeng, Suradej; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is a rare disorder of bone resorption defect that results in generalized sclerotic bones and bone marrow failure. Allogeneic BMT is the only treatment for cure. One of the complications following a successful BMT is hypercalcemia that is a unique complication in this group of patients. We report a three-yr-old boy with osteopetrosis who developed hypercalcemia following the successful BMT. His maximal calcium level was 13.3 mg/dL. Markedly increased both bone formation and resorption markers were demonstrated along with hypercalcemia. These findings indicated an active donor-derived osteoclastic function and thus bone resorption following the successful donor engraftment in the patient. Treatment with hyperhydration, furosemide and bone resorption inhibitors, calcitonin, and bisphosphonate led to normalization of the serum calcium level. Bone resorption but not bone formation marker was persistently elevated despite having normocalcemia during a 16.5-month follow-up period. PMID:21323826

  14. Life-Threatening Hypercalcemia due to Graves' Disease and Concomitant Adrenal Failure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ozkaya, Hande Mefkure; Keskin, Fatma Ela; Haliloglu, Ozlem Asmaz; Senel, Tugba Elif; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with the complaints of nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. She had a history of bilateral surrenalectomy due to Cushing's syndrome. On examination she had tachycardia and orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory examinations revealed hypercalcemia and suppressed parathyroid hormone levels. She also had thyrotoxicosis due to Graves' disease. The investigations to rule out a malignancy were negative. With steroid, zoledronic acid, and antithyroid drug treatment her symptoms were resolved and calcium level was normalized. This case highlights the importance of recognizing thyrotoxicosis and concomitant adrenal failure as a possible cause of severe hypercalcemia. PMID:25878906

  15. Gallium nitrate inhibits calcium resorption from bone and is effective treatment for cancer-related hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Warrell, R P; Bockman, R S; Coonley, C J; Isaacs, M; Staszewski, H

    1984-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of patients who receive the anticancer drug gallium nitrate develop mild hypocalcemia. To evaluate the mechanism of drug-induced hypocalcemia, we tested the effects of gallium nitrate upon in vitro release of 45Ca++ from explanted fetal rat bones. The drug significantly inhibited 45Ca++ release in response to stimulation with both parathyroid hormone and a lymphokine preparation with osteoclast activating factor activity. The inhibitory effects on bone resorption were both time- and dose-dependent. Later, in a pilot study, we treated 10 patients who had cancer-related hypercalcemia with gallium nitrate administered by continuous infusion. All patients responded by a reduction of total serum calcium to normal or subnormal concentrations (13.8 +/- 1.05 mg/dl, mean +/- SD pretreatment, to 8.03 +/- 1.03 mg/dl, mean posttreatment nadir). Our results indicate that gallium nitrate effectively treats cancer-related hypercalcemia and that it probably acts by inhibiting calcium release from bone. Images PMID:6715548

  16. Hypercalcemia - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also ... URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  17. Severe Hypercalcemia in a Child With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapse: Successful Management With Combination of Calcitonin and Bisphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Tagiyev, Anar; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Tavil, Betul; Buyukyilmaz, Gonul; Gumruk, Fatma; Cetin, Mualla

    2016-04-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare complication of hematological malignancy in children. An 8-year-old girl with CALLA (+) Pre-B-cell ALL developed hypercalcemia during bone marrow relapse. She had nausea, vomiting, leg pain, polyuria, polydipsia, and muscle weakness. At the time of relapse, the ionized calcium level was 1.99 mmol/L. Rehydration with 0.9% saline and furosemide and methylprednisolone (MP) treatment were used for the treatment of hypercalcemia. The serum ionized calcium level increased to 2.2 mmol/L despite hydration, furosemide, and MP treatment. Then, a single-dose pamidronate (1 mg/kg/dose) was administered. Despite pamidronate treatment, the calcium level continued to rise. Next, calcitonin at a dose of 8 IU/kg/dose, 4 doses per day, was added to the treatment. After commencement of calcitonin treatment, her ionized calcium level decreased to normal reference ranges. In conclusion, because of the postponed effect of bisphosphonate treatment, pamidronate and calcitonin combination is an effective treatment option in the early resolution of malignancy-related hypercalcemia. PMID:26907650

  18. Forearm bone mineral density in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and primary hyperparathyroidism: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Troels; Nielsen, Christian Stoltz; Christensen, Signe Engkjær; Nissen, Peter H; Heickendorff, Lene; Mosekilde, Leif

    2011-10-01

    Studies have shown that cancellous bone is relatively preserved in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), whereas bone loss is seen in cortical bone. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) patients seem to preserve bone mineral in spite of hypercalcemia and often elevated plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH). The objective of this study was to compare total and regional forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with PHPT and FHH and to examine if differences can be used to separate the two disorders. We included 63 FHH, and 121 PHPT patients in a cross-sectional study. We performed dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans of the forearm, hip and lumbar spine and measured a number of biochemical variables. PTH patients had significantly lower Z-scores in all parts of the forearm compared to FHH. This was also the case after adjustment for body mass index. When stratifying for age, gender and PTH, T-scores were still significantly lower in PHPT patients than in FHH patients at the total, the mid and the ultradistal forearm, but not at the proximal 1/3 forearm. In a multiple regression analysis BMD Z-score was lower in PHPT compared to FHH at the total forearm, the mid forearm and the ultradistal forearm but not the proximal forearm when adjusting for biochemical variables including PTH, 1,25(OH)(2)D and Ca(2+). These observations support that inactivating mutations in the CASR gene in bone cells in FHH may protect against forearm bone loss. Differences between the two groups in total or regional forearm BMD were inferior to the calcium/creatinine clearance ratio as a diagnostic tool to separate FHH from PHPT. PMID:21785908

  19. Neonatal hypercalcemia secondary to subcutaneous fat necrosis successfully treated with pamidronate: a case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Samedi, Veronica Mugarab; Yusuf, Kamran; Yee, Wendy; Obaid, Hala; Al Awad, Essa Hamdan

    2014-11-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCFN) is a noninfectious panniculitis that occurs in term infants who experience significant distress in the 1st weeks of life, including hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Since the introduction of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE, there have been a few published case reports of SCFN, following this modality of treatment. Although, most cases of SCFN resolve spontaneously, SCFN may be associated with hypercalcemia, which may sometimes reach dangerous levels. Approaches used for the management of this potentially life-threatening condition, include hyperhydration, calciuric diuretics, corticosteroids, and in more resistant cases pamidronate, a bisphosphonate. We report our experience on the use of pamidronate in two cases of severe hypercalcemia associated with SCFN following therapeutic hypothermia for HIE. We believe that with increasing use of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE, clinicians are likely to encounter this condition more frequently. PMID:25452891

  20. Neonatal Hypercalcemia Secondary to Subcutaneous Fat Necrosis Successfully Treated with Pamidronate: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Samedi, Veronica Mugarab; Yusuf, Kamran; Yee, Wendy; Obaid, Hala; Al Awad, Essa Hamdan

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCFN) is a noninfectious panniculitis that occurs in term infants who experience significant distress in the 1st weeks of life, including hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Since the introduction of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE, there have been a few published case reports of SCFN, following this modality of treatment. Although, most cases of SCFN resolve spontaneously, SCFN may be associated with hypercalcemia, which may sometimes reach dangerous levels. Approaches used for the management of this potentially life-threatening condition, include hyperhydration, calciuric diuretics, corticosteroids, and in more resistant cases pamidronate, a bisphosphonate. We report our experience on the use of pamidronate in two cases of severe hypercalcemia associated with SCFN following therapeutic hypothermia for HIE. We believe that with increasing use of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE, clinicians are likely to encounter this condition more frequently. PMID:25452891

  1. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in SLC34A1 Encoding Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter 2A Cause Idiopathic Infantile Hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Schlingmann, Karl P; Ruminska, Justyna; Kaufmann, Martin; Dursun, Ismail; Patti, Monica; Kranz, Birgitta; Pronicka, Ewa; Ciara, Elzbieta; Akcay, Teoman; Bulus, Derya; Cornelissen, Elisabeth A M; Gawlik, Aneta; Sikora, Przemysław; Patzer, Ludwig; Galiano, Matthias; Boyadzhiev, Veselin; Dumic, Miroslav; Vivante, Asaf; Kleta, Robert; Dekel, Benjamin; Levtchenko, Elena; Bindels, René J; Rust, Stephan; Forster, Ian C; Hernando, Nati; Jones, Glenville; Wagner, Carsten A; Konrad, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia (IIH) is characterized by severe hypercalcemia with failure to thrive, vomiting, dehydration, and nephrocalcinosis. Recently, mutations in the vitamin D catabolizing enzyme 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) were described that lead to increased sensitivity to vitamin D due to accumulation of the active metabolite 1,25-(OH)2D3. In a subgroup of patients who presented in early infancy with renal phosphate wasting and symptomatic hypercalcemia, mutations in CYP24A1 were excluded. Four patients from families with parental consanguinity were subjected to homozygosity mapping that identified a second IIH gene locus on chromosome 5q35 with a maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 6.79. The sequence analysis of the most promising candidate gene, SLC34A1 encoding renal sodium-phosphate cotransporter 2A (NaPi-IIa), revealed autosomal-recessive mutations in the four index cases and in 12 patients with sporadic IIH. Functional studies of mutant NaPi-IIa in Xenopus oocytes and opossum kidney (OK) cells demonstrated disturbed trafficking to the plasma membrane and loss of phosphate transport activity. Analysis of calcium and phosphate metabolism in Slc34a1-knockout mice highlighted the effect of phosphate depletion and fibroblast growth factor-23 suppression on the development of the IIH phenotype. The human and mice data together demonstrate that primary renal phosphate wasting caused by defective NaPi-IIa function induces inappropriate production of 1,25-(OH)2D3 with subsequent symptomatic hypercalcemia. Clinical and laboratory findings persist despite cessation of vitamin D prophylaxis but rapidly respond to phosphate supplementation. Therefore, early differentiation between SLC34A1 (NaPi-IIa) and CYP24A1 (24-hydroxylase) defects appears critical for targeted therapy in patients with IIH. PMID:26047794

  2. Endogenous prostaglandin E2 mediates inhibition of rat thick ascending limb Cl reabsorption in chronic hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L N; McKay, A J; Borzecki, J S

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis that endogenous PGE2 mediates defective thick ascending limb (TAL) Cl reabsorption (percent delivered load: FRCl%) in rats with vitamin D-induced chronic hypercalcemia (HC) was tested by measuring FRCl% in loop segments microperfused in vivo in HC and control rats treated acutely with indomethacin (Indo) or its vehicle, and obtaining the corresponding outer medullary [PGE2]. Microperfusion conditions were developed in which FRCl% was exclusively furosemide sensitive. To determine the cellular mechanism, tubules were perfused acutely with forskolin (FSK), cAMP, or the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine (SSP). Outer medullary [PGE2] in HC rats was 9 to 10 times greater than control and could be normalized by Indo. FRCl% was 20% lower in HC rats infused with vehicle, and Indo, FSK, and cAMP returned FRCl% to normal despite sustained HC. Indo or FSK had no effect on FRCl% in control rats and Indo did not prevent inhibition of FRCl% by luminal PGE2 (1 microM). Luminal SSP (10(-7), 10(-8) M) in HC did not return FRCl% to control values. We conclude that impaired TAL FRCl% in HC occurs at a pre-cAMP site and is due to endogenous PGE2 and not to HC. Images PMID:8390479

  3. Familial pheochromocytoma, hypercalcemia, and von Hippel-Lindau disease. A ten year study of a large family.

    PubMed

    Atuk, N O; McDonald, T; Wood, T; Carpenter, J T; Walzak, M P; Donaldson, M; Gillenwater, J Y

    1979-05-01

    Long-term epidemiological and laboratory studies were carried out in a kindred with familial pheochromocytoma associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease. Thirteen members were affected by the syndrome and the trait appears to be transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Of 13 patients, 7 had pheochromocytoma alone. Of the remaining six patients, one had pheochromocytoma combined with von Hippel-Lindau disease, four had pheochromocytoma with retinal disease only, and a single patient had a retinal lesion without pheochromocytoma. In four patients, pheochromocytoma antedated the development of retinal lesions. Ten members also had mild hypercalcemia without accompanying elevations of PTH in the 4 patients in whom this was determined. In all, hypercalcemia was corrected with removal of tumors, and no patient had a return of hypercalcemia in the absence of recurrent increases in urinary catecholamines. The clinical presentations in 12 patients varied markedly, as did their urinary excretion rates of norepinephrine, epinephrine and their metabolites. However, an analysis of the data revealed significant correlations not previously described between the urinary excretion of free catecholamines (norepinephrine plus epinephrine), blood pressure, the free catecholamine content of the tumor and the age of the patient. Urinary excretion of free norepinephrine plus epinephrine appear to be decreased with advancing age (p less than 0.001). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures and the age of the patient were inversely correlated (p less than 0.01). A significant inverse relationship between the tumor content of free catecholamines and the age of the patients was, although to a lesser degree, also present (p less than 0.05). As a whole, the size of the tumors and their norepinephrine content were not correlated. We present a concept that, in familial pheochromocytoma, the metabolism of catecholamines is altered by the process of aging, and that this change modifies the

  4. Hypercalcemia and diffuse osteolytic lesions in a 45-year-old patient with myeloid sarcoma with megakaryocytic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Aditya; Abdelqader, Abdelhai; Dahagam, Chanukya; Jabaji, Ramez; Kumar, Pallavi; Aboulafia, Albert; Selinger, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare form of acute myeloid leukemia that carries a poor prognosis. As most cases of osteolytic lesions are due to plasma cell and myeloid malignancies, maintaining a broad differential directly influences clinical course. We document a 45-year-old patient with progressive constitutional symptoms, osteolytic bone lesions in the setting of hypercalcemia, who developed acutely worsening pancytopenia. The diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma with megakaryocytic differentiation was made after obtaining tissue from osteolytic bone that stained strong for CD34. Immunohistochemical testing underscores the importance of how serologic and urine testing remains limited and can delay early diagnosis in this disease. PMID:27124159

  5. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE RENAL FAILURE WITH DELAYED HYPERCALCEMIA SECONDARY TO SARCOCYSTIS NEURONA-INDUCED MYOSITIS AND RHABDOMYOLYSIS IN A CALIFORNIA SEA LION (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Alexander, Amy B; Hanley, Christopher S; Duncan, Mary C; Ulmer, Kyle; Padilla, Luis R

    2015-09-01

    A 3-yr-old captive-born California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) developed Sarcocystis neurona-induced myositis and rhabdomyolysis that led to acute renal failure. The sea lion was successfully managed with fluid therapy, antiprotozoals, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, antiemetics, gastroprotectants, and diuretics, but developed severe delayed hypercalcemia, a syndrome identified in humans after traumatic or exertion-induced rhabdomyolysis. Treatment with calcitonin was added to the management, and the individual recovered fully. The case emphasizes that animals with rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure risk developing delayed hypercalcemia, which may be life threatening, and calcium levels should be closely monitored past the resolution of renal failure. PMID:26352981

  6. Calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia in a patient with granulomatous mycosis fungoides and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Takamasa; Ohashi, Naro; Tsuji, Naoko; Naito, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Shinsuke; Ono, Masafumi; Fujikura, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Takayuki; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Yasuda, Hideo; Kato, Akihiko; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Tokura, Yoshiki; Fujigaki, Yoshihide

    2013-05-01

    An 86-year-old man, diagnosed as having mycosis fungoides in May 2008 and treated with repeated radiation therapy, was admitted to our hospital for initiation of hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in April 2012. On admission, his corrected serum calcium level was 9.3 mg/dL, and his intact parathyroid hormone level was 121.9 pg/mL (normal range 13.9-78.5 pg/mL), indicating secondary hyperparathyroidism due to ESRD. After starting hemodialysis, urinary volume diminished rapidly. The serum calcium level increased (12.7 mg/dL), and the intact parathyroid hormone level was suppressed (< 5 pg/mL), while the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) level increased (114 pg/mL, normal range: 20.0-60.0 pg/mL) in June 2012. The possibilities of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis were ruled out. Skin biopsies from tumorous lesions revealed a diagnosis of granulomatous mycosis fungoides. The serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels and the degrees of skin lesions went in parallel with the increased serum calcium and calcitriol levels. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia possibly associated with granulomatous mycosis fungoides. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides is rare, and its association with calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia has not been reported. Careful attention to calcium metabolism is needed in patients with granulomatous mycosis fungoides, especially in patients with ESRD. PMID:24175265

  7. Interleukin 1 synthesis by a transitional cell carcinoma: relationship to bone resorption and humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Sammon, P.; Wronski, T.; Ignaszewski, L.; Flueck, J.; Cohen, D.A.

    1986-03-01

    A tumor cell line (TCCB) was isolated from a patient with transitional cell carcinoma, who had tumor-associated hypercalcemia. Culture supernatants from TCCB had significant bone resorption activity in a /sup 45/Ca release assay from fetal mouse long bones. Furthermore, TCCB supernatants possessed potent interleukin 1 (IL-1) activity in a mouse thymocyte assay. Histomorphometric analysis of fetal mouse long bones incubated with TCCB supernatants showed a 7 fold increase in osteoclasts and a significant decrease in bone mass as compared to control bones. IL-1 activity in culture supernatants from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes comigrated with both IL-1 and bone resorption activities from TCCB tumor cells by gel chromatography on AcA-54 ultrogel. Furthermore, antisera against human IL-1 was shown to inhibit the Il-1 activity from both monocytes and TCCB tumor cells. In light of recent reports that IL-1 can cause bone resorption in vitro, these data suggest that the hypercalcemia of malignancy seen with certain solid tumors, may be the result of IL-1 release by the tumor which subsequently elevates serum calcium by induction of bone resorption.

  8. A Male Patient with Humoral Hypercalcemia of Malignancy (HHM) with Leukocytosis Caused by Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Resulting from Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kohji; Umegaki, Noriko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Kubota, Takuo; Namba, Noriyuki; Etani, Yuri; Hirai, Haruhiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Nakajima, Shigeo; Takahashi, Yuji; Tamai, Katsuto; Katayama, Ichiro; Ozono, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a severe skin disorder. Although the patients are at risk for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), no case of cutaneous SCC derived from RDEB with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM) has been reported. We present the first case report of a male patient with HHM with leukocytosis caused by cutaneous SCC resulting from RDEB. A 20-yr-old Japanese male patient with RDEB; the diagnosis was confirmed by electron microscopic examination, suffered an intractable skin ulcer and hypercalcemia and leukocytosis. PTH-rP, SCC antigen and Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were elevated. The histological diagnosis of the skin lesion was made well-differentiated SCC. Immunohistochemical staining showed the expression of PTH-rP in atypical tumor cells. For the control of hypercalcemia before an amputation, we used zoledronate safely and could control the serum Ca concentration in the normal range. After the amputation of his right leg including SCC, leukocytosis improved immediately and PTH-rP in blood decreased to the normal range. One month after the amputation, local recurrence of cutaneous SCC and multiple lung metastases were observed. PTH-rP increased gradually associated with hypercalcemia. Although the patient reached an unfortunate turning point about 4 mo after the amputation, we propose that zoledronate is an effective and safe treatment for HHM with cardiorenal complications. PMID:23926398

  9. Hypercalcemia, hypervitaminosis A and 3-epi-25-OH-D3 levels after consumption of an "over the counter" vitamin D remedy. a case report.

