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Sample records for hypercompact stellar systems

  1. A Protostellar Jet Emanating from a Hypercompact H ii Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Contreras, Yanett; Dougados, Catherine; Cabrit, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    We present radio continuum observations of the high-mass young stellar object (HMYSO) G345.4938+01.4677 obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 5, 9, 17, and 19 GHz. These observations provide definite evidence that the outer and inner pairs of radio lobes consist of shock-ionized material being excited by an underlying collimated and fast protostellar jet emanating from a hypercompact H ii region. By comparing with images taken 6 years earlier at 5 and 9 GHz using the same telescope, we assess the proper motions (PMs) of the radio sources. The outer west and east lobes exhibit PMs of 64 ± 12 and 48 ± 13 mas yr‑1, indicating velocities projected in the plane of the sky and receding from G345.4938+01.4677 of 520 and 390 {\\text{km s}}-1, respectively. The internal radio lobes also display PM signals consistently receding from the HMYSO with magnitudes of 17 ± 11 and 35 ± 10 mas yr‑1 for the inner west and east lobes, respectively. The morphology of the outer west lobe is that of a detached bow shock. At 17 and 19 GHz, the outer east lobe displays an arcuate morphology also suggesting a bow shock. These results show that disk accretion and jet acceleration—possibly occurring in a very similar way compared with low-mass protostars—is taking place in G345.4938+01.4677 despite the presence of ionizing radiation and the associated hypercompact H ii region.

  2. Hiding in Plain Sight: Record-breaking Compact Stellar Systems in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Michael A.; Vo, Richard P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Choi, Jieun; Jennings, Zachary G.; Conroy, Charlie; Brodie, Jean P.; Foster, Caroline; Villaume, Alexa; Norris, Mark A.; Janz, Joachim; Forbes, Duncan A.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by the recent, serendipitous discovery of the densest known galaxy, M60-UCD1, we present two initial findings from a follow-up search, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Subaru/Suprime-Cam, and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and SOuthern Astrophysical Research (SOAR)/Goodman spectroscopy. The first object discovered, M59-UCD3, has a similar size to M60-UCD1 (half-light radius of rh ˜ 20 pc) but is 40% more luminous (MV ˜ -14.6), making it the new densest-known galaxy. The second, M85-HCC1, has a size like a typical globular cluster (GC; rh ˜ 1.8 pc) but is much more luminous (MV ˜ -12.5). This hypercompact cluster is by far the densest confirmed free-floating stellar system, and is equivalent to the densest known nuclear star clusters. From spectroscopy, we find that both objects are relatively young (˜9 and ˜3 Gyr, respectively), with metal-abundances that resemble those of galaxy centers. Their host galaxies show clear signs of large-scale disturbances, and we conclude that these dense objects are the remnant nuclei of recently accreted galaxies. M59-UCD3 is an ideal target for follow-up with high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy to search for an overweight central supermassive black hole as was discovered in M60-UCD1. These findings also emphasize the potential value of ultra-compact dwarfs and massive GCs as tracers of the assembly histories of galaxies.

  3. Geoscience laser altimeter system - stellar reference system

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, Pamela S.; Sirota, J. Marcos

    1998-01-15

    GLAS is an EOS space-based laser altimeter being developed to profile the height of the Earth's ice sheets with {approx}15 cm single shot accuracy from space under NASA's Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE). The primary science goal of GLAS is to determine if the ice sheets are increasing or diminishing for climate change modeling. This is achieved by measuring the ice sheet heights over Greenland and Antarctica to 1.5 cm/yr over 100 kmx100 km areas by crossover analysis (Zwally 1994). This measurement performance requires the instrument to determine the pointing of the laser beam to {approx}5 urad (1 arcsecond), 1-sigma, with respect to the inertial reference frame. The GLAS design incorporates a stellar reference system (SRS) to relate the laser beam pointing angle to the star field with this accuracy. This is the first time a spaceborne laser altimeter is measuring pointing to such high accuracy. The design for the stellar reference system combines an attitude determination system (ADS) with a laser reference system (LRS) to meet this requirement. The SRS approach and expected performance are described in this paper.

  4. Equilibrium stellar systems with genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gularte, E.; Carpintero, D. D.

    In 1979, M Schwarzschild showed that it is possible to build an equilibrium triaxial stellar system. However, the linear programmation used to that goal was not able to determine the uniqueness of the solution, nor even if that solution was the optimum one. Genetic algorithms are ideal tools to find a solution to this problem. In this work, we use a genetic algorithm to reproduce an equilibrium spherical stellar system from a suitable set of predefined orbits, obtaining the best solution attainable with the provided set. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  5. Stellar tracking attitude reference system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klestadt, B.

    1974-01-01

    A satellite precision attitude control system was designed, based on the use of STARS as the principal sensing system. The entire system was analyzed and simulated in detail, considering the nonideal properties of the control and sensing components and realistic spacecraft mass properties. Experimental results were used to improve the star tracker noise model. The results of the simulation indicate that STARS performs in general as predicted in a realistic application and should be a strong contender in most precision earth pointing applications.

  6. Theoretical Astrophysics - Volume 2, Stars and Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2001-07-01

    Preface; 1. Overview: stars and stellar systems; 2. Stellar structure; 3. Stellar evolution; 4. Supernova (Type II); 5. White dwarfs, neutron stars and blackholes; 6. Pulsars; 7. Binary stars and accretion; 8. Sun and the solar system; 9. Interstellar medium; 10. Globular clusters; References; Index.

  7. Alfven Wave Propagation in Young Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humienny, Ray; Fatuzzo, Marco

    Young stellar systems have disks that are threaded by magnetic field lines with an hourglass geometry. These fields funnel ionizing cosmic rays (CRs) into the system. However, the effect is offset by magnetic mirroring. An previous analysis considered how the presence of magnetic turbulence moving outward from the disk would effect the propagation of cosmic-rays, and in turn, change the cosmic-ray ionization fraction occurring within the disk. This work indicated that turbulence reduces the overall flux of cosmic-rays at the disk, which has important consequences for both chemical processes and planet formation that occur within these environments. However, the analysis assumed ideal MHD condition in which the gas is perfectly coupled to the magnetic field. We explore here the validity of this assumption by solving the full equations governing the motion of both ions and neutral within the system.

  8. Stellar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation.' As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules.' The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly-ionized oxygen atoms.

  9. Exploring the Solar System with Stellar Occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Dunham, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    By recording the light intensity as a function of time when a planet occults a relatively bright star, the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of the planet can be probed. The main feature of stellar occultation observations is their high spatial resolution, typically several thousand times better than the resolution achievable with ground-based imaging. Five stellar occultations have been observed. The main results of these observations are summarized. Stellar occultations have been observed on Uranus, Mars, Pallas, Neptune and the Jovian Ring.

  10. Dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2004-10-01

    The research presented in this thesis comprises a theoretical study of several aspects relating to the dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems such as globular clusters. First, I present the results of a study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our Monte-Carlo code. Heavy objects, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes, exhibit behavior that is in quantitative agreement with simple analytical arguments. Light objects, which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, are predominantly lost from the cluster, as expected from simple analytical arguments, but may remain in the halo in larger numbers than expected. Using a recent null detection of planetary-mass microlensing events in M22, I find an upper limit of ˜25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the form of very low-mass objects. Turning to more realistic clusters, I present a study of the evolution of clusters containing primordial binaries, based on an enhanced version of the Monte-Carlo code that treats binary interactions via cross sections and analytical prescriptions. All models exhibit a long-lived “binary burning” phase lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of the models during this phase match well those of most observed Galactic globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. The results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is delayed sufficiently that the cluster will undergo complete tidal disruption before core collapse. Moving a step beyond analytical prescriptions, I

  11. Stellar Occultation Studies of the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Earth-based observations of stellar occultations provide extremely high spatial resolution for bodies in the outer solar system, about 10,000 times better than that of traditional imaging observations. Stellar occultation data can be used to establish the structure of atmospheres and rings of solar system bodies at high spatial resolution. Airborne occultation observations are particularly effective, since the controlled mobility of the observing platform allows the observer to fly within the optimum part of the occultation shadow for most events that are visible from Earth. Airborne observations are carried out above any clouds and are nearly free of scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere. KAO occultation observations resulted in the first detection of gravity waves in the Martian atmosphere, discovery of the Uranian rings, the first detection of Pluto's atmosphere, the first Earth-based investigations of Triton's atmosphere, and the discovery of narrow jets from Chiron's nucleus. The first SOFIA occultation opportunity will be an investigation of Pluto's atmospheric structure in November, 2002, and will resolve a problem that has lingered since the KAO discovery observation fourteen years earlier. We plan to continue our successful airborne occultation program with the greatly enhanced capability provided by SOFIA. We propose here to replace our KAO occultation photometer with one having twice the throughput, half the noise, a somewhat wider wavelength range, four times the field of view, and ten times the frame rate to optimize its performance and to capitalize on the larger collecting area offered by SOFIA. It will also allow for simultaneous visible and IR occultation observations, greatly enriching the results that we can obtain from occultations. We call this new imaging occultation photometer HOPI (High-speed Occultation Photometer and Imager). HOPI will provide a signal-to-noise ratio two to four times that of our present photometer for a given

  12. LOW STELLAR OBLIQUITIES IN COMPACT MULTIPLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.

    2013-07-01

    We measure the sky-projected stellar obliquities ({lambda}) in the multiple-transiting planetary systems KOI-94 and Kepler-25, using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. In both cases, the host stars are well aligned with the orbital planes of the planets. For KOI-94 we find {lambda} = -11 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign , confirming a recent result by Hirano and coworkers. Kepler-25 was a more challenging case, because the transit depth is unusually small (0.13%). To obtain the obliquity, it was necessary to use prior knowledge of the star's projected rotation rate and apply two different analysis methods to independent wavelength regions of the spectra. The two methods gave consistent results, {lambda} = 7 Degree-Sign {+-} 8 Degree-Sign and -0. Degree-Sign 5 {+-} 5. Degree-Sign 7. There are now a total of five obliquity measurements for host stars of systems of multiple-transiting planets, all of which are consistent with spin-orbit alignment. This alignment is unlikely to be the result of tidal interactions because of the relatively large orbital distances and low planetary masses in the systems. In this respect, the multiplanet host stars differ from hot-Jupiter host stars, which commonly have large spin-orbit misalignments whenever tidal interactions are weak. In particular, the weak-tide subset of hot-Jupiter hosts has obliquities consistent with an isotropic distribution (p = 0.6), but the multiplanet hosts are incompatible with such a distribution (p {approx} 10{sup -6}). This suggests that high obliquities are confined to hot-Jupiter systems, and provides further evidence that hot-Jupiter formation involves processes that tilt the planetary orbit.

  13. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  14. Two Suns in The Sky: Stellar Multiplicity in Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Mason, B. D.; Subasavage, J. P.; Jao, W. C.; Beaulieu, T. D.; Hambly, N. C.

    2005-12-01

    We present results of a reconnaissance for stellar companions to all 131 radial-velocity-detected candidate extrasolar planetary systems known as of July 1, 2005. Common proper motion (CPM) companions were investigated using the multi-epoch STScI Digitized Sky Surveys (DSS), and confirmed by matching the trigonometric parallax distances of the primaries to companion distances estimated photometrically using SuperCOSMOS plate, CCD optical and 2MASS infrared photometry. We evaluate whether the ``companions" listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) are gravitationally bound to the primary or coincidental alignments in the sky. We also attempt to confirm or refute companions listed in the Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS), Hipparcos, and Duquennoy & Mayor, 1991. Our findings indicate that a lower limit of 29 (22%) of the 131 exoplanet systems have stellar companions, and an additional 7 (5%) have candidate companions. We report a previously unknown stellar companion to planet host HD 38529, and identify a companion candidate to HD 188015. We confirm 16 previously reported stellar companions to exoplanet hosts, and report 8 additional companions --- these are known stellar companions, but previously not recognized to be in exoplanet systems. In addition, we have confirmed the gravitational connection for a WDS entry for HD 222582. We have also found evidence for 20 entries in WDS that are not gravitationally bound companions --- they do not show any related proper motion in the DSS plates. At least three, and possibly five of the exoplanet systems are contained within triple star systems, and of these, HD 38529 may have a fourth stellar companion as well. Two of the exoplanet systems contain white dwarf companions. These results indicate that solar systems are found in a variety of stellar multiplicity environments -- singles, binaries, triples, and possibly quadruples; and that planets survive post-main-sequence evolution of companion stars.

  15. The AIMSS Project - III. The stellar populations of compact stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, Joachim; Norris, Mark A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Huxor, Avon; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Frank, Matthias J.; Escudero, Carlos G.; Faifer, Favio R.; Forte, Juan Carlos; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Maraston, Claudia; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Thompson, Bradley R.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, a growing zoo of compact stellar systems (CSSs) have been found whose physical properties (mass, size, velocity dispersion) place them between classical globular clusters (GCs) and true galaxies, leading to debates about their nature. Here we present results using a so far underutilized discriminant, their stellar population properties. Based on new spectroscopy from 8-10m telescopes, we derive ages, metallicities, and [α/Fe] of 29 CSSs. These range from GCs with sizes of merely a few parsec to compact ellipticals (cEs) larger than M32. Together with a literature compilation, this provides a panoramic view of the stellar population characteristics of early-type systems. We find that the CSSs are predominantly more metal rich than typical galaxies at the same stellar mass. At high mass, the cEs depart from the mass-metallicity relation of massive early-type galaxies, which forms a continuous sequence with dwarf galaxies. At lower mass, the metallicity distribution of ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs) changes at a few times 107 M⊙, which roughly coincides with the mass where luminosity function arguments previously suggested the GC population ends. The highest metallicities in CSSs are paralleled only by those of dwarf galaxy nuclei and the central parts of massive early types. These findings can be interpreted as CSSs previously being more massive and undergoing tidal interactions to obtain their current mass and compact size. Such an interpretation is supported by CSSs with direct evidence for tidal stripping, and by an examination of the CSS internal escape velocities.

  16. Kinetic theory of spatially inhomogeneous stellar systems without collective effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, P.-H.

    2013-08-01

    We review and complete the kinetic theory of spatially inhomogeneous stellar systems when collective effects (dressing of the stars by their polarization cloud) are neglected. We start from the BBGKY hierarchy issued from the Liouville equation and consider an expansion in powers of 1/N in a proper thermodynamic limit. For N → +∞, we obtain the Vlasov equation describing the evolution of collisionless stellar systems like elliptical galaxies. This corresponds to the mean field approximation. At the order 1/N, we obtain a kinetic equation describing the evolution of collisional stellar systems like globular clusters. This corresponds to the weak coupling approximation. This equation coincides with the generalized Landau equation derived from a more abstract projection operator formalism. This equation does not suffer logarithmic divergences at large scales since spatial inhomogeneity is explicitly taken into account. Making a local approximation, and introducing an upper cut-off at the Jeans length, it reduces to the Vlasov-Landau equation which is the standard kinetic equation of stellar systems. Our approach provides a simple and pedagogical derivation of these important equations from the BBGKY hierarchy which is more rigorous for systems with long-range interactions than the two-body encounters theory. Making an adiabatic approximation, we write the generalized Landau equation in angle-action variables and obtain a Landau-type kinetic equation that is valid for fully inhomogeneous stellar systems and is free of divergences at large scales. This equation is less general than the recently derived Lenard-Balescu-type kinetic equation since it neglects collective effects, but it is substantially simpler and could be useful as a first step. We discuss the evolution of the system as a whole and the relaxation of a test star in a bath of field stars. We derive the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation in angle-action variables and provide expressions for the

  17. Determination of stellar parameters using binary system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blay, Georgina; Lovekin, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    Stellar parameters can be constrained more tightly with binary systems than can typically be done with single stars. We used a freely available binary fitting code to determine the best fitting parameters of a collection of potential eclipsing binary systems observed with the Kepler satellite. These model fits constrain the mass ratio, radii ratio, surface brightness ratio, and the orbital inclination of both stars in the binary system. The frequencies of these pulsations can then be determined and used to constrain asteroseismic models.

  18. Models of cuspy triaxial stellar systems - IV. Rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpintero, D. D.; Muzzio, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    We built two self-consistent models of triaxial, cuspy, rotating stellar systems adding rotation to non-rotating models presented in previous papers of this series. The final angular velocity of the material is not constant and varies with the distance to the centre and with the height over the equator of the systems, but the figure rotation is very uniform in both cases. Even though the addition of rotation to the models modifies their original semi-axes ratios, the final rotating models are considerably flattened and triaxial. An analysis of the orbital content of the models shows that about two-thirds of their orbits are chaotic yet the models are very stable over intervals of the order of one Hubble time. The bulk of regular orbits are short-axis tubes, while long-axis tubes are replaced by tubes whose axes lie on the short-long axes plane, but do not coincide with the major axis. Other types of regular orbits that do not appear in non-rotating systems, like horseshoes and orbits that cross themselves, are also found in the present models. Finally, our frequency maps show empty regions where studies of orbits on fixed potentials found orbits, a likely consequence of the self-consistency of our models that excludes them.

  19. Particle simulation of plasmas and stellar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Clark, A.; Craddock, G.G.; Gilden, D.L.; Leung, W.K.; Li, Y.M.; Robertson, J.A.; Saltzman, B.J.

    1985-04-01

    A computational technique is introduced which allows the student and researcher an opportunity to observe the physical behavior of a class of many-body systems. A series of examples is offered which illustrates the diversity of problems that may be studied using particle simulation. These simulations were in fact assigned as homework in a course on computational physics.

  20. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN STELLAR SYSTEMS: 'QUIESCENT' ACCRETION AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Volonteri, M.; Campbell, D.; Mateo, M.; Dotti, M.

    2011-04-01

    Only a small fraction of local galaxies harbor an accreting black hole, classified as an active galactic nucleus. However, many stellar systems are plausibly expected to host black holes, from globular clusters to nuclear star clusters, to massive galaxies. The mere presence of stars in the vicinity of a black hole provides a source of fuel via mass loss of evolved stars. In this paper, we assess the expected luminosities of black holes embedded in stellar systems of different sizes and properties, spanning a large range of masses. We model the distribution of stars and derive the amount of gas available to a central black hole through a geometrical model. We estimate the luminosity of the black holes under simple, but physically grounded, assumptions on the accretion flow. Finally, we discuss the detectability of 'quiescent' black holes in the local universe.

  1. Bottlenecks in simulations of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Junichiro; Hut, Piet

    1990-12-01

    The efficiency of different algorithms for treating the formation and evolution of binaries, as well as higher-order multiple systems, in the context of N-body calculations is discussed. How the calculational cost of binaries can be estimated is addressed, and how the ratio of the calculational cost of binaries to the total calculational cost scales with the total number of stars N is examined. It is found that the cost of binaries becomes negligible for large N. Empirical results obtained for N between 100 and 3000 show reasonable agreement with the theoretical considerations. The possibility of treating close encounters between stars using fully self-consistent three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations is discussed.

  2. Breadboard stellar tracker system test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollodge, J. C.; Parrish, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    BASD has, in the past, developed several unique position tracking algorithms for charge transfer device (CTD) sensors. These algorithms provide an interpixel transfer function with the following characteristics: (1) high linearity; (2) simplified track logic; (3) high gain; and (4) high noise rejection. A previous test program using the GE charge injection device (CID) showed that accuracy for BASD's breadboard was limited to approximately 2% of a pixel (1 sigma) whereas analysis and simulation indicated the limit should be less than 0.5% of a pixel, assuming the limit to be detector response and dark current noise. The test program was conducted under NASA contract No. NAS8-34263. The test approach for that program did not provide sufficient data to identify the sources of error and left open the amount of contribution from parameters such as image distribution, geometric distortion and system alignment errors.

  3. Equilibrium stellar systems with spindle singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium sequences of axisymmetric Newtonian clusters that tend toward singular states are constructed. The distribution functions are chosen to be of the form f = f(E, Jz). The numerical method then determines the density and gravitational potential self-consistently to satisfy Poisson's equation. For the prolate models, spindle singularities arise from the depletion of angular momentum near the symmetry axis. While the resulting density enhancement is confined to the region near the axis, the influence of the spindle extends much further out through its tidal gravitational field. Centrally condensed prolate clusters may contain strong-field regions even though the spindle mass is small and the mean cluster eccentricity is not extreme. While the calculations performed here are entirely Newtonian, the issue of singularities is an important topic in general relativity. Equilibrium solutions for relativistic star clusters can provide a testing ground for exploring this issue. The methods used in this paper for building nonspherical clusters can be extended to relativistic systems.

  4. Observational dynamics of low-mass stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M. J.

    The last fifteen years have seen the discovery of new types of low-mass stellar systems that bridge the gap between the once well-separated regimes of galaxies and of star clusters. Whether such objects are considered galaxies depends also on the definition of the term ``galaxy'', and several possible criteria are based on their internal dynamics (e.g. the common concept that galaxies contain dark matter). Moreover, studying the internal dynamics of low-mass stellar systems may also help understand their origin and evolutionary history. The focus of this paper is on two classes of stellar systems at the interface between star clusters and dwarf galaxies: ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) and diffuse Galactic globular clusters (GCs). A review of our current knowledge on the properties of UCDs is provided and dynamical considerations applying to diffuse GCs are introduced. In the following, recent observational results on the internal dynamics of individual UCDs and diffuse Galactic globular clusters are presented. Partly based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Observing Programmes 078.B-0496(B) and 081.B-0282). Doctoral Thesis Award Lecture 2013

  5. On the universal stellar law for extrasolar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we consider a statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies to derive and develop an universal stellar law for extrasolar systems. Previously, it has been proposed the statistical theory for a cosmogonic body forming (so-called spheroidal body). The proposed theory starts from the conception for forming a spheroidal body inside a gas-dust protoplanetary nebula; it permits us to derive the form of distribution functions, mass density, gravitational potentials and strengths both for immovable and rotating spheroidal bodies as well as to find the distribution function of specific angular momentum. If we start from the conception for forming a spheroidal body as a protostar (in particular, proto-Sun) inside a prestellar (presolar) nebula then the derived distribution functions of particle as well as the mass density of an immovable spheroidal body characterize the first stage of evolution: from a prestellar molecular cloud (the presolar nebula) to a forming core or a protostar (the proto-Sun) together with its shell as a stellar nebula (the solar nebula). This paper derives the equation of state of an ideal stellar substance based on conception of gravitating spheroidal body. Using this equation we obtain the universal stellar law (USL) for the planetary systems connecting temperature, size and mass of each of stars. This work also considers the solar corona in the connection with USL. Then it is accounting under calculation of the ratio of temperature of the solar corona to effective temperature of the Sun' surface and modification of USL. To test justice of the modified USL for different types of stars, temperature of the stellar corona is estimated. The prediction of parameters of stars is carrying out by means of the modified USL as well as the known Hertzsprung-Russell's dependence is derived from USL directly. This paper also shows that knowledge of some characteristics for multi-planet extrasolar systems refines own parameters of stars. In

  6. Photodynamical modeling of hierarchical stellar system KOI-126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, Nicholas Michael

    The power and precision of the Kepler space telescope has provided the astrophysical field with a valuable insight into the dynamics of extra-solar systems. KOI-126 represents the first eclipsing hierarchical triple stellar system identified in the Kepler mission's photometry. The dynamics of the system are such that ascertaining the parameters of each body accurately (better than a few percent) is possible from the photometry alone. This allows determination of the characteristics while avoiding biases inherent in traditional studies of low-mass eclipsing systems. The parameter set for KOI-126 was originally reported on by Carter et al. and is uniquely composed of a low-mass binary, KOI-126 B and KOI-126 C. This pair orbits a third, more massive star KOI-126 A. The original analysis employed a full dynamical-photometric model, utilizing a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and least-squares minimization, to fit the short-cadence (i.e. successive 58.84 second cadence exposures) photometric data from the Kepler spacecraft captured over a period of 247 days. The updated catalog of short-cadence data now covers a span of 1,300 days. In light of the new data, and the valuable contribution accurately sampled fully-convective stars offer to theoretical stellar models, it is therefore relevant to refine the parameters of this system. Furthermore, with the ubiquity of multi-stellar systems, a well documented, portable, scalable computer modeling code for N-body systems is introduced. Thus, a new analysis is done on KOI-126 using this parallelized dynamical-photometric modeling package written in Python, based on Carter et al.'s original code, titled Pynamic. Pynamic allows the use of several fitting algorithms, but in this analysis utilizes the affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo ensemble.

  7. Black holes in binary stellar systems and galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    In the last 40 years, following pioneering papers by Ya B Zeldovich and E E Salpeter, in which a powerful energy release from nonspherical accretion of matter onto a black hole (BH) was predicted, many observational studies of black holes in the Universe have been carried out. To date, the masses of several dozen stellar-mass black holes (M_BH = (4{-}20) M_\\odot) in X-ray binary systems and of several hundred supermassive black holes (M_BH = (10^{6}{-}10^{10}) M_\\odot) in galactic nuclei have been measured. The estimated radii of these massive and compact objects do not exceed several gravitational radii. For about ten stellar-mass black holes and several dozen supermassive black holes, the values of the dimensionless angular momentum a_* have been estimated, which, in agreement with theoretical predictions, do not exceed the limiting value a_* = 0.998. A new field of astrophysics, so-called black hole demography, which studies the birth and growth of black holes and their evolutionary connection to other objects in the Universe, namely stars, galaxies, etc., is rapidly developing. In addition to supermassive black holes, massive stellar clusters are observed in galactic nuclei, and their evolution is distinct from that of supermassive black holes. The evolutionary relations between supermassive black holes in galactic centers and spheroidal stellar components (bulges) of galaxies, as well as dark-matter galactic haloes are brought out. The launch into Earth's orbit of the space radio interferometer RadioAstron opened up the real possibility of finally proving that numerous discovered massive and highly compact objects with properties very similar to those of black holes make up real black holes in the sense of Albert Einstein's General Relativity. Similar proofs of the existence of black holes in the Universe can be obtained by intercontinental radio interferometry at short wavelengths \\lambda \\lesssim 1 mm (the international program, Event Horizon Telescope).

  8. Parametric systems analysis of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.; Krakowski, R. A.; Bathke, C. G.

    1982-05-01

    The close coupling in the stellarator/torsatron/heliotron (S/T/H) between coil design, magnetics topology, and plasma performance complicates the reactor assessment more so than for most magnetic confinement systems. To provide an additional degree of resolution of this problem for the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR), a parametric systems model was applied. This model reduces key issues associated with plasma performance, first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S), and coil design to a simple relationship between beta, system geometry, and a number of indicators of overall plant performance. The results are used to guide more detailed, multidimensional plasma, magnetics, and coil design efforts towards technically and economically viable operating regimes. It is shown that beta values 0.08 may be needed if the MSR approach is to be substantially competitive with other approaches to magnetic fusion in terms of system power density, mass utilization, and cost for total power output around 4.0 GWt; lower powers will require even higher betas.

  9. Peculiar compact stellar systems in the Fornax cluster★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Carolin; Lisker, Thorsten; Pasquali, Anna; Hilker, Michael; Grebel, Eva K.

    2016-04-01

    We search for hints to the origin and nature of compact stellar systems in the magnitude range of ultra-compact dwarf galaxies in deep wide-field imaging data of the Fornax cluster core. We visually investigate a large sample of 355 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members with V-band equivalent magnitudes brighter than -10 mag for faint extended structures. Our data reveal peculiar compact stellar systems, which appear asymmetric or elongated from their outer light distribution. We characterize the structure of our objects by quantifying their core concentration, as well as their outer asymmetry and ellipticity. For the brighter objects of our sample we also investigate their spatial and phase-space distribution within the cluster. We argue that the distorted outer structure alone that is seen for some of our objects, is not sufficient to decide whether these systems have a star cluster or a galaxy origin. However, we find that objects with low core concentration and high asymmetry (or high ellipticity) are primarily located at larger cluster-centric distances as compared to the entire sample. This supports the hypothesis that at least some of these objects may originate from tidally stripped galaxies.

  10. Peculiar compact stellar systems in the Fornax cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Carolin; Lisker, Thorsten; Pasquali, Anna; Hilker, Michael; Grebel, Eva K.

    2016-07-01

    We search for hints to the origin and nature of compact stellar systems in the magnitude range of ultracompact dwarf galaxies in deep wide-field imaging data of the Fornax cluster core. We visually investigate a large sample of 355 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members with V-band equivalent magnitudes brighter than -10 mag for faint extended structures. Our data reveal peculiar compact stellar systems, which appear asymmetric or elongated from their outer light distribution. We characterize the structure of our objects by quantifying their core concentration, as well as their outer asymmetry and ellipticity. For the brighter objects of our sample we also investigate their spatial and phase-space distribution within the cluster. We argue that the distorted outer structure alone that is seen for some of our objects, is not sufficient to decide whether these systems have a star cluster or a galaxy origin. However, we find that objects with low core concentration and high asymmetry (or high ellipticity) are primarily located at larger cluster-centric distances as compared to the entire sample. This supports the hypothesis that at least some of these objects may originate from tidally stripped galaxies.

  11. C/O: Effects on Habitability of Stellar Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence V.; Sevin Peckmezci, Gül; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2015-11-01

    We assess how differences in the composition of exoplanet host stars might affect the availability of water in their systems, particularly the role of carbon and oxygen abundances. Water, one of the key chemical ingredients for habitability, may be in short supply in carbon-rich, oxygen-poor systems even if planets exist in the ‘habitable zone’. For the solar system, C/O = 0.55 is particularly important in determining the refractory (silicate and metal) to volatile ice ratio expected in material condensed beyond the snow line (Gaidos E. J. Icarus 145, 637, 2000; Wong M. H. et al. in Oxygen in the Solar System, G.J. MacPherson, Ed., 2008). Our analysis of published compositions for a set of exoplanet host stars (Johnson T. V. et al. ApJ. 757(2), 192, 2012) showed that the amount of condensed water ice in those systems might range from as much as 50% by mass for sub-solar C/O = 0.35 to less than a few percent for super-solar C/O = 0.7. A recent analysis using similar techniques (Pekmezci G. S., Dottorato di Ricerca in Astronomia, Università Degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, 2014) of a much larger stellar composition data set for 974 FGK stars (Petigura E. and Marcy G. Journal of Astrophysics 735, 2011), allows us to assess the possible range of water ice abundance in the circumstellar accretion disks of these ‘solar-type’ stars (of which 72 were known to have one or more planets as of 2011). Stellar C/O in a subset (457 stars) of this stellar database with reported C, O, Ni, and Fe abundances ranges from 0.3 to 1.4. The resulting computed water ice fractions and refractory (silicate + metal) fractions range from ~0 to 0.6 and 0.3 to 0.9 respectively. These results have implications for assessing the habitability of exoplanets since they constrain the amount of water available beyond the snow line for dynamical delivery to inner planets, depending on the host stars’ C/O in the circumstellar nebula. TVJ acknowledges government support at JPL

  12. Planet formation in multiple stellar systems: GG Tau A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Köhler, R.; Piétu, V.

    2014-12-01

    GG Tau is a hierarchical quadruple system of young, low-mass stars. Because of its well-studied bright circumbinary ring of dust and gas surrounding the main binary GG Tau A, it is a unique laboratory to study planet formation in the disturbed environment of binary/multiple stellar systems. We have started a large observing program of GG Tau A that combines several high-resolution instruments in a multi-wavelength approach. We have recently reported the detection of a new low-mass companion in GG Tau A that turns out to itself be a triple system. This discovery was possible thanks to the very high angular resolution of the near-IR instrument PIONIER on the VLT interferometer, and was confirmed with sub-aperture masking techniques on VLT/NaCo. The detected close binary GG Tau Ab (ρ = 0.032'', or about 5 AU) provides a natural explanation for two enigmas: the discrepancy between the dynamical mass and the spectral type estimates in GG Tau A, and the absence of dust thermal emission in the vicinity of the Ab component. GRAVITY will provide the adequate angular resolution to complete the astrometric characterization of the close binary in the next 10 years. With now 5 coeval low-mass stars, GG Tau is an ideal laboratory to calibrate stellar evolution tracks at young ages (few Myr). Beyond this peculiar system, GRAVITY also has a strong potential to study the impact of multiplicity on the existence of disks, and in fine on planet formation mechanisms in multiple systems.

  13. N-body simulations of disks. [of stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.

    1975-01-01

    The methods used in large-scale n-body simulations are discussed. However, the present review concentrates on results already obtained in n-body simulations using systems containing up to 200,000 simulation stars. Results are presented which show that the stability criterion developed for flattened systems applies only to truly axisymmetric instabilities. Purely stellar disks acquire rather large velocity dispersions, generally two or more times the velocity dispersion required by Toomre (1964) for axisymmetric stability. In computer simulations, the bar-forming instability can be prevented only by comparatively large velocity dispersions. However, simulations including the effects of the galactic halo and core as a fixed background field show that bar formation can be prevented for fixed halo components as large or larger than the self-consistent disk component. Experiments performed to determine the collisional relaxation time for large-scale gravitational n-body calculations show that these models are indeed 'collisionless'.

  14. Initiating solar system formation through stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Myhill, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and other meteoritical components require nucleosynthesis in stellar interiors, condensation into dust grains in stellar envelopes, transport of the grains through the interstellar medium by stellar outflows, and finally injection of the grains into the presolar nebula. The proximity of the presolar cloud to these energetic stellar events suggests that a shock wave from a stellar outflow might have initiated the collapse of an otherwise stable presolar cloud. We have begun to study the interactions of stellar shock waves with thermally supported, dense molecular cloud cores, using a three spatial dimension (3D) radiative hydrodynamics code. Supernova shock waves have been shown by others to destroy quiescent clouds, so we are trying to determine if the much smaller shock speeds found in, e.g., asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star winds, are strong enough to initiate collapse in an otherwise stable, rotating, solar-mass cloud core, without leading to destruction of the cloud.

  15. EXPLOSIVE DISINTEGRATION OF A MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR SYSTEM IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Schmid-Burgk, Johannes; Menten, Karl M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2009-10-10

    Young massive stars in the center of crowded star clusters are expected to undergo close dynamical encounters that could lead to energetic, explosive events. However, there has so far never been clear observational evidence of such a remarkable phenomenon. We here report new interferometric observations that indicate the well-known enigmatic wide-angle outflow located in the Orion BN/KL star-forming region to have been produced by such a violent explosion during the disruption of a massive young stellar system, and that this was caused by a close dynamical interaction about 500 years ago. This outflow thus belongs to a totally different family of molecular flows that is not related to the classical bipolar flows that are generated by stars during their formation process. Our molecular data allow us to create a three-dimensional view of the debris flow and to link this directly to the well-known Orion H{sub 2} 'fingers' farther out.

  16. Explosive Disintegration of a Massive Young Stellar System in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Schmid-Burgk, Johannes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Menten, Karl M.

    2009-10-01

    Young massive stars in the center of crowded star clusters are expected to undergo close dynamical encounters that could lead to energetic, explosive events. However, there has so far never been clear observational evidence of such a remarkable phenomenon. We here report new interferometric observations that indicate the well-known enigmatic wide-angle outflow located in the Orion BN/KL star-forming region to have been produced by such a violent explosion during the disruption of a massive young stellar system, and that this was caused by a close dynamical interaction about 500 years ago. This outflow thus belongs to a totally different family of molecular flows that is not related to the classical bipolar flows that are generated by stars during their formation process. Our molecular data allow us to create a three-dimensional view of the debris flow and to link this directly to the well-known Orion H2 "fingers" farther out.

  17. Analysis of star-disk interaction in young stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, N. N. J.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Bouvier, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results of the study of star-disk interaction in the classical T Tauri star V354 Mon, a member of the young stellar cluster NGC 2264. As part of an international campaign of observation of NGC 2264 organized from December 2011 to February 2012, high resolution photometric and spectroscopic data of this object were obtained simultaneously with the Chandra, CoRoT and Spitzer satellites, and ground-based telescopes, as CFHT and VLT at ESO. The optical and infrared light curves of V354 Mon show periodic brightness minima that vary in depth and width every rotational cycle. We found evidence that the Hα emission line profile changes according to the period of photometric variations, indicating that the same phenomenon causes both modulations. Such a correlation between emission line variability and light curve modulation was also identified in a previous observational campaign on the same object, where we concluded that material non-uniformly distributed in the inner part of the disk is the main cause of the photometric modulation. This assumption is supported by the fact that the system is seen at high inclination. It is believed that this distortion of the inner part of the disk results from the dynamical interaction between the stellar magnetosphere, inclined with respect to the rotation axis, and the circumstellar disk, as also observed in the classical T Tauri star AA Tau, and predicted by magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations. A model of occultation by circumstellar material was applied to the photometric data in order to determine the parameters of the obscuring material during both observational campaigns, thus providing an investigation of its stability on a timescale of a few years.

  18. Analysis of star-disk interaction in young stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Nathalia N. J.; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2014-08-01

    We present preliminary results of the study of star-disk interaction in the classical T Tauri star V354 Mon, a member of the young stellar cluster NGC 2264. As part of an international campaign of observations of NGC 2264 organized from December 2011 to February 2012, high resolution photometric and spectroscopic data of this object were obtained simultaneously with the Chandra, CoRoT and Spitzer satellites, and ground-based telescopes, such as CFHT and ESO/VLT. The optical and infrared light curves of V354 Mon show periodic brightness minima that vary in depth and width every 5.21 days rotational cycle. We found evidence that the Hα emission line profile changes according to the period of photometric variations, indicating that the same phenomenon causes both modulations. Such correlation was also identified in a previous observational campaign on the same object, where we concluded that material non-uniformly distributed in the inner part of the disk is the main cause of the photometric modulation. This assumption is supported by the fact that the system is seen at high inclination. It is believed that this distortion of the inner part of the disk results from the dynamical interaction between the stellar magnetosphere, inclined with respect to the rotation axis, and the circumstellar disk, as also observed in the classical T Tauri star AA Tau, and predicted by magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations. A model of occultation by circumstellar material was applied to the photometric data in order to determine the parameters of the obscuring material during both observational campaigns, thus providing an investigation of its stability on a timescale of a few years. We also studied V422 Mon, a classical T Tauri star with photometric variations similar to those of V354 Mon at optical wavelengths, but with a distinct behavior in the infrared. The mechanism that produces such a difference is investigated, testing the predictions of magnetospheric accretion models.

  19. Analysis of Star-Disk Interaction in Young Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Nathalia; Alencar, Silvia; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2013-07-01

    We present the study of star-disk interaction in the classical T Tauri star V354 Mon, a member of the young stellar cluster NGC 2264. As part of an international campaign of observation of NGC 2264 organized from December 2011 to February 2012, high resolution photometric and spectroscopic data of this object were obtained simultaneously with the Chandra, CoRoT and Spitzer satellites, and ground-based telescopes, as CFHT and VLT/FLAMES at ESO. The optical and infrared light curves of V354 Mon show periodic brightness minima that vary in depth and width every rotational cycle. We found evidence that the H/alpha emission line profile changes according to the period of photometric variations, indicating that the same phenomenon causes both modulations. Such correlation was also identified in a previous observational campaign on the same object, where we concluded that material non-uniformly distributed in the inner part of the disk is the main cause of the photometric modulation. This assumption is supported by the fact that the system is seen at high inclination. It is believed that this distortion of the inner part of the disk results from the dynamical interaction between the stellar magnetosphere, inclined with respect to the rotation axis, and the circumstellar disk, as also observed in the classical T Tauri star AA Tau, and predicted by magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations. A model of occultation by circumstellar material was applied to the photometric data in order to determine the parameters of the obscuring material during both observational campaigns, thus providing an investigation of its stability on a timescale of a few years. We also studied V422 Mon, a classical T Tauri star with photometric variations similar to those of V354 Mon at optical wavelengths, but with a distinct behavior in the infrared. The mechanism that produces such difference is investigated, testing the predictions of magnetospheric accretion models.

  20. Truncated γ-exponential models for tidal stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Leyton, Y. J.; Velazquez, L.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a parametric family of models to characterize the properties of astrophysical systems in a quasi-stationary evolution under the incidence evaporation. We start from an one-particle distribution fγ (q, p|β,ɛs) that considers an appropriate deformation of Maxwell-Boltzmann form with inverse temperature β, in particular, a power-law truncation at the scape energy ɛs with exponent γ > 0. This deformation is implemented using a generalized γ-exponential function obtained from the fractional integration of ordinary exponential. As shown in this work, this proposal generalizes models of tidal stellar systems that predict particles distributions with isothermal cores and polytropic haloes, e.g.: Michie-King models. We perform the analysis of thermodynamic features of these models and their associated distribution profiles. A nontrivial consequence of this study is that profiles with isothermal cores and polytropic haloes are only obtained for low energies whenever deformation parameter γ < γc ≃ 2.13. This study is a first approximation to characterize a self- gravitating system, so we consider equal to all the particles that constitute the system.

  1. A millisecond pulsar in a stellar triple system.

    PubMed

    Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Archibald, A M; Hessels, J W T; Kaplan, D L; van Kerkwijk, M H; Boyles, J; Deller, A T; Chatterjee, S; Schechtman-Rook, A; Berndsen, A; Lynch, R S; Lorimer, D R; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Kondratiev, V I; McLaughlin, M A; van Leeuwen, J; Rosen, R; Roberts, M S E; Stovall, K

    2014-01-23

    Gravitationally bound three-body systems have been studied for hundreds of years and are common in our Galaxy. They show complex orbital interactions, which can constrain the compositions, masses and interior structures of the bodies and test theories of gravity, if sufficiently precise measurements are available. A triple system containing a radio pulsar could provide such measurements, but the only previously known such system, PSR B1620-26 (refs 7, 8; with a millisecond pulsar, a white dwarf, and a planetary-mass object in an orbit of several decades), shows only weak interactions. Here we report precision timing and multiwavelength observations of PSR J0337+1715, a millisecond pulsar in a hierarchical triple system with two other stars. Strong gravitational interactions are apparent and provide the masses of the pulsar M[Symbol: see text](1.4378(13), where M[Symbol: see text]is the solar mass and the parentheses contain the uncertainty in the final decimal places) and the two white dwarf companions (0.19751(15)M[Symbol: see text] and 0.4101(3))M[Symbol: see text], as well as the inclinations of the orbits (both about 39.2°). The unexpectedly coplanar and nearly circular orbits indicate a complex and exotic evolutionary past that differs from those of known stellar systems. The gravitational field of the outer white dwarf strongly accelerates the inner binary containing the neutron star, and the system will thus provide an ideal laboratory in which to test the strong equivalence principle of general relativity. PMID:24390352

  2. Close Stellar Binary Systems by Grazing Envelope Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2015-02-01

    I suggest a spiral-in process in which a stellar companion grazes the envelope of a giant star while both the orbital separation and the giant radius shrink simultaneously, forming a close binary system. The binary system might be viewed as evolving in a constant state of "just entering a common envelope (CE) phase." In cases where this process takes place, it can be an alternative to CE evolution where the secondary star is immersed in the giant's envelope. Grazing envelope evolution (GEE) is made possible only if the companion manages to accrete mass at a high rate and launches jets that remove the outskirts of the giant envelope, hence preventing the formation of a CE. The high accretion rate is made possible by the accretion disk launching jets which efficiently carry the excess angular momentum and energy from the accreted mass. The orbital decay itself is caused by the gravitational interaction of the secondary star with the envelope inward of its orbit, i.e., dynamical friction (gravitational tide). Mass loss through the second Lagrangian point can carry additional angular momentum and envelope mass. The GEE lasts for tens to hundreds of years. The high accretion rate, with peaks lasting from months to years, might lead to a bright object referred to as the intermediate luminosity optical transient (Red Novae; Red Transients). A bipolar nebula and/or equatorial ring are formed around the binary remnant.

  3. Stellar winds in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.; Vitello, P. A. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is thought that accretion from a strong stellar wind by a compact object may be responsible for the X-ray emission from binary systems containing a massive early-type primary. To investigate the effect of X-ray heating and ionization on the mass transfer process in systems of this type, an idealized model is constructed for the flow of a radiation-driven wind in the presence of an X-ray source of specified luminosity, L sub x. It is noted that for low values of L sub x, X-ray photoionization gives rise to additional ions having spectral lines with wavelengths situated near the peak of the primary continuum flux distribution. As a consequence, the radiation force acting on the gas increases in relation to its value in the absence of X-rays, and the wind is accelerated to higher velocities. As L sub x is increased, the degree of ionization of the wind increases, and the magnitude of the radiation force is diminished in comparison with the case in which L sub x = 0. This reduction leads at first to a decrease in the wind velocity and ultimately (for L sub x sufficiently large) to the termination of radiatively driven mass loss.

  4. The Cepheid in the eclipsing binary system OGLE-LMC-CEP1812 is a stellar merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, Hilding; Ignace, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Classical Cepheids and eclipsing binary systems are powerful probes for measuring stellar fundamental parameters and constraining stellar astrophysics. A Cepheid in an eclipsing binary system is even more powerful, constraining stellar physics, the distance scale and the Cepheid mass discrepancy. However, these systems are rare, only three have been discovered. One of these, OGLE-LMC-CEP1812, presents a new mystery: where the Cepheid component appears to be younger than its red giant companion. In this work, we present stellar evolution models and show that the Cepheid is actually product of a stellar merger during main sequence evolution that causes the Cepheid to be a rejuvenated star. This result raises new questions into the evolution of Cepheids and their connections to smaller-mass anomalous Cepheids.

  5. Orbital approach to studying the slow dynamics of stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyachenko, V. L.; Polyachenko, E. V.; Shukhman, I. G.

    2008-03-01

    We develop new approaches to the numerical simulations of slowly evolving stellar systems with characteristic times of the order of the precession period for a typical orbit. This period is assumed to be long compared to the characteristic oscillation periods of individual stars in their orbits. For such processes, the standard numerical simulations using various N-body methods become inadequate, since the bulk of the computational time is spent on the repeated calculations of almost invariable orbits. We suggest a new N-orbit approach (called so by analogy and by contrast with N-body methods) that takes into account the specifics of the problems under consideration, in which whole orbits take the place of individual stars in N-body methods. Accordingly, the stellar system is represented by a set of N orbits the changes in the spatial orientation and shape of which lead to a slow evolution of the system. We derive the equations governing the nonlinear dynamics of orbits separately for 2D (disk) and 3D systems. These equations have the form of Hamiltonian equations for canonically conjugate pairs of variables. In the 2D case, one pair of such equations will suffice: for the angular momentum L and for the angle of direction to the apocenter Ψ. In the 3D case, there are two such pairs. The first pair of equations is for the modulus of the angular momentum L and the angle of direction to the apocenter in the orbital plane Ψ, while the second pair is for L z (the component of the angular momentum vector L along the z axis) and the orientation angle of the line of nodes W. Together with the energy E, which is an adiabatic invariant, these two (or four) parameters completely define the orbit (in the 2D and 3D cases, respectively). The evolution of the system is traced by solving these equations within the framework of the suggested N-orbit approach. We have in mind two versions of this approach. In the first version, a separate orbit corresponds to each star along which

  6. Construction of models of rotating stars and stellar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervoort, P.O.; Welty, D.E.

    1981-09-01

    A new method is presented for the construction of the equilibrium configurations of rotating stars and stellar systems. A configuration is represented in a first approximation as stratified on similar and similarly situated ellipsoids. The stratification is determined by solving a spherically symmetric model of the governing equations, whereas the ellipsoidal geometry is determined by solving the tensor virial equations of the second order. The structure of the configuration is determined in a second approximation by solving exactly the equations of mechanical equilibrium in which the prevailing gravitational field is given by the solution for the field obtained in the first approximation. The method is formulated in detail for barotropic configurations and applied to the construction of both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric configurations of uniformly rotating polytropes. Comparisons of the present results with results obtained in other investigations with the aid of purely numerical methods show that the new method described here gives a surprisingly accurate representation of the structures of uniformly rotating polytropes. Generalizations and wider applications of the method are briefly described.

  7. A Test of Stellar Cohabitation in Multiple Transiting Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered over 2,300 exoplanet candidates, including more than 885 associated with target stars with multiple transiting planet candidates. While these putative multiple planet systems are predicted to have an extremely low false positive rate, it is important to test what fraction are indeed transiting a single star and what fraction are some sort of blend (e.g., one transiting planet and an eclipsing binary, or two planet-hosting stars blended within the photometric aperture). We perform such a test for stellar cohabitation using the observed distribution of ξ, the period-normalized transit duration ratio of pairs of transiting planet candidates. We developed a Bayesian framework to estimate the probability that two candidates orbit the target star based on the observed orbital periods and light curve properties with an emphasis on ξ. For priors distributions, we use empirical planet, binary star, and hierarchical triple star occurrence rates and galactic population synthesis models. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we calculate the implied distributions of ξ for all plausible blend scenarios; i.e., a planet around the target star and a background or physically associated eclipsing binary star, a planet around the the target star and a planet around a background or physically associated secondary star, as well as a single star with two planets and no blend. Finally, we compute the posterior probability that a given pair of transiting planet candidates are indeed a pair of planets in orbit around the target star given the observed values. We present the results of our test for a selection Kepler multiple planet candidates and for systems confirmed through other methods, such as transit timing variations. We demonstrate the utility of this technique for the confirmation and characterization of multiple transiting planet systems.

  8. THE AGE AND STELLAR PARAMETERS OF THE PROCYON BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, James; Arnett, David; Fontaine, Gilles; Young, Patrick A.; Williams, Kurtis A. E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu E-mail: pyoung.3@asu.edu

    2013-05-20

    The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 yr, a newly refined determination) is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 {+-} 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (Z = 0.014) is assumed for the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram fitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse and Sauval (Z = 0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, 11 new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated to investigate the dependences of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) core composition, (3) helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19 {+-} 0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} M{sub Sun }. In a plot of initial versus final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several {sigma} below a straight line fit.

  9. A HIGH STELLAR OBLIQUITY IN THE WASP-7 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Hirano, Teruyuki; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.

    2012-01-10

    We measure a tilt of 86 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign between the sky projections of the rotation axis of the WASP-7 star and the orbital axis of its close-in giant planet. This measurement is based on observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect with the Planet Finder Spectrograph on the Magellan II telescope. The result conforms with the previously noted pattern among hot-Jupiter hosts, namely, that the hosts lacking thick convective envelopes have high obliquities. Because the planet's trajectory crosses a wide range of stellar latitudes, observations of the RM effect can in principle reveal the stellar differential rotation profile; however, with the present data the signal of differential rotation could not be detected. The host star is found to exhibit radial-velocity noise ({sup s}tellar jitter{sup )} with an amplitude of Almost-Equal-To 30 m s{sup -1} over a timescale of days.

  10. Fractal properties of stellar systems and random forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumak, O. V.; Rastorguev, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The nearest neighbor distance distribution law is generalized to fractal stellar media. The asymptotics of the distribution law for the magnitude of a large random force has been derived for them. An expression for the effective mean interparticle distance in such a medium has been found. The derived asymptotics for a power-law change in conditional density is shown to coincide closely with the results obtained within the framework of a general approach. We conclude that the large random forces in a fractal stellar medium are entirely attributable to the nearest neighbors (clumps) located in a sphere with an effective radius determined from a generalized Holtsmark distribution.

  11. The impact of stellar evolution on planetary system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The connection between stellar evolution and planet formation is investigated. Particular attention is given to the problem posed by the fact that the formation of Jupiter occurred before the formation of Mars and that the formation of the solid core of Saturn was completed before the dissipation of the gas in the nebula. Several possible solutions to this problem are suggested.

  12. Chemical abundances of giant stars in the Crater stellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Zaggia, S.; François, P.; Sbordone, L.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We obtained spectra for two giants of Crater (Crater J113613-105227 and Crater J113615-105244) using X-Shooter at the VLT, with the purpose of determining their radial velocities and metallicities. Methods: Radial velocities were determined by cross-correlating the spectra with that of a standard star. The spectra were analysed with the MyGIsFOS code using a grid of synthetic spectra computed from one-dimensional, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model atmospheres. Effective temperature and surface gravity were derived from photometry measured from images obtained by the Dark Energy Survey. Results: The radial velocities are 144.3 ± 4.0 km s-1 for Crater J113613-105227 and and 134.1 ± 4.0km s-1 for Crater J113615-105244. The metallicities are [Fe/H] = -1.73 and [Fe/H] = -1.67, respectively. In addition to the iron abundance, we were able to determine abundances for nine elements: Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Ba. For Na and Ba we took into account deviations from LTE because the corrections are significant. The abundance ratios are similar in the two stars and resemble those of Galactic stars of the same metallicity. In the deep photometric images we detected several stars that lie to the blue of the turn-off. Conclusions: The radial velocities imply that both stars are members of the Crater stellar system. The difference in velocity between the two taken at face value implies a velocity dispersion >3.7 km s-1 at a 95% confidence level. Our spectroscopic metallicities agree excellently well with those determined by previous investigations using photometry. Our deep photometry and the spectroscopic metallicity imply an age of 7 Gyr for the main population of the system. The stars to the blue of the turn-off can be interpreted as a younger population that is of the same metallicity and an age of 2.2 Gyr. Finally, spatial and kinematical parameters support the idea that this system is associated with the galaxies Leo IV and Leo V. All the

  13. Evolution of planetary systems with time-dependent stellar mass-loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Anderson, Kassandra R.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2013-06-01

    Observations indicate that intermediate-mass stars, binary stars and stellar remnants often host planets; a complete explanation of these systems requires an understanding of how planetary orbits evolve as their central stars lose mass. Motivated by these dynamical systems, this paper generalizes in two directions previous studies of orbital evolution in planetary systems with stellar mass-loss: (1) many previous treatments focus on constant mass-loss rates and much of this work is carried out numerically. Here, we study a class of single planet systems where the stellar mass-loss rate is time dependent. The mass-loss rate can be increasing or decreasing, but the stellar mass always decreases monotonically. For this class of models, we develop analytic approximations to specify the final orbital elements for planets that remain bound after the epoch of mass-loss, and find the conditions required for the planets to become unbound. We also show that for some mass-loss functions, planets become unbound only in the asymptotic limit where the stellar mass vanishes. (2) We consider the chaotic evolution for two planet systems with stellar mass-loss. Here, we focus on a model consisting of analogues of Jupiter, Saturn and the Sun. By monitoring the divergence of initially similar trajectories through time, we calculate the Lyapunov exponents of the system. This analogue Solar system is chaotic in the absence of mass-loss with Lyapunov time τly ≈ 5-10 Myr; we find that the Lyapunov time decreases with increasing stellar mass-loss rate, with a nearly linear relationship between the two time-scales. Taken together, the results of this paper help provide an explanation for a wide range of dynamical evolution that occurs in Solar systems with stellar mass-loss.

  14. Youngest Brown Dwarf Yet in a Multiple Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    ... and the Sharpest Optical Image (0.18 arcsec) from the VLT so far...! Astronomers are eager to better understand the formation of stars and planets - with an eye on the complex processes that lead to the emergence of our own solar system some 4600 million years ago. Brown Dwarfs (BDs) play a special role in this context. Within the cosmic zoo, they represent a class of "intermediate" objects. While they are smaller than normal stars, they shine by their own energy for a limited time, in contrast to planets. Recent observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) of a "young" Brown Dwarf in a multiple stellar system are taking on a particular importance in this connection. An evaluation of the new data by an international team of astronomers [1] shows that it is by far the youngest of only four such objects found in a stellar system so far. The results are now providing new insights into the stellar formation process. This small object is known as TWA-5 B and with a mass of only 15 - 40 times that of Jupiter, it is near the borderline between planets and Brown Dwarfs, cf. the explanatory Appendix to this Press Release. However, visible and infrared VLT spectra unambiguously classify it in the latter category. Accurate positional measurements with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the VLT hint that it is orbiting the central, much heavier and brighter star in this system, TWA-5 A (itself a close double star of which each component presumably has a mass of 0.75 solar masses), with a period that may be as long as 900 years. And, by the way, an (I-band) image of the TWA-5 system is the sharpest delivered by the VLT so far, with an image size of only 0.18 arcsec [2]! Brown Dwarfs: a cool subject In current astronomical terminology, Brown Dwarfs (BDs) are objects whose masses are below those of normal stars - the borderline is believed to be about 8% of the mass of our Sun - but larger than those of planets, cf. [3]. Unlike normal stars, Brown Dwarfs are unable

  15. Stellar & Planetary Parameters for K2's M dwarf Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Arturo Omar; Crossfield, Ian; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Petigura, Erik; Aller, Kimberly Mei; Lepine, Sebastien; Beichman, Charles A.; Howard, Andrew; Werner, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing K2 mission uses photometry in order to find planets around stars of various types. M dwarfs are of high interests since they have been shown to host more planets than any other main sequence stars and transiting planets around M dwarfs are easier to find. In this poster, we present stellar parameters from M dwarfs hosting transiting planet candidates discovered by our team. Spectra of various bright M dwarfs and K2 objects were obtained in the J, H, and K bands (0.95 microns to 2.52 microns) at R ~ 1000. We measure equivalent widths of spectra features to obtain stellar radii and effective temperatures. Since planet radii and equilibrium temperatures depend on calculating the parameters of its host stars, understanding the nature of the hosts stars improves the precision with which we can measure these K2 objects of interest.