    PubMed

    Granado-Lorencio, F; Rubio, E; Blanco-Navarro, I; Pérez-Sacristán, B; Rodríguez-Pena, R; García López, F J

    2012-06-01

    Intoxication from vitamin D supplements has been rarely reported but, nowadays, it occurs more frequently. 3-epi-25-OH-D(3) is highly prevalent in adults and it is considered of biological relevance. We report a case of vitamin D toxicity with hypercalcemia, acute renal failure and hypervitaminosis A after consuming an over-the-counter vitamin D supplement. Our data suggest that the contribution of 3-epi-25-OH-D(3) is not altered during vitamin D toxicity, although the serum levels of 25-OH-D(3) and 3-epi-25-OH-D(3) may display a different rate of clearance. The patient also displayed hypervitaminosis A unrelated to diet, possibly caused by renal failure related to the hypercalcemia induced by vitamin D toxicity. Because of the increasing use of over-the-counter vitamin D supplements and the potential iatrogenic hypercalcemia related to hypervitaminosis A, the present case highlights the importance of evaluating both the use of (non-) prescribed medication and vitamin A status during vitamin D toxicity. PMID:22426357

  10. A Case of Hypercalcemia and Overexpression of CYP27B1 in Skeletal Muscle Lesions in a Patient with HIV Infection After Cosmetic Injections with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for Wasting.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Sahar M; Wang, Yongmei; Jones, Kirk D; Nussbaum, Jesse C; Chang, Yongen; Masharani, Umesh; Bikle, Daniel; Shoback, Dolores M; Hsiao, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    Foreign body-induced granuloma is an uncommon yet clinically significant cause of hypercalcemia. The molecular mechanisms are uncertain, although extrarenal calcitriol production has been proposed. We describe severe hypercalcemia associated with increased levels of plasma calcitriol in a patient with HIV and local granulomatous reaction 5 years after injection of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as dermal filler for cosmetic body sculpting. Extensive evaluation revealed no identifiable cause of increased calcitriol levels. Nuclear imaging was remarkable for diffuse uptake in the subcutaneous tissues of the buttocks. Subsequent muscle biopsy and immunohistochemical staining showed strong local expression of CYP27B1 within histiocytes surrounding globules of PMMA. This case highlights an unfortunate complication of dermal fillers and shows that inflammatory cells can express high levels of CYP27B1 even without frank granulomas. The growing trend of body contour enhancement using injectable fillers should raise suspicion for this cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice. Patients with HIV who receive this treatment for lipodystrophy or other cosmetic purposes may have increased susceptibility to hypercalcemia in the setting of underlying chronic inflammation. This may be a concern when changing anti-retroviral therapy, since alterations in levels of HIV viremia may initiate or contribute to worsening hypercalcemia. PMID:26253396

  11. Targeted 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1α-hydroxylase adoptive gene therapy ameliorates dss-induced colitis without causing hypercalcemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Baylink, David J; Walter, Michael H; Lau, Kin-Hing William; Meng, Xianmei; Wang, Jun; Cherkas, Andriy; Tang, Xiaolei; Qin, Xuezhong

    2015-02-01

    Systemic 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment ameliorating murine inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) could not be applied to patients because of hypercalcemia. We tested the hypothesis that increasing 1,25(OH)2D3 synthesis locally by targeting delivery of the 1α-hydroxylase gene (CYP27B1) to the inflamed bowel would ameliorate IBD without causing hypercalcemia. Our targeting strategy is the use of CD11b(+)/Gr1(+) monocytes as the cell vehicle and a macrophage-specific promoter (Mac1) to control CYP27B1 expression. The CD11b(+)/Gr1(+) monocytes migrated initially to inflamed colon and some healthy tissues in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis mice; however, only the migration of monocytes to the inflamed colon was sustained. Adoptive transfer of Gr1(+) monocytes did not cause hepatic injury. Infusion of Mac1-CYP27B1-modified monocytes increased body weight gain, survival, and colon length, and expedited mucosal regeneration. Expression of pathogenic Th17 and Th1 cytokines (interleukin (IL)-17a and interferon (IFN)-α) was decreased, while expression of protective Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) was increased, by the treatment. This therapy also enhanced tight junction gene expression in the colon. No hypercalcemia occurred following this therapy. In conclusion, we have for the first time obtained proof-of-principle evidence for a novel monocyte-based adoptive CYP27B1 gene therapy using a mouse IBD model. This strategy could be developed into a novel therapy for IBD and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25327179

  12. Renal Failure Found during the Follow-up of Sarcoidosis: The Relevance of a Delay in the Diagnosis of Concurrent Hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Erika; Masuda, Takahiro; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sato, Ryuta; Wakabayashi, Natsuko; Miki, Atsushi; Otani, Naoko; Imai, Toshimi; Sugase, Taro; Takeda, Shin-Ichi; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of relapsed sarcoidosis with a deteriorated renal function accompanied by hypercalcemia, nephrolithiasis, and a ureteral stone in a woman with a history of ocular sarcoidosis. The ocular involvement appeared to be well controlled for a long period of time with a topical ophthalmic steroid; however, we believe that the absence of apparent recrudescence could have led to the delay in our diagnosis of relapse of the disease during the follow-up period. The conundrums regarding longitudinal surveillance for both evaluating the disease activity and determining the necessity of therapeutics are also discussed. PMID:27432099

  13. Functional Parathyroid Cyst: A Rare Cause of Malignant Hypercalcemia with Primary Hyperparathyroidism—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Areej; Khan, Yusra; Raza, Shahzad; Akbar, Ghulam; Khan, Monis; Diwan, Nauman; Rizvi, Wajih

    2012-01-01

    Parathyroid cysts are rare lesions found in the neck and anterior mediastinum. They are often nonfunctional (>90%) and rarely in the functional form. This paper discusses a case of severe hypercalcemia (23 mg/dL) secondary to a rare functional parathyroid cyst. The patient was later found to have a hemorrhagic cyst with compression of the right recurrent laryngeal nerve. Preoperative diagnosis of the lesion was parathyroid carcinoma. However, reexploration of the parathyroid mass along with microscopic study confirmed the diagnosis of a parathyroid cyst. Following cystectomy, the patient restored her baseline functional status with preservation of the right recurrent laryngeal nerve. Postoperative followup three years later showed no evidence of cyst recurrence. This paper illustrates the rare presentation of parathyroid functional cysts with severe hypercalcemia and primary hyperparathyroidism. Physicians should be aware of the presence of hemorrhage, inflammation, and compressive symptoms in these cysts which mimic parathyroid carcinoma. These patients should be managed with aggressive medical and surgical intervention. PMID:22431942

  14. A G-protein Subunit-α11 Loss-of-Function Mutation, Thr54Met, Causes Familial Hypocalciuric Hypercalcemia Type 2 (FHH2).

    PubMed

    Gorvin, Caroline M; Cranston, Treena; Hannan, Fadil M; Rust, Nigel; Qureshi, Asjid; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2016-06-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with three variants, FHH1 to FHH3. FHH1 is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein coupled receptor that predominantly signals via G-protein subunit alpha-11 (Gα11 ) to regulate calcium homeostasis. FHH2 is the result of loss-of-function mutations in Gα11 , encoded by GNA11, and to date only two FHH2-associated Gα11 missense mutations (Leu135Gln and Ile200del) have been reported. FHH3 is the result of loss-of-function mutations of the adaptor protein-2 σ-subunit (AP2σ), which plays a pivotal role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We describe a 65-year-old woman who had hypercalcemia with normal circulating parathyroid hormone concentrations and hypocalciuria, features consistent with FHH, but she did not have CaSR and AP2σ mutations. Mutational analysis of the GNA11 gene was therefore undertaken, using leucocyte DNA, and this identified a novel heterozygous GNA11 mutation (c.161C>T; p.Thr54Met). The effect of the Gα11 variant was assessed by homology modeling of the related Gαq protein and by measuring the CaSR-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca(2+) i ) responses of HEK293 cells, stably expressing CaSR, to alterations in extracellular calcium (Ca(2+) o ) using flow cytometry. Three-dimensional modeling revealed the Thr54Met mutation to be located at the interface between the Gα11 helical and GTPase domains, and to likely impair GDP binding and interdomain interactions. Expression of wild-type and the mutant Gα11 in HEK293 cells stably expressing CaSR demonstrate that the Ca(2+) i responses after stimulation with Ca(2+) o of the mutant Met54 Gα11 led to a rightward shift of the concentration-response curve with a significantly (p < 0.01) increased mean half-maximal concentration (EC50 ) value of 3.88 mM (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.76-4.01 mM), when compared with the wild-type EC50 of 2.94 mM (95% CI 2.81-3.07

  15. Sarcoidosis presenting with an unusual erythematous rash and persistent hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Barney, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease that often presents with constitutional symptoms and ocular and skin manifestations. The chest roentgenogram may show no abnormalities or only diffuse interstitial disease. The serum calcium level is uncommonly persistently elevated and responds rapidly to low-dose corticosteroid therapy. The level of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D is often elevated, and the level of parathyroid hormone is almost always suppressed. Skin manifestations vary considerably and may appear in an unusual fashion. A skin biopsy may often be essential in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Images PMID:1595285

  16. Cinacalcet for Symptomatic Hypercalcemia Caused by AP2S1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    In the full list of authors as shown in the PDF file posted with the published letter at NEJM.org, Drs. Nesbit and Thakker should have been listed as the penultimate and final authors, rather than as the seventh and eighth authors. The letter is correct at NEJM.org. PMID:27276582

  17. Regulation of parathyroid hormone gene expression by hypocalcemia, hypercalcemia, and vitamin D in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Naveh-Many, T; Silver, J

    1990-01-01

    In vivo in the rat 1,25(OH)2D3 decreases and a low calcium increases PTH mRNA levels. We now report the effect of 3 and 8 wk of changes in dietary vitamin D and calcium on PTH mRNA levels. PTH mRNA levels were increased by 3 wk of calcium deficiency (five times), a vitamin D-deficient diet (two times), and combined deficiency (10 times), but not changed by high calcium. Vitamin D-deficient-diet rats' PTH mRNA did not decrease after a single large dose of 1,25(OH)2D3, but did decrease partially after repeated daily doses of 1,25(OH)2D3. Rats after a vitamin D-, calcium-deficient (-D-Ca) diet did not respond to changes in serum calcium at 1 h. Flow cytometry of isolated cells from parathyroid-thyroid tissue separated the smaller parathyroid from the larger thyroid cells and allowed an analysis of parathyroid cell number. In normal vitamin D/normal calcium (NDNCa) rats the parathyroid cells were 24.7 +/- 3.4% (n = 6) of the total cell number, whereas in -D-Ca rats they were 41.8 +/- 6.6% (n = 6) (P less than 0.05). That is, -D-Ca rats had 1.7 times the number of cells, whereas they had 10 times the amount of PTH mRNA, indicating the major contribution (6 times) of increased PTH gene expression per cell. Moreover, a calcium-deficient, more so than a vitamin D-deficient diet, amplifies the expression of the PTH gene, and vitamin D is necessary for an intact response of PTH mRNA to 1,25(OH)2D3 or calcium. Images PMID:2212016

  18. Alendronate distributed on bone surfaces inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro and in experimental hypercalcemia models.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Y; Sato, H; Oue, Y; Okabe, K; Ohta, T; Tsuchimoto, M; Kiyoki, M

    1995-02-01

    Alendronate is an aminobisphosphonate that acts as a potent inhibitor of osteoclastic bone resorption. To understand the mechanism of action of alendronate in vivo, in this study we investigated the relationship between distribution of [14C]-alendronate in rat bone and its effects on bone resorption in vitro or in rat hypercalcemic models. A single IV dose of 0.05 approximately 1.25 mg/kg inhibited the increase in plasma calcium level induced by bovine PTH or 1 alpha(OH)D3. The minimal effective dose of pamidronate (1.25 mg/kg) and etidronate (over 31.25 mg/kg) were at least 5 times and 25 times, respectively, higher than the dose of alendronate in the rat hypercalcemic model prepared by 1 alpha(OH)D3. The relative potencies of compounds in the hypercalcemic rat models reflected those of inhibitory effects on bone resorption in vitro. We conducted the ivory-slice assay under two conditions: (a) addition of a given bisphosphonate after adherence of the osteoclasts; and (b) preincubation of the ivory slices with a given bisphosphonate. The inhibitory IC50 values of alendronate under condition (b) were similar to those under condition (a). To evaluate the interaction between osteoclasts and alendronate in bone, we investigated the localization of [14C]-alendronate in the tibia of growing rats (4-day-old rats). Alendronate did not distribute uniformly in the tibia. At 1 day after injection (0.05 mg SC), dense labeling was seen primarily under osteoclasts. We injected 0.05 mg/kg of [14C]-alendronate (single i.v.) into rats [14C]-alendronate was rapidly eliminated from plasma, and mainly distributed to the bone in rats. These data suggest that alendronate which distributed on bone surface mainly contributed to the antihypercalcemic action in vivo. PMID:7756053

  19. [Influence of an acute hypercalcemia on the gastric secretion in duodenal ulcer, peptic ulcer of the jejunum and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome].

    PubMed

    Arendt, R

    1975-05-15

    In 36 patients with ulcer without Zollinger-Ellison-syndrome (25 patients with recurrent duodenal ulcer, 11 with an ulcus pepticum jejuni after B II-resection of the stomach) and 2 patients suffering from ulcus pepticum jejuni with an ascertained gastrinoma the secretion of acid was compared after stimulation of pentagstrin (6 mug/kg) and calcium (4 mg Ca++/kg/h). The secretion of hydrochloric acid was statistically significantly stimulated in all patients suffering from ulcer by the hypercalcaemia (increase of the serum calcium concentration from 5.0 +/- 0.3 mval/1 to 6.2 +/- 0.8 mval/1). But in patients suffering from ulcer with gastrinoma the stimulatory effect was larger than in such patients without autonomous source of gastrin: the calcium-stimulated secretion of hydrochloric acid was on the average in cases of duodenal ulcer 40% (2 to 68%), in the ulcera peptica jejuni 47% (17 to 75%), in the 4 comparative examinations of the two patients with Zollinger-Ellison-syndrome, however, always more than 100% (106 to 177%) of the pentagastrin-stimulated peak secretion. The comparative test of the pentagastrin and calcium-stimulated secretion of hydrochloric acid could be a help for the proof of autonomous places of the formation of gastrin. PMID:1199239

  20. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Elderly Patients Receiving SSRIs; Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated with Canagliflozin Use in a Type 1 Diabetic Patient; Duloxetine-Induced Galactorrhea; Canagliflozin-Associated Severe Hypercalcemia and Hypernatremia; Vemurafenib-Induced Fanconi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mancano, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA's MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:26912914

  1. A Case of Solitary Kidney Atrophy Due to Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Jiang, Jiunn-Song; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tsai, Ming-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is asymptomatic in most patients, its main clinical manifestation is nephrolithiasis. In general, hypercalcemia would lead to unilateral renal stones, which may become bilateral over time. We present a rare case of a large unilateral asymptomatic ureteral stone in a patient with hypercalcemia secondary to PHPT, which eventually led to renal atrophy. The diagnosis of PHPT should be considered in patients with hypercalcemia and renal stones, as asymptomatic PHPT may result in a devastating renal outcome. PMID:26765435

  2. PubMed Central

    Bergeron, R.; Martin, N.; Moreau, A.

    1995-01-01

    The most frequent, potentially fatal, metabolic complication in cancer patients is hypercalcemia. After a discussion of cancer-associated hypercalcemia, we propose an individualized intervention model based on an analysis of the clinical situation, the prognosis, and available treatment options. PMID:7773028

  3. A case of adolescent giant parathyroid adenoma presenting multiple osteolytic fractures and postoperative hungry bone syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Kosuke; Miyoshi, Yuji; Izumi, Shinji; Hashimoto, Jun; Naka, Norifumi; Tsukamoto, Yasunori; Kashii, Masafumi; Kaito, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and postoperative hungry bone syndrome are very rare conditions in adolescents, and may be frequently misdiagnosed as a metastatic bone tumor. However, delay in diagnosis may lead to a fatal preoperative hypercalcemia and postoperative hypocalcemia. PHPT is a differential diagnosis of adolescent hypercalcemia and osteolytic fractures. PMID:26509019

  4. [Renal ultrasound in fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Tizki, S; Lasry, F; Elftoiki, F Z; Hadj Khalifa, H; Itri, M; Khadir, K; Benchikhi, H

    2013-07-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis is an uncommon disease that may be complicated with potentially fatal hypercalcemia or with nephrocalcinosis. We report on the case of a patient with a history of significant perinatal asphyxia, hospitalized for a urinary tract infection. Lesions of subcutaneous fat necrosis were noted, with asymptomatic hypercalcemia at 3.9mmol/L. A renal ultrasound was performed and showed echogenic medullary pyramids bilaterally, consistent with nephrocalcinosis and left nephrolithiasis. The treatment of hypercalcemia included hyperhydration, a diuretic and corticosteroids. Progression was characterized by the total regression of skin lesions and normalization of serum calcium. Hypercalcemia is a rare complication of subcutaneous fat necrosis. It develops within days to weeks after the appearance of skin lesions. Nephrocalcinosis appears after several weeks or months. Hypercalcemia must be treated in due time to avoid the impact on the kidney. PMID:23726682

  5. Endocrine causes of calcium disorders.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2012-11-01

    Endocrine diseases that may cause hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia include hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, thyroid disorders, hyperadrenocorticism, hypoadrenocorticism, and less commonly pheochromocytoma and multiple endocrine neoplasias. The differential diagnosis of hypercalcemia may include malignancy (lymphoma, anal sac carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma), hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D intoxication, chronic renal disease, hypoadrenocorticism, granulomatous disorders, osteolysis, or spurious causes. Hypocalcemia may be caused by puerperal tetany, pancreatitis, intestinal malabsorption, ethlyene glycol intoxication, acute renal failure, hypopararthyroidism, hypovitaminosis D, hypomagnesemia, and low albumin. This article focuses on the endocrine causes of calcium imbalance and provides diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for identifying the cause of hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia in veterinary patients. PMID:23415381

  6. IN VITRO INHIBITORY AND FUNGICIDAL PROPERTIES OF EDTA FOR ASPERGILLUS AND FUSARIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) is approved for food preservation, treatment for hypercalcemia and heavy metal poisoning and as a blood count tube anticoagulant. Reports indicate EDTA also inhibits microbial growth. This study investigated EDTA lethality and inhibitory propert...

  7. Primary hyperparathyroidism in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Roizen, Jeffrey; Levine, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrine disorder in adults in whom the typical presentation is incidentally discovered as asymptomatic hypercalcemia. PHPT is much less common in children and adolescents, but has greater morbidity in this age group, as most young patients with PHPT will have symptomatic hypercalcemia or complications such as kidney stones, abdominal pain, and skeletal fragility. An important feature of PHPT in younger patients is the relatively high prevalence of germline inactivating mutations of the CASR gene, which encodes the calcium-sensing receptor. Biallelic CASR mutations cause neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism, a life-threatening condition that presents within days of life with marked hypercalcemia, respiratory distress, failure to thrive, and skeletal demineralization. By contrast, more common heterozygous CASR mutations are generally associated with a benign variant of PHPT termed familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. Appropriate management of PHPT in children and adolescents requires distinction between familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, which generally requires no specific treatment, and other forms of PHPT that are best treated by parathyroidectomy. PMID:22989537

  8. Complete Tumor Resection for a Hepatocellular Carcinoma Secreting Parathyroid Hormone-related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Jin Su; Shin, Ki Chul; Lee, Gil Tae; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, Sang Beom; Ku, Yun Hyi

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in Korea. Diverse paraneoplastic syndromes can occur in patients with HCC, but parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTH-rP)-induced hypercalcemia is uncommon. Hypercalcemia due to PTH or particularly PTH-rP-secreting HCC is associated with poor outcomes. We report a 71-year-old man who presented with symptoms of vague abdominal discomfort, somnolence, lethargy, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Imaging studies revealed a large HCC without metastasis. The laboratory findings showed elevated serum calcium level, low intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level and elevated PTH-rP level. These results led to a diagnosis of a PTH-rP-secreting HCC and paraneoplastic hypercalcemia. After emergency management of the hypercalcemia, the patient underwent an extended right hemihepatectomy with cholecystectomy. One year after the surgery, he is alive with normal calcium, PTH-rP, and iPTH levels. This case demonstrates that the rare phenomenon of life-threatening hypercalcemia caused by HCC should not be overlooked. These symptoms offer a good opportunity to diagnose HCC early. Radical tumor resection makes it possible to cure patients with PTH-rP-secreting HCC. PMID:26289247

  9. Kidney function and influence of sunlight exposure in patients with impaired 24-hydroxylation of vitamin D due to CYP24A1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Linglart, Agnès; Bienaime, Frank; Allain-Launay, Emma; Roussey-Kessler, Gwenaelle; Ryckewaert, Amélie; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Hourmant, Maryvonne

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of CYP24A1, the enzyme that converts the major circulating and active forms of vitamin D to inactive metabolites, recently have been implicated in idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. Patients with biallelic mutations in CYP24A1 present with severe hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis in infancy or hypercalciuria, kidney stones, and nephrocalcinosis in adulthood. We describe a cohort of 7 patients (2 adults, 5 children) presenting with severe hypercalcemia who had homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in CYP24A1. Acute episodes of hypercalcemia in infancy were the first symptom in 6 of 7 patients; in all patients, symptoms included nephrocalcinosis, hypercalciuria, low parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and higher than expected 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels. Longitudinal data suggested that in most patients, periods of increased sunlight exposure tended to correlate with decreases in PTH levels and increases in calcemia and calciuria. Follow-up of the 2 adult patients showed reduced glomerular filtration rate and extrarenal manifestations, including calcic corneal deposits and osteoporosis. Cases of severe PTH-independent hypercalcemia associated with hypercalciuria in infants should prompt genetic analysis of CYP24A1. These patients should be monitored carefully throughout life because they may be at increased risk for developing chronic kidney disease. PMID:25446019

  10. Parathyroid cancer - difficult diagnosis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Pyzik, Aleksandra Joanna; Matyjaszek-Matuszek, Beata; Zwolak, Agnieszka; Chrapko, Beata; Pyzik, Dawid; Strawa-Zakościelna, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid cancer is a rare disorder of unclear etiology that is difficult to diagnose and treat. It is most often diagnosed incidentally based on multi-organ non-specific symptoms of hypercalcemia as a consequence of parathyroid hormone oversecretion. We present a case of a male with primary hyperparathyroidism who was diagnosed with parathyroid cancer ectopically located in the mediastinum only after the third surgery. However, due to chronic hypercalcemia, problems with localization and a bad clinical condition, the patient was not able to undergo a radical resection and one year after the first pathological fracture died. Taking into consideration the whole clinical picture we want to emphasize the need to apply comprehensive differential diagnosis of hypercalcemia and localization diagnosis of parathyroid tissue with a use of MIBI scintigraphy accompanied by the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as the most specific diagnostic tools employed in this pathology. PMID:26838944

  11. Renal tubular acidosis due to the milk-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rochman, J; Better, O S; Winaver, J; Chaimowitz, C; Barzilai, A; Jacobs, R

    1977-06-01

    A 60-year-old man with a history of excessive ingestion of calcium carbonate presented with azotemia, hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. His acid-base status was initially normal. Following the cessation of calcium carbonate treatment, the hypercalcemia and azotemia disappeared, and the patient was found to be in metabolic acidosis with blunted acid excretion and a urine pH of 6.1. Kidney biopsy showed focal tubular calcification; the tubular damage was apparently caused by hypercalcemia and had resulted in renal tubular acidosis. During the three months of observation since that time there has been a tendecy for spontaneous remission of the renal tubular acidosis. Impaired renal hydrogen ion excretion prevented the development of metabolic alkalosis despite ingestion of alkali initially, and was later responsible for the metabolic acidosis. Renal tubular acidosis occurring as a sequel to the milk-alkali syndrome may aggravate the danger of nephrocalcinosis in this syndrome. PMID:885714

  12. Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Like Syndrome due to Hypercalcemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rösche, Johannes; Sieveking, Catharina; Kampf, Christina; Benecke, Reiner

    2015-10-01

    Hypercalcemia can cause a subacute syndrome of progressive dementia and marked changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG). We report a case of iatrogenic hypercalcemia with a close correlation between the clinical course and the EEG changes. A 73-year-old woman presented with a subacute syndrome of progressive dementia and bursts of 1.5 to 2 Hz intermittent rhythmic delta activity superimposed on a low-voltage background activity in the EEG. Clinical and EEG abnormalities rapidly resolved after normalization of serum calcium levels. As part of the diagnostic workup of a subacute progressive dementia, a serum calcium level and an EEG should be obtained to detect a Creutzfeldt-Jakob like syndrome in hypercalcemia. Unlike in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob-like syndrome induced by lithium intoxication, there are rarely myoclonic jerks and periodic discharges in hypercalcemic encephalopathy. PMID:24973231

  13. Primary hyperparathyroidism with duodenal ulcer and H. pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Abe, Keiko; Oshima, Naoki; Kawashima, Kousaku; Hamamoto, Naoharu; Moritani, Makoto; Mak, Rumi; Ishihara, Shunji; Adachi, Kyoichi; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2002-05-01

    A patient with duodenal ulcer and primary hyperparathyroidism was found to have an abnormally high intragastric pH. The pH level returned to normal after surgical removal of the parathyroid adenoma followed by normalization of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and serum calcium concentrations. The patient was positive for Helicobacter pylon (H. pylori) infection. Although the exact mechanism by which chronic hypercalcemia or high PTH level inhibited gastric acid secretion in this case remains unclear, our findings suggest that hypercalcemia may play some role in H. pylori associated gastroduodenal diseases through induction of proinflammatory cytokines or by enhancing the attachment of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. PMID:12058887

  14. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis as a Result of Long-Standing Staghorn Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Jongyotha, Kamonchanok; Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn

    2015-01-01

    We report on a 79-year-old woman with staghorn calculi who presented with severe hypercalcemia. She was later found to have humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy caused by a rare tumor, squamous cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. Chronic irritation, infection and inflammation from staghorn stones cause squamous metaplasia, leading to squamous cell carcinoma of the renal collecting system. The prognosis is very poor, with a 5-year survival rate of <10%. This case highlights the importance of awareness of a very rare and aggressive carcinoma in a patient with long-standing nephrolithiasis. PMID:26557077

  15. The Pathophysiology and Clinical Aspects of Hypercalcemic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David B. N.; Zawada, Edward T.; Kleeman, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    For the purposes of this review, the vast and increasingly complex subject of hypercalcemic disorders can be broken down into the following categories: (1) Physiochemical state of calcium in circulation. (2) Pathophysiological basis of hypercalcemia. (3) Causes of hypercalcemia encountered in clinical practice: causes indicated by experience at the University of California, Los Angeles; neoplasia; hyperparathyroidism; nonparathyroid endocrinopathies; pharmacological agents; possible increased sensitivity to vitamin D; miscellaneous causes. (4) Clinical manifestations and diagnostic considerations of hypercalcemic disorders. (5) The management of hypercalcemic disorders: general measures; measures for lowering serum calcium concentration; measures for correcting primary causes—the management of asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism. PMID:362722

  16. Sleeping Parathyroid Tumor: Rapid Hyperfunction after Removal of the Dominant Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, William F.; Weinstein, Lee S.; Collins, Michael T.; Kebebew, Electron; Nilubol, Naris; Phan, Giao Q.; Libutti, Steven K.; Remaley, Alan T.; Van Deventer, Manuel; Marx, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Due to frequent multiplicity of tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, it may be difficult to decide when to stop a parathyroid exploration. A fall of intraoperative serum PTH by a certain percentage during parathyroid surgery is often used as one criterion for ending the operation. Results: We report two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism due to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 who had their first parathyroidectomy at the National Institutes of Health. In both cases, two and a half glands were removed, an extensive search was done for an occult parathyroid tumor, and intraoperative PTH decreased markedly to the lower limits of normal, suggesting a successful operation. Despite this, both patients became hypercalcemic within 3 d after the operation and showed persistent primary hyperparathyroidism. Detailed findings suggest the following course: chronic hypercalcemia had caused near total suppression of PTH secretion by an undiscovered parathyroid tumor (sleeping parathyroid tumor). When the hypercalcemia decreased after surgery due to the removal of the dominant parathyroid tumor(s), the abnormal yet previously suppressed tumor rapidly began to oversecrete PTH and thus caused postoperative hypercalcemia. Conclusions: Even a fall of the intraoperative PTH to the lower limits of the normal range cannot guarantee that removal of all parathyroid tumors has been complete in cases with multiple tumors. These findings likely reflect strikingly differing PTH secretory functions among distinct tumors in the same patient, with hypercalcemia at least from a dominant tumor suppressing PTH secretion by one or more other parathyroid tumors. PMID:22508712

  17. Four Case Histories and a Literature Review of Williams Syndrome and Autistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; Rasmussen, Peder

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the case histories of four young children with concurrent autistic disorder and Williams syndrome. Williams syndrome comprises a peculiar facial appearance, learning disorder, and often hypercalcemia, mild microcephaly, large blood vessel stenosis, and a specific behavioral phenotype. Literature on Williams syndrome is…

  18. Primary hyperparathyroidism: an uncommon cause of hip pain.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Muhammad; Erickson, Evelyn; Agyare, Samuel; Godil, Mushtaq A

    2015-04-01

    Hip pain is a common complaint in a pediatric emergency department. The causes of hip pain are diverse and generally include traumatic and infectious causes. We report a case of hip pain caused by deep soft tissue infection associated with hypercalcemia and primary hyperparathyroidism. Atypical presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism may result in a delay in diagnosis. PMID:25831028

  19. Emergency medicine: A comprehensive review

    SciTech Connect

    Kravis, T.C.; Warner, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 91 chapters divided among 14 sections. Some of the chapter titles are: Transfusions; Minor Lacerations and Abrasions; Diabetic Emergencies; Adrenal Insufficiency; Hypercalcemia; Medical Genetics; Burns; Hazardous Materials; Gastrointestinal Emergencies; Infectious Disease Emergencies; Reye's Syndrome; Bites and Stings; and Hypothermia.

  20. Lithium-associated primary hyperparathyroidism complicated by nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Aksakal, Nihat; Erçetin, Candaş; Özçınar, Beyza; Aral, Ferihan; Erbil, Yeşim

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-associated hyperparathyroidism is the leading cause of hypercalcemia in lithium-treated patients. Lithium may lead to exacerbation of pre-existing primary hyperparathyroidism or cause an increased set-point of calcium for parathyroid hormone suppression, leading to parathyroid hyperplasia. Lithium may cause renal tubular concentration defects directly by the development of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus or indirectly by the effects of hypercalcemia. In this study, we present a female patient on long-term lithium treatment who was evaluated for hypercalcemia. Preoperative imaging studies indicated parathyroid adenoma and multinodular goiter. Parathyroidectomy and thyroidectomy were planned. During the postoperative course, prolonged intubation was necessary because of agitation and delirium. During this period, polyuria, severe dehydration, and hypernatremia developed, which responded to controlled hypotonic fluid infusions and was unresponsive to parenteral desmopressin. A diagnosis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was apparent. A parathyroid adenoma and multifocal papillary thyroid cancer were detected on histopathological examination. It was thought that nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was masked by hypercalcemia preoperatively. A patient on lithium treatment should be carefully followed up during or after surgery to prevent life-threatening complications of previously unrecognized nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and the possibility of renal concentrating defects on long-term lithium use should be sought, particularly in patients with impaired consciousness. PMID:26504422

  1. Calcium kinetics in the Solanum malacoxylon-treated rat.

    PubMed

    Cabrejas, M; Ladizesky, M; Mautalen, C A

    1975-12-01

    The chronic ingestion of the leaves of the plant Solanum malacoxylon (SM) causes an endemic disease in the cattle of some areas of Buenos Aires province. The animals affected manifest loss of appetite and weight, hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and ectopic calcifications. In order to study the mechanism of the hypercalcemia provoked by the administration of SM, a calcium kinetic study was performed in control and treated adult intact rats. The animals receiving SM showed higher levels of serum calcium throughout the study. The body excretion of 47Ca and the size of the most rapidly exchangeable calcium pool were also elevated. On the other hand, the bone accretion rate and the urinary excretion of total hydroxyproline were significantly diminished. The results indicate that during the early phase of SM administration in intact rats, bone turnover rate is depressed. PMID:1195017

  2. A Pleural Solitary Fibrous Tumor, Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Moyamoya Disease, and Hyperparathyroidism in a Patient Associated with NF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Kodama, Ken; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Takeda, Masashi; Michishita, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also called von Recklinghausen's disease, is a multisystemic disease caused by an alteration of the NF1 gene, a tumor suppressor located on the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Loss of the gene function, due to a point mutation, leads to an increase in cell proliferation and the development of several tumors. We report a 60-year-old female patient manifesting hypercalcemia due to hyperparathyroidism, a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pleura, multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and moyamoya disease associated with NF1. The SFT and GISTs were removed by staged operations. Then, hypercalcemia was successfully controlled after resection of the parathyroid adenoma. Based on a literature review, these combinations have never been reported, and the relevant literature is briefly discussed. PMID:26442164

  3. No more milk in milk-alkali syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Almusawi, Ali; Alhawaj, Shurooq; Al-Mousawi, Mohammed; Dashti, Tareq

    2012-09-01

    This is a case of Milk-AlKali syndrome in a patient who presented with the classical triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis and renal impairment. The source of calcium was over-the-counter calcium-containing antacid (Tums®). Milk-alkali syndrome was first recognized secondary to treatment of peptic ulcer disease with milk and absorbable alkali. Its incidence fell after the introduction of H2-blocker and proton pump inhibitor. However, it is one of the leading causes of hypercalcemia nowadays because of the wide availability, increased marketing and use of calcium carbonate especially in osteoporosis prevention and treatment. The demographics of milk-alkali syndrome have changed compared to when it was initially described. The presentation could be acute, subacute or chronic. Early diagnosis, discounting calcium supplement and intravenous hydration are the mainstay of MAS management. PMID:23074554

  4. Radioiodine-induced thyroid storm. Case report and literature review

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M.T.; Kidd, G.S.; Dodson, L.E. Jr.; Hofeldt, F.D.

    1983-08-01

    Thyroid storm developed following radioiodine therapy in a 43-year-old man with Graves' disease, weight loss, myopathy, severe thyrotoxic hypercalcemia, and a pituitary adenoma. The hypercalcemia may have been a significant, and previously unreported, predisposing factor for the radioiodine-associated thyroid storm. This case and 15 other well-documented cases of radioiodine-associated storm found in the literature are reviewed, as are several other cases of less severe exacerbations of thyrotoxicosis associated with radioiodine therapy. Although not often seen, these complications are often fatal. High-risk patients, such as the elderly, those with severe thyrotoxicosis, and those with significant underlying diseases, may benefit from preventive measures such as the judicious use of thyrostatic medications during the periods before and after isotope administration.

  5. Turner syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungmee; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Beom Hee; Yoon, Jong Ho; Jeong, Woon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome has multiple comorbidities such as osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypertension. As they are treatable conditions in Turner syndrome, early recognition and proper treatment should be needed. We report on a 23-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who presented with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. Laboratory tests showed elevated levels of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry showed severe osteopo-rosis (z score, -3.5). Ultrasound and 99mTc scintigraphy of parathyroid glands showed an adenoma in the right inferior gland. She was diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism due to an adenoma of the parathyroid gland. After excision of the adenoma, the patient's serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels returned to normal. Although only a few cases of Turners syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism have been reported, hyperparathyroidism should be considered in cases of Turner syndrome with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. PMID:24904858

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism in a bobcat (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Goodnight, Andrea L; Gottfried, Sharon D; Emanuelson, Karen

    2011-09-01

    An 18-yr-old male bobcat (Lynx rufus) presented with chronic moderate weight loss and acute onset of anorexia and lethargy. Hypercalcemia and azotemia were present on the serum chemistry panel. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hyperechoic renal cortices, but no evidence of neoplasia. Ionized calcium and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were mildly elevated, intact parathyroid hormone was severely elevated, and parathormone-related protein was undetected, suggesting primary hyperparathyroidism with possible renal dysfunction. Azotemia lessened in severity following diuresis, but hypercalcemia persisted; thus primary hyperparathyroidism was considered the most probable differential diagnosis. A second ultrasound including the cervical region revealed a solitary intraparenchymal left thyroid nodule. The nodule was surgically excised; histopathology confirmed a parathyroid adenoma. Although primary hyperparathyroidism was suspected, diagnosis was not achieved from serum chemistry values alone. This case emphasizes the importance of diagnostic imaging and histopathology in the investigation of persistently abnormal laboratory values. PMID:22950324

  7. Sevelamer as a phosphate binder in adult hemodialysis patients: an evidence-based review of its therapeutic value

    PubMed Central

    Nadin, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Patients on hemodialysis require phosphate binders to reduce dietary phosphate absorption and control serum phosphate. The standard therapy, calcium salts, can be associated with elevated serum calcium (hypercalcemia). Concern has been raised that hypercalcemia, especially combined with elevated serum phosphate, may be associated with arterial calcification, and this may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Sevelamer is a nonmetal, nonabsorbed phosphate binder. Aims: This review assesses the evidence for the therapeutic value of sevelamer as a phosphate binder in adult hemodialysis patients. Evidence review: Strong evidence shows that sevelamer is as effective as calcium salts in controlling serum phosphate and calcium–phosphate product, has less risk of inducing hypercalcemia and is more effective at lowering lipid levels. Some evidence indicates that sevelamer reduces arterial calcification progression and loss of bone mineral density, but it may be more likely to induce metabolic acidosis, compared with calcium salts. Sevelamer-containing regimens may improve calcific uremic arteriolopathy, although the evidence is weak. Evidence is divided on whether the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events with sevelamer is similar to or higher than that with calcium salts. Retrospective and modeling studies suggest lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with sevelamer than with calcium salts, with incremental cost-effectiveness of $US1100–2200 per life-year gained. Further direct evidence is needed on mortality, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. Place in therapy: Sevelamer is effective in controlling serum phosphate and lowering lipid levels in hemodialysis patients without inducing hypercalcemia, and may have beneficial effects on arterial calcification. PMID:22496676

  8. Unusual cases of chronic intoxication by vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Chiricone, Daniela; De Santo, Natale G; Cirillo, Massimo

    2003-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for recent renal colic and neurologic disorders. Routine biochemistry indicated the presence of hypercalcemia (serum total calcium = 15.3 mg/100 mL) and renal failure (serum creatinine = 3.72 mg/100 mL). The patient reported that he had been on treatment with a slow-release multivitamin preparation containing vitamin D and vitamin A, administered by i.m. injection. Plasma 25-OH vitamin D was > 150 ng/mL (normal range 16-74 ng/mL), plasma 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D was 32.5 pg/mL (normal range 14-60 pg/mL), plasma parathyroid hormone 1.3 pg/mL (normal range 10-65 pg/mL). There were calcifications of left and right iliac artery at abdomen x-ray. Ultrasound and computed tomography of the glutei showed alterations of skeletal muscle and calcifications. Immediate treatment with infusion of isotonic saline, furosemide and prednisone induced rapid control of hypercalcemia and renal failure. Chronic treatment per os was discontinued after six months. The patient reported that the treatment with vitamin D had been prescribed by a physician also to his wife (55-year-old). For the woman, routine biochemistry indicated the presence of hypercalcemia (serum total calcium = 11.3 mg/100 mL) and renal failure (serum creatinine = 1.8 mg/ mL). Plasma 25-OH vitamin D was > 150 ng/mL, plasma 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D 47.9 pg/mL, plasma parathyroid hormone was 2.5 pg/mL. Hypercalcemia was acutely treated by oral hydration, furosemide, and prednisone. Chronic treatment per os was discontinued after five months. PMID:14736022

  9. [Nonsurgical management of mild primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism(PHPT)is one of the common endocrine disorders, which results clinically in nephrolithiasis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, cardiac and psychiatric abnormalities even in a mild or asymptomatic disease. Parathyroidectomy(PTX)is the only definitive treatment for PHPT, however, some patients with sporadic PHPT refuse surgery, are medically unfit, or have residual or recurrent disease inaccessible to further surgery. These patients may require intervention for management of symptomatic or moderate to severe hypercalcemia, bone loss or kidney calculi. PMID:27230840

  10. Vitamin D intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Behzat; Hatun, Sükrü; Bereket, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D intoxication (VDI) may result from supplementation rarely, but it has been reported more frequently in recent years. This may be attributable to an increase in vitamin D supplement intake due to an understanding of the role of vitamin D (25OHD) in the pathogenesis of several diseases. The symptoms and findings associated with VDI are closely related to serum calcium concentration and duration of hypercalcemia. In patients with VDI, hypercalcemia, normal or high serum phosphorus levels, normal or low levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), high levels of serum 25OHD, low serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), and high urine calcium/creatinine are usually present. Serum 25OHD levels above 150 ng/ml are considered as VDI. The main goal of treatment for VDI is correction of the hypercalcemia. When the calcium concentration exceeds 14 mg/dl, emergency intervention is necessary because of the adverse effects of hypercalcemia on cardiac, central nervous system, renal, and gastrointestinal functions. However, since vitamin D is stored in fat tissues, effects of toxicity may last for months despite the removal of the exogenous source of vitamin D. Treatment for VDI includes: discontinuation of intake, a diet with low calcium and phosphorus content, intravenous hydration with saline, loop diuretics, glucocorticoids, calcitonin, and bisphosphonates. In conclusion, the diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency rickets (VDDR) without checking serum 25OHD level may cause redundant treatment that leads to VDI. All patients who are clinically suspected of VDDR should be checked for serum vitamin D status and questioned for previous vitamin D administration before starting vitamin D therapy. On the other hand, parents of all infants should be asked whether they are using dietary or oral supplements, and serial questioning may be required during supplementation to avoid excessive intake. PMID:22734293

  11. Neonatal Seizure as a Manifestation of Unrecognized Maternal Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin Anıl; Özkan, Behzat; Terek, Demet; Dizdarer, Ceyhun; Arslanoğlu, Sertaç

    2013-01-01

    Maternal hypercalcemia suppresses parathyroid activity in the fetus resulting in impaired parathyroid responsiveness to hypocalcemia after birth. Resultant hypocalcemia may be severe and prolonged and rarely may lead to convulsions. Here, we present a newborn infant admitted to the pediatric emergency department at age two weeks with recurrent tonic convulsions due to asymptomatic maternal hyperparathyroidism and vitamin D deficiency. Physicians should be aware that undiagnosed maternal hyperparathyroidism can cause severe hypocalcemia in the newborn. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24072092

  12. A Case Report of 20 Lung Radiofrequency Ablation Sessions for 50 Lung Metastases from Parathyroid Carcinoma Causing Hyperparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Tochio, Maki Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takao, Motoshi; Shimamoto, Akira; Tarukawa, Tomohito; Shimpo, Hideto; Takeda, Kan

    2010-06-15

    A 47-year-old man presented with multiple lung metastases from parathyroid carcinoma that caused hyperparathyroidism and refractory hypercalcemia. Lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation was repeated to decrease the serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels and improve general fatigue. Pulmonary resection was combined for lung hilum metastases. The patient is still alive 4 years after the initial RF session. He has received 20 RF sessions for 50 lung metastases during this period.

  13. Emergencies in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Stolinsky, David C.

    1978-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms may cause life-threatening complications requiring prompt diagnosis and emergency therapy. Whether or not the underlying neoplasm is potentially curable, the physician can often provide worthwhile prolongation of life and dramatic symptomatic relief. Among the serious complications of neoplasia are superior vena cava obstruction, airway obstruction, pericardial tamponade, spinal cord compression, brain metastasis, meningeal involvement by cancer, hyperuricemia, hypercalcemia and hyperkalemia. PMID:360621

  14. New aspects of treatment of renal bone disease in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, G

    2007-07-01

    The abnormalities in bone and mineral metabolism in chronic kidney disease patients are associated with an increased risk of fractures, vascular calcifications and cardiovascular diseases. A few decades ago hyperphosphatemia and the common development of secondary hyperparathyroidism were thought to be the main problem to deal with. Since dietary phosphate restriction and haemodialysis were not proven to be sufficient measures to reduce phosphorus, phosphate-binding therapy has been widely instituted as a treatment option. Various types of phosphate binders employed over the years have contributed to the changing spectrum of renal osteodystrophy from high to low bone turnover along with the shift from hypocalcemia and negative calcium balance towards hypercalcemia and the positive calcium balance. Thus, hypercalcemia instead of hyperphosphatemia is nowadays associated with the increased risk of vascular calcification, morbidity and mortality in the dialysis population. Besides the very expensive non-calcium based phosphate binders, at least two common tools may be helpful in the treatment of hypercalcemia and adynamic bone. A reduced daily use of calcium carbonate/acetate up to 1g per main meal is an easily manageable and inexpensive tool. The second option for stimulation of parathyroid gland activity and bone turnover is the lowering of the dialysate calcium concentration. In conclusion, an aggressive treatment of hyperphosphatemia and calcium overload might lead towards an opposite effect of hypoparathyroidism and hypercalcemia. Reasonable treatment strategies based on a careful monitoring should be employed in order to prevent related consequences and to contribute to a better long-term quality of life and survival of dialysis patients. PMID:17932468

  15. Reoperation for primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    McGarity, W C; Goldman, A L

    1981-01-01

    Between 1960 and April, 1980, 302 patients were explored for primary hyperparathyroidism at Emory University Hospital. Seventeen of these 302 patients had undergone initial surgical exploration elsewhere, and were referred for persistent hypercalcemia. Of the 285 patients who were operated on at our institution, 14 subsequently had persistent hypercalcemia, and two had recurrent hypercalcemia. Twenty-eight of these 33 patients had had re-exploration, and 23 (82%) are now normocalcemic. Twenty-eight abnormal glands were found; 22 (79%) were retrievable via the neck and six (21%) required sternotomy. Of those glands removed via the neck, nine were in a near normal location and 13 in a subnormal or abnormal location. The causes of initial surgical failures were abnormally located glands, in ten patients, insufficient explorations of the neck in eight patients, hyperfunctioning parathyroid remnants in three patients, inadequate plans for hyperplasia in two patients, and carcinoma in one patient. In 57% of our patients who underwent successful re-exploration, the glands were correctly localized before operation by angiographic examination or selective venous sampling for parathormone. Thorough exploration and obtainment of biopsy specimens of all parathyroid glands are recommended in order to keep initial failures to a minimum. If reoperation is required, localization using CT scan, angiography and selective venous sampling are recommended. PMID:7259338

  16. [Postoperative hypoparathyroidism: risk of complications].