  16. James Webb Space Telescope Observations of Stellar Occultations by Solar System Bodies and Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; French, R. G.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Stansberry, J.; Lin, Z.-Y.; Zhang, Z.-W.; Vilenius, E.; Müller, Th.; Ortiz, J. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Bosh, A.; Duffard, R.; Lellouch, E.; Tancredi, G.; Young, L.; Milam, Stefanie N.; the JWST “Occultations” Focus Group

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of Solar System bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a byproduct of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  17. A tunable integrated system to simulate colder stellar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erculiani, Marco S.; Claudi, Riccardo; Barbisan, Diego; Giro, Enrico; Bonato, Matteo; Cocola, Lorenzo; Farisato, Giancarlo; Meneghini, Metteo; Poletto, Luca; Salasnich, Bernardo; Trivellin, Nicola

    2015-09-01

    In the last years, a lot of extrasolar planets have been discovered in any direction of the Galaxy. More interesting, some of them have been found in the habitable zone of their host stars. A large diversity of spectral type, from early types (A) to colder ones (M), is covered by the planetary system host stars. A lot of efforts are done in order to find habitable planets around M stars and indeed some habitable super earths were found. In this framework, "Atmosphere in a Test Tube", a project started at Astronomical observatory of Padua, simulates planetary environmental condition in order to understand how and how much the behavior of photosynthetic bacteria in different planetary/star scenarios can modify the planet atmosphere. The particular case of an habitable planet orbiting a M dwarf star is under study for the time being. The irradiation of an M star, due to its lower surface temperature is very different in quality and quantity by the irradiation of a star like our Sun. We would like to describe the study of feasibility of a new kind of tunable led stellarlight simulator capable to recreate the radiation spectrum of M type stars (but with the potential to be expanded even to F, G, K star spectra types) incident on the planet. The radiation source is a multiple LED matrix cooled by means of air fan technology. In order to endow it with modularity this device will be composed by a mosaic of circuit boards arranged in a pie-chart shape, on the surface of which will be welded the LEDs. This concept is a smart way in order to replace blown out pieces instead of changing the entire platform as well as implement the device with new modules suitable to reproduce other type of stars. The device can be driven by a PC to raise or lower the intensity of both each LED and the lamp, in order to simulate as close as possible a portion of the star spectrum. The wavelength intervals overlap the limits of photosynthetic pigment absorption range (280-850 nm), while the

  18. An Empirical Clock to Measure the Dynamical Age of Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessandro, E.

    2014-08-01

    Blue Straggler Stars (BSS) are among the brightest and more massive stars in globular clusters (GCs). For this reason they represent an ideal tool to probe the dynamical evolution of these stellar systems. Here I show, following the results by Ferraro et al. (2012), that the BSS radial distribution can be used as a powerful indicator of the cluster dynamical age. In fact on the basis of their BSS radial distribution shape, GCs can be efficiently grouped in different families corresponding to the different dynamical stages reached by the stellar systems. This allows one to define a first empirical clock, the dynamical clock, able to measure the dynamical age of a stellar system from pure observational quantities.

  19. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Early-Type GAlaxy Survey: Analysis of Small Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.

    VEGAS-SSS is a program devoted to study the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) around bright galaxies, built on the VEGAS survey. At completion, the survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ˜ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, SBF, etc.) and the clustered light (compact stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  20. Galaxy evolution. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: stellar systems that ran away.

    PubMed

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2015-04-24

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts. PMID:25908816

  1. EVOLUTION OF THE BINARY FRACTION IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Fregeau, John M.; Ivanova, Natalia; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2009-12-20

    Using our recently improved Monte Carlo evolution code, we study the evolution of the binary fraction in globular clusters. In agreement with previous N-body simulations, we find generally that the hard binary fraction in the core tends to increase with time over a range of initial cluster central densities for initial binary fractions approx<90%. The dominant processes driving the evolution of the core binary fraction are mass segregation of binaries into the cluster core and preferential destruction of binaries there. On a global scale, these effects and the preferential tidal stripping of single stars tend to roughly balance, leading to overall cluster binary fractions that are roughly constant with time. Our findings suggest that the current hard binary fraction near the half-mass radius is a good indicator of the hard primordial binary fraction. However, the relationship between the true binary fraction and the fraction of main-sequence stars in binaries (which is typically what observers measure) is nonlinear and rather complicated. We also consider the importance of soft binaries, which not only modify the evolution of the binary fraction, but can also drastically change the evolution of the cluster as a whole. Finally, we briefly describe the recent addition of single and binary stellar evolution to our cluster evolution code.

  2. Collective outflow from a small multiple stellar system

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klaassen, Pamela D.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Schrön, Martin; Klessen, Ralf S.; Federrath, Christoph; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-06-10

    The formation of high-mass stars is usually accompanied by powerful protostellar outflows. Such high-mass outflows are not simply scaled-up versions of their lower-mass counterparts, since observations suggest that the collimation degree degrades with stellar mass. Theoretically, the origins of massive outflows remain open to question because radiative feedback and fragmentation of the accretion flow around the most massive stars, with M > 15 M {sub ☉}, may impede the driving of magnetic disk winds. We here present a three-dimensional simulation of the early stages of core fragmentation and massive star formation that includes a subgrid-scale model for protostellar outflows. We find that stars that form in a common accretion flow tend to have aligned outflow axes, so that the individual jets of multiple stars can combine to form a collective outflow. We compare our simulation to observations with synthetic H{sub 2} and CO observations and find that the morphology and kinematics of such a collective outflow resembles some observed massive outflows, such as Cepheus A and DR 21. We finally compare physical quantities derived from simulated observations of our models to the actual values in the models to examine the reliability of standard methods for deriving physical quantities, demonstrating that those methods indeed recover the actual values to within a factor of two to three.

  3. A VERY LARGE ARRAY STUDY OF ULTRACOMPACT AND HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS FROM 0.7 TO 3.6 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Sewilo, M.; Churchwell, E.; Kurtz, S.; Goss, W. M.; Hofner, P.

    2011-06-01

    We report multi-frequency Very Large Array observations of three massive star formation regions (MSFRs) containing radio continuum components that were identified as broad radio recombination line (RRL) sources and hypercompact (HC) H II region candidates in our previous H92{alpha} and H76{alpha} study: G10.96+0.01 (component W), G28.20-0.04 (N), and G34.26+0.15 (B). An additional HC H II region candidate, G45.07+0.13, known to have broad H66{alpha} and H76{alpha} lines, small size, high electron density, and emission measure, was also included. We observed with high spatial resolution (0.''9-2.''3) the H53{alpha}, H66{alpha}, H76{alpha}, and H92{alpha} RRLs and the radio continuum at the corresponding wavelengths (0.7-3.6 cm). The motivation for these observations was to obtain RRLs over a range of principal quantum states to look for signatures of pressure broadening and macroscopic velocity structure. We find that pressure broadening contributes significantly to the linewidths, but it is not the sole cause of the broad lines. We compare radio continuum and dust emission distributions and find a good correspondence. We also discuss maser emission and multi-wavelength observations reported in the literature for these MSFRs.

  4. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  5. Complex Stellar System ESO65SC03: Open Cluster or Remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gireesh C.; Joshi, Y. C.; Joshi, S.; Chowdhury, S.; Tyagi, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    We present a complete spatial and dynamical study of the poorly populated stellar system ESO65SC03. The radial distribution of the system gives a core and cluster radii of 1.10±0.63 and 5.36±0.24 arcmin, respectively. The SNDP does not show any clear enhancement of the surface stellar number density between the stars of the system and the field regions. We derive the optimum isochrone solution for a particular grid size in the CMD using the statistical cleaning procedure. Using the statistically cleaned CMDs, we find the distance modulus, (m - M)0, and reddening, E(B - V), of the system to be 11.8±0.2 and 0.45 mag, respectively. The mean proper motion of this system is - 5.37±0.81 mas yr-1 and 0.31±0.40 in RA and DEC directions, respectively. The mean proper motion of this system is found to be almost similar to the field region. The mass function for the brighter stars is found to be too high for the system to be an open cluster. These combined results place constraints on whether stellar system ESO65SC03 is a POCR or an Asterism. Our understanding is that the ESO65SC03 is in a stage of POCR by losing their main-sequence stars in the dynamic evolution processes.

  6. The Dynamical Evolution of the Multiple Stellar System α Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, M.; Docobo, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    The sextuple system Castor (α Gem) comprises of a visual binary (Castor A and B) with an orbital period of approximately 460 years. Each of these components is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of only a few days. In addition, a distant double-lined spectroscopic eclipsing binary (Castor C, or YY Gem), with an orbital period of less than 1 day, is considered to be in orbit around them with a period of roughly 14 000 years or more. In this contribution, we study the long-term dynamics of this hierarchical system. Many orbital elements still remain unknown, mainly those regarding the AB-C system. Apart from the direct integration of the equations of motion for the quadruple (Aa,Ab)-(Ba,Bb) system, we also perform a qualitative analysis of the global system by means of numerical techniques in order to find the most distinctive features of its dynamics.

  7. GG Tau: the ringworld and beyond. Mass accretion and planetary formation in young multiple stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Beck, Tracy; Guilloteau, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In binary stellar systems, exoplanet searches have revealed planetary mass companions orbiting both in circumstellar and in circumbinary orbits. Modelling studies suggest increased dynamical complexity around the young stars that form such systems. Circumstellar and circumbinary disks likely exhibit different physical conditions for planet formation, which also depends on the stellar separation. Although binaries and higher order multiple stars are relatively common in nearby star-forming regions, surprisingly few systems with circumbinary distributions of proto-planetary material have been found. With its spectacular ring of dust and gas encircling the central triple star, one such system, GG Tau A, has become a unique laboratory for investigating the physics of circumsystem gas and dust evolution. We review here its physical properties.

  8. Raga: Monte Carlo simulations of gravitational dynamics of non-spherical stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Raga (Relaxation in Any Geometry) is a Monte Carlo simulation method for gravitational dynamics of non-spherical stellar systems. It is based on the SMILE software (ascl:1308.001) for orbit analysis. It can simulate stellar systems with a much smaller number of particles N than the number of stars in the actual system, represent an arbitrary non-spherical potential with a basis-set or spline spherical-harmonic expansion with the coefficients of expansion computed from particle trajectories, and compute particle trajectories independently and in parallel using a high-accuracy adaptive-timestep integrator. Raga can also model two-body relaxation by local (position-dependent) velocity diffusion coefficients (as in Spitzer's Monte Carlo formulation) and adjust the magnitude of relaxation to the actual number of stars in the target system, and model the effect of a central massive black hole.

  9. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  10. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Joss, P. C.; Webbink, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    A new theoretical treatment of the evolution of highly compact binary systems is presented. The evolution is calculated until almost the entire mass of the secondary has been transferred to the primary or lost from the system. It is assumed that gravitational radiation from the system is the cause of mass transfer. It is found that the structure of the mass-losing star can be approximated by an n = 3/2 polytrope, and as a result a relatively large number of different cases can be explored and some general conclusions drawn. An explanation is found for the existence of a cutoff in the orbital period distribution among the cataclysmic variables and light is shed upon the possible generic relationships among cataclysmic variables, the low-mass X-ray binaries, and the spectrally soft transient X-ray sources.

  11. Evolutionary models of rotating dense stellar systems: challenges in software and hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiestas, Jose

    2016-02-01

    We present evolutionary models of rotating self-gravitating systems (e.g. globular clusters, galaxy cores). These models are characterized by the presence of initial axisymmetry due to rotation. Central black hole seeds are alternatively included in our models, and black hole growth due to consumption of stellar matter is simulated until the central potential dominates the kinematics in the core. Goal is to study the long-term evolution (~ Gyr) of relaxed dense stellar systems, which deviate from spherical symmetry, their morphology and final kinematics. With this purpose, we developed a 2D Fokker-Planck analytical code, which results we confirm by detailed N-Body techniques, applying a high performance code, developed for GPU machines. We compare our models to available observations of galactic rotating globular clusters, and conclude that initial rotation modifies significantly the shape and lifetime of these systems, and can not be neglected in studying the evolution of globular clusters, and the galaxy itself.

  12. Masses of black holes in binary stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M.

    1996-08-01

    Mass determination methods and their results for ten black holes in X-ray binary systems are summarised. A unified interpretation of the radial velocity and optical light curves allows one to reliably justify the close binary system model and to prove the correctness of determination of the optical star mass function fv(m).The orbit plane inclination i can be estimated from an analysis of optical light curve of the system, which is due mainly to the ellipsoidal shape of the optical star (the so-called ellipticity effect). The component mass ratio q = mx/mv is obtained from information about the distance to the binary system as well as from data about rotational broadening of absorption lines in the spectrum of the optical star. These data allow one to obtain from the value of fv(m) a reliable value of the black hole mass mx or its low limit, as well as the optical star mass mv. An independent estimate of the optical star mass mv obtained from information about its spectral class and luminosity gives us test results. Additional test comes from information about the absence or presence of X-ray eclipses in the system. Effects of the non-zero dimension of the optical star, its pear-like shape, and X-ray heating on the absorption line profiles and the radial velocity curve are investigated. It is very significant that none of ten known massive (mx > 3M) X-ray sources considered as black hole candidates is an X-ray pulsar or an X-ray burster of the first kind.

  13. Breadboard stellar tracker system test report, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Complete data from a test program designed to evaluate the performance of a star tracker, a breadboard tracker system, is presented in tabular form. All data presented was normalized to the pixel dimension of 20 micrometers. Data from determination of maximum spatial noise as it applies to the coarse and fine acquisition modes is presented. Pointing accuracy test data, raw pixel data for the track cycle, and data from equipment related tests is also presented.

  14. The dedicated ICRH system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Schweer, B.; Vervier, M.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Offermans, G.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; Birus, D.; Bozhenkov, S.; Hartmann, D. A.; Kallmeyer, J.; Renard, S.; Wolf, R.

    2014-02-01

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band 25-38 MHz and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio, that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenarii are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. The system contains a prematching capacitor to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps is counterbalanced by the use of a decoupler. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  15. Infalling Planetesimals in Pre-Main Sequence Stellar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.; Sitko, Michael L.; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hanner, Martha S.; Perez, Mario R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; DeWinter, Dolf

    1999-01-01

    These are exciting times in the study of planetary system formation with a steadily expanding inventory of exo-planet detections, and imaging of dust disks around nearby young and main sequence stars. While these discoveries imply that our Solar System is far from unique, linking the data for the protoplanetary and debris disks to mature planetary systems requires a demonstration that disk evolution proceeds via planetesimal production and growth to the formation of planets. Theoretical studies of planet formation indicate that planetesimals grow, via runaway accretion, to lunar-sized (approx. = 2000 km) embryos in 10(exp 5) years. Recent gas giant planet formation studies have suggested that most of the action in planet formation occurs over 1-16 Myr, with formation of planets similar to Jupiter in t less than 10 Myr, within the time interval that infrared (IR) and optical emission line studies have demonstrated that circumstellar material remains detectable around both solar mass and intermediate mass stars. Direct imaging of exo-planetesimals is not feasible with current and foreseeable technology, since such bodies have substantially less surface area than micron-sized grains distributed in a disk, and thus are inefficient IR emitters. However, such bodies may be indirectly detectable.

  16. The dedicated ICRH system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Schweer, B.; Vervier, M.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; and others

    2014-02-12

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band 25-38 MHz and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio, that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenarii are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. The system contains a prematching capacitor to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps is counterbalanced by the use of a decoupler. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  17. Evolutionary stellar population synthesis with MILES - I. The base models and a new line index system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazdekis, A.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Cenarro, A. J.; Beasley, M. A.; Cardiel, N.; Gorgas, J.; Peletier, R. F.

    2010-06-01

    We present synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for single-age, single-metallicity stellar populations (SSPs) covering the full optical spectral range at moderately high resolution [full width at half-maximum (FWHM) = 2.3Å]. These SEDs constitute our base models, as they combine scaled-solar isochrones with an empirical stellar spectral library [Medium resolution INT Library of Empirical Spectra (MILES)], which follows the chemical evolution pattern of the solar neighbourhood. The models rely as much as possible on empirical ingredients, not just on the stellar spectra, but also on extensive photometric libraries, which are used to determine the transformations from the theoretical parameters of the isochrones to observational quantities. The unprecedented stellar parameter coverage of the MILES stellar library allowed us to safely extend our optical SSP SED predictions from intermediate- to very-old-age regimes and the metallicity coverage of the SSPs from super-solar to [M/H] = -2.3. SSPs with such low metallicities are particularly useful for globular cluster studies. We have computed SSP SEDs for a suite of initial mass function shapes and slopes. We provide a quantitative analysis of the dependence of the synthesized SSP SEDs on the (in)complete coverage of the stellar parameter space in the input library that not only shows that our models are of higher quality than those of other works, but also in which range of SSP parameters our models are reliable. The SSP SEDs are a useful tool to perform the analysis of stellar populations in a very flexible manner. Observed spectra can be studied by means of full spectrum fitting or by using line indices. For the latter, we propose a new line index system to avoid the intrinsic uncertainties associated with the popular Lick/IDS system and provide more appropriate, uniform, spectral resolution. Apart from constant resolution as a function of wavelength, the system is also based on flux-calibrated spectra

  18. Unique Stellar System Gives Einstein a Thumbs-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Taking advantage of a unique cosmic coincidence, astronomers have measured an effect predicted by Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity in the extremely strong gravity of a pair of superdense neutron stars. The new data indicate that the famed physicist's 93-year-old theory has passed yet another test. Double Pulsar Graphic Artist's Conception of Double Pulsar System PSR J0737-3039A/B CREDIT: Daniel Cantin, DarwinDimensions, McGill University Click on image for more graphics. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to make a four-year study of a double-star system unlike any other known in the Universe. The system is a pair of neutron stars, both of which are seen as pulsars that emit lighthouse-like beams of radio waves. "Of about 1700 known pulsars, this is the only case where two pulsars are in orbit around each other," said Rene Breton, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. In addition, the stars' orbital plane is aligned nearly perfectly with their line of sight to the Earth, so that one passes behind a doughnut-shaped region of ionized gas surrounding the other, eclipsing the signal from the pulsar in back. "Those eclipses are the key to making a measurement that could never be done before," Breton said. Einstein's 1915 theory predicted that, in a close system of two very massive objects, such as neutron stars, one object's gravitational tug, along with an effect of its spinning around its axis, should cause the spin axis of the other to wobble, or precess. Studies of other pulsars in binary systems had indicated that such wobbling occurred, but could not produce precise measurements of the amount of wobbling. "Measuring the amount of wobbling is what tests the details of Einstein's theory and gives a benchmark that any alternative gravitational theories must meet," said Scott Ransom of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The eclipses allowed the astronomers to pin

  19. Special-purpose computing for dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Junichiro

    2007-08-01

    I'll describe the current status of the GRAPE-DR project. The GRAPE-DR is the next-generation hardware for N-body simulation. Unlike the previous GRAPE hardwares, it is programmable SIMD machine with a large number of simple processors integrated into a single chip. The GRAPE-DR chip consists of 512 simple processors and operates at the clock speed of 500 MHz, delivering the theoretical peak speed of 512/226 Gflops (single/double precision). As of August 2006, the first prototype board with the sample chip successfully passed the test we prepared. The full GRAPE-DR system will consist of 4096 chips, reaching the theoretical peak speed of 2 Pflops.

  20. Adiabatic growth of a black hole in a rotating stellar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Man Hoi; Goodman, Jeremy

    1989-01-01

    The consequences of slowly adding a massive black hole to the center of a rotating stellar system are considered. Although both the rotation velocity V and the velocity dispersion sigma increase when the black hole is added, the rotation velocity increases faster. The effect goes in the right direction but is too gradual to explain the V/sigma profiles recently observed in several galactic nuclei.

  1. Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.

    1998-01-01

    This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

  2. Breadboard stellar tracker system test report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollodge, J. C.; Hubbard, M. W.; Jain, S.; Schons, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of a star tracker equipped with a focal plane detector was evaluated. The CID board is an array of 256 x 256 pixels which are 20 x 20 micrometers in dimension. The tracker used for test was a breadboard tracker system developed by BASD. Unique acquisition and tracking algorithms are employed to enhance performance. A pattern recognition process is used to test for proper image spread function and to avoid false acquisition on noise. A very linear, high gain, interpixel transfer function is derived for interpolating star position. The lens used in the tracker has an EFL of 100 mm. The tracker has an FOV of 2.93 degrees resulting in a pixel angular subtense of 41.253 arc sec in each axis. The test procedure used for the program presented a star to the tracker in a circular pattern of positions; the pattern was formed by projecting a simulated star through a rotatable deviation wedge. Further tests determined readout noise, Noise Equivalent Displacement during track, and spatial noise during acquisition by taking related data and reducing it.

  3. Ultraviolet Spectral Diagnostics of the Age of Old Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth

    2007-05-01

    For our Hubble Treasury program GO-9455, we are modeling the mid- and near-ultraviolet regions of old stars across the color-magnitude diagram. After revising the list of input atomic and molecular line parameters from 2200A to 9000A, we are calculating spectra of individual stars from first principles, and combining their weighted fluxes to form composite spectra representing single-age, single-metallicity populations older than 1Gyr. We are doing this for metallicities from one-hundredth to three times solar, and for three different ratios of the abundances of light versus iron-peak elements. We show plots comparing the calculated spectra with observations of stars, M31 globular clusters, and more distant galaxies. We find that the light-element ratio affects not only the strengths of individual lines and bands, but also the blue continuum in cool stars of near-solar metallicity and higher, as the continuous opacity is increased by high magnesium abundance. We also note that at such metallicities, the mid-ultraviolet spectrum of composite systems is suppressed below 2500A, and the near-ultraviolet becomes the spectral region providing the strongest observable constraints on age, metallicity, and abundance ratio.

  4. GRAVITATIONAL CONUNDRUM? DYNAMICAL MASS SEGREGATION VERSUS DISRUPTION OF BINARY STARS IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Li, Chengyuan; Zheng, Yong; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Deng, Licai; Hu, Yi; Wicker, James E.

    2013-03-01

    Upon their formation, dynamically cool (collapsing) star clusters will, within only a few million years, achieve stellar mass segregation for stars down to a few solar masses, simply because of gravitational two-body encounters. Since binary systems are, on average, more massive than single stars, one would expect them to also rapidly mass segregate dynamically. Contrary to these expectations and based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations, we show that the compact, 15-30 Myr old Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1818 exhibits tantalizing hints at the {approx}> 2{sigma} level of significance (>3{sigma} if we assume a power-law secondary-to-primary mass-ratio distribution) of an increasing fraction of F-star binary systems (with combined masses of 1.3-1.6 M {sub Sun }) with increasing distance from the cluster center, specifically between the inner 10''-20'' (approximately equivalent to the cluster's core and half-mass radii) and the outer 60''-80''. If confirmed, then this will offer support for the theoretically predicted but thus far unobserved dynamical disruption processes of the significant population of 'soft' binary systems-with relatively low binding energies compared to the kinetic energy of their stellar members-in star clusters, which we have access to here by virtue of the cluster's unique combination of youth and high stellar density.

  5. Stellar rotation-planetary orbit period commensurability in the HAT-P-11 system

    SciTech Connect

    Béky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-10

    A number of planet host stars have been observed to rotate with a period equal to an integer multiple of the orbital period of their close planet. We expand this list by analyzing Kepler data of HAT-P-11 and finding a period ratio of 6:1. In particular, we present evidence for a long-lived spot on the stellar surface that is eclipsed by the planet in the same position four times, every sixth transit. We also identify minima in the out-of-transit light curve and confirm that their phase with respect to the stellar rotation is mostly stationary for the 48 month time frame of the observations, confirming the proposed rotation period. For comparison, we apply our methods to Kepler-17 and confirm the findings of Bonomo and Lanza that the period ratio is not exactly 8:1 in that system. Finally, we provide a hypothesis on how interactions between a star and its planet could possibly result in an observed commensurability for systems where the stellar differential rotation profile happens to include a period at some latitude that is commensurable to the planetary orbit.

  6. Magnetic Origins of the Stellar Mass-Obliquity Correlation in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin

    2015-10-01

    Detailed observational characterization of transiting exoplanet systems has revealed that the spin-axes of massive (M≳ 1.2{M}⊙ ) stars often exhibit substantial misalignments with respect to the orbits of the planets they host. Conversely, lower-mass stars tend to only have limited obliquities. A similar trend has recently emerged within the observational data set of young stars’ magnetic field strengths: massive T-Tauri stars tend to have dipole fields that are ˜10 times weaker than their less-massive counterparts. Here we show that the associated dependence of magnetic star-disk torques upon stellar mass naturally explains the observed spin-orbit misalignment trend, provided that misalignments are obtained within the disk-hosting phase. Magnetic torques act to realign the stellar spin-axes of lower-mass stars with the disk plane on a timescale significantly shorter than the typical disk lifetime, whereas the same effect operates on a much longer timescale for massive stars. Cumulatively, our results point to a primordial excitation of extrasolar spin-orbit misalignment, signalling consistency with disk-driven migration as the dominant transport mechanism for short-period planets. Furthermore, we predict that spin-orbit misalignments in systems where close-in planets show signatures of dynamical, post-nebular emplacement will not follow the observed correlation with stellar mass.

  7. Spectroscopy of the Stellar Wind in the Cygnus X-1 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskovicova, Ivica; Hanke, Manfred; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schultz, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The X-ray luminosity of black holes is produced through the accretion of material from their companion stars. Depending on the mass of the donor star, accretion of the material falling onto the black hole through the inner Lagrange point of the system or accretion by the strong stellar wind can occur. Cygnus X-1 is a high mass X-ray binary system, where the black hole is powered by accretion of the stellar wind of its supergiant companion star HDE226868. As the companion is close to filling its Roche lobe, the wind is not symmetric, but strongly focused towards the black hole. Chandra-HETGS observations allow for an investigation of this focused stellar wind, which is essential to understand the physics of the accretion flow. We compare observations at the distinct orbital phases of 0.0, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.75. These correspond to different lines of sights towards the source, allowing us to probe the structure and the dynamics of the wind.

  8. A Third Exoplanetary System with Misaligned Orbital and Stellar Spin Axes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnosn, John A.; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Gazak, J. Zachary

    2009-01-01

    We presented evidence that the WASP-14 exoplanetary system has misaligned orbital and stellar-rotational axes, with an angle of 33.1 plus or minus 7.4 degrees between their sky projections. At the time of this publication, WASP-14 was the third system known to have a significant spin-orbit misalignment, and all three systems had super- Jupiter planets and eccentric orbits. Therefore we hypothesized that the migration and subsequent orbital evolution of massive, eccentric exoplanets is somehow different from that of less massive close-in Jupiters, the majority of which have well-aligned orbits.

  9. Candidate configuration trade study, Stellar-inertial Measurement Systems (SIMS) for an Earth Observation Satellite (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogletree, G.; Coccoli, J.; Mckern, R.; Smith, M.; White, R.

    1972-01-01

    The results of analytical and simulation studies of the stellar-inertial measurement system (SIMS) for an earth observation satellite are presented. Subsystem design analyses and sensor design trades are reported. Three candidate systems are considered: (1) structure-mounted gyros with structure-mounted star mapper, (2) structure-mounted gyros with gimbaled star tracker, and (3) gimbaled gyros with structure-mounted star mapper. The purpose of the study is to facilitate the decisions pertaining to gimbaled versus structure-mounted gyros and star sensors, and combinations of systems suitable for the EOS satellite.

  10. Instrument Pointing Control System for the Stellar Interferometry Mission - Planet Quest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul B.; Kang, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the high precision Instrument Pointing Control System (PCS) for the Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) - Planet Quest. The PCS system provides front-end pointing, compensation for spacecraft motion, and feedforward stabilization, which are needed for proper interference. Optical interferometric measurements require very precise pointing (0.03 as, 1-(sigma) radial) for maximizing the interference pattern visibility. This requirement is achieved by fine pointing control of articulating pointing mirrors with feedback from angle tracking cameras. The overall pointing system design concept is presentcd. Functional requirements and an acquisition concept are given. Guide and Science pointing control loops are discussed. Simulation analyses demonstrate the feasibility of the design.

  11. APOSTLE OBSERVATIONS OF GJ 1214b: SYSTEM PARAMETERS AND EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kundurthy, P.; Agol, E.; Becker, A. C.; Williams, B.; Mukadam, A.; Barnes, R.

    2011-04-20

    We present three transits of GJ 1214b, observed as part of the Apache Point Observatory Survey of Transit Light Curves of Exoplanets. By applying Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to a multi-wavelength data set which included our r-band light curves and previously gathered data of GJ 1214b, we confirm earlier estimates of system parameters. Using spectral energy distribution fitting, mass-luminosity relations, and light curve data, we derived absolute parameters for the star and planet, improving uncertainties by a factor of two for the stellar mass (M{sub *} = 0.153{sup +0.010}{sub -0.009} M{sub sun}), stellar radius (R{sub *} = 0.210{sup +0.005}{sub -0.004} R{sub sun}), planetary radius (R{sub p} = 2.74{sup +0.06}{sub -0.05} R{sub +}), and planetary density ({rho}{sub p} = 1.68 {+-} 0.23 g cm{sup -3}). Transit times derived from our study show no evidence for strong transit timing variations. We also report the detection of two features in our light curves which we believe are evidence for a low-energy stellar flare and a spot-crossing event.

  12. Planet formation in a triple stellar system: implications of the third star's orbital inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingos, R. C.; Winter, O. C.; Izidoro, A.

    2015-04-01

    Planets have been revealed both in binary and triple stellar systems. Although there have been several studies of the late stages of planet formation in binary stars this process does not appear to have been studied in triple stellar systems. To understand how the late stage of planetary accretion is affected by a third companion, in this work we have numerically investigated the formation of planets in a hypothetical triple stellar system. The system is composed by an inner binary formed by two half-solar-mass components orbited by a solar-mass star. In our experiments, lunar and Mars-sized planetary embryos are distributed around the centre of mass of the inner binary system. Our main goal is to analyse how the formation of planets evolves depending on the orbital configuration of the massive distant companion. We have performed an extensive number of numerical simulations considering different orbital configurations for the third star. All simulations were numerically integrated for at least 107 years. The results show that when the protoplanetary disc and the stars are initially on coplanar orbits, one or two planets are quickly formed between 6 and 8 AU. In general such planets have also small eccentricities with values about 10-2. On the other hand, when the third star is considered initially on inclined orbits (even tiny values), there tends to occur a significant increase in the inclination of bodies of protoplanetary disc, which prevents the collisions between these objects and their growth. As a result, in this latter case we do not evidence the formation of planets during the timescale of our integrations but note the existence of several leftover objects that can survive for longer than 10 Myr, moving in orbits with semi-major axes ranging between ~6 and 8 AU. Thus, our results do not rule out the planet formation in this kind of stellar arrangements at all, but they indicate that, if planetary bodies keep stable orbits, the late stage of planet

  13. Exotic populations in globular clusters: blue stragglers as tracers of the internal dynamical evolution of stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Francesco R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper I present an overview of the main observational properties of a special class of exotic objects (the so-called Blue Straggler Stars, BSSs) in Galactic Globular Clusters (GCs). The BSS specific frequency and their radial distribution are discussed in the framework of using this stellar population as probe of GC internal dynamics. In particular, the shape of the BSS radial distribution has been found to be a powerful tracer of the dynamical evolution of stellar systems, thus allowing the definition of an empirical ``clock''able to measure the dynamical age of stellar aggregates from pure observational properties.

  14. Grid search in stellar parameters: a software for spectrum analysis of single stars and binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The currently operating space missions, as well as those that will be launched in the near future, will deliver high-quality data for millions of stellar objects. Since the majority of stellar astrophysical applications still (at least partly) rely on spectroscopic data, an efficient tool for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy is needed. Aims: We aim at developing an efficient software package for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy of single stars and those in binary systems. The major requirements are that the code should have a high performance, represent the state-of-the-art analysis tool, and provide accurate determinations of atmospheric parameters and chemical compositions for different types of stars. Methods: We use the method of atmosphere models and spectrum synthesis, which is one of the most commonly used approaches for the analysis of stellar spectra. Our Grid Search in Stellar Parameters (gssp) code makes use of the Message Passing Interface (OpenMPI) implementation, which makes it possible to run in parallel mode. The method is first tested on the simulated data and is then applied to the spectra of real stellar objects. Results: The majority of test runs on the simulated data were successful in that we were able to recover the initially assumed sets of atmospheric parameters. We experimentally find the limits in signal-to-noise ratios of the input spectra, below which the final set of parameters is significantly affected by the noise. Application of the gssp package to the spectra of three Kepler stars, KIC 11285625, KIC 6352430, and KIC 4931738, was also largely successful. We found an overall agreement of the final sets of the fundamental parameters with the original studies. For KIC 6352430, we found that dependence of the light dilution factor on wavelength cannot be ignored, as it has a significant impact on the determination of the atmospheric parameters of this binary system. Conclusions: The

  15. Triangulum II: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Hot Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Rich, R. Michael; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chapman, Scott C.; Koch, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    We present a study of the recently discovered compact stellar system Triangulum II. From observations conducted with the DEIMOS spectrograph on Keck II, we obtained spectra for 13 member stars that follow the CMD features of this very faint stellar system and include two bright red giant branch stars. Tri II has a very negative radial velocity (< {v}{{r}}> =-{383.7}-3.3+3.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1) that translates to < {v}{{r},{gsr}}> ≃ -264 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and confirms it is a Milky Way satellite. We show that, despite the small data set, there is evidence that Tri II has complex internal kinematics. Its radial velocity dispersion increases from {4.4}-2.0+2.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 in the central 2\\prime to {14.1}-4.2+5.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 outwards. The velocity dispersion of the full sample is inferred to be {σ }{vr}={9.9}-2.2+3.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1. From the two bright RGB member stars we measure an average metallicity < {{[Fe/H]}}> =-2.6+/- 0.2, placing Tri II among the most metal-poor Milky Way dwarf galaxies. In addition, the spectra of the fainter member stars exhibit differences in their line widths that could be the indication of a metallicity dispersion in the system. All these properties paint a complex picture for Tri II, whose nature and current state are largely speculative. The inferred metallicity properties of the system however lead us to favor a scenario in which Tri II is a dwarf galaxy that is either disrupting or embedded in a stellar stream.

  16. A New Four-Barrel Pellet Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; McGill, James M; Baylor, Larry R; Caughman, John B; Fehling, Dan T; Harris, Jeffrey H; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A; McCarthy, K. J.; Chamorro, M.; Garcia, R.; Hildago, C.; Medrano, M.; Unamuno, R.

    2011-01-01

    A new pellet injection system for the TJ-II stellarator has been developed/constructed as part of a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Centro de Investigaciones Energ ticas, Medioambientales y Tecnol gicas (CIEMAT). ORNL is providing most of the injector hardware and instrumentation, the pellet diagnostics, and the pellet transport tubes; CIEMAT is responsible for the injector stand/interface to the stellarator, cryogenic refrigerator, vacuum pumps/ballast volumes, gas manifolds, remote operations, plasma diagnostics, and data acquisition. The pellet injector design is an upgraded version of that used for the ORNL injector installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). It is a four-barrel system equipped with a cryogenic refrigerator for in situ hydrogen pellet formation and a combined mechanical punch/propellant valve system for pellet acceleration (speeds ~100 to 1000 m/s). On TJ-II, it will be used as an active diagnostic and for fueling. To accommodate the plasma experiments planned for TJ-II, pellet sizes significantly smaller than those typically used for the MST application are required. The system will initially be equipped with four different pellet sizes, with the gun barrel bores ranging between ~0.5 to 1.0 mm. The new system is almost complete and is described briefly here, highlighting the new features added since the original MST injector was constructed. Also, the future installation on TJ-II is reviewed.

  17. The Two-Component Virial Theorem and the Physical Properties of Stellar Systems.

    PubMed

    Dantas; Ribeiro; Capelato; de Carvalho RR

    2000-01-01

    Motivated by present indirect evidence that galaxies are surrounded by dark matter halos, we investigate whether their physical properties can be described by a formulation of the virial theorem that explicitly takes into account the gravitational potential term representing the interaction of the dark halo with the baryonic or luminous component. Our analysis shows that the application of such a "two-component virial theorem" not only accounts for the scaling relations displayed by, in particular, elliptical galaxies, but also for the observed properties of all virialized stellar systems, ranging from globular clusters to galaxy clusters. PMID:10587482

  18. A Rich Globular Cluster System in Dragonfly 17: Are Ultra-diffuse Galaxies Pure Stellar Halos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Eric W.; Lim, Sungsoon

    2016-05-01

    Observations of nearby galaxy clusters at low surface brightness have identified galaxies with low luminosities, but sizes as large as L ⋆ galaxies, leading them to be dubbed “ultra-diffuse galaxies” (UDGs). The survival of UDGs in dense environments like the Coma cluster suggests that UDGs could reside in much more massive dark halos. We report the detection of a substantial population of globular clusters (GCs) around a Coma UDG, Dragonfly 17 (DF17). We find that DF17 has a high GC specific frequency of S N = 26 ± 13. The GC system is extended, with an effective radius of 12″ ± 2″, or 5.6 ± 0.9 kpc at Coma distance, 70% larger than the galaxy itself. We also estimate the mean of the GC luminosity function to infer a distance of {97}-14+17 Mpc, providing redshift-independent confirmation that one of these UDGs is in the Coma cluster. The presence of a rich GC system in DF17 indicates that, despite its low stellar density, star formation was intense enough to form many massive star clusters. If DF17's ratio of total GC mass to total halo mass is similar to those in other galaxies, then DF17 has an inferred total mass of ˜1011 M ⊙, only ˜10% the mass of the Milky Way, but extremely dominated by dark matter, with M/L V ≈ 1000. We suggest that UDGs like DF17 may be “pure stellar halos,” i.e., galaxies that formed their stellar halo components, but then suffered an early cessation in star formation that prevented the formation of any substantial central disk or bulge. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  19. Second Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampapa, M. S. (Editor); Golub, L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Solar and stellar atmospheric phenomena and their fundamental physical properties such as gravity, effective temperature and rotation rate, which provides the range in parameter space required to test various theoretical models were investigated. The similarity between solar activity and stellar activity is documented. Some of the topics discussed are: atmospheric structure, magnetic fields, solar and stellar activity, and evolution.

  20. THE HD 192263 SYSTEM: PLANETARY ORBITAL PERIOD AND STELLAR VARIABILITY DISENTANGLED

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Henry, Gregory W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Laughlin, Gregory

    2012-07-20

    As part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey, we present new radial velocities and photometry of the HD 192263 system. Our analysis of the already available Keck-HIRES and CORALIE radial velocity measurements together with the five new Keck measurements we report in this paper results in improved orbital parameters for the system. We derive constraints on the size and phase location of the transit window for HD 192263b, a Jupiter-mass planet with a period of 24.3587 {+-} 0.0022 days. We use 10 years of Automated Photoelectric Telescope photometry to analyze the stellar variability and search for planetary transits. We find continuing evidence of spot activity with periods near 23.4 days. The shape of the corresponding photometric variations changes over time, giving rise to not one but several Fourier peaks near this value. However, none of these frequencies coincides with the planet's orbital period and thus we find no evidence of star-planet interactions in the system. We attribute the {approx}23 day variability to stellar rotation. There are also indications of spot variations on longer (8 years) timescales. Finally, we use the photometric data to exclude transits for a planet with the predicted radius of 1.09 R{sub J} , and as small as 0.79 R{sub J} .

  1. Balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer: Acquisition, tracking and command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) which is carried to an altitude of 40 km by a 15 million cubic foot balloon for night-time observations of ultraviolet stellar spectra is discussed. The BUSS optical system, comprising an 0.40 m aperture Cassegrain telescope and an Ebert-Fastie spectrometer, points at various selected stars and focuses a portion of their spectra on the photocathode of an image dissector tube. The spectral region between 2,775 Angstroms and 2,825 Angstroms is sampled by the detector at 0.25 Angstroms increments using photon counting techniques. The pointing system for the payload uses a pair of orthogonal magnetometers which sense the earth's magnetic field for an aximuth reference, and a platform potentiometer for an elevation reference. This pointing system places the target star within the 3x1 degree field of view of an outer optical star tracker. The outer star tracker is then used to point the entire instrument to within one arc minute of the target star.

  2. Dynamical star-disk interaction in the young stellar system V354 Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, N. N. J.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Bouvier, J.; Favata, F.; Flaccomio, E.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The main goal of this work is to characterize the mass accretion and ejection processes of the classical T Tauri star V354 Mon, a member of the young stellar cluster NGC 2264. Methods: In March 2008, photometric and spectroscopic observations of V354 Mon were obtained simultaneously with the CoRoT satellite, the 60 cm telescope at the Observatório Pico dos Dias (LNA, Brazil) equipped with a CCD camera and Johnson/Cousins BV(RI)c filters, and the SOPHIE échelle spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS, France). Results: The light curve of V354 Mon shows periodical minima (P = 5.26 ± 0.50 days) that vary in depth and width at each rotational cycle. The BV(RI)c observations indicate that the system becomes slightly bluer as the flux increases. The spectra of this T Tauri star exhibit variable emission lines, with blueshifted and redshifted absorption components associated with a disk wind and with the accretion process, respectively, confirming the magnetospheric accretion scenario. From the analysis of the photometric and spectroscopic data, it is possible to identify correlations between the emission line variability and the light-curve modulation of the young system, such as the occurrence of pronounced redshifted absorption in the Hα line at the epoch of minimum flux. This is evidence that during photometric minima we see the accretion funnel projected onto the stellar photosphere in our line of sight, implying that the hot spot coincides with the light-curve minima. We applied models of cold and hot spots and a model of occultation by circumstellar material to investigate the source of the observed photometric variations. Conclusions: We conclude that nonuniformly distributed material in the inner part of the circumstellar disk is the main cause of the photometric modulation, which does not exclude the presence of hot and cold spots at the stellar surface. It is believed that the distortion in the inner part of the disk is created by the

  3. Planets and Stellar Activity: Hide and Seek in the CoRoT-7 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, R. D.; Cameron, A. C.; Queloz, D.; Barros, S. C. C.; Deleuil, M.; Fares, R.; Gillon, M.; Hatzes, A.; Lanza, A. F.; Lovis, C.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Unruh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the transiting Super-Earth CoRoT-7b, several investigations have been made of the number and precise masses of planets present in the system, but they all yield different results, owing to the star's high level of activity. Radial velocity (RV) variations induced by stellar activity therefore need to be modelled and removed to allow a reliable detection of all planets in the system. We re-observed CoRoT-7 in January 2012 with both HARPS and the CoRoT satellite, so that we now have the benefit of simultaneous RV and photometric data. We fitted the off-transit variations in the CoRoT lightcurve using a harmonic decomposition similar to that implemented in Queloz et al. (2009). This fit was then used to model the stellar RV contribution, according to the methods described by Aigrain et al. (2011). This model was incorporated into a Monte Carlo Markov Chain in order to make a precise determination of the orbits of CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c. We also assess the evidence for the presence of one or two additional planetary companions.

  4. Hydrodynamic Moving-mesh Simulations of the Common Envelope Phase in Binary Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The common envelope (CE) phase is an important stage in binary stellar evolution. It is needed to explain many close binary stellar systems, such as cataclysmic variables, SN Ia progenitors, or X-ray binaries. To form the resulting close binary, the initial orbit has to shrink, thereby transferring energy to the primary giant's envelope that is hence ejected. The details of this interaction, however, are still not understood. Here, we present new hydrodynamic simulations of the dynamical spiral-in forming a CE system. We apply the moving-mesh code arepo to follow the interaction of a 1{M}⊙ compact star with a 2{M}⊙ red giant possessing a 0.4{M}⊙ core. The nearly Lagrangian scheme combines advantages of smoothed particle hydrodynamics and traditional grid-based hydrodynamic codes and allows us to capture also small flow features at high spatial resolution. Our simulations reproduce the initial transfer of energy and angular momentum from the binary core to the envelope by spiral shocks seen in previous studies, but after about 20 orbits a new phenomenon is observed. Large-scale flow instabilities are triggered by shear flows between adjacent shock layers. These indicate the onset of turbulent convection in the CE, thus altering the transport of energy on longer timescales. At the end of our simulation, only 8% of the envelope mass is ejected. The failure to unbind the envelope completely may be caused by processes on thermal timescales or unresolved microphysics.

  5. A new Monte Carlo method for dynamical evolution of non-spherical stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel Monte Carlo method for simulating the dynamical evolution of stellar systems in arbitrary geometry. The orbits of stars are followed in a smooth potential represented by a basis-set expansion and perturbed after each timestep using local velocity diffusion coefficients from the standard two-body relaxation theory. The potential and diffusion coefficients are updated after an interval of time that is a small fraction of the relaxation time, but may be longer than the dynamical time. Thus, our approach is a bridge between the Spitzer's formulation of the Monte Carlo method and the temporally smoothed self-consistent field method. The primary advantages are the ability to follow the secular evolution of shape of the stellar system, and the possibility of scaling the amount of two-body relaxation to the necessary value, unrelated to the actual number of particles in the simulation. Possible future applications of this approach in galaxy dynamics include the problem of consumption of stars by a massive black hole in a non-spherical galactic nucleus, evolution of binary supermassive black holes, and the influence of chaos on the shape of galaxies, while for globular clusters it may be used for studying the influence of rotation.

  6. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  7. Compact planetary systems perturbed by an inclined companion. II. Stellar spin-orbit evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-07-10

    The stellar spin orientation relative to the orbital planes of multiplanet systems is becoming accessible to observations. Here, we analyze and classify different types of spin-orbit evolution in compact multiplanet systems perturbed by an inclined outer companion. Our study is based on classical secular theory, using a vectorial approach developed in a separate paper. When planet-planet perturbations are truncated at the second order in eccentricity and mutual inclination, and the planet-companion perturbations are developed at the quadrupole order, the problem becomes integrable. The motion is composed of a uniform precession of the whole system around the total angular momentum, and in the rotating frame, the evolution is periodic. Here, we focus on the relative motion associated with the oscillations of the inclination between the planet system and the outer orbit and of the obliquities of the star with respect to the two orbital planes. The solution is obtained using a powerful geometric method. With this technique, we identify four different regimes characterized by the nutation amplitude of the stellar spin axis relative to the orbital plane of the planets. In particular, the obliquity of the star reaches its maximum when the system is in the Cassini regime where planets have more angular momentum than the star and where the precession rate of the star is similar to that of the planets induced by the companion. In that case, spin-orbit oscillations exceed twice the inclination between the planets and the companion. Even if the mutual inclination is only ≅ 20°, this resonant case can cause the spin-orbit angle to oscillate between perfectly aligned and retrograde values.

  8. An experimental system for spectral line ratio measurements in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Pelaez, R.

    2008-10-15

    The chord-integrated emissions of spectral lines have been monitored in the TJ-II stellarator by using a spectral system with time and space scanning capabilities and relative calibration over the entire UV-visible spectral range. This system has been used to study the line ratio of lines of different ionization stages of carbon (C{sup 5+} 5290 A and C{sup 4+} 2271 A) for plasma diagnostic purposes. The local emissivity of these ions has been reconstructed, for quasistationary profiles, by means of the inversion Fisher method described previously. The experimental line ratio is being empirically studied and in parallel a simple spectroscopic model has been developed to account for that ratio. We are investigating whether the role played by charge exchange processes with neutrals and the existence of non-Maxwellian electrons, intrinsic to Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) heating, leave any distinguishable mark on this diagnostic method.

  9. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 6th Cambridge Workshop, Seattle, WA, Sept. 18-21, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, George (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun encompasses stellar chromospheres and coronae, binary stars, the stellar evolution of contracting stars and red giants, stellar evolution abundances of the elements, mass loss and envelopes, and stellar pulsation. Specific issues addressed include theories regarding the acoustic and magnetic heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae, stellar granulation, wave heating in magnetic flux tubes, observations of the solar Ca-II lines, longitudinal-transverse magnetic tube waves in the solar atmosphere, radio emission from rapidly rotating cool giant stars, and spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars. Also addressed are the optical and UV spectra of RS-CVn stars, emission lines from T-Tauri stars, the spectroscopy of HR1614 group stars, red giants in external galaxies, the rotation of evolved stars, the transition from red giant to planetary nebula, and radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of variable stars.

  10. [Stellar Occultation Studies of Small Bodies in the Outer Solar System: Accomplishments, Status, and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, James

    2005-01-01

    Bodies residing in the outer solar system exhibit unique physical processes, and some of the lessons learned from them can be applied to understanding what occurred in the outer solar system during its formation and early evolution. Pluto, the largest known Kuiper Belt object (KBO), and its near twin Triton--an ex-KBO that has been captured by Neptune--have nitrogen atmospheres that are in vapor-pressure equilibrium with surface ice. These atmospheres are most sensitively probed from Earth by the technique of Stellar occultations, which can provide the temperature and pressure profiles of these atmospheres at a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. Recent results from occultations show that the surface pressure of Triton's atmosphere has been increasing and that the shape of the atmosphere deviates from its expected spherical figure. With the occultation technique we can also learn the sizes of smaller bodies that have formed in the outer solar system: Charon, the Centaurs, and KBOs. Our proposed program involves identifying occultation candidates, predicting occultations, observing occultations, analysis of the data, and synthesis of the occultation results with other data. The main goals for our proposed work are to (i) further observe occultations by Triton with the objectives of understanding its pressure changes, distortion, and enigmatic thermal structure (ii) determine whether the abrupt drop in Pluto's stellar occultation light curve is caused by a sharp thermal gradient near its surface or by atmospheric haze, (iii) further observations to characterize the potential collapse of Pluto's atmosphere as it recedes from the sun (information that should be of interest to the Pluto-Kuiper Express), ( iv ) determine Charon's radius more accurately than can be done with the mutual events to derive a better estimate of Charon's density, and ( v ) directly determine the size (and albedo) of Centaurs with the goal of more accurately estimating the sizes of KBOS.

  11. A versatile timing system based on OS9 for the Spanish stellarator TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pacios, L.; Pena, A. de la; Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Lapayese, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe the Timing System for the TJ-II Stellarator, which is presently under construction in Madrid (Spain), and which is expected to start operation in 1996. The Timing System is an essential element of the TJ-II, that has been commissioned, designed, and built to provide synchronization for all the subsystems, diagnostics and auxiliary heating systems of TJ-II. Its structure is both centralized and distributed. The PSK (Phase Shift Keying) modulation technique is used to distribute simultaneously both timing and event information via fiber optic link. The system provides absolute timing references with a variable time resolution ranging from 500 ns to 1 ms, depending on the span time selected, but in all cases, with a precision of 500 ns. The system allows a wide variety of programmable operating modes and control features to be configured easily in a user friendly environment. These are used to generate the sequence of signals required during each experimental pulse. In addition a new set of libraries and C programs named TEMPO have been developed for the OS9 Real Time Operating System, and a set of VME cards has been designed. Remote access via ethernet LAN and multi-user capabilities are also provided. The Timing System has been fully developed by the TJ-II Monitoring and Control Team at CIEMAT. This paper outlines the detailed design of the hardware and software and gives results from the test phase.

  12. Stellar Activity and Exclusion of the Outer Planet in the HD 99492 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Thirumalachari, Badrinath; Henry, Gregory W.; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Fischer, Debra A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-03-01

    A historical problem for indirect exoplanet detection has been contending with the intrinsic variability of the host star. If the variability is periodic, it can easily mimic various exoplanet signatures, such as radial velocity (RV) variations that originate with the stellar surface rather than the presence of a planet. Here we present an update for the HD 99492 planetary system, using new RV and photometric measurements from the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey. Our extended time series and subsequent analyses of the Ca ii H&K emission lines show that the host star has an activity cycle of ∼13 years. The activity cycle correlates with the purported orbital period of the outer planet, the signature of which is thus likely due to the host star activity. We further include a revised Keplerian orbital solution for the remaining planet, along with a new transit ephemeris. Our transit-search observations were inconclusive.

  13. Dual-frequency and dual-polarization VLBI observations of the stellar system Algol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, Jean-Francois; Mutel, Robert L.; Preston, Robert A.; Phillips, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Results of multiepoch VLBI observations of the stellar system Algol are presented, including dual-polarization and dual-frequency measurements at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz. The brightness temperature of the radio source is generally between 3 x 10 to the 8th K and 5 x 10 to the 9th K and is consistent with gyrosynchrotron emission from energetic electrons with mean energy less than 1 MeV in an active coronal region. Two exceptional events were observed: a high-brightness, broad-band outburst occurring simultaneously at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz, and a short-duration, highly polarized and high-brightness temperature outburst at 1.66 GHz. A simple physical model which includes all three types of emission is suggested.

  14. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MODERATE- AND LONG-PERIOD GIANT PLANETS: SCATTERING EXPERIMENTS FOR SYSTEMS IN ISOLATION AND WITH STELLAR FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, Aaron C.; Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.

    2012-07-20

    The chance that a planetary system will interact with another member of its host star's nascent cluster would be greatly increased if gas giant planets form in situ on wide orbits. In this paper, we explore the outcomes of planet-planet scattering for a distribution of multi-planet systems that all have one of the planets on an initial orbit of 100 AU. The scattering experiments are run with and without stellar flybys. We convolve the outcomes with distributions for protoplanetary disk and stellar cluster sizes to generalize the results where possible. We find that the frequencies of large mutual inclinations and high eccentricities are sensitive to the number of planets in a system, but not strongly to stellar flybys. However, flybys do play a role in changing the low and moderate portions of the mutual inclination distributions, and erase dynamically cold initial conditions on average. Wide-orbit planets can be mixed throughout the planetary system, and in some cases, can potentially become hot Jupiters, which we demonstrate using scattering experiments that include a tidal damping model. If planets form in situ on wide orbits, then there will be discernible differences in the proper-motion distributions of a sample of wide-orbit planets compared with a pure scattering formation mechanism. Stellar flybys can enhance the frequency of ejections in planetary systems, but autoionization is likely to remain the dominant source of free-floating planets.

  15. Alignment of the stellar spin with the orbits of a three-planet system.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Winn, Joshua N; Barclay, Thomas; Clarke, Bruce D; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan J; Geary, John C; Holman, Matthew J; Howard, Andrew W; Jenkins, Jon M; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Mullally, Fergal; Ragozzine, Darin; Seader, Shawn E; Still, Martin; Thompson, Susan E

    2012-07-26

    The Sun's equator and the planets' orbital planes are nearly aligned, which is presumably a consequence of their formation from a single spinning gaseous disk. For exoplanetary systems this well-aligned configuration is not guaranteed: dynamical interactions may tilt planetary orbits, or stars may be misaligned with the protoplanetary disk through chaotic accretion , magnetic interactions or torques from neighbouring stars. Indeed, isolated 'hot Jupiters' are often misaligned and even orbiting retrograde. Here we report an analysis of transits of planets over starspots on the Sun-like star Kepler-30 (ref. 8), and show that the orbits of its three planets are aligned with the stellar equator. Furthermore, the orbits are aligned with one another to within a few degrees. This configuration is similar to that of our Solar System, and contrasts with the isolated hot Jupiters. The orderly alignment seen in the Kepler-30 system suggests that high obliquities are confined to systems that experienced disruptive dynamical interactions. Should this be corroborated by observations of other coplanar multi-planet systems, then star-disk misalignments would be ruled out as the explanation for the high obliquities of hot Jupiters, and dynamical interactions would be implicated as the origin of hot Jupiters. PMID:22836999

  16. Simultaneous modelling of the stellar halo and globular cluster system of NGC 5128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Michael. A.; Harris, William E.; Harris, Gretchen L. H.; Forbes, Duncan A.

    2003-03-01

    An important test for models of galaxy formation lies in the metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) of spheroid stars and their globular clusters (GCs). We have compared the MDFs obtained from spectroscopy of the GCs and the star-by-star photometry of the old halo red giants in the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 5128, with the predictions of a Λ-cold dark matter (ΛCDM) semi-analytic galaxy formation model. We have selected model ellipticals comparable in luminosity and environment to NGC 5128, and reconstructed their MDFs by summing the total star formation occurring over all their progenitors. A direct comparison between models and data shows that the MDFs are qualitatively similar, both have stellar components that are predominantly metal-rich (~0.8 Zsolar), with a small fraction of metal-poor stars extending down to 0.002 Zsolar. The model MDFs show only small variations between systems, whether they constitute brightest cluster galaxies or low-luminosity group ellipticals. Our comparison also reveals that these model MDFs harbour a greater fraction of stars at Z > Zsolar than the observations, producing generally more metal-rich (by ~0.1 dex) MDFs. One possibility is that the outer-bulge observations are missing some of the highest-metallicity stars in this galaxy. We find good agreement between the model and observed GC MDFs, provided that the metal-poor GC formation is halted early (z~ 5) in the model. Under this proviso, both the models and data are bimodal with peaks at 0.1 Zsolar and Zsolar, and cover similar metallicity ranges. This broad agreement for the stars and GCs suggests that the bulk of the stellar population in NGC 5128 may have been built up in a hierarchical fashion, involving both quiescent and merger-induced star formation. The predicted existence of age structure amongst the metal-rich GCs needs to be tested against high-quality data for this galaxy.