    PubMed

    Sawicki, A

    For assessing the risk of adverse complications of surgery the group of 130 patients with post-operational hypoparathyroidism was analysed. Surgical hypoparathyroidism has been diagnosed in 51% of operated on thyroid gland patients. Laryngeal nerves have been damaged in 46.6% of patients. The injury to laryngeal nerves has been irreversible in 2/3 of patients, and reversible in the remaining 1/3. Cataract, nephrolithiasis and vitamin D3 intoxication have been observed in some cases before surgery. Their incidence increased in severe surgical hypoparathyroidism. Osteoporosis of the spine has been diagnosed in 49% of patients including some with vertebral fractures. No correlation between the degree of spine osteoporosis and diagnosis before surgery, number of operations on thyroid gland, and type of therapy has been noted. The symptoms of hypercalcemia have been diagnosed in 5 patients out of which hypercalcemia has been transient in 2 patients, and lasted for 1-5 months in the remaining 3 patients. The results of 7,873 analyses of mineral metabolism have been assessed. Hypocalcemia has been found in 38.4%, hypercalcemia in 1.6%, hypomagnesemia in 25.7%, hyperphosphatemia in 41.5%, decreased alkaline phosphatase serum activity in 28.7%, and hypercalciuria in 22.4% of cases. Surgical hypoparathyroidism is frequently accompanied by surgical hypothyroidism and injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves. PMID:1669168

  17. Persistent Primary Hyperparathyroidism, Severe Vitamin D Deficiency, and Multiple Pathological Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Carvallo-Venegas, Mauricio; Vargas-Castilla, Jorge Alberto; Balcázar-Hernández, Lourdes Josefina; Gregor-Gooch, Julián Malcolm Mac

    2016-01-01

    Persistent primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) refers to the sustained hypercalcemia state detected within the first six months following parathyroidectomy. When it coexists with severe vitamin D deficiency, the effects on bone can be devastating. We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who was sent to this center because of persistent hyperparathyroidism. Her disease had over 3 years of evolution with nephrolithiasis and hip fracture. Parathyroidectomy was performed in her local unit; however, she continued with hypercalcemia, bone pain, and pathological fractures. On admission, the patient was bedridden with multiple deformations by fractures in thoracic and pelvic members. Blood pressure was 100/80, heart rate was 86 per minute, and body mass index was 19 kg/m2. Calcium was 14 mg/dL, parathormone 1648 pg/mL, phosphorus 2.3 mg/dL, creatinine 2.4 mg/dL, urea 59 mg/dL, alkaline phosphatase 1580 U/L, and vitamin D 4 ng/mL. She received parenteral treatment of hypercalcemia and replenishment of vitamin D. The second surgical exploration was radioguided by gamma probe. A retroesophageal adenoma of 4 cm was resected. Conclusion. Persistent hyperparathyroidism with severe vitamin D deficiency can cause catastrophic skeletal bone softening and fractures. PMID:27525132

  18. Acute Vitamin D Intoxication Possibly Due to Faulty Production of a Multivitamin Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Anık, Ahmet; Çatlı, Gönül; Abacı, Ayhan; Dizdarer, Ceyhun; Böber, Ece

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D intoxication usually occurs as a result of inappropriate use of vitamin D preparations and can lead to life-threatening hypercalcemia. It is also known that there are a number of physicians who prescribe vitamin D supplements for various clinical conditions, such as poor appetite and failure to thrive. While inappropriate use of vitamin D supplements may lead to vitamin D intoxication, there are no reports of cases of vitamin D toxicity due to manufacturing errors of vitamin D preparations. Here, we present cases of hypervitaminosis D which developed following the use of a standard dose of a multivitamin preparation. All three cases presented with hypercalcemia symptoms and had characteristic laboratory findings such as hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, low levels of parathyroid hormone. The very high serum 25(OH) vitamin D levels in these patients indicated vitamin D excess. The vitamin D level of the prescribed multivitamin preparation in the market was studied and was found to contain a very low level of vitamin D (10 IU/5 mL). Although the stated vitamin D content of the preparations ingested by these patients was not high, unproven but possible manufacturing errors were considered to be a possible cause of the hypervitaminosis D diagnosed in these three patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23748070

  19. The calcium-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Mariangeli; Fenves, Andrew Z; Emmett, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The milk-alkali syndrome was a common cause of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal failure in the early 20th century. It was caused by the ingestion of large quantities of milk and absorbable alkali to treat peptic ulcer disease. The syndrome virtually vanished after introduction of histamine-2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors. More recently, a similar condition called the calcium-alkali syndrome has emerged as a common cause of hypercalcemia and alkalosis. It is usually caused by the ingestion of large amounts of calcium carbonate salts to prevent or treat osteoporosis and dyspepsia. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented with weakness, malaise, and confusion. She was found to have hypercalcemia, acute renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis. Upon further questioning, she reported use of large amounts of calcium carbonate tablets to treat recent heartburn symptoms. Calcium supplements were discontinued, and she was treated with intravenous normal saline. After 5 days, the calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized and renal function returned to baseline. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of the calcium-alkali syndrome as well as the differences between the traditional and modern syndromes. PMID:23543983

  20. Parathyroid adenoma in patients with Graves' disease: a report of 21 cases.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuanzeng; Baloch, Zubair W; LiVolsi, Virginia A

    2015-03-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is frequently associated with mild hypercalcemia. The hypercalcemia may be due to the activation of osteoclastic bone resorption caused by the excess thyroid hormone. In some cases of GD, the hypercalcemia can be attributable to concomitant parathyroid diseases. In this study, 21 patients with a history of GD developed parathyroid adenoma based on histology, intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) monitoring, and other clinical features. There were 11 patients with a history of radioactive iodine therapy (RAI) for GD. The latency time of RAI was from 12 to 41 years. The case cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (group GR: 11 patients) and patients without a history of RAI (group G: 10 patients). Mean age of patients in group GR was 54.8 years compared to 62.2 years of group G (P = 0.08). There were no statistically significant differences regarding the parathyroid weight, serum calcium, and pre- and post-parathyroidectomy PTH levels. There was no histopathologic difference between the two groups. In conclusion, we report 21 cases of parathyroid adenoma in patients with Graves' disease. There may be a possible link between GD patients with a RAI history and an increased risk of parathyroid adenoma. The parathyroid adenomas showed no clinicopathological differences between GD patient with and without a history of RAI. PMID:25501495

  1. Pathophysiology and treatment of nonfamilial hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is the main cause of hypercalcemia and the most common parathyroid glands disease. The diagnosis is easy in patients with hypercalcemia and elevated PTH serum level. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (PTx) represents the treatment of choice for symptomatic patients, leading to several advantages, including immediate normalization of hypercalcemia and significant improvement of bone mineral density, cardiovascular dysfunctions, neuropsychological symptoms and quality of life. Secondary and tertiary HPT are relatively common complications in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or advanced kidney failure, and in kidney transplant recipients who did not achieve complete calcium/phosphate metabolism normalization, respectively. The drugs available for patients with secondary HPT, and to treat hyperphosphatemia include non-calcium-containing phosphate binder, calcitriol analogues, calcimimetic agents, or a combination of two or more drugs. Although recent studies report that PTx significantly improves survival also in patients with CKD and severe secondary HPT, the indications for surgery are not yet well established. Subtotal or total PTx with or without autotransplantation are the surgical options for treating all patients with secondary HPT. Total PTx leads to a faster reduction in serum calcium level and normalization of PTH, but the risk of hypoparathyroidism is higher than after subtotal PTx. Further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of the drugs currently recommended, and others will have to be tested in the near future. PMID:25643126

  2. Immunochemical Localization of Parathyroid Hormone in Cancer Tissue from Patients with Ectopic Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Genaro M. A.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    1974-01-01

    Immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH) in nonparathyroid malignant tumors associated with hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia in the absence of demonstrable bone metastases was determined by radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescent techniques. Six of seven tumors contained material with immunological cross-reactivity to bovine PTH by radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescence. The intensity of the immunofluorescent stain varied considerably in the different tumors. From 15 to 90% of neoplastic cells were stained specifically with fluorescein-labeled anti-PTH. In contrast, normal parathyroid glands and parathyroid adenomas showed uniform distribution of immunofluorescence in all parenchymal cells. In one malignant tumor, PTH was localized also by immunoautoradiography. In every case PTH was detected only in the cytoplasm of parenchymal cells. One patient lacked detectable PTH in his tumor, yet showed regression of the hypercalcemia to normal values after removal of large masses of neoplastic tissue and recurrence of hypercalcemia when new growth occurred. Dilutional radioimmunoassay curves of nonparathyroid malignant tumors were in most cases different from those obtained with extracts of normal parathyroid glands and parathyroid adenomas. Although both nonparathyroid neoplasmas and parathyroid extracts demonstrated immunoheterogeneity by gel filtration, greater heterogeneity was found in nonparathyroid malignant tumors. In those tumors in which immunological cross-reactivity to PTH was detected, the capability of secreting PTH may be restricted to derepressed cell clones amidst other neoplastic cells, whereas the greater heterogeneity of ectopic PTH may reflect hormone cleavage by proteolytic enzymes in the tumor that is less specific than the Pro-PTH cleaving enzyme in the parathyroids. Images PMID:4364410

  3. Chemoprevention activity of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the MMTV-PyMT mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rossdeutscher, Lionel; Li, Jiarong; Luco, Aimée-Lee; Fadhil, Ibtihal; Ochietti, Benoit; Camirand, Anne; Huang, Dao Chao; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Muller, William; Kremer, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Development of oncologic conditions is often accompanied by inadequate vitamin D status. The chemoprevention ability of this molecule is of high interest for breast cancer, the most common malignancy in women worldwide. Because current effective vitamin D analogues, including the naturally occurring active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D), frequently cause hypercalcemia at pharmacologic doses, the development of safer molecules for clinical chemopreventive use is essential. This study examines whether exogenously supplied prohormone 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) can delay tumor progression in vivo without hypercalcemic effects. A low vitamin D diet (25 IU/kg) in the non-immunodeficient MMTV-PyMT mouse model of metastatic breast cancer revealed a significant acceleration of mammary neoplasia compared with normal diet (1,000 IU/kg). Systemic perfusion of MMTV-PyMT mice with 25(OH)D or 1,25(OH)2D delayed tumor appearance and significantly decreased lung metastasis, and both metabolites reduced Ki-67, cyclin D1, and ErbB2 levels in tumors. Perfusion with 25(OH)D caused a 50% raise in tumor 1,25(OH)2D levels, indicating good tumor penetration and effective activation. Importantly, in contrast with 1,25(OH)2D, perfusion with 25(OH)D did not cause hypercalcemia. In vitro treatment of cultured MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cells with 25(OH)D inhibited proliferation, confirming local activation of the prohormone in this system. This study provides an in vivo demonstration in a non-immunodeficient model of spontaneous breast cancer that exogenous 25(OH)D delays neoplasia, tumor growth, and metastasis, and that its chemoprevention efficacy is not accompanied by hypercalcemia. PMID:25468832

  4. The efficacy of calcitriol therapy in the management of bone loss and fractures: a qualitative review

    PubMed Central

    Hebl, S.; Purnell, J. Q.; Reid, M. E.; Rosier, R. N.; Mustian, K. M.; Palesh, O. G.; Huston, A. J.; Ling, M. N.; Morrow, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis, a skeletal disorder characterized by a reduction in bone strength, increases fracture risk. Primary osteoporosis is usually a result of reduced bone mineral density as a consequence of natural aging. Secondary osteoporosis is usually a result of a disease, such as cystic fibrosis, or medical treatment, such as corticosteroids or cancer treatment. Introduction Currently, ten million Americans are osteoporotic and an additional 34 million have the precursor condition, osteopenia. Osteoporosis leads to 1.5 million fractures and 500,000 hospitalizations annually. Osteoporosis-related fractures increase mortality and reduce quality of life. Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, regulates intestinal calcium absorption, among other actions. During the past four decades, many clinical trials investigating the effect of calcitriol on bone loss have been performed. Methods We conducted a systematic qualitative review of clinical trials that assessed calcitriol for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone loss. In these clinical trials, calcitriol was used as a monotherapy and in combination with other therapeutic bone agents. Results and conclusion Studies using calcitriol monotherapy, although not conclusive, found that calcitriol slowed the rate of bone loss in a variety of populations. Calcitriol in combination with other therapeutic bone agents was shown to have additional bone-preserving effects when compared to the use of therapeutic bone agents alone. A common side-effect of calcitriol therapy was hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, but the degree of hypercalcemia was mild. Recent research found that intermittent dosing can reduce hypercalcemia rates. Calcitriol, alone or in combination with other agents, should be considered for the therapy of osteoporosis. PMID:19960185

  5. Cytologic Diagnosis of Heterobilharzia americana Infection in a Liver Aspirate From a Dog.

    PubMed

    Le Donne, V; McGovern, D A; Fletcher, J M; Grasperge, B J

    2016-05-01

    Heterobilharzia americanais a trematode of the Schistosomatidae family that infects dogs, raccoons, and other mammals as definitive hosts. This parasite is considered endemic in the southern Atlantic and Gulf coasts; however, only a few cases are reported. A 7-year-old dog from Louisiana was referred for persistent hypercalcemia, hyperglobulinemia, and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasound revealed diffuse hyperechogenicity of the liver with several hyperechoic nodules of varying size. Cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirates of the liver revealed few ovoid to round basophilic thin-walled eggshell fragments and rare ciliated miracidia.H. americanaeggs were identified on fecal sedimentation. PMID:26272209

  6. [Nephropathy associated with electrolyte disorders].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, K; Nakauchi, M; Hondo, I; Nihei, H

    1995-08-01

    It is well known that renal dysfunction is associated with several types of electrolyte disorders. On the other hand, renal manifestations have been attributed to electrolyte disorders. Hypokalemia is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality encountered in clinical practice. The main cause of hypokalemia is due to abuse of laxatives and diuretics or to anorexia nervosa. Hypercalcemia is another major electrolyte abnormality, associated with numerous renal manifestations. Renal tubules damages and chronic interstitial nephritis are characteristic pathological findings in prolonged electrolyte disorders. The mechanism of renal involvement and characteristic clinical manifestations of the electrolyte disorders are reviewed. PMID:7563640

  7. Is calcium supplementation a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in older women?

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Zohreh; Vatanparast, Hassanali

    2009-02-01

    Low intake of dietary calcium is related to bone loss and fragility fracture in older adults, especially postmenopausal women. Contradictory findings have been reported from studies that investigated the association between calcium supplementation and hypertension and the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. Misinterpretation of findings from studies that are not primarily designed to address these issues might overshadow the benefits of dietary calcium. Until well-designed studies address the current uncertainties, the possible detrimental effect (e.g., hypercalcemia and its complications) of higher-than-recommended calcium intake should be balanced against the likely benefits of calcium on bone, particularly in elderly women. PMID:19178652

  8. Impact of Vitamin D on Chronic Kidney Diseases in Non-Dialysis Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijuan; Wan, Xuesi; Huang, Zhimin; Zeng, Fangfang; Wei, Guohong; Fang, Donghong; Deng, Wanping; Li, Yanbing

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Recent studies have supported a role for both newer and more established vitamin D compounds in improving proteinuria, although systematic evaluation is lacking. Furthermore, concerns remain regarding the influence of vitamin D on the progression of renal function. We analyzed the efficacy and safety of vitamin D in non-dialysis patients and compared the use of newer versus established vitamin D compounds by performing a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Design A literature search of PubMed (1975 to September, 2012), EMBASE.com (1966 to September, 2012) and Ovid EBM Reviews (through September, 2012) was conducted. Results Eighteen studies were eligible for final inclusion; of these, six explored the effects of vitamin D on proteinuria, twelve studied the effects of supplementation on renal function, and fifteen discussed the incidence of hypercalcemia. Compared to the placebo or no interference, both the newer and established vitamin D sterols reduced proteinuria to a similar extent (RR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.42 to 2.81). No decrease in the glomerular filter rate was observed (SMD, −0.10; 95%CI, −0.24 to 0.03), and the risk for dialysis initiation was 1.48 (95% CI, 0.54 to 4.03) with vitamin D treatment. Additionally, there was an increased risk of hypercalcemia for patients treated with either newer or established vitamin D compounds as compared with the controls (RR, 4.78; 95% CI, 2.20 to 10.37). The head-to-head studies showed no differences in the effects of either newer or established compounds on proteinuria or the risk of hypercalcemia. No serious adverse events were associated with the administration of vitamin D. Conclusions Vitamin D therapy appears to decrease proteinuria and have no negative influence on renal function in non-dialysis patients. But the occurrence of hypercalcemia should be evaluated when vitamin D is provided. No superiority for newer versus established vitamin D analogue is found. PMID:23626678

  9. A rare but significant cause of priapism in the elderly: multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Fatih; Akin, Sibel; Atay, Kadri; Saka, Bulent; Kutlu, Omer; Tascioglu, Cemil

    2011-01-01

    Priapism is a rare symptom with diverse etiological factors. Although most cases in adults are secondary to drug use and intracavernosal injections, blood dyscrasias and hypercoagulable states, vasculitis, penile metastases, neurological conditions, spider bites, carbon monoxide poisoning, and total parenteral nutrition may also result in priapism. We report a case of recurrent and refractory priapism in a 61-year-old man which was diagnosed as multiple myeloma after emergence of hypercalcemia and renal failure due to progression of the underlying pathology. The value of the initial diagnostic approach is emphasized. PMID:22526083

  10. [Adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia associated with HTLV-I virus in Martinique: apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Plumelle, Y; Sanhadji, K; Barin, F; Gazzolo, L; Constant-Desportes, M; Pascaline, N; Diebold, J; De-Thé, G

    1986-01-01

    Two HTLV-I associated adult T cell leukemia cases were observed in patient from Martinique (French West Indies). These case are similar to the clinical entity, described by Takatsuki in 1977 in Japan and by Catovsky in Caribbean patients, characterized by a lymphadenopathy, skin lesions and visceral involvement, hypercalcemia, an aggressive course, and poor prognosis. The malignant cells with T4 phenotype and often suppressive function, were pleomorphic, mature, with prominent nuclear irregularities. Systematic research of HTLV-I virus or antibodies in patients with this clinical picture, to measure the influence of this virus in T cell lymphoproliferative diseases in France and in French West Indies is required. PMID:3016639

  11. An adolescent case of familial hyperparathyroidism with a germline frameshift mutation of the CDC73 gene.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takako; Yoto, Yuko; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Kamasaki, Hotaka; Kondo, Atsushi; Ogino, Jiro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Yama, Naoya; Anan, Sawa; Uchino, Shinya; Ishikawa, Aki; Sakurai, Akihiro; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    A 13-yr-old boy who complained of persistent nausea, vomiting and weight loss had hypercalcemia and an elevated intact PTH level. Computed tomography confirmed two tumors in the thyroid gland. The tumors were surgically removed and pathologically confirmed as parathyroid adenoma. Because his maternal aunt and grandmother both had histories of parathyroid tumors, genetic investigation was undertaken for him, and a germline frameshift mutation of the CDC73 gene was identified. CDC73 gene analysis should be done on individuals who are at risk of familial hyperparathyroidism, including those who are asymptomatic, and they should be followed for potential primary hyperparathyroidism and associated disorders including resultant parathyroid carcinoma. PMID:26568659

  12. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Fogarasi Szabo, Nathalie; Diezi, Léonore; Delenclos, Laurie; Renard, Delphine; Chtioui, Haithem; Rothuizen, Laura E; Buclin, Thierry; Livio, Françoise

    2015-01-14

    The main pharmacovigilance updates in 2014 are reviewed. Ivabradine: increased risk of cardiovascular death and myocardial infarction in patients with symptomatic angina treated with high dosages. Clopidogrel: rare observations of acquired hemophilia. Orlistat: may reduce the absorption of HIV antiretrovirals. Ponatinib: increased risk of arteriopathy and thrombosis. Axitinib: significant risk of heart failure (class effect). Tocilizumab: possible causal relationship with the emergence or aggravation of psoriasis. Lithium: hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism commonly observed. Sildenalfil: suspected causal association with melanoma, so far not proven, Methylphenidate: rare observations of priapism. St John's wort (Hypericum): reduced effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives, including implants. PMID:25799668

  13. Intrathyroidal parathyroid carcinoma mimicking a thyroid nodule in a MEN type 1 patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Eui Jong; Choi, Woo Suk; Park, Won Seo; Kim, Sung Won

    2014-05-01

    A 59-year-old woman with classic manifestations of hyperparathyroidism associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 presented with a right adrenal mass and two pituitary microadenomas on imaging studies. For evaluation of hypercalcemia, (99m) Tc-MIBI scintigraphy was done and showed focal uptake at the thyroid level of the right anterior neck. Subsequent neck sonography showed several thyroid nodules, but there was no parathyroid tumor. Percutaneous fine-needle aspiration of the dominant thyroid nodule indicated a follicular nodule. After surgery, final histopathology revealed intrathyroidal parathyroid carcinoma. This case illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing parathyroid carcinoma via fine-needle aspiration. PMID:24037737

  14. Ectopic parathyroid adenoma in child.

    PubMed

    Libánský, P; Astl, J; Adámek, S; Nanka, O; Pafko, P; Spacková, J; Foltán, R; Sedý, J

    2008-01-01

    A 10-year old girl presented with fatigue, hypercalcemia, and subperiosteal phalangeal osteolytic lesions. Ultrasonography and MIBI scintigraphy showed a structure near the lower pole of thyroid gland. The structure macroscopically appeared as adenoma, histologically it was thymic tissue. Bilateral neck exploration together with exploration of cervical thymic extensions was performed; adenoma was not found. During next two years, the level of calcium and parathormone raised, bone mineral density decreased. Ultrasonography, MRI, CT and PET/CT were negative. Adenoma was located by MIBI-SPECT/CT near the left border of jugulum. It was found dorsolateral to left common carotid artery and removed. PMID:19548602

  15. A middle aged lady with recurrent low trauma fracture due to parathyroid adenoma.

    PubMed

    Saifuddin, M; Selim, S; Haq, T; Shefin, S M; Latif, Z A

    2015-01-01

    A 48 year old lady was referred to BIRDEM Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh by her local physician for evaluation of hypercalcaemia and increased serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the background history of low trauma fracture. Ultrasound of neck and parathyroid scintigraphy with 99mTc-MIBI revealed a parathyroid adenoma. Parathyroidectomy was done. Histopathology report showed features consistent with parathyroid adenoma. Primary hyperparathyroidism should be kept in mind in all patients presenting with history of bone problems ranging from simple bone pain to spontaneous or low trauma fracture associated with hypercalcemia. By the help of appropriate localization technique it can be localized and cured by parathyriodectomy. PMID:25725690

  16. [A 38 years old female with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Gorham, J; Liberale, G; Haydar, H Nasser; De Saint Aubain, N; Meert, A P

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT) are rare tumors. They were originally described in the lung, but they have been now observed in many others locations, mainly abdominal and pelvic. These tumors are usually benign but their recurrent nature and the presence of an abnormality of chromosome band 2p23 in some of them, suggest that some lesions form a true tumor entity. Surgical excision as complete as possible is the gold standard treatment. We report the case of a 38 years old female, who presented a recurrent metastasizing inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor causing lactic acidosis and other biological abnormalities such as hypercalcemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation and inflammatory syndrome. PMID:27487696

  17. Expression of stanniocalcin in the epithelium of human choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Franzén, A M; Zhang, K Z; Westberg, J A; Zhang, W M; Arola, J; Olsen, H S; Andersson, L C

    2000-12-29

    Stanniocalcin (STC) is a 28 kD glycoprotein hormone originally found in bony fish in which it regulates calcium/phosphate homeostasis and protects against hypercalcemia. The recently characterized mammalian STC shows about 70% homology with fish STC. The epithelial cells of proximal tubuli in human and rat kidney and brain neurons have been found to express STC. Here we show that the epithelium of the choroid plexus, already at 16 weeks of fetal age, and of plexus papillomas, synthesize and express STC. Our findings suggest that STC may be of importance for the distribution of calcium and phosphate between the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. PMID:11134638

  18. Absence of gallium-67 avidity in diffuse pulmonary calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Foster, R.W.

    1985-09-01

    Diffuse pulmonary uptake by bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals has been reported previously but, in the same patient, would pulmonary uptake of Ga-67 citrate yield clinically meaningful results. A patient with hypercalcemia and renal failure in whom bone scintigraphy demonstrated striking diffuse bilateral pulmonary uptake, but subsequent gallium imaging demonstrated no evidence of pulmonary uptake greater than body background, is discussed. We conclude that pulmonary uptake of gallium cannot be attributed to calcium deposition and should carry the same clinical significance in regard to inflammatory and malignant lesions as would be assigned to patients without pulmonary calcific deposits.

  19. Evaluation of intense renal parenchymal activity (hot kidneys) on bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, M.S.; Hayward, M.; Hayward, C.; Mundy, L. )

    1990-04-01

    The bone scintigrams of 600 patients performed over a 12-month period were reviewed. Thirty-six demonstrated abnormalities of the urinary tract of which six cases of intense renal parenchymal activity (hot kidneys) were found. Two cases were related to treatment with the new antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone. In one patient it was related to treatment with calcitonin. Neither of these associations has been previously reported. Recognized causes of hypercalcemia and recent radiotherapy were present in two patients. No cause could be found in the final patient.

  20. The pathophysiology of primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Edward M

    2002-11-01

    The parathyroid glands play a key role in maintaining near constancy of the extracellular calcium concentration ( Ca(o)2+) through their capacity to sense even minute changes in the level of blood calcium from its normal level. The G protein-coupled, Ca(o)(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) is the mechanism through which the parathyroid chief cells senses changes in Ca(o)2+. In primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), Ca(o)2+ is reset upward from its normal level. This defect likely arises from increases in both the mass of pathological parathyroid tissue as well as the set point for Ca(o)(2+)-regulated parathyroid hormone (PTH) release. The former likely arises from somatic mutations that enhance parathyroid cellular proliferation, although our understanding of the mechanism(s) underlying the latter is incomplete. However, substantial insights have been achieved through the study of inherited disorders caused by mutations in CaSR gene. In familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH), heterozygous inactivating mutations in the CaSR gene produce mild, generally asymptomatic hypercalcemia, whereas in neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT), homozygous inactivating mutations cause severe hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism. Thus, the body's "calciostat" is reset upward in FHH and NSHPT because of resistance of CaSR-expressing cells, including the parathyroid cells, to Ca(o)2+. In FHH, there is a reduced complement of normal CaSRs (e.g., haploinsufficiency) that likely provides an explanation for the Ca(o)(2+)-resistance in this condition, whereas in NSHPT, there are no normally functioning CaSRs, thereby engendering more severe Ca(o)2+ resistance. Although somatic mutations in the CaSR gene could provide an explanation for the Ca(o)(2+)-resistance in PHPT, no such mutations have been found. Instead, in PHPT, the resistance of pathological parathyroid glands to Ca(o)2+ results, at least in part, from a reduced expression of otherwise apparently structurally normal CaSRs. Thus

  1. Syndromes that Link the Endocrine System and Genitourinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Özlük, Yasemin; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system and genitourinary tract unite in various syndromes. Genitourinary malignancies may cause paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes by secreting hormonal substances. These entities include Cushing`s syndrome, hypercalcemia, hyperglycemia, polycythemia, hypertension, and inappropriate ADH or HCG production. The most important syndromic scenarios that links these two systems are hereditary renal cancer syndromes with specific genotype/phenotype correlation. There are also some very rare entities in which endocrine and genitourinary systems are involved such as Carney complex, congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. We will review all the syndromes regarding manifestations present in endocrine and genitourinary organs. PMID:26177325

  2. Hypercalcemic encephalopathy due to milk alkali syndrome and injection teriparatide.

    PubMed

    Kharb, Sandeep; Gundgurthi, Abhay; Pandit, Aditi; Brar, Karninder S; Garg, M K

    2012-11-01

    An 82-year-old male, a known case of severe osteoporosis with vertebral fracture and prostatic carcinoma, was treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue, calcium carbonate, cholecalciferol sachet and injection teriparatide. His diet consisted of milk and curd. He developed altered behavior and generalized weakness, and on investigation, hypercalcemia, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis with low parathyroid hormone levels were detected. Injection teriparatide was stopped and he was managed with forced saline diuresis and injection zoledronic acid. He was diagnosed as a case of milk alkali syndrome in whom teriparatide and prolonged immobilization played a permissive role in the development of hypercalcemic encephalopathy. PMID:23226658

  3. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary, Hypercalcemic Type: Report of a Bilateral Case in a Teenager Associated with SMARCA4 Germline Mutation.

    PubMed

    Lavrut, Pierre-Marie; Le Loarer, François; Normand, Charline; Grosos, Céline; Dubois, Rémi; Buenerd, Annie; Conter, Cécile; Dijoud, Frédérique; Blay, Jean-Yves; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT), is a highly aggressive neoplasm that typically occurs in young females. Paraneoplastic hypercalcemia is associated in two thirds of the cases. Recent studies demonstrated that this rare tumor harbors the same molecular features of malignant rhabdoid tumor secondary to SMARCA4/BRG1 mutations. We illustrate herein a typical bilateral case of SCCOHT with comprehensive molecular characterization in a 14-year-old girl. We also discuss the value of SMARCA4 immunostaining in the diagnostic approach of undifferentiated ovarian and pelvic malignancies. PMID:26230154

  4. At the crossroads: EGFR and PTHrP signaling in cancer-mediated diseases of bone

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Nicole; Riese, David J.; Hollenhorst, Peter C.; Lorch, Gwendolen; Foley, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a well-established cancer therapeutic target due to its stimulation of proliferation, motility, and resistance to apoptosis. Recently, additional roles for the receptor have been identified in growth of metastases. Similar to development, metastatic spread requires signaling interactions between epithelial-derived tumor cells and mesenchymal derivatives of the microenvironment. This necessitates reactivation of developmental signaling molecules, including the hypercalcemia factor parathyroid hormone-related protein. This review covers the variations of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in cancers that produce bone metastases, regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein, and evidence that the two molecules drive cancer-mediated diseases of bone. PMID:22684584

  5. Transient thyrotoxicosis accompanied by panhypopituitarism caused by ruptured Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin Ook; Cho, Dong Hyeok; Chung, Dong Jin; Chung, Min Young

    2011-01-01

    We describe a rare case of transient thyrotoxicosis secondary to painless thyroiditis accompanied by panhypopituitarism caused by ruptured Rathke's cleft cyst. A 32-year-old man presented with vomiting and diarrhea. Laboratory data showed that he had transient hypercalcemia, primary thyrotoxicosis due to painless thyroiditis and panhypopituitarism. The sellar magnetic resonance imaging showed cystic macroadenoma. He underwent surgical exploration. Histological examination showed a ruptured Rathke's cleft cyst. Our case suggests that, although rare, it is important to recognize the possibility of coexistence of hypopituitarism in patients with primary thyrotoxicosis. PMID:22185992

  6. [Cognitive Function and Calcium. The link between dementia and bone and calcium metabolism disorders].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Bone and calcium metabolism disorders are closely linked with dementia. Screening for dementia is important since chronic hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia resulting from parathyroid function abnormalities can become a cause of dementia onset. In recent years, it has become clear that vitamin D deficiencies inducing cardiovascular disease and other factors are involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases that in turn become risk factors in dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, osteoporosis and dementia both commonly occur among the elderly. Treating dementia patients for osteoporosis is important since fragility fractures, especially femoral neck fractures, resulting from osteoporosis greatly affect the prognosis of patients with dementia. PMID:25634043

  7. Association of a wide invasive malignant thymoma with myastenia gravis and primary hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid adenoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Lolli, Ivan; Troccoli, Giuseppe; Resta, Francesco; Sabbà, Carlo; Ruggieri, Nadia; Tafaro, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    There are few cases described in the world literature reporting an association of thymoma (with myasthenia gravis or not) with hyperparathyroidism. In these cases the hyperparathyroidism was due to the presence of an adenoma or hyperplasic parathyroid tissue either in the cervical region or in an ectopic intrathymic location.(12345) In other cases the syndrome of hypercalcemia was due to the secretion of parathyroid-related protein (PTHRP) (6) or parathyroid hormone (PTH) (7) by the thymoma itself. We report the first case, at the best of our knowledge, of a wide invasive malignant thymoma (type B3), associated with myasthenia gravis and hyperparathyroidism caused by parathyroid adenoma. PMID:16873103

  8. Calcium-Alkali Syndrome in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami M.; Adeseun, Gbemisola A.; Goldfarb, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The ingestion of calcium, along with alkali, results in a well-described triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal insufficiency. Over time, the epidemiology and root cause of the syndrome have shifted, such that the disorder, originally called the milk-alkali syndrome, is now better described as the calcium-alkali syndrome. The calcium-alkali syndrome is an important cause of morbidity that may be on the rise, an unintended consequence of shifts in calcium and vitamin D intake in segments of the population. We review the pathophysiology of the calcium-alkali syndrome. PMID:24288027

  9. [Does calcifediol replace vitamin D as a preventive and therapeutic agent?].

    PubMed

    Burmeister, W

    1984-07-01

    Cholecalciferol (CC) given orally is not utilized as efficiently as the CC produced by cutaneous UV light. The infant receives only minute amounts of CC by breast feeding, abolishing therefore the role of a vitamin for CC. The most important D-metabolite of human milk, the calcifediol (CF), however, has transient vitamin character. CF is both resorbed more efficiently by the intestine and it effects mineral metabolism faster via kidney than CC, which needs hydroxylation in the liver first. Thus CF shows advantages in prophylaxis and therapy. However, different (lower) dosages and the danger of hypercalcemia should be kept in mind using CF. PMID:6088972

  10. HYPOALDOSTERONISM IN A MATSCHIE'S TREE KANGAROO (DENDROLAGUS MATSCHIEI).

    PubMed

    Whoriskey, Sophie T; Bartlett, Susan L; Baitchman, Eric

    2016-06-01

    A 20-yr-old female Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) was diagnosed with hypoaldosteronism, a rare condition in which the body fails to produce normal amounts of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone. Aldosterone plays a key role in body salt homeostasis, increasing sodium reabsorption and promoting excretion of potassium. Hypoaldosteronism resulted in decreased appetite, lethargy, and weight loss in conjunction with hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia in this tree kangaroo. The animal was successfully managed with mineralocorticoid replacement using desoxycorticosterone pivalate. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of hypoaldosteronism in a tree kangaroo and one of the few reports in the veterinary literature in any species. PMID:27468039

  11. 7q11.23 deletions in Williams syndrome arise as a consequence of unequal meiotic crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Z.; Csiszar, K.; Boyd, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by mental retardation, a specific neurobehavioral profile, characteristic facies, infantile hypercalcemia, cardiovascular abnormalities, progressive joint limitation, hermas, and soft skin. Recent studies have shown that hemizygosity at the elastin (ELN) gene locus on chromosome 7q is associated with WS. Furthermore, two FISH studies using cosmid recombinants containing the 5{prime} or the 3{prime} end of the ELN gene revealed deletion of the entire ELN gene in 90%-96% of classical WS cases. However, the size of the 7q11.23 deletions and the mechanism by which these deletions arise are not known. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary (Hypercalcemic Type): Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kascak, Peter; Zamecnik, Michal; Bystricky, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of malignant rhabdoid tumor (ovarian small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type) in a 24-year-old female with fulminant course. Clinically, hypercalcemia was not found at the time of primary diagnosis. However, it appeared later during the course of tumor progression. Histologically, the tumor showed classical features of small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type. Therapy included radical surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite this intensive therapy, the disease recurred and the patient died 10 months after the diagnosis. We discuss the diagnosis and therapy of this tumor, as well as its recent classification as malignant rhabdoid tumor. PMID:27462229

  13. Progressive kidney failure as the sole manifestation of extrapulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Supreet; Relia, Nitin; Syal, Gaurav; Kaushik, Chhavi; Gokden, Neriman; Malik, Ahmad B

    2013-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystem disorder characterized by an accumulation of T lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes, non-caseating epitheliod granulomas and derangement of normal tissue architecture in affected organs. Sarcoidosis can affect any organ system, however approximately 90% of patients with sarcoidosis have pulmonary, lymph node, cutaneous or ocular manifestations. Renal involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and clinically significant renal dysfunction even less common. We present a case of isolated renal sarcoidosis which manifested with progressively worsening renal function and hypercalcemia. A systematic diagnostic approach with pertinent laboratory studies, imaging and renal biopsy elucidated the diagnosis of renal sarcoidosis without any evidence of systemic involvement. PMID:24079056

  14. Pseudohypoaldosteronism presenting with thrombocytosis and bilateral pneumothoraces in an infant.

    PubMed

    Javed, Asma; Leonard, Jennifer M; Cramer, Carl; Kumar, Seema; Kirmani, Salman; Brands, Chad K

    2013-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-1) is a rare salt-wasting syndrome caused by a peripheral resistance to aldosterone. Here, we describe an unusual presentation of the autosomal dominant PHA-1 featuring bilateral pneumothoraces at birth, thrombocytosis in infancy, and hypercalcemia in addition to the well-described findings of hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and failure to thrive. These findings contribute to the limited case descriptions of PHA-1 and may suggest additional diagnostic considerations in a neonate presenting with hyperkalemia, hyponatremia, and failure to thrive. PMID:23327809

  15. An uncommon case showing three different pathologies on 99mtechnetium-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Karunanithi, Sellam; Dhull, Varun Singh; Kumar, Kunal; Gupta, Ravikant; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2015-01-01

    99mTechnetium-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy (BS) has an important role in evaluating skeletal pathology, especially its extent. Incidental extra-osseous uptake may sometimes be seen in soft-tissue pathologies. We present a 64-year-old female with skull base osteomyelitis referred for BS which revealed involvement of the skull base on the left side, uptake was also noted in bilateral lungs secondary to hypercalcemia of renal failure and in the D12-L1 vertebrae as the patient had a history of Pott's spine. This is perhaps a unique case showing three findings each of a different etiology in the same scan. PMID:25589816

  16. [A case of parathyroid adenoma with oxyphil cells].

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao

    2014-11-01

    A 56-year-old woman who was undergoing dialysis for renal failure that occurred 4 years previously was identified with hypercalcemia and high levels of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), as observed on blood analysis results. Blood analysis also indicated high levels of Ca (12.7 mg/dL) and parathyroid hormone (PTH 1,280 ng/mL). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was suspected to be the cause of hypercalcemia. Cervical neck ultrasonography revealed a 13-× 4-mm hypoechoic mass in the lower left pole of the thyroid gland. Tc-99 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG )imaging revealed aberrant accumulation at the lower region of the left accessory thyroid. Cervical neck computed tomography revealed a 12-mm mass at the inferior pole of the left thyroid gland. Considering the above observations, a diagnosis of lower left parathyroid adenoma was made. Lumpectomy was performed, and the final pathology report indicated oxyphilic adenoma. Chief cells are often observed in parathyroid adenoma, but, to our knowledge, this is the first case of a parathyroid adenoma with oxyphil cells. PMID:25731384

  17. Ultrastructural evaluation of parathyroid glands and thyroid C cells of cattle fed Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Collins, W T; Capen, C C; Döbereiner, J; Tokarnia, C H

    1977-06-01

    Fine structural alterations of thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells were evaluated after feeding dried leaves of the calcinogenic plant, Solanum malacoxylon, to cattle for 1, 6 and 32 days. Thyroid C cells initially were degranulated in response to the hypercalcemia, and parathyroid chief cells accumulated secretory granules. There was hypertrophy of thyroid C cells with well-developed secretory organelles but few secretory granules in the cytoplasm after 6 days of feeding S. malacoxylon. Inactive chief cells with dispersed profiles of endoplasmic reticulum and increased lysosomal bodies predominated in the parathyroid glands. Multiple foci of soft tissue mineralization were present in the heart, lung, and kidney. Thyroid C cells underwent hypertrophy and hyperplasia after 32 days of S. malacoxylon, and parathyroid chief cells were inactive or atrophic in response to the long-term hypercalcemia. Severe soft tissue mineralization was present throughout the cardiovascular system, lung, kidney, and spleen. These ultrastructural changes in thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells plus the widespread soft tissue mineralization observed after feeding cattle small amounts of S. malacoxylon are consistent with the recent evidence that leaves of this plant are a potent source of the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, of vitamin D. PMID:869016

  18. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W. M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1–108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an α-helical structure extending from residues 14–29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor. PMID:19346515

  19. A dimer model of human calcitonin13-32 forms an α-helical structure and robustly aggregates in 50% aqueous 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol solution.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Mei; Yoshida, Ryota; Akaji, Kenichi; Asano, Akiko; Doi, Mitsunobu

    2016-07-01

    Determining the cause of human calcitonin (hCT) aggregation could be of help in the effort to utilize hCT for treatment of hypercalcemia. Here we report that a dimer model of hCT13-32 aggregated to a greater degree than native hCT under aqueous 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol conditions. Analyses using circular dichroism spectroscopy, thioflavine-T binding assays and atomic force microscopy suggest that the α-helical portion of hCT is important for initiation of the aggregation process, which yields long fibrils. Dimerization, which stabilizes the β-sheet structure of hCT, enhances aggregation potency. Dimerization of hCT stabilizes the α-helix under aqueous TFE conditions, leading to the long fibril formation. Up to now, there have been no reports of using a dimer model to investigate the properties of hCT aggregation. Our findings could potentially serve as the basis for development of novel hCT derivatives that could be utilized for treatment of hypercalcemia, as well as for development of novel therapeutics for other ailments caused by amyloid peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27238594

  20. [Primary hyperparathyroidism: diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Body, J J

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) varies between 1 and 4/1.000 in the general population. HPT is nowadays most often asymptomatic. The classical bone disease has been replaced by osteopenia or osteoporosis with a preferential bone loss in cortical sites. The incidence of nephrolithiasis has been considerably lowered, but renal lithiasis is still the most frequent complication of HPT. The diagnosis is most often made by chance or during the workup of an abnormal bone mass. Hypercalcemia and an elevated PTH concentration, or at least a PTH level in the upper part of the normal range, generally point to a diagnosis of HPT. Additional tests include an evaluation of renal function, vitamin D measurement, determination of 24-hour urinary calcium and bone densitometry. Besides symptomatic HPT, classical recommendations for surgery include age less than 50, serum Ca at least 1 mg/dl above the upper limit of normal, creatinine clearance < 60 ml/min and osteoporosis. Surgical referral will, however, take into account patient age and comorbidities, as well as patient preferences. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, the success rate of parathyroidectomy is 95-98% and the rate of permanent complications is 1-3%. Parathyroid scintigraphy is the best preoperative localization technique of the adenoma. When surgery is contraindicated or refused by the patient, bisphosphonates or cinacalcet can be indicated in cases of osteoporosis or clinically significant hypercalcemia, respectively. PMID:23091930

  1. Reoperation for parathyroid adenoma: A contemporary experience

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Anathea C.; Alexander, H. Richard; Chang, Richard; Marx, Stephen J.; Skarulis, Monica; Pingpank, James F.; Bartlett, David L.; Hughes, Marybeth; Weinstein, Lee S.; Simonds, William F.; Collins, Michael F.; Shawker, Thomas; Chen, Clara C.; Reynolds, James; Cochran, Craig; Steinberg, Seth M.; Libutti, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    Background We reviewed reoperations for persistent or recurrent sporadic parathyroid adenoma to evaluate and compare our current results and outcomes to our previous experience. Methods From 1996 to 2008, 237 patients with persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism after failed operation underwent reoperation. Patients were re-explored with the assistance of non-invasive and sometimes invasive imaging. Results A missed adenoma was suspected pre-operatively in 163 patients. Reoperation resulted in long-term resolution of hypercalcemia in 92%. Adenomas were in entopic locations in 32%; the most frequent ectopic location was the thymus (20%). Sestamibi scanning and ultrasonography were the most successful non-invasive imaging studies (96% positive predictive value (PPV) and 84% PPV respectively). Forty-four percent of patients had a reoperation based solely on non-invasive imaging. Of the invasive procedures performed, arteriography resulted in the best localization (92% PPV). Permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve injury occurred in 1.8%. Conclusion Compared to our prior experience (1982–1995), outcomes remained similar (92% resolution of hypercalcemia and 1.8% recurrent nerve injury currently versus 96% and 1.3% previously). Fewer patients received invasive studies for pre-operative localization (56% vs 73%, respectively). The decreased use of invasive imaging is due to technical improvements and greater confidence in the combination of ultrasonography and sestamibi scanning. PMID:19958942

  2. Pleiotropic effects of vitamin D in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Chih; Wu, Chia-Chao; Hung, Yao-Min; Liao, Min-Tser; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Yeh, Kun-Chieh

    2016-01-30

    Low 25(OH)D levels are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and are implicated in all-cause mortality and morbidity risks. Furthermore, the progression of CKD is accompanied by a gradual decline in 25(OH)D production. Vitamin D deficiency in CKD causes skeletal disorders, such as osteoblast or osteoclast cell defects, bone turnover imbalance, and deterioration of bone quality, and nonskeletal disorders, such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension, immune dysfunction, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and anemia. Extra-renal organs possess the enzymatic machinery for converting 25(OH)D to 1,25(OH)2D, which may play considerable biological roles beyond the traditional roles of vitamin D. Pharmacological 1,25(OH)2D dose causes hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia as well as adynamic bone disorder, which intensifies vascular calcification. Conversely, native vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, which may play a role in managing bone and cardio-renal health and ultimately reducing mortality in CKD patients. Nevertheless, the combination of native vitamin D and active vitamin D can enhance therapy benefits of secondary hyperparathyroidism because of extra-renal 1α-hydroxylase activity in parathyroid gland. This article emphasizes the role of native vitamin D replacements in CKD, reviews vitamin D biology, and summarizes the present literature regarding native vitamin D replacement in the CKD population. PMID:26656443