  17. MODEL-INDEPENDENT STELLAR AND PLANETARY MASSES FROM MULTI-TRANSITING EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Johnson, John Asher

    2013-01-10

    Precise exoplanet characterization requires precise classification of exoplanet host stars. The masses of host stars are commonly estimated by comparing their spectra to those predicted by stellar evolution models. However, spectroscopically determined properties are difficult to measure accurately for stars that are substantially different from the Sun, such as M-dwarfs and evolved stars. Here, we propose a new method to dynamically measure the masses of transiting planets near mean-motion resonances and their host stars by combining observations of transit timing variations with radial velocity (RV) measurements. We derive expressions to analytically determine the mass of each member of the system and demonstrate the technique on the Kepler-18 system. We compare these analytic results to numerical simulations and find that the two are consistent. We identify eight systems for which our technique could be applied if follow-up RV measurements are collected. We conclude that this analysis would be optimal for systems discovered by next-generation missions similar to TESS or PLATO, which will target bright stars that are amenable to efficient RV follow-up.

  18. AN UPPER LIMIT TO THE VELOCITY DISPERSION OF RELAXED STELLAR SYSTEMS WITHOUT MASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M. Coleman; Davies, Melvyn B.

    2012-08-10

    Massive black holes have been discovered in all closely examined galaxies with high velocity dispersion. The case is not as clear for lower-dispersion systems such as low-mass galaxies and globular clusters. Here we suggest that above a critical velocity dispersion {approx}40 km s{sup -1}, massive central black holes will form in relaxed stellar systems at any cosmic epoch. This is because above this dispersion primordial binaries cannot support the system against deep core collapse. If, as previous simulations show, the black holes formed in the cluster settle to produce a dense subcluster, then given the extremely high densities reached during core collapse the holes will merge with each other. For low velocity dispersions and hence low cluster escape speeds, mergers will typically kick out all or all but one of the holes due to three-body kicks or the asymmetric emission of gravitational radiation. If one hole remains, it will tidally disrupt stars at a high rate. If none remain, one is formed after runaway collisions between stars, and then it tidally disrupts stars at a high rate. The accretion rate after disruption is many orders of magnitude above Eddington. If, as several studies suggest, the hole can accept matter at that rate because the generated radiation is trapped and advected, then it will grow quickly and form a massive central black hole.

  19. Dynamical Stability and Long-term Evolution of Rotating Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varri, Anna L.; Vesperini, E.; McMillan, S. L. W.; Bertin, G.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first results of an extensive survey of N-body simulations designed to investigate the dynamical stability and the long-term evolution of two new families of self-consistent stellar dynamical models, characterized by the presence of internal rotation. The first family extends the well-known King models to the case of axisymmetric systems flattened by solid-body rotation while the second family is characterized by differential rotation. The equilibrium configurations thus obtained can be described in terms of two dimensionless parameters, which measure the concentration and the amount of rotation, respectively. Slowly rotating configurations are found to be dynamically stable and we followed their long-term evolution, in order to evaluate the interplay between collisional relaxation and angular momentum transport. We also studied the stability of rapidly rotating models, which are characterized by the presence of a toroidal core embedded in an otherwise quasi-spherical configuration. In both cases, a description in terms of the radial and global properties, such as the ratio between the ordered kinetic energy and the gravitational energy of the system, is provided. Because the role of angular momentum in the process of cluster formation is only partly understood, we also undertook a preliminary investigation of the violent relaxation of simple systems initially characterized by approximate solid-body rotation. The properties of the final equilibrium configurations thus obtained are compared with those of the above-described family of differentially rotating models.

  20. The Dynamics of Dense Stellar Systems with a Massive Central Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Michael A.

    In this work, we explore the dynamics of two similar types of dense stellar systems with a central black hole of mass much greater than a typical stellar object. In particular, we use numerical N-body simulations to examine the effects that the massive black hole (MBH) has on the surrounding stars and compact objects as they pertain to indirectly observable signals. The first systems we consider are the highly uncertain cusps likely comprised of primarily massive compact objects that surround the MBHs at the center of typical galaxies. The gradual inspiral of a compact object by emission of gravitational radiation, called an extreme mass-ratio inspiral (EMRI), will produce a signal that falls in the peak detection range of the space-bound laser interferometer space antenna (LISA). Despite a veritable gold mine of astrophysical data that could be gleaned from such a detection, previous investigations in the literature have left the predicted rate of these events uncertain by several orders of magnitude. We present direct N-body simulations of the innermost ≤ 100 objects with the inclusion of the first-order Post-Newtonian correction with the aim of reducing one of the key uncertainties in the dynamics of these systems - the efficiency of resonant relaxation. We find that relativistic pericenter precession prevents a significant enhancement of the EMRI rate; the rate we derive during this work is consistent with those derived in the literature from less direct methods. We do find, however, that our EMRI progenitors originate from much closer to the MBH than previous investigations have suggested was likely. Our second investigation delves into the possibility of finding intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), with masses ˜ 102-4 Msun , at the center of dense star clusters. Because of the substantial investment of telescope time needed to perform the multiyear proper motion studies that are likely needed to achieve a definitive detection, careful selection of

  1. Ground Based Astrometric Search for Substellar Companions in Stellar Multiple Systems, The Case of the Exoplanet Host System HD 19994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röll, T.; Seifahrt, A.; Neuhäuser, R.; Köhler, R.

    2010-12-01

    Due to the unknown inclination angle, radial velocity (RV) measurements only provide the minimum mass of companions. In combination with transit observations one can derive the true mass, but a transit is only observable for nearly edge-on systems. For all other systems, astrometry is the only method to get the true mass of an orbiting companion by measuring the reflex motion of the host star. In our ongoing astrometric search program we observe stellar multiple systems within a distance of 100 parsec in order to confirm RV exoplanet candidates and to search for unknown substellar companions. Here we present preliminary results of one of our targets, the binary HD 19994, which is known to harbour a RV planet candidate around the A component. From our astrometric observations over the last years, it seems that a high mass brown dwarf is orbiting the low-mass B component. Analysis of our data with speckle interferometry confirms the existence of an additional body.

  2. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  3. Stellar Masses in the Mysterious Young Triple Star System AS 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encalada, Frankie; Rosero, Viviana A.; Prato, Lisa A.; Bruhns, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The lack of accurate absolute mass measurements for young, low-mass pre-main sequence stars is problematic for the calibration of stellar evolutionary track models. An on-going program to increase the sample of young star masses begins with mass ratio measurements in spectroscopic binaries. By the end of its 5-year duration, the GAIA all-sky mission will provide new astrometric measurements for young spectroscopic binaries down to separations of tens of microarcseconds, yielding absolute masses for double-lined systems. We obtain mass ratios by taking high-resolution spectra of young double-lined spectroscopic binaries over a few epochs to construct a radial velocity versus phase diagram. For the young spectroscopic binary AS 205B, using eight of our own spectra supplied by the CSHELL instrument on the IRTF at Mauna Kea, plus one from the literature, we estimate a period of approximately 140 days, an eccentricity of 0.7, and a mass-ratio of 0.5. This spectroscopic system comprises the secondary in a 1.4'' visual binary in which both the A and B components are surrounded by optically thick, actively accreting disks, making AS 205B a member of that rare class of young spectroscopic binaries with a primordial circumbinary disk.

  4. Stellar scattering and the formation of hot Jupiters in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, J. G.; Beaugé, C.

    2015-04-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are usually defined as giant Jovian-size planets with orbital periods P<=10 days. Although they lie close to the star, several have finite eccentricities and significant misalignment angle with respect to the stellar equator, leading to ~20% of HJs in retrograde orbits. More than half, however, seem consistent with near-circular and planar orbits. In recent years, two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the excited and misaligned subpopulation of HJs: Lidov-Kozai migration and planet-planet scattering. Although both are based on completely different dynamical phenomena, at first hand they appear to be equally effective in generating hot planets. Nevertheless, there has been no detailed analysis comparing the predictions of both mechanisms, especially with respect to the final distribution of orbital characteristics. In this paper, we present a series of numerical simulations of Lidov-Kozai trapping of single planets in compact binary systems that suffered a close fly-by of a background star. Both the planet and the binary component are initially placed in coplanar orbits, although the inclination of the impactor is assumed random. After the passage of the third star, we follow the orbital and spin evolution of the planet using analytical models based on the octupole expansion of the secular Hamiltonian. We also include tidal effects, stellar oblateness and post-Newtonian perturbations. The present work aims at the comparison of the two mechanisms (Lidov-Kozai and planet-planet scattering) as an explanation for the excited and inclined HJs in binary systems. We compare the results obtained through this paper with results in Beaugé & Nesvorný (2012), where the authors analyse how the planet-planet scattering mechanisms works in order to form this hot Jovian-size planets. We find that several of the orbital characteristics of the simulated HJs are caused by tidal trapping from quasi-parabolic orbits, independent of the driving mechanism

  5. Orbital stability analysis and chaotic dynamics of exoplanets in multi-stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyal, Suman

    The advancement in detection technology has substantially increased the discovery rate of exoplanets in the last two decades. The confirmation of thousands of exoplanets orbiting the solar type stars has raised new astrophysical challenges, including the studies of orbital dynamics and long-term stability of such planets. Continuous orbital stability of the planet in stellar habitable zone is considered vital for life to develop. Hence, these studies furthers one self-evident aim of mankind to find an answer to the century old question: Are we alone?. This dissertation investigates the planetary orbits in single and binary star systems. Within binaries, a planet could orbit either one or both stars as S-type or P-type, respectively. I have considered S-type planets in two binaries, gamma Cephei and HD 196885, and compute their orbits by using various numerical techniques to assess their periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic nature. The Hill stability (HS) function, which measures the orbital perturbation induced by the nearby companion, is calculated for each system and then its efficacy as a new chaos indicator is tested against Maximum Lyapunov Exponents (MLE) and Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO). The dynamics of HD 196885 AB is further explored with an emphasis on the planet's higher orbital inclination relative to the binary plane. I have quantitatively mapped out the chaotic and quasi-periodic regions of the system's phase space, which indicates a likely regime of the planet's inclination. In, addition, the resonant angle is inspected to determine whether alternation between libration and circulation occurs as a consequence of Kozai oscillations, a probable mechanism that can drive the planetary orbit to a large inclination. The studies of planetary system in GJ 832 shows potential of hosting multiple planets in close orbits. The phase space of GJ 832c (inner planet) and the Earth-mass test planet(s) are analyzed for periodic

  6. Absolute masses and radii determination in multiplanetary systems without stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Mardling, R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Damiani, C.; Bruno, G.; Bonfils, X.; Deleuil, M.

    2015-11-01

    The masses and radii of extrasolar planets are key observables for understanding their interior, formation and evolution. While transit photometry and Doppler spectroscopy are used to measure the radii and masses respectively of planets relative to those of their host star, estimates for the true values of these quantities rely on theoretical models of the host star which are known to suffer from systematic differences with observations. When a system is composed of more than two bodies, extra information is contained in the transit photometry and radial velocity data. Velocity information (finite speed-of-light, Doppler) is needed to break the Newtonian MR-3 degeneracy. We performed a photodynamical modelling of the two-planet transiting system Kepler-117 using all photometric and spectroscopic data available. We demonstrate how absolute masses and radii of single-star planetary systems can be obtained without resorting to stellar models. Limited by the precision of available radial velocities (38 m s-1), we achieve accuracies of 20 per cent in the radii and 70 per cent in the masses, while simulated 1 m s-1 precision radial velocities lower these to 1 per cent for the radii and 2 per cent for the masses. Since transiting multiplanet systems are common, this technique can be used to measure precisely the mass and radius of a large sample of stars and planets. We anticipate these measurements will become common when the TESS and PLATO mission provide high-precision light curves of a large sample of bright stars. These determinations will improve our knowledge about stars and planets, and provide strong constraints on theoretical models.

  7. THE QUADRUPLE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE SYSTEM LkCa 3: IMPLICATIONS FOR STELLAR EVOLUTION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Prato, L.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Badenas, Mariona; Schaefer, G. H.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2013-08-10

    We report the discovery that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) object LkCa 3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close ({approx}0.''5) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94 day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented by new near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double lined; the second one has a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and NIR flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we also detect the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06 day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of all of these constraints with current stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth series points to an age of 1.4 Myr and a distance of 133 pc, consistent with previous estimates for the region and suggesting that the system is on the near side of the Taurus complex. Similar comparisons of the properties of LkCa 3 and the well-known quadruple PMS system GG Tau with the widely used models from the Lyon series for a mixing length parameter of {alpha}{sub ML} = 1.0 strongly favor the Dartmouth models.

  8. Constraints on MACHO Dark Matter from Compact Stellar Systems in Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.

    2016-06-01

    I show that a recently discovered star cluster near the center of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Eridanus II provides strong constraints on massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) of ≳5 M ⊙ as the main component of dark matter. MACHO dark matter will dynamically heat the cluster, driving it to larger sizes and higher velocity dispersions until it dissolves into its host galaxy. The stars in compact ultra-faint dwarf galaxies themselves will be subject to the same dynamical heating; the survival of at least 10 such galaxies places independent limits on MACHO dark matter of masses ≳10 M ⊙. Both Eri II’s cluster and the compact ultra-faint dwarfs are characterized by stellar masses of just a few thousand M ⊙ and half-light radii of 13 pc (for the cluster) and ∼30 pc (for the ultra-faint dwarfs). These systems close the ∼20–100 M ⊙ window of allowed MACHO dark matter and combine with existing constraints from microlensing, wide binaries, and disk kinematics to rule out dark matter composed entirely of MACHOs from ∼10‑7 M ⊙ up to arbitrarily high masses.

  9. Is the Stellar System WR 11 a Gamma-Ray Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaglia, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Many early-type stars are in systems; some of them have been indicated as putative high-energy emitters. The radiation would be produced at the region where two stellar winds collide. Compelling evidence of such emission was found only for the colliding-wind binary (CWB) Eta Car, which was associated to a GeV source. Very recently, the closest CWB, WR 11, was proposed as a counterpart of a 6σ emission excess, measured with the Fermi LAT satellite. We sought evidence to support or reject the hypothesis that WR 11 is responsible of the gamma-ray excess. Archive radio interferometric data at 1.4 and 2.5 GHz taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array along 16 dates were reduced. The sizes of the field-of-view at 2.5 GHz and of the central region of the Fermi LAT excess are alike. We analysed the emission of the WR 11 field, characterised the radio sources detected and derived their spectral indices, to investigate their nature. Eight sources with fluxes above 10 mJy were detected at both frequencies. All but one (WR 11) showed negative spectral indices. Four of them were identified with known objects, including WR 11. A fifth source, labeled here S6, is a promising candidate to produce gamma-ray emission, besides the CWB WR 11.

  10. Frontiers of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses theoretical and observational views of star formation, spectroscopic constraints on the evolution of massive stars, very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, asteroseismology, globular clusters as tests of stellar evolution, observational tests of stellar evolution, and mass loss from cool evolved giant stars. Also discussed are white dwarfs and hot subdwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, supernovae from single stars, close binaries with evolved components, accretion disks in interacting binaries, supernovae in binary systems, stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution, and interacting binaries containing compact components.

  11. Influence of Stellar Multiplicity on Planet Formation. II. Planets are Less Common in Multiple-star Systems with Separations Smaller than 1500 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-01

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  12. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  13. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect reloaded: Probing the 3D spin-orbit geometry, differential stellar rotation, and the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum of star-planet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, H. M.; Lovis, C.; Bourrier, V.; Beeck, B.; Watson, C. A.; Pepe, F.

    2016-04-01

    When a planet transits its host star, it blocks regions of the stellar surface from view; this causes a distortion of the spectral lines and a change in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities, known as the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. Since the LOS velocities depend, in part, on the stellar rotation, the RM waveform is sensitive to the star-planet alignment (which provides information on the system's dynamical history). We present a new RM modelling technique that directly measures the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum behind the planet. This is done by scaling the continuum flux of the (HARPS) spectra by the transit light curve, and then subtracting the in- from the out-of-transit spectra to isolate the starlight behind the planet. This technique does not assume any shape for the intrinsic local profiles. In it, we also allow for differential stellar rotation and centre-to-limb variations in the convective blueshift. We apply this technique to HD 189733 and compare to 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We reject rigid body rotation with high confidence (>99% probability), which allows us to determine the occulted stellar latitudes and measure the stellar inclination. In turn, we determine both the sky-projected (λ ≈ -0.4 ± 0.2°) and true 3D obliquity (ψ ≈ 7+12-4°). We also find good agreement with the MHD simulations, with no significant centre-to-limb variations detectable in the local profiles. Hence, this technique provides a new powerful tool that can probe stellar photospheres, differential rotation, determine 3D obliquities, and remove sky-projection biases in planet migration theories. This technique can be implemented with existing instrumentation, but will become even more powerful with the next generation of high-precision radial velocity spectrographs.

  14. Ceci N'est Pas a globular cluster: the metallicity distribution of the stellar system Terzan 5

    SciTech Connect

    Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Lovisi, L.; Rich, R. M.; Reitzel, D.; Valenti, E.; Ibata, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present new determinations of the iron abundance for 220 stars belonging to the stellar system Terzan 5 in the Galactic bulge. The spectra have been acquired with FLAMES at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory and DEIMOS at the Keck II Telescope. This is by far the largest spectroscopic sample of stars ever observed in this stellar system. From this data set, a subsample of targets with spectra unaffected by TiO bands was extracted and statistically decontaminated from field stars. Once combined with 34 additional stars previously published by our group, a total sample of 135 member stars covering the entire radial extent of the system has been used to determine the metallicity distribution function of Terzan 5. The iron distribution clearly shows three peaks: a super-solar component at [Fe/H] ≅ 0.25 dex, accounting for ∼29% of the sample, a dominant sub-solar population at [Fe/H] ≅ –0.30 dex, corresponding to ∼62% of the total, and a minor (6%) metal-poor component at [Fe/H] ≅ –0.8 dex. Such a broad, multi-modal metallicity distribution demonstrates that Terzan 5 is not a genuine globular cluster but the remnant of a much more complex stellar system.

  15. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Programme to Study the Satellite Stellar Systems around Bright Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Napolitano, N.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Paolillo, M.; Iodice, E.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Raimondo, G.; Spavone, M.; La Barbera, F.; Puzia, T. H.; Schipani, P.

    2015-03-01

    The VEGAS-SSS programme is devoted to studying the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) in and around bright galaxies, built on the VLT Survey Telescope early-type galaxy survey (VEGAS), an ongoing guaranteed time imaging survey distributed over many semesters (Principal Investigator: Capaccioli). On completion, the VEGAS survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ~ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, surface brightness fluctuations, etc.) and the distribution of clustered light (compact ''small'' stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  16. The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer: Exploring Exoplanetary Systems with an Infrared Space Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchi, W. C.; Barry, R. K.; Lopez, B.; Augereau, J. C.; Ollivier, M.; Leger, A.; Petrov, R.; Kern, P.; Borde, P.; Monin, J.-L.; Jacquinod, S.; Beust, H.; Bonfils, X.

    2009-11-01

    The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) is a mission concept for a nulling interferometer for the near-to-mid-infrared spectral region. FKSI is conceived as a mid-sized strategic or Probe class mission. FKSI has been endorsed by the Exoplanet Community Forum 2008 as such a mission and has been costed to be within the expected budget. The current design of FKSI is a two-element nulling interferometer. The two telescopes, separated by 12.5m, are precisely pointed (by small steering mirrors) on the target star. The two path lengths are accurately controlled to within a few nanometers to be precisely the same. A phase shifter/beam combiner (via Mach-Zender interferometer) produces an output beam consisting of the nulled sum of the planet's light and the star's light. When properly oriented, the starlight is nulled by a factor of 10^{-4}, and the planet light is undimmed. Accurate modeling of the signal is used to subtract this residual starlight, permitting the detection of planets much fainter than the host star. The current version of FKSI with 0.5 m apertures and waveband 3-8 μm has the following main capabilities: (1) detect exozodiacal emission levels to that of our own solar system (1 Solar System Zodi) around nearby F, G, and K, stars; (2) characterize spectroscopically the atmospheres of a large number of known non-transiting planets; (3) survey and characterize nearby stars for planets down to 2 Earth-radii from just inside the habitable zone and inward. An enhanced version of FKSI with 1-m apertures separated by 20-m and cooled to 40 K, with science waveband 5-15 μm, allows for the detection and characterization of 2 Earth-radius and smaller super-Earths in the habitable zone around nearby stars.

  17. Stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the understanding and use of chromospheric diagnostics are discussed with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) trends emerging from semiempirical models of single stars; (2) the validity of claims that theoretical models of chromospheres are becoming realistic; (3) the correlation between the widths of Ca 2 H and K line emission cores and stellar absolute luminosity extending over 15 magnitudes (Wilson-Bappu relation); and (4) the existence of systematic flow patterns in stellar chromospheres.

  18. Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-10-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on nearby galaxies, which are best suited to study this theme. Of course, the understanding of stellar populations is intimately connected to understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies, one of the great outstanding problems of astronomy. We are currently in a situation where very large observational advances have been made in recent years. Galaxies have been detected up to a redshift of ten. A huge effort has to be made so that stellar population theory can catch up with observations. Since most galaxies are far away, information about them has to come from stellar population synthesis of integrated light. Here I will discuss how stellar evolution theory, together with observations in our Milky Way and Local Group, are used as building blocks to analyse these integrated stellar populations.

  19. On the Abundance of Water in Extrasolar Planetary Systems as a Function of Stellar Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Gerardo

    2016-06-01

    The discovery, to date, of several hundred confirmed extra solar planets and a statistical analysis of their properties has revealed intriguing patterns in the abundance and types of extrasolar planets. The metallicity of the host star appears to be a driver in determining extrasolar planetary system characteristics, although a mechanistic understanding of these relationships is not currently available. Understanding the broad relationship(s) between the characteristics of extrasolar planets and stellar metallicity thus appears timely.Recent work examining the timescales for water production in protoplanetary disks suggest that ionizing radiation required to drive surface chemistry in protoplanetary disks is insufficient and production timescales too slow to account for a significant amount of water in protoplanetary disks. Here we focus on the timescales for water production in cold molecular clouds and examine the relationship of this timescale as a function of molecular cloud metallicity. To do this, we consider the distribution of surface area concentration (dA/dV) in molecular clouds as a function of their metallicity and various MRN-like dust grain size distributions. We find that molecular cloud metallicity is a significant factor in determining upper-limits to the availability of water in molecular clouds and by extension, protoplanetary disks. The spectral index of the MRN distribution affects the upper-limits to H2O abundance, but the effect is not as significant as metallicity. We find that the ratio of H2O/SiO2 produced in a molecular cloud of solar metallicity can easily account for Earth’s present day ratio , supporting the “wet” hypothesis for the origins of Earth’s water. Future studies will focus on the retention of water on interstellar dust grain surfaces in protoplanetary disk environments inside the water line, the abundance of other volatile species, more detailed estimates of H2O destruction timescales in molecular clouds, and

  20. Chemical and kinematical properties of galactic bulge stars surrounding the stellar system Terzan 5

    SciTech Connect

    Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Lovisi, L.; Rich, R. M.; Reitzel, D.; Ibata, R.

    2014-08-20

    As part of a study aimed at determining the kinematical and chemical properties of Terzan 5, we present the first characterization of the bulge stars surrounding this puzzling stellar system. We observed 615 targets located well beyond the tidal radius of Terzan 5 and found that their radial velocity distribution is well described by a Gaussian function peaked at (v {sub rad}) = +21.0 ± 4.6 km s{sup –1} with dispersion σ {sub v} = 113.0 ± 2.7 km s{sup –1}. This is one of the few high-precision spectroscopic surveys of radial velocities for a large sample of bulge stars in such a low and positive latitude environment (b = +1.°7). We found no evidence of the peak at (v {sub rad}) ∼ +200 km s{sup –1} found in Nidever et al. Strong contamination of many observed spectra by TiO bands prevented us from deriving the iron abundance for the entire spectroscopic sample, introducing a selection bias. The metallicity distribution was finally derived for a subsample of 112 stars in a magnitude range where the effect of the selection bias is negligible. The distribution is quite broad and roughly peaked at solar metallicity ([Fe/H] ≅ +0.05 dex) with a similar number of stars in the super-solar and in the sub-solar ranges. The population number ratios in different metallicity ranges agree well with those observed in other low-latitude bulge fields, suggesting (1) the possible presence of a plateau for |b| < 4° in the ratio between stars in the super-solar (0 < [Fe/H] <0.5 dex) and sub-solar (–0.5 < [Fe/H] <0 dex) metallicity ranges; (2) a severe drop in the metal-poor component ([Fe/H] <–0.5) as a function of Galactic latitude.

  1. Planets and stellar activity: hide and seek in the CoRoT-7 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, R. D.; Collier Cameron, A.; Queloz, D.; Barros, S. C. C.; Deleuil, M.; Fares, R.; Gillon, M.; Lanza, A. F.; Lovis, C.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Unruh, Y. C.

    2014-09-01

    Since the discovery of the transiting super-Earth CoRoT-7b, several investigations have yielded different results for the number and masses of planets present in the system, mainly owing to the star's high level of activity. We re-observed CoRoT-7 in 2012 January with both HARPS and CoRoT, so that we now have the benefit of simultaneous radial-velocity and photometric data. This allows us to use the off-transit variations in the star's light curve to estimate the radial-velocity variations induced by the suppression of convective blueshift and the flux blocked by starspots. To account for activity-related effects in the radial velocities which do not have a photometric signature, we also include an additional activity term in the radial-velocity model, which we treat as a Gaussian process with the same covariance properties (and hence the same frequency structure) as the light curve. Our model was incorporated into a Monte Carlo Markov Chain in order to make a precise determination of the orbits of CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c. We measure the masses of planets b and c to be 4.73 ± 0.95 and 13.56 ± 1.08 M⊕, respectively. The density of CoRoT-7b is (6.61 ± 1.72)(Rp/1.58 R⊕)-3 g cm-3, which is compatible with a rocky composition. We search for evidence of an additional planet d, identified by previous authors with a period close to 9 d. We are not able to confirm the existence of a planet with this orbital period, which is close to the second harmonic of the stellar rotation at ˜7.9 d. Using Bayesian model selection, we find that a model with two planets plus activity-induced variations is most favoured.

  2. FIDUCIAL STELLAR POPULATION SEQUENCES FOR THE VJK{sub S} PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Brasseur, Crystal M.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Stetson, Peter B.; Casagrande, Luca; Bono, Giuseppe; Dall'Ora, Massimo E-mail: vandenbe@uvic.c E-mail: lcasagrande@mpa-garching.mpg.d E-mail: dallora@na.astro.i

    2010-12-15

    We have obtained broadband near-infrared photometry for seven Galactic star clusters (M 92, M 15, M 13, M 5, NGC 1851, M 71, and NGC 6791) using the WIRCam wide-field imager on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, supplemented by images of NGC 1851 taken with HAWK-I on the Very Large Telescope. In addition, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) observations of the [Fe/H] {approx}0.0 open cluster M 67 were added to the cluster database. From the resultant (V - J) - V and (V - K{sub S} ) - V color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), fiducial sequences spanning the range in metallicity, -2.4 {approx}< [Fe/H] {approx}< +0.3, have been defined which extend (for most clusters) from the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) to {approx}2.5 mag below the main-sequence turnoff. These fiducials provide a valuable set of empirical isochrones for the interpretation of stellar population data in the 2MASS system. We also compare our newly derived CMDs to Victoria isochrones that have been transformed to the observed plane using recent empirical and theoretical color-T{sub eff} relations. The models are able to reproduce the entire CMDs of clusters more metal rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-1.4 quite well, on the assumption of the same reddenings and distance moduli that yield good fits of the same isochrones to Johnson-Cousins BV(RI){sub C} photometry. However, the predicted giant branches become systematically redder than the observed RGBs as the cluster metallicity decreases. Possible explanations for these discrepancies are discussed.

  3. Accretion of planetary matter and the lithium problem in the 16 Cygni stellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, Morgan; Richard, Olivier; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    Context. The 16 Cygni system is composed of two solar analogues with similar masses and ages. A red dwarf is in orbit around 16 Cygni A, and 16 Cygni B hosts a giant planet. The abundances of heavy elements are similar in the two stars, but lithium is much more depleted in 16 Cygni B than in 16 Cygni A, by a factor of at least 4.7. Aims: The interest of studying the 16 Cygni system is that the two star have the same age and the same initial composition. The differences currently observed must be due to their different evolution, related to the fact that one of them hosts a planet while the other does not. Methods: We computed models of the two stars that precisely fit the observed seismic frequencies. We used the Toulouse Geneva Evolution Code (TGEC), which includes complete atomic diffusion (including radiative accelerations). We compared the predicted surface abundances with the spectroscopic observations and confirm that another mixing process is needed. We then included the effect of accretion-induced fingering convection. Results: The accretion of planetary matter does not change the metal abundances but leads to lithium destruction, which depends upon the accreted mass. A fraction of the Earth's mass is enough to explain the lithium surface abundances of 16 Cygni B. We also checked the beryllium abundances. Conclusions: In the case of accretion of heavy matter onto stellar surfaces, the accreted heavy elements do not remain in the outer convective zones, but are mixed downwards by fingering convection induced by the unstable μ-gradient. Depending on the accreted mass, this mixing process may transport lithium down to its nuclear destruction layers and lead to an extra lithium depletion at the surface. A fraction of the Earth's mass is enough to explain a lithium ratio of 4.7 in the 16 Cygni system. In this case beryllium is not destroyed. Such a process may be frequent in planet-hosting stars and should be studied in other cases in the future.

  4. RECON - A new system for probing the outer solar system with stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, M. W.; Keller, J. M.; Wasserman, L. H.

    2015-10-01

    The Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network (RECON) is a new system for coordinated occultation observations of outer solar system objects. Occultations by objects in the outer solar system are more difficult to predict due to their large distance and limited duration of the astrometric data used to determine their orbits and positions. This project brings together the research and educational community into a unique citizen-science partnership to overcome the difficulties of observing these distant objects. The goal of the project is to get sizes and shapes for TNOs with diameters larger than 100 km. As a result of the system design it will also serve as a probe for binary systems with spatial separations too small to be resolved directly. Our system takes the new approach of setting up a large number of fixed observing stations and letting the shadows come to the network. The nominal spacing of the stations is 50 km. The spread of the network is roughly 2000 km along a roughly north-south line in the western United States. The network contains 56 stations that are committed to the project and we get additional ad hoc support from the International Occultation Timing Association. At our minimum size, two stations will record an event while the other stations will be probing for secondary events. Larger objects will get more chords and will allow determination of shape profiles. The stations are almost exclusively sited and associated with schools, usually at the 9-12 grade level. We have successfully completed our first TNO observation which is presented in the compainion paper by G. Rossi et al (this conference).

  5. Using modern stellar observables to constrain stellar parameters and the physics of the stellar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.

    2014-05-01

    The current state and future evolution of a star is, in principle, specified by a only a few physical quantities: the mass, age, hydrogen, helium, and metal abundance. These same fundamental quantities are crucial for reconstructing the history of stellar systems ranging in scale from planetary systems to galaxies. However, the fundamental parameters are rarely directly observable, and we are forced to use proxies that are not always sensitive or unique functions of the stellar parameters we wish to determine. Imprecise or inaccurate determinations of the fundamental parameters often limit our ability to draw inferences about a given system. As new technologies, instruments, and observing techniques become available, the list of viable stellar observables increases, and we can explore new links between the observables and fundamental quantities in an effort to better characterize stellar systems. In the era of missions such as Kepler, time-domain observables such as the stellar rotation period and stellar oscillations are now available for an unprecedented number of stars, and future missions promise to further expand the sample. Furthermore, despite the successes of stellar evolution models, the processes and detailed structure of the deep stellar interior remains uncertain. Even in the case of well-measured, well understood stellar observables, the link to the underlying parameters contains uncertainties due to our imperfect understanding of stellar interiors. Model uncertainties arise from sources such as the treatment of turbulent convection, transport of angular momentum and mixing, and assumptions about the physical conditions of stellar matter. By carefully examining the sensitivity of stellar observables to physical processes operating within the star and model assumptions, we can design observational tests for the theory of stellar interiors. I propose a series of tools based on new or revisited stellar observables that can be used both to constrain

  6. S-TYPE AND P-TYPE HABITABILITY IN STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS: A COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH. II. ELLIPTICAL ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M.

    2015-01-10

    In the first paper of this series, a comprehensive approach has been provided for the study of S-type and P-type habitable regions in stellar binary systems, which was, however, restricted to circular orbits of the stellar components. Fortunately, a modest modification of the method also allows for the consideration of elliptical orbits, which of course entails a much broader range of applicability. This augmented method is presented here, and numerous applications are conveyed. In alignment with Paper I, the selected approach considers a variety of aspects, which comprise the consideration of a joint constraint including orbital stability and a habitable region for a possible system planet through the stellar radiative energy fluxes ({sup r}adiative habitable zone{sup ;} RHZ). The devised method is based on a combined formalism for the assessment of both S-type and P-type habitability; in particular, mathematical criteria are deduced for which kinds of systems S-type and P-type habitable zones are realized. If the RHZs are truncated by the additional constraint of orbital stability, the notation of ST-type and PT-type habitability applies. In comparison to the circular case, it is found that in systems of higher eccentricity, the range of the RHZs is significantly reduced. Moreover, for a considerable number of models, the orbital stability constraint also reduces the range of S-type and P-type habitability. Nonetheless, S-, P-, ST-, and PT-type habitability is identified for a considerable set of system parameters. The method as presented is utilized for BinHab, an online code available at The University of Texas at Arlington.

  7. Chemical and Kinematical Properties of Galactic Bulge Stars Surrounding the Stellar System Terzan 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Origlia, L.; Rich, R. M.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Ibata, R.; Lovisi, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Reitzel, D.

    2014-08-01

    As part of a study aimed at determining the kinematical and chemical properties of Terzan 5, we present the first characterization of the bulge stars surrounding this puzzling stellar system. We observed 615 targets located well beyond the tidal radius of Terzan 5 and found that their radial velocity distribution is well described by a Gaussian function peaked at langv radrang = +21.0 ± 4.6 km s-1 with dispersion σ v = 113.0 ± 2.7 km s-1. This is one of the few high-precision spectroscopic surveys of radial velocities for a large sample of bulge stars in such a low and positive latitude environment (b = +1.°7). We found no evidence of the peak at langv radrang ~ +200 km s-1 found in Nidever et al. Strong contamination of many observed spectra by TiO bands prevented us from deriving the iron abundance for the entire spectroscopic sample, introducing a selection bias. The metallicity distribution was finally derived for a subsample of 112 stars in a magnitude range where the effect of the selection bias is negligible. The distribution is quite broad and roughly peaked at solar metallicity ([Fe/H] sime +0.05 dex) with a similar number of stars in the super-solar and in the sub-solar ranges. The population number ratios in different metallicity ranges agree well with those observed in other low-latitude bulge fields, suggesting (1) the possible presence of a plateau for |b| < 4° in the ratio between stars in the super-solar (0 < [Fe/H] <0.5 dex) and sub-solar (-0.5 < [Fe/H] <0 dex) metallicity ranges; (2) a severe drop in the metal-poor component ([Fe/H] <-0.5) as a function of Galactic latitude. Based on FLAMES observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, proposal numbers 087.D-0716(B), 087.D-0748(A), and 283.D-5027(A), and at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was

  8. A family of models of partially relaxed stellar systems. I. Dynamical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, M.; Bertin, G.

    2005-01-01

    Recently we have found that a family of models of partially relaxed, anisotropic stellar systems, inspired earlier by studies of incomplete violent relaxation, exhibits some interesting thermodynamic properties. Here we present a systematic investigation of its dynamical characteristics, in order to establish the basis for a detailed comparison with simulations of collisionless collapse, planned for a separate paper. For a full comparison with the observations of elliptical galaxies, the models should be extended to allow for the presence a sizable dark halo and of significant rotation. In the spherical limit, the family is characterized by two dimensionless parameters, i.e. Ψ, measuring the depth of the galaxy potential, and ν, defining the form of a third global quantity Q, which is argued to be approximately conserved during collisionless collapse (in addition to the total energy and the total number of stars). The family of models is found to have the following properties. The intrinsic density profile beyond the half-mass radius r_M is basically universal and independent of Ψ. The projected density profiles are well fitted by the R1/n law, with n ranging from 2.5 to 8.5, dependent on Ψ, with n close to 4 for concentrated models. All models exhibit radial anisotropy in the pressure tensor, especially in their outer parts, already significant at r ≈ r_M. At fixed values of ν, models with lower Ψ are more anisotropic; at fixed values of Ψ, models with lower ν are more concentrated and more anisotropic. When the global amount of anisotropy, measured by 2K_r/K_T, is large, the models are unstable with respect to the radial-orbit instability; still, a wide region of parameter space (i.e., sufficiently high values of Ψ, for ν > 3/8) is covered by models that are dynamically stable; for these, the line profiles (line-of-sight velocity distribution) are Gaussian at the 5% level, with a general trend of positive values of h_4 at radii larger than the

  9. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  10. Ceci N'est Pas a Globular Cluster: The Metallicity Distribution of the Stellar System Terzan 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Origlia, L.; Rich, R. M.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Valenti, E.; Ibata, R.; Lovisi, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Reitzel, D.

    2014-11-01

    We present new determinations of the iron abundance for 220 stars belonging to the stellar system Terzan 5 in the Galactic bulge. The spectra have been acquired with FLAMES at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory and DEIMOS at the Keck II Telescope. This is by far the largest spectroscopic sample of stars ever observed in this stellar system. From this data set, a subsample of targets with spectra unaffected by TiO bands was extracted and statistically decontaminated from field stars. Once combined with 34 additional stars previously published by our group, a total sample of 135 member stars covering the entire radial extent of the system has been used to determine the metallicity distribution function of Terzan 5. The iron distribution clearly shows three peaks: a super-solar component at [Fe/H] ~= 0.25 dex, accounting for ~29% of the sample, a dominant sub-solar population at [Fe/H] ~= -0.30 dex, corresponding to ~62% of the total, and a minor (6%) metal-poor component at [Fe/H] ~= -0.8 dex. Such a broad, multi-modal metallicity distribution demonstrates that Terzan 5 is not a genuine globular cluster but the remnant of a much more complex stellar system. Based on FLAMES observations performed at the European Southern Observatory, proposal numbers 087.D-0716(B), 087.D-0748(A), and 283.D-5027(A), and at the W. M. Keck Observatory. Keck is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  11. Merging between a Central Massive Black Hole and a Compact Stellar System: A Clue to the Origin of M31'S Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2000-09-01

    The central bulge of M31 is observed to have two distinct brightness peaks with the separation of ~2 pc. S. Tremaine recently proposed the new idea that M31's nucleus is actually a single thick eccentric disk surrounding the central supermassive black hole. In order to explore the origin of the proposed eccentric disk, we numerically investigate the dynamical evolution of a merger between a central massive black hole with a mass of ~107 Msolar and a compact stellar system with a mass of ~106 Msolar and size of a few parsecs in the central 10 pc of a galactic bulge. We find that the stellar system is destroyed by the strong tidal field of the massive black hole and consequently forms a rotating nuclear thick stellar disk. The orbit of each stellar component in the developed disk is rather eccentric with a mean eccentricity of ~0.5. These results imply that M31's nuclear eccentric disk proposed by Tremaine can be formed by merging between a central massive black hole and a compact stellar system. We furthermore discuss when and how a compact stellar system is transferred into the nuclear region around a massive black hole.

  12. The use of stellar occultations to study the figures and atmospheres of small bodies in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, Michael James

    The methods of analyzing stellar occultations by small bodies in the outer solar system are discussed with examples from Triton, Pluto, and Charon. Simulations were performed characterizing the analysis of multi-chord occultations including: the effects of the direction of residual minimization in figure fits, the complications in measuring the reliability of fitted figure parameters when there are few degrees of freedom, and the proper treatment of grazing chords in model fitting. The 2005 July 11 C313.2 stellar occultation by Charon was analyzed. Occultation timings from the three published data sets were combined to accurately determine the mean radius of Charon: 606.0 ± 1.5 km. The analysis indicates that a slight oblateness in the body (0.006 ± 0.003) best matches the data, with a confidence level of 86%. Charon's mean radius corresponds to a bulk density of 1.63 ± 0.07 g/cm 3 , which is significantly less than Pluto's (1.92 ± 0.12 g/cm 3 ), consistent with an impact formation scenario in which at least one of the impactors was differentiated. The 2002 August 21 P131.1 and the 1988 June 9 P8 stellar occultations by Pluto were analyzed. The ellipticity of Pluto's atmosphere as measured by the P131.1 event is 0.066 ± 0.040, with a Gaussian confidence level of 63%, and the ellipticity as measured by the P8 occultations is 0.091 ± 0.041, with a Gaussian confidence level of 70%. If this nonsphericity is confirmed, its size and variation could possibly be attributed to superrotating winds driven by sources such as surface frost migration due to changing insolation patterns or albedo properties, gravity waves, and an asymmetric mass distribution in Pluto itself. The 2001 August 23 Tr231 stellar occultation by Triton was analyzed. The half- light radius of Triton's atmosphere was calculated from astrometrically calibrated model fits to the occultation light curve. The resulting half-light radius of 1479.01 km is larger than the value of 1456.3 km derived from

  13. OGLE-ing the Magellanic system: stellar populations in the Magellanic Bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Skowron, D. M.; Jacyszyn, A. M.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of a young stellar bridge that forms a continuous connection between the Magellanic Clouds. This finding is based on number density maps for stellar populations found in data gathered by OGLE-IV that fully cover over 270 deg{sup 2} of the sky in the Magellanic Bridge area. This is the most extensive optical survey of this region to date. We find that the young population is present mainly in the western half of the MBR, which, together with the newly discovered young population in the eastern Bridge, form a continuous stream of stars connecting both galaxies along δ ∼ –73.5 deg. The young population distribution is clumped, with one of the major densities close to the SMC and the other fairly isolated and located approximately mid-way between the Clouds, which we call the OGLE island. These overdensities are well matched by H I surface density contours, although the newly found young population in the eastern Bridge is offset by ∼2 deg north from the highest H I density contour. We observe a continuity of red clump stars between the Magellanic Clouds which represent an intermediate-age population. Red clump stars are present mainly in the southern and central parts of the Magellanic Bridge, below its gaseous part, and their presence is reflected by a strong deviation from the radial density profiles of the two galaxies. This may indicate either a tidal stream of stars, or that the stellar halos of the two galaxies overlap. On the other hand, we do not observe such an overlap within an intermediate-age population represented by the top of the red giant branch and the asymptotic giant branch stars. We also see only minor mixing of the old populations of the Clouds in the southern part of the Bridge, represented by the lowest part of the red giant branch.

  14. A family of models of partially relaxed stellar systems. II. Comparison with the products of collisionless collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, M.; Bertin, G.; van Albada, T. S.

    2005-04-01

    N-body simulations of collisionless collapse have offered important clues for the construction of realistic stellar dynamical models of elliptical galaxies. Understanding this idealized and relatively simple process, by which stellar systems can reach partially relaxed equilibrium configurations (characterized by isotropic central regions and radially anisotropic envelopes), is a prerequisite to more ambitious attempts at constructing physically justified models of elliptical galaxies in which the problem of galaxy formation is set in the generally accepted cosmological context of hierarchical clustering. In a previous paper we have discussed the dynamical properties of a family of models of partially relaxed stellar systems (the f(ν) models), designed to incorporate the qualitative properties of the products of collisionless collapse at small and at large radii. Here we revisit the problem of incomplete violent relaxation, by making a direct comparison between the detailed properties of such family of models and those of the products of collisionless collapse found in N-body simulations that we have run for the purpose. Surprisingly, the models thus identified are able to match the simulated density distributions over nine orders of magnitude and also to provide an excellent fit to the anisotropy profiles and a good representation of the overall structure in phase space. The end-products of the simulations and the best-fitting models turn out to be characterized by a level of pressure anisotropy close to the threshold for the onset of the radial-orbit instability. The conservation of Q, a third quantity that is argued to be approximately conserved in addition to total energy and total number of particles as a basis for the construction of the f(ν) family, is discussed and tested numerically.

  15. The Stellar Spectra Acquisition, Reduction, and Archiving Systems at the Ondřejov Observatory 2-meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škoda, P.; Honsa, J.; Šlechta, M.

    The 2-meter telescope of the Ondřejov Observatory near Prague is a middle-class instrument fully devoted to high dispersion stellar spectroscopy. The data are produced by two acquisition systems of different generations. The older linear detector Reticon 1872 AF is controlled by a DOS program providing quick-look display capability as well. The second is a CCD driven by a stand-alone Linux program. The quick-look is provided by SAOimage or XImtool through data pipes. An easy access to both the raw and reduced data is provided by a simple WWW-based archiving system. We give a basic overview of these systems and software methods used for their communication with the spectrograph control system.

  16. On mechanics and thermodynamics of a stellar galaxy in a two-component virial system and the Fundamental Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secco, L.

    2005-06-01

    The paper confirms the existence of a special configuration (among the infinitive number of a priori possible virial states) which a B stellar (Baryonic) component may assume inside a given D dark halo potential well. This satisfies the d'Alembert Principle of virtual works and its typical dimension works as a scale length (we call tidal radius) induced on the gravitational field of the bright component by the dark one. Its dynamic and thermodynamic properties are here analyzed in connection with the physical reason for the existence of the Fundamental Plane (FP) for ellipticals and, in general, for two-component virialized systems. The analysis is performed by using two-component models with two power-law density profiles and two homogeneous cores. The outputs of this kind of models, at the special configuration, are summarized and compared with some observable scaling relations for pressure supported ellipticals. The problem of extending the results to a general class of models with Zhao (1996) [MNRAS 278, 488] profiles, which are more suitable for an elliptical galaxy system, is also taken into account. The virial equilibrium stages of the two-component system have to occur after a previous violent relaxation phase. If the stellar B component is allowed to cool slowly its virial evolution consists of a sequence of contractions with enough time to rearrange the virial equilibrium after any step. The thermodynamic process during the dynamical evolution is so divided into a sequence of transformations which are irreversible but occur between two quasi-equilibrium stages. Then, it is possible to assign: a mean temperature to the whole B component during this quasi-static sequence and the entropy variation between two consecutive virial steps. The analysis allows the conclusion that the induced scale length is a real confinement for the stellar system. This follows from the application of the Io Thermodynamics Principle under the virial equilibrium constraint, by

  17. On the use of Video Camera Systems in the Detection of Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasinghe, Dilini

    2012-10-01

    Due to the distance between us and the Kuiper Belt, direct detection of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) is not currently possible for objects less than 10 km in diameter. Indirect methods such as stellar occultations must be employed to remotely probe these bodies. The size, shape, as well as atmospheric properties and ring system information of a body (if any), can be collected through observations of stellar occultations. This method has been previously used with some success - Roques et al. (2006) detected 3 Trans-Neptunian objects; Schlichting et al. (2009) detected a single object in archival data. However, previous assessments of KBO occultation detection rates have been calculated only for telescopes - we extend this method to video camera systems. Building on Roques & Moncuquet (2000), we present a derivation that can be applied to any video camera system, taking into account camera specifications and diffraction effects. This allows for a determination of the number of observable KBO occultations per night. Example calculations are presented for some of the automated meteor camera systems currently in use at the University of Western Ontario. The results of this project will allow us to refine and improve our own camera system, as well as allow others to enhance their systems for KBO detection. Roques, F., Doressoundiram, A., Dhillon, V., Marsh, T., Bickerton, S., Kavelaars, J. J., Moncuquet, M., Auvergne, M., Belskaya, I., Chevreton, M., Colas, F., Fernandez, A., Fitzsimmons, A., Lecacheux, J., Mousis, O., Pau, S., Peixinho, N., & Tozzi, G. P. (2006). The Astronomical Journal, 132(2), 819-822. Roques, F., & Moncuquet, M. (2000). Icarus, 147(2), 530-544. Schlichting, H. E., Ofek, E. O., Wenz, M., Sari, R., Gal-Yam, A., Livio, M., Nelan, E., & Zucker, S. (2009). Nature, 462(7275), 895-897.

  18. CHARACTERIZING THE STELLAR PHOTOSPHERES AND NEAR-INFRARED EXCESSES IN ACCRETING T TAURI SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; Espaillat, C.; Hernandez, J.; Luhman, K. L.; D'Alessio, P.; Sargent, B. E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx

    2013-05-20

    Using NASA Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX data from 0.8 to 4.5 {mu}m, we determine self-consistently the stellar properties and excess emission above the photosphere for a sample of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) in the Taurus molecular cloud with varying degrees of accretion. This process uses a combination of techniques from the recent literature as well as observations of weak-line T Tauri stars to account for the differences in surface gravity and chromospheric activity between the T Tauri stars and dwarfs, which are typically used as photospheric templates for CTTS. Our improved veiling and extinction estimates for our targets allow us to extract flux-calibrated spectra of the excess in the near-infrared. We find that we are able to produce an acceptable parametric fit to the near-infrared excesses using a combination of up to three blackbodies. In half of our sample, two blackbodies at temperatures of 8000 K and 1600 K suffice. These temperatures and the corresponding solid angles are consistent with emission from the accretion shock on the stellar surface and the inner dust sublimation rim of the disk, respectively. In contrast, the other half requires three blackbodies at 8000, 1800, and 800 K, to describe the excess. We interpret the combined two cooler blackbodies as the dust sublimation wall with either a contribution from the disk surface beyond the wall or curvature of the wall itself, neither of which should have single-temperature blackbody emission. In these fits, we find no evidence of a contribution from optically thick gas inside the inner dust rim.

  19. Orbital period changes and possible stellar wind mass loss in the algol-type binary system AT Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Magdy A.

    2012-12-01

    An analysis of the measurements of mid-eclipse times of AT Peg has been presented. It indicates a period decrease rate of dP/dt = -4.2 × 10-7 d/yr, which can be interpreted in terms of mass loss from the system via stellar wind with a rate between (1 and 2) × 10-8 Mʘ/yr. The O-C diagram shows a growing sine wave covering two different cycles of 13 yr and 31.9 yr with amplitudes equal to 0.026 and 0.032 day, respectively. These unequal durations of the cycles may be explained by magnetic activity cycling variations due to star spots. The obtained characteristics of the second cycle are consistent with similar systems when applying Applegate’s mechanism.

  20. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Johnson, B.; Swaminathan, N.

    1989-01-01

    Software and hardware assembled to support specific engineering activities. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation (SINW) is integrated computer workstation providing systems and engineering support functions for Space Shuttle guidance and navigation-system logistics, repair, and procurement activities. Consists of personal-computer hardware, packaged software, and custom software integrated together into user-friendly, menu-driven system. Designed to operate on IBM PC XT. Applied in business and industry to develop similar workstations.

  1. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  2. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  3. LUT Reveals an Algol-type Eclipsing Binary With Three Additional Stellar Companions in a Multiple System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhou, X.; Hu, J.-Y.; Qian, S.-B.; Li, L.-J.; Liao, W.-P.; Tian, X.-M.; Wang, Z.-H.

    2016-04-01

    A complete light curve of the neglected eclipsing binary Algol V548 Cygni in the UV band was obtained with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope in 2014 May. Photometric solutions are obtained using the Wilson–Devinney method. It is found that solutions with and without third light are quite different. The mass ratio without third light is determined to be q = 0.307, while that derived with third light is q = 0.606. It is shown that V548 Cygni is a semi-detached binary where the secondary component is filling the critical Roche lobe. An analysis of all available eclipse times suggests that there are three cyclic variations in the O–C diagram that are interpreted by the light travel-time effect via the presence of three additional stellar companions. This is in agreement with the presence of a large quantity of third light in the system. The masses of these companions are estimated as m sin i‧ ∼ 1.09, 0.20, and 0.52 M⊙. They are orbiting the central binary with orbital periods of about 5.5, 23.3, and 69.9 years, i.e., in 1:4:12 resonance orbit. Their orbital separations are about 4.5, 13.2, and 26.4 au, respectively. Our photometric solutions suggest that they contribute about 32.4% to the total light of the multiple system. No obvious long-term changes in the orbital period were found, indicating that the contributions of the mass transfer and the mass loss due to magnetic braking to the period variations are comparable. The detection of three possible additional stellar components orbiting a typical Algol in a multiple system make V548 Cygni a very interesting binary to study in the future.

  4. The Stellar Parameters and Evolutionary State of the Primary in the d' Symbiotic System StHα 190

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Verne V.; Pereira, Claudio B.; Cunha, Katia

    2001-07-01

    We report on a high-resolution spectroscopic stellar parameter and abundance analysis of a d' symbiotic star: the yellow component of StHα190. This star has recently been discovered, and confirmed here, to be a rapidly rotating (vsini=100+/-10 km s-1) subgiant, or giant, that exhibits radial velocity variations of probably at least 40 km s-1, indicating the presence of a companion (as in many symbiotic systems, the companion is a hot white dwarf star). An analysis of the red spectrum reveals the cool stellar component to have an effective temperature of Teff=5300+/-150 K and a surface gravity of logg=3.0+/-0.5 (this corresponds to an approximate spectral type of G4 III/IV). These parameters result in an estimated primary luminosity of 45 Lsolar, implying a distance of about 780 pc (within a factor of 2). The iron and calcium abundances are found to be close to solar; however, barium is overabundant, relative to Fe and Ca, by about 0.5 dex. The Ba enhancement reflects mass transfer of s-process-enriched material when the current white dwarf was an asymptotic giant branch star, of large physical dimension (>=1 AU). The past and future evolution of this binary system depends critically on its current orbital period, which is not yet known. Concerted and frequent radial velocity measurements are needed to provide crucial physical constraints to this d' symbiotic system. Based on observations made with the 2.1 m telescope of McDonald Observatory, University of Texas.

  5. Towards a Measurement of the Half-Life of {sup 60}Fe for Stellar and Early Solar System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ostdiek, K.; Anderson, T.; Bauder, W.; Bowers, M.; Collon, P.; Dressler, R.; Greene, J.; Kutschera, W.; Lu, W.; Paul, M.

    2015-10-15

    Radioisotopes, produced in stars and ejected into the Interstellar Medium, are important for constraining stellar and early Solar System (ESS) models. In particular, the half-life of the radioisotope, Fe-60, can have an impact on calculations for the timing for ESS events, the distance to nearby Supernovae, and the brightness of individual, non-steady-state Fe gamma ray sources in the Galaxy. A half-life measurement has been undertaken at the University of Notre Dame and measurements of the Fe-60/Fe-56 concentration of our samples using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has begun. This result will be coupled with an activity measurement of the isomeric decay in Co-60, which is the decay product of Fe. Preliminary half-life estimates of (2.53 +/- 0.24) x 10(6) years seem to confirm the recent measurement by Rugel et al. (2009). (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. THE STELLAR OBLIQUITY AND THE LONG-PERIOD PLANET IN THE HAT-P-17 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Crepp, Justin R.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Johnson, John Asher; Knutson, Heather A.; Zhao Ming

    2013-08-01

    We present the measured projected obliquity-the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin axis and orbital angular momentum-of the inner planet of the HAT-P-17 multi-planet system. We measure the sky-projected obliquity of the star to be {lambda}=19{sup +14}{sub -16} deg by modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in Keck/HIRES radial velocities (RVs). The anomalous RV time series shows an asymmetry relative to the midtransit time, ordinarily suggesting a nonzero obliquity-but in this case at least part of the asymmetry may be due to the convective blueshift, increasing the uncertainty in the determination of {lambda}. We employ the semi-analytical approach of Hirano et al. that includes the effects of macroturbulence, instrumental broadening, and convective blueshift to accurately model the anomaly in the net RV caused by the planet eclipsing part of the rotating star. Obliquity measurements are an important tool for testing theories of planet formation and migration. To date, the measured obliquities of {approx}50 Jovian planets span the full range, from prograde to retrograde, with planets orbiting cool stars preferentially showing alignment of stellar spins and planetary orbits. Our results are consistent with this pattern emerging from tidal interactions in the convective envelopes of cool stars and close-in planets. In addition, our 1.8 yr of new RVs for this system show that the orbit of the outer planet is more poorly constrained than previously thought, with an orbital period now in the range of 10-36 yr.