  3. Sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C; Mirallié, E; Mathonnet, M

    2010-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT1) is a common endocrine disorder, which is asymptomatic in 80% of cases. The diagnosis is ordinarily easily made, based on an inappropriately elevated parathormone level (PTH) in the face of hypercalcemia. In 85% of cases, HPT1 is due to hormone secretion from a single parathyroid gland (uniglandular disease) and the remaining patients have multiglandular disease. The best localization study is MIBI scintigraphy (methoxy isobutyl isonitrile) coupled with the results of a neck ultrasound exam (sensitivity >95%). Other investigations are reserved for patients with persistent or recurrent HPT1 post-surgery. Surgery is the only cure. The surgical approach may include a bilateral cervical exploration, a unilateral approach under local anesthesia, or focused minimally invasive (video-assisted or totally endoscopic) approaches. A decrease in PTH level measured intraoperatively of greater than 50% is predictive of cure in more than 97% of cases. Surgery is recommended even for moderate HPT1 and for very elderly patients because improvement in both the quality of life and bone density have been proven in these situations. The role of medical treatment is limited. Persistent or recurrent HPT1 requires a meticulous diagnostic approach and management in surgical centers with expertise. Persistent elevation of PTH postoperatively without hypercalcemia does not mandate further exploration. The prognosis of normocalcemic patients with elevated postoperative PTH levels remains uncertain. PMID:20888315

  4. Parathyroid cyst presenting as acute pancreatitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Young; Chung, Cho-Yun; Kim, Jong-Sun; Myung, Dae-Seong; Cho, Sung-Bum; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young; Joo, Young-Eun

    2013-12-01

    We report the first case of hypercalcemia-induced acute pancreatitis caused by a functioning parathyroid cyst in a 67-year-old man. Laboratory investigation revealed increased serum amylase and lipase, increased serum ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and decreased serum phosphate, indicating pancreatitis and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed mild swelling of the pancreatic head with peri-pancreatic fat infiltration and fluid collection around the pancreatic tail. Ultrasonography and CT of the neck showed a cystic lesion at the inferior portion of the left thyroid gland, suggesting a parathyroid cyst. There was no evidence of parathyroid adenoma by 99mTc sestamibi scintigraphy. PHPT caused by a functioning parathyroid cyst was suspected. The patient underwent surgical resection of the functioning parathyroid cyst owing to his prolonged hypercalcemia. At 3 weeks after the operation, his serum levels of PTH, total calcium, ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate, amylase, and lipase were normalized. At the follow-up examinations, he has remained asymptomatic. PMID:24400215

  5. Regression of orbital brown tumor after surgical removal of parathyroid adenoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Felipe Martins de; Makimoto, Tiago Eidy; Scalissi, Nilza Maria; Marone, Marília Martins Silveira; Maeda, Sergio Setsuo

    2015-10-01

    Brown tumors are rare skeletal manifestations that occur in less than 2% of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) cases. Even rarer is the occurrence of brown tumor of the orbit, and few cases have been reported around the world. The rare instance of this benign tumor has prompted us to report the case and treatment of an orbital brown tumor in a patient with PHPT caused by parathyroid adenoma. We present the case of a patient undergoing follow-up at a referral center. The 60-year-old female patient, presented herself with progressive swelling in the nasal region, epistaxis and proptosis, she had noticed seven months prior to our examination. Multiple imaging and laboratory findings revealed parathyroid hormone (PTH)-dependent hypercalcemia (total calcium = 14.3 mg/dL and PTH = 1,573 pg/mL), a nodular lesion in the upper pole of the left thyroid lobe and increased uptake in left upper cervical region. The patient underwent left superior parathyroidectomy in September 2011, which led to the normalization of hypercalcemia and regression of the orbital tumor, as seen on control CT scan. This case highlights the spontaneous regression of the brown tumor after surgical management of the parathyroid adenoma. PMID:26331231

  6. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W.M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-08-18

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1-108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an {alpha}-helical structure extending from residues 14-29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor.

  7. Chronic Vitamin D Intoxication in Captive Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus)

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Luis; Raya, Ana; Lopez, Guillermo; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico

    2016-01-01

    To document the biochemical and pathologic features of vitamin D intoxication in lynx and to characterize mineral metabolism in healthy lynx, blood samples were obtained from 40 captive lynx that had been receiving excessive (approximately 30 times the recommended dose) vitamin D3 in the diet, and from 29 healthy free ranging lynx. Tissue samples (kidney, stomach, lung, heart and aorta) were collected from 13 captive lynx that died as a result of renal disease and from 3 controls. Vitamin D intoxication resulted in renal failure in most lynx (n = 28), and widespread extraskeletal calcification was most severe in the kidneys and less prominent in cardiovascular tissues. Blood minerals and calciotropic hormones in healthy lynx were similar to values reported in domestic cats except for calcitriol which was higher in healthy lynx. Changes in mineral metabolism after vitamin D intoxication included hypercalcemia (12.0 ± 0.3 mg/dL), hyperphosphatemia (6.3 ± 0.4 mg/dL), increased plasma calcidiol (381.5 ± 28.2 ng/mL) and decreased plasma parathyroid hormone (1.2 ± 0.7 pg/mL). Hypercalcemia and, particularly, hyperphosphatemia were of lower magnitude that what has been previously reported in the course of vitamin D intoxication in other species. However, extraskeletal calcifications were severe. The data suggest that lynx are sensitive to excessive vitamin D and extreme care should be taken when supplementing this vitamin in captive lynx diets. PMID:27243456

  8. Chronic Vitamin D Intoxication in Captive Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ignacio; Pineda, Carmen; Muñoz, Luis; Raya, Ana; Lopez, Guillermo; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico

    2016-01-01

    To document the biochemical and pathologic features of vitamin D intoxication in lynx and to characterize mineral metabolism in healthy lynx, blood samples were obtained from 40 captive lynx that had been receiving excessive (approximately 30 times the recommended dose) vitamin D3 in the diet, and from 29 healthy free ranging lynx. Tissue samples (kidney, stomach, lung, heart and aorta) were collected from 13 captive lynx that died as a result of renal disease and from 3 controls. Vitamin D intoxication resulted in renal failure in most lynx (n = 28), and widespread extraskeletal calcification was most severe in the kidneys and less prominent in cardiovascular tissues. Blood minerals and calciotropic hormones in healthy lynx were similar to values reported in domestic cats except for calcitriol which was higher in healthy lynx. Changes in mineral metabolism after vitamin D intoxication included hypercalcemia (12.0 ± 0.3 mg/dL), hyperphosphatemia (6.3 ± 0.4 mg/dL), increased plasma calcidiol (381.5 ± 28.2 ng/mL) and decreased plasma parathyroid hormone (1.2 ± 0.7 pg/mL). Hypercalcemia and, particularly, hyperphosphatemia were of lower magnitude that what has been previously reported in the course of vitamin D intoxication in other species. However, extraskeletal calcifications were severe. The data suggest that lynx are sensitive to excessive vitamin D and extreme care should be taken when supplementing this vitamin in captive lynx diets. PMID:27243456

  9. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  10. A nonclassical vitamin D receptor pathway suppresses renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ichiaki; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Masato; Abe, Rumi; Nagai, Yu; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Yuka; Ohkido, Ichiro; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Murayama, Akiko; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2013-01-01

    The TGF-β superfamily comprises pleiotropic cytokines that regulate SMAD and non-SMAD signaling. TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is known to be involved in tissue fibrosis, including renal fibrosis. Here, we found that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3–bound [1,25(OH)2D3-bound] vitamin D receptor (VDR) specifically inhibits TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction through direct interaction with SMAD3. In mouse models of tissue fibrosis, 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment prevented renal fibrosis through the suppression of TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction. Based on the structure of the VDR-ligand complex, we generated 2 synthetic ligands. These ligands selectively inhibited TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction without activating VDR-mediated transcription and significantly attenuated renal fibrosis in mice. These results indicate that 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent suppression of TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is independent of VDR-mediated transcriptional activity. In addition, these ligands did not cause hypercalcemia resulting from stimulation of the transcriptional activity of the VDR. Thus, our study provides a new strategy for generating chemical compounds that specifically inhibit TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction. Since TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is reportedly involved in several disorders, our results will aid in the development of new drugs that do not cause detectable adverse effects, such as hypercalcemia. PMID:24135137

  11. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  12. Primary hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Soto, Gonzalo; Linglart, Agnès; Sénat, Marie-Victoire; Kamenicky, Peter; Chanson, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is rarely diagnosed during pregnancy but is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Information on appropriate management is limited. We reviewed the medical literature through December 2012 for key articles on PHPT during pregnancy, focusing on large series. Clinical knowledge in this area is restricted to isolated case reports and a few retrospective studies. Diagnosis can be difficult, owing to the non-specific nature of signs and symptoms of hypercalcemia during pregnancy. Pregnant women with a calcium level over 2.85 mmol/L (11.4 mg/dL) and prior pregnancy loss are at a particularly high risk of maternal complications (hypercalcemic crisis, nephrolithiasis, pancreatitis, etc.) and fetal loss. Around one-half of neonates born to mothers with untreated PHPT have hypocalcemia and tetany. Algorithms proposed for the management of the pregnant woman with PHPT are not evidence based, reflecting the paucity of data. Treatment should thus be individually tailored. Gestational age and the severity of hypercalcemia should be taken into account when assessing the risk-benefit balance of a conservative approach (hyperhydration and vitamin D supplementation) versus parathyroid surgery. Current evidence supports parathyroidectomy as the main treatment, performed preferably during the second trimester, when the serum calcium is above 2.75 mmol/L (11 mg/dL). In the patients with mild forms of PHPT, which are nowadays the most frequent, a conservative management is generally preferred. PMID:23670708

  13. X-ray microscopy studies on the pharmaco-dynamics of therapeutic gallium in rat bones

    SciTech Connect

    Bockman, R.; Repo, M.; Warrell, R.; Pounds, J.G.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Schidlovksy, G.; Jones, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    We describe here our preliminary results on gallium and calcium quantitation and localization using x-ray microscopy techniques at the X-26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at 50 to 100 ..mu..m resolution and 10/sup )minus/6) gg detection levels. Since the original observation of exogenous gallium accumulation in bones, several studies have demonstrated that gallium nitrate is extremely effective in preserving boen mienral content both in vivo and in vitro. Gallium nitrate therapy normalized serum calcium levels in a study of patients with caner-related hypercalcemia, resistant to standard hydration and diuretic therapy. Recently, gallium nitrate treatment has been shown to halt the accelerated bone resorption that is frequently associated with cancers metastatic to bone. Several lines of evidence from vitro studies recently led to the demonstration of increased bone calcium and improvement in hydroxyapatite crystallinity in adult gallium-treated rats. Evidence is rapidly accumulating that gallium nitrate is an effective, new therapeutic agent for inhibition of accelerated bone resorption associated with cancer-related hypercalcemia. It has also been suggested that gallium could have wide clinical applications in disorders characterized by accelerated calcium loss from bone. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Ultrastructural evaluation of parathyroid glands and thyroid C cells of cattle fed Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, W. T.; Capen, C. C.; Döbereiner, J.; Tokarnia, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    Fine structural alterations of thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells were evaluated after feeding dried leaves of the calcinogenic plant, Solanum malacoxylon, to cattle for 1, 6 and 32 days. Thyroid C cells initially were degranulated in response to the hypercalcemia, and parathyroid chief cells accumulated secretory granules. There was hypertrophy of thyroid C cells with well-developed secretory organelles but few secretory granules in the cytoplasm after 6 days of feeding S. malacoxylon. Inactive chief cells with dispersed profiles of endoplasmic reticulum and increased lysosomal bodies predominated in the parathyroid glands. Multiple foci of soft tissue mineralization were present in the heart, lung, and kidney. Thyroid C cells underwent hypertrophy and hyperplasia after 32 days of S. malacoxylon, and parathyroid chief cells were inactive or atrophic in response to the long-term hypercalcemia. Severe soft tissue mineralization was present throughout the cardiovascular system, lung, kidney, and spleen. These ultrastructural changes in thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells plus the widespread soft tissue mineralization observed after feeding cattle small amounts of S. malacoxylon are consistent with the recent evidence that leaves of this plant are a potent source of the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, of vitamin D. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:869016

  15. Reversible vascular calcifications associated with hypervitaminosis D.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Massimo; Bilancio, Giancarlo; Cirillo, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    A 64-year-old man was hospitalized in 2002 with symptoms of stupor, weakness, and renal colic. The clinical examination indicated borderline hypertension, small masses in the glutei, and polyuria. Laboratory tests evidenced high serum concentrations of creatinine, calcium, and phosphate. Imaging assessments disclosed widespread vascular calcifications, gluteal calcifications, and pelvic ectasia. Subsequent lab tests indicated suppressed serum parathyroid hormone, extremely high serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D, and normal serum 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. Treatment was started with intravenous infusion of saline and furosemide due to the evidence of hypercalcemia. Prednisone and omeprazole were added given the evidence of hypervitaminosis D. The treatment improved serum calcium, kidney function, and consciousness. The medical history disclosed recent treatment with exceptionally high doses of slow-release intra-muscular cholecalciferol and the recent excretion of urinary stones. The patient was discharged when it was possible to stop the intravenous treatment. The post-discharge treatment included oral hydration, furosemide, prednisone and omeprazole for approximately 6 months up to complete resolution of the hypercalcemia. The patient came back 12 years later because of microhematuria. Lab tests were normal for calcium/phosphorus homeostasis and kidney function. Imaging tests indicated only minor vascular calcifications. This is the first evidence of reversible vascular calcifications secondary to hypervitaminosis D. PMID:26318020

  16. An unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a patient with ANCA associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Wajid M; Nori, Uday S; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic kidney biopsies sometimes yield clinically unsuspected diagnoses. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman with established ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) of 4 years duration who was in clinical remission following cytotoxic therapy and was on maintenance immunosuppression. She presented to the hospital with acute kidney injury (AKI), symptoms suggestive of a systemic vasculitis, and in addition had hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis. A relapse in the AAV was suspected but a diagnostic kidney biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, patchy interstitial inflammation, and calcium phosphate deposits. It was found that the patient recently started consuming large doses of over-the-counter calcium-containing antacids and vitamin Dcontaining multivitamin supplements. Cessation of these drugs led to improvement of renal function to baseline. This case highlights several teaching points: (1) the kidney biopsy can prove to be critically important even in cases where there appears to be a more obvious clinical diagnosis, (2) AK due to calcium-alkali syndrome has characteristic histopathological changes, and (3) that the triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and AKI is exclusively associated with the ingestion of excessive quantities of calcium-containing antacids. The physician should keep this in mind, and pro-actively seek pertinent medication history from the patient. A brief review of calcium-alkali syndrome is given. PMID:26932179

  17. Multiple myeloma in a dog with multiple concurrent infectious diseases and persistent polyclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Geigy, Caroline; Riond, Barbara; Bley, Carla Rohrer; Grest, Paula; Kircher, Patrick; Lutz, Hans

    2013-03-01

    A 12-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was presented for acute hematuria, stranguria, polyuria, and polydipsia, as well as lameness for 8 days. Previous medical history included treatment for infection with Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Leishmania infantum, and Dirofilaria immitis 6.5 years prior to presentation. Besides persistently increased antibody titers to E canis and A phagocytophilum, polyclonal gammopathy with a monoclonal spike and moderate hypercalcemia were observed. There was marked hematuria, and Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from urine. Two weeks after successful treatment of the urinary tract infection, radiographs showed an extensive destructive monostotic lesion of the right humerus. Cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirates of this lesion revealed a neoplastic round cell population suggestive of multiple myeloma. The dog was treated with melphalan and prednisolone for suspected multiple myeloma and doxycycline for suspected ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. Treatments lead to resolution of the clinical signs, hypercalcemia, and monoclonal gammopathy, and there was radiographic improvement of bone lesions; polyclonal gammopathy persisted. About one year after presentation the dog was still in clinical remission. This is a rare report of a dog with suspected multiple myeloma and a history of multiple chronic infectious diseases, suggesting that chronic infection and uncontrolled long-term stimulation of the immune system could contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. PMID:23278475

  18. Quantitation of CYP24A1 Enzymatic Activity With a Simple Two-Hybrid System

    PubMed Central

    Mugg, Amy; Legeza, Balazs; Tee, Meng Kian; Damm, Izabella; Long, Roger K.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Mutations of the CYP24A1 gene encoding the 24-hydroxylase (24OHase) that inactivates metabolites of vitamin D can cause hypercalcemia in infants and adults; in vitro assays of 24OHase activity have been difficult. Objective: We sought an alternative assay to characterize a CYP24A1 mutation in a young adult with bilateral nephrolithiasis and hypercalcemia associated with ingestion of excess vitamin D supplements and robust dairy intake for 5 years. Methods: CYP24A1 exons were sequenced from leukocyte DNA. Wild-type and mutant CYP24A1 cDNAs were expressed in JEG-3 cells, and 24OHase activity was assayed by a two-hybrid system. Results: The CYP24A1 missense mutation L409S was found on only one allele; no other mutation was found in exons or in at least 30 bp of each intron/exon junction. Based on assays of endogenous 24OHase activity and of activity from a transiently transfected CYP24A1 cDNA expression vector, JEG-3 cells were chosen over HepG2, Y1, MA10, and NCI-H295A cells for two-hybrid assays of 24OHase activity. The apparent Michaelis constant, Km(app), was 9.0 ± 2.0 nm for CYP24A1 and 8.6 ± 2.2 nm for its mutant; the apparent maximum velocity, Vmax(app), was 0.71 ± 0.055 d−1 for the wild type and 0.22 ± 0.026 d−1 for the mutant. As assessed by Vmax/Km, the L409S mutant has 32% of wild-type activity (P = .0012). Conclusions: The two-hybrid system in JEG-3 cells provides a simple, sensitive, quantitative assay of 24OHase activity. Heterozygous mutation of CYP24A1 may cause hypercalcemia in the setting of excessive vitamin D intake, but it is also possible that the patient had another, unidentified CYP24A1 mutation on the other allele. PMID:25375986

  19. The Abnormal Phenotypes of Cartilage and Bone in Calcium-Sensing Receptor Deficient Mice Are Dependent on the Actions of Calcium, Phosphorus, and PTH

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Chunxiang; Ding, Guoxian; Karaplis, Andrew; Brown, Edward; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2011-01-01

    Patients with neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) are homozygous for the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) mutation and have very high circulating PTH, abundant parathyroid hyperplasia, and severe life-threatening hypercalcemia. Mice with homozygous deletion of CaR mimic the syndrome of NSHPT. To determine effects of CaR deficiency on skeletal development and interactions between CaR and 1,25(OH)2D3 or PTH on calcium and skeletal homeostasis, we compared the skeletal phenotypes of homozygous CaR–deficient (CaR−/−) mice to those of double homozygous CaR– and 1α(OH)ase–deficient [CaR−/−1α(OH)ase−/−] mice or those of double homozygous CaR– and PTH–deficient [CaR−/−PTH−/−] mice at 2 weeks of age. Compared to wild-type littermates, CaR−/− mice had hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperparathyroidism, and severe skeletal growth retardation. Chondrocyte proliferation and PTHrP expression in growth plates were reduced significantly, whereas trabecular volume, osteoblast number, osteocalcin-positive areas, expression of the ALP, type I collagen, osteocalcin genes, and serum ALP levels were increased significantly. Deletion of 1α(OH)ase in CaR−/− mice resulted in a longer lifespan, normocalcemia, lower serum phosphorus, greater elevation in PTH, slight improvement in skeletal growth with increased chondrocyte proliferation and PTHrP expression, and further increases in indices of osteoblastic bone formation. Deletion of PTH in CaR−/− mice resulted in rescue of early lethality, normocalcemia, increased serum phosphorus, undetectable serum PTH, normalization in skeletal growth with normal chondrocyte proliferation and enhanced PTHrP expression, and dramatic decreases in indices of osteoblastic bone formation. Our results indicate that reductions in hypercalcemia play a critical role in preventing the early lethality of CaR−/− mice and that defects in endochondral bone formation in CaR−/− mice result from effects of the

  20. The abnormal phenotypes of cartilage and bone in calcium-sensing receptor deficient mice are dependent on the actions of calcium, phosphorus, and PTH.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingning; Lv, Fangqiao; Sun, Wen; Tao, Chunxiang; Ding, Guoxian; Karaplis, Andrew; Brown, Edward; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2011-09-01

    Patients with neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) are homozygous for the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) mutation and have very high circulating PTH, abundant parathyroid hyperplasia, and severe life-threatening hypercalcemia. Mice with homozygous deletion of CaR mimic the syndrome of NSHPT. To determine effects of CaR deficiency on skeletal development and interactions between CaR and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) or PTH on calcium and skeletal homeostasis, we compared the skeletal phenotypes of homozygous CaR-deficient (CaR(-/-)) mice to those of double homozygous CaR- and 1α(OH)ase-deficient [CaR(-/-)1α(OH)ase(-/-)] mice or those of double homozygous CaR- and PTH-deficient [CaR(-/-)PTH(-/-)] mice at 2 weeks of age. Compared to wild-type littermates, CaR(-/-) mice had hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperparathyroidism, and severe skeletal growth retardation. Chondrocyte proliferation and PTHrP expression in growth plates were reduced significantly, whereas trabecular volume, osteoblast number, osteocalcin-positive areas, expression of the ALP, type I collagen, osteocalcin genes, and serum ALP levels were increased significantly. Deletion of 1α(OH)ase in CaR(-/-) mice resulted in a longer lifespan, normocalcemia, lower serum phosphorus, greater elevation in PTH, slight improvement in skeletal growth with increased chondrocyte proliferation and PTHrP expression, and further increases in indices of osteoblastic bone formation. Deletion of PTH in CaR(-/-) mice resulted in rescue of early lethality, normocalcemia, increased serum phosphorus, undetectable serum PTH, normalization in skeletal growth with normal chondrocyte proliferation and enhanced PTHrP expression, and dramatic decreases in indices of osteoblastic bone formation. Our results indicate that reductions in hypercalcemia play a critical role in preventing the early lethality of CaR(-/-) mice and that defects in endochondral bone formation in CaR(-/-) mice result from effects of the marked elevation in serum

  1. Inecalcitol, an analog of 1,25D₃, displays enhanced antitumor activity through the induction of apoptosis in a squamous cell carcinoma model system