  7. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Context. Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. Aims: To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808 B, which is in the process of PR formation. Methods: We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging in the F450W, F555W, or F606W and F814W filters. Extensive completeness tests, PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Results: Both PRGs contain young CSSs (<1 Gyr) with masses of up to 5 × 106M⊙, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive CSSs may be progenitors of metal-rich globular clusters or ultra compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies. We identify one such young UCD candidate, NGC 3808 B-8, and measure its size of reff = 25.23+1.43-2.01 pc. We reconstruct the star formation history of the two PRGs and find strong peaks in the star formation rate (SFR, ≃200 M⊙/yr) in NGC 3808 B, while NGC 4650 A shows milder (declining) star formation (SFR< 10 M⊙/yr). This difference may support different evolutionary paths between these PRGs. Conclusions: The spatial distribution, masses, and peak star formation epoch of the clusters in NGC 3808 suggest for a tidally triggered star formation. Incompleteness at old ages prevents us from probing the SFR at earlier epochs of NGC 4650 A, where we observe the fading tail of CSS formation. This also impedes us from testing the formation scenarios of this PRG.

  8. STELLARATOR INJECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1962-09-01

    A method and means are described for injecting energetic neutral atoms or molecular ions into dense magnetically collimated plasma columns of stellarators and the like in such a manner that the atoms or ions are able to significantly penetrate the column before being ionized by collision with the plasma constituent particles. Penetration of the plasma column by the neutral atoms or molecular ions is facilitated by superposition of two closely spaced magnetic mirrors on the plasma confinement field. The mirrors are moved apart to magnetically sweep plasma from a region between the mirrors and establish a relatively low plasma density therein. By virture of the low density, neutral atoms or molecular ions injected into the region significantly penetrate the plasma column before being ionized. Thereafter, the mirrors are diminished to permit the injected material to admix with the plasma in the remainder of the column. (AEC)

  9. Introduction to stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scilla, Degl’Innocenti

    2016-04-01

    This contribution is meant as a first brief introduction to stellar physics. First I shortly describe the main physical processes active in stellar structures then I summarize the most important features during the stellar life-cycle.

  10. Delayed Gratification Habitable Zones (DG-HZs): When Deep Outer Solar System Regions Become Balmy During Post-Main Sequence Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. A.

    2002-09-01

    Late in the Sun's evolution it, like all low and moderate mass stars, it will burn as a red giant, generating 1000s of solar luminosities for a few tens of millions of years. A dozen years ago this stage of stellar evolution was predicted to create observable sublimation signatures in systems where Kuiper Belts (KBs) are extant (Stern et al. 1990, Nature, 345, 305); recently, the SWAS spacecraft detected such systems (Melnick et al. 2001, 412, 160). During the red giant phase, the habitable zone of our solar system will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and KBOs orbit. Compared to the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resided early in the solar system's history, this "delayed gratification habitable zone (DG-HZ)" will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment-- with far lower harmful UV radiation levels from the Sun, and a far quieter collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and KBOs, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Sun's DG-HZ may only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, several 108 approximately solar-type Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our solar system (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DG-HZs form a kind of niche habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the galaxy. I will show the calculated temporal evolution of DG-HZs around various stellar types using modern stellar evolution luminosity tracks, and then discuss various aspects of DG-HZs, including the effects of stellar pulsations and mass loss winds. This work was supported by NASA's Origins of Solar Systems Program.

  11. THE DYNAMICS OF STELLAR CORONAE HARBORING HOT JUPITERS. I. A TIME-DEPENDENT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE INTERPLANETARY ENVIRONMENT IN THE HD 189733 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Sokolov, I. V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2011-05-20

    We carry out the first time-dependent numerical magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an extrasolar planetary system to study the interaction of the stellar magnetic field and wind with the planetary magnetosphere and outflow. We base our model on the parameters of the HD 189733 system, which harbors a close-in giant planet. Our simulation reveals a highly structured stellar corona characterized by sectors with different plasma properties. The star-planet interaction (SPI) varies in magnitude and complexity, depending on the planetary phase, planetary magnetic field strength, and the relative orientation of the stellar and planetary fields. It also reveals a long, comet-like tail which is a result of the wrapping of the planetary magnetospheric tail by its fast orbital motion. A reconnection event occurs at a specific orbital phase, causing mass loss from the planetary magnetosphere that can generate a hot spot on the stellar surface. The simulation also shows that the system has sufficient energy to produce hot spots observed in Ca II lines in giant planet hosting stars. However, the short duration of the reconnection event suggests that such SPI cannot be observed persistently.

  12. Evolutions of Stellar-mass Black Hole Hyperaccretion Systems in the Center of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Cui-Ying; Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Tian, Jian-Xiang; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-12-01

    A neutrino-dominated accretion disk around a stellar-mass black hole (BH) can power a gamma-ray burst (GRB) via annihilation of neutrinos launched from the disk. For the BH hyperaccretion system, high accretion rate should trigger the violent evolution of the BH’s characteristics, which further leads to the evolution of the neutrino annihilation luminosity. In this paper, we consider the evolution of the accretion system to analyze the mean time-dependent neutrino annihilation luminosity with the different mean accretion rates and initial BH parameters. By time-integrating the luminosity, the total neutrino annihilation energy with the reasonable initial disk mass can satisfy most short-duration GRBs and about half of long-duration GRBs. Moreover, the extreme Kerr BH should exist in the cental engines of some high-luminosity GRBs. GRBs with higher energy have to request the alternative magnetohydrodynamics processes in the centers, such as the Blandford-Znajek jet from the accretion system or the millisecond magnetar.

  13. Stellar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Paul

    This chapter steps finally away from the sun and towards the stars, the idea being to apply the physical insight gained so far to see how much of stellar magnetism can be understood in terms of dynamo action. Dynamo action in the convective core of massive main-sequence stars is first considered and shown viable. For intermediate-mass main-sequence stars the fossil field hypothesis will carry the day, although possible dynamo alternatives are also briefly discussed. The extension of the solar dynamo models investigated in Chap. 3 (10.1007/978-3-642-32093-4_3) to other solar-type stars will first take us through an important detour in first having to understand rotational evolution in response to angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind. Dynamo action in fully convective stars comes next, and the chapter closes with an overview of the situation for pre- and post-main-sequence stars and compact objects, leading finally to the magnetic fields of galaxies and beyond.

  14. Stellar activity observed by the Kepler Space Telescope. The M dwarf of the Kepler-32 system with five orbiting planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2013-10-01

    The activity of the central star of the Kepler-32 planetary system is studied using continuous 1141-day observations with the Kepler Space Telescope. The Kepler-32 system includes a slowly rotating Mdwarf (rotational period of 37.8 d) with a mass of 0.54 M ⊙ and five planets. One of the unique properties of the system is its compactness: the orbits of all five planets are less than a third of the size of the orbit of Mercury; the planet closest to the star is separated from it by only 4.3 stellar radii. Surface-temperature inhomogeneities of the central star are studied using precise photometric observations of Kepler-32, and their evolution traced. In total, 42 624 individual brightness measurements in the 1141-day (3.1-year) observing interval were selected for the analysis. The calculated amplitude power spectra for the first and second halves of the interval of the Kepler-32 observations indicate appreciable variability of the photometric period, corresponding to the evolution of active regions at various latitudes on the stellar surface. Evidence for the existence of two active regions on the stellar surface separated in phase by 0.42 has been found. Time intervals in which the longitudes of the active regions changed ("flip-flops") with durations of the order of 200-300 days have been established. The spotted area of the star was, on average, about 1% of the total visible surface, and varied from 0.3 to 1.7%. The results for the dwarf Kepler-32 are compared with those from a spectropolarimetric survey of 23 M dwarfs, including both fully convective stars and stars with weakly radiative cores. For a more detailed comparison, temperature inhomogeneities on the surface of one of the survey stars, DS Leo, was reconstructed using the ground-based observations (316 individual measurements of the V-band brightness of the star during seven observing seasons in an all-sky automated survey). The general properties and evolution of the active regions on DS Leo and

  15. THE GJ1214 SUPER-EARTH SYSTEM: STELLAR VARIABILITY, NEW TRANSITS, AND A SEARCH FOR ADDITIONAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Berta, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Bean, Jacob; Irwin, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Nutzman, Philip; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-07-20

    The super-Earth GJ1214b transits a nearby M dwarf that exhibits a 1% intrinsic variability in the near-infrared. Here, we analyze new observations to refine the physical properties of both the star and planet. We present three years of out-of-transit photometric monitoring of the stellar host GJ1214 from the MEarth Observatory and find the rotation period to be long, most likely an integer multiple of 53 days, suggesting low levels of magnetic activity and an old age for the system. We show that such variability will not pose significant problems to ongoing studies of the planet's atmosphere with transmission spectroscopy. We analyze two high-precision transit light curves from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) along with seven others from the MEarth and Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.2 m telescopes, finding physical parameters for the planet that are consistent with previous work. The VLT light curves show tentative evidence for spot occultations during transit. Using two years of MEarth light curves, we place limits on additional transiting planets around GJ1214 with periods out to the habitable zone of the system. We also improve upon the previous photographic V-band estimate for the star, finding V = 14.71 {+-} 0.03.

  16. The GJ1214 Super-Earth System: Stellar Variability, New Transits, and a Search for Additional Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Bean, Jacob; Irwin, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J.; Désert, Jean-Michel; Nutzman, Philip; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-07-01

    The super-Earth GJ1214b transits a nearby M dwarf that exhibits a 1% intrinsic variability in the near-infrared. Here, we analyze new observations to refine the physical properties of both the star and planet. We present three years of out-of-transit photometric monitoring of the stellar host GJ1214 from the MEarth Observatory and find the rotation period to be long, most likely an integer multiple of 53 days, suggesting low levels of magnetic activity and an old age for the system. We show that such variability will not pose significant problems to ongoing studies of the planet's atmosphere with transmission spectroscopy. We analyze two high-precision transit light curves from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) along with seven others from the MEarth and Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.2 m telescopes, finding physical parameters for the planet that are consistent with previous work. The VLT light curves show tentative evidence for spot occultations during transit. Using two years of MEarth light curves, we place limits on additional transiting planets around GJ1214 with periods out to the habitable zone of the system. We also improve upon the previous photographic V-band estimate for the star, finding V = 14.71 ± 0.03.

  17. STELLAR WIND INFLUENCE ON PLANETARY DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Heyner, Daniel; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Schmitt, Dieter

    2012-05-10

    We examine the possible influence of early stellar wind conditions on the evolution of planetary dynamo action. In our model, the dynamo operates within a significant ambient magnetospheric magnetic field generated by the interaction between the stellar wind and the planetary magnetic field. This provides a negative feedback mechanism which quenches the dynamo growth. The external magnetic field magnitude which the dynamo experiences, and thus the strength of the quenching, depends on the stellar wind dynamic pressure. As this pressure significantly changes during stellar evolution, we argue that under early stellar system conditions the coupling between the stellar wind and the interior dynamics of a planet is much more important than has been thought up to now. We demonstrate the effects of the feedback coupling in the course of stellar evolution with a planet at a similar distance to the central star as Mercury is to the Sun.

  18. Observational Constraints on Stellar Flares and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    Multi-wavelength surveys have catalogued a wealth of stellar flare data for stars representing a broad range of masses and ages. Young solar analogs inform our understanding of the Sun's evolution and the influence of its activity on early solar system formation, while field star observations allow us to place its current activity into context within a statistical ensemble of main-sequence G-type stars. At the same time, stellar observations probe a variety of interior and coronal conditions, providing constraints on models of equilibrium (and loss thereof!) for magnetic structures. In this review, I will focus on our current understanding of stellar flares, prominences, and coronal mass ejections as a function of stellar parameters. As our interpretation of stellar data relies heavily on solar-stellar analogy, I will explore how far into extreme stellar parameter spaces this comparison can be invoked.

  19. Chaos and stellar streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Valluri, Monica; Pearson, Sarah; Kupper, Andreas Hans Wilhelm; Hogg, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological simulations predict that dark matter halos around galaxies should be triaxial in shape with universal density profiles. A significant number of orbits in such systems are chaotic, though it is commonly assumed that chaos is not dynamically relevant for galaxy halos because the timescales over which chaos is computed to be important are generally long relative to the dynamical time. In recent work, we showed that even when chaos is not important for restructuring the global structure of a galaxy, chaos can greatly enhance the density evolution and alter the morphologies of stellar streams over just a few orbital times by causing streams to 'fan out.' This occurs because the orbits of the stars in stellar streams have small distributions of fundamental frequencies and are therefore sensitive to mild chaos that modulates the frequencies on small-scales over much faster timescales. This suggests that the morphology of tidal streams alone can be used to estimate the significance of chaos along the orbits of the progenitor systems, thereby placing constraints on the global properties of the gravitational potential. I will explain our theoretical understanding of this phenomenon and discuss implications for a recently discovered stellar stream (the Ophiuchus stream) that may be on a chaotic orbit in the inner Milky Way due to the influence of the time-dependent, triaxial potential of the Galactic bar.

  20. DISTINGUISHING CENTRAL PERTURBATIONS BY BINARY STELLAR AND PLANETARY SYSTEMS UNDER THE MODERATELY STRONG FINITE-SOURCE EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Lee, Chung-Uk E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2011-11-10

    We investigate high-magnification events caused by wide binary stellar and planetary systems under the moderately strong finite-source effect where the diameter of the source star is comparable with the caustics induced by a binary companion and a planet. From this investigation, we find that a characteristic feature in the central perturbations induced by the binary systems commonly appears in a constant range where the size of the caustic induced by the binary companion is between 1.5 and 1.9 times of the diameter of the source, whereas in the central perturbations induced by the planetary systems the feature commonly appears in a range where the ratio of the size of the caustic induced by the planet to the source diameter changes with the planet/primary mass ratio. High-magnification events caused by the binary and planetary systems with the characteristic feature produce a distinctive short-duration bump in the residuals from the single-lensing light curve, where the bump occurs near the time of peak magnification of the events. Because of a well-known planet/binary degeneracy, we compare binary- and planetary-lensing events with the short-duration bump in the residuals. As a result, we find the features of the binary-lensing events that are discriminated from the planetary-lensing events despite the moderately strong finite-source effect and thus can be used to immediately distinguish between the binary and planetary companions. We also find the feature that appears only in binary-lensing events with a very low mass ratio or planetary-lensing events. This implies that the lens systems with the feature have a very low mass binary companion (such as a brown dwarf) or a planet.

  1. The Impact of Stellar Multiplicity on Planetary Systems. I. The Ruinous Influence of Close Binary Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Huber, Daniel; Mann, Andrew W.; Dupuy, Trent J.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamical influence of binary companions is expected to profoundly influence planetary systems. However, the difficulty of identifying planets in binary systems has left the magnitude of this effect uncertain; despite numerous theoretical hurdles to their formation and survival, at least some binary systems clearly host planets. We present high-resolution imaging of 382 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) obtained using adaptive-optics imaging and nonredundant aperture-mask interferometry on the Keck II telescope. Among the full sample of 506 candidate binary companions to KOIs, we super-resolve some binary systems to projected separations of <5 au, showing that planets might form in these dynamically active environments. However, the full distribution of projected separations for our planet-host sample more broadly reveals a deep paucity of binary companions at solar-system scales. For a field binary population, we should have found 58 binary companions with projected separation ρ < 50 au and mass ratio q > 0.4 we instead only found 23 companions (a 4.6σ deficit), many of which must be wider pairs that are only close in projection. When the binary population is parametrized with a semimajor axis cutoff a cut and a suppression factor inside that cutoff S bin, we find with correlated uncertainties that inside {a}{cut}={47}-23+59 au, the planet occurrence rate in binary systems is only {S}{bin}={0.34}-0.15+0.14 times that of wider binaries or single stars. Our results demonstrate that a fifth of all solar-type stars in the Milky Way are disallowed from hosting planetary systems due to the influence of a binary companion.

  2. Conditions of consistency for multicomponent stellar systems. II. Is a point-axial symmetric model suitable for the Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Under a common potential, a finite mixture of ellipsoidal velocity distributions satisfying the Boltzmann collisionless equation provides a set of integrability conditions that may constrain the population kinematics. They are referred to as conditions of consistency and were discussed in a previous paper on mixtures of axisymmetric populations. As a corollary, these conditions are now extended to point-axial symmetry, that is, point symmetry around the rotation axis or bisymmetry, by determining which potentials are connected with a more flexible superposition of stellar populations. Under point-axial symmetry, the potential is still axisymmetric, but the velocity and mass distributions are not necessarily. A point-axial stellar system is, in a natural way, consistent with a flat velocity distribution of a disc population. Therefore, no additional integrability conditions are required to solve the Boltzmann collisionless equation for such a population. For other populations, if the potential is additively separable in cylindrical coordinates, the populations are not kinematically constrained, although under point-axial symmetry, the potential is reduced to the harmonic function, which, for the Galaxy, is proven to be non-realistic. In contrast, a non-separable potential provides additional conditions of consistency. When mean velocities for the populations are unconstrained, the potential becomes quasi-stationary, being a particular case of the axisymmetric model. Then, the radial and vertical mean velocities of the populations can differ and produce an apparent vertex deviation of the whole velocity distribution. However, single population velocity ellipsoids still have no vertex deviation in the Galactic plane and no tilt in their intersection with a meridional Galactic plane. If the thick disc and halo ellipsoids actually have non-vanishing tilt, as the surveys of the solar neighbourhood that include RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) data seem to show, the

  3. Solar System and stellar tests of a quantum-corrected gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shan-Shan; Xie, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The renormalization group running of the gravitational constant has a universal form and represents a possible extension of general relativity. These renormalization group effects on general relativity will cause the running of the gravitational constant, and there exists a scale of renormalization α ν , which depends on the mass of an astronomical system and needs to be determined by observations. We test renormalization group effects on general relativity and obtain the upper bounds of α ν in the low-mass scales: the Solar System and five systems of binary pulsars. Using the supplementary advances of the perihelia provided by INPOP10a (IMCCE, France) and EPM2011 (IAA RAS, Russia) ephemerides, we obtain new upper bounds on α ν in the Solar System when the Lense-Thirring effect due to the Sun's angular momentum and the uncertainty of the Sun's quadrupole moment are properly taken into account. These two factors were absent in the previous work. We find that INPOP10a yields the upper bound as α ν =(0.3 ±2.8 )×10-20 while EPM2011 gives α ν =(-2.5 ±8.3 )×10-21. Both of them are tighter than the previous result by 4 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, based on the observational data sets of five systems of binary pulsars: PSR J 0737 -3039 , PSR B 1534 +12 , PSR J 1756 -2251 , PSR B 1913 +16 , and PSR B 2127 +11 C , the upper bound is found as α ν =(-2.6 ±5.1 )×10-17. From the bounds of this work at a low-mass scale and the ones at the mass scale of galaxies, we might catch an updated glimpse of the mass dependence of α ν , and it is found that our improvement of the upper bounds in the Solar System can significantly change the possible pattern of the relation between log |α ν | and log m from a linear one to a power law, where m is the mass of an astronomical system. This suggests that |α ν | needs to be suppressed more rapidly with the decrease of the mass of low-mass systems. It also predicts that |α ν | might have an upper limit in high

  4. Pulsars in binary systems: probing binary stellar evolution and general relativity.

    PubMed

    Stairs, Ingrid H

    2004-04-23

    Radio pulsars in binary orbits often have short millisecond spin periods as a result of mass transfer from their companion stars. They therefore act as very precise, stable, moving clocks that allow us to investigate a large set of otherwise inaccessible astrophysical problems. The orbital parameters derived from high-precision binary pulsar timing provide constraints on binary evolution, characteristics of the binary pulsar population, and the masses of neutron stars with different mass-transfer histories. These binary systems also test gravitational theories, setting strong limits on deviations from general relativity. Surveys for new pulsars yield new binary systems that increase our understanding of all these fields and may open up whole new areas of physics, as most spectacularly evidenced by the recent discovery of an extremely relativistic double-pulsar system. PMID:15105492

  5. On angular momentum transfer in binary systems. [stellar orbital period change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Stothers, R.

    1975-01-01

    The maximum limit for the conversion of orbital angular momentum into rotational angular momentum of the mass-gaining component in a close binary system is derived. It is shown that this conversion process does not seriously affect the rate of orbital period change and can be neglected in computing the mass transfer rate. Integration of this limit over the entire accretion process results in a value for the maximum accumulated rotational angular momentum that is 3 to 4 times larger than that implied by the observed underluminosity of stars in such systems as Mu(1) Sco, V Pup, SX Aur, and V356 Sgr. It is suggested that shell stars and emission-line stars in binary systems may be produced when the core angular momentum is transferred into an envelope having a rotational angular momentum close to the maximum limit.-

  6. Complex Analysis of the Stellar Binary HD25811: A Subgiant System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Wardat, Mashhoor A.; Widyan, Hatem S.; Al-thyabat, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The visually close binary system HD25811 is analysed to estimate its physical and geometrical parameters in addition to its spectral type and luminosity class. The method depends on obtaining the best fit between the entire observational spectral energy distribution (SED) of the system and synthetic SEDs created by atmospheric modelling of the individual components, consistent with the system's modified orbital elements. The parameters of the individual components of the system are derived as: T a eff = 6850 ± 50 K, T b eff = 7000 ± 50 K, log g a = 4.04 ± 0.10, log g b = 4.15 ± 0.10, R a = 1.96 ± 0.20 R⊙, R b = 1.69 ± 0.20 R⊙, M a v = 1.m97 ± 0.20, M b v = 2.m19 ± 0.20, La = 7.59 ± 0.70L ⊙, Lb = 6.16 ± 0.70L ⊙ with dynamical parallax π (textrm {mas})=5.095± 0.095 . The analysis shows that the system consists of a 1.55M ⊙ F2 subgiant star and a less evolved 1.50M ⊙ F1 secondary subgiant star with ages around 2 Gy formed by fragmentation. Synthetic magnitudes of both components were calculated under Johnson-Cousins, Strömgren, and Tycho photometrical systems.

  7. Gravidynamics Scalar-Tensor Gravitation) and the Observed Discrete Mass Spectrum of Compact Stellar Remnants in Close Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    There are two new observational facts: the mass spectrum of neutron stars and black hole candidates (or collapsars) shows an evident absence of compact objects with masses within the interval from 2 M⊙ (with a peak for neutron stars about 1.4 M⊙) to about 6 M⊙, and in close binary stellar systems with a low-massive (about 0.6 M⊙) optical companion the most probable mass value (the peak in the masses distribution of black hole candidates) is close to 7 M⊙. The problem of the compact objects discrete mass spectra demands some solution both in the context of the supernovae and gamma-ray bursts relation, and in connection with the core-collapse supernovae explosion mechanism itself. In the totally non-metric scalar-tensor model of gravitational interaction (in a modified or extended Feynman field approach to gravitation) the total mass of a compact relativistic object with extremely strong gravitational field (an analog of black holes in General Relativity) is approximately equal to 6.7 M⊙ with radius of a region filled with a matter (quark-gluon plasma) ≈ 10 km. Polarized emission of long gamma-ray bursts, a black-body component in their spectrum and other observed properties could be explained by the direct manifestation of a surface of these collapsars.

  8. Stellar Cartography: A Three-Dimensional View of the Magellanic System using Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, Barry

    We will use the data obtained by the Spitzer SAGE-LMC, SAGE-SMC and SAGE-Var programs to measure the three-dimensional structure of the Magellanic System using Cepheids. Cepheids have been demonstrated to have a narrow period-luminosity relation in the mid-infrared, such that mean magnitudes, and hence distances, can be obtained with high precision. In the Magellanic System we will be able to obtain distances with precisions of 5% to individual Cepheids. Using around 5000 Cepheids --- a factor of 50 more than our previous works --- and with newly discovered Cepheids in the Magellanic Bridge, we will be able to study the 3D structure of the System at an unprecedented fidelity. Understanding the structure of the Magellanic System is key to understanding its evolutionary history. A more precise three dimensional representation of the system will enable us to distinguish between different theoretical models, such as those in which the Clouds experience a close pass and those in which they experience a merger event. We will create templates light curves to phase the mid--IR Cepheid observations with the publicly available optical OGLE light curves to determine accurate mean magnitudes for these stars. We will also create a deep field using the newly released SAGE—Var data in order to measure the old, RR Lyrae population for comparison with the young, Cepheid population. This project is complementary to the on-going Spitzer Exploration Science SMHASH program, which is studying the structure of the Milky Way using mid-infrared observations of RR Lyrae. We will be able to use the results from this work in concert with SMHASH to produce a 3D representation of the MW-LMC-SMC system, bypassing the systematics of using multiple telescopes. The project lays an excellent foundation for future JWST and WFIRST projects studying the evolution of dwarf galaxy systems. The in--depth study of the well resolved, interacting LMC-SMC pair that we will perform will be used as an

  9. A Solar-type Stellar Companion to a Deep Contact Binary in a Quadruple System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Zhang, B.; Kreiner, J.

    2016-02-01

    The four-color (B, V, Rc, Ic) light curves of V776 Cas are presented and analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney method. It is discovered that V776 Cas is an early F-type (F2V) overcontact binary with a very high contact degree (f = 64.6%) and an extremely low-mass ratio (q = 0.130), which indicate that it is at the final evolutionary stage of cool short-period binaries. The mass of the primary and secondary stars are calculated to be M1 = 1.55(±0.04) M⊙, M2 = 0.20(±0.01) M⊙. V776 Cas is supposed to be formed from an initially detached binary system via the loss of angular momentum due to the magnetic wind. The initial masses of the present primary and secondary components are calculated to be M1i = 0.86(±0.10) M⊙ and M2i = 2.13(±0.04) M⊙. The observed-calculated curve exhibits a cyclic period variation, which is due to the light-travel time effect caused by the presence of a third component with a period of 23.7 years. The mass of the third component is estimated to be M3 = 1.04(±0.03) M⊙ and the orbital inclination of the third component is calculated to be i‧ = 33.°1. The distance of the binary system to the mass center of the triple system is calculated to be {a}12\\prime = 3.45 AU. The presence of the close-in tertiary component may play an important role in the formation and evolution of this binary system by drawing angular momentum from the central system.

  10. Binary systems, star clusters and the Galactic-field population. Applied stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    This book contains the results of recent theoretical work on the evolution of primordial binary systems in young star clusters, their effect on the evolution of their host clusters, implications for the distribution of young stars in the Milky Way, and the formation of bound star clusters. This work shows that if the Galactic-field binary population is a dynamically evolved version of the Taurus-Auriga pre-main sequence population, then most stars form in clusters with typically a few hundred binaries within a radius of about 0.5-1 pc. The results also suggest that the population I primordial binary-star orbital-parameter distribution functions may be universal, much like the initial mass function. Most solar-like planetary systems can survive in such clusters. The work presented here also establishes that most observed triple and quadruple systems must be primordial, but that α Cen A/B-Proxima Cen-like systems can form in clusters through dynamical capture. Precise N-body calculations using Aarseth's N-body codes of clusters containing up to 104 stars are used to create an extensive young-cluster library. These data demonstrate that the primordial binary systems are disrupted on a crossing-time scale, and that the truncation of the surviving period distribution measures the maximum concentration the cluster ever experienced. The N-body calculations demonstrate that Galactic star clusters form readily as nuclei of expanding OB associations despite a star-formation efficiency of typically 30 per cent and gas-expulsion over a time-span shorter than the cluster crossing time.

  11. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Masses of black holes in binary stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M.

    1996-08-01

    Mass determination methods and their results for ten black holes in X-ray binary systems are summarised. A unified interpretation of the radial velocity and optical light curves allows one to reliably justify the close binary system model and to prove the correctness of determination of the optical star mass function fv(m).The orbit plane inclination i can be estimated from an analysis of optical light curve of the system, which is due mainly to the ellipsoidal shape of the optical star (the so-called ellipticity effect). The component mass ratio q = mx/mv is obtained from information about the distance to the binary system as well as from data about rotational broadening of absorption lines in the spectrum of the optical star. These data allow one to obtain from the value of fv(m) a reliable value of the black hole mass mx or its low limit, as well as the optical star mass mv. An independent estimate of the optical star mass mv obtained from information about its spectral class and luminosity gives us test results. Additional test comes from information about the absence or presence of X-ray eclipses in the system. Effects of the non-zero dimension of the optical star, its pear-like shape, and X-ray heating on the absorption line profiles and the radial velocity curve are investigated. It is very significant that none of ten known massive (mx > 3M\\odot) X-ray sources considered as black hole candidates is an X-ray pulsar or an X-ray burster of the first kind.

  12. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae

  13. Delayed Gratification Habitable Zones: When Deep Outer Solar System Regions Become Balmy During Post-Main Sequence Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    2003-06-01

    Like all low- and moderate-mass stars, the Sun will burn as a red giant during its later evolution, generating of solar luminosities for some tens of millions of years. During this post-main sequence phase, the habitable (i.e., liquid water) thermal zone of our Solar System will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects orbit. Compared with the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resides, this "delayed gratification habitable zone" (DGHZ) will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment - with lower harmful radiation levels from the Sun, and a far less destructive collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Kuiper Belt, with >105 objects >=50 km in radius and more than three times the combined surface area of the four terrestrial planets, provides numerous sites for possible evolution once the Sun's DGHZ reaches it. The Sun's DGHZ might be thought to only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, ~109 Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our Solar System (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DGHZs may form a niche type of habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the Galaxy.

  14. Delayed gratification habitable zones: when deep outer solar system regions become balmy during post-main sequence stellar evolution.

    PubMed

    Stern, S Alan

    2003-01-01

    Like all low- and moderate-mass stars, the Sun will burn as a red giant during its later evolution, generating of solar luminosities for some tens of millions of years. During this post-main sequence phase, the habitable (i.e., liquid water) thermal zone of our Solar System will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects orbit. Compared with the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resides, this "delayed gratification habitable zone" (DGHZ) will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment - with lower harmful radiation levels from the Sun, and a far less destructive collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Kuiper Belt, with >10(5) objects > or =50 km in radius and more than three times the combined surface area of the four terrestrial planets, provides numerous sites for possible evolution once the Sun's DGHZ reaches it. The Sun's DGHZ might be thought to only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, approximately 10(9) Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our Solar System (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DGHZs may form a niche type of habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the Galaxy. PMID:14577880

  15. Stellar occultation of polarized light from circumstellar electrons. 4: Detached binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    The finite sizes of stars in detached binary systems are incorporated in the single scattering approximation of Brown, McLean, & Emslie (1978). In the absence of scatterer occultation, the predicted polarimetric variability is found to be represented by a terminating two harmonic time series, as previously found by Brown et al. (1978). When the occultation of scatterers by the light sources is included, additional Fourier harmonics are introduced. Model results are illustrated for a spherically symmetric scattering envelope centered on the primary star, in which it is found that for occultation effects to be identified in polarimetric data requires the separation of the system to be less than 10 times the radius of the primary, and for the primary to be the dominant light source.

  16. Possible planet formation in the young, low-mass, multiple stellar system GG Tau A.

    PubMed

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Boehler, Yann; Bary, Jeff; Beck, Tracy; Beust, Hervé; Chapillon, Edwige; Gueth, Fredéric; Huré, Jean-Marc; Pierens, Arnaud; Piétu, Vincent; Simon, Michal; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2014-10-30

    The formation of planets around binary stars may be more difficult than around single stars. In a close binary star (with a separation of less than a hundred astronomical units), theory predicts the presence of circumstellar disks around each star, and an outer circumbinary disk surrounding a gravitationally cleared inner cavity around the stars. Given that the inner disks are depleted by accretion onto the stars on timescales of a few thousand years, any replenishing material must be transferred from the outer reservoir to fuel planet formation (which occurs on timescales of about one million years). Gas flowing through disk cavities has been detected in single star systems. A circumbinary disk was discovered around the young low-mass binary system GG Tau A (ref. 7), which has recently been shown to be a hierarchical triple system. It has one large inner disk around the single star, GG Tau Aa, and shows small amounts of shocked hydrogen gas residing within the central cavity, but other than a single weak detection, the distribution of cold gas in this cavity or in any other binary or multiple star system has not hitherto been determined. Here we report imaging of gas fragments emitting radiation characteristic of carbon monoxide within the GG Tau A cavity. From the kinematics we conclude that the flow appears capable of sustaining the inner disk (around GG Tau Aa) beyond the accretion lifetime, leaving time for planet formation to occur there. These results show the complexity of planet formation around multiple stars and confirm the general picture predicted by numerical simulations. PMID:25355359

  17. Study and design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Van Eester, D.; Schweer, B.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Offermans, G.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; Birus, D.; Bozhenkov, S.; Hartmann, D. A.; Kallmeyer, J. P.; Renard, S.; Wolf, R. C.; Fülöp, T.

    2014-06-01

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band, 25-38 MHz, and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenario are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation, and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. Important elements of the complete ion cyclotron resonance heating system are discussed: a resonator circuit with tap feed to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and a decoupler to counterbalance the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  18. HD 98800: A Unique Stellar System of Post-T Tauri Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; King, Jeremy R.; Siess, Lionel; Noll, Keith S.; Gilmore, Diane M.; Henry, Todd J.; Nelan, Edmund; Burrows, Christopher J.; Brown, Robert A.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara J.; Franz, Otto G.; Wasserman, Laurence H.; Jones, Burton F.; Latham, David W.; Torres, Guillermo; Stefanik, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    HD 98800 is a system of four stars, and it has a large infrared excess that is thought to be due to a dust disk within the system. In this paper we present new astrometric observations made with Hipparcos, as well as photometry from Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images. Combining these observations and reanalyzing previous work allow us to estimate the age and masses of the stars in the system. Uncertainty in these ages and masses results from uncertainty in the temperatures of the stars and any reddening they may have. We find that HD 98800 is most probably about 10 Myr old, although it may be as young as 5 Myr or as old as 20 Myr old. The stars in HD 98800 appear to have metallicities that are about solar. An age of 10 Myr means that HD 98800 is a member of the post T Tauri class of objects, and we argue that the stars in HD 98800 can help us understand why post T Tauris have been so elusive, HD 98800 may have formed in the Centaurus star-forming region, but it is extraordinary in being so young and yet so far from where it was born.

  19. Study and design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Van Eester, D.; Schweer, B.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band, 25–38 MHz, and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenario are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation, and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. Important elements of the complete ion cyclotron resonance heating system are discussed: a resonator circuit with tap feed to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and a decoupler to counterbalance the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  20. The HH 24 Jet Complex: Collimated and Colliding Jets from a Newborn Multiple Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo

    2013-10-01

    The HH 24 complex constitutes the richest concentration of collimated bright Herbig-Haro jets known, and they originate from a small grouping of newborn binary and multiple systems. At least 6 jets are identified in deep groundbased optical interference images, and a similar number of sources in infrared images. We propose to do the first HST study of this complex, using H-alpha and [SII] filters. HST 0.05" to 0.1" angular resolution {20 to 40 AU at d 400 pc} is needed to resolve the shocks and their post-shock cooling layers for comparison with advanced numerical modeling. Our emphasis here is to explore outflows from a multiple system of newborn stars. Many of the jets show clear evidence of wiggling. The theory of jet motion from binary systems coupled with disk precession is now understood, and we will interpret the jet wiggles in this framework. Additionally, two of the HH 24 jets are showing evidence for a collision, a unique situation not seen anywhere else, and HST resolution is needed for comparison with gas-dynamic studies of jet-jet collisions. Two of the HH 24 jets are bright in the infrared [FeII] 1.644 line. In this line the main jet can be traced all the way to the source, which is the most important region for understanding the effects of binarity on the jet structure. We also apply for a second-epoch [SII] image in Cycle 23. This allows us, in addition to deriving the bulk motion, to determine such processes as expansion of the jet beam, sideways ejection in a working surface, turbulent and chaotic motions, and the effect of instabilities.

  1. AL Cassiopeiae: An F-type contact binary system with a cool stellar companion

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E.-G.; Liao, W.-P.; Zola, S.; Leung, K.-C.

    2014-11-01

    According to the general catalog of variable stars, AL Cas was classified as an EW-type eclipsing binary with a spectral type of B and an orbital period of P = 0.5005555 days. The first photometric light curves of the close binary in the B, V, R, and I bands are presented. New low-resolution spectra indicate that its spectral type is about F7 rather than B-type. A photometric analysis with the Wilson-Devinney method suggests that it is a contact binary (f = 39.3%) with a mass ratio of 0.61. Using 17 newly determined eclipse times together with those collected from the literature, we found that the observed–calculated (O – C) curve of AL Cas shows a cyclic change with a period of 86.6 yr and an amplitude of 0.0181 days. The periodic variation was analyzed for the light-travel time effect via the presence of a third body. The mass of the third body was determined to be M {sub 3}sin i' = 0.29(± 0.05) M {sub ☉} when a total mass of 2.14 M {sub ☉} for AL Cas is adopted. It is expected that the cool companion star may have played an important role in the origin and evolution of the system by removing angular momentum from the central binary system during early dynamical interaction and/or late dynamical evolution. This causes the original detached system to have a low angular momentum and a short initial orbital period. Then it can evolve into the present contact configuration via a case A mass transfer.

  2. AL Cassiopeiae: An F-type Contact Binary System with a Cool Stellar Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhou, X.; Zola, S.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E.-G.; Liao, W.-P.; Leung, K.-C.

    2014-11-01

    According to the general catalog of variable stars, AL Cas was classified as an EW-type eclipsing binary with a spectral type of B and an orbital period of P = 0.5005555 days. The first photometric light curves of the close binary in the B, V, R, and I bands are presented. New low-resolution spectra indicate that its spectral type is about F7 rather than B-type. A photometric analysis with the Wilson-Devinney method suggests that it is a contact binary (f = 39.3%) with a mass ratio of 0.61. Using 17 newly determined eclipse times together with those collected from the literature, we found that the observed-calculated (O - C) curve of AL Cas shows a cyclic change with a period of 86.6 yr and an amplitude of 0.0181 days. The periodic variation was analyzed for the light-travel time effect via the presence of a third body. The mass of the third body was determined to be M 3sin i' = 0.29(± 0.05) M ⊙ when a total mass of 2.14 M ⊙ for AL Cas is adopted. It is expected that the cool companion star may have played an important role in the origin and evolution of the system by removing angular momentum from the central binary system during early dynamical interaction and/or late dynamical evolution. This causes the original detached system to have a low angular momentum and a short initial orbital period. Then it can evolve into the present contact configuration via a case A mass transfer.

  3. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Geha, Marla; Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter; Simon, Joshua D.; Djorgovski, S. G. E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl

    2013-09-10

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  4. Early solar system. Stellar origin of the ¹⁸²Hf cosmochronometer and the presolar history of solar system matter.

    PubMed

    Lugaro, Maria; Heger, Alexander; Osrin, Dean; Goriely, Stephane; Zuber, Kai; Karakas, Amanda I; Gibson, Brad K; Doherty, Carolyn L; Lattanzio, John C; Ott, Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    Among the short-lived radioactive nuclei inferred to be present in the early solar system via meteoritic analyses, there are several heavier than iron whose stellar origin has been poorly understood. In particular, the abundances inferred for (182)Hf (half-life = 8.9 million years) and (129)I (half-life = 15.7 million years) are in disagreement with each other if both nuclei are produced by the rapid neutron-capture process. Here, we demonstrate that contrary to previous assumption, the slow neutron-capture process in asymptotic giant branch stars produces (182)Hf. This has allowed us to date the last rapid and slow neutron-capture events that contaminated the solar system material at ~100 million years and ~30 million years, respectively, before the formation of the Sun. PMID:25104382

  5. CLOSE STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN YOUNG, SUBSTRUCTURED, DISSOLVING STAR CLUSTERS: STATISTICS AND EFFECTS ON PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Jonathan; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-06-01

    Both simulations and observations indicate that stars form in filamentary, hierarchically clustered associations, most of which disperse into their galactic field once feedback destroys their parent clouds. However, during their early evolution in these substructured environments, stars can undergo close encounters with one another that might have significant impacts on their protoplanetary disks or young planetary systems. We perform N-body simulations of the early evolution of dissolving, substructured clusters with a wide range of properties, with the aim of quantifying the expected number and orbital element distributions of encounters as a function of cluster properties. We show that the presence of substructure both boosts the encounter rate and modifies the distribution of encounter velocities compared to what would be expected for a dynamically relaxed cluster. However, the boost only lasts for a dynamical time, and as a result the overall number of encounters expected remains low enough that gravitational stripping is unlikely to be a significant effect for the vast majority of star-forming environments in the Galaxy. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for models of the origin of the solar system, and of free-floating planets. We also provide tabulated encounter rates and orbital element distributions suitable for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation in a clustered environment.

  6. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Meiksin, A.; Joss, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    A highly compact binary represents a system which is composed of a collapsed object (degenerate dwarf, neutron star, or black hole) in orbit with a low-mass (equal to or less than 0.5 solar mass) secondary star. Matter may be transferred from the secondary to the collapsed star due to the decay of the orbit resulting from the emission of gravitational radiation. The present investigation has the objective to study quantitatively the evolution of highly compact binaries in globular cluster cores, subject to the interplay of gravitational radiation and collisions with field stars. The investigation is exploratory in nature. The numerical methods employed are based on the techniques developed by Rappaport et al. (1982). It is found that occasional close encounters with field stars strongly dominate the evolution of highly compact binaries in dense globular cluster cores. Attention is given to the applicability of the findings to observations of X-ray sources and cataclysmic variables.

  7. Intense X-ray flares from active stellar systems - EV Lacertae and HD 8357

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambruster, C.; Snyder, W. A.; Wood, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    The HEAO A-1 Sky Survey Experiment included X-ray data used to define light curves for the flare star EV Lac and for X-ray flares observed in the binary system HD 8357. The data were taken during flare events and were detailed enough to calculate the flare rates and flaring luminosities. The peak luminosities during flares were several times the luminosities in normal X-ray flares emitted by the objects. Peak luminosities reached 30-50 times the normal variations and were associated with an order of magnitude increase in energy output. EV Lac was sufficiently active to be recommended for inclusion in future X-ray monitoring programs.

  8. Integrated inertial stellar attitude sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Tye M. (Inventor); Kourepenis, Anthony S. (Inventor); Wyman, Jr., William F. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An integrated inertial stellar attitude sensor for an aerospace vehicle includes a star camera system, a gyroscope system, a controller system for synchronously integrating an output of said star camera system and an output of said gyroscope system into a stream of data, and a flight computer responsive to said stream of data for determining from the star camera system output and the gyroscope system output the attitude of the aerospace vehicle.

  9. The nearby eclipsing stellar system δ Velorum . I. Origin of the infrared excess from VISIR and NACO imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Thévenin, F.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The triple stellar system δ Vel system presents a significant infrared excess, whose origin is still being debated. A large infrared bow shock has been discovered using Spitzer/MIPS observations. Although it appears as a significant contributor to the measured IR excess, the possibility exists that a circumstellar IR excess is present around the stars of the system. Aims: The objective of the present VISIR and NACO observations is to identify whether one of the stars of the δ Vel system presents a circumstellar photometric excess in the thermal IR domain and to quantify it. Methods: We observed δ Vel using the imaging modes of the ESO/VLT instruments VISIR (in BURST mode) and NACO to resolve the A-B system (0.6´´ separation) and obtain the photometry of each star. We also obtained one NACO photometry epoch precisely at the primary (annular) eclipse of δ Vel Aa by Ab. Results: Our photometric measurements with NACO (2.17 μm), complemented by the existing visible photometry allowed us to reconstruct the spectral energy distribution of the three stars. We then compared the VISIR photometry (8.6-12.8 μm) to the expected photospheric emission from the three stars at the corresponding wavelengths. Conclusions: We can exclude the presence of a circumstellar thermal infrared excess around δ Vel A or B down to a few percent level. This supports the conclusions of Gáspár et al. (2008, ApJ, 672, 974) that the IR excess of δ Vel has an interstellar origin, although a cold circumstellar disk could still be present. In addition, we derive the spectral types of the three stars Aa, Ab, and B (respectively A2IV, A4V and F8V), and we estimate the age of the system around 400-500 Myr. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory, under ESO programs 081.D-0109(B) and 081.D-0109(C).

  10. The binary systems IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1: Accretion of matter from an intense Wolf-Rayet stellar wind onto a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutukov, A. V.; Fedorova, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The current evolutionary stage of the binary systems IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1, which contain a massive black hole and a Wolf-Rayet star with a strong stellar wind that does not fill its Roche lobe, is considered. The high X-ray luminosity and X-ray properties testify to the presence of accretion disks in these systems. The consistency of the conditions for the existence of such a disk and the possibility of reproducing the observed X-ray luminosity in the framework of the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton theory for a spherically symmetric stellar wind is analyzed. A brief review of information about the mass-loss rates of Wolf-Rayet stars and the speeds of their stellar winds is given. The evolution of these systems at the current stage is computed. Estimates made using the derived parameters show that it is not possible to achieve consistency, since the conditions for the existence of an accretion disk require that the speed of the Wolf-Rayetwind be appreciably lower than is required to reproduce the observedX-ray luminosity. Several explanations of this situation are possible: (1) the real pattern of the motion of the stellar-wind material in the binary is substantially more complex than is assumed in the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton theory, changing the conditions for the formation of an accretion disk and influencing the accretion rate onto the black hole; (2) some of the accreting material leaves the accretor due to X-ray heating; (3) the accretion efficiency in these systems is nearly an order of magnitude lower than in the case of accretion through a thin disk onto a non-rotating black hole; (4) the intensity of the Wolf-Rayet wind is one to two orders of magnitude lower than has been suggested by modern studies.

  11. Stellar Vampires Unmasked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    Astronomers have found possible proofs of stellar vampirism in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, they found that some hot, bright, and apparently young stars in the cluster present less carbon and oxygen than the majority of their sisters. This indicates that these few stars likely formed by taking their material from another star. "This is the first detection of a chemical signature clearly pointing to a specific scenario to form so-called 'Blue straggler stars' in a globular cluster", said Francesco Ferraro, from the Astronomy Department of Bologna University (Italy) and lead-author of the paper presenting the results. Blue stragglers are unexpectedly young-looking stars found in stellar aggregates, such as globular clusters, which are known to be made up of old stars. These enigmatic objects are thought to be created in either direct stellar collisions or through the evolution and coalescence of a binary star system in which one star 'sucks' material off the other, rejuvenating itself. As such, they provide interesting constraints on both binary stellar evolution and star cluster dynamics. To date, the unambiguous signatures of either stellar traffic accidents or stellar vampirism have not been observed, and the formation mechanisms of Blue stragglers are still a mystery. The astronomers used ESO's Very Large Telescope to measure the abundance of chemical elements at the surface of 43 Blue straggler stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae [1]. They discovered that six of these Blue straggler stars contain less carbon and oxygen than the majority of these peculiar objects. Such an anomaly indicates that the material at the surface of the blue stragglers comes from the deep interiors of a parent star [2]. Such deep material can reach the surface of the blue straggler only during the mass transfer process occurring between two stars in a binary system. Numerical simulations indeed show that the coalescence of stars should not

  12. A New Look at Stellar Outflows: Spitzer Observations of the HH 46/47 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Morris, Patrick; Marleau, Francine R.; Carey, Sean; Boogert, Adwin; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Evans, Neal J., II; Keene, Jocelyn; Muzerolle, James; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Lowrance, Patrick; Allen, Lori; Bourke, Tyler L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Early Release Observations of the HH 46/47 system and HH 46 IRS 1 source, taken with the three instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The optically invisible southwest lobe, driven by the HH 47C bow shock, is revealed in full detail by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) images and displays a 'loop'-like morphology. Both of the mid-infrared outflow lobes are narrower than those of CO flow. We believe that the combination of emission by H2 rotational lines [S(11)-S(4)] and some atomic lines, which fall within the IRAC passbands, are responsible for the bulk of the observed emission, although contributions from the 3.3, 6.2, and 7.7 micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission bands cannot be ruled out. Weak spectral features corresponding to these emitters are present in the Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the HH 47A bow shock. The spectrum of HH 46 IRS 1 shows remarkable similarities to those of high-mass protostars, which include the presence of H2O, CO2, CH4, and possibly NH3, CH3OH, and ices. The high ice abundances and the lack of signs of thermal processing indicate that these ices in the envelope are well shielded from the powerful outflow and its cavity. Emission from the Bok globule at 24 micron is detected and displays a similar structure to that observed at 8 micron.

  13. The Design of an Electron Bernstein Wave Heating System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Angela; Sarksyan, Karen A.; Matveev, Nicolai V.; Castejon, Francisco; Cappa, Alvaro; Kharchev, Nicolai K.; Tereshchenko, Maxim A.; Starshinov, N. N.; Martin, Romualdo

    2004-09-15

    Electron Bernstein waves excited by either X-B or O-X-B conversion scheme can be used to create and heat a dense plasma in TJ-II in the first harmonic. Two gyrotrons operating in the regime of second-harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating (53.2 GHz) create a target plasma, and then a 28-GHz gyrotron is switched on. The power of the gyrotron is 300 kW and the pulse length is 100 ms.A new high-voltage power supply was designed for this gyrotron. It supplies 70 kV and a maximum current of 25 A. Corrugated waveguides will be used to transmit the microwave radiation. The distance between the position of the gyrotron and the TJ-II window is {approx}7 m. The microwave beam is launched through the D6 port of TJ-II. A movable internal mirror is needed to focus the beam and to accomplish the restrictive launching angle conditions. The layout and the main features of the new system are presented.

  14. THE 2008 OUTBURST IN THE YOUNG STELLAR SYSTEM Z CMa: THE FIRST DETECTION OF TWIN JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E. T.; Dougados, C.; Bonnefoy, M.; Bouvier, J.; Chauvin, G.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Malbet, F.; Perrin, M. D.; Bains, I.; Redman, M. P.; Ray, T. P.; Bouy, H.; Benisty, M.; Grankvin, K.

    2010-09-01

    The Z CMa binary is understood to undergo both FU Orionis (FUOR) and EX Orionis (EXOR) type outbursts. While the SE component has been spectroscopically classified as an FUOR, the NW component, a Herbig Be star, is the source of the EXOR outbursts. The system has been identified as the source of a large outflow; however, previous studies have failed to identify the driver. Here, we present adaptive optics assisted [Fe II] spectro-images which reveal for the first time the presence of two small-scale jets. Observations made using OSIRIS at the Keck Observatory show the Herbig Be star to be the source of the parsec-scale outflow, which within 2'' of the source shows signs of wiggling and the FUOR to be driving a {approx}0.''4 jet. The wiggling of the Herbig Be star's jet is evidence for an additional companion which could in fact be generating the EXOR outbursts, the last of which began in 2008. Indeed, the dynamical scale of the wiggling corresponds to a timescale of 4-8 years which is in agreement with the timescale of these outbursts. The spectro-images also show a bow-shock-shaped feature and possible associated knots. The origin of this structure is as of yet unclear. Finally, interesting low velocity structure is also observed. One possibility is that it originates in a wide-angle outflow launched from a circumbinary disk.

  15. Stellar encounters as the origin of distant Solar System objects in highly eccentric orbits.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Scott J; Bromley, Benjamin C

    2004-12-01

    The Kuiper belt extends from the orbit of Neptune at 30 au to an abrupt outer edge about 50 au from the Sun. Beyond the edge is a sparse population of objects with large orbital eccentricities. Neptune shapes the dynamics of most Kuiper belt objects, but the recently discovered planet 2003 VB12 (Sedna) has an eccentric orbit with a perihelion distance of 70 au, far beyond Neptune's gravitational influence. Although influences from passing stars could have created the Kuiper belt's outer edge and could have scattered objects into large, eccentric orbits, no model currently explains the properties of Sedna. Here we show that a passing star probably scattered Sedna from the Kuiper belt into its observed orbit. The likelihood that a planet at 60-80 au can be scattered into Sedna's orbit is about 50 per cent; this estimate depends critically on the geometry of the fly-by. Even more interesting is the approximately 10 per cent chance that Sedna was captured from the outer disk of the passing star. Most captures have very high inclination orbits; detection of such objects would confirm the presence of extrasolar planets in our own Solar System. PMID:15577903

  16. Hans A. Bethe Prize Talk: Neutron stars and stellar collapse: the physics of strongly interacting Fermi systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    2011-04-01

    The talk will touch on a number of themes in the application of many-body theory to neutron stars and stellar collapse. One of these will be the composition and equation of state of nuclear matter. Specific topics will include nuclei in neutron stars, superfluidity and superconductivity of nuclear matter, and inhomogeneous phases of nuclear matter. A second major theme will be neutrino processes in dense matter: neutrino emission is the most powerful cooling mechanism for young neutron stars, and rates of neutrino processes are a key ingredient in simulations of stellar collapse.

  17. A Stellar Highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijsdijk, Case

    2015-10-01

    Thomas Henderson, at the Royal Observatory of the Cape, was the first person to measure the distance to a star in 1834. Robert Innes, at the Union Observatory in Johannesburg, discovered that Proxima Centauri was the nearest star to the Sun in 1915. The idea of marking the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Proxima Centauri in 2015 led to the development of a Stellar Highway, similar to the well-known scale models of the Solar System or Planetary Highways, but showing the scaled distance between stars.

  18. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. II. OVERCOMING THE FRAGMENTATION BARRIER IN α CENTAURI AND γ CEPHEI-LIKE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-10

    Planet formation in small-separation (∼20 AU) eccentric binaries such as γ Cephei or α Centauri is believed to be adversely affected by the presence of the stellar companion. Strong dynamical excitation of planetesimals by the eccentric companion can result in collisional destruction (rather than growth) of 1-100 km objects, giving rise to the ''fragmentation barrier'' for planet formation. We revise this issue using a novel description of secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries, which accounts for the gravity of the eccentric, coplanar protoplanetary disk, as well as gas drag. By studying planetesimal collision outcomes, we show, in contrast to many previous studies, that planetesimal growth and subsequent formation of planets (including gas giants) in AU-scale orbits within ∼20 AU separation binaries may be possible, provided that the protoplanetary disks are massive (≳ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}) and only weakly eccentric (disk eccentricity ≲ 0.01). These requirements are compatible with both the existence of massive (several M{sub J} ) planets in γ Cep-like systems and the results of recent simulations of gaseous disks in eccentric binaries. Terrestrial and Neptune-like planets can also form in lower-mass disks at small (sub-AU) radii. We find that the fragmentation barrier is less of a problem in eccentric disks that are apsidally aligned with the binary orbit. Alignment gives rise to special locations, where (1) relative planetesimal velocities are low and (2) the timescale of their drag-induced radial drift is long. This causes planetesimal pileup at such locations in the disk and promotes their growth locally, helping to alleviate the timescale problem for core formation.

  19. THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT 08576nr292: DISCOVERY OF A DISK-JET SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Ellerbroek, Lucas E.; Kaper, Lex; De Koter, Alex; Sana, Hugues; Waters, Laurens B. F. M.; Bik, Arjan; Horrobin, Matthew; Puga, Elena

    2011-05-01

    We present observations of the embedded massive young stellar object (YSO) candidate 08576nr292, obtained with X-shooter and SINFONI on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). The flux-calibrated, medium-resolution X-shooter spectrum (300-2500 nm) includes over 300 emission lines, but no (photospheric) absorption lines, and is consistent with a reddened disk spectrum. Among the emission lines are three hydrogen series and helium lines, both permitted and forbidden metal lines, and CO first-overtone emission. A representative sample of lines with different morphologies is presented. The H{alpha} and Ca II triplet lines are very strong, with profiles indicative of outflow and-possibly-infall, usually observed in accreting stars. These lines include a blueshifted absorption component at {approx}-125 km s{sup -1}. The He I and metal-line profiles are double peaked, with a likely origin in a circumstellar disk. The forbidden lines, associated with outflow, have a single blueshifted emission component centered at -125 km s{sup -1}, coinciding with the absorption components in H{alpha} and Ca II. SINFONI H- and K-band integral-field spectroscopy of the cluster environment demonstrates that the [Fe II] emission is produced by a jet originating at the location of 08576nr292. Because the spectral type of the central object cannot be determined, its mass remains uncertain. We argue that 08576nr292 is an intermediate-mass YSO with a high accretion rate ( M-dot{sub acc}{approx}10{sup -6}-10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}). These observations demonstrate the potential of X-shooter and SINFONI to study in great detail an accretion disk-jet system, rarely seen around the more massive YSOs.

  20. History of Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of stellar interferometry from the suggestion of Fizeau that stellar interferometry was possible,to the use of the Mark I, II and III for astrometry. Photographs, and parts of original articles are presented.