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Luo, Wei; Delansorne, Remi; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest an important role of vitamin D signaling in cancer development and progression, and experimental studies demonstrate that the active vitamin D metabolite 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ (1,25D₃) has broad spectrum antitumor activity. Hypercalcemia has often been suggested to limit the clinical application of these data. The 14-epi-analog of 1,25D₃, inecalcitol [19-nor-14-epi-23-yne-1,25-(OH)₂D₃; TX522], was developed to have superagonistic antitumor activities but low hypercalcemia potential. We examined the antitumor activity of inecalcitol and the underlying mechanisms in a murine squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) model system. In vitro, compared with 1,25D₃, inecalcitol showed enhanced vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated transcriptional activity. Inecalcitol suppressed SCC cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with an IC₅₀ value 30 times lower than that of 1,25D₃. Both inecalcitol and 1,25D₃ induced a comparable level of G₀/G₁ cell cycle arrest in SCC cells. The level of apoptosis induced by inecalcitol was markedly higher than that of 1,25D₃. Apoptosis was mediated through the activation of the caspase 8/10- caspase 3 pathway. Further, inecalcitol markedly inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of c-IAP1 and XIAP compared with 1,25D₃. In vivo, inecalcitol inhibits SCC tumor growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Notably, inecalcitol induced a significantly higher level of apoptosis in the SCC xenograft model. While in vitro inecalcitol demonstrates apparent enhanced VDR binding and antiproliferative effects compared to 1,25D₃, in vivo these advantages disappear; at doses of inecalcitol that have equivalent antitumor effects, similar hypercalcemia is seen. This may be explained by the pharmacokinetics of 1,25D₃ vs. inecalcitol and attributed to the much shorter serum half-life of inecalcitol.We show that inecalcitol has potent antitumor activity in the SCC model system, and this is associated with a

  2. Notch2 transduction by feline leukemia virus in a naturally infected cat.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Kuse, Kyohei; Ochi, Haruyo; Anai, Yukari; Hisasue, Masaharu; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2014-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) induces neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases in cats. The transduction of cellular genes by FeLV is sometimes observed and associated with neoplastic diseases including lymphoma and sarcoma. Here, we report the first natural case of feline Notch2 transduction by FeLV in an infected cat with multicentric lymphoma and hypercalcemia. We cloned recombinant FeLVs harboring Notch2 in the env gene. Notch2 was able to activate expression of a reporter gene, similar to what was previously reported in cats with experimental FeLV-induced thymic lymphoma. Our findings suggest that the transduction of Notch2 strongly correlates with FeLV-induced lymphoma. PMID:24317268

  3. Congenital mastoid cholesteatoma presenting as a mass obstructing external auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Khairunnisak, M; Mohd Khairi, M D

    2014-12-01

    We describe the clinical presentation, investigation and management of an eventually fatal case of hypercalcemic crisis due to primary hyperparathyridism (PHPT). A 60 year-old lady with history of urolithiasis presented with worsening generalized bone pain, spinal scoliosis and a limp. Laboratory data showed hypercalcemia and raised alkaline phosphatase. Left hip x-ray revealed a subcapital femoral neck fracture. Intact parathyroid hormone was elevated, 187.6 pmol/L (1.6 - 6.9) and ultrasound showed an enlarged right parathyroid gland. Despite initial reduction of serum calcium with saline infusion and multiple doses of intravenous pamidronate, her calcium increased to 4.14 mmol/L a week following application of Buck's traction for persistent left hip pain. She succumbed eventually with serum calcium peaking at 6.28 mmol/L despite multiple therapeutic interventions. PMID:25934960

  4. Functional parathyroid cystic adenoma: A rare cause of hypercalcemic crisis with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sumana, B S; Sabaretnam, M; Sarathi, Vijaya; Savith, Akshatha

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a case of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a giant cystic parathyroid adenoma presenting with neck swelling and hypercalcemic crisis. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of presumed thyroid swelling from one of the two sites aspirated yielded clear fluid but was not attributed to parathyroid pathology. Elevated serum calcium and intact parathormone (iPTH) levels suggested preoperative parathyroid pathology. Ultrasound neck and sestamibi scan for parathyroid localization were not conclusive. Due to resistant hypercalcemia, the patient underwent emergency bilateral neck exploration and excision of the identified left superior parathyroid cyst along with total thyroidectomy. Monitoring of intra-operative iPTH helped complete removal of hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue. Histopathological examination confirmed the parathyroid cyst. Cystic parathyroid adenoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic neck lesions. PMID:26549073

  5. Vitamin D and Risk for Vitamin A Intoxication in an 18-Month-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Barreca, Massimo; Galiano, Rossella; Galati, Maria Concetta; Raiola, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    An 18-month-old boy presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and poor appetite for 6 days. He had been given a multivitamin preparation once daily, containing 50.000 IU of vitamin D and 10.000 IU of vitamin A for a wide anterior fontanelle for about three months. He presented with hypercalcemia, low levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), and very high serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels. Renal ultrasound showed nephrocalcinosis. He did not have sign or symptom of vitamin A intoxication. Patient was successfully treated with intravenous hydration, furosemide, and prednisolone. With treatment, serum calcium returned rapidly to the normal range and serum 25-OHD levels were reduced progressively. In conclusion the diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency rickets without checking 25-OHD levels may cause redundant treatment that leads to vitamin D intoxication (VDI). PMID:27478669

  6. “The Great Mimicker”: An Unusual Etiology of Cytopenia, Diffuse Lymphadenopathy, and Massive Splenomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Zaarour, Mazen; Weerasinghe, Chanudi; Moussaly, Elias; Hussein, Shafinaz; Atallah, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic multisystem disease characterized by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. It frequently presents with pulmonary infiltrates and bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Splenic involvement is common, but massive splenomegaly is a rare occurrence. Sarcoidosis is known as “the great mimicker” (or “the great imitator”) since it exhibits a myriad of symptoms, mimicking other inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic conditions, including lymphoma. Herein, we report the case of a 44-year-old male patient who was found to have bicytopenia, hypercalcemia, diffuse lymphadenopathy, and massive splenomegaly, a constellation of findings suggestive of underlying lymphoma. Interestingly, lymph node biopsy showed noncaseating granulomas suggestive of sarcoidosis, without evidence of malignancy. PMID:26579198

  7. Osteonecrosis of the Torus Palatinus in the Setting of Long-Term Oral Bisphosphonate Use--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joshua L; Larson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are medications used orally and intravenously for a variety of conditions including cancer metastatic to bone, hypercalcemia of malignancy, Paget's disease and osteoporosis. Osteonecrosis of the jaw has been related to bisphosphonate use. Osteonecrosis of the jaw most commonly occurs in the setting of intravenous bisphosphonate use and concomitant dental work or trauma. Oral bisphosphonates have much less risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. We present an interesting case of a patient on an oral bisphosphonate for an extended period of time (nine years), with a torus palatinus, who burned her palate while eating a slice of pizza. Over six months later, she presented with an area of denuded bone and diagnosis consistent with osteonecrosis of the torus palatinus. PMID:26882578

  8. Massive Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage as an Initial Presentation of a Rare and Aggressive Form of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Alawadhi, Aydah; Leb, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma, a plasma cell neoplasm, presents most commonly with anemia, hypercalcemia, renal failure, and bone pain. Only few cases of clinical aggressive presentation associated with bleeding were reported in the medical literature. The reported cases included gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiac tamponade. Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage as initial presentation has not been so far reported. We hereby report a case of a 64-year-old female who was found to have catastrophic hemorrhage in the retroperitoneal region that extended into intrathecal space causing cord compression. The case posed a significant diagnostic and management dilemma. This case emphasizes the need to think broadly and include multiple myeloma in the diagnosis of unexplained massive retroperitoneal bleeding. PMID:26885415

  9. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Madkhali, Tarıq; Alhefdhi, Amal; Chen, Herbert; Elfenbein, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder caused by overactivation of parathyroid glands resulting in excessive release of parathyroid hormone. The resultant hypercalcemia leads to a myriad of symptoms. Primary hyperparathyroidism may increase a patient’s morbidity and even mortality if left untreated. During the last few decades, disease presentation has shifted from the classic presentation of severe bone and kidney manifestations to most patients now being diagnosed on routine labs. Although surgery is the only curative therapy, many advances have been made over the past decades in the diagnosis and the surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism. The aim of this review is to summarize the characteristics of the disease, the work up, and the treatment options. PMID:26985167

  10. Mechanisms of radio-protection by catecholamines in the hamster /Mesocricetus auratus/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewitt, R. L.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on normal and splenectomized male and female hamsters between 2 and 3 months old subjected to a whole-body exposure of 1000 or 2000 rads in a Co-60 source with a view toward evaluating their radio-protection by norepinephrine, isoproterenol, and phenylephrine. Vasoconstriction hypoxia mechanism of radio-protection is examined along with the hypothesis that isoproterenol protects by hypercalcemia-induced cell proliferation. Radiation experiment results are found to be consistent with the hypothesis that stimulation of alpha receptors results in radio-protection through a tissue hypoxia mechanism. Beta agonists seem to protect by a hypotensive-hypoxia mechanism. The catecholamines protect against the hematopoietic syndrome, but show no evidence of protection against the gastrointestinal syndrome.

  11. Bone and body mass changes during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, V.; Oganov, V.; LeBlanc, A.; Rakmonov, A.; Taggart, L.; Bakulin, A.; Huntoon, C.; Grigoriev, A.; Varonin, L.

    Long duration space flight has shown us that humans have significant bone loss and mineral changes because they are living in microgravity. Skylab and the longer Salyut and Mir missions, are providing us useful data and allowing us to explore the mechanism involved in skeletal turnover. Bone redistribution occurs throughout space flight with bone loss predominately in the weight bearing bones of posture and locomotion. The primary health hazards which may occur during space flight induced by skeletal changes include signs and symptoms of hypercalcemia, and the risk of kidney stones and metastatic calcification. After flight lengthy recovery of bone mass and the possible increase in the risk of bone fracture should be considered. Continued research studies are being directed toward determining the mechanisms by which bone is lost in space and developing more effective countermeasures by both the US (Schneider and McDonald, 1984 and Schneider, LeBlanc & Huntoon, 1993) and Russian (Grigoriev et. al., 1989) space programs.

  12. Multisystemic Side Effects of an Indispensable Old Drug: A Case Report of Chronic Lithium Use (A Patient with Multiple Side Effects of Lithium)

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas, Levent; Akbas, Emin Murat; Degirmenci, Husnu; Gurel, Ali; Duzgun, Eren

    2015-01-01

    Presented here is a case of long-term lithium use, with multiple emerging lithium-associated side effects. An 82-year-old woman was brought into the emergency department because of loss of consciousness. According to the physical examination and laboratory analyses, patient was diagnosed with lithium-associated hypercalcemia, hyperparathyroidism, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), symptomatic sinus bradycardia, and thyroid dysfunction. In the literature, there is a limited number of case reports with lithium induced multiple clinical conditions. Multiple clinical manifestations due to the side effects of chronic lithium use might be seen. Health care professionals should keep in mind that lithium-related side effects might trigger or exacerbate each other. To avoid toxicity, close follow-up and clinical supervision are important for the early diagnosis and treatment of these side effects, due to the narrow therapeutic index and obscure clinical signs and symptoms of toxicity. PMID:26604931

  13. Influence of prednisolone on urinary calcium oxalate and struvite relative supersaturation in healthy young adult female domestic shorthaired cats.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Nicole; Bartges, Joseph W; Kirk, Claudia A; Cox, Sherry; Hezel, Alisha; Moyers, Tammy; Hayes, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    Prednisolone (10 mg PO q24h) or placebo was administered to healthy cats for 2 weeks in a masked, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study, and 24-hour urine samples were collected. When cats received prednisolone, 24-hour urine pH was lower and 24-hour urine excretion of creatinine, magnesium, phosphate, and potassium was higher than when cats received placebo. No significant difference was found in urinary relative supersaturation for calcium oxalate (CaOx) or struvite between treatment groups. Prednisolone administration did not induce diuresis, nor was it associated with increased calcium excretion or urinary saturation for CaOx in these healthy cats. Results of this study, however, should not be extrapolated to cats that form CaOx uroliths associated with idiopathic hypercalcemia. PMID:18183542

  14. Vitamin D: Pharmacokinetics and Safety When Used in Conjunction with the Pharmaceutical Drugs Used in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Deborah A.; Cooley, Kieran; Skidmore, Becky; Fritz, Heidi; Campbell, Tara; Seely, Dugald

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D has reported anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties modulated through gene transcription and non-genomic signaling cascades. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available research on interactions and pharmacokinetics between vitamin D and the pharmaceutical drugs used in patients with cancer. Hypercalcemia was the most frequently reported side effect that occurred in high dose calcitriol. The half-life of 25(OH)D3 and/or 1,25(OH)2D3 was found to be impacted by cimetidine; rosuvastatin; prednisone and possibly some chemotherapy drugs. No unusual adverse effects in cancer patients; beyond what is expected from high dose 1,25(OH)2D3 supplementation, were revealed through this review. While sufficient evidence is lacking, supplementation with 1,25(OH)2D3 during chemotherapy appears to have a low risk of interaction. Further interactions with vitamin D3 have not been studied. PMID:24216707

  15. Nuclear Imaging and Minimally Invasive Surgery in the Management of Hyperparathyroidism*

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Benjamin L.; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2013-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is the most common cause of hypercalcemia, and the treatment is primarily surgical. Because of biochemical screening, more patients now present with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism, and consensus guidelines have been developed for the treatment of these patients. There is now considerable interest in minimally invasive approaches to the treatment of hyperparathyroidism. Sestamibi scanning as a localizing study, used in combination with anatomic imaging and intraoperative rapid parathyroid hormone assays, has enabled focused surgical approaches. Patients with localizing studies that indicate a single parathyroid adenoma are candidates for such approaches, including unilateral neck exploration, minimally invasive single-gland exploration, or endoscopic exploration instead of the traditional approach of bilateral neck exploration. Nuclear imaging is also critical to the successful management of patients with persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism. PMID:18927330

  16. [Renal osteodystrophy (3); its treatment in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Ghitu, S; Oprisiu, R; Benamar, L; Said, S; Tataru Albu, A; Arsenescu, I; el Esper, N; Morinière, P; Fournier, A

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence and the clinical gravity of the various histopathological varieties of renal osteodystrophy in dialysis patients depends on the severity of both the aluminium intoxication and that of hyperparathyroidism. The prevalence of bone pains, fractures and hypercalcemias are the highest in adynamic bone diseases (ABD) with severe aluminium intoxication, then in osteitis fibrosa and mixed osteopathy, in the ABD with moderate aluminium intoxication and rare in the mild lesion in spite of similar moderate aluminium intoxication. In the absence of aluminium intoxication, hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia prevalence is higher only when intact PTH is more that 4 times the upper limit of normal. When PTH is between 1 and 2 folds the ULN this prevalence is null and bone mineral density is the highest. 2. The low turnover aluminic bone diseases (osteomalacic or adynamic) will be cured by long term deferoxamine treatment. The hazards of such treatment justify the performance of a bone biopsy to ensure the diagnosis. Their prevention relies on adequate treatment of tapwater and definitive exclusion of long term administration of aluminum phosphate binders. 3. Non aluminic osteomalacia will be treated according to the same guidelines given for the uremic patients before dialysis. 4. Non aluminic adynamic bone disease will be cured by means aiming at stimulating PTH secretion as discontinuing 1 alpha hydroxylated vitamin D derivatives, and, if there is no hyperphosphatemia by discontinuation of calcium supplement. In case of hyperphosphatemia in dialysis patients CaCO3 doses have to be nevertheless increased after the dialysate calcium concentration (DCa) has been decreased in order to induce a negative perdialytic calcium balance for PTH secretion stimulation. In the near future substitution of CaCO3 by non calcemic non aluminic phosphate binders will suffice. 5. Osteitis fibrosa due to hyperparathyroidism will be treated first by securing an optimal vitamin D

  17. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Following Olanzapine Treatment and 759C/T Polymorphism of HTR2C Gene: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Emmanouil; Tournikioti, Kalliopi; Alevyzakis, Evangelos; Peppa, Melpomeni; Papazaxos, Konstantinos; Zorbas, Georgios; Michopoulos, Ioannis; Liappas, Ioannis; Papageorgiou, Charalampos; Douzenis, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can be attributed to numerous potential causes, such as alcohol abuse, chololithiasis, infection, lesions, tumors, hypercalcemia, hyperlipidemia, and medications. Among psychotropic medications, the use of some atypical antipsychotics, such as clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone, has been implicated in the development of acute pancreatitis, although the underlying mechanism has not been clarified. We describe the case of a young man with no other major medical problems, alcohol abuse or predisposing factors, who developed acute necrotizing pancreatitis following olanzapine administration, possibly through severe elevation of serum triglycerides. A pharmacogenomic analysis revealed the presence of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C, G protein-coupled (HTR2C) -759C genotype which is related to increased risk for metabolic syndrome. PMID:26359410

  18. [Dw-MRI and bone scintigraphy in monitoring radio-therapy response in bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Raucci, Antonio; Gatta, Gianluca; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of metastatic spread of malignancy, with possible deleterious effects including pain, hypercalcemia, and pathologic fracture. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) remains the mainstay for treatment of painful bone metastases. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) has been described as an efficient method to differentiate good and poor responders to radiotherapy in bone metastases patients. The addition of DWI to conventional whole-body MRI sequences enhanced lesion conspicuity and improved diagnostic accuracy. We evaluate bone metastases patients with bone scintigraphy and DW-MRI. With technical optimization, whole-body MRI with DWI, as a nonionizing imaging modality, may potentially be useful as an alternative method to bone scintigraphy in the management of bone metastases. PMID:23096728

  19. Bisphosphonates: mechanism of action and role in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Drake, Matthew T; Clarke, Bart L; Khosla, Suneep

    2008-09-01

    Bisphosphonates are primary agents in the current pharmacological arsenal against osteoclast-mediated bone loss due to osteoporosis, Paget disease of bone, malignancies metastatic to bone, multiple myeloma, and hypercalcemia of malignancy. In addition to currently approved uses, bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed for prevention and treatment of a variety of other skeletal conditions, such as low bone density and osteogenesis imperfecta. However, the recent recognition that bisphosphonate use is associated with pathologic conditions including osteonecrosis of the jaw has sharpened the level of scrutiny of the current widespread use of bisphosphonate therapy. Using the key words bisphosphonate and clinical practice in a PubMed literature search from January 1, 1998, to May 1, 2008, we review current understanding of the mechanisms by which bisphosphonates exert their effects on osteoclasts, discuss the role of bisphosphonates in clinical practice, and highlight some areas of concern associated with bisphosphonate use. PMID:18775204

  20. Granulomatous Lithiasic Cholecystitis in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder granulomas are exceedingly rare, reported in association with tuberculosis or sarcoidosis. Here we report a case of gallbladder granulomatous cholecystitis occurring in the context of sarcoidosis. A 70-years old man presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The medical history revealed sarcoidosis diagnosed more than 20-years previously. 2-years previously the patient showed renal lithiasis, hypercalcemia and, increased angiotensin converting enzyme. The imaging features suggested thoraco-abdominal sarcoidosis. Prednisone was given at 1.2 mg/kg/day initially, than decreased, being at 2.5 mg/day at present. The ultrasound examination showed gallbladder lithiasis. A cholecystectomy was performed. Microscopy showed subacute and chronic cholecystitis with several epithelioid and giant cell granulomas some of them perineural. In conclusion, we report a case of granulomatous cholecystitis occurring in the course of treated sarcoidosis. The perineural location of granulomas may give further insights into the pathogenesis of gallbladder dysmotility. PMID:27162601

  1. Paraneoplastic syndromes in olfactory neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gabrych, Anna; Czapiewski, Piotr; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare malignant neoplasm of sinonasal tract, derived from olfactory epithelium. Unilateral nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sinusitis, and headaches are common symptoms. Olfactory neuroblastoma shows neuroendocrine differentiation and similarly to other neuroendocrine tumors can produce several types of peptic substances and hormones. Excess production of these substances can be responsible for different types of endocrinological paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS). Moreover, besides endocrinological, in ONB may also occur neurological PNS, caused by immune cross-reactivity between tumor and normal host tissues in the nervous system. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB include: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS), humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), hypertension due to catecholamine secretion by tumor, opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (OMA) and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB tend to have atypical features, therefore diagnosis may be difficult. In this review, we described initial symptoms, patterns of presentation, treatment and outcome of paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB, reported in the literature. PMID:26199564

  2. Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Linglart, Agnès; Biosse-Duplan, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Hypophosphatasia is a rare disorder due to a mutation in the ALPL gene encoding the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) leading to a diminished activity of the enzyme in bone, liver, and kidney. Hypophosphatasia is a heterogeneous disease, ranging from extreme life-threatening forms revealed at birth in young infants presenting with severely impaired bone mineralization, seizures, and hypercalcemia, to young adults with premature exfoliation of their teeth without any other symptom. We will review the challenges of the clinical, biochemical, radiological, and genetic diagnosis. Schematically, the diagnosis relies on low ALP levels and, in most cases, on the genetic defect in the ALPL gene. An enzyme replacement therapy is now developed for hypophosphatasia; early results in the severe form of the disease are extremely encouraging. However, multidisciplinary care remains the core of treatment of hypophosphatasia encompassing nutritional support, adjustment of calcium and phosphate intake, monitoring of vitamin D levels, careful and personalized physical therapy, and regular dental monitoring and care. PMID:27084188

  3. Reader's digest of the pathophysiology of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    Bone metastases are a process originally proposed as the "seed and soil theory" in the eighteenth century. Tumor cell disseminating from patients with breast or prostate cancer typically use the bony environment to grow outside the primary tumor location. The severe clinical consequences of bone metastasis such as pain, fractures, and hypercalcemia result from a serious misbalance of bone turnover. Most bone metastases cause catabolic changes of bone turnover. The severity of bone resorption is associated with tumor growth, suggesting the existence of a vicious cycle that needs to be interrupted. Osteoblastic metastasis showing signs of osteosclerotic lesions are observed in prostate cancer. Understanding the pathophysiology of bone metastases and their detrimental consequence provide the scientific basis for therapeutic interventions at various levels including homing of tumors to bone, survival and growth of the tumor cell in the bone niche, and the mechanisms causing bone destruction. PMID:22797871

  4. Parathyroid adenoma in a young male with multiple fractures and varied clinical features.

    PubMed

    Bhanu Murthy, R; Srihari, V; Lakshmi Narayana, M

    2014-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is due to parathyroid adenoma (80-85%), hyperplasia (10-15%), carcinoma (2-3%) of cases. The most common presentation is asymptomatic hypercalcemia. Multiple pathological fractures, nephrocalcinosis as a presenting feature of primary hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid adenoma is extremely rare at the age of 19 years. A case of parathyroid adenoma with multiple fractures of left femur, renal calculi, nephrocalcinosis, weight loss, constipation, dyspepsia abdominal pain was presented. The case was investigated completely with biochemical investigations, X-ray of forearm bones and femur, ultrasonography of neck and abdomen, CT scan of neck and abdomen, MRI scan, Scintigraphy of the neck. Right inferior parathyroid adenoma was diagnosed and confirmed by histopathological examination after excision. The post operative serum calcium levels became normal. PMID:24605315