  1. Cannibalization and rebirth in the NGC 5387 system. I. The stellar stream and star-forming region

    SciTech Connect

    Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Verbiscer, Anne; Martínez-Delgado, David; D'Onghia, Elena; Zibetti, Stefano; Gabany, R. Jay; Blanton, Michael

    2014-08-01

    We have identified a low surface brightness stellar stream from visual inspection of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging for the edge-on, spiral galaxy NGC 5387. An optically blue overdensity coincident with the stream intersection with the NGC 5387 disk was also identified in SDSS and in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Deep Imaging Survey contributing 38% of the total far-UV integrated flux from NGC 5387. Deeper optical imaging was acquired with the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope that confirmed the presence of both features. The stellar stream is red in color, (B – V) = 0.7, has a stellar mass of 6 × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉}, which implies a 1:50 merger ratio, has a circular radius, R{sub circ} ∼ 11.7 kpc, formed in ∼240 Myr, and the progenitor had a total mass of ∼4 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}. Spectroscopy from LBT+MODS1 was used to determine that the blue overdensity is at the same redshift as NGC 5387, consists of young stellar populations (∼10 Myr), is metal-poor (12 + log (O/H) = 8.03), and is forming stars at an enhanced rate (∼1-3 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). The most likely interpretations are that the blue overdensity is (1) a region of enhanced star formation in the outer disk of NGC 5387 induced by the minor accretion event or (2) the progenitor of the stellar stream experiencing enhanced star formation. Additional exploration of these scenarios is presented in a companion paper.

  2. Cannibalization and Rebirth in the NGC 5387 System. I. The Stellar Stream and Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Rachael L.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Majewski, Steven R.; D'Onghia, Elena; Zibetti, Stefano; Gabany, R. Jay; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Blanton, Michael; Verbiscer, Anne

    2014-08-01

    We have identified a low surface brightness stellar stream from visual inspection of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging for the edge-on, spiral galaxy NGC 5387. An optically blue overdensity coincident with the stream intersection with the NGC 5387 disk was also identified in SDSS and in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Deep Imaging Survey contributing 38% of the total far-UV integrated flux from NGC 5387. Deeper optical imaging was acquired with the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope that confirmed the presence of both features. The stellar stream is red in color, (B - V) = 0.7, has a stellar mass of 6 × 108 M ⊙, which implies a 1:50 merger ratio, has a circular radius, R circ ~ 11.7 kpc, formed in ~240 Myr, and the progenitor had a total mass of ~4 × 1010 M ⊙. Spectroscopy from LBT+MODS1 was used to determine that the blue overdensity is at the same redshift as NGC 5387, consists of young stellar populations (~10 Myr), is metal-poor (12 + log (O/H) = 8.03), and is forming stars at an enhanced rate (~1-3 M ⊙ yr-1). The most likely interpretations are that the blue overdensity is (1) a region of enhanced star formation in the outer disk of NGC 5387 induced by the minor accretion event or (2) the progenitor of the stellar stream experiencing enhanced star formation. Additional exploration of these scenarios is presented in a companion paper. Based on observations with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  3. Low Surface Brightness Imaging of the Magellanic System: Imprints of Tidal Interactions between the Clouds in the Stellar Periphery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besla, Gurtina; Martínez-Delgado, David; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Beletsky, Yuri; Seibert, Mark; Schlafly, Edward F.; Grebel, Eva K.; Neyer, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    We present deep optical images of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) using a low cost telephoto lens with a wide field of view to explore stellar substructure in the outskirts of the stellar disk of the LMC (<10° from the LMC center). These data have higher resolution than existing star count maps, and highlight the existence of stellar arcs and multiple spiral arms in the northern periphery, with no comparable counterparts in the south. We compare these data to detailed simulations of the LMC disk outskirts, following interactions with its low mass companion, the SMC. We consider interaction in isolation and with the inclusion of the Milky Way tidal field. The simulations are used to assess the origin of the northern structures, including also the low density stellar arc recently identified in the Dark Energy Survey data by Mackey et al. at ∼15°. We conclude that repeated close interactions with the SMC are primarily responsible for the asymmetric stellar structures seen in the periphery of the LMC. The orientation and density of these arcs can be used to constrain the LMC’s interaction history with and impact parameter of the SMC. More generally, we find that such asymmetric structures should be ubiquitous about pairs of dwarfs and can persist for 1–2 Gyr even after the secondary merges entirely with the primary. As such, the lack of a companion around a Magellanic Irregular does not disprove the hypothesis that their asymmetric structures are driven by dwarf–dwarf interactions.

  4. The Age of the Young Bulge-like Population in the Stellar System Terzan 5: Linking the Galactic Bulge to the High-z Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, F. R.; Massari, D.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Origlia, L.; Rich, R. M.; Mucciarelli, A.

    2016-09-01

    The Galactic bulge is dominated by an old, metal-rich stellar population. The possible presence and the amount of a young (a few gigayears old) minor component is one of the major issues debated in the literature. Recently, the bulge stellar system Terzan 5 was found to harbor three sub-populations with iron content varying by more than one order of magnitude (from 0.2 up to two times the solar value), with chemical abundance patterns strikingly similar to those observed in bulge field stars. Here we report on the detection of two distinct main-sequence turnoff points in Terzan 5, providing the age of the two main stellar populations: 12 Gyr for the (dominant) sub-solar component and 4.5 Gyr for the component at super-solar metallicity. This discovery classifies Terzan 5 as a site in the Galactic bulge where multiple bursts of star formation occurred, thus suggesting a quite massive progenitor possibly resembling the giant clumps observed in star-forming galaxies at high redshifts. This connection opens a new route of investigation into the formation process and evolution of spheroids and their stellar content. Based on data obtained with (1) the ESA/NASA HST, under programs GO-14061, GO-12933, GO-10845, (2) the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory during the Science Verification of the camera MAD; (3) the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and NASA.

  5. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  6. A POSSIBLE BINARY SYSTEM OF A STELLAR REMNANT IN THE HIGH-MAGNIFICATION GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2007-BLG-514

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, N.; Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Dong, S.; Gould, A.; Street, R. A.; Greenhill, J.; Bond, I. A.; Fukui, A.; Holderness, S.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2012-06-20

    We report the extremely high-magnification (A > 1000) binary microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514. We obtained good coverage around the double peak structure in the light curve via follow-up observations from different observatories. The binary lens model that includes the effects of parallax (known orbital motion of the Earth) and orbital motion of the lens yields a binary lens mass ratio of q = 0.321 {+-} 0.007 and a projected separation of s = 0.072 {+-} 0.001 in units of the Einstein radius. The parallax parameters allow us to determine the lens distance D{sub L} = 3.11 {+-} 0.39 kpc and total mass M{sub L} = 1.40 {+-} 0.18 M{sub Sun }; this leads to the primary and secondary components having masses of M{sub 1} = 1.06 {+-} 0.13 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.34 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }, respectively. The parallax model indicates that the binary lens system is likely constructed by the main-sequence stars. On the other hand, we used a Bayesian analysis to estimate probability distributions by the model that includes the effects of xallarap (possible orbital motion of the source around a companion) and parallax (q = 0.270 {+-} 0.005, s = 0.083 {+-} 0.001). The primary component of the binary lens is relatively massive, with M{sub 1} = 0.9{sup +4.6}{sub -0.3} M{sub Sun} and it is at a distance of D{sub L} = 2.6{sup +3.8}{sub -0.9} kpc. Given the secure mass ratio measurement, the companion mass is therefore M{sub 2} = 0.2{sup +1.2}{sub -0.1} M{sub Sun }. The xallarap model implies that the primary lens is likely a stellar remnant, such as a white dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole.

  7. Comparison of fast tomographic methods for application on the Soft X-Ray Tomography System on Wendelstein 7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P. J.; Thomsen, H.; Gori, S.; Toussaint, U. v.; Geiger, J.; Weller, A.; Coelho, R.; Fernandes, H.

    2008-03-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, presently under construction in Greifswald, is foreseen to operate on a steady state regime. Under such a scenario, a constant diagnosis of the plasma characteristics is strongly envisaged. A X-Ray Tomography diagnostic is a particularly useful tool since a poloidal cross-section of the plasma's X-Ray emissivity can be reconstructed and the plasma's position as well as MHD activity can be inferred. Fast tomographic algorithms such as the Cormack inversion or neural networks (NN) can be applied to obtain recon-structions at a human time scale (10˜100 reconstructions per second). This paper discusses the potential application of these algorithms on the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator by comparing performance and reliability of the results. The NN reconstruction has proven to be faster and more reliable than the Cormack's.

  8. Stellar halos around Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2016-08-01

    The Local Group is now home to 102 known galaxies and candidates, with many new faint galaxies continuing to be discovered. The total stellar mass range spanned by this population covers a factor of close to a billion, from the faintest systems with stellar masses of order a few thousand to the Milky Way and Andromeda, with stellar masses of order 1011 M ⊙. Here, I discuss the evidence for stellar halos surrounding Local Group galaxies spanning from dwarf scales (with the case of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal), though to intermediate mass systems (M33) and finishing with M31. Evidence of extended stellar populations and merging is seen across the luminosity function, indicating that the processes that lead to halo formation are common at all mass scales.

  9. Measurements of stellar inclinations for Kepler planet candidates. II. Candidate spin-orbit misalignments in single- and multiple-transiting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.

    2014-03-01

    We present a test for spin-orbit alignment for the host stars of 25 candidate planetary systems detected by the Kepler spacecraft. The inclination angle of each star's rotation axis was estimated from its rotation period, rotational line broadening, and radius. The rotation periods were determined using the Kepler photometric time series. The rotational line broadening was determined from high-resolution optical spectra with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. Those same spectra were used to determine the star's photospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), which were then interpreted with stellar-evolutionary models to determine stellar radii. We combine the new sample with the seven stars from our previous work on this subject, finding that the stars show a statistical tendency to have inclinations near 90°, in alignment with the planetary orbits. Possible spin-orbit misalignments are seen in several systems, including three multiple-planet systems (KOI-304, 988, 2261). Ideally, these systems should be scrutinized with complementary techniques, such as the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, starspot-crossing anomalies, or asteroseismology, but the measurements will be difficult owing to the relatively faint apparent magnitudes and small transit signals in these systems.

  10. THE BANANA PROJECT. IV. TWO ALIGNED STELLAR ROTATION AXES IN THE YOUNG ECCENTRIC BINARY SYSTEM EP CRUCIS: PRIMORDIAL ORIENTATION AND TIDAL ALIGNMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Setiawan, Johny; Torres, Guillermo; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2013-04-10

    With observations of the EP Cru system, we continue our series of measurements of spin-orbit angles in eclipsing binary star systems, the BANANA project (Binaries Are Not Always Neatly Aligned). We find a close alignment between the sky projections of the rotational and orbital angular momentum vectors for both stars ({beta}{sub p} = -1. Degree-Sign 8 {+-} 1. Degree-Sign 6 and |{beta}{sub s}| < 17 Degree-Sign ). We also derive precise absolute dimensions and stellar ages for this system. The EP Cru and DI Her systems provide an interesting comparison: they have similar stellar types and orbital properties, but DI Her is younger and has major spin-orbit misalignments, raising the question of whether EP Cru also had a large misalignment at an earlier phase of evolution. We show that tidal dissipation is an unlikely explanation for the good alignment observed today, because realignment happens on the same timescale as spin-orbit synchronization, and the stars in EP Cru are far from synchronization (they are spinning nine times too quickly). Therefore it seems that some binaries form with aligned axes, while other superficially similar binaries are formed with misaligned axes.

  11. Correction to Method of Establishing the Absolute Radiometric Accuracy of Remote Sensing Systems While On-orbit Using Characterized Stellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Howard S.; Cunningham, Douglas M.

    2007-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Brief history of related events; 2) Overview of original method used to establish absolute radiometric accuracy of remote sensing instruments using stellar sources; and 3) Considerations to improve the stellar calibration approach.

  12. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  13. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  14. The GAPS programme with HARPS-N at TNG. V. A comprehensive analysis of the XO-2 stellar and planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasso, M.; Biazzo, K.; Bonomo, A. S.; Desidera, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Nascimbeni, V.; Esposito, M.; Scandariato, G.; Sozzetti, A.; Cosentino, R.; Gratton, R.; Malavolta, L.; Rainer, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Poretti, E.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.; Ribas, I.; Santos, N.; Affer, L.; Andreuzzi, G.; Barbieri, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Benatti, S.; Bernagozzi, A.; Bertolini, E.; Bonavita, M.; Borsa, F.; Borsato, L.; Boschin, W.; Calcidese, P.; Carbognani, A.; Cenadelli, D.; Christille, J. M.; Claudi, R. U.; Covino, E.; Cunial, A.; Giacobbe, P.; Granata, V.; Harutyunyan, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Leto, G.; Libralato, M.; Lodato, G.; Lorenzi, V.; Mancini, L.; Martinez Fiorenzano, A. F.; Marzari, F.; Masiero, S.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Molinaro, M.; Munari, U.; Murabito, S.; Pagano, I.; Pedani, M.; Piotto, G.; Rosenberg, A.; Silvotti, R.; Southworth, J.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: XO-2 is the first confirmed wide stellar binary system where the almost twin components XO-2N and XO-2S have planets, and it is a peculiar laboratory in which to investigate the diversity of planetary systems. This stimulated a detailed characterization study of the stellar and planetary components based on new observations. Methods: We collected high-resolution spectra with the HARPS-N spectrograph and multi-band light curves. Spectral analysis led to an accurate determination of the stellar atmospheric parameters and characterization of the stellar activity, and high-precision radial velocities of XO-2N were measured. We collected 14 transit light curves of XO-2Nb used to improve the transit parameters. Photometry provided accurate magnitude differences between the stars and a measure of their rotation periods. Results: The iron abundance of XO-2N was found to be +0.054 dex greater, within more than 3σ, than that of XO-2S. The existence of a long-term variation in the radial velocities of XO-2N is confirmed, and we detected a turnover with respect to previous measurements. We suggest the presence of a second massive companion in an outer orbit or the stellar activity cycle as possible causes of the observed acceleration. The latter explanation seems more plausible with the present dataset. We obtained an accurate value of the projected spin-orbit angle for the XO-2N system (λ = 7° ± 11°), and estimated the real 3D spin-orbit angle (ψ =27+12-27 degrees). We measured the XO-2 rotation periods, and found a value of P = 41.6 ± 1.1 days in the case of XO-2N, in excellent agreement with the predictions. The period of XO-2S appears shorter, with an ambiguity between 26 and 34.5 days that we cannot solve with the present dataset alone. The analysis of the stellar activity shows that XO-2N appears to be more active than the companion, perhaps because we sampled different phases of their activity cycle, or because of an interaction between XO-2N and its hot

  15. Does the stellar distribution flare? A comparison of stellar scale heights with LAB H I data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Dedes, L.; Haud, U.

    2014-10-10

    The question of whether the stellar populations in the Milky Way take part in the flaring of scale heights as observed for the H I gas is a matter of debate. Standard mass models for the Milky Way assume a constant scale height for each of the different stellar distributions. However, there is mounting evidence that at least some of the stellar distributions reach, at large galactocentric distances, high altitudes, which are incompatible with a constant scale height. We discuss recent observational evidence for stellar flaring and compare it with H I data from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn survey. Within the systemic and statistical uncertainties we find a good agreement between both.

  16. Deriving Stellar Inclination of Slow Rotators Using Stellar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ~2-2.5 km s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84+6-20 deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of \\psi =4+18-4 considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45+9-19, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s-1. Based on observations made with the MOST satellite, the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile), and the SOPHIE instrument at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France).

  17. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ∼2-2.5 km s{sup –1}. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84{sub −20}{sup +6} deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of ψ=4{sub −4}{sup +18} considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45{sub −19}{sup +9}, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s{sup –1}.

  18. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary system AQ Serpentis: A stringent test of convective core overshooting in stellar evolution models

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Vaz, Luiz Paulo R.; Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: lpv@fisica.ufmg.br E-mail: claret@iaa.es

    2014-02-01

    We report differential photometric observations and radial-velocity measurements of the detached, 1.69 day period, double-lined eclipsing binary AQ Ser. Accurate masses and radii for the components are determined to better than 1.8% and 1.1%, respectively, and are M {sub 1} = 1.417 ± 0.021 M {sub ☉}, M {sub 2} = 1.346 ± 0.024 M {sub ☉}, R {sub 1} = 2.451 ± 0.027 R {sub ☉}, and R {sub 2} = 2.281 ± 0.014 R {sub ☉}. The temperatures are 6340 ± 100 K (spectral type F6) and 6430 ± 100 K (F5), respectively. Both stars are considerably evolved, such that predictions from stellar evolution theory are particularly sensitive to the degree of extra mixing above the convective core (overshoot). The component masses are different enough to exclude a location in the H-R diagram past the point of central hydrogen exhaustion, which implies the need for extra mixing. Moreover, we find that current main-sequence models are unable to match the observed properties at a single age even when allowing the unknown metallicity, mixing length parameter, and convective overshooting parameter to vary freely and independently for the two components. The age of the more massive star appears systematically younger. AQ Ser and other similarly evolved eclipsing binaries showing the same discrepancy highlight an outstanding and largely overlooked problem with the description of overshooting in current stellar theory.

  19. SEARCH FOR IONIZED JETS TOWARD HIGH-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, Andres E.; Garay, Guido; Brooks, Kate J.; Voronkov, Maxim A.

    2012-07-01

    We are carrying out multi-frequency radio continuum observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, to systematically search for collimated ionized jets toward high-mass young stellar objects (HMYSOs). Here we report observations at 1.4, 2.4, 4.8, and 8.6 GHz, made with angular resolutions of about 7'', 4'', 2'', and 1'', respectively, toward six objects of a sample of 33 southern HMYSOs thought to be in very early stages of evolution. The objects in the sample were selected from radio and infrared catalogs by having positive radio spectral indices and being luminous (L{sub bol} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }), but underluminous in radio emission compared with that expected from its bolometric luminosity. This criterion makes the radio sources good candidates for being ionized jets. As part of this systematic search, two ionized jets have been discovered: one previously published and the other reported here. The rest of the observed candidates correspond to three hypercompact H II regions and two ultracompact H II regions. The two jets discovered are associated with two of the most luminous (7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} and 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} L{sub Sun }) HMYSOs known to harbor this type of object, showing that the phenomena of collimated ionized winds appear in the formation process of stars at least up to masses of {approx}20 M{sub Sun} and provide strong evidence for a disk-mediated accretion scenario for the formation of high-mass stars. From the incidence of jets in our sample, we estimate that the jet phase in high-mass protostars lasts for {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} yr.

  20. The Effect of Stellar Evolution on Population II Contact Binaries in the Period-Color Relation. I. Equal-Mass, Marginal Contact Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, Eric P.

    2001-06-01

    Field W Ursae Majoris binaries observe a well-known period-color relation such that systems containing more massive stars are bluer and have longer orbital periods than systems with lower mass components. However, it has been known for a decade that metal-poor W Ursae Majoris binaries are too blue, have too short an orbital period, or both. Correcting the observed color for the reduced line blanketing in the atmosphere of a Population II star accounts for only part of the observed discrepancy. As others have suggested and Rucinski recently showed, the smaller radii of Population II stars and the correspondingly shorter orbital periods are responsible for the remainder. In this paper I investigate the effect of evolution on the location in the period-color plane. This paper addresses the restricted case of equal-mass components in critical contact with their inner Roche lobes but should be applicable to the more general cases to the extent that the relative sizes of stellar components are preserved with metallicity changes. The calculated metallicity-age dependent period-color relations substantially agree with Rucinski & Duerbeck's recent empirically derived corrections to the period-color relation over most of the investigated range of periods. However, our predictions deviate to a greater degree as stellar age increases, since their parameterization does not include the effect of evolution.

  1. Evidence from stellar rotation of enhanced disc dispersal. I. The case of the triple visual system BD-21 1074 in the β Pictoris association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.; Monard, B.; Biazzo, K.; Melo, C. H. F.; Frasca, A.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The early stage of stellar evolution is characterized by a magnetic coupling between a star and its accretion disc, known as a star-disc locking mechanism. The disc-locking prevents the star to spin its rotation up, and its timescale depends on the disc lifetime, which should not be longer than about 10 Myr. Some mechanisms can significantly shorten this lifetime, allowing a few stars to start spinning up much earlier than other stars and increasing the observed rotation period dispersion among coeval stars. Aims: In the present study, we aim to investigate how the properties of the circumstellar environment can shorten the disc lifetime, more specifically the presence of a close stellar companion. Methods: We have identified a few multiple stellar systems, composed of stars with similar masses, which belong to associations with a known age. Since all parameters that are responsible for the rotational evolution, with the exception of environment properties and initial stellar rotation, are similar for all components, we expect that significant differences among the rotation periods can only arise from differences in the disc lifetimes. A photometric timeseries allowed us to measure the rotation periods of each component, while high-resolution spectra provided us with the fundamental parameters, v sin i and chromospheric line fluxes. Results: In the present study, we have collected timeseries photometry of BD-21 1074, a member of the 21 Myr old β Pictoris association, and measured the rotation periods of its brightest components A and B. They differ significantly, and the component B, which has a closer companion C, rotates faster than the more distant and isolated component A. It also displays a slightly higher chromospheric activity level. Conclusions: Since components A and B have similar mass, age, and initial chemical composition, we can ascribe the rotation period difference to either different initial rotation periods or different disc

  2. Triple microlens OGLE-2008-BLG-092L: binary stellar system with a circumprimary uranus-type planet

    SciTech Connect

    Poleski, Radosław; Gould, Andrew; Skowron, Jan; Udalski, Andrzej; Kozłowski, Szymon; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Szymański, Michał K.; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Soszyński, Igor; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Han, Cheongho; Dong, Subo

    2014-11-01

    We present the gravitational microlensing discovery of a 4 M {sub Uranus} planet that orbits a 0.7 M {sub ☉} star at ≈18 AU. This is the first known analog of Uranus. Similar planets, i.e., cold ice giants, are inaccessible to either radial velocity or transit methods because of the long orbital periods, while low reflected light prevents direct imaging. We discuss how similar planets may contaminate the sample of the very short microlensing events that are interpreted as free-floating planets with an estimated rate of 1.8 per main-sequence star. Moreover, the host star has a nearby stellar (or brown dwarf) companion. The projected separation of the planet is only about three times smaller than that of the companion star, suggesting significant dynamical interactions.

  3. Stellar feedback efficiencies: supernovae versus stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierlinger, Katharina M.; Burkert, Andreas; Ntormousi, Evangelia; Fierlinger, Peter; Schartmann, Marc; Ballone, Alessandro; Krause, Martin G. H.; Diehl, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds and supernova (SN) explosions of massive stars (`stellar feedback') create bubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM) and insert newly produced heavy elements and kinetic energy into their surroundings, possibly driving turbulence. Most of this energy is thermalized and immediately removed from the ISM by radiative cooling. The rest is available for driving ISM dynamics. In this work we estimate the amount of feedback energy retained as kinetic energy when the bubble walls have decelerated to the sound speed of the ambient medium. We show that the feedback of the most massive star outweighs the feedback from less massive stars. For a giant molecular cloud (GMC) mass of 105 M⊙ (as e.g. found in the Orion GMCs) and a star formation efficiency of 8 per cent the initial mass function predicts a most massive star of approximately 60 M⊙. For this stellar evolution model we test the dependence of the retained kinetic energy of the cold GMC gas on the inclusion of stellar winds. In our model winds insert 2.34 times the energy of an SN and create stellar wind bubbles serving as pressure reservoirs. We find that during the pressure-driven phases of the bubble evolution radiative losses peak near the contact discontinuity (CD), and thus the retained energy depends critically on the scales of the mixing processes across the CD. Taking into account the winds of massive stars increases the amount of kinetic energy deposited in the cold ISM from 0.1 per cent to a few per cent of the feedback energy.

  4. Stellarator Turbulence: Subdominant Eigenmodes and Quasilinear Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, M. J.; Faber, B. J.; Citrin, J.; Hegna, C. C.; Terry, P. W.; Hatch, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    Owing to complex geometry, gyrokinetic simulations in stellarator geometry produce large numbers of subdominant unstable and stable, near-orthogonal eigenmodes. Here, results based on the full eigenmode spectrum in stellarator geometry are presented for the first time. In the nonlinear state of a low-magnetic-shear ion-temperature-gradient-driven case, a multitude of these modes are active and imprint the system. Turbulent frequency spectra are broadband as a consequence, in addition to a nonlinear, narrow signature at electron frequencies. It is shown that successful quasilinear, mixing-length transport modeling is possible in stellarators, where it is essential to account for all subdominant unstable modes.

  5. Stellarator-Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-03-01

    A novel concept for magnetic plasma confinement, Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP), is proposed. Numerical analysis with the classical-stellarator-type outboard stellarator windings demonstrates a number of potential advantages of SSP for controlled nuclear fusion. Among the main ones are: simple and compact magnet coil configuration, absence of material structures (e.g. magnet coils or conducting walls) in the center of the torus, high rotational transform, and a possibility of MHD equilibria with very high {beta} (pressure/magnetic pressure) of the confined plasma.

  6. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  7. Evolution of stellar entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. A.; de Avellar, M. G. B.; Horvath, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    An appraisal of the behavior of stellar entropy along stellar evolution is made. It is shown that the entropy per baryon of a star of a fixed baryon number decreases monotonically with increasing compactness of the star. The same entropy per baryon increases only whenever an irreversible collapse of the star happens. The recent proposals for a gravitational entropy related to curvature may justify the huge increase of the entropy in the ultimate collapse to a black hole.

  8. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A preliminary conceptual study is made of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR). A steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor is proposed for use as a central electric-power station. The MSR concept combines the physics of the classic stellarator confinement topology with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. The physics basis of the design point is described together with supporting magnetics, coil-force, and stress computations. The approach and results presented herein will be modified in the course of ongoing work to form a firmer basis for a detailed conceptual design of the MSR.

  9. Chaotic pulsations in stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchler, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The irregular behavior of large-amplitude pulsating stars undergoing radial oscillations is examined theoretically, with a focus on hydrodynamic simulations of the W Virginis population II Cepheids (stars which show both regular and RV Tau characteristics). Sequences of models are constructed as one-parameter families (with luminosity, mass, and composition fixed and Teff as the control parameter) and analyzed to derive a systematic map of the bifurcation set; i.e., of the possible types of pulsations. The results are presented graphically, and it is shown that both cascades of period doubling (via destabilization of an overtone through a half-integer-type resonance) and tangent bifurcation are possible routes to chaos in these systems, depending on the stellar parameters. The general robustness of the chaotic behavior and the existence of a 'chaotic blue edge' in stellar-parameter space are demonstrated. 55 refs.

  10. A phenomenological interpretation of stellar chromospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadian, G. A.

    1986-06-01

    An attempt is made to develop a phenomenological interpretation of stellar chromospheres. The following problems are examined: observed emission powers of 'magnesium' chromospheres on stars based on the ultraviolet doublet, 2800 Mg II, observations; dependence of chromosphere emission on spectral and luminosity classes; stellar chromospheres as an accidental event; chromospheres of stars-components of binary systems; stars with the chromospheres of solar type (S) and nonsolar (NS) type; distribution of stars by means of the type of their chromosphere on luminosity class; stars with superpower magnesium emission; emission measures for both the 'magnesium' and 'calcium' chromospheres' interrelation between chromosphere, transition zone and corona; chromospheric activity and rotation of stars; possibility of the existence of chromospheres on hot stars; phenomenological picture of stellar chromospheres; stars without the line 2800 Mg II, in emission or in absorption; syndrome of red giant HD 4174. At the end, the problem of heating of stellar chromospheres is discussed.

  11. Stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Hui; Li, Li-Fang; Han, Zhan-Wen

    In this paper we review the study of stellar population synthesis. So far there exist three methods in the study of the integrated light of stellar population-trail-and error, automated, and evolutionary population synthesis (EPS). We have discussed advantages and disadvantages for these methods. Among the three methods the EPS is the most direct approach to model galaxies. In this scheme, the model builder starts with knowledge of stellar evolution and attempts to build a model galaxy with physical input parameters such as star formation rate (SFR) and the initial mass function (IMF) slope. Therefore we have discussed emphatically the EPS method. First we have described and given the often used grids of several key ingredients in the EPS studies: (1) the library of evolutionary tracks used to calculate isochrones in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD), (2) the libraries of spectra adopted, which include empirical and theoretical stellar spectral libraries, star cluster library, active galactic nuclear (AGN) library and galaxy library, to derive the integrated spectral energy distributions (ISED) or magnitudes and colors in the suitable passbands, (3) the IMF used to evaluate the relative proportions of stars in the various evolutionary phases, and (4) the assumption for the underlying star formation rate (SFR) and chemical enrichment. Then we have listed several population synthesis criterions, i.e. broadband color indices, the integrated spectral energy distribution (ISED) and narrow band color indices, given the basic method of calculating broadband colors and flux-distribution for a simple stellar population (SSP). At last we have discussed simply the existed limitations, which are caused by some uncertainties in its two principal building blocks: stellar evolution models and spectral libraries in the studies of the EPS. Stellar evolution models are often subject to limitations in the following areas: the atomic data (radiative opacities, heavy element mixture

  12. Stellar duplicity and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, Rob

    2014-09-01

    Half or more of all stars more massive than our Sun are orbited by one (or more) companion stars. Many companions are close enough that the evolution of both stars is greatly altered by the transfer of mass and angular momentum from one star to the other. Such mass transfer is highly likely during the late stages of evolution, such as on the giant branches, which are quite coincidentally also when stars undergo interesting nucleosynthesis. Direct mass transfer truncates the (A)GB prematurely compared to single stars and the ensuing stellar envelope is ejected perhaps to form a (chemically peculiar?) planetary nebula. In wider binaries, where one star has captured material from a long-dead companion, we can probe the nucleosynthesis that happened in ancient stars as well as fundamental astrophysical phenomena like wind accretion and circumbinary disc formation. I will focus on recent quantitative work on nucleosynthesis in mass-transfer systems, such as carbon-enhanced metal-poor and barium stars, and highlight some of the key open questions - and opportunities - that will dominate the next decade of duplicitous nucleosynthesis.

  13. SI: The Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager (SI) will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 milliarcsec resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and simple snapshots into spellbinding evolving views. SI s science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI s prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era by imaging a sample of magnetically active stars with enough resolution to map their evolving dynamo patterns and their internal flows. By exploring the Universe at ultra-high resolution, SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magnetohydrodynamically controlled structures and processes in the Universe.

  14. ALMA Early Science Observations of Outbursting Stellar Systems:Disk Masses for FU Ori and EXor Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, Lucas A.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tobin, John J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Casassus, Simon; Principe, David; Schreiber, Matthias R.

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that low-mass stars build a significant fraction of their total mass during short outbursts of enhanced accretion (up to 10E-4 MSOLAR /yr). The most dramatic episodic accretion events known in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are FU Ori and EXor outbursts. FU Ori objects are characterized by a sudden brightening of 5 magnitudes or more within one year and remain bright for decades. EXor objects have lower amplitude outbursts on shorter timescales (months to years). Here we present an ALMA 230 GHz (1.3 mm / band-6) mini-survey of 8 outbursting sources (three FU Ori and ve EXor objects) in Orion with 1" (450 AU) resolution. We present continuum, 12CO, 13CO, and C18O line images and derive dust and (when possible) gas disk masses. The disk masses derived from the line observations are systematically lower (by factors of 3-5) than those calculated from the continuum and adopting the standard gas-to-dust ratio of 100, which agrees with results on T Tauri disks in Taurus. After beam deconvolution, we nd that the disks are remarkably compact (r = 70-150 AU). The 1.3 mm fuxes of the outbursting sources span over three orders of magnitude, but the FU Ori objects are signi cantly brighter than the EXor objects. The inferred disk masses for the brightest objects are > 0.1 Msolar , rendering gravitational instability a likely outburst mechanism. On the other hand, the inferred disk masses for the faintest targets are ~ 1-5 MJUP , and thus an alternative mechanism must be responsible for their outbursts.

  15. VEGAS-SSS. A VST early-type galaxy survey: analysis of small stellar systems. Testing the methodology on the globular cluster system in NGC 3115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, Michele; Capaccioli, Massimo; Napolitano, Nicola; Grado, Aniello; Limatola, Luca; Paolillo, Maurizio; Iodice, Enrica; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Raimondo, Gabriella; Spavone, Marilena; La Barbera, Francesco; Puzia, Thomas H.; Schipani, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of globular clusters (GCs) and other small stellar systems (SSSs) in the field of NGC 3115, observed as part of the ongoing wide-field imaging survey VEGAS, carried out with the 2.6 m VST telescope. We used deep g and i observations of NGC 3115, a well-studied lenticular galaxy that is covered excellently well in the scientific literature. This is fundamental to test the methodologies, verify the results, and probe the capabilities of the VEGAS-SSS. Leveraging the large field of view of the VST allowed us to accurately study the distribution and properties of SSSs as a function of galactocentric distance, well beyond ~20 galaxy effective radii, in a way that is rarely possible. Our analysis of colors, magnitudes, and sizes of SSS candidates confirms the results from existing studies, some of which were carried out with 8-10 m class telescopes, and further extends them to previously unreached galactocentric distances with similar accuracy. In particular, we find a color bimodality for the GC population and a de Vaucouleurs r1/4 profile for the surface density of GCs similar to the galaxy light profile. The radial color gradient of blue and red GCs previously found, for instance, by the SLUGGS survey with Subaru and Keck data, is further extended out to the largest galactocentric radii inspected, ~65 kpc. In addition, the surface density profiles of blue and red GCs taken separately are well approximated by a r1/4 density profile, with the fraction of blue GCs being slightly larger at larger radii. We do not find hints of a trend for the red GC subpopulation and for the GC turnover magnitude to vary with radius, but we observe a ~0.2 mag difference in the turnover magnitude of the blue and red GC subpopulations. Finally, from inspecting SSS sizes and colors, we obtain a list of ultracompact dwarf galaxies and GC candidates suitable for future spectroscopic follow-up. In conclusion, our study shows i) the reliability of the methodologies developed

  16. A near infra-red video system as a protective diagnostic for electron cyclotron resonance heating operation in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Reintrog, A.; Corre, Y.; Moncada, V.; Travere, J.-M.

    2015-11-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X stellarator is a large nuclear fusion device based at Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald in Germany. The main plasma heating system for steady state operation in W7-X is electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). During operation, part of plama facing components will be directly heated by the non-absorbed power of 1 MW rf beams of ECRH. In order to avoid damages of such components made of graphite tiles during the first operational phase, a near infra-red video system has been developed as a protective diagnostic for safe and secure ECRH operation. Both the mechanical design housing the camera and the optical system are very flexible and respect the requirements of steady state operation. The full system including data acquisition and control system has been successfully tested in the vacuum vessel, including on-line visualization and data storage of the four cameras equipping the ECRH equatorial launchers of W7-X.

  17. Reaching the boundary between stellar kinematic groups and very wide binaries. III. Sixteen new stars and eight new wide systems in the β Pictoris moving group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Caballero, J. A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Solano, E.; Montes, D.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We look for common proper motion companions to stars of the nearby young β Pictoris moving group. Methods: First, we compiled a list of 185 β Pictoris members and candidate members from 35 representative works. Next, we used the Aladin and STILTS virtual observatory tools and the PPMXL proper motion and Washington Double Star catalogues to look for companion candidates. The resulting potential companions were subjects of a dedicated astro-photometric follow-up using public data from all-sky surveys. After discarding 67 sources by proper motion and 31 by colour-magnitude diagrams, we obtained a final list of 36 common proper motion systems. The binding energy of two of them is perhaps too small to be considered physically bound. Results: Of the 36 pairs and multiple systems, eight are new, 16 have only one stellar component previously classified as a β Pictoris member, and three have secondaries at or below the hydrogen-burning limit. Sixteen stars are reported here for the first time as moving group members. The unexpected large number of high-order multiple systems, 12 triples and two quadruples among 36 systems, may suggest a biased list of members towards close binaries or an increment of the high-order-multiple fraction for very wide systems.

  18. A near infra-red video system as a protective diagnostic for electron cyclotron resonance heating operation in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Reintrog, A.; Corre, Y.; Moncada, V.; Travere, J.-M.

    2015-11-15

    The Wendelstein 7-X stellarator is a large nuclear fusion device based at Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald in Germany. The main plasma heating system for steady state operation in W7-X is electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). During operation, part of plama facing components will be directly heated by the non-absorbed power of 1 MW rf beams of ECRH. In order to avoid damages of such components made of graphite tiles during the first operational phase, a near infra-red video system has been developed as a protective diagnostic for safe and secure ECRH operation. Both the mechanical design housing the camera and the optical system are very flexible and respect the requirements of steady state operation. The full system including data acquisition and control system has been successfully tested in the vacuum vessel, including on-line visualization and data storage of the four cameras equipping the ECRH equatorial launchers of W7-X.

  19. Probabilistic Description of Stellar Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, Miguel

    I describe the modeling of stellar ensembles in terms of probability distributions. This modeling is primary characterized by the number of stars included in the considered resolution element, whatever its physical (stellar cluster) or artificial (pixel/IFU) nature. It provides a solution of the direct problem of characterizing probabilistically the observables of stellar ensembles as a function of their physical properties. In addition, this characterization implies that intensive properties (like color indices) are intrinsically biased observables, although the bias decreases when the number of stars in the resolution element increases. In the case of a low number of stars in the resolution element (N<105), the distributions of intensive and extensive observables follow nontrivial probability distributions. Such a situation ​​​ can be computed by means of Monte Carlo simulations where data mining techniques would be applied. Regarding the inverse problem of obtaining physical parameters from observational data, I show how some of the scatter in the data provides valuable physical information since it is related to the system size (and the number of stars in the resolution element). However, making use of such ​​​ information requires following iterative procedures in the data analysis.

  20. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  1. Las Campanas Stellar Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan; Beletsky, Yuri; Worthey, Guy

    2015-08-01

    Stellar libraries are fundamental tools required to understand stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies as well as properties of individual stars. Comprehensive libraries exist in the optical domain, but the near-infrared (NIR) domain stays a couple of decades behind. Here we present the Las Campanas Stellar Library project aiming at obtaining high signal-to-noise intermediate-resolution (R=8000) NIR spectra (0.83<λ<2.5μm) for a sample of 1200 stars in the Southern sky using the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph at the 6.5-m Magellan Baade telescope. We developed a dedicated observing strategy and customized the telescope control software in order to achieve the highest possible level of data homogeniety. As of 2015, we observed about 600 stars of all spectral types and luminosity classes making our library the largest homogeneous collection of stellar spectra covering the entire NIR domain. We also re-calibrated in flux and wavelength the two existing optical stellar libraries, INDO-US and UVES-POP and followed up about 400 non-variable stars in the NIR in order to get complete optical-NIR coverage. Worth mentioning that our current sample includes about 80 AGB stars and a few dozens of bulge/LMC/SMC stars.

  2. Stellar population in LLAGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2004-11-01

    LLAGN that include low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), and transition-type objects (TOs) represent the most common type of nuclear activity. Here, a study of the central stellar population of LLAGN is presented. Our goal is to search for spectroscopic signatures of young and intermediate age stars, and to investigate their relationship with the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the UV-optical continuum of the innermost (20-100 pc) regions in these galaxies. Half of the LINERs and TOs of the Palomar catalogue are analysed. It is found that weak-[OI] ([OI]/Hα≤0.25) LLAGN have an intermediate age stellar population that dominates the optical light. But young stellar clusters dominate the UV continuum in these objects. These clusters can co-exist with a black-hole in spatial scales of a few pc. Most of the strong-[OI] LLAGN have a predominantly old stellar population. These results suggest that young and intermediate age stars do not play a significant role in the ionization of LLAGN with strong [OI].

  3. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  4. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. In the context of exoplanets, this allows us to derive the true obliquity of a system if the projected stellar spin-planetary orbit angle can measured via the Rossiter-Mclaughlin effect. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than 2-2.5 km.s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 that can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit the activity variation of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. The case of the equator-on star HD189733 will be presented, as well as the case of Alpha Centauri B, which present an inclination of 45+9-19 degrees, implying that the earth-mass orbiting planet is not transiting if aligned with its host star. Other exemples will also demonstrate the power of the technique, that can infer a stellar inclination, even for slow rotators like Alpha Centauri B, that present a projected rotational velocity smaller than 1.15 km.s-1. In addition, the SOAP 2.0 simulation can be used to correct for the effect of activity when one major active region is dominating the RV signal. This could enhance the detection of small mass exoplanets orbiting slightly active stars.This project is funded by ETAEARTH (European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n. 313014), a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of

  5. On the universal stellar law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander

    In this work, we consider a statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies to derive and develop the universal stellar law for extrasolar systems. Previously, the statistical theory for a cosmogonic body forming (so-called spheroidal body)has been proposed [1-3]. This theory starts from the conception for forming a spheroidal body inside a gas-dust protoplanetary nebula; it permits us to derive the form of distribution functions, mass density, gravitational potentials and strengths both for immovable and rotating spheroidal bodies as well as to find the distribution function of specific angular momentum[1-3]. If we start from the conception for forming a spheroidal body as a protostar (in particular, proto-Sun) inside a prestellar (presolar) nebula then the derived distribution functions of particle (as well as the mass density of an immovable spheroidal body) characterizes the first stage of evolution: from a prestellar molecular cloud (the presolar nebula) to the forming core of protostar (the proto-Sun) together with its shell as a stellar nebula (the solar nebula). This work derives the equation of state of an ideal stellar substance based on conception of gravitating spheroidal body. Using this equation, we obtain the universal stellar law (USL) for the planetary systems connecting temperature, size and mass of each of stars. This work also considers the Solar corona in the connection with USL. Then it is accounting under calculation of the ratio of temperature of the Solar corona to effective temperature of the Sun’ surfaceand modification of USL. To test justice of the modified USLfor different types of stars, the temperature of stellar corona is estimated. The prediction of parameters of stars is carrying out by means of the modified USL,as well as the Hertzsprung-Russell’s dependence [5-7]is derivedby means of USL directly. This paper also shows that knowledge of some characteristics for multi-planet extrasolar systems refines own parameters of

  6. Difficulty in the Formation of Counter-orbiting Hot Jupiters from Near-coplanar Hierarchical Triple Systems: A Sub-stellar Perturber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuxin; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    Among 100 transiting planets with a measured projected spin-orbit angle λ, several systems are suggested to be counter-orbiting. While these cases may be due to the projection effect, the mechanism that produces a counter-orbiting planet has not been established. A promising scenario for counter-orbiting planets is the extreme eccentricity evolution in near-coplanar hierarchical triple systems with eccentric inner and outer orbits. We examine this scenario in detail by performing a series of systematic numerical simulations, and consider the possibility of forming hot Jupiters (HJs), especially a counter-orbiting one under this mechanism with a distant sub-stellar perturber. We incorporate quadrupole and octupole secular gravitational interaction between the two orbits, and also short-range forces (correction for general relativity, star and inner planetary tide, and rotational distortion) simultaneously. We find that most systems are tidally disrupted and that a small fraction of the surviving planets turn out to be prograde. The formation of counter-orbiting HJs in this scenario is possible only in a very restricted parameter region, and thus is very unlikely in practice.

  7. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  8. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  9. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  10. Opacity of stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F J

    1998-09-17

    New efforts to calculate opacity have produced significant improvements in the quality of stellar models. The most dramatic effect has been large opacity enhancements for stars subject to large amplitude pulsations. Significant improvement in helioseismic modeling has also been obtained. A description and comparisons of the new opacity efforts are give

  11. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, G H; Brown, T G; Gates, D A; Lu, K P; Zarnstorff, M C; Boozer, A H; Harris, J H; Meneghini, O; Mynick, H E; Pomphrey, N; Reiman, A H; Xanthopoulos, P

    2011-01-05

    The quasi-axisymmetric stellarator (QAS) concept offers a promising path to a more compact stellarator reactor, closer in linear dimensions to tokamak reactors than previous stellarator designs. Concept improvements are needed, however, to make it more maintainable and more compatible with high plant availability. Using the ARIES-CS design as a starting point, compact stellarator designs with improved maintenance characteristics have been developed. While the ARIES-CS features a through-the-port maintenance scheme, we have investigated configuration changes to enable a sector-maintenance approach, as envisioned for example in ARIES AT. Three approaches are reported. The first is to make tradeoffs within the QAS design space, giving greater emphasis to maintainability criteria. The second approach is to improve the optimization tools to more accurately and efficiently target the physics properties of importance. The third is to employ a hybrid coil topology, so that the plasma shaping functions of the main coils are shared more optimally, either with passive conductors made of high-temperature superconductor or with local compensation coils, allowing the main coils to become simpler. Optimization tools are being improved to test these approaches.

  12. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  13. Stellar Ontogeny: From Dust...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of star formation. Infrared and radio astronomy, particularly microwave astronomy is used to provide information on different stages of stellar formation. The role of dust and gas which swirl through the interstellar regions of a galaxy and the collapse of a cloud in star formation are also presented. (HM)

  14. Trends of stellar entropy along stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Guilherme Bronzato, Marcio; Alvares de Souza, Rodrigo; Horvath, Jorge Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to discussing the difference in the thermodynamic entropy budget per baryon in each type of stellar object found in the Universe. We track and discuss the actual decrease of the stored baryonic thermodynamic entropy from the most primitive molecular cloud up to the final fate of matter in black holes, passing through evolved states of matter as found in white dwarfs and neutron stars. We then discuss the case of actual stars with different masses throughout their evolution, clarifying the role of the virial equilibrium condition for the decrease in entropy and related issues. Finally, we discuss the role of gravity in driving the composition and the structural changes of stars with different Main Sequence masses during their evolution up to the final product. Particularly, we discuss the entropy of a black hole in this context arguing that the dramatic increase in its entropy, differently from the other cases, is due to the gravitational field itself.

  15. Stellar dynamic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Dulk, G. A.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    The dynamic spectrum, a three dimensional record of the radio intensity as a function both of time and frequency, has long been used as a probe of plasma processes in the solar corona. Beginning with the work of Wild and McCready (1950) dynamic spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between the multitude of radio wave emitting phenomena which occur in the solar corona and to infer the physical mechanisms responsible. Stellar dynamic spectroscopy has always been a tantalizing prospect. The vast body of experience with solar dynamic spectroscopy would prove invaluable in interpreting stellar dynamic spectra. Further, the new parameter regimes presented by stellar coronas would allow further insight to be gained in the physical processes at work in stellar coronas. Recently, Bastian and Bookbinder (1987) used the Very Large Array The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is operated by Associated Universities, Inc. under contract with the National Science Foundation. in spectral line mode at 1.4 GHz with a bandwidth of 50 MHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of nearby flare stars. The spectral resolution was 3.125 MHz and the temporal resolution was 5 s. While the relative bandwidth was less than ideal (δν/ν ˜ 5%), the spectra so obtained were sufficient to show the presence of narrowband structure in a radio outburst from the well-known dMe flare star UV Ceti. Several efforts are now underway to obtain stellar dynamic spectra, of both RS CVn binaries and dMe flare stars, with higher degrees of spectral and temporal resolution. Among these are use of a 1024 channel correlator with the 1000' telescope at Arecibo and use of the Berkeley Fast Pulsar Search Machine (Kulkarni et al. 1984) with the Green Bank 140' telescope.

  16. New Theory of Stellar Convection without the mixing-length parameter: new stellar atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection determines all the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium. The new theory of stellar convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory are now compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm with very satisfactory results for atmosphere models of the Sun and all the stars around the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  17. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-06

    The present invention generates stellarator fields having favorable properties (magnetic well and large rotational transform) by a simple coil system consisting only of unlinked planar non-circular coils. At large rotational transform toroidal effects on magnetic well and rotational transform are small and can be ignored. We do so herein, specializing in straight helical systems.

  18. Stellar Multiples Among the KOIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyse Hirsch, Lea; Everett, Mark; Ciardi, David; Furlan, Elise; Horch, Elliott; Howell, Steve; Teske, Johanna; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2015-12-01

    We examine high-resolution follow-up imaging data for 84 KOIs with stellar companions detected within 2”. These stars were observed in the optical using speckle interferometry (Gemini/DSSI or WIYN/DSSI) and/or in the near-infrared with adaptive optics imaging (Keck/NIRC2, Palomar/PHARO, or Lick/IRCAL), and all have imaging results in at least two filters. Their companions are all unresolved in the Kepler images, and fall on the same pixel of the Kepler detector; thus the planet radii calculated for planet candidates in these systems are subject to upward revision due to contamination of the target star’s light by the stellar companion. We calculate updated planet radii for these 84 planet candidates, assuming the planet orbits the brighter of the two stars. We also use isochrone models and distance estimates to assess the likelihood that the companion is bound. This analysis complements galaxy models that determine the probability of a chance alignment of a background star for each system (Everett et al., in prep.). Together, these data allow us to isolate a sub-population of Kepler planets and planet candidates that reside in physical binary systems, for comparison to the wider Kepler planet population.

  19. Stellar Pulsations and Stellar Evolution: Conflict, Cohabitation, or Symbiosis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Achim

    While the analysis of stellar pulsations allows the determination of current properties of a star, stellar evolution models connect it with its previous history. In many cases results from both methods do not agree. In this review some classical and current cases of disagreement are presented. In some cases these conflicts led to an improvement of the theory of stellar evolution, while in others they still remain unsolved. Some well-known problems of stellar physics are pointed out as well, for which it is hoped that seismology—or in general the analysis of stellar pulsations—will help to resolve them. The limits of this symbiosis will be discussed as well.

  20. On stellar limb darkening and exoplanetary transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Ian D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines how to compare stellar limb-darkening coefficients evaluated from model atmospheres with those derived from photometry. Different characterizations of a given model atmosphere can give quite different numerical results (even for a given limb-darkening 'law'), while light-curve analyses yield limb-darkening coefficients that are dependent on system geometry, and that are not directly comparable to any model-atmosphere representation. These issues are examined in the context of exoplanetary transits, which offer significant advantages over traditional binary-star eclipsing systems in the study of stellar limb darkening. 'Like for like' comparisons between light-curve analyses and new model-atmosphere results, mediated by synthetic photometry, are conducted for a small sample of stars. Agreement between the resulting synthetic-photometry/atmosphere-model (SPAM) limb-darkening coefficients and empirical values ranges from very good to quite poor, even though the targets investigated show only a small dispersion in fundamental stellar parameters.

  1. On the origin of the IMF: First detection of a low-mass star ejected from a triple stellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinard, L.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Rodriguez, M.

    2002-12-01

    Using high-resolution, multi-epoch VLA observations, we have detected orbital motions in several low-luminosity protobinary systems in the Taurus and rho-Ophiuchus molecular complexes. The masses obtained from Kepler's third law are of the order of 0.5 to 1 Msun, as would have been expected for such low-mass protostars. In addition, in one of the sources studied (a triple system in Taurus), one of the three component appears to have been recently ejected from the system. During the first 15 of the 20 years covered by the observations, this component has been on a closed elliptical orbit with a velocity of a few km/s, but in the last 5 years, it has started to spiral out at high speed (20 km/s). Such an ejection is not unexpected in a triple system, because such systems are thought to exhibit chaotic behaviours. However, this is the first time that it is detected directly. The implications for the IMF will be discussed

  2. ON THE ROLE OF DISKS IN THE FORMATION OF STELLAR SYSTEMS: A NUMERICAL PARAMETER STUDY OF RAPID ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.

    2010-01-10

    We study rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks with a series of idealized global, numerical experiments using the code ORION. Our numerical parameter study focuses on protostellar disks, showing that one can predict disk behavior and the multiplicity of the accreting star system as a function of two dimensionless parameters which compare the infall rate to the disk sound speed and orbital period. Although gravitational instabilities become strong, we find that fragmentation into binary or multiple systems occurs only when material falls in several times more rapidly than the canonical isothermal limit. The disk-to-star accretion rate is proportional to the infall rate and governed by gravitational torques generated by low-m spiral modes. We also confirm the existence of a maximum stable disk mass: disks that exceed approx50% of the total system mass are subject to fragmentation and the subsequent formation of binary companions.

  3. Survey of MAgellanic Stellar History - SMASH!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidever, D.; Smash Team

    2015-05-01

    Over the last several years, various discoveries have drastically altered our view of the iconic Magellanic Clouds (MCs), the nearest interacting galaxy system. The best evidence is now that they are on first infall into the Milky Way, that their stellar populations extend much further than previously thought, and that they suffered a close collision that tore out both the well-known Magellanic Stream and a large amount of still undetected stellar debris. Here we propose a community DECam survey of the Clouds mapping 480 deg2 (distributed over ˜2400 deg2 at ˜20% filling factor) to 24th mag in griz (and u 23 mag) that will supplement the 5000 deg2 Dark Energy Surveys partial coverage of the Magellanic periphery, allowing us to map the expected stellar debris and extended populations with unprecedented fidelity. We have already conducted a pilot project demonstrating that DECam will allow us to carry out the following: (1) Map the stellar periphery of the MCs with old main sequence turnoff stars to a surface brightness limit of ˜35 mag/arcsec2, revealing relics of their formation and past interactions. (2) Identify the stellar component of the Magellanic Stream and Leading Arm for the first time, if they exist, making them the only Galactic halo tracers with both gaseous and stellar components. (3) Derive spatially-resolved star formation histories covering all ages out to large radii of the MCs that will further complement our understanding of their formation. The combination of this survey and the DES data will allow us to uncover a multitude of stellar structure that will unveil the complex and dramatic history of these two dwarf galaxies, while enabling a broad spectrum of community-led projects. SMASH has obtained initial data through DECam Science Verification (data public now) and through first observing runs in 2013A. Subsequent observations to fulfill the science goals described below have been proposed through the NOAO Survey program.

  4. Limits on Pluto's ring system from the June 12 2006 stellar occultation and implications for the New Horizons impact hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; French, Richard G.; Shoemaker, Kevin; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ruhland, Trina R.; Young, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pluto system passed in front of a 15th magnitude star on 12 June 2006. We observed this occultation from the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT), and took photometric observations every 100 ms for 3 h. Our three-hour baseline of data provides among the longest and highest-quality occultation dataset of the Pluto system ever taken. Results on Pluto's atmospheric structure from these data have been previously reported (Young, E.F. [2008]. Astron. J. 136, 1757-1769). Here we report on limits for rings, ring arcs, and small satellites within the system. We find a 3 σ upper limit on the normal optical depth of τ < 0.07 for narrow rings of width 2.4 km, and τ < 5 ×10-3 for rings of width 1500 km. We also detect no discrete objects of radius 220 m or larger along the occultation path. Motivated by the upcoming flyby of New Horizons through the Pluto system, we estimate the dust impact hazard to the spacecraft based on our optical depth limits and those derived from imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  5. Stellar radio emission (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelezniakov, V. V.

    The current understanding of the radio-emission characteristics of 'ordinary' main sequence stars as well as giants and supergiants is examined. Particular consideration is given to radio emission from supergiants, Young T Tauri stars, magnetic Ap stars, flare stars of UV Ceti type, Alpha Sco, and RS CVn objects. It is noted that the study of stellar radio emission is in its initial stage. Further progress in this area depends on successes in finding new radio sources, associated, for example, with magnetic stars, and on an intensified investigation of the frequency spectra and polarization of already-discovered radio stars. It is also noted that, although the current knowledge of solar physics can help in understanding stellar radio emission, models and ideas developed for solar conditions should not be mechanically transferred to other stars by a simple change in scale.

  6. Stellarator approach to fusion plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The stellarator is a toroidal fusion plasma confinement device with nested magnetic flux surfaces. The required twist of the field lines is produced by external helical coils rather than by plasma current, as in a tokamak. Stellarator devices are attractive fusion reactor candidates precisely because they offer the prospect of steady-state operation without plasma current. In the last few years the excellent results achieved with currentless stellarator plasmas of modest minor radius (10 to 20 cm) at Kyoto University (Japan) and the Max Planck Institute (West Germany) have made the stellarator second only to the tokamak in its progress toward fusion breakeven, with temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/ approx. 1 KeV, Lawson products n tau approx. 2 to 5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/.s, and volume-averaged beta values approx. = 2%. The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), now under construction at Oak Ridge Natioal Laboratory (ORNL) and scheduled to operate in 1986, represents a significant advance in stellarator research, with a plasma major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a magnetic field of 2 T for 5 s or 1 T at steady state. ATF replaces the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B heating and diagnostic system.

  7. Massive Stars: Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2007-07-01

    Massive stars dominate the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM, and ultimately of their parent galaxy and the universe, because of their fast evolution and intense supersonic winds. Four decades ago, the first rocket UV spectra of massive stars revealed the importance of mass loss and began to change our understanding of their evolution. Recently, advances in stellar modeling, and the observation of crucial ions in the far-UV spectral range, led to the resolution of long-standing issues in our understanding of massive star atmospheres. A revised (downwards) calibration of Teff for early spectral types is emerging as a result. Meanwhile, HST imaging, and large ground-based telescopes with multislit spectroscopic capabilities, had opened the possibility of resolved studies of stellar populations in Local Group galaxies, which sample a variety of metallicity and environment conditions. More recently, GALEX is providing a global, deep view of the young stellar populations for hundreds of nearby galaxies, revealing their recent star-formation history and modalities. The wide-field coverage and sensitivity of the GALEX UV imaging, easily detecting extremely low levels of star formation, is again changing some of our views on massive star formation in galaxies.

  8. Stellar yields of rotating first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2014-05-02

    First stars, also called population III stars, are born in the earliest universe without any heavy elements. These stars are the first nuclear reactor in the universe and affect their circumstances emitting synthesized materials. Not only the stellar evolution, but also their chemical yields have many distinctive characteristics. We have modeled evolution of population III stars including effect of stellar rotation. Internal mixing induced by rotation naturally results in primary nitrogen production. Evolution of rotating massive stars is followed until the core collapse phase. The new Pop III yield model will consistently explain the observed abundances of metal-poor systems.

  9. First Results from the MIT Optical Rapid Imaging System (MORIS) on the IRTF: A Stellar Occultation by Pluto and a Transit by Exoplanet XO-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbis, A. A. S.; Bus, S. J.; Elliot, J. L.; Rayner, J. T.; Stahlberger, W. E.; Rojas, F. E.; Adams, E. R.; Person, M. J.; Chung, R.; Tokunaga, A. T.; Zuluaga, C. A.

    2011-04-01

    We present a high-speed, visible-wavelength imaging instrument: MORIS (the MIT Optical Rapid Imaging System). MORIS is mounted on the 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its primary component is an Andor iXon camera, a nearly 60" square field of view with high quantum efficiency, low read noise, low dark current, and full-frame readout rates ranging from as slow as desired to a maximum of between 3.5 Hz and 35 Hz (depending on the mode; read noise of 6 e- pixel-1 and 49 e- pixel-1 with electron-multiplying gain = 1, respectively). User-selectable binning and subframing can increase the cadence to a few hundred hertz. An electron-multiplying mode can be employed for photon counting, effectively reducing the read noise to subelectron levels at the expense of dynamic range. Data cubes, or individual frames, can be triggered to several-nanosecond accuracy using the Global Positioning System. MORIS is mounted on the side-facing exit window of SpeX, allowing simultaneous near-infrared and visible observations. Here, we describe the components, setup, and measured characteristics of MORIS. We also report results from the first science observations: the 2008 June 24 stellar occultation by Pluto and an extrasolar planetary transit by XO-2b. The Pluto occultation of a 15.8R magnitude star has a signal-to-noise ratio of 35 per atmospheric scale height and a midtime error of 0.32 s. The XO-2b transit reaches photometric precision of 0.5 mmag in 2 minutes and has a midtime timing precision of 23 s.

  10. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    younger clusters. The O abundances in the younger clusters are significantly larger than those seen in H II regions, planetary nebulae, and supergiants. It is suggested, and supported with observational evidence, that this may be due to incomplete stellar models and the possibility that a significant fraction of O in gaseous nebulae is locked up in dust grains. Examining our results in a broader sense, we suggest that: a) the formation of the Galactic halo was a slow process but b) did not involve the merger of independent "fragments" c) Type Ia supernovae are dominated by CO-He white dwarf systems having Fe production timescales of a few Gyr d) The hiatus between the end of halo formation and the beginning of star formation in the disk, possibly required if CO-He white dwarfs are the dominant source of Type Ia supernovae, may be confirmed as the observed gap in the [O/H] distribution e) The long timescale (10^9 - 10^10 yr) of Fe production by CO-He white dwarf systems is also seen to be consistent with the lack of any correlation between age and [Fe/H] in our open cluster sample and the large scatter present in the [Fe/H] vs. age relations for field stars. (SECTION: Dissertation Summaries)

  11. Construction of a photometer to detect stellar occultations by outer solar system bodies for the Whipple mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Kenter, Almus T.; Alcock, Charles; Murray, Stephen S.; Loose, Markus; Gauron, Thomas; Germain, Gregg; Peregrim, Lawrence

    2014-08-01

    (FPGA). A simple, real time band pass filter, called the Equivalent Width (EW) algorithm, has been instantiated in the FPGA. This EW filter selects for telemetry only those occultation event light curves that differed significantly from noise. As part of our technology development program, a key facet of the proposed Whipple focal plane was constructed and operated in our laboratory consisting of a single HyViSI H2RG sensor, a Teledyne SIDECAR ASIC, and a flight-like Virtex-5 FPGA. In order to fully demonstrate the capabilities of this photometer, we also made a occultation light-curve simulator. The entire system can generate simulated occultation light curves, project them onto an H2RG sensor, read out the sensor in windowing mode at 40 Hz, pass the data to an FPGA that continuously monitors the light curves and dumps candidate occultation events to our simulated Ground Support Equipment (GSE). In this paper, we summarize the technical capabilities of our system, present sample data, and discuss how this system will be used to support our proposal effort for the next Discovery round.

  12. Berkeley heterodyne interferometer. [for IR stellar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A.

    1975-01-01

    A prototype heterodyne stellar interferometer has been built in order to demonstrate the feasibility of heterodyne techniques in measuring angular diameters of bright infrared stars. The first system tests were performed in December 1972. Attention is given to investigations concerning the possibility that optical air turbulence within the structure of the solar telescope employed can possibly destroy the phase coherence of the fringe signals.

  13. Accurate characterization of the stellar and orbital parameters of the exoplanetary system WASP-33 b from orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    2016-01-01

    By using the most recently published Doppler tomography measurements and accurate theoretical modelling of the oblateness-driven orbital precessions, we tightly constrain some of the physical and orbital parameters of the planetary system hosted by the fast rotating star WASP-33. In particular, the measurements of the orbital inclination ip to the plane of the sky and of the sky-projected spin-orbit misalignment λ at two epochs about six years apart allowed for the determination of the longitude of the ascending node Ω and of the orbital inclination I to the apparent equatorial plane at the same epochs. As a consequence, average rates of change dot{Ω }_exp, dot{I}_exp of this two orbital elements, accurate to a ≈10-2 deg yr-1 level, were calculated as well. By comparing them to general theoretical expressions dot{Ω }_{J_2}, dot{I}_{J_2} for their precessions induced by an oblate star whose symmetry axis is arbitrarily oriented, we were able to determine the angle i⋆ between the line of sight the star's spin {S}^{star } and its first even zonal harmonic J_2^{star } obtaining i^{star } = {142}^{+10}_{-11} deg, J_2^{star } = 2.1^{+0.8}_{-0.5}times; 10^{-4}. As a by-product, the angle between {S}^{star } and the orbital angular momentum L is as large as about ψ ≈ 100 ° psi; ^{2008} = 99^{+5}_{-4} deg, ψ ^{{2014}} = 103^{+5}_{-4} deg and changes at a rate dot{ψ }= 0.{7}^{+1.5}_{-1.6} deg {yr}^{-1}. The predicted general relativistic Lense-Thirring precessions, of the order of ≈10-3deg yr-1, are, at present, about one order of magnitude below the measurability threshold.

  14. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  15. Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and Their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES). Multiplicity and the Physical Environment in L1448N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Katherine I.; Dunham, Michael M.; Myers, Philip C.; Tobin, John J.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Offner, Stella S. R.; Arce, Héctor G.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Bourke, Tyler L.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Chandler, Claire J.; Harris, Robert J.; Kratter, Kaitlin; Looney, Leslie W.; Melis, Carl; Perez, Laura M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    We present continuum and molecular line observations at 230 and 345 GHz from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward three protostars in the Perseus L1448N region. The data are from the large project “Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA.” Three dust continuum sources, Source B, Source NW, and Source A, are detected at both frequencies. These sources have corresponding emission peaks in C18O (J=2\\to 1), 13CO (J=2\\to 1), and HCO+ (J=4\\to 3), and have offsets with N2D+ (J=3\\to 2) peaks. High angular resolution data from a complementary continuum survey with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array show that Source B is associated with three 8 mm continuum objects, Source NW with two, and Source A remains single. These results suggest that multiplicity in L1448N exists at different spatial scales from a few thousand AU to <100 AU. Velocity gradients in each source obtained from two-dimensional fits to the SMA C18O emission are found to be perpendicular to within 20° of the outflow directions as revealed by 12CO (J=2\\to 1). We have observed that Sources B and NW with multiplicity have higher densities than Source A without multiplicity. This suggests that thermal Jeans fragmentation can be relevant in the fragmentation process. However, we have not observed a difference in the ratio between rotational and gravitational energy between sources with and without multiplicity. We also have not observed a trend between non-thermal velocity dispersions and the level of fragmentation. Our study has provided the first direct and comprehensive comparison between multiplicity and core properties in low-mass protostars, although based on small number statistics.

  16. Stellar Spectroscopy during Exoplanet Transits: Revealing structures across stellar surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Dahlén, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Exoplanet transits permit to study stellar surface portions that successively become hidden behind the planet. Differential spectroscopy between various transit phases reveals spectra of those stellar surface segments that were hidden. The deduced center-to-limb behavior of stellar spectral line shapes, asymmetries and wavelength shifts enables detailed tests of 3-dimensional hydrodynamic models of stellar atmospheres, such that are required for any precise determination of abundances or seismic properties. Such models can now be computed for widely different classes of stars (including metal-poor ones and white dwarfs), but have been feasible to test and verify only for the Sun with its resolved surface structure. Exoplanet transits may also occur across features such as starspots, whose magnetic signatures will be retrieved from spectra of sufficient fidelity.Knowing the precise background stellar spectra, also properties of exoplanet atmospheres are better constrained: e.g., the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect becomes resolved as not only a simple change of stellar wavelength, but as a variation of the full line profiles and their asymmetries.Such studies are challenging since exoplanets cover only a tiny fraction of the stellar disk. Current work, analyzing sequences of high-fidelity ESO UVES spectra, demonstrate that such spatially resolved stellar spectra can already be (marginally) retrieved in a few cases with the brightest host stars. Already in a near future, ongoing exoplanet surveys are likely to find further bright hosts that will enable such studies for various stellar types. http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.1402

  17. Stellar structure of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, JianMin; Zuo, Wei; Gu, JianZhong; Shang, XinLe

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars are strong magnetized neutron stars which could emit quiescent X-ray, repeating burst of soft gamma ray, and even the giant flares. We investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the structure of isolated magnetars. The stellar structure together with the magnetic field configuration can be obtained at the same time within a self-consistent procedure. The magnetar mass and radius are found to be weakly enhanced by the strong magnetic fields. Unlike other previous investigations, the magnetic field is unable to violate the mass limit of the neutron stars.

  18. Stellar figure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. N.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of analytical and experimental data is presented concerning the stellar figure sensor. The sensor is an interferometric device which is located in the focal plane of an orbiting large space telescope (LST). The device was designed to perform interferometry on the optical wavefront of a single star after it has propagated through the LST. An analytical model of the device was developed and its accuracy was verified by an operating laboratory breadboard. A series of linear independent control equations were derived which define the operations required for utilizing a focal plane figure sensor in the control loop for the secondary mirror position and for active control of the primary mirror.

  19. Physics of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  20. Near-infrared Spectroscopy of 2M0441+2301 AabBab: A Quadruple System Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Mass Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2015-10-01

    We present Keck/NIRC2 and OSIRIS near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of 2M0441+2301 AabBab, a young (1–3 Myr) hierarchical quadruple system comprising a low-mass star, two brown dwarfs, and a planetary-mass companion in Taurus. All four components show spectroscopic signs of low surface gravity, and both 2M0441+2301 Aa and Ab possess Paβ emission indicating they each harbor accretion subdisks. Astrometry spanning 2008–2014 reveals orbital motion in both the Aab (0.″23 separation) and Bab (0.″095 separation) pairs, although the implied orbital periods of >300 years mean dynamical masses will not be possible in the near future. The faintest component (2M0441+2301 Bb) has an angular H-band shape, strong molecular absorption (VO, CO, H2O, and FeH), and shallow alkali lines, confirming its young age, late spectral type (L1 ± 1), and low temperature (≈1800 K). With individual masses of {200}-50+100 MJup, 35 ± 5 MJup, 19 ± 3 MJup, and 9.8 ± 1.8 MJup, 2M0441+2301 AabBab is the lowest-mass quadruple system known. Its hierarchical orbital architecture and mass ratios imply that it formed from the collapse and fragmentation of a molecular cloud core, demonstrating that planetary-mass companions can originate from a stellar-like pathway analogous to higher-mass quadruple star systems as first speculated by Todorov et al. More generally, cloud fragmentation may be an important formation pathway for the massive exoplanets that are now regularly being imaged on wide orbits. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  1. Color-magnitude relations within globular cluster systems of giant elliptical galaxies: The effects of globular cluster mass loss and the stellar initial mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik E-mail: kruijssen@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have provided evidence for a 'bottom-heavy' stellar initial mass function (IMF) in massive elliptical galaxies. Here we investigate the influence of the IMF shape on the recently discovered color-magnitude relation (CMR) among globular clusters (GCs) in such galaxies. To this end we use calculations of GC mass loss due to stellar and dynamical evolution to evaluate (1) the shapes of stellar mass functions in GCs after 12 Gyr of evolution as a function of current GC mass along with their effects on integrated-light colors and mass-to-light ratios, and (2) their impact on the effects of GC self-enrichment using the 2009 'reference' model of Bailin and Harris. As to the class of metal-poor GCs, we find the observed shape of the CMR (often referred to as the 'blue tilt') to be very well reproduced by Bailin and Harris's reference self-enrichment model once 12 Gyr of GC mass loss is taken into account. The influence of the IMF on this result is found to be insignificant. However, we find that the observed CMR among the class of metal-rich GCs (the 'red tilt') can only be adequately reproduced if the IMF was bottom-heavy (–3.0 ≲ α ≲ –2.3 in dN/dM∝M{sup α}), which causes the stellar mass function at subsolar masses to depend relatively strongly on GC mass. This constitutes additional evidence that the metal-rich stellar populations in giant elliptical galaxies were formed with a bottom-heavy IMF.

  2. Thermonuclear inverse magnetic pumping power cycle for stellarator reactor

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Darwin D.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma column in a stellarator is compressed and expanded alternatively in minor radius. First a plasma in thermal balance is compressed adiabatically. The volume of the compressed plasma is maintained until the plasma reaches a new thermal equilibrium. The plasma is then expanded to its original volume. As a result of the way a stellarator works, the plasma pressure during compression is less than the corresponding pressure during expansion. Therefore, negative work is done on the plasma over a complete cycle. This work manifests itself as a back-voltage in the toroidal field coils. Direct electrical energy is obtained from this voltage. Alternatively, after the compression step, the plasma can be expanded at constant pressure. The cycle can be made self-sustaining by operating a system of two stellarator reactors in tandem. Part of the energy derived from the expansion phase of a first stellarator reactor is used to compress the plasma in a second stellarator reactor.

  3. Starspots and Stellar Rotation: Stellar Activity with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, L. M.; Basri, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    While the telescopic study of starspots dates back to Galileos observations of our own Sun, recent space-borne photometric missions (such as MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler) are opening a new window into understanding these ubiquitous manifestations of stellar activity. Because of the intimate link between stellar rotation and the generation of the magnetic field, starspots cause a modulation in the lightcurve at the rate of stellar rotation. To complicate matters, stars rotate differentially, so the stellar rotation rate is not really best characterized by a single value but rather by a range of rotation rates. Through high-precision, long-term photometric monitoring of stars of different spectral types and activity strengths, it is possible to determine stellar rotation rates and differential rotation measures. In addition, modeling these lightcurves can tell us about the properties of stellar spots, such as location, areal coverage, and lifetime. New observations provide precision photometry for a large cohort of stars, ranging from Sun-like to rather different stellar properties, at a spread of ages, making these lightcurves a powerful tool for understanding magnetic activity for stars of all activity levels. Here, I will discuss how Kepler can provide new insight into the continuum of stellar activity and our own Suns place amongst the stars.

  4. Formation and stellar spin-orbit misalignment of hot Jupiters from Lidov-Kozai oscillations in stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kassandra R.; Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Observed hot Jupiter (HJ) systems exhibit a wide range of stellar spin-orbit misalignment angles. This paper investigates the inward migration of giant planets due to Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations induced by a distant stellar companion. We conduct a large population synthesis study, including the octupole gravitational potential from the stellar companion, mutual precession of the host stellar spin axis and planet orbital axis, tidal dissipation in the planet and stellar spin-down in the host star due to magnetic braking. We consider a range of planet masses (0.3-5 MJ) and initial semimajor axes (1-5 au), different properties for the host star, and varying tidal dissipation strengths. The fraction of systems that result in HJs depends on planet mass and stellar type, with fHJ = 1-4 per cent (depending on tidal dissipation strength) for Mp = 1 MJ, and larger (up to 8 per cent) for more massive planets. The production efficiency of `hot Saturns' (Mp = 0.3MJ) is much lower, because most migrating planets are tidally disrupted. We find that the fraction of systems that result in either HJ formation or tidal disruption, fmig ≃ 11-14 per cent is roughly constant, having little variation with planet mass, stellar type and tidal dissipation strength. The distribution of final HJ stellar obliquities exhibits a complex dependence on the planet mass and stellar type. For Mp = (1-3)MJ, the distribution is always bimodal, with peaks around 30° and 130°. The distribution for 5MJ planets depends on host stellar type, with a preference for low obliquities for solar-type stars, and higher obliquities for more massive (1.4 M⊙) stars.

  5. A direct imaging search for close stellar and sub-stellar companions to young nearby stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, N.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Contreras-Quijada, A.; Schmidt, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 28 young nearby stars (ages {≤ 60} Myr) have been observed in the K_s-band with the adaptive optics imager Naos-Conica of the Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. Among the targets are ten visual binaries and one triple system at distances between 10 and 130 pc, all previously known. During a first observing epoch a total of 20 faint stellar or sub-stellar companion-candidates were detected around seven of the targets. These fields, as well as most of the stellar binaries, were re-observed with the same instrument during a second epoch, about one year later. We present the astrometric observations of all binaries. Their analysis revealed that all stellar binaries are co-moving. In two cases (HD 119022 AB and FG Aqr B/C) indications for significant orbital motions were found. However, all sub-stellar companion candidates turned out to be non-moving background objects except PZ Tel which is part of this project but whose results were published elsewhere. Detection limits were determined for all targets, and limiting masses were derived adopting three different age values; they turn out to be less than 10 Jupiter masses in most cases, well below the brown dwarf mass range. The fraction of stellar multiplicity and of the sub-stellar companion occurrence in the star forming regions in Chamaeleon are compared to the statistics of our search, and possible reasons for the observed differences are discussed. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 083.C-0150(B), 084.C-0364(A), 084.C-0364(B), 084.C-0364(C), 086.C-0600(A) and 086.C-0600(B).

  6. Chromospheric activity and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippenhahn, R.

    1973-01-01

    A study of stellar chromospheres based on the internal structure of particular stars is presented. Used are complex flow diagrams of the linkage paths between mass loss, angular momentum loss, magnetic field from the turbulent dynamo and its relations to differential rotations and the convection zone, and stellar evolution.

  7. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  8. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  9. Black holes in young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Kiel, Paul; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2014-02-01

    We present theoretical models for stellar black hole (BH) properties in young, massive star clusters. Using a Monte Carlo code for stellar dynamics, we model realistic star clusters with N ≅ 5 × 10{sup 5} stars and significant binary fractions (up to 50%) with self-consistent treatments of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. We compute the formation rates and characteristic properties of single and binary BHs for various representative ages, cluster parameters, and metallicities. Because of dynamical interactions and supernova (SN) kicks, more single BHs end up retained in clusters compared to BHs in binaries. We also find that the ejection of BHs from a cluster is a strong function of initial density. In low-density clusters (where dynamical effects are negligible), it is mainly SN kicks that eject BHs from the cluster, whereas in high-density clusters (initial central density ρ {sub c}(0) ∼ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} pc{sup –3} in our models) the BH ejection rate is enhanced significantly by dynamics. Dynamical interactions of binary systems in dense clusters also modify the orbital period and eccentricity distributions while increasing the probability of a BH having a more massive companion.

  10. Stellar Feedback of the First Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Bromm, Volker; Heger, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    We present the results from our cosmological simulations of impacts of the first binaries. Recent results of the Pop III star formation suggest that those stars tend to form into binaries or multiple stellar systems, so the Pop III stars could be less massive than we originally thought. It implies most Pop III stars would die as core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) instead of pair-instability supernovae (PSNe). CCSNe and PSNe have very different nucleosynthesis products and explosion energies that could significantly affect the chemical enrichment in the IGM. Besides, the results from stellar archeology also suggested the Pop III CCSN models could produce abundance patterns in good accord with the observation of metal poor stars. We use the recent results of Pop III stellar models and their nucleosynthesis products as initial inputs for our cosmological simulations and trace the transport of ejected metals to study their chemical impacts to the early universe. We will discusses how stellar feedback from the first binaries affects the primordial IGM, the major building block of the first galaxies.

  11. The Solar-Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, A. S.; García, R. A.; Houdek, G.; Nandy, D.; Pinsonneault, M.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how recent advances in observations, theory and numerical simulations have allowed the stellar community to progress in its understanding of stellar convection, rotation and magnetism and to assess the degree to which the Sun and other stars share similar dynamical properties. Ensemble asteroseismology has become a reality with the advent of large time domain studies, especially from space missions. This new capability has provided improved constraints on stellar rotation and activity, over and above that obtained via traditional techniques such as spectropolarimetry or CaII H&K observations. New data and surveys covering large mass and age ranges have provided a wide parameter space to confront theories of stellar magnetism. These new empirical databases are complemented by theoretical advances and improved multi-D simulations of stellar dynamos. We trace these pathways through which a lucid and more detailed picture of magnetohydrodynamics of solar-like stars is beginning to emerge and discuss future prospects.

  12. Early stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the formation and early evolution of stars is currently an area of great interest and activity. The theoretical and observational foundations for this development are reviewed in this paper. By now, the basic physics governing cloud collapse is well understood, as is the structure of the resulting protostars. However, the theory predicts protostellar luminosities that are greater than those of most infrared sources. Observationally, it is thought that protostars emit powerful winds that push away remnant cloud gas, but both the origin of these winds and the nature of their interaction with ambient gas are controversial. Finally, the theory of pre-main-sequence stars has been modified to incorporate more realistic initial conditions. This improvement helps to explain the distribution of such stars in the H-R diagram. Many important issues, such as the origin of binary stars and stellar clusters, remain as challenges for future research.

  13. Stellar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the various radiation mechanisms believed to play a role in stellar radio emission. The radio emission from most stars is nonthermal and is generally due to mildly relativistic electrons with energies from a few keV to over 10 MeV. Magnetic fields play a crucial role both in accelerating the electrons to the requisite energies and in mediating the emission mechanism. They also play a fundamental role in creating the velocity anisotropies that are necessary for the operation of some of the coherent emission mechanisms. Coherent emission is seen most commonly on the M dwarfs, rarely on the RS CVns, and has yet to be detected for any other class of star. These coherent processes are best studied by means of their dynamic spectra; such studies are now just getting underway.

  14. The stellar opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Gilles, D.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    Opacities are fundamental ingredients of stellar physics. Helioseismology and asteroseismology have put in evidence anomalies that could be attributed to an insufficient knowledge of the photon-plasma interactions. We work on a revision of this plasma physics in the conditions where the anomalies have been found: the region of the iron opacity peak near log T= 5.2 and the inner radiative region of Sun and solar-like stars. The international OPAC consortium performs new calculations, compares them and looks for the origin of their differences. In parallel, experimental campaigns are realized, others are in preparation to validate some conclusions on the reliability of the new proposed calculations. New tables for astrophysics will be performed in the framework of the ANR OPACITY and their influence on seismic observables will be studied. We explicit here the difficulty of the computations together with some computation resources.

  15. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity indicators. Aims: We propose a new class of age-activity relations that connects the Mt. Wilson S index and the average scatter in the light curve with the small frequency separation and the amplitude of the p-mode oscillations. Methods: We used a Bayesian inference to compute the posterior probability of various empirical laws for a sample of 19 solar-like active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. Results: We demonstrate the presence of a clear correlation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the relative age of the stars as indicated by the small frequency separation, as well as an anti-correlation between the S index and the oscillation amplitudes. We argue that the average activity level of the stars shows a stronger correlation with the small frequency separation than with the absolute age that is often considered in the literature. Conclusions: The phenomenological laws discovered in this paper have the potential to become new important diagnostics to link stellar evolution theory with the dynamics of global magnetic fields. In particular we argue that the relation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the oscillation amplitudes is in good agreement with the findings of direct numerical simulations of magneto-convection.

  16. High Precision Measurement of Stellar Radial Velocity Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype instrument for measurement of stellar radial velocity variations to a precision of a few meters per second is discussed. The instrument will be used to study low amplitude stellar non-radial oscillations, to search for binary systems with large mass ratios, and ultimately to search for extrasolar planetary systems. The instrument uses a stable Fabry-Perot etalon, in reflection, to impose a set of fixed reference absorption lines on the stellar spectrum before it enters the coude spectrograph of the McDonald Observatory 2.7-m telescope. The spectrum is recorded on the Octicon detector, which consists of eight Reticon arrays placed end to end. Radial velocity variations of the star are detected by measuring the shift of the stellar lines with respect the artificial Fabry-Perot lines, and correcting for the known motions in the solar system.

  17. The Dark Energy Survey: Prospects for resolved stellar populations

    SciTech Connect

    Rossetto, Bruno M.; Santiago, Basílio X.; Girardi, Léo; Camargo, Julio I. B.; Balbinot, Eduardo; da Costa, Luiz N.; Yanny, Brian; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Makler, Martin; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Pellegrini, Paulo S.; Ramos, Beatriz; de Simoni, Fernando; Armstrong, R.; Bertin, E.; Desai, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lin, H.; Mohr, J. J.; Tucker, D. L.

    2011-05-06

    Wide angle and deep surveys, regardless of their primary purpose, always sample a large number of stars in the Galaxy and in its satellite system. We here make a forecast of the expected stellar sample resulting from the Dark Energy Survey and the perspectives that it will open for studies of Galactic structure and resolved stellar populations in general. An estimated 1.2 x 108 stars will be sampled in DES grizY filters in the southern equatorial hemisphere. This roughly corresponds to 20% of all DES sources. Most of these stars belong to the stellar thick disk and halo of the Galaxy.

  18. Astrospheres and Stellar Bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marle, Allard Jan

    2016-07-01

    As stars evolve, they deliver feedback to the surrounding medium in the form of stellar wind and radiation. These shape the surrounding matter, forming what is called an astrosphere, a sphere of influence in which the star dominates the morphology and composition of the surrounding medium. Astrospheres are fascinating objects. Because they are formed through the interaction between the stellar feedback and the interstellar gas, they can tell us a great deal about both. Furthermore, because they are shaped over time they provide us with a window into the past. This is of particular interest for the study of stellar evolution, because the astrosphere reflects changes in the properties of the stellar wind, which relate directly to the properties of the star. A special sub-class of astrospheres, the stellar bow shocks, occur when the progenitor star moves through the surrounding medium at supersonic speed. Because the properties of the bow shock relate directly to both the stellar wind and the interstellar medium, the shape and size of the bow shock can be used to determine these properties. Using state-of-the-art numerical codes, it is possible to simulate the interaction between the stellar wind and radiation and the interstellar medium. These results can then be compared to observations. They can also be used to predict the type of observations that are best suited to study these objects. In this fashion computational and observational astronomy can support each other in their efforts to gain a better understanding of stars and their environment.

  19. Extreme Low Aspect Ratio Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul

    1997-11-01

    Recently proposed Spherical Stellarator (SS) concept [1] includes the devices with stellarator features and low aspect ratio, A <= 3.5, which is very unusual for stellarators (typical stellarators have A ≈ 7-10 or above). Strong bootstrap current and high-β equilibria are two distinguished elements of the SS concept leading to compact, steady-state, and efficient fusion reactor. Different coil configurations advantageous for the SS have been identified and analyzed [1-6]. In this report, we will present results on novel stellarator configurations which are unusual even for the SS approach. These are the extreme-low-aspect-ratio-stellarators (ELARS), with the aspect ratio A ≈ 1. We succeeded in finding ELARS configurations with extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform (ι ≈ 0.1 - 0.15), large plasma volume, and good particle transport characteristics. [1] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 651 (1996); [2] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3055 (1996); [3] P.E. Moroz, D.B. Batchelor et al., Fusion Tech. 30, 1347 (1996); [4] P.E. Moroz, Stellarator News 48, 2 (1996); [5] P.E. Moroz, Plasma Phys. Reports 23, 502 (1997); [6] P.E. Moroz, Nucl. Fusion 37, No. 8 (1997). *Supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER54395.

  20. A Stellar Stream Surrounds the Whale Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    that a dwarf satellite galaxy was disrupted to make that stream.To support their observations, the authors modeled the system using an N-body simulation. They were able to reproduce the appearance of the stream by sending a single, massive dwarf satellite onto a moderately eccentric orbit around the Whale galaxy. The team showed that, over the span of about 3.5 Gyr, the satellite became disrupted and spread into a structure very similar to the stellar tidal stream we now observe. In this simulation, the last remains of the dwarf satellite are contained within the northwest arm of the stream.The authors point out that the Whale galaxy has additional gaseous tidal features that likely originated from a more recent, gas-rich accretion event. There are also two bright regions that may be more dwarf satellites around the galaxy (labeled DW1 and DW2 in the header image). If the authors interpretation of the observed stellar stream is correct, then the Whale galaxy shows evidence for multiple recent mergers. This would support the idea that hierarchical formation models apply to other galaxies similar to the Milky Way.CitationDavid Martnez-Delgado et al 2015 AJ 150 116. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/4/116

  1. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer

    Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments.

    The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster.

    Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more.

    While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster.

    Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image.

    This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming

  2. The Hibernating Stellar Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Optically Active Magnetar-Candidate Discovered Astronomers have discovered a most bizarre celestial object that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again. It is most likely to be a missing link in the family of neutron stars, the first case of an object with an amazingly powerful magnetic field that showed some brief, strong visible-light activity. Hibernating Stellar Magnet ESO PR Photo 31/08 The Hibernating Stellar Magnet This weird object initially misled its discoverers as it showed up as a gamma-ray burst, suggesting the death of a star in the distant Universe. But soon afterwards, it exhibited some unique behaviour that indicates its origin is much closer to us. After the initial gamma-ray pulse, there was a three-day period of activity during which 40 visible-light flares were observed, followed by a brief near-infrared flaring episode 11 days later, which was recorded by ESO's Very Large Telescope. Then the source became dormant again. "We are dealing with an object that has been hibernating for decades before entering a brief period of activity", explains Alberto J. Castro-Tirado, lead author of a paper in this week's issue of Nature. The most likely candidate for this mystery object is a 'magnetar' located in our own Milky Way galaxy, about 15 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Vulpecula, the Fox. Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion billion times stronger than that of the Earth. "A magnetar would wipe the information from all credit cards on Earth from a distance halfway to the Moon," says co-author Antonio de Ugarte Postigo. "Magnetars remain quiescent for decades. It is likely that there is a considerable population in the Milky Way, although only about a dozen have been identified." Some scientists have noted that magnetars should be evolving towards a pleasant retirement as their magnetic fields decay, but no suitable source had been identified up to now as evidence for

  3. Stellar populations of stellar halos: Results from the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, B. A.; Conroy, C.; Pillepich, A.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of both major and minor mergers is expected to significantly affect gradients of stellar ages and metallicities in the outskirts of galaxies. Measurements of observed gradients are beginning to reach large radii in galaxies, but a theoretical framework for connecting the findings to a picture of galactic build-up is still in its infancy. We analyze stellar populations of a statistically representative sample of quiescent galaxies over a wide mass range from the Illustris simulation. We measure metallicity and age profiles in the stellar halos of quiescent Illustris galaxies ranging in stellar mass from 1010 to 1012 M ⊙, accounting for observational projection and luminosity-weighting effects. We find wide variance in stellar population gradients between galaxies of similar mass, with typical gradients agreeing with observed galaxies. We show that, at fixed mass, the fraction of stars born in-situ within galaxies is correlated with the metallicity gradient in the halo, confirming that stellar halos contain unique information about the build-up and merger histories of galaxies.

  4. Stellar Multiplicity in the DEBRIS disk sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.; Duchene, Gaspard; Tom, Henry; Kennedy, Grant; Matthews, Brenda C.; Butner, Harold M.

    2015-01-01

    Circumstellar disks around young stars serve as the sites of planet formation. A common outcome of the star formation process is that of stellar binary systems. How does the presence of multiple stars affect the properties of disks, and thus of planet formation? To examine the frequency of disks around stellar binaries we carried out a multiplicity survey on stars in the DEBRIS sample. This sample consists of 451 stars of spectral types A-M observed with the Herschel Space Telescope. We have examined the stellar multiplicity of this sample by gathering information from the literature and performing an adaptive optics imaging survey at Lick Observatory. We identify 189 (42%) binary or multiple star systems.In our sample, we find that debris disks are less common around binaries than single stars, though the disk detection frequency is comparable among A stars regardless of multiplicity. Nevertheless, the period distribution of disk-bearing binaries is consistent with that of non-disk binaries and with comparison field samples. Although the frequency of disk-bearing binaries may be lower than in single star systems, the processes behind disk formation are comparable among both single and multiple-star populations.This work is supported in part by a Chile Fondecy grant #3130520.

  5. Devastated Stellar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the nasty effects of living near a group of massive stars: radiation and winds from the massive stars (white spot in center) are blasting planet-making material away from stars like our sun. The planetary material can be seen as comet-like tails behind three stars near the center of the picture. The tails are pointing away from the massive stellar furnaces that are blowing them outward.

    The picture is the best example yet of multiple sun-like stars being stripped of their planet-making dust by massive stars.

    The sun-like stars are about two to three million years old, an age when planets are thought to be growing out of surrounding disks of dust and gas. Astronomers say the dust being blown from the stars is from their outer disks. This means that any Earth-like planets forming around the sun-like stars would be safe, while outer planets like Uranus might be nothing more than dust in the wind.

    This image shows a portion of the W5 star-forming region, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. It is a composite of infrared data from Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer. Light with a wavelength of 3.5 microns is blue, while light from the dust of 24 microns is orange-red.

  6. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  7. Ultraviolet stellar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.; Kondo, Y.; Ocallaghan, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During all three Skylab missions, prism-on observations were obtained in 188 starfields and prism-off observations in 31 starfields. In general, the fields are concentrated in the Milky Way where the frequency of hot stars is highest. These fields cover an area approximately 3660 degrees and include roughly 24 percent of a band 30 deg wide centered on the plane of the Milky Way. A census of stars in the prism-on fields shows that nearly 6,000 stars have measurable flux data at a wavelength of 2600A, that 1,600 have measurable data at 2000A, and that 400 show useful data at 1500A. Obvious absorption or emission features shortward of 2000A are visible in approximately 120 stars. This represents a bonanza of data useful for statistical studies of stellar classification and of interstellar reddening as well as for studies of various types of peculiar stars.

  8. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  9. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  10. Theory of Stellar Convection: Removing the Mixing-Length parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection determines all the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium. The new theory of stellar convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm with exceptional results for atmosphere models of the Sun and all the stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  11. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in describing and interpreting coronal plasma processes and the relationship between the solar corona and its stellar counterparts is reported. Topics covered include: stellar X-ray emission, HEAO 2 X-ray survey of the Pleiades, closed coronal structures, X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones, implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission, and magnetic field stochasticity.

  12. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 7th Cambridge Workshop, Tucson, AZ, Oct. 9-12, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampapa, Mark S. (Editor); Bookbinder, Jay A. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to HST observations of late-type stars, molecular absorption in the UV spectrum of Alpha Ori, EUV emission from late-type stars, Rosat observations of the Pleiades cluster, a deep ROSAT observation of the Hyades cluster, optical spectroscopy detected by EXOSAT, stellar photospheric convection, a structure of the solar X-ray corona, magnetic surface images of the BY Dra Star HD 82558, a Zebra interpretatin of BY Dra stars, optical flares on II Peg, a low-resolution spectroscopic survey of post-T tauri candidates, millimeter and sub-millimeter emission from flare stars, and activity in tidally interacting binaries. Attention is also given to modeling stellar angular momentum evolution, extended 60-micron emission from nearby Mira variables, the PANDORA atmosphere program, the global properties of active regions, oscillations in a stratified atmosphere, lithium abundances in northern RS CVn binaries, a new catalog of cool dwarf stars, the Far UV Spectrograph Explorer, and development of reflecting coronagraphs.

  13. Structure coefficients for use in stellar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnlek, Gülay; Budding, Edwin

    2012-12-01

    We present new values of the structural coefficients η j , and related quantities, for realistic models of distorted stars in close binary systems. Our procedure involves numerical integration of Radau's equation for detailed structural data and we verified our technique by referring to the 8-digit results of Brooker & Olle (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 115:101, 1955) for purely mathematical models. We provide tables of representative values of η j , and related quantities, for j=2,3,…,7 for a selection of Zero Age Stellar Main Sequence (ZAMS) stellar models taken from the EZWeb compilation of the Dept. of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison. We include also some preliminary comparisons of our findings with the results of Claret and Gimenez (Astron. Astrophys. 519:A57 2010) for some observed stars.

  14. Modular stellarator reactor: a fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Heck, F.M.; Green, L.; Karbowski, J.S.; Murphy, J.H.; Tupper, R.B.; DeLuca, R.A.; Moazed, A.

    1983-07-01

    A comparative analysis of the modular stellarator and the torsatron concepts is made based upon a steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, reactor embodiment of each concept for use as a central electric-power station. Parametric tradeoff calculations lead to the selection of four design points for an approx. 4-GWt plant based upon Alcator transport scaling in l = 2 systems of moderate aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-(0.08) and low-(0.04) beta versions of the modular stellarator and torsatron concepts. The physics basis of each design point is described together with supporting engineering and economic analyses. The primary intent of this study is the elucidation of key physics and engineering tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties with respect to the ultimate power reactor embodiment.

  15. The Stellar Observations Network Group - first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoci, Victoria; Grundahl, Frank; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2015-08-01

    SONG - the Stellar Observations Network Group is a Danish-led project set to design and build a global network of 1-m telescopes to carry out detailed studies of solar-like stars using asteroseismology and to discover and characterise exo-planets and their star system. Here we present more than 100 nights of high-precision radial velocity measurements from 2014 of the subgiant mu Herculis. Preliminary analyses of the largest ground-based data set ever obtained for such as star clearly show the detection of stochastically excited pressure modes. The high quality of our data allows unique extraction of individual modes over many orders in the frequency spectrum, leading to studies of rotation, convection, near-surface effects, core structure using mixed modes and stellar activity.

  16. Stellar Populations Archive: The Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, D. R.; Ouellette, J. O.; Shara, M.; Hurley, J.; Ferguson, H.

    2001-12-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope cycle 10 panels have awarded us an archival grant to create a web based archive for the 101 Galactic globular clusters observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We will reduce all globular cluster WFPC2 data using ALLFrame in order to provide a photometric database which is precise and consistent from cluster to cluster. In addition the American Museum of Natural History has recently acquired three special purpose computers (GRAPE6) for dynamical simulations of stellar clusters. The simulations will be archived and a public database will be made available. The archive will go online early 2002 and as each cluster is reduced it will be made public. It is hoped that this "service to the community" will encourage comparitive studies of the Galactic globular cluster system. This database will also produce a library of template stellar populations with widespread applications.

  17. The Stellar Imager (SI) - A Mission to Resolve Stellar Surfaces, Interiors, and Magnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/Optical, Space-Based Interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. SI is included as a 'Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission' in the 2005 NASA Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a 'Pathways to Life Observatory' in the NASA Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005). In this paper we discuss the science goals and technology needs of, and the baseline design for, the SI Mission (http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/) its ability to image the 'Biggest, Baddest, Coolest Stars'.

  18. Models of stellar population at high redshift, as constrained by PN yields and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Stellar population models are the tool to derive the properties of real galaxies, or predict them via galaxy formation models. A constructive approach is to use nearby stellar systems to calibrate uncertain quantities in stellar evolution. These checks and comparisons are particulary needed for evolved and short stellar phases such as the Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic giant branch, after whcih intermediate-mass stars evolve through the planetary nebula stage. Given the stellar mass range for which the fuel consumption along the TP-AGB is larger, high-redshift galaxies are the best probes of our modelling. I shall present the models, discuss how different prescription for the treatment of this stellar phase affects the integrated spectral energy distribution and how these compare to galaxy data, and discuss implications for the PN nebulae luminosity function and stellar remnants stemming from the various assumptions.

  19. STELLAR POPULATION VARIATIONS IN THE MILKY WAY's STELLAR HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Eric F.; Xue Xiangxiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ruhland, Christine; Hogg, David W.

    2010-12-15

    If the stellar halos of disk galaxies are built up from the disruption of dwarf galaxies, models predict highly structured variations in the stellar populations within these halos. We test this prediction by studying the ratio of blue horizontal branch stars (BHB stars; more abundant in old, metal-poor populations) to main-sequence turn-off stars (MSTO stars; a feature of all populations) in the stellar halo of the Milky Way using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We develop and apply an improved technique to select BHB stars using ugr color information alone, yielding a sample of {approx}9000 g < 18 candidates where {approx}70% of them are BHB stars. We map the BHB/MSTO ratio across {approx}1/4 of the sky at the distance resolution permitted by the absolute magnitude distribution of MSTO stars. We find large variations of the BHB/MSTO star ratio in the stellar halo. Previously identified, stream-like halo structures have distinctive BHB/MSTO ratios, indicating different ages/metallicities. Some halo features, e.g., the low-latitude structure, appear to be almost completely devoid of BHB stars, whereas other structures appear to be rich in BHB stars. The Sagittarius tidal stream shows an apparent variation in the BHB/MSTO ratio along its extent, which we interpret in terms of population gradients within the progenitor dwarf galaxy. Our detection of coherent stellar population variations between different stellar halo substructures provides yet more support to cosmologically motivated models for stellar halo growth.

  20. Skylab ultraviolet stellar astronomy experiment S019

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocallaghan, F. G.; Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    An objective-prism stellar spectrograph of 15-cm aperture was flown on all three Skylab missions. The wavelength region from 1300 A to 5000 A was covered by a special optical system containing a combination of reflecting telescope optics, a CaF2 objective prism, and an achromatized field-corrector lens system of CaF2 and LiF. Observations of 188 star fields, each covering 4.0 x 5.0 deg of arc, were conducted at the Skylab antisolar airlock with the aid of an articulated mirror system which allowed acquisition within a 30 by 360 deg band of the sky.

  1. Constraining the Initial Mass Function of unresolved stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, I.; La Barbera, F.; Vazdekis, A.

    2015-05-01

    All studies of unresolved stellar populations rely on a proper characterization of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), i.e. the distribution of stellar masses at birth. Over the past few years, several avenues of research have suggested a systematic variation of the IMF in early-type galaxies, with a departure from the standard IMF in the most massive systems towards both an enhanced contribution from low-mass dwarves (derived from line strength constraints); and an excess of stellar M/L (from galaxy dynamics and gravitational lensing constraints). We present here some of the recent results, focusing on constraints based on spectral line strengths and the consequences derived from galactic chemical enrichment.

  2. Stellar matter with pseudoscalar condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. A.; Andrianov, V. A.; Espriu, D.; Kolevatov, S. S.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we consider how the appearance of gradients of pseudoscalar condensates in dense systems may possibly influence the transport properties of photons in such a medium as well as other thermodynamic characteristics. We adopt the hypothesis that in regions where the pseudoscalar density gradient is large the properties of photons and fermions are governed by the usual lagrangian extended with a Chern-Simons interaction for photons and a constant axial field for fermions. We find that these new pieces in the lagrangian produce non-trivial reflection coefficients both for photons and fermions when entering or leaving a region where the pseudoscalar has a non-zero gradient. A varying pseudoscalar density may also lead to instability of some fermion and boson modes and modify some properties of the Fermi sea. We speculate that some of these modifications could influence the cooling rate of stellar matter (for instance in compact stars) and have other observable consequences. While quantitative results may depend on the precise astrophysical details most of the consequences are quite universal and consideration should be given to this possibility.

  3. Looking for high-mass young stellar objects: H2O and OH masers in ammonia cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, C.; Cesaroni, R.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Beltrán, M. T.; Furuya, R.; Testi, L.

    2010-02-01

    Context. The earliest stages of high-mass star formation have yet to be characterised well, because high-angular resolution observations are required to infer the properties of the molecular gas hosting the newly formed stars. Aims: We search for high-mass molecular cores in a large sample of 15 high-mass star-forming regions that are observed at high-angular resolution, extending a pilot survey based on a smaller number of objects. Methods: The sample was chosen from surveys of H2O and OH masers to favour the earliest phases of high-mass star formation. Each source was first observed with the 32-m single-dish Medicina antenna in the (1, 1) and (2, 2) inversion transitions at 1.3 cm of ammonia, which is an excellent tracer of dense gas. High-resolution maps in the NH3(2, 2) and (3, 3) lines and the 1.3 cm continuum were obtained successively with the VLA interferometer. Results: We detect continuum emission in almost all the observed star-forming regions, which corresponds to extended and UCHii regions created by young stellar objects with typical luminosities of ˜10^4~L⊙. However, only in three cases do we find a projected overlap between Hii regions and H2O and OH maser spots. On the other hand, the VLA images detect eight ammonia cores closely associated with the maser sources. The ammonia cores have sizes of ˜10^4 AU, and high masses (up to 104M⊙), and are very dense (from ˜10^6 to a few ×10^9 cm-3). The typical relative NH3 abundance is ≤10-7, in agreement with previous measurements in high-mass star-forming regions. Conclusions: The statistical analysis of the distribution between H2O and OH masers, NH3 cores, and Hii regions confirms that the earliest stages of high-mass star formation are characterised by high-density molecular cores with temperatures of on average ≥30 K, either without a detectable ionised region or associated with a hypercompact Hii region.

  4. The HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. XXXVI. Planetary systems and stellar activity of the M dwarfs GJ 3293, GJ 3341, and GJ 3543

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astudillo-Defru, N.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Ségransan, D.; Forveille, T.; Bouchy, F.; Gillon, M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Neves, V.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Rojo, P.; Santos, N. C.; Udry, S.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Planetary companions of a fixed mass induce reflex motions with a larger amplitude around lower-mass stars, which adds to making M dwarfs excellent targets for extra-solar planet searches. The most recent velocimeters with a stability of ~1 m s-1 can detect very low-mass planets out to the habitable zone of these stars. Low-mass small planets are abundant around M dwarfs, and most of the known potentially habitable planets orbit one of these cool stars. Aims: Our M-dwarf radial velocity monitoring with HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla observatory makes a major contribution to this sample. Methods: We present here dense radial velocity (RV) time series for three M dwarfs observed over ~five years: GJ 3293 (0.42 M⊙), GJ 3341 (0.47 M⊙), and GJ 3543 (0.45 M⊙). We extracted these RVs through minimum χ2-matching of each spectrum against a stack of all observed spectra for the same star that has a high signal-to-noise ratio. We then compared potential orbital signals against several stellar activity indicators to distinguish the Keplerian variations induced by planets from the spurious signals that result from rotational modulation of stellar surface inhomogeneities and from activity cycles. Results: Two Neptune-mass planets - msin(i) = 1.4 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.1Mnept - orbit GJ 3293 with periods P = 30.60 ± 0.02 d and P = 123.98 ± 0.38 d, possibly together with a super-Earth - msin(i) ~ 7.9 ± 1.4 M⊕ - with period P = 48.14 ± 0.12d. A super-Earth - msin(i) ~ 6.1 M⊕ - orbits GJ 3341 with P = 14.207 ± 0.007d. The RV variations of GJ 3543, on the other hand, reflect its stellar activity rather than planetary signals. Based on observations made with the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope under the program IDs 072.C-0488, 082.C-0718 and 183.C-0437 at Cerro La Silla (Chile).Tables A.1-A.3 (radial velocity data) are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp

  5. Introduction to stellar astrophysics. Volume 1 - Basic stellar observations and data. Volume 2 - Stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    Volume 1: The global properties of stars and the observational techniques used to determine them are examined in an introduction for undergraduate students. Chapters are devoted to stellar positions, proper motions, brightness, color-magnitude diagrams, luminosities, angular radii, and effective temperatures. Also considered are stellar masses and radii, spectral classification, population II stars, stellar rotation, magnetic fields, peculiar spectra, pulsating stars, explosive stars, the sun, and interstellar absorption. Diagrams, graphs, sample images and spectra, tables of numerical constants, and a set of problems are provided. Volume 2: The basic principles used in the study of the outer layers of a star are discussed. The subjects addressed include stellar magnitudes, colors, and spectra; temperature estimates for stars; radiative transfer; depth dependence of the source function; the continuous absorption coefficient; the influence of the nongreyness of the absorption coefficient; pressure stratification; theory of line formation; hydrogen lines; spectrum analysis; nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium; the hydrogen convection zone; stellar chromospheres, transition layers, and coronae; and stellar winds.

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Stellarator and Heliotron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, John L.

    1999-02-01

    Stellarators and tokamaks are the most advanced devices that have been developed for magnetic fusion applications. The two approaches have much in common; tokamaks have received the most attention because their axisymmetry justifies the use of simpler models and provides a more forgiving geometry. However, recent advances in treating more complicated three dimensional systems have made it possible to design stellarators that are not susceptible to disruptions and do not need plasma current control. This has excited interest recently. The two largest new magnetic experiments in the world are the LHD device, which commenced operation in Toki, Japan, in 1998 and W7-X, which should become operational in Greifswald, Germany, in 2004. Other recently commissioned stellarators, including H-1 in Canberra, Australia, TJ-II in Madrid, Spain, and IMS in Madison, Wisconsin, have joined these in rejuvenating the stellarator programme. Thus, it is most appropriate that the author has made the lecture material that he presents to his students in the Graduate School of Energy Science at Kyoto University available to everyone. Stellarator and Heliotron Devices provides an excellent treatment of stellarator theory. It is aimed at graduate students who have a good understanding of classical mechanics and mathematical techniques. It contains good descriptions and derivations of essentially every aspect of fusion theory. The author provides an excellent qualitative introduction to each subject, pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of the models that are being used and describing our present understanding. He judiciously uses simple models which illustrate the similarities and differences between stellarators and tokamaks. To some extent the treatment is uneven, rigorous derivations starting with basic principles being given in some cases and relations and equations taken from the original papers being used as a starting point in others. This technique provides an excellent training

  7. The Stellar Imager (SI) - A Mission to Resolve Stellar Surfaces, Interiors, and Magnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita; Si Team

    2011-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a space-based, UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and of the Universe in general. It will also probe via asteroseismology flows and structures in stellar interiors. SI will enable the development and testing of a predictive dynamo model for the Sun, by observing patterns of surface activity and imaging of the structure and differential rotation of stellar interiors in a population study of Sun-like stars to determine the dependence of dynamo action on mass, internal structure and flows, and time. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe and will revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. SI is a "Landmark/Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap, an implementation of the UVOI in the 2006 Astrophysics Strategic Plan, and a NASA Vision Mission ("NASA Space Science Vision Missions" (2008), ed. M. Allen). We present here the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technology development needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  8. Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on research activities covered on Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters. Substantial progress was made in the development and dissemination of the "Starlab" software environment. Significant improvements were made to "kira," an N-body simulation program tailored to the study of dense stellar systems such as star clusters and galactic nuclei. Key advances include (1) the inclusion of stellar and binary evolution in a self-consistent manner, (2) proper treatment of the anisotropic Galactic tidal field, (3) numerous technical enhancements in the treatment of binary dynamics and interactions, and (4) full support for the special-purpose GRAPE-4 hardware, boosting the program's performance by a factor of 10-100 over the accelerated version. The data-reduction and analysis tools in Starlab were also substantially expanded. A Starlab Web site (http://www.sns.ias.edu/-starlab) was created and developed. The site contains detailed information on the structure and function of the various tools that comprise the package, as well as download information, "how to" tips and examples of common operations, demonstration programs, animations, etc. All versions of the software are freely distributed to all interested users, along with detailed installation instructions.

  9. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  10. Inferences on Stellar Activity and Stellar Cycles from Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, William J.; Basu, Sarbani

    2014-12-01

    The solar activity cycle can be studied using many different types of observations, such as counting sunspots, measuring emission in the Ca II H&K lines, magnetograms, radio emissions, etc. One of the more recent ways of studying solar activity is to use the changing properties of solar oscillations. Stellar activity cycles are generally studied using the Ca II lines, or sometimes using photometry. Asteroseismology is potentially an exciting means of studying these cycles. In this article we examine whether or not asteroseismic data can be used for this purpose, and what the asteroseismic signatures of stellar activity are. We also examine how asteroseismology may help in more indirect ways.

  11. Stellar Activity and CMEs: Important Factors of Planetary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, Maxim L.

    CME activity of the Sun is known to be an important impacting factor for the magnetospheres, atmospheres, and surfaces of solar system planets. Following an idea of a solar-stellar analogy, CME phenomena are expected on other stars as well. The main planetary impact factors of the stellar CMEs include the associated interplanetary shocks, plasma density and velocity disturbances, energetic particles accelerated in the shock regions, as well as distortions of the magnetic field direction and modulus. All these factors should be properly taken into account during the study of evolutionary processes on exoplanets and their atmospheric and plasma environments. The planetary impact of the stellar CME activity may vary depending on stellar age, stellar spectral type and the orbital distance of a planet. Because of the relatively short range of propagation of the majority of CMEs, they affect most strongly the magnetospheres and atmospheres of close-orbit ( < 0.1 AU) exoplanets. In this chapter we discuss an issue of the stellar CME activity in the context of several actual problems of modern exoplanetology, including planetary atmosphere mass loss, planet survival at close orbits, and definition of a criterion for habitability.

  12. Can stellar activity make a planet seem misaligned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshagh, M.; Dreizler, S.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Reiners, A.

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have shown that the occultation of stellar active regions by the transiting planet can generate anomalies in the high-precision transit light curves, and these anomalies may lead to an inaccurate estimate of the planetary parameters (e.g., the planet radius). Since the physics and geometry behind the transit light curve and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (spectroscopic transit) are the same, the Rossiter-McLaughlin observations are expected to be affected by the occultation of stellar active regions in a similar way. In this paper we perform a fundamental test on the spin-orbit angles as derived by Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements, and we examine the impact of the occultation of stellar active regions by the transiting planet on the spin-orbit angle estimations. Our results show that the inaccurate estimation on the spin-orbit angle due to stellar activity can be quite significant (up to ~30 deg), particularly for the edge-on, aligned, and small transiting planets. Therefore, our results suggest that the aligned transiting planets are the ones that can be easily misinterpreted as misaligned owing to the stellar activity. In other words, the biases introduced by ignoring stellar activity are unlikely to be the culprit for the highly misaligned systems.

  13. Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey: Stellar Populations and Mass Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stephane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Dalcanton, Julianne; de Jong, Roelof S.; McDonald, Michael; Tully, R. Brent

    2015-01-01

    M31 is ideal for understanding the structure and stellar populations of spiral galaxies thanks to its proximity and our external vantage point. The Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey (ANDROIDS) has used MegaCam and WIRCam on the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope to map the M31 bulge and disk out to R=40 kpc in ugriJKs bands. Through careful sky monitoring and modelling, ANDROIDS is uniquely able to observe both the resolved stars and integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) over M31's entire disk (complimenting HST's PHAT program). By simultaneously fitting stellar populations with isochrones and SED models for M31, we can assess the systematic uncertainties of SED fits to more distant unresolved systems, and constrain the stellar populations that contribute to each bandpass. We pay close attention to the near-IR light of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in stellar population models. ANDROIDS has also surveyed M31 in narrowband TiO and CN bands, enabling a clean classification of Carbon AGB stars, and a mapping the ratio of Carbon and M-type AGB stars (C/M) across the entire disk. The correlation between C/M and stellar metallicity is useful for constraining the NIR colors of more distant galaxies. We also present a hierarchical Bayesian model of pixel-by-pixel stellar populations, yielding the most detailed map of M31's stellar mass and star formation history to date. We find that a full six-band optical-NIR fit provides the best constraints to stellar mass, a triumph for modern NIR stellar population synthesis models, though the results are consistent with an optical-only fits. Fits based on the popular g-i color combination find M/L* ratios biased by 0.1 dex, while color-mass-to-light prescriptions in the literature may differ by 0.3 dex. This result affirms that panchromatic SED modelling is crucial even for stellar mass estimation, let alone age and metallicity. Overall, we estimate the stellar mass of M31, within R=30 kpc, to be 10.3 (+2.3, -1

  14. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  15. Atomic Data for Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher Alan; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Wood, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Stellar chemical composition analyses can only yield reliable abundances if the atomic transition parameters are accurately determined. During the last couple of decades a renewed emphasis on laboratory spectroscopy has produced large sets of useful atomic transition probabilities for species of interest to stellar spectroscopists. In many cases the transition data are of such high quality that they play little part in the abundance error budgets. In this talk we will review the current state of atomic parameters, highlighting the areas of satisfactory progress and noting places where further laboratoryprogress will be welcome.