  5. Osteosclerotic and osteolytic manifestations of hyperparathyroidism in a case of Tc99m SestaMIBI positive parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalpa Jyoti; Sehgal, Aditi Khurana; Jaiman, Ashish; Sethi, Ravinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is the first differential diagnosis when a patient presents with asymptomatic hypercalcemia. The symptoms of hyperparathyroidism can be as grave as skeletal, cardiovascular, and neuropsychological changes. Skeletal manifestations are relatively common, and patient may present with generalized or focal bone pains, fragility fractures, subperiosteal bone resorption, and osteolytic lesions like brown tumors and salt and pepper appearance of the skull. However, focal osteosclerotic lesions of the skull are rare findings in hyperparathyroidism. Only a few cases of associated osteosclerosis are reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of Tc99m SestaMIBI positive parathyroid adenoma with coexisting osteolytic and osteosclerotic skull lesions on Tc99m methylene diphosphonate bone scan. PMID:26170573

  6. [Parathyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Poissonnet, Gilles; Castillo, Laurent; Bozec, Alexandre; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Ettore, Francette; Santini, José; Demard, François; Dassonville, Olivier

    2006-03-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare disease accounting for 1 to 5% of parathyroid neoplasms. This malignant tumour must be suspected when a severe primary hyperparathyroidism occurs with high hypercalcemia and elevated parathormon levels. At this time, a cervical mass is often palpable. Both head and neck ultrasonography and 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy are the best preoperative imaging tests to suspect and localize the tumour. Surgical approach with simultaneous tumorectomy and hemithyroidectomy, completed by selective neck dissection (level VI) is the treatment of choice. An elective lateral neck dissection should be performed if necessary. Tumour control should be monitored by regular measurement of calcium and parathormon levels. Local recurrence or metastasis risk is 30 to 70% and the 5 year overall survival about 50 to 80%. In case of recurrence, aggressive surgical management should be applied and adjuvant radiation therapy may be discussed. PMID:16567315

  7. Transmucosal delivery systems for calcitonin: a review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lugo, M; Peppas, N A

    2000-06-01

    The commercial availability of peptides and proteins and their advantages as therapeutic agents have been the basis for tremendous efforts in designing delivery systems for such agents. The protection of these agents from biological fluids and physiological interactions is crucial for the treatment efficacy. One such agent is salmon calcitonin, a 32 amino-acid polypeptide hormone used in the treatment of bone diseases such as Paget's disease, hypercalcemia and osteoporosis. Researchers have studied different routes to deliver salmon calcitonin more effectively, including nasal, oral, vaginal and rectal delivery. These systems are designed to protect the polypeptide from the biological barriers that each delivery route imposes. Oil-based and polymer-based delivery systems are discussed. PMID:10811300

  8. Primary Hyperparathyroidism in Pregnancy: A Two-Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Martínez, A. D.; Bahamondes-Opazo, R.; Palomares-Ortega, R.; Muñoz-Jiménez, C.; Gálvez-Moreno, M. A.; Quesada Gómez, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in pregnant women is an uncommon disease. It could be easily misdiagnosed because of physiologic changes during pregnancy; in some cases, patients could remain asymptomatic maintaining elevated calcium serum levels, and this situation represents a threat to the health of both mother and fetus. We present two cases of PHPT during pregnancy and their evolution after surgical treatment in the second trimester; there were no observed complications during pregnancy or delivery in our patients. Early diagnosis and medical/surgical treatment in PHPT are necessary for avoiding maternal and fetal complications which could not be predicted based on duration or severity of hypercalcemia. An appropriate management of PHPT during pregnancy is necessary for preserving the health of both the woman and the fetus. PMID:25893124

  9. Evaluation of radioactive phosphorus in the palliation of metastatic bone lesions from carcinoma of the breast and prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, A.; Driedger, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive phosphorus effected substantial palliation of intractable bone pain in 17 of 33 (51.5%) women with metastatic carcinoma of the breast and in 14 of 15 (93.3%) men with metastatic carcinoma of the prostate. No significant difference in the overall response rate was found between androgen and paralthormone priming prior to radiophosphorus therapy. The degree of response was not dependent on total dose of /sup 32/P within the range of 9 to 18 mCi (333 to 666 MPq). Myelosuppression was a transient complication in 9 of 33 patients with metastatic breast carcinoma and in 7 of 15 patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma. Symptomatic hypercalcemia was an infrequent complication of radiophosphorus therapy irrespective of the priming regimen.

  10. Bilateral genu valgum: an unusual presentation of juvenile primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Kumar, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a generalized disorder of bone and mineral metabolism caused by autonomous secretion of parathyroid hormone. It is primarily seen in adults with typical age of presentation between third and fifth decades of life. Juvenile hyperparathyroidism is a rare disorder. The common presentations in order of incidence are fatigue and lethargy, headache, nephrolithiasis, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting and polydipsia. Though skeletal symptoms include bone pains and fractures, but the presence of limb deformity is atypical. We report a case of young girl who presented with isolated progressive genu valgum of both lower limbs and pigeon-shaped chest deformity. She was found to have hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia with raised parathyroid hormone levels. The neck imaging showed a single adenoma in the left inferior parathyroid gland. The surgical removal of parathyroid adenoma was performed. PMID:27471596

  11. Mineral and bone disorder and vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Pércio, Pedro Paulo Verona

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications has been associated with bone and mineral disorders. The alterations in the serum level of calcium concentrations and phosphate are importants factors implicated in the arterial calcification in chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is a complex mechanism and not completely clear, being able to correspond to an active process of cellular transformation and heterotopic ossification. Beyond the hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, they are involved in this process changes in the metabolism of inhibitors and promoters of calcification such as fetuin A, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, and matrix gla protein. For the diagnosis of the calcified arterial injury are available several complementary methods, a method of estimate of the cardiovascular risk based on plain radiographs of the lumbar column and another method based on simple x-rays of the pelvis and hands. Below, we will present a review approching the link between vascular calcifications and mineral disorders. PMID:25055361

  12. [Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Atanes-Bonome, P; Atanes-Bonome, A; Ríos-Lage, P; Atanes-Sandoval, A D

    2014-04-01

    The bisphosphonates are stable inorganic pyrophosphate analogs that have demonstrated their efficacy in treatment of osteolytic lesions associated with bony metastases, and multiple myeloma, malignant hypercalcemia, Paget's disease, and osteoporosis. Several publications within the last few years have suggested that osteonecrosis of the jaw is associated with bisphosphonate therapy. The diagnosis and management strategies of the patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw is very difficult. It is important for patients to be informed of the risk of this complication, so that they have the opportunity to assess the need for dental treatment before starting therapy. Preventive measures must be taken before, during, and after treatment with bisphosphonates. If osteonecrosis of the jaw is present, management should be conservative: oral chlorhexidine and antibiotics. Surgical treatment should be reserved for those patients who are symptomatic. PMID:24001573

  13. Space medicine considerations: Skeletal and calcium homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Victor B.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the information obtained from space missions, particularly Skylab and the longer Salyut missions, it is clear that bone and mineral metabolism is substantially altered during space flight. Calcium balance becomes increasingly more negative throughout the flight, and the bone mineral content of the os calcis declines. The major health hazards associated with skeletal changes include the signs and symptoms of hypercalcemia with rapid bone turnover, the risk of kidney stones because of hypercalciuria, the lengthy recovery of lost bone mass after flight, the possibility of irreversible bone loss (particularly the trabecular bone), the possible effects of metastated calcification in the soft tissues, and the possible increase in fracture potential. For these reasons, major efforts need to be directed toward elucidating the fundamental mechanisms by which bone is lost in space and developing more effective countermeasures to prevent both short-term and long-term complications.

  14. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: a growing problem].

    PubMed

    Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Guadalix Iglesias, Sonsoles; Hawkins Carranza, Federico

    2013-08-01

    Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism is at present one of the most common reasons for consultation in bone metabolism units. It is characterized by increased levels of intact parathyroid hormone in the presence of normal serum calcium (total and ionized) in generally asymptomatic individuals. The differential diagnosis should be considered in all situations that occur with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Its natural history is not well known, and it does not always progress to hypercalcemia. As a recently recognized entity, there are still no specific recommendations for its management. In this review we discuss some aspects of this entity, emphasizing the importance of a proper laboratory diagnosis, assessing possible signs or symptoms associated such as kidney stones or osteoporosis, which can help the clinician to take a conservative or interventionist attitude. PMID:23199831

  15. Successful treatment of Netherton's syndrome with topical calcipotriol.

    PubMed

    Godic, Aleksandar; Dragos, Vlasta

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with Netherton syndrome (NS) and skin manifestation of ichthyosis linearis circumflexa (ILC) who was successfully treated with topical 0.05% calcipotriol ointment bid. It was applied every fourth day on the same body area, which measured from 18% to 27% of the total body surface. Significant improvement of erythema and scaling was noted two weeks after the beginning of the treatment, with nearly total remission one week later, when the treatment was suspended. Remission lasted three to four weeks, when a few lesions of ILC appeared on his trunk and limbs and the treatment began again. The patient responded well each time he was treated. No adverse effects, suggestive of hypercalcemia or nephrocalcinosis, were noted during the treatment period which lasted for nine months. To evaluate calcipotriol's long-term efficacy and safety it should be tested on a larger group of patients with NS. PMID:15197002

  16. Acute renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D J; Sherman, W H; Osserman, E F; Appel, G B

    1984-02-01

    In the past, patients with multiple myeloma and acute renal failure have had a poor prognosis. Few patients recovered renal function and fewer still survived for prolonged time periods. This report describes the course of 10 patients with multiple myeloma and true acute renal failure treated during the decade 1970 to 1980, and reviews recent reports concerning this association. The use of radiographic contrast agents is no longer the primary predisposing factor to acute renal failure in the myeloma population. Rather, infection, hypercalcemia, and dehydration in the presence of light chain excretion are the major conditions precipitating the renal failure. Despite severe renal failure requiring dialysis, many patients may regain good renal function. Factors associated with a good or poor prognosis in this population are reviewed. The prognosis in patients with myeloma and acute renal failure has greatly improved in recent years, and prolonged survival may occur. PMID:6695948

  17. The role of RANK-ligand inhibition in cancer: the story of denosumab.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Daniel; Sepulveda, Juan Manuel; García-Escobar, Ignacio; Rodriguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Sundlöv, Anna; Cortes-Funes, Hernán

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of bone metastases is an event with certain consequences for the patient. They often mean pain and can also mean pathological fractures, hypercalcemia, and spinal cord compression, all synonymous with a diminished quality of life and often also hospitalization. Since the advent of the intravenous bisphosphonates, things began to look a bit brighter for patients with bone metastases-bone destruction was kept at bay a little longer. The next generation of bone metastasis treatments is well on its way in clinical development, and among them, the most advanced drug is denosumab. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits osteoclast maturation, activation, and function by binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand, with the final result being a reduced rate of bone resorption. In this review, we give an overview of relevant preclinical and clinical data regarding the use of denosumab in patients with solid tumors in general and prostate cancer in particular. PMID:21285392

  18. The multifaceted actions of PTHrP in skeletal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Soki, Fabiana N; Park, Serk In; McCauley, Laurie K

    2012-01-01

    PTHrP, identified during the elucidation of mediators of malignancy-induced hypercalcemia, plays numerous roles in normal physiology as well as pathological conditions. Recent data support direct functions of PTHrP in metastasis, particularly from tumors with strong bone tropism. Bone provides a unique metastatic environment because of mineralization and the diverse cell populations in the bone marrow. PTHrP is a key regulator of tumor–bone interactions and regulates cells in the bone microenvironment through proliferative and prosurvival activities that prime the ‘seed’ and the ‘soil’ of the metastatic lesion. This review highlights recent findings regarding the role of PTHrP in skeletal metastasis, including direct actions in tumor cells, as well as alterations in the bone microenvironment and future perspectives involving the potential roles of PTHrP in the premetastatic niche, and tumor dormancy. PMID:22830401

  19. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  20. Thallium-technetium parathyroid scan. A useful noninvasive technique for localization of abnormal parathyroid tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Manni, A.; Basarab, R.M.; Plourde, P.V.; Koivunen, D.; Harrison, T.S.; Santen, R.J.

    1986-06-01

    We studied the usefulness of the thallium-technetium scan in 60 patients with suspected parathyroid disorders. The scan correctly localized abnormal parathyroid tissue in 82% of patients with surgically proved primary hyperparathyroidism due to a single adenoma and in 60% of patients operated on for primary hyperplasia. The scan was particularly useful in patients who had undergone previous neck explorations, since it successfully identified residual adenomatous or hyperplastic tissue in six of seven patients. False-positive images were consistently produced in all patients with coexisting thyroid disease. We conclude that the thallium-technetium scan is useful for localizing abnormal parathyroid tissue. We recommend its routine use in patients with persistent or recurrent hypercalcemia following neck exploration for primary hyperparathyroidism who have no evidence of thyroid disorders.

  1. Enhancement of the antiparakeratotic potency of calcitriol and tacalcitol in liposomal preparations in the mouse tail test.

    PubMed

    Körbel, J N; Sebök, B; Kerényi, M; Mahrle, G

    2001-01-01

    In order to test the advantage of vitamin D(3) preparations in liposomal form, calcitriol, the natural activated form of vitamin D(3), and tacalcitol, a vitamin D(3) analogue, were employed in various concentrations and using different vehicles in the mouse tail test, an animal model for testing the antiparakeratotic efficacy of topical medications. The optimal concentration in petrolatum turned out to be similar to that in commercial preparations. The liposomal preparations were superior to those in petrolatum and to those in nonliposomal phospholipids. The antiparakeratotic potency (drug activity) of liposomal tacalcitol in a concentration of 2 microg/g was twice that of the commercial preparation with a higher concentration of 4 microg/g. These results suggest that the use of liposomal vitamin D(3) preparations can achieve a given antipsoriatic effect with a reduced concentration of the active substance thereby reducing the risk of skin irritation and of hypercalcemia. PMID:11586070

  2. Williams syndrome starts making sense

    SciTech Connect

    Ashkenas, J.

    1996-10-01

    1996 may be marked as a transitional year in the study of Williams syndrome (WS), when the causes of this complex condition and a practical way to investigate began to come into focus. WS presents a remarkable collection of symptoms that affect blood vessels, growth, intelligence, and behavior. WS commonly leads to infantile hypercalcemia, retardation of growth, prematurely wrinkled skin, supraventricular aortic stenosis (SVAS), and sensitivity to loud noise. Children with this condition are often mentally retarded, with distinctive {open_quotes}elfin{close_quotes} facial features, a hoarse voice, and an {open_quotes}engaging{close_quotes} personality. Their cognitive deficits may be minimal or profound but typically involve a specific pattern of strengths and weaknesses, with better-than-average face recognition but little ability to recognize how parts of patterns that they see fit into a whole. 36 refs.

  3. International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Statement for the Management, Treatment, and Supportive Care of Patients With Myeloma Not Eligible for Standard Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Larocca, Alessandra; Niesvizky, Ruben; Morgan, Gareth; Landgren, Ola; Hajek, Roman; Einsele, Hermann; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Richardson, Paul G.; Cavo, Michele; Spencer, Andrew; Stewart, A. Keith; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Lonial, Sagar; Sonneveld, Pieter; Durie, Brian G.M.; Moreau, Philippe; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide an update on recent advances in the management of patients with multiple myeloma who are not eligible for autologous stem-cell transplantation. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature on diagnostic criteria is provided, and treatment options and management of adverse events are summarized. Results Patients with symptomatic disease and organ damage (ie, hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, or bone lesions) require immediate treatment. The International Staging System and chromosomal abnormalities identify high- and standard-risk patients. Proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, corticosteroids, and alkylating agents are the most active agents. The presence of concomitant diseases, frailty, or disability should be assessed and, if present, treated with reduced-dose approaches. Bone disease, renal damage, hematologic toxicities, infections, thromboembolism, and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequent disabling events requiring prompt and active supportive care. Conclusion These recommendations will help clinicians ensure the most appropriate care for patients with myeloma in everyday clinical practice. PMID:24419113

  4. The science and practice of bone health in oncology: managing bone loss and metastasis in patients with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Allan; Uzzo, Robert; Amato, Robert J; Ellis, Georgiana K; Hakimian, Behrooz; Roodman, G David; Smith, Matthew R

    2009-10-01

    Cancer and its treatment can compromise bone health, leading to fracture, pain, loss of mobility, and hypercalcemia of malignancy. Bone metastasis occurs frequently in advanced prostate and breast cancers, and bony manifestations are commonplace in multiple myeloma. Osteoporosis and osteopenia may be consequences of androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, aromatase inhibition for breast cancer, or chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure. Osteoporotic bone loss and bone metastasis ultimately share a pathophysiologic pathway that stimulates bone resorption by increasing the formation and activity of osteoclasts. Important mediators of pathologic bone metabolism include substances produced by osteoblasts, such as RANKL, the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand, which spurs osteoclast differentiation from myeloid cells. Available therapies are targeted to various steps in cascade of bone metastasis. PMID:19878635

  5. PTHrP Gene Expression in Cancer: Do All Paths Lead to Ets?

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Virgile; Rosol, Thomas J.; Foley, John

    2010-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) came to the attention of the scientific community in the mid-1980s because of its association with the paraneoplastic syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. Recently, a crucial role for the peptide has been identified in the metastatic growth of cancer cells in bone. Efforts to understand the peptide’s role in these pathological processes have evolved into the study of PTHrP gene expression. Currently, regulation of the third PTHrP promoter is beginning to be understood in the context of activation of certain signaling pathways involved in the growth and progression of specific neoplasms. In addition, factors that modulate the entire PTHrP-transcriptional unit, as well as the stability of the mRNA, are being elucidated at the level of cis-acting sequences. PMID:16022632

  6. [Derangements of mineral metabolism associated with tumors].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    Bone as a hard tissue has several functions such as supporting our body and protecting internal organs. In addition, bone has a pivotal role in the regulation of circulatory mineral concentrations. Therefore, abnormal bone metabolism is sometimes accompanied by deranged serum calcium or phosphate levels as shown in patients with malignancy-associated hypercalcemia (MAH) or tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) . Parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, was cloned as a major humoral factor causing MAH. Similarly, fibroblast growth factor 23, FGF23, was identified as a causative factor for TIO. Therefore, MAH and TIO are not only important in clinical practice but also gave us deep insights into the mechanisms of mineral homeostasis, and bone and cartilage metabolism. PMID:25065866

  7. Metastatic ductal adenocarcinoma in a Western Hognose snake (Heterodon nasicus).

    PubMed

    Stern, Adam W; Velguth, Karen E; D'Agostino, Jennifer

    2010-06-01

    A 17-yr-old Western Hognose snake (Heterodon nasicus) presented with a prominent midcoelomic swelling. Surgical exploration revealed a large, multicystic, irregular, tan, and firm mass grossly effacing the splenopancreas. The mass was subsequently removed. Histologically, the mass was composed of tubules of columnar to flattened neoplastic cells with an abundant stroma and moderate cellular atypia consistent with a scirrhous adenocarcinoma, likely ductal in origin, given the location of the neoplastic mass. Bloodwork revealed anemia, monocytosis, marked hypercalcemia, and, postoperatively, persistent hyperglycemia. After postoperative recovery, the snake was diagnosed with iatrogenically induced diabetes mellitus and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Due to the inability to clinically control the diabetes mellitus and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and when additional palpable masses were noted, the snake was euthanatized. Necropsy and histopathologic examination confirmed metastasis of the previously removed adenocarcinoma to the liver, right kidney, and large intestine. PMID:20597225

  8. Urothelial Cancer With Occult Bone Marrow Metastases and Isolated Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Ajjai; Davis, Elizabeth; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Dhanasekaran, Saravana; Mehra, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer rarely presents clinically with a myelophthisic picture from diffuse bone marrow infiltration especially in the absence of detectable skeletal metastases. A 75-year old man presented with newly diagnosed urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pathology from transurethral resection of bladder tumor demonstrated muscle-invasive disease. Pre-therapy imaging including CT abdomen/pelvis, CXR and bone scan demonstrated liver lesions concerning for metastatic disease but no skeletal metastases. Labs were notable for isolated thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury prompting hospitalization. Hematologic work-up including bone marrow aspiration and biopsy revealed diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by urothelial cancer. The case illustrates the importance of fully investigating otherwise unexplained clinical findings in patients with clinically localized urothelial cancer prior to curative intent surgery. PMID:26793516

  9. Molecular regulation of osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Baron, Roland

    2006-06-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors that are primarily responsible for the degradation of mineralized bone during bone development, homeostasis and repair. In various skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy, tumor metastases and Paget's disease, bone resorption by osteoclasts exceeds bone formation by osteoblasts leading to decreased bone mass, skeletal fragility and bone fracture. The overall rate of osteoclastic bone resorption is regulated either at the level of differentiation of osteoclasts from their monocytic/macrophage precursor pool or through the regulation of key functional proteins whose specific activities in the mature osteoclast control its attachment, migration and resorption. Thus, reducing osteoclast numbers and/or decreasing the bone resorbing activity of osteoclasts are two common therapeutic approaches for the treatment of hyper-resorptive skeletal diseases. In this review, several of the key functional players involved in the regulation of osteoclast activity will be discussed. PMID:16951988

  10. Novel agents in the treatment of multiple myeloma: a review about the future.

    PubMed

    Naymagon, Leonard; Abdul-Hay, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disease that affects plasma cells and can lead to devastating clinical features such as anemia, lytic bone lesions, hypercalcemia, and renal disease. An enhanced understanding of MM disease mechanisms has led to new more targeted treatments. There is now a plethora of treatments available for MM. In this review article, our aim is to discuss many of the novel agents that are being studied or have recently been approved for the treatment of MM. These agents include the following: immunomodulators (pomalidomide), proteasome inhibitors (carfilzomib, marizomib, ixazomib, oprozomib), alkylating agents (bendamustine), AKT inhibitors (afuresertib), BTK inhibitors (ibrutinib), CDK inhibitors (dinaciclib), histone deacetylase inhibitors (panobinostat, rocilinostat, vorinostat), IL-6 inhibitors (siltuximab), kinesin spindle protein inhibitors (filanesib), monoclonal antibodies (daratumumab, elotuzumab, indatuximab, SAR650984), and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors. PMID:27363832