  16. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  17. The slow ionized wind and rotating disklike system that are associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677

    SciTech Connect

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Bronfman, Leonardo; Mardones, Diego; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Moran, James; Brooks, Kate J.; Nyman, Lars-Åke; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2014-12-01

    We report the detection, made using ALMA, of the 92 GHz continuum and hydrogen recombination lines (HRLs) H40α, H42α, and H50β emission toward the ionized wind associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677. This is the luminous central dominating source located in the massive and dense molecular clump associated with IRAS 16562–3959. The HRLs exhibit Voigt profiles, which is a strong signature of Stark broadening. We successfully reproduce the observed continuum and HRLs simultaneously using a simple model of a slow ionized wind in local thermodynamic equilibrium, with no need for a high-velocity component. The Lorentzian line wings imply electron densities of 5 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3} on average. In addition, we detect SO and SO{sub 2} emission arising from a compact (∼3000 AU) molecular core associated with the central young star. The molecular core exhibits a velocity gradient that is perpendicular to the jet-axis, which we interpret as evidence of rotation. The set of observations toward G345.4938+01.4677 are consistent with it being a young high-mass star associated with a slow photo-ionized wind.

  18. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  19. Integrated Circuit Stellar Magnitude Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit which can be used to demonstrate the stellar magnitude scale. Six rectangular light-emitting diodes with independently adjustable duty cycles represent stars of magnitudes 1 through 6. Experimentally verifies the logarithmic response of the eye. (Author/GA)

  20. The SOHO-Stellar Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    Objective was to conduct a variety of observing programs with the SUMER spectrometer on SOHO, in order to further the understanding of the solar-stellar connection. The program was a continuation of SOHO GO program NAG5-6124 of the previous year.

  1. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  2. Distance Measurements and Stellar Population Properties via Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBFs) are one of the most powerful techniques to measure the distance and to constrain the unresolved stellar content of extragalactic systems. For a given bandpass, the absolute SBF magnitude AS11076_IE1.gif depends on the properties of the underlying stellar population. Multi-band SBFs allow scientists to probe different stages of the stellar evolution: ultraviolet and blue wavelength band SBFs are sensitive to the evolution of stars within the hot horizontal branch and post-asymptotic giant branch phases, whereas optical SBF magnitudes explore the stars within the red giant branch and horizontal branch regimes. Near- and far-infrared SBF luminosities probe the important stellar evolution stage within the asymptotic giant branch and thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch phases. Since the first successful application by Tonry and Schneider, a multiplicity of works have used this method to expand the distance scale up to 150Mpc and beyond. This article gives a historical background of distance measurements, reviews the basic concepts of the SBF technique, presents a broad sample of investigations and discusses possible selection effects, biases, and limitations of the method. In particular, exciting new developments and improvements in the field of stellar population synthesis are discussed that are essential to understand the physics and properties of the populations in unresolved stellar systems. Further, promising future directions of the SBF technique are presented. With new upcoming space-based satellites such as Gaia, the SBF method will remain as one of the most important tools to derive distances to galaxies with unprecedented accuracy and to give detailed insights into the stellar content of globular clusters and galaxies.

  3. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' Multiplication-Sign 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of {approx}20-70 pixel{sup -1} in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} > 150 km s{sup -1}, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by {approx}50%, and only a weak correlation between {sigma}{sub *} and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are {approx} an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 R{sub e} , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high {alpha}-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  4. Direct UV/Optical Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: The Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita; Mozurkewich, David

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/optical, space-based interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living with a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in thc Universe. SI is a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap. We discuss herein the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technologies needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  5. Averaged equilibrium and stability in low-aspect-ratio stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.; Carreras, B.A.; Dominguez, N.

    1989-01-01

    The MHD equilibrium and stability calculations or stellarators are complex because of the intrinsic three-dimensional (3-D) character of these configurations. The stellarators expansion simplifies the equilibrium calculation by reducing it to a two-dimensional (2-D) problem. The classical stellarator expansion includes terms up to order epsilon/sup 2/, and the vacuum magnetic field is also included up to this order. For large-aspect-ratio configurations, the results of the stellarator expansion agree well with 3-D numerical equilibrium results. But for low-aspect-ratio configurations, these are significant discrepancies with 3-D equilibrium calculations. The main reason for these discrepancies is the approximation in the vacuum field contributions. This problem can be avoided by applying the average method in a vacuum flux coordinate system. In this way, the exact vacuum magnetic field contribution is included and the results agree well with 3-D equilibrium calculations even for low-aspect-ratio configurations. Using the average method in a vacuum flux coordinate system also permit the accurate calculation of local stability properties with the Mercier criterion. The main improvement is in the accurate calculation of the geodesic curvature term. In this paper, we discuss the application of the average method in flux coordinates to the calculation of the Mercier criterion for low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  7. Simulating Convection in Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Joel

    Understanding convection in stellar envelopes, and providing a mathematical description of it, would represent a substantial advance in stellar astrophysics. As one of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models, existing treatments of convection fail to account for many of the dynamical effects of convection, such as turbulent pressure and asymmetry in the velocity field. To better understand stellar convection, we must be able to study and examine it in detail, and one of the best tools for doing so is numerical simulation. Near the stellar surface, both convective and radiative process play a critical role in determining the structure and gas dynamics. By following these processes from first principles, convection can be simulated self-consistently and accurately, even in regions of inefficient energy transport where existing descriptions of convection fail. Our simulation code includes two radiative transfer solvers that are based on different assumptions and approximations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Using the code to construct a grid of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the link between convection and various chemical compositions. The stellar parameters correspond to main-sequence stars at several surface gravities, and span a range in effective temperatures (4500 < Teff < 6400). Different chemical compositions include four metallicities (Z = 0.040, 0.020, 0.010, 0.001), three helium abundances (Y = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) and several levels of alpha-element enhancement. Our grid of simulations shows that various convective properties, such as velocity and the degree of superadiabaticity, are

  8. EVIDENCE FOR TWO DISTINCT STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.

    2012-12-20

    We present velocity dispersion measurements of 20 Local Group stellar clusters (7 < log(age [yr]) <10.2) from integrated light spectra and examine the evolution of the stellar mass-to-light ratio, Y{sub *}. We find that the clusters deviate from the evolutionary tracks corresponding to simple stellar populations drawn from standard stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). The nature of this failure, in which Y{sub *} is at first underestimated and then overestimated with age, invalidates potential simple solutions involving a rescaling of either the measured masses or modeled luminosities. A range of possible shortcomings in the straightforward interpretation of the data, including subtleties arising from cluster dynamical evolution on the present-day stellar mass functions and from stellar binarity on the measured velocity dispersions, do not materially affect this conclusion given the current understanding of those effects. Independent of further conjectures regarding the origin of this problem, this result highlights a basic failing of our understanding of the integrated stellar populations of these systems. We propose the existence of two distinct IMFs, one primarily, but not exclusively, valid for older, metal-poor clusters and the other for primarily, but not exclusively, younger, metal-rich clusters. The young (log(age [yr]) < 9.5) clusters are well described by a bottom-heavy IMF, such as a Salpeter IMF, while the older clusters are better described by a top-heavy IMF, such as a light-weighted Kroupa IMF, although neither of these specific forms is a unique solution. The sample is small, with the findings currently depending on the results for four key clusters, but doubling the sample is within reach.

  9. Theory of stellar convection: removing the mixing-length parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Cropper, M.; Grebel, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by Mixing-Length Theory, which makes use of the mixing length-scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing length-scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scaleheight, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun. No strong arguments exist to suggest that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and at all evolutionary phases. The aim of this study is to present a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. We present a self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection that determines the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and of the surrounding medium. This new theory is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame comoving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convectively unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time-dependent formalism. We obtain an analytical, non-local, time-dependent subsonic solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The theory is suitable for the outer convective zones of solar type stars and stars of all mass on the main-sequence band. The predictions of the new theory are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm for the most accurate calibrator, the Sun, with very satisfactory results.

  10. Theory of stellar convection II: first stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Chiosi, E.; Cropper, M.; Weiss, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD), in which convection is treated according to the new scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. (2014). The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few percent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients ∇ and ∇e, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the "calibrated" MT theory for main sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, as it is more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.

  11. Theory of stellar convection - II. First stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Chiosi, E.; Cropper, M.; Weiss, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, in which convection is treated according to the new scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few per cent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients ∇ and ∇e, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the `calibrated' MT theory for main-sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, as it is more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.

  12. Large stellar interferometer MIRA-ST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Masanori; Sato, Koichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Ohishi, Naoko; Kotani, Takayuki

    2003-02-01

    We propose a millisecond of arc optical/infrared array for stellar territory, MIRA-ST, with nine 4m-aperture off-axis telescopes, whose maximum baseline length is about 600 m. MIRA-ST will have the photon collecting area equivalent to that of a single-dish telescope of 12 m diameter, and the imaging capability better than 1 millisecond of arc resolution at 2.2 micrometers with a high dynamic range of reconstructed images. Combining the light beams from each pupil telescope efficiently is one of the most difficult tasks. We compare the relative merits among a so-called pair-wise beam combining, an all-on-one beam combining, and a tree-structured beam combining. As for transferring the beams from individual telescopes to a beam combining facility with the loss of photons as small as possible, an optical fiber system is a most interesting substitute for the current mirror-and-vacuum-pipe combination. Specifically, the nature of spatial filtering of optical fibers has been under study in the light of deepening the limiting magnitude attainable without introducing an adaptive optics to each telescope. With MIRA-ST we will be able to zoom in the stellar territory to unveil the detailed structures and lifecycles of stars of various kinds, and to examine the universality and/or diversity along the coarse of their evolutionary paths. The specific targets of most interesting for us are, among others, T Tauri stars, AGB and post-AGB stars, Cepheids, brown dwarfs, white dwarfs, stellar atmosphere/envelope of low temperature stars, accretion disks, and fundamental structures of main sequence stars.

  13. Stellar Firework in a Whirlwind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    VLT Image of Supernova in Beautiful Spiral Galaxy NGC 1288 Stars do not like to be alone. Indeed, most stars are members of a binary system, in which two stars circle around each other in an apparently never-ending cosmic ballet. But sometimes, things can go wrong. When the dancing stars are too close to each other, one of them can start devouring its partner. If the vampire star is a white dwarf - a burned-out star that was once like our Sun - this greed can lead to a cosmic catastrophe: the white dwarf explodes as a Type Ia supernova. In July 2006, ESO's Very Large Telescope took images of such a stellar firework in the galaxy NGC 1288. The supernova - designated SN 2006dr - was at its peak brightness, shining as bright as the entire galaxy itself, bearing witness to the amount of energy released. ESO PR Photo 39/07 ESO PR Photo 39/07 SN 2006dr in NGC 1288 NGC 1288 is a rather spectacular spiral galaxy, seen almost face-on and showing multiple spiral arms pirouetting around the centre. Bearing a strong resemblance to the beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 1232, it is located 200 million light-years away from our home Galaxy, the Milky Way. Two main arms emerge from the central regions and then progressively split into other arms when moving further away. A small bar of stars and gas runs across the centre of the galaxy. The first images of NGC 1288, obtained during the commissioning period of the FORS instrument on ESO's VLT in 1998, were of such high quality that they have allowed astronomers [1] to carry out a quantitative analysis of the morphology of the galaxy. They found that NGC 1288 is most probably surrounded by a large dark matter halo. The appearance and number of spiral arms are indeed directly related to the amount of dark matter in the galaxy's halo. The supernova was first spotted by amateur astronomer Berto Monard. On the night of 17 July 2006, Monard used his 30-cm telescope in the suburbs of Pretoria in South Africa and discovered the supernova as an

  14. Quasi-axially symmetric stellarators

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Confinement of a plasma for controlled thermonuclear fusion is studied numerically. Toroidal equilibria are considered, with an emphasis on the Modular Helias-like Heliac 2 (MHH2), which is a stellarator of low aspect ratio with just two field periods surrounded by 16 modular coils. The geometry is fully three-dimensional, but there is an axial symmetry of the magnetic structure that is calculated to give confinement competitive with that in circular tokamaks. Additional vertical and toroidal field coils, together with a current drive, provide the flexibility and the control of rotational transform necessary for a successful experiment. An MHH3 device with three field periods and comparable quasi-axial symmetry is presented, too, and because of reversed shear, its physical properties may be better. Variational analysis of equilibrium and stability is shown to give a more reliable prediction of performance for these stellarators than linearized or local theories that suffer from a failure of differentiability and convergence. PMID:9707544

  15. Quasi-axially symmetric stellarators.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, P R

    1998-08-18

    Confinement of a plasma for controlled thermonuclear fusion is studied numerically. Toroidal equilibria are considered, with an emphasis on the Modular Helias-like Heliac 2 (MHH2), which is a stellarator of low aspect ratio with just two field periods surrounded by 16 modular coils. The geometry is fully three-dimensional, but there is an axial symmetry of the magnetic structure that is calculated to give confinement competitive with that in circular tokamaks. Additional vertical and toroidal field coils, together with a current drive, provide the flexibility and the control of rotational transform necessary for a successful experiment. An MHH3 device with three field periods and comparable quasi-axial symmetry is presented, too, and because of reversed shear, its physical properties may be better. Variational analysis of equilibrium and stability is shown to give a more reliable prediction of performance for these stellarators than linearized or local theories that suffer from a failure of differentiability and convergence. PMID:9707544

  16. Magnetohydrostatic modelling of stellar coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacTaggart, D.; Gregory, S. G.; Neukirch, T.; Donati, J.-F.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce to the stellar physics community a method of modelling stellar coronae that can be considered to be an extension of the potential field. In this approach, the magnetic field is coupled to the background atmosphere. The model is magnetohydrostatic and is a balance between the Lorentz force, the pressure gradient and gravity. Analytical solutions are possible and we consider a particular class of equilibria in this paper. The model contains two free parameters and the effects of these on both the geometry and topology of the coronal magnetic field are investigated. A demonstration of the approach is given using a magnetogram derived from Zeeman-Doppler imaging of the 0.75 M⊙ M-dwarf star GJ 182.

  17. The Solar/Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha

    2015-08-01

    The Sun is the archetype of magnetic star. Its proximity and the wealth of very high accuracy observations that this has allowed us to gather over many decades have greatly helped us understanding how solar-like stars (e.g with a convective envelope) redistribute angular momentum and generate a cyclic magnetic field. However most models have been so fine tuned that when they are straightforwardly extended to other solar-like stars and are compared with the ever growing stellar magnetism and differential rotation observations the agreement is not as good as one could hope. In this review I will discuss based on theoretical considerations and multi-D MHD stellar models what can be considered as robust properties of solar-like star dynamics and magnetism and what is still speculative.

  18. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  19. Stellar yields from rotating stellar models: Their effect on chemical evolution model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, C.; Matteucci, F.

    In this work we evaluate the impact of the new stellar yields recently computed by \\citet{mm02}, where stellar rotation is taken into account, on important open questions related to the C, N and He enrichment in galaxies. Moreover, we show that some abundance ratios offer an important tool to investigate the halo-disk discontinuity. It is shown that the effect of a halt in the star formation between the halo/thick disk and thin disk phases, already suggested from studies based both on Fe/O and Fe/Mg, should also be seen in a C/O versus O/H plot if C is produced mainly by low- and intermediate-mass stars (LIMS). Recent C/O measurements for stars in the MW halo and disk seem to confirm the above prediction. Finally, a more gentle increase of N abundance with metallicity (or time) is predicted when adopting the stellar yields with rotation of \\citet{mm02}, which do not include hot-bottom burning, than when adopting the yields of \\citet{vdhg97}, for intermediate mass stars. This fact has some implications for the timescales for the N enrichment and thus for the interpretation of the nature of damped lyman alpha systems (DLAs).

  20. Stellar Gyroscope for Determining Attitude of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Hancock, Bruce; Liebe, Carl; Mellstrom, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    A paper introduces the concept of a stellar gyroscope, currently at an early stage of development, for determining the attitude or spin axis, and spin rate of a spacecraft. Like star trackers, which are commercially available, a stellar gyroscope would capture and process images of stars to determine the orientation of a spacecraft in celestial coordinates. Star trackers utilize chargecoupled devices as image detectors and are capable of tracking attitudes at spin rates of no more than a few degrees per second and update rates typically <5 Hz. In contrast, a stellar gyroscope would utilize an activepixel sensor as an image detector and would be capable of tracking attitude at a slew rate as high as 50 deg/s, with an update rate as high as 200 Hz. Moreover, a stellar gyroscope would be capable of measuring a slew rate up to 420 deg/s. Whereas a Sun sensor and a three-axis mechanical gyroscope are typically needed to complement a star tracker, a stellar gyroscope would function without them; consequently, the mass, power consumption, and mechanical complexity of an attitude-determination system could be reduced considerably.

  1. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  2. Geometry Dependence of Stellarator Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, P. Xanthopoulos and A.H. Boozer

    2009-08-10

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST, we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry-dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the 2D structure of the microturbulence over that surface, and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrodinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  3. Solar and Stellar Eclipse Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budding, E.

    2007-05-01

    The special circumstance of solar eclipse affords an opportunity to review its background, particularly in the cultural context of western Anatolia. This links with a current project of çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University. Turning to the more general subject of stellar eclipses, topics of particular note concern: choice of fitting functions, disk eclipses, spot eclipses and the gravity-darkening effect. These topics arise within new era eclipsing binary studies and are relevant to active researches on remote binaries and extrasolar planets.

  4. A Stellar Ripple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This false-color composite image shows the Cartwheel galaxy as seen by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far ultraviolet detector (blue); the Hubble Space Telescope's wide field and planetary camera 2 in B-band visible light (green); the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared array camera at 8 microns (red); and the Chandra X-ray Observatory's advanced CCD imaging spectrometer-S array instrument (purple).

    Approximately 100 million years ago, a smaller galaxy plunged through the heart of Cartwheel galaxy, creating ripples of brief star formation. In this image, the first ripple appears as an ultraviolet-bright blue outer ring. The blue outer ring is so powerful in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations that it indicates the Cartwheel is one of the most powerful UV-emitting galaxies in the nearby universe. The blue color reveals to astronomers that associations of stars 5 to 20 times as massive as our sun are forming in this region. The clumps of pink along the outer blue ring are regions where both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation are superimposed in the image. These X-ray point sources are very likely collections of binary star systems containing a blackhole (called massive X-ray binary systems). The X-ray sources seem to cluster around optical/ultraviolet-bright supermassive star clusters.

    The yellow-orange inner ring and nucleus at the center of the galaxy result from the combination of visible and infrared light, which is stronger towards the center. This region of the galaxy represents the second ripple, or ring wave, created in the collision, but has much less star formation activity than the first (outer) ring wave. The wisps of red spread throughout the interior of the galaxy are organic molecules that have been illuminated by nearby low-level star formation. Meanwhile, the tints of green are less massive, older visible-light stars.

    Although astronomers have not identified exactly which galaxy collided with the Cartwheel, two of three

  5. Disk Galaxy Stellar Velocity Ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, M. A.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Andersen, D. R.; Swaters, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    We have measured the disk stellar velocity ellipsoids in a subset of spiral galaxies observed for the Disk-Mass Survey, which provide information on disk stability and secular heating mechanisms. Our methodology invokes our 2D ionized gas and stellar kinematics and a suite of dynamical assumptions based on the Jeans' equations. When combined with orthogonal axes from our 2D data, either the epicycle approximation (EA) or asymmetric drift (AD) equation may close the necessary equation set, individually. We have isolated large observational and inherent systematic effects via EA-only, AD-only, and EA+AD ellipsoid decomposition methodologies. In an attempt to minimize these effects and generate robust ellipsoid measurements we explore constraints provided by higher order expansions of the Jeans' equations and direct orbital integrations. We compare our best ellipsoid axial ratio estimates to similar measurements made by, e.g., van der Kruit & de Grijs (1999, A&A, 352, 129) and Shapiro et al. (2003, AJ, 126, 2707). Finally, we discuss possibilities for the measurement of vertical velocity dispersions in low-surface-brightness galaxies by applying the characterization of the stellar velocity ellipsoid in late-type galaxies. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (AST-0607516).

  6. Heating of the stellar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1986-01-01

    The present state of development of the theory of coronal heating is summarized. Coronal heating is the general cause of stellar X-ray emission, and it is also the cause of stellar mass loss in most stars. Hence a quantitive theory of coronal heating is an essential part of X-ray astronomy, and the development of a correct theory of coronal heating should be a primary concern of X-ray astronomers. The magnetohydrodynamical effects involved in coronal heating are not without interest in their own right, representing phenomena largely unknown in the terrestrial laboratory. Until these effects can be evaluated and assembled into a comprehensive theory of coronal heating for at least one star, the interpretation of the X-ray emissions of all stars is a phenomenological study at best, based on arbitrary organization and display of X-ray luminosity against bolometric luminosity, rotation rate, etc. The sun provides the one opportunity to pursue the exotic physical effects that combine to heat a stellar corona.

  7. Stellar oscillations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-01

    Starting from the equations of modified gravity hydrodynamics, we derive the equations of motion governing linear, adiabatic, radial perturbations of stars in scalar-tensor theories. There are two new features: first, the eigenvalue equation for the period of stellar oscillations is modified such that the eigenfrequencies are always larger than predicted by general relativity. Second, the general relativity condition for stellar instability is altered so that the adiabatic index can fall below 4/3 before unstable modes appear. Stars are more stable in modified gravity theories. Specializing to the case of chameleonlike theories, we investigate these effects numerically using both polytropic Lane-Emden stars and models coming from modified gravity stellar structure simulations. We find that the change in the oscillation period of Cepheid star models can be as large as 30% for order-one matter couplings and the change in the inferred distance using the period-luminosity relation can be up to three times larger than if one had only considered the modified equilibrium structure. We discuss the implications of these results for recent and upcoming astrophysical tests and estimate that previous methods can produce new constraints such that the modifications are screened in regions of Newtonian potential of O(10-8).

  8. Optical metrology for Starlight Separated Spacecraft Stellar Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, S.; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Abramovici, A.; Asbury, C. G.; Kuhnert, A. C.; Mulder, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a high-precision inter-spacecraft metrology system designed for NASA 's StarLight mission, a space-based separated-spacecraft stellar interferometer. It consists of dual-target linear metrology, based on a heterodyne interferometer with carrier phase modulation, and angular metrology designed to sense the pointing of the laser beam and provides bearing information. The dual-target operation enables one metrology beam to sense displacement of two targets independently. We present the current design, breadboard implementation of the Metrology Subsystem in a stellar interferometer testbed and the present state of development of flight qualifiable subsystem components.

  9. Stellar halos and the link to galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmi, Amina

    2016-08-01

    I present a brief overview of how stellar halos may be used to constrain the process of galaxy formation. In particular, streams and substructure in stellar halos trace merger events but can also be used to determine the mass distribution of the host galaxy and hence put constraints on the nature of dark matter. Much of the focus of this contribution is on the Milky Way, but I also present an attempt to understand the kinematics of the globular cluster system of M31.

  10. Understanding the size growth of massive galaxies through stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, I.; Trujillo, I.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Pérez-González, P.

    Massive early-type galaxies undergo a significant process of evolution with redshift on the stellar mass vs size plane. Furthermore, this trend does not depend on the age of their stellar populations. Therefore, such an evolution should involve processes that do not include a significant amount of star formation, leaving (mostly) dry mergers as the main growth channel. By studying close pairs involving a massive galaxy, one can quantify the role of mergers on the growth of massive galaxies. A recent study based on the SHARDS dataset reveals that minor mergers cannot be the dominant mechanism to explain the bulk of size growth in these systems. Merging is found to provide a constant fractional growth rate of ~10% per Gyr from redshift z=1, corresponding to an overall stellar mass increase of 2× between z=1 and z=0.

  11. BASE-9: Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution with nine variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Elliot; von Hippel, Ted; Stein, Nathan; Stenning, David; Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel; Si, Shijing; van Dyk, David

    2016-08-01

    The BASE-9 (Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution with nine variables) software suite recovers star cluster and stellar parameters from photometry and is useful for analyzing single-age, single-metallicity star clusters, binaries, or single stars, and for simulating such systems. BASE-9 uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique along with brute force numerical integration to estimate the posterior probability distribution for the age, metallicity, helium abundance, distance modulus, line-of-sight absorption, and parameters of the initial-final mass relation (IFMR) for a cluster, and for the primary mass, secondary mass (if a binary), and cluster probability for every potential cluster member. The MCMC technique is used for the cluster quantities (the first six items listed above) and numerical integration is used for the stellar quantities (the last three items in the above list).

  12. Stellar sources of the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielemann, F.-K.; Argast, D.; Brachwitz, F.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Oechslin, R.; Rauscher, T.; Hix, W. R.; Liebendörfer, M.; Mezzacappa, A.; Höflich, P.; Iwamoto, K.; Nomoto, K.; Schatz, H.; Wiescher, M. C.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rosswog, S.

    With the exception of the Big Bang, responsible for 1,2 H, 3,4 He, and 7 Li, stars act as sources for the composition of the interstellar medium. Cosmic rays are related to the latter and very probably due to acceleration of the mixed interstellar medium by shock waves from supernova remnants. Thus, the understanding of the abundance evolution in the interstellar medium and especially the enrichment of heavy elements, as a function of space and time, is essential. It reflects the history of star formation and the lifetimes of the diverse contributing stellar objects. Therefore, the understanding of the endpoints of stellar evolution is essential as well. These are mainly planetary nebulae and type II/Ib/Ic supernovae as evolutionary endpoints of single stars, but also events in binary systems can contribute, like e.g. supernovae of type Ia, novae and possibly X-ray bursts and neutron star or neutron star - black hole mergers. Despite many efforts, a full and self-consistent understanding of supernovae (the main contributors to nucleosynthesis in galaxies) is not existing, yet. Their fingerprints, however, seen either in spectra, lightcurves, radioactivities/decay gamma-rays or in galactic evolution, can help to constrain the composition of their ejecta and related model uncertainties.

  13. Stellar Archaeology: New Science with Old Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The early chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Universe is vital to our understanding of a host of astrophysical phenomena. Since the most metal-poor Galactic stars are relics from the high-redshift Universe, they probe the chemical and dynamical conditions as the Milky Way began to form, the origin and evolution of the elements, and the physics of nucleosynthesis. They also provide constraints on the nature of the first stars, their associated supernovae and initial mass function, and early star and galaxy formation. I will present exemplary metal-poor stars with which these different topics can be addressed. Those are the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy ([Fe/H] < -5.0), and metal-poor stars with strong overabundances of heavy elements, in particular uranium and thorium, which can be used to radioactively date the stars to be 13 Gyr old. I will then transition to recent discoveries of metal-poor ([Fe/H] -3.0) stars in the least luminous dwarf satellites orbiting the Milky Way. Their stellar chemical signatures support the concept that small systems, analogous to the surviving dwarf galaxies, were the building blocks of the Milky Way's low-metallicity halo. This opens a new window for studying galaxy formation through stellar chemistry.

  14. The relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1975-01-01

    The general relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution are reformulated in a notation which makes easy contact with Newtonian theory. A general relativistic version of the mixing-length formalism for convection is presented. It is argued that in work on spherical systems, general relativity theorists have identified the wrong quantity as total mass-energy inside radius r.

  15. Computer Infrastructure for the Variable Young Stellar Objects Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walawender, Josh; Reipurth, Bo; Paegert, Martin

    2011-03-01

    An increasing number of remote or robotically controlled telescopes are using commercial "off the shelf" hardware and software. We describe a system which has been implemented in the Variable Young Stellar Objects Survey (VYSOS) project which uses simple, commercially available software and hardware to enable the quick restoration of observatory operations in the event of a computer failure.

  16. Chemical evolution of circumstellar matter around young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; Blake, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent observational studies of the chemical composition of circumstellar matter around both high- and low-mass young stellar objects are reviewed. The molecular abundances are found to be a strong function of evolutionary state, but not of system mass or luminosity. The data are discussed with reference to recent theoretical models.

  17. Results of Compact Stellarator Eengineering Trade Studies

    SciTech Connect

    T. Brown, L. Bromberg, and M. Cole

    2009-09-25

    A number of technical requirements and performance criteria can drive stellarator costs, e.g., tight tolerances, accurate coil positioning, low aspect ratio (compactness), choice of assembly strategy, metrology, and complexity of the stellarator coil geometry. With the completion of a seven-year design and construction effort of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) it is useful to interject the NCSX experience along with the collective experiences of the NCSX stellarator community to improving the stellarator configuration. Can improvements in maintenance be achieved by altering the stellarator magnet configuration with changes in the coil shape or with the combination of trim coils? Can a mechanical configuration be identified that incorporates a partial set of shaped fixed stellarator coils along with some removable coil set to enhance the overall machine maintenance? Are there other approaches that will simplify the concepts, improve access for maintenance, reduce overall cost and improve the reliability of a stellarator based power plant? Using ARIES-CS and NCSX as reference cases, alternative approaches have been studied and developed to show how these modifications would favorably impact the stellarator power plant and experimental projects. The current status of the alternate stellarator configurations being developed will be described and a comparison made to the recently designed and partially built NCSX device and the ARIES-CS reactor design study.

  18. Results of Compact Stellarator Engineering Trade Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Brown, L. Bromberg, M. Cole

    2009-05-27

    number of technical requirements and performance criteria can drive stellarator costs, e.g., tight tolerances, accurate coil positioning, low aspect ratio (compactness), choice of assembly strategy, metrology, and complexity of the stellarator coil geometry. With the completion of a seven-year design and construction effort of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) it is useful to interject the NCSX experience along with the collective experiences of the NCSX stellarator community to improving the stellarator configuration. Can improvements in maintenance be achieved by altering the stellarator magnet configuration with changes in the coil shape or with the combination of trim coils? Can a mechanical configuration be identified that incorporates a partial set of shaped fixed stellarator coils along with some removable coil set to enhance the overall machine maintenance? Are there other approaches that will simplify the concepts, improve access for maintenance, reduce overall cost and improve the reliability of a stellarator based power plant? Using ARIES-CS and NCSX as reference cases, alternative approaches have been studied and developed to show how these modifications would favorably impact the stellarator power plant and experimental projects. The current status of the alternate stellarator configurations being developed will be described and a comparison made to the recently designed and partially built NCSX device and the ARIES-CS reactor design study.

  19. Modeling Small Stellar Populations Using Starburst99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gerardo Arturo; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Stellar populations synthesis models have proven to be excellent tools to learn about galaxy evolution. However, modeling small stellar populations (lower than 105 M⊙) has been an intriguing and continuous to be a field of intensive research. In this work, we have developed a new approach to form stars from clusters first, where massive stars are formed from fractions of mass of small stellar clusters. This new approximation is based on the empirical power law (mc-2) for the mass function of clusters between 20-1100 M⊙ found in recent years and the maximum stellar mass that can be formed in a cluster. Incorporating this new approach to form clusters has made us upgrade the way we integrate the stellar properties and the way that the isochrone is produced with a new technique. To produce the new models we have used the most recent version of Starburst99 that incorporates the most recent stellar evolution models with rotation. On the verge of solving nearby stellar populations and observing small stellar populations across the universe, this new approach brings a new scope on trying to disentangle the nature of hyper and supermassive stars in small stellar populations. In this work we present this new approach and the results when these models are applied to very energetic stellar populations such as the cluster in NGC 3603. Our most important result is that we have modeled the ionizing power of this cluster and some others by forming enough supermassive stars in a cluster of ~104 M⊙.

  20. Stellar X-ray accretion signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C.; Guenther, M.

    2016-06-01

    Accretion is observed in a wide range objects with partially overlapping properties. In this contribution, we study accretion in young stars, where we can directly observe the accretion shock on the stellar surface in the X-ray regime. High-resolution grating spectroscopy allows us to infer the properties of the accretion streams. I will present results from our recent 250 ks XMM-Newton/Chandra program targeting the prototypical T Tau system such as strong X-ray variability despite constant mass accretion, abundances typical for accreting stars, but line ratios typically not found in accreting stars. Finally, I will compare these results with other systems focusing on potentially different accretion modes.

  1. Habitable zone dependence on stellar parameter uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.

    2014-02-20

    An important property of exoplanetary systems is the extent of the Habitable Zone (HZ), defined as that region where water can exist in a liquid state on the surface of a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure. Both ground- and space-based observations have revealed a plethora of confirmed exoplanets and exoplanetary candidates, most notably from the Kepler mission using the transit detection technique. Many of these detected planets lie within the predicted HZ of their host star. However, as is the case with the derived properties of the planets themselves, the HZ boundaries depend on how well we understand the host star. Here we quantify the uncertainties of HZ boundaries on the parameter uncertainties of the host star. We examine the distribution of stellar parameter uncertainties from confirmed exoplanet hosts and Kepler candidate hosts and translate these into HZ boundary uncertainties. We apply this to several known systems with an HZ planet to determine the uncertainty in their HZ status.

  2. Relativistic stellar stability: An empirical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.

    1972-01-01

    The PPN formalism which encompasses the post-Newtonian limit of nearly every metric theory of gravity is used to analyze stellar stability. This analysis enables one to infer, for any given gravitation theory, the extent to which post-Newtonian effects induce instabilities in white dwarfs, in neutron stars, and in supermassive stars. It also reveals the extent to which our current empirical knowledge of post-Newtonian gravity (based on solar-system experiments) actually guarantees that relativistic instabilities exist. In particular, it shows that: (1) for conservative theories of gravity, current solar-system experiments guarantee that the critical adiabatic index, for the stability of stars against radial pulsations exceeds the Newtonian value of 4/3 and (2) for nonconservative theories, current experiments do not permit any firm conclusion about the sign of the critical adiabatic index, and (3) in the PPN approximation to every metric theory, the standard Schwarzschild criterion for convection is valid.

  3. Vertical oscillations of fluid and stellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Bonner, Gage

    2015-06-01

    A satellite galaxy or dark matter subhalo that passes through a stellar disc may excite coherent oscillations in the disc perpendicular to its plane. We determine the properties of these modes for various self-gravitating plane symmetric systems (Spitzer sheets) using the matrix method of Kalnajs. In particular, we find an infinite series of modes for the case of a barotropic fluid. In general, for a collisionless system, there is a double series of modes, which include normal modes and/or Landau-damped oscillations depending on the phase space distribution function of the stars. Even Landau-damped oscillations may decay slowly enough to persist for several hundred Myr. We discuss the implications of these results for the recently discovered vertical perturbations in the kinematics of solar neighbourhood stars and for broader questions surrounding secular phenomena such as spiral structure in disc galaxies.

  4. Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEMS WITH W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A FOR A RADIO SELECTED SAMPLE OF 77 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MAGNETIC FIELDS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J. E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.c

    2010-03-01

    We present a catalog of Mg II absorption systems obtained from high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/VLT data of 77 quasi-stellar objects in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0, and down to an equivalent width W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A. The statistical properties of our sample are found to be in agreement with those from the previous work in the literature. However, we point out that the previously observed increase with redshift of partial derivN/partial derivz for weak absorbers pertains exclusively to very weak absorbers with W{sub 0} < 0.1 A. Instead, partial derivN/partial derivz for absorbers with W{sub 0} in the range 0.1-0.3 A actually decreases with redshift, similar to the case of strong absorbers. We then use this catalog to extend our earlier analysis of the links between the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of the quasars and the presence of intervening Mg II absorbing systems in their spectra. In contrast to the case with strong Mg II absorption systems (W{sub 0} > 0.3 A), the weaker systems do not contribute significantly to the observed RM of the background quasars. This is possibly due to the higher impact parameters of the weak systems compared to strong ones, suggesting that the high column density magnetized material that is responsible for the Faraday rotation is located within about 50 kpc of the galaxies. Finally, we show that this result also rules out the possibility that some unexpected secondary correlation between the quasar redshift and its intrinsic RM is responsible for the association of high RM and strong intervening Mg II absorption that we have presented elsewhere, since this would have produced an equal effect for the weak absorption line systems, which exhibit a very similar distribution of quasar redshifts.

  5. Mg II Absorption Systems with W 0 >= 0.1 Å for a Radio Selected Sample of 77 Quasi-Stellar Objects and their Associated Magnetic Fields at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.

    2010-03-01

    We present a catalog of Mg II absorption systems obtained from high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/VLT data of 77 quasi-stellar objects in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0, and down to an equivalent width W 0 >= 0.1 Å. The statistical properties of our sample are found to be in agreement with those from the previous work in the literature. However, we point out that the previously observed increase with redshift of ∂N/∂z for weak absorbers pertains exclusively to very weak absorbers with W 0 < 0.1 Å. Instead, ∂N/∂z for absorbers with W 0 in the range 0.1-0.3 Å actually decreases with redshift, similar to the case of strong absorbers. We then use this catalog to extend our earlier analysis of the links between the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of the quasars and the presence of intervening Mg II absorbing systems in their spectra. In contrast to the case with strong Mg II absorption systems (W 0 > 0.3 Å), the weaker systems do not contribute significantly to the observed RM of the background quasars. This is possibly due to the higher impact parameters of the weak systems compared to strong ones, suggesting that the high column density magnetized material that is responsible for the Faraday rotation is located within about 50 kpc of the galaxies. Finally, we show that this result also rules out the possibility that some unexpected secondary correlation between the quasar redshift and its intrinsic RM is responsible for the association of high RM and strong intervening Mg II absorption that we have presented elsewhere, since this would have produced an equal effect for the weak absorption line systems, which exhibit a very similar distribution of quasar redshifts. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under Programme IDs 075.A-0841 and 076.A-0860.

  6. A census of stellar mass in ten massive haloes at z ~ 1 from the GCLASS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burg, R. F. J.; Muzzin, A.; Hoekstra, H.; Wilson, G.; Lidman, C.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We study the stellar mass content of massive haloes in the redshift range 0.86 < z < 1.34, by measuring (1) the stellar mass in the central galaxy versus total dynamical halo mass; (2) the total stellar mass (including satellites) versus total halo mass; and (3) the radial stellar mass and number density profiles for the ensemble halo. Methods: We use a Ks-band selected catalogue for the 10 clusters in the Gemini Cluster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey (GCLASS), with photometric redshifts and stellar masses measured from 11-band SED fitting. Combining the photometric catalogues with the deep spectroscopic component of GCLASS, we correct the cluster galaxy sample for interlopers. We also perform a dynamical analysis of the cluster galaxies to estimate the halo mass M200 for each cluster based on a measurement of its velocity dispersion. Results: (1) We find that the central galaxy stellar mass fraction decreases with total halo mass and that this is in reasonable, quantitative agreement with measurements from abundance matching studies at z ~ 1. (2) The total stellar mass fractions of these systems decrease with halo mass, indicating that lower mass systems are more efficient at transforming baryons into stars. We find the total stellar mass to be a good proxy for total halo mass, with a small intrinsic scatter. When we compare these results from GCLASS with literature measurements, we find that the stellar mass fraction at fixed halo mass shows no significant evolution in the range 0 < z < 1. (3) We measure a relatively high NFW concentration parameter cg ~ 7 for the stellar mass distribution in these clusters, and debate a possible scenario for explaining the evolution of the stellar mass distribution from the GCLASS sample to their likely descendants at lower redshift. Conclusions: The stellar mass measurements in the z ~ 1 haloes provided by GCLASS puts constraints on the stellar mass assembly history of clusters observed in the local Universe. A simple

  7. Envelope Inflation or Stellar Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, S.; Matzner, C. D.

    We an optically-thick, transonic, steady wind model for a H-free Wolf-Rayet star. A bifurcation is found across a critical mass loss rate Mb. Slower winds M < Mb extend by several hydrostatic stellar radii, reproduce features of envelope in ation from Petrovic et al. (2006) and Gräfener et al. (2012), and are energetically unbound. This work is of particular interest for extended envelopes and winds, radiative hydrodynamic instabilities (eg. wind stagnation, clumping, etc.), and NLTE atmospheric models.

  8. The Solar-Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunker, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    The influence of rotation on stellar magnetism, and the importance of the shear layer between a radiative core and the convective envelope for the generation of magnetic fields are key to understanding solar-like dynamos. Despite having an abundance of observational constraints, the answer to the solar dynamo problem remains tantalisingly out of reach. With the advent of space-based instrumentation for asteroseismology including Kepler, CoRoT, and in the future PLATO, we can exploit the sheer number of observations, and complementary techniques to constrain the rotation of Sun-like stars.

  9. Properties of stellar activity cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi

    2015-08-01

    The current photometric datasets, that span decades, allow for studying long-term magentic cycles on active stars. Complementary Ca H&K observations give information also on the cycles of normal solar-like stars, which have significantly smaller, and less easily detectable, spots. In recent years, high precision space-based observations, for example from the Kepler satellite, have allowed also to study the sunspot-like spot sizes in other stars. In this talk I will review what is known about the properties of the cyclic stellar activity in other stars than our Sun, and also discuss the future prospects in this field.

  10. Development of quasi-isodynamic stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nührenberg, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical stellarator research from MHD-stable stellarators via quasi-helically symmetric ones to Wendelstein 7-X, quasi-axisymmetric tokamaks and quasi-isodynamic stellarators is sketched. Research strategy, computational aspects and various favorable properties are emphasized. The results found, but only together with the completion of according experimental devices and their scientific exploitation, may form a basis for selecting the confinement geometry most viable for fusion.

  11. The Anemic Stellar Halo of M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, Benne

    2014-10-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context predict that massive disk galaxies should have richly-structured extended stellar halos, containing ~10% of a galaxy's stars, originating in large part from the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies. Observations of a number of nearby disk galaxies have generally agreed with these expectations. Recent new observations in integrated light with a novel array of low scattered-light telephoto lenses have failed to convincingly detect a stellar halo in the nearby massive face-on disk galaxy M101 (van Dokkum et al. 2014). They argue that any halo has to have <0.3% of the mass of the galaxy. This halo would be the least massive of any massive disk galaxy in the local Universe (by factors of several) -- such a halo is not predicted or naturally interpreted by the models, and would present a critical challenge to the picture of ubiquitous stellar halos formed from the debris of disrupting dwarf galaxies.We propose to resolve the stellar populations of this uniquely anemic stellar halo for 6 orbits with HST (ACS and WFC3), allowing us to reach surface brightness limits sufficient to clearly detect and characterize M101's stellar halo if it carries more than 0.1% of M101's mass. With resolved stellar populations, we can use the gradient of stellar populations as a function of radius to separate stellar halo from disk, which is impossible using integrated light observations. The resolved stellar populations will reveal the halo mass to much greater accuracy, measure the halo radial profile, constrain any halo lopsidedness, estimate the halo's stellar metallicity, and permit an analysis of outer disk stellar populations.

  12. Symmetry breaking of quasihelical stellarator equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-04-01

    A mean-field Ohm's law is used to determine the effects of the bootstrap current on quasihelically symmetric stellarator equilibria. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the effects of the bootstrap current break the quasihelical stellarator symmetry at second order in an inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic field strength. The level of symmetry breaking suggests that good approximations to quasihelical stellarator fusion reactors may not be attainable.

  13. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  14. Theoretical studies of the outer envelopes of young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee

    1992-01-01

    With the Monte Carlo code developed by Whitney and Hartmann, a series of models was computed of scattering in disks around young stellar objects. The code calculates scattering by dust, including polarization, in arbitrary geometries. By computing model images, it was found that disk, by themselves, around young stellar objects would be very difficult to detect with present day imaging techniques. In comparing these images to observations of young stellar objects which show diffuse structure, little resemblance was found. A flared disk system will only give high polarization when viewed edge-on, and the position angle is always oriented perpendicular to the disk plane. This suggests that an envelope, perhaps the remnant infalling envelope, must be present to scatter more stellar light than a disk can, and obscure the star at many inclinations. A grid was computed of models of scattering in a disk+envelope system. Evidence is presented that the wind of the pre-main sequence object FU Orionis arises from the surface of the luminous prostellar accretion disk. A disk wind model calculated assuming radiative equilibrium explains the differential behavior of the observed asymmetrical absorption line profiles. The model predicts that strong lines should be asymmetric and blueshifted, while weak lines should be symmetric and doubled peaked due to disk rotation, in agreement with observations.

  15. Physics and chemistry of the late stages of stellar evolution — an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    2016-07-01

    The stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to planetary nebulae (PN) contains some of the most interesting physical and chemical processes in the Universe. Within a time period of one million years starting from the nucleosynthesis of carbon in the core, we witness the chemical synthesis of molecules in the atmosphere, followed by the condensation of minerals and organics in the stellar outflow. Different phases of supersonic stellar winds, both spherical symmetric and highly collimated, and their interactions lead to a series of dynamical processes and morphological transformation of the stellar ejecta. Most interestingly, PN are now known to be major sources of complex organics in the Galaxy. Organic compounds of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structures have been observed to form in the post-AGB evolution over time scales as short as hundreds of years. There is likely that these stellar organics journeyed through the Galaxy and were embedded in early Solar System.

  16. Stellar radii from long-baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Long baseline interferometers now measure the angular diameters of nearby stars with sub-percent accuracy. They can be translated in photospheric radii when the parallax is known, thus creating a novel and powerful constraint for stellar models. I present applications of interferometric radius measurements to the modeling of main sequence stars. Over the last few years, we obtained accurate measurements of the linear radius of many of the nearest stars: Procyon A, 61 Cyg A & B, α Cen A & B, Sirius A, Proxima. . . Firstly, I describe the example of our modeling of Procyon A (F5IV-V) with the CESAM code, constrained using spectrophotometry, the linear radius, and asteroseismic frequencies. I also present our recent results on the low-mass 61 Cyg system (K5V+K7V), for which asteroseismic frequencies have not been detected yet.

  17. Proper Stellar Direction and Astronomical Aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Mariateresa; Vecchiato, A.

    2009-05-01

    The general relativistic definition of astrometric measurement needs an appropriate use of the concept of reference frame, which should then be linked to the conventions of the IAU Resolutions (IAU, 2000), which fix the celestial coordinate system. A consistent definition of the astrometric observables in the context of General Relativity is also essential to find uniquely the stellar coordinates and proper motion, this being the main physical task of the inverse ray tracing problem. Aim of this presentation is to set the level of reciprocal consistency of two relativistic models, GREM and RAMOD (Gaia, ESA mission), in order to guarantee a physically correct definition of light direction to a star, an essential item for deducing the star coordinates and proper motion within the same level of measurement accuracy.

  18. Proper stellar directions and astronomical aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Mariateresa; Vecchiato, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The general relativistic definition of astrometric measurement needs an appropriate use of the concept of reference frame, which should then be linked to the conventions of the IAU Resolutions (Soffel et al., 2003), which fix the celestial coordinate system. A consistent definition of the astrometric observables in the context of General Relativity is also essential to find uniquely the stellar coordinates and proper motion, this being the main physical task of the inverse ray tracing problem. Aim of this work is to set the level of reciprocal consistency of two relativistic models, GREM and RAMOD (Gaia, ESA mission), in order to guarantee a physically correct definition of light direction to a star, an essential item for deducing the star coordinates and proper motion within the same level of measurement accuracy.

  19. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  20. Stellar dynamics of CEN A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, A.; Sharples, R. M.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Wallace, P. T.

    1986-01-01

    The first complete map of the stellar velocity field within 100 arcsec of the nucleus of the bright elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Cen A) has been compiled, and complementary long-slit spectra out to 400 arcsec along the optical major axis have been obtained. These data show that the ellipsoidal stellar component is rotating slowly (maximum line-of-sight velocity 40 km/s) approximately perpendicular to the dust lane about a projected axis lying in pa approximately 135 deg and in the opposite sense to that expected if the warp were due to the dust lying in stable orbits round a triaxial potential. The velocity field may be explained by either an effectively stationary oblate triaxial model where the radio jet lies along the major axis perpendicular to the dust lane, or by an effectively stationary prolate model where the jet is not constrained to be perpendicular to the dust lane, but in either case the present warped dust lane configuration must be transient. It is shown that the dust lane can significantly affect the steepness of the rotation curve, the skew of the velocity field, and the magnitude of the dispersion.

  1. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  2. Problems of collisional stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggie, D. C.

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of dynamical friction was Chandrasekhar's best known contribution to the theory of stellar dynamics, but his work ranged from the few-body problem to the limit of large N (in effect, galaxies). Much of this work was summarised in the text "Principles of Stellar Dynamics" tep{C1942,C1960}, which ranges from a precise calculation of the time of relaxation, through a long analysis of galaxy models, to the behaviour of star clusters in tidal fields. The later edition also includes the work on dynamical friction and related issues. In this review we focus on progress in the collisional aspects of these problems, i.e. those where few-body interactions play a dominant role, and so we omit further discussion of galaxy dynamics. But we try to link Chandrasekhar's fundamental discoveries in collisional problems with the progress that has been made in the 50 years since the publication of the enlarged edition. There is one other such problem to which Chandrasekhar contributed, though the paper in question tep{C1944} was not reprinted in the book. See Section ref{sec:binaries}. For more on the collisionless problems studied by Chandrasekhar, see the paper by N. Wyn Evans (2011) in the present volume.

  3. Stellarator Research at Columbia University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Caliri, C.; Clark, A. W.; Febre, A.; Hammond, K. C.; Massidda, S. D.; Sweeney, R. M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Sarasola, X.; Spong, D. A.; Kornbluth, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Neutral plasmas were formed and heated by Electron Cyclotron and Electron Bernstein Waves at 2.45 GHz in the Columbia Nonneutral Torus (CNT) and were characterized with Langmuir probe and fast camera measurements. Future research will take advantage of the low aspect ratio (A = 2.3-2.7), high fraction of trapped particles and large vessel of CNT. The first plasma was obtained in a prototype circular coil tokamak-stellarator hybrid (Proto-CIRCUS). As a result of the toroidal-field coils being tilted and interlinked with each other, the device can be operated at lower plasma-current than a tokamak of comparable size and field, with implications for disruptions and steady state. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced. Comparisons between field-line calculations and experimental mapping is expected to confirm the generation of rotational transform and its dependence on the radial location and tilt of the coils, both of which can be varied. Finally we propose a small EC-heated classical stellarator to improve the production-rate and charge-state of ions in EC-resonant ion sources (ECRIS) over the conventional magnetic-mirror design, and discuss how ions would be extracted, for injection in research and medical accelerators.

  4. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  5. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    follow-up observations, and Thompson joined online. "Observing with the students is very exciting. It gives the students a chance to learn about radio telescopes and pulsar observing in a very hands-on way, and it is extra fun when we find a pulsar," said Rosen. Snider, on the other hand, said, "I got very, very nervous. I expected when I went there that I would just be watching other people do things, and then I actually go to sit down at the controls. I definitely didn't want to mess something up." Everything went well, and the observations confirmed that the students had found an exotic pulsar. "I learned more in the two hours in the control room than I would have in school the whole day," Mabry said. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling lighthouse beams of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its normal life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name neutron star. One tablespoon of material from a pulsar would weigh 10 million tons -- as much as a supertanker. The object that the students discovered is in a special class of pulsar that spins very fast - in this case, about 30 times per second, comparable to the speed of a kitchen blender. "The big question we need to answer first is whether this is a young pulsar or a recycled pulsar," said Maura McLaughlin, an astronomer at WVU. "A pulsar spinning that fast is very interesting as it could be newly born or it could be a very old, recycled pulsar." A recycled pulsar is one that was once in a binary system. Material from the companion star is deposited onto the pulsar, causing it to speed up, or be recycled. Mystery remains, however, about whether this pulsar has ever had a companion star. If it did, "it may be that this pulsar had a massive

  6. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPIC STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF NEARBY DISKS: HINTS OF STELLAR MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yoachim, Peter; Roskar, Rok; Debattista, Victor P.

    2012-06-20

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) to observe 12 nearby disk galaxies. We successfully measure ages in the outer disk in six systems. In three cases (NGC 2684, NGC 6155, and NGC 7437), we find that a downward break in the disk surface brightness profile corresponds with a change in the dominant stellar population with the interior being dominated by active star formation and the exterior having older stellar populations that are best fit with star formation histories that decline with time. The observed increase in average stellar ages beyond a profile break is similar to theoretical models that predict surface brightness breaks are caused by stellar migration, with the outer disk being populated from scattered old interior stars. In three more cases (IC 1132, NGC 4904, and NGC 6691), we find no significant change in the stellar population as one crosses the break radius. In these galaxies, both the inner and outer disks are dominated by active star formation and younger stellar populations. While radial migration can contribute to the stellar populations beyond the break, it appears that more than one mechanism is required to explain all of our observed stellar profile breaks.

  7. Discovery of a new white dwarf in a binary system (EUVE 0720-317) in the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer survey and implications for the late stages of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Thorstensen, John R.

    1994-01-01

    A new precataclysmic binary is identified in the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey. The bright source EUVE 0720-317 shows a hot hydrogen-rich white dwarf optical continuum with overlying narrow Balmer-line emission. Using high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy in the 4100-6700 A range, we identify a late-type companion and find a 1.3d periodic modulation in the emission-line velocities and strengths. This is the signature of Feige 24-type close binary systems. We determine the components' spectral types (DAO and dM0-2), orbital velocities (K(sub DAO) = 104 +/- 12 km/s, K(sub dM) = 96 +/- 7 km/s), and systemic velocity (gamma = 15 +/- 12 km/s). A first estimate of the white dwarf gravitational redshift, gamma(sub g) = 45 +/- 20 km/s, and theoretical mass-radius relationships imply R(sub DAO) = 0.010-0.016 solar radius and M(sub DAO) = 0.55-0.90 solar mass. The orbital inclination is therefore i greater than or equal to 52 deg, consistent with the large amplitude variations found in H-alpha equivalent widths that imply i greater than or equal to 42 deg. We show that the discovery of new close WD + MS binary systems in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sky surveys has important implications for theory of common-envelope evolution, in particular for the predicted close binary birthrate and orbital and stellar parameters.

  8. Theoretical modeling of planet-induced stellar activity using A.I.K.E.F. simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riousset, J. A.; Motschmann, U.; Reiners, A.; Marvin, C.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma flows and turbulences in stellar atmospheres and chromospheres can be disturbed by the presence of a planet in close orbit around the star. Such disturbances can be generated through tidal interactions between the two bodies, or through direct magnetic interaction between the magnetic fields of the star and the planet. The presence of an outer disturber and its influence on the generation of stellar activity, together with the knowledge about stars with no close planets, provide a unique laboratory for the investigation of plasma turbulence in stellar atmospheres. In this work we develop an integrated model covering the star and the planet as an interacting system where gravitational and electromagnetic forces are implemented self-consistently. The model is based on A.I.K.E.F. hybrid code for simulating stellar wind interaction with astronomical bodies. Compared to previous studies, the solar wind is no longer modeled as inflow/outflow boundary conditions, but created instead by a second body representing a star inside the simulation domain. The incorporation of the star is carried out based on Parker (1952) model for slow rotating stars with moderate stellar magnetic fields or on the sophisticated stellar wind model of Weber and Davis (1967) for fast rotators with strong stellar magnetic fields. Such an approach is not without scaling constraints, which will be discussed in this paper. Here, we present the first results for a configuration where the planet is within the star's Alfven radius, i.e., where the stellar wind flow velocity is subcritical. In this case, the resulting current system is extended and may even propagate against the inflowing stellar wind with possible consequences for the stellar activity.

  9. The stellar accretion origin of stellar population gradients at large radii in massive, early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers (stellar accretion) and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar population gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing a set of high-resolved, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity and color gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity and colour gradients in agreement with present-day observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations (too flat). In the wind model, colour and metallicity gradients are significantly steeper for systems which have accreted stars in minor mergers, while galaxies with major mergers have relatively flat gradients, confirming previous results. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (like MaNGA and Califa), which in turn can help to constrain models for energetic processes in simulations.

  10. Merging binaries in the Galactic Center: the eccentric Kozai-Lidov mechanism with stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Alexander P.; Naoz, Smadar; Ghez, Andrea M.; Witzel, Gunther; Sitarski, Breann N.; Do, Tuan; Kocsis, Bence

    2016-08-01

    Most, if not all, stars in the field are born in binary configurations or higher multiplicity systems. In dense stellar environment such as the Galactic Center (GC), many stars are expected to be in binary configurations as well. These binaries form hierarchical triple-body systems, with the massive black hole (MBH) as the third, distant object. The stellar binaries are expected to undergo large-amplitude eccentricity and inclination oscillations via the so-called `eccentric Kozai-Lidov' mechanism. These eccentricity excitations, combined with post-main-sequence stellar evolution, can drive the inner stellar binaries to merge. We study the mergers of stellar binaries in the inner 0.1 pc of the GC caused by gravitational perturbations due to the MBH. We run a large set of Monte Carlo simulations that include the secular evolution of the orbits, general relativistic precession, tides and post-main-sequence stellar evolution. We find that about 13 per cent of the initial binary population will have merged after a few Myr and about 29 per cent after a few Gyr. These expected merged systems represent a new class of objects at the GC, and we speculate that they are connected to G2-like objects and the young stellar population.

  11. Merging binaries in the Galactic Center: the eccentric Kozai-Lidov mechanism with stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Alexander P.; Naoz, Smadar; Ghez, Andrea M.; Witzel, Gunther; Sitarski, Breann N.; Do, Tuan; Kocsis, Bence

    2016-08-01

    Most, if not all, stars in the field are born in binary configurations or higher multiplicity systems. In dense stellar environment such as the Galactic Center (GC), many stars are expected to be in binary configurations as well. These binaries form hierarchical triple body systems, with the massive black hole (MBH) as the third, distant object. The stellar binaries are expected to undergo large amplitude eccentricity and inclination oscillations via the so-called "eccentric Kozai-Lidov" (EKL) mechanism. These eccentricity excitations, combined with post main sequence stellar evolution, can drive the inner stellar binaries to merge. We study the mergers of stellar binaries in the inner 0.1 pc of the GC caused by gravitational perturbations due to the MBH. We run a large set of Monte Carlo simulations that include the secular evolution of the orbits, general relativistic precession, tides, and post-main-sequence stellar evolution. We find that about 13 % of the initial binary population will have merged after a few million years and about 29 % after a few billion years. These expected merged systems represent a new class of objects at the GC and we speculate that they are connected to G2-like objects and the young stellar population.

  12. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, L. G.; Han, J. L.; Kong, M. Z.; Wu Xuebing

    2011-05-10

    Ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) are classified into several types depending on the dominance of starburst or active galactic nucleus (AGN) components. We conducted a stellar population analysis for a sample of 160 ULIRGs to study the evolution of ULIRGs. We found that the dominance of intermediate-age and old stellar populations increases along the sequence of H II-like ULIRGs, Seyfert-H II composite ULIRGs, and Seyfert 2 ULIRGs. Consequently, the typical mean stellar age and stellar mass increase along the sequence. Comparing the gas mass estimated from the CO measurements to the stellar mass estimated from the optical spectra, we found that the gas fraction is anti-correlated with stellar mass. Even so, the total masses of H II-like ULIRGs with small stellar masses and a large fraction of gas are not comparable to the small masses of Seyfert 2 ULIRGs. This indicates that H II-like ULIRGs with small stellar masses have no evolutionary connections with massive Seyfert 2 ULIRGs. Only massive ULIRGs may follow the evolution sequence toward AGNs, and massive H II-like ULIRGs are probably in an earlier stage of the sequence.

  13. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  14. Stellar-opacity calculations. II. Lecture 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-03-14

    We turn to the effects on opacities of atomic lines and molecular bands. It was the realization that these atomic lines were important for the opacity and the radiation flow in stars that allowed the field of stellar evolution to greatly flower in the 1960's and 1970's. Our understanding of stellar structure and evolution is now very deep.

  15. Stellar velocity dispersion in dissipative galaxy mergers with star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Stickley, Nathaniel R.; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    In order to better understand stellar dynamics in merging systems, such as NGC 6240, we examine the evolution of central stellar velocity dispersion (σ{sub *}) in dissipative galaxy mergers using a suite of binary disk merger simulations that include feedback from stellar formation and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that σ{sub *} undergoes the same general stages of evolution that were observed in our previous dissipationless simulations: coherent oscillation, then phase mixing, followed by dynamical equilibrium. We also find that measurements of σ{sub *} that are based only upon the youngest stars in simulations consistently yield lower values than measurements based upon the total stellar population. This finding appears to be consistent with the so-called 'σ{sub *} discrepancy', observed in real galaxies. We note that quasar-level AGN activity is much more likely to occur when σ{sub *} is near its equilibrium value rather than during periods of extreme σ{sub *}. Finally, we provide estimates of the scatter inherent in measuring σ{sub *} in ongoing mergers.

  16. Optimization of compact stellarator configuration as fusion devicesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmabadi, Farrokh; Rene Raffray, A.; Ku, Long-Poe; Lyon, James F.; Aries Team

    2006-05-01

    Optimization of the stellarator configuration requires tradeoffs among a large number of physics parameters and engineering constraints. An integrated study of compact stellarator power plants, ARIES-CS, aims at examining these tradeoffs and defining key R&D areas. Configurations with a plasma aspect ratio of A ⩽6 and excellent quasiaxisymmetry (QA) in both two and three field period versions were developed while reducing α-particle losses to <10%. Stability to linear ideal MHD modes was attained, but at the expense of reduced QA (and increased α-particle losses) and increased complexity of the plasma shape. Recent experimental results indicate, however, that linear MHD stability limits may not be applicable to stellarators. By utilizing a highly efficient shield-only region in strategic areas, the minimum standoff was reduced by ˜30%. This allows a comparable reduction in the machine size. The device configuration, assembly, and maintenance procedures appear to impose severe constraints: three distinct approaches were developed, each applicable to a certain blanket concept and/or stellarator configuration. Modular coils are designed to examine the geometric complexity and to understand the constraints imposed by the maximum allowable field, desirable coil-plasma separation, coil-coil spacing, and other coil parameters. A cost-optimization system code has also been developed and will be utilized to assess the tradeoff among physics and engineering constraints in a self-consistent manner in the final phase of the ARIES-CS study.

  17. Estimating stellar atmospheric parameters based on Lasso features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan-Xing; Zhang, Pei-Ai; Lu, Yu

    2014-04-01

    With the rapid development of large scale sky surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), GAIA and LAMOST (Guoshoujing telescope), stellar spectra can be obtained on an ever-increasing scale. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate stellar atmospheric parameters such as Teff, log g and [Fe/H] automatically to achieve the scientific goals and make full use of the potential value of these observations. Feature selection plays a key role in the automatic measurement of atmospheric parameters. We propose to use the least absolute shrinkage selection operator (Lasso) algorithm to select features from stellar spectra. Feature selection can reduce redundancy in spectra, alleviate the influence of noise, improve calculation speed and enhance the robustness of the estimation system. Based on the extracted features, stellar atmospheric parameters are estimated by the support vector regression model. Three typical schemes are evaluated on spectral data from both the ELODIE library and SDSS. Experimental results show the potential performance to a certain degree. In addition, results show that our method is stable when applied to different spectra.

  18. Stellar dynamics around a massive black hole - II. Resonant relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, S.; Touma, Jihad R.

    2016-06-01

    We present a first-principles theory of resonant relaxation (RR) of a low-mass stellar system orbiting a more massive black hole (MBH). We first extend the kinetic theory of Gilbert to include the Keplerian field of a black hole of mass M•. Specializing to a Keplerian stellar system of mass M ≪ M•, we use the orbit-averaging method of Sridhar & Touma to derive a kinetic equation for RR. This describes the collisional evolution of a system of N ≫ 1 Gaussian rings in a reduced 5-dim space, under the combined actions of self-gravity, 1 post-Newtonian (PN) and 1.5 PN relativistic effects of the MBH and an arbitrary external potential. In general geometries, RR is driven by both apsidal and nodal resonances, so the distinction between scalar RR and vector RR disappears. The system passes through a sequence of quasi-steady secular collisionless equilibria, driven by irreversible two-ring correlations that accrue through gravitational interactions, both direct and collective. This correlation function is related to a `wake function', which is the linear response of the system to the perturbation of a chosen ring. The wake function is easier to appreciate, and satisfies a simpler equation, than the correlation function. We discuss general implications for the interplay of secular dynamics and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics in the evolution of Keplerian stellar systems towards secular thermodynamic equilibria, and set the stage for applications to the RR of axisymmetric discs in Paper III.

  19. Spectral evolution of young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    An evolutionary sequence, from protostars to pre-main-sequence stars, is suggested for the classification of young stellar objects. This sequence is derived by comparing the predictions of the theoretical models of Adams and Shu with the morphological classification scheme of Lada and Wilking. We first define the spectral index in the near- and mid-infrared, n is identical to d log(nu F sub nu)/d log nu, and then interpret the class of sources with negative spectral indices as protostars. The inferred mass infall rates for these objects are generally consistent with the measured gas temperatures of approx. 35 K in Ophiuchus, and of approx. 10 K in Taurus. Fitting the data requires us to adopt cloud rotation rates in Ophiuchus which are typically an order of magnitude greater than in Taurus, and we speculate on the mechanistic origin for this difference. Next, we consider a subclass of T Tauri stars with near- and mid-infrared excesses and positive or zero spectral indices. We find that the objects with the steeper indices can be understood as the post-infall products from the collapse of rotating cloud cores, where the infrared excesses arise from the simple reprocessing of visible stellar photons in optically thick but spatially thin disks. The sources with flatter spectra may require massive accretion disks. Given the existence of protostars and naked star/disk systems, there is a natural interpretation of another subclass of T Tauri stars, those with two peaks in their emergent spectral energy distributions. These are readily explained as intermediate cases in which dust envelopes still surround the stars and disks. Finally, we find that the theory can be extended to explain the spectral energy distribution of FU Orionis, a famous outburst source. Our model suggests that FU Orionis has a disk, but it offers no discrimination between the competing ideas that the outburst took place on the star or in the disk.

  20. Stellar Interlopers Caught Speeding Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Click on individual image for larger view

    Resembling comets streaking across the sky, these four speedy stars are plowing through regions of dense interstellar gas and creating brilliant arrowhead structures and trailing tails of glowing gas.

    These bright arrowheads, or bow shocks, can be seen in these four images taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The bow shocks form when the stars' powerful stellar winds, streams of matter flowing from the stars, slam into surrounding dense gas. The phenomenon is similar to that seen when a speeding boat pushes through water on a lake.

    The stars in these images are among 13 runaway stars spotted by Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys. The stars appear to be young, just millions of years old. Their ages are based on their colors and the presence of strong stellar winds, a signature of youthful stars.

    Depending on their distance from Earth, the bullet-nosed bow shocks could be 100 billion to a trillion miles wide (the equivalent of 17 to 170 solar system diameters, measured out to Neptune's orbit). The bow shocks indicate that the stars are moving fast, more than 180,000 kilometers an hour (more than 112,000 miles an hour) with respect to the dense gas they are plowing through. They are traveling roughly five times faster than typical young stars, relative to their surroundings.

    The high-speed stars have traveled far from their birth places. Assuming their youthful phase lasts only a million years and they are moving at roughly 180,000 kilometers an hour, the stars have journeyed 160 light-years.

    The Hubble observations were taken between October 2005 and July 2006.

  1. The Gaseous Disks of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    Disks represent a crucial stage in the formation of stars and planets. They are novel astrophysical systems with attributes intermediate between the interstellar medium and stars. Their physical properties are inhomogeneous and are affected by hard stellar radiation and by dynamical evolution. Observing disk structure is difficult because of the small sizes, ranging from as little as 0.05 AU at the inner edge to 100-1000 AU at large radial distances. Nonetheless, substantial progress has been made by observing the radiation emitted by the dust from near infrared to mm wavelengths, i.e., the spectral energy distribution of an unresolved disk. Many fewer results are available for the gas, which is the main mass component of disks over much of their lifetime. The inner disk gas of young stellar objects (henceforth YSOs) have been studied using the near infrared rovibrational transitions of CO and a few other molecules, while the outer regions have been explored with the mm and sub-mm lines of CO and other species. Further progress can be expected in understanding the physical properties of disks from observations with sub-mm arrays like SMA, CARMA and ALMA, with mid infrared measurements using Spitzer, and near infrared spectroscopy with large ground-based telescopes. Intense efforts are also being made to model the observations using complex thermal-chemical models. After a brief review of the existing observations and modeling results, some of the weaknesses of the models will be discussed, including the absence of good laboratory and theoretical calculations for essential microscopic processes.

  2. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  3. Theory and modeling of stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    I will briefly outline basic concepts of the stellar atmospheres theory. After summarizing basic structural equations describing a stellar atmospheres, an emphasis is given to describing efficient numerical methods developed to deal with the stellar atmosphere problem, namely the method of complete linearization ant its recent variants, and the whole class of methods known by name Accelerated Lambda Iteration. In the next part of the lectures I will briefly summarize existing computer codes, with an emphasis on our code TLUSTY, and list some of the most useful grids of model atmospheres that are publicly available. Next, I will show how the model atmospheres and synthetic spectra are used in quantitative stellar spectroscopy in order to determine basic stellar parameters and chemical abundances. Finally, I will briefly describe an application of model atmosphere theory and models to related objects, such as accretion disks around various accretors, and atmospheres of substellar-mass objects-extrasolar giant planets and brown dwarfs.

  4. Convective Overshoot in Stellar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2015-07-01

    In stellar interiors, the turbulent thermal convection transports matters and energy, and dominates the structure and evolution of stars. The convective overshoot, which results from the non-local convective transport from the convection zone to the radiative zone, is one of the most uncertain and difficult factors in stellar physics at present. The classical method for studying the convective overshoot is the non-local mixing-length theory (NMLT). However, the NMLT bases on phenomenological assumptions, and leads to contradictions, thus the NMLT was criticized in literature. At present, the helioseismic studies have shown that the NMLT cannot satisfy the helioseismic requirements, and have pointed out that only the turbulent convection models (TCMs) can be accepted. In the first part of this thesis, models and derivations of both the NMLT and the TCM were introduced. In the second part, i.e., the work part, the studies on the TCM (theoretical analysis and applications), and the development of a new model of the convective overshoot mixing were described in detail. In the work of theoretical analysis on the TCM, the approximate solution and the asymptotic solution were obtained based on some assumptions. The structure of the overshoot region was discussed. In a large space of the free parameters, the approximate/asymptotic solutions are in good agreement with the numerical results. We found an important result that the scale of the overshoot region in which the thermal energy transport is effective is 1 HK (HK is the scale height of turbulence kinetic energy), which does not depend on the free parameters of the TCM. We applied the TCM and a simple overshoot mixing model in three cases. In the solar case, it was found that the temperature gradient in the overshoot region is in agreement with the helioseismic requirements, and the profiles of the solar lithium abundance, sound speed, and density of the solar models are also improved. In the low-mass stars of open

  5. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1989-01-01

    Progress in observational, theoretical, and radio studies of coronal plasmas is summarized. Specifically work completed in the area of solar and stellar magnetic fields, related photospheric phenomena and the relationships between magnetism, rotation, coronal and chromospheric emission in solar-like stars is described. Also outlined are theoretical studies carried out in the following areas, among others: (1) neutral beams as the dominant energy transport mechanism in two ribbon-flares; (2) magneto hydrodynamic and circuit models for filament eruptions; and (3) studies of radio emission mechanisms in transient events. Finally, radio observations designed for coronal activity studies of the sun and of solar-type coronae are described. A bibliography of publications and talks is provided along with reprints of selected articles.

  6. Multichannel spectrophotometry of stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mochnacki, S. W.; Zirin, H.

    1980-01-01

    Stellar flares have been observed using the 32 channel spectrophotometer on the 5 m telescope. Net flare fluxes in the region 3200-7000 A are presented. A simple model of blackbody radiation and hydrogen recombination emission appears to fit the continuum points well. Owing to vignetting problems, only the region between 4200 and 7000 A was used for a detailed fit to the Planck function to obtain apparent temperatures and effective areas. The rise of each flare was associated with an increase of the area, while the initial steep decline of the light was associated with a similar decrease of the blackbody temperature. The maximum temperatures, coincident with maximum light, were 7500-9500 K, similar to values for solar flares. The hydrogen line emission rose simultaneously with the continuum but declined more slowly. The ratio of H sub gamma to H sub alpha was about 1.5 at the peak, declining to about 1.0 after the peak.

  7. Stellarmak a hybrid stellarator: Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.

    1980-01-04

    This paper discusses hybridization of modified Stellarator-like transform windings (T-windings) with a Spheromak or Field-Reversed-Mirror configuration. This configuration, Stellarmak, retains the important topological advantage of the Spheromak or FRM of having no plasma linking conductors or blankets. The T-windings provide rotational transformation in toroidal angle of the outer poloidal field lines, in effect creating a reversed B/sub Toroidal/ Spheromak or adding average B/sub T/ to the FRM producing higher shear, increased limiting ..beta.., and possibly greater stability to kinks and tilt. The presence of field ripple in the toroidal direction may be sufficient to inhibit cancellation of directed ion current by electron drag to allow steady state operation with the toroidal as well as poloidal current maintained by neutral beams.

  8. Polarimetric Investigations of Stellar Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachikian, E. Ye.; Eritsian, M. A.; Hovhannessian, R. Kh.

    2002-07-01

    The degree of polarization of light from stars in 44 O B associations as a function of interstellar absorption is investigated. It is shown that the character of the dependence of P on A V for stars in associations and stars not in associations depends on the value of A V: for A V 2 m .5 it has a linear character and is the same for both groups of stars. For A V > 2 m .5 the dependence of P on A V for stars in and not in associations departs from linearity and for A V = 4 m .5 it reaches P ass = 1.8% and P nonass = 1%, respectively. Such a difference is explained by the additional depolarization in stellar associations. Such strong depolarization in associations may be due to the overall magnetic field of the Galaxy and to physical peculiarities in the association itself.

  9. Pumping the stellar hydroxyl maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Dale F.

    1987-01-01

    IRAS far-IR flux data for 163 OH maser stars were analyzed to quantify the contributions 35 and 53 microns inversions make to pumping of the hydroxyl maser. The 35 microns transition is from the 3,3 ground state to the 1,5 rotationally excited level and subsequent decay; the 53 microns transition is a change from the ground state to the 1,3 excited level and relaxation. The stars examined included Mira, short period semi-regular and long-period semi-regular variables. Both transition lines had rough parity in contributing to the approximately 8 percent pumping efficiency at 1612 MHz. However, the individual contributions of the lines could not be determined for the stellar population studied.

  10. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  11. Galactic evolution. I - Single-zone models. [encompassing stellar evolution and gas-star dynamic theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, T. X.; Hart, M. H.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The two basic approaches of physical theory required to calculate the evolution of a galactic system are considered, taking into account stellar evolution theory and the dynamics of a gas-star system. Attention is given to intrinsic (stellar) physics, extrinsic (dynamical) physics, and computations concerning the fractionation of an initial mass of gas into stars. The characteristics of a 'standard' model and its variants are discussed along with the results obtained with the aid of these models.

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR INCLINATIONS FOR KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period P{sub s} inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin I{sub s} and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination I{sub s} of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination I{sub s} can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations I{sub s} for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with I{sub s} 90 Degree-Sign suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small I{sub s} for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  13. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Winn, Joshua N.; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi

    2012-09-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period Ps inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity Vsin Is and stellar radius obtained by a high-resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination Is of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line of sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination Is can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) systems, whose light curves show periodic flux variations. Detailed analyses of their light curves and spectra revealed that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations Is for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with Is = 90° suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small Is for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.

  14. Ambitious Survey Spots Stellar Nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    -dimensional geometry of the Magellanic system. Chris Evans from the VMC team adds: "The VISTA images will allow us to extend our studies beyond the inner regions of the Tarantula into the multitude of smaller stellar nurseries nearby, which also harbour a rich population of young and massive stars. Armed with the new, exquisite infrared images, we will be able to probe the cocoons in which massive stars are still forming today, while also looking at their interaction with older stars in the wider region." The wide-field image shows a host of different objects. The bright area above the centre is the Tarantula Nebula itself, with the RMC 136 cluster of massive stars in its core. To the left is the NGC 2100 star cluster. To the right is the tiny remnant of the supernova SN1987A (eso1032). Below the centre are a series of star-forming regions including NGC 2080 - nicknamed the "Ghost Head Nebula" - and the NGC 2083 star cluster. The VISTA Magellanic Cloud Survey is one of six huge near-infrared surveys of the southern sky that will take up most of the first five years of operations of VISTA. Notes [1] VISTA ― the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy ― is the newest telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. VISTA is a survey telescope working at near-infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest survey telescope. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. The telescope is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 m across. In photographic terms it can be thought of as a 67-megapixel digital camera with a 13 000 mm f/3.25 mirror lens. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries

  15. SME@XSEDE: An automated spectral synthesis tool for stellar characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, Leslie; Cargile, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, large scale discovery surveys like Kepler have produced vast catalogs of newly discovered extrasolar planetary systems. Most of these systems require stellar characterization of the host stars in order to derive the host star masses and completely solve for the planetary properties. Currently, there is no widely accepted and standardized method to determine fundamental parameters from stellar spectra. Here, we present a new approach to automating stellar characterization of large datasets of high resolution spectra. Our software, called SME@XSEDE, is based on one of the most widely used spectral synthesis algorithms, Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), originally described in Valenti and Piskanov (1996). Like SME, SME@XSEDE compares an observed spectrum to synthetic model spectra derived through radiative transfer calculations for a range of stellar parameters in order to find the global stellar properties (temperature, gravity, metallicity, vsini, and individual abundances) that result in a synthetic spectrum that best matches an observed spectrum. We use the XSEDE super computer cluster to run many sets of initial guesses of stellar parameters to determine robust SME-based solutions without extensive, hands-on work. In this paper, we describe our software in detail and compare results derived from the application of SME@XSEDE to several well-studied datasets of stellar parameters including Valenti and Fischer 2005, Torres et al. 2012, and Huber et al 2013.

  16. Stellar mass and population diagnostics of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.

    2013-12-01

    We conduct a broad investigation about stellar mass and population diagnostics in order to formulate novel constraints related to the formation and evolution of galaxies from a nearby cluster environment. Our work is powered by the use of stellar population models which transform galaxy colours and/or absorption line strengths into estimates of its stellar properties. As input to such models, we assemble an extensive compilation of age and chemical abundance information for Galactic globular clusters. This compilation allows a confident expansion of these models into new regions of parameter space that promise to refine our knowledge of galactic chemical evolution. We then draw upon a state-of-the-art spectroscopic and photometric survey of the Virgo galaxy cluster in order to constrain spatial variations of the stellar ages, metallicities, and masses within its member galaxies, and their dynamical masses. We interpret these data in the context of the histories of star formation, chemical enrichment, and stellar mass assembly to formulate a broad picture of the build-up of this cluster's content over time. In it, the giant early-type galaxies formed through highly dissipational processes at early times that built up most of their stellar mass and drew significant amounts of dark matter within their optical radii. Conversely, dwarf early-types experienced environmental processes that quenched their star formation during either the early stages of cluster assembly or upon infall at later times. Somewhat perplexing is our finding that the internal dynamics of these galaxies are largely explained by their stellar masses. Lastly, Virgo spirals also suffer from their dense environment, through ram pressure stripping and/or tidal harrassment. In addition to quenching, these effects leave an imprint on their internal dynamical evolution too. Late-type spirals exhibit evidence of having ejected significant amounts of baryons from their inner regions, likely via energetic

  17. Predicting Fundamental Stellar Parameters From Photometric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Adam; Richards, J.; Bloom, J. S.; a larger Team

    2014-01-01

    We present a new machine-learning-based framework for the prediction of the fundamental stellar parameters, Teff, log g, and [Fe/H], based on the photometric light curves of variable stellar sources. The method was developed following a systematic spectroscopic survey of stellar variability. Variable sources were selected from repeated Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations of Stripe 82, and spectroscopic observations were obtained with Hectospec on the 6.5-m Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, spectra were obtained for ~9000 stellar variables (including ~3000 from the SDSS archive), for which we measured Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] using the Segue Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). Examining the full sample of ~67k variables in Stripe 82, we show that the vast majority of photometric variables are consistent with main-sequence stars, even after restricting the search to high galactic latitudes. From the spectroscopic sample we confirm that most of these stellar variables are G and K dwarfs, though there is a bias in the output of the SSPP that prevents the identification of M type variables. We are unable to identify the dominant source of variability for these stars, but eclipsing systems and/or star spots are the most likely explanation. We develop a machine-learning model that can determine Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] without obtaining a spectrum. Instead, the random-forest-regression model uses SDSS color information and light-curve features to infer stellar properties. We detail how the feature set is pruned and the model is optimized to produce final predictions of Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] with a typical scatter of 165 K, 0.42 dex, and 0.33 dex, respectively. We further show that for the subset of variables with at least 50 observations in the g band the typical scatter reduces to 75 K, 0.19 dex, and 0.16 dex, respectively. We consider these results an important step on the path to the efficient and optimal extraction of information from future time

  18. Predicting Fundamental Stellar Parameters from Photometric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.

    We present a new machine learning based framework for the prediction of the fun- damental stellar parameters, Teff, logg, and [Fe/H], based on the photometric light curves of variable stellar sources. The method was developed following a systematic spectroscopic survey of stellar variability. Variable sources were selected from re- peated Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations of Stripe 82, and spectroscopic observations were obtained with Hectospec on the 6.5-m Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, spectra were obtained for ˜9,000 stellar variables (including ˜3,000 from the SDSS archive), for which we measured Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] using the Segue Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). Examining the full sample of ˜67,000 variables in Stripe 82, we show that the vast majority of photometric variables are consistent with main-sequence stars, even after restricting the search to high galactic latitudes. From the spectroscopic sample we confirm that most of these stellar variables are G and K dwarfs, though there is a bias in the output of the SSPP that prevents the identification of M type variables. We are unable to identify the dominant source of variability for these stars, but eclipsing systems and/or star spots are the most likely explanation. We develop a machine learning model that can determine Teff , log g, and [Fe/H] without obtaining a spectrum. Instead, the random forest regression model uses SDSS color information and light curve features to infer stellar properties. We detail how the feature set is pruned and the model is optimized to produce final predictions of Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] with a typical scatter of 165 K, 0.42 dex, and 0.33 dex, respectively. We further show that for the subset of variables with at least 50 observations in the g band the typical scatter reduces to 75 K, 0.19 dex, and 0.16 dex, respectively. We consider these results an important step on the path to the efficient and optimal extraction of information from future time

  19. MIUSCAT: extended MILES spectral coverage - I. Stellar population synthesis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazdekis, A.; Ricciardelli, E.; Cenarro, A. J.; Rivero-González, J. G.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.

    2012-07-01

    We extend the spectral range of our stellar population synthesis models based on the MILES and CaT empirical stellar spectral libraries. For this purpose, we combine these two libraries with the Indo-U.S. to construct composite stellar spectra to feed our models. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) computed with these models and the originally published models are combined to construct composite SEDs for single-age, single-metallicity stellar populations (SSPs) covering the range λλ3465-9469 Å at moderately high and uniform resolution (full width at half-maximum = 2.51 Å). The colours derived from these SSP SEDs provide good fits to Galactic globular cluster data. We find that the colours involving redder filters are very sensitive to the initial mass function (IMF), as well as a number of features and molecular bands throughout the spectra. To illustrate the potential use of these models, we focus on the Na I doublet at 8200 Å and with the aid of the newly synthesized SSP model SEDs, we define a new IMF-sensitive index that is based on this feature, which overcomes various limitations from previous index definitions for low-velocity dispersion stellar systems. We propose an index-index diagram based on this feature and the neighbouring Ca II triplet at 8600 Å, to constrain the IMF if the age and [Na/Fe] abundance are known. Finally we also show a survey-oriented spectrophotometric application which evidences the accurate flux calibration of these models for carrying out reliable spectral fitting techniques. These models are available through our user-friendly website.

  20. KEPLER MISSION STELLAR AND INSTRUMENT NOISE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Miglio, Andrea; Dunham, Edward W.; Argabright, Vic S.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Koch, David G.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Buzasi, Derek L.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Welsh, William F.

    2011-11-01

    Kepler mission results are rapidly contributing to fundamentally new discoveries in both the exoplanet and asteroseismology fields. The data returned from Kepler are unique in terms of the number of stars observed, precision of photometry for time series observations, and the temporal extent of high duty cycle observations. As the first mission to provide extensive time series measurements on thousands of stars over months to years at a level hitherto possible only for the Sun, the results from Kepler will vastly increase our knowledge of stellar variability for quiet solar-type stars. Here, we report on the stellar noise inferred on the timescale of a few hours of most interest for detection of exoplanets via transits. By design the data from moderately bright Kepler stars are expected to have roughly comparable levels of noise intrinsic to the stars and arising from a combination of fundamental limitations such as Poisson statistics and any instrument noise. The noise levels attained by Kepler on-orbit exceed by some 50% the target levels for solar-type, quiet stars. We provide a decomposition of observed noise for an ensemble of 12th magnitude stars arising from fundamental terms (Poisson and readout noise), added noise due to the instrument and that intrinsic to the stars. The largest factor in the modestly higher than anticipated noise follows from intrinsic stellar noise. We show that using stellar parameters from galactic stellar synthesis models, and projections to stellar rotation, activity, and hence noise levels reproduce the primary intrinsic stellar noise features.

  1. Stellar coronae from Einstein - Observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    Einstein Observatory observations of stellar X-ray emission are presented and their implications for the formation of stellar coronae and the problem of stellar angular momentum loss are discussed. Solar coronal X-ray observations and observations of stellar coronae made prior to Einstein are reviewed, and it is noted that they already suggest that the standard theory of acoustic coronal heating is inadequate. The principal results of the Einstein/CfA stellar survey are summarized, with attention given to variations of the level of X-ray flux detected along the main sequence, the decline of X-ray flux with increasing age of giants and supergiants, and indications of a large range of X-ray emission levels within a given type, which are clearly incompatible with models for acoustic flux generation. A new theory to explain stellar coronae and hence X-ray emission from them is then proposed in which stellar magnetic fields play the key role in determining the level of coronal emission, and the modulation of the surface magnetic flux level and the level of stressing of surface magnetic fields essentially determine the variation of mean coronal activity in the H-R diagram.

  2. Adiabatic invariants in stellar dynamics. 1: Basic concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    The adiabatic criterion, widely used in astronomical dynamics, is based on the harmonic oscillator. It asserts that the change in action under a slowly varying perturbation is exponentially small. Recent mathematical results that precisely define the conditions for invariance show that this model does not apply in general. In particular, a slowly varying perturbation may cause significant evolution stellar dynamical systems even if its time scale is longer than any internal orbital time scale. This additional 'heating' may have serious implications for the evolution of star clusters and dwarf galaxies which are subject to long-term environmental forces. The mathematical developments leading to these results are reviewed, and the conditions for applicability to and further implications for stellar systems are discussed. Companion papers present a computational method for a general time-dependent disturbance and detailed example.

  3. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  4. Stellar activity cycles and asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.

    2011-12-01

    The success of helioseismology is due to its capability to accurately measure the p-mode parameters of the solar eigenmode spectrum, which allow us to infer unique information about the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun from its surface all the way down to the core. It has contributed greatly to a clearer understanding of the Sun and provided insights into the complex solar magnetism, by means for instance of the variability of the characteristics of the p-mode spectrum. Indeed, variations in the mean strength of the solar magnetic field lead to significant shifts in the frequencies of even the lowest-degree p modes with high levels of correlation with solar surface activity proxies. These frequency shifts are explained to arise from structural changes in the outer layers of the Sun during the 11-year activity cycle, which is understood to be driven by a dynamo process. However, clear differences between p-mode frequencies and solar surface activity during the unusually extended minimum of cycle 23 were observed. The origin of the p-mode variability is thus far from being properly understood and a better comprehension of its relationship with solar and stellar activity cycles will help us in our understanding of the dynamo processes. Spectroscopic measurements of Ca H and K emission lines revealed magnetic activity variations in a large sample of solar-type stars with timescales ranging from 2.5 and 25 years. This broad range of cycle periods is thought to reflect differences in the rotational properties and the depths of the surface convection zones with various masses and ages. However, spectroscopic measurements are only good proxies of surface magnetic fields. The recent discovery of variations with magnetic activity in the p-mode oscillation frequencies of the solar-like star HD 49933 observed by CoRoT, with a frequency dependence comparable in shape to the one observed in the Sun, opens a new era in the study of the physical phenomena involved in the

  5. Model atmospheres and fundamental stellar parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plez, B.

    2013-11-01

    I start by illustrating the need for precise and accurate fundamental stellar parameters through there examples: lithium abundances in metal-poor stars, the derivation of stellar ages from isochrones, and the chemical composition of planet-hosting stars. I present widely used methods (infrared flux method, spectroscopy) in the determination of T_{eff}, and log g. I comment upon difficulties encountered with the determination of stellar parameters of red supergiant stars, and I discuss the impact of non-LTE and 3D hydrodynamical effects.

  6. High angular resolution stellar imaging with occultations from the Cassini spacecraft - II. Kronocyclic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Lloyd, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We present an advance in the use of Cassini observations of stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn for stellar studies. Stewart et al. demonstrated the potential use of such observations for measuring stellar angular diameters. Here, we use these same observations, and tomographic imaging reconstruction techniques, to produce two-dimensional images of complex stellar systems. We detail the determination of the basic observational reference frame. A technique for recovering model-independent brightness profiles for data from each occulting edge is discussed, along with the tomographic combination of these profiles to build an image of the source star. Finally, we demonstrate the technique with recovered images of the α Centauri binary system and the circumstellar environment of the evolved late-type giant star, Mira.

  7. Peculiar Transients as Probes of Stellar Evolution and Mass-Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drout, Maria; Berger, Edo; Pan-STARRS1 CFA/JHU Transient Team

    2016-01-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of supernovae not only probe the explosion mechanism, but also carry information about the configuration of the star at the moment of collapse and the mass-loss history of the progenitor system in the years immediately preceding its death. The study of supernovae therefore offers us one of our only observational views of the final stages of stellar evolution. As a result, the discovery by wide-field dedicated surveys of new classes of astronomical transients at an ever-increasing rate has both expanded the types of stellar systems that we can directly probe and challenged some of our existing views of how these uncertain final stages proceed. In this talk I will discuss my thesis work on several types of new and peculiar astronomical transients and what their properties, intrinsic rates, and explosion environments are teaching us about stellar evolution and stellar death.

  8. DISENTANGLING PLANETS AND STELLAR ACTIVITY FOR GLIESE 667C

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2014-10-01

    Gliese 667C is an M1.5V star with a multi-planet system, including planet candidates in the habitable zone. The exact number of planets in the system is unclear, because the existing radial velocity (RV) measurements are known to contain contributions from stellar magnetic activity. Following our analysis of Gliese 581, we have analyzed the effect of stellar activity on the HARPS/HARPS-TERRA RVs of GJ 667C, finding a significant RV-activity correlation when using the width (FWHM) of the HARPS cross-correlation function to trace the magnetic activity. When we correct for this correlation, we confirm the detections of the previously observed planets b and c in the system, while simultaneously ascribing the RV signal near 90 days ({sup p}lanet d{sup )} to an artifact of the stellar rotation. We are unable to confirm the existence of the additional RV periodicities described in Anglada-Escudé et al. in our activity-corrected data.

  9. Stellar Pulsations Excited by Planetary Tides in WASP-33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew; Guenther, E.; Matthews, J. M.; Amado, P. J.; McDonald, I.; Shkolnik, E.; Smith, A. M. S.; Telting, J.; Walker, G. A. H.; MOST Science Team

    2011-09-01

    The bright, rapidly-rotating A5 star HD 15082 (= WASP-33) has a transiting gas-giant planet in a 1.22-day retrograde orbit, only 5.5 stellar radii from the stellar photosphere (Collier Cameron et al 2010, MNRAS 407, 507). Time-resolved spectra of the system during several transits revealed a complex pattern of non-radial pulsations of the gamma Dor and/or delta Scuti type. The extreme proximity of the planet to the host star raises the possibility that some of these pulsation modes could be excited by planetary tides (Herrero et al 2011 A&A 526, L10). The system was observed continuously by the MOST satellite(*) from 2010 October 07.0 to October 31.0. The MOST data establish the frequency spectrum of the stellar pulsations, providing a direct test of theories of planetary tidal evolution via excitation of inertial waves in the host star. The ellipsoidal variation of the host star places limits on the mass of the planet. During the MOST run, a ground-based support campaign of time-resolved echelle spectroscopy yielded tomographic data sets suitable for mode identification and precise determination of the orientation of the planet's orbit. (*) MOST is a Canadian Space Agency mission, operated by Microsat Systems Canada Inc. (formerly the space division of Dynacon Inc.), the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with support from the University of Vienna.

  10. Self-gravity, Resonances, and Orbital Diffusion in Stellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, Jean-Baptiste; Binney, James; Pichon, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    Fluctuations in a stellar system's gravitational field cause the orbits of stars to evolve. The resulting evolution of the system can be computed with the orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation once the diffusion tensor is known. We present the formalism that enables one to compute the diffusion tensor from a given source of noise in the gravitational field when the system's dynamical response to that noise is included. In the case of a cool stellar disk we are able to reduce the computation of the diffusion tensor to a one-dimensional integral. We implement this formula for a tapered Mestel disk that is exposed to shot noise and find that we are able to explain analytically the principal features of a numerical simulation of such a disk. In particular the formation of narrow ridges of enhanced density in action space is recovered. As the disk's value of Toomre's Q is reduced and the disk becomes more responsive, there is a transition from a regime of heating in the inner regions of the disk through the inner Lindblad resonance to one of radial migration of near-circular orbits via the corotation resonance in the intermediate regions of the disk. The formalism developed here provides the ideal framework in which to study the long-term evolution of all kinds of stellar disks.

  11. Planetary transits and stellar variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the detection of extrasolar planets via the transit method, and more specifically addresses issues relevant to the preparation of upcoming space missions such as CoRoT, Kepler, Eddington, aiming to detect terrestrial planets. The automated detection of transits in tens of thousands of noisy light curves is a challenging task because of the brief, shallow and rare nature of the sought-after signal. I developed a Bayesian transit detection algorithm and tested it through Monte Carlo simulations. This led to a number of improvements to the algorithm, resulting in a maximum likelihood box-fitting approach that is simpler and, for detection purposes, more effective. I also developed an empirical model of the intrinsic micro-variability of the parent stars, which constitutes one of the main performance limitations for space-based transit searches, and used this model to optimise variability filters. These tools were used to identify optimal regions of the stellar parameter space to be targeted by missions such as CoRoT and Eddington, through Monte Carlo simulations and participation in the first CoRoT blind transit detection exercise. Recently, the same tools have been used to analyse ground-based data from the University of New South Wales planet search project, leading to the identification of several potential transiting planet candidates.

  12. Monoenergetic Neutrons for Stellar Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosconi, M.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Mengoni, A.; Nolte, R.

    2009-09-01

    With modern techniques, neutron-capture cross sections can be determined with uncertainties of a few percent. However, Maxwellian averaged cross sections calculated from such data require a correction (because low-lying excited states are thermally populated in the hot stellar photon bath) which has to be determined by theoretical calculations. These calculations can be improved with information from indirect measurements, in particular by the inelastic scattering cross section. For low-lying levels, the inelastically scattered neutrons are difficult to separate from the dominant elastic channel. This problem is best solved by means of pulsed, monoenergetic neutron beams. For this reason, a pulsed beam of 30 keV neutrons with an energy spread of 7 to 9 keV FWHM and a width from 10 to 15 ns has been produced at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe using the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction directly at the reaction threshold. With this neutron beam the inelastic scattering cross section of the first excited level at 9.75 keV in 187Os was determined with a relative uncertainty of 6%. The use of monoenergetic neutron beams has been further pursued at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig, including the 3H(p, n)3He reaction for producing neutrons with an energy of 64 keV.

  13. Fred's Contributions to Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestel, L.

    2003-07-01

    Fred began work on stellar structure after Hans Bethe and Carl-Friedrich von Weizsäcker had independently established that the thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen into helium is the primary source of the energy radiated by the Sun and other main sequence stars. A joint paper with Ray Lyttleton included this temperature-sensitive process explicitly in the energy equation, effectively vindicating the essentials of the theory of homogeneous gaseous stars presented in Sir Arthur Eddington's celebrated monograph `The Internal Constitution of the Stars'. Agreement with the solar luminosity can be obtained with two alternative values for the hydrogen content. In a subsequent paper, Fred argued convincingly in favour of the case with a very high rather than a moderate fraction of hydrogen. An epoch-making joint paper with Martin Schwarzschild followed the evolution of a low mass star through nuclear processing, from the main sequence into the giant domain in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The slowly growing, burnt-out core becomes degenerate and nearly isothermal, while the photospheric boundary condition forces the expanding envelope to become largely convective. At the top of the giant branch, the degenerate core becomes hot enough for the fusion of helium into carbon; the consequent secular instability, noted first in studies of white dwarfs, brings the star down to the `horizontal branch', the location of the short-period globular cluster Cepheids. Two subsequent papers with Brian Haselgrove studied in further detail the structure of both main sequence and giant stars.

  14. Evidence for Strange Stellar Family (Artist Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This artist concept depicts a quadruple-star system called HD 98800. The system is approximately 10 million years old, and is located 150 light-years away in the constellation TW Hydrae.

    HD 98800 contains four stars, which are paired off into doublets, or binaries. The stars in the binary pairs orbit around each other, and the two pairs also circle each other like choreographed ballerinas. One of the stellar pairs, called HD 98800B, has a disk of dust around it, while the other pair does not.

    Although the four stars are gravitationally bound, the distance separating the two binary pairs is about 50 astronomical units (AU) -- slightly more than the average distance between our sun and Pluto.

    Using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists finally have a detailed view of HD 98800B's potential planet-forming disk. Astronomers used the telescope's infrared spectrometer to detect the presence of two belts in the disk made of large dust grains. One belt sits approximately 5.9 AU away from the central binary, or about the distance from the sun to Jupiter, and is likely made up of asteroids and comets. The other belt sits at 1.5 to 2 AU, comparable to the area where Mars and the asteroid belt sit, and is made up of sand-sized dust grains.

  15. Mergers and Obliquities in Stellar Triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoz, Smadar; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-10-01

    Many close stellar binaries are accompanied by a faraway star. The "eccentric Kozai-Lidov" (EKL) mechanism can cause dramatic inclination and eccentricity fluctuations, resulting in tidal tightening of inner binaries of triple stars. We run a large set of Monte Carlo simulations, including the secular evolution of the orbits, general relativistic precession, and tides, and we determine the semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and spin-orbit angle distributions of the final configurations. We find that the efficiency of forming tight binaries (lsim 16 days) when taking the EKL mechanism into account is ~21%, and about 4% of all simulated systems ended up in a merger event. These merger events can lead to the formation of blue stragglers. Furthermore, we find that the spin-orbit angle distribution of the inner binaries carries a signature of the initial setup of the system; thus, observations can be used to disentangle close binaries' birth configuration. The resulting inner and outer final orbits' period distributions and their estimated fraction suggest that secular dynamics may be a significant channel for the formation of close binaries in triples and even blue stragglers.

  16. KINEMATICS OF STELLAR POPULATIONS IN POSTSTARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hiner, Kyle D.; Canalizo, Gabriela E-mail: khiner@astro-udec.cl

    2015-01-20

    Poststarburst galaxies host a population of early-type stars (A or F) but simultaneously lack indicators of ongoing star formation such as [O II] emission. Two distinct stellar populations have been identified in these systems: a young poststarburst population superimposed on an older host population. We present a study of nine poststarburst galaxies with the following objectives: (1) to investigate whether and how kinematical differences between the young and old populations of stars can be measured, and (2) to gain insight into the formation mechanism of the young population in these systems. We fit high signal-to-noise spectra with two independent populations in distinct spectral regions: the Balmer region, the Mg IB region, and the Ca triplet when available. We show that the kinematics of the two populations largely track one another if measured in the Balmer region with high signal-to-noise data. Results from examining the Faber-Jackson relation and the fundamental plane indicate that these objects are not kinematically disturbed relative to more evolved spheroids. A case study of the internal kinematics of one object in our sample shows it to be pressure supported and not rotationally dominated. Overall our results are consistent with merger-induced starburst scenarios where the young population is observed during the later stages of the merger.

  17. Mergers and obliquities in stellar triples

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-10-01

    Many close stellar binaries are accompanied by a faraway star. The 'eccentric Kozai-Lidov' (EKL) mechanism can cause dramatic inclination and eccentricity fluctuations, resulting in tidal tightening of inner binaries of triple stars. We run a large set of Monte Carlo simulations, including the secular evolution of the orbits, general relativistic precession, and tides, and we determine the semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and spin-orbit angle distributions of the final configurations. We find that the efficiency of forming tight binaries (≲ 16 days) when taking the EKL mechanism into account is ∼21%, and about 4% of all simulated systems ended up in a merger event. These merger events can lead to the formation of blue stragglers. Furthermore, we find that the spin-orbit angle distribution of the inner binaries carries a signature of the initial setup of the system; thus, observations can be used to disentangle close binaries' birth configuration. The resulting inner and outer final orbits' period distributions and their estimated fraction suggest that secular dynamics may be a significant channel for the formation of close binaries in triples and even blue stragglers.

  18. Radial velocity fitting challenge. I. Simulating the data set including realistic stellar radial-velocity signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Stellar signals are the main limitation for precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements. These signals arise from the photosphere of the stars. The m s-1 perturbation created by these signals prevents the detection and mass characterization of small-mass planetary candidates such as Earth-twins. Several methods have been proposed to mitigate stellar signals in RV measurements. However, without precisely knowing the stellar and planetary signals in real observations, it is extremely difficult to test the efficiency of these methods. Aims: The goal of the RV fitting challenge is to generate simulated RV data including stellar and planetary signals and to perform a blind test within the community to test the efficiency of the different methods proposed to recover planetary signals despite stellar signals. Methods: In this first paper, we describe the simulation used to model the measurements of the RV fitting challenge. Each simulated planetary system includes the signals from instrumental noise, stellar oscillations, granulation, supergranulation, stellar activity, and observed and simulated planetary systems. In addition to RV variations, this simulation also models the effects of instrumental noise and stellar signals on activity observables obtained by HARPS-type high-resolution spectrographs, that is, the calcium activity index log (R'HK) and the bisector span and full width at half maximum of the cross-correlation function. Results: We publish the 15 systems used for the RV fitting challenge including the details about the planetary systems that were injected into each of them. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Parana Observatory, ESO (Chile), with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope.The simulated data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A5 and at the wiki of the RV fitting challenge http://https://rv-challenge.wikispaces.com.

  19. Stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Fender, Rob; Belloni, Tomaso

    2012-08-01

    We review the likely population, observational properties, and broad implications of stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources. We focus on the clear empirical rules connecting accretion and outflow that have been established for stellar-mass black holes in binary systems in the past decade and a half. These patterns of behavior are probably the keys that will allow us to understand black hole feedback on the largest scales over cosmological time scales. PMID:22859481

  20. Stellar Mass Distributions in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, D.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2011-01-01

    We present the radial distributions of the stellar mass and the star formation histories for a large sample of dwarf irregular galaxies assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/index.html). Specifically, utilizing the multi-band data including FUV/NUV/UBV/Hα/3.6μm, and with the CB07 stellar population synthesis models, we analyze the variations of the SEDs as a function of radius. By studying the relationship between the stellar mass, star formation histories, star formation and HI gas, we will discuss the possible star formation modes and the roles played by the stellar mass and gas in determining the star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies in general. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation (AST-0707563).

  1. Diagnostics for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Stratton; D. Johnson; R. Feder; E. Fredrickson; H. Neilson; H. Takahashi; M. Zarnstorf; M. Cole; P. Goranson; E. Lazarus; B. Nelson

    2003-09-16

    The status of planning of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) diagnostics is presented, with the emphasis on resolution of diagnostics access issues and on diagnostics required for the early phases of operation.

  2. Stellar populations in the ELT perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, G.; Braga, V. F.; Fabrizio, M.; Gilmozzi, R.; Buonanno, R.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Milone, A.; Nonino, M.; Pulone, L.; Stetson, P. B.; Thevénin, F.; Walker, A. R.

    We discuss the impact that the next generation of Extremeley Large Telescopes will have on the open astrophysical problems of resolved stellar populations. In particular, we address the interplay between multiband photometry and spectroscopy.

  3. SAGA: Stellar Abundances for Galatic Archeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, T.

    A tutorial for the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database is presented. This paper describes the outline of the database, reports the current status of the data compilation and known problems, and presents plans for future updates and extensions.

  4. The Zeeman effect in stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.

    A short biography of Pieter Zeeman is presented. The main formulae for the normal, anomalous, quadratic Zeeman effects and Paschen-Back effect are given. Instrumentation for Zeeman effect measurements in stellar spectra is described, the most important scientific achievements in magnetic stars investigations with the world's largest telescopes for 50 years are demonstrated. The devices for magnetic measurements made at SAO and the main results of stellar magnetic observations obtained with the 6 m telescope are described in detail.

  5. Disks around Massive Young Stellar Objects: Are They Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhibo; Tamura, Motohide; Hoare, Melvin G.; Yao, Yongqiang; Ishii, Miki; Fang, Min; Yang, Ji

    2008-02-01

    We present K-band polarimetric images of several massive young stellar objects at resolutions ~0.1''-0.5''. The polarization vectors around these sources are nearly centrosymmetric, indicating they are dominating the illumination of each field. Three out of the four sources show elongated low-polarization structures passing through the centers, suggesting the presence of polarization disks. These structures and their surrounding reflection nebulae make up bipolar outflow/disk systems, supporting the collapse/accretion scenario as their low-mass siblings. In particular, S140 IRS 1 shows well-defined outflow cavity walls and a polarization disk which matches the direction of previously observed equatorial disk wind, thus confirming that the polarization disk is actually the circumstellar disk. To date, a dozen massive protostellar objects show evidence for the existence of disks; our work adds additional samples around massive young stellar objects equivalent to early B type stars.

  6. Understanding the size growth of massive galaxies through stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    The growth of massive galaxies remains an open problem. The observational evidence seems to converge on a two-stage scenario, where a compact massive core is formed during an early, intense burst, followed by a more extended process of mass and size growth at intermediate redshift (z<2). This talk focuses on the latter, exploring the growth of massive galaxies through a detailed analysis of the stellar populations in close pairs, to study their formation history. Two surveys are explored (SHARDS and GAMA), probing the stellar populations of pre-merging systems out to z~1.3, and down to a mass ratio ~1:100. We will compare the results between medium band spectral fitting (SHARDS) and those from a more targeted analysis of line strengths in the GAMA data. The combination of the two datasets provide a unique insight of the growth channel of massive galaxies via mergers.

  7. Ubiquitous time variability of integrated stellar populations.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Choi, Jieun

    2015-11-26

    Long-period variable stars arise in the final stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. They have periods of up to about 1,000 days and amplitudes that can exceed a factor of three in the I-band flux. These stars pulsate predominantly in their fundamental mode, which is a function of mass and radius, and so the pulsation periods are sensitive to the age of the underlying stellar population. The overall number of long-period variables in a population is directly related to their lifetimes, which is difficult to predict from first principles because of uncertainties associated with stellar mass-loss and convective mixing. The time variability of these stars has not previously been taken into account when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies. Here we construct time-dependent stellar population models that include the effects of long-period variable stars, and report the ubiquitous detection of this expected 'pixel shimmer' in the massive metal-rich galaxy M87. The pixel light curves display a variety of behaviours. The observed variation of 0.1 to 1 per cent is very well matched to the predictions of our models. The data provide a strong constraint on the properties of variable stars in an old and metal-rich stellar population, and we infer that the lifetime of long-period variables in M87 is shorter by approximately 30 per cent compared to predictions from the latest stellar evolution models. PMID:26570999

  8. The distribution of stellar populations within galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Novais, Patricia M.; Sodre, Laerte

    2015-08-01

    Stellar populations are a fossil record of several physical processes which occur in galaxies and their distribution within these objects may provide important clues on how they form and evolve. In this work we present some initial results of our approach to study the spatial distribution of stellar populations inside galaxies from their SDSS images. We used colours to estimate the age and then to obtain pixel-by-pixel proxies of the stellar populations and their distributions inside each galaxy. Our approach aims to obtain quantitative estimates on how the different stellar populations are distributed within a galaxy, bringing hints on how galaxies grow and evolve. The pixel-by-pixel analysis of a small sample shows that the stellar populations tend to evolve inside-out in spiral and late spiral galaxies, while the stellar populations of elliptical galaxies appear to have undergone other process of formation and evolution. These first results show that this approach is effective and will be explored and improved in future works, with the IFU-like data provided by the J-PAS and APLUS surveys.

  9. Stellar Parameter Determination Using Bayesian Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanayake, Gemunu B.; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions of stars covering the wavelength range from far UV to far IR can be used to derive stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and iron abundance) with a high reliability. For this purpose we are using a method based on Bayesian statistics, which make use of all available photometric data for a given star to construct stellar parameter probability distribution function (PDF) in order to determine the expectation values and their uncertainties in stellar parameters. The marginalized probabilities allow us to characterize the constraint for each parameter and estimate the influence of the quantity and quality of the photometric data on the resulting parameter values. We have obtained low resolution spectroscopy of blue horizontal branch, blue straggler and normal main sequence A, B, G and F stellar parameter standard stars using the McDonald observatory, 2.1m telescope to constrain both synthetic and empirical stellar libraries like Atlas9, MARCS, MILES and Pickles across a wide range in parameter space. This calibration process helps to evaluate the correlations between different stellar libraries and observed data especially in the UV part of the spectrum. When the calibration is complete the Bayesian analysis can be applied to large samples of data from GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS,WISE etc. We expect significant improvements to luminosity classification, distances and interstellar extinction using this technique.

  10. TRANSIT PROBABILITIES FOR STARS WITH STELLAR INCLINATION CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, Thomas G.; Seager, Sara

    2010-04-01

    The probability that an exoplanet transits its host star is high for planets in close orbits, but drops off rapidly for increasing semimajor axes. This makes transit surveys for planets with large semimajor axes orbiting bright stars impractical, since one would need to continuously observe hundreds of stars that are spread out over the entire sky. One way to make such a survey tractable is to constrain the inclination of the stellar rotation axes in advance, and thereby enhance the transit probabilities. We derive transit probabilities for stars with stellar inclination constraints, considering a reasonable range of planetary system inclinations. We find that stellar inclination constraints can improve the transit probability by almost an order of magnitude for habitable-zone planets. When applied to an ensemble of stars, such constraints dramatically lower the number of stars that need to be observed in a targeted transit survey. We also consider multiplanet systems where only one planet has an identified transit and derive the transit probabilities for the second planet assuming a range of mutual planetary inclinations.

  11. Research on stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Kotenko, V. G.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Nemov, V. V.; Ågren, O.; Noack, K.; Kalyuzhnyi, V. N.; Hagnestål, A.; Källne, J.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Garkusha, I. E.

    2014-09-01

    The development of a stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid concept is reviewed. The hybrid comprises of a fusion neutron source and a powerful sub-critical fast fission reactor core. The aim is the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and safe fission energy production. In its fusion part, neutrons are generated in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma, confined magnetically in a stellarator-type system with an embedded magnetic mirror. Based on kinetic calculations, the energy balance for such a system is analyzed. Neutron calculations have been performed with the MCNPX code, and the principal design of the reactor part is developed. Neutron outflux at different outer parts of the reactor is calculated. Numerical simulations have been performed on the structure of a magnetic field in a model of the stellarator-mirror device, and that is achieved by switching off one or two coils of toroidal field in the Uragan-2M torsatron. The calculations predict the existence of closed magnetic surfaces under certain conditions. The confinement of fast particles in such a magnetic trap is analyzed.

  12. Stellar X-ray Emission From Magnetically Funneled Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Hans

    be observed in cycle 9), a magnetic A0p star with an exceptionally soft X-ray spectrum. We have an established and working code to simulate high-resolution X-ray spectra emitted by shocks. This code was originally developed for accretion shocks on CTTS. We will fit a grid of models from this code to the observed spectra to deduce the shock properties, such as infall velocity, mass accretion rate and elemental composition. Specifically, we will 1) test for the existence of wind shocks in IQ Aur and, if confirmed, measure density, velocity, mass flow and distance to the stellar surface, 2) calculate the accretion density and rate on DN Tau (all previously modeled CTTS have higher masses, so a comparison shows how the accretion shock X-ray emission and thus the feedback on the disk depends on the stellar mass) and 3) analyze the X-ray properties of MN Lup, which has been Doppler-imaged in the past, to design a simultaneous X-ray/Doppler imaging campaign to pinpoint the accretion spots on the stellar surface. Through an analysis of X-ray data, this research characterizes the (high-energy) environment of planet formation and the interaction of different components in stellar systems (magnetic fields and plasma flows), which are two aspects of NASA's strategic goals.

  13. The SOHO-Stellar Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    I discusses practical aspects of the so-called "solar-stellar" connection; namely, the fundamental principles, the tools at the disposal of the stellar astronomer, and a few recent examples of the connection in action. I provide an overall evolutionary context for coronal activity, calling attention to the very different circumstances of low mass main sequence stars like the Sun, which are active mainly early in their lives; compared with more massive stars, whose coronally active phase occurs near the end of their lives, during their brief incursion into the cool half of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as yellow and then red giants. On the instrumental slide, I concentrate primarily on spectroscopy, in the ultraviolet and X-ray bands where coronae leave their most obvious signatures. I present an early glimpse of the type of moderate resolution spectra we can expect from the recently launched Chandra observatory, and contemporaneous HST STIS high-resolution UV measurements of the CXO calibration star Capella (alpha Aur; G8 III + G1 III). I compare STIS spectra of solar-type dwarfs-zeta Dor (F7 V), an active coronal source; and alpha Cen A (G2 V), a near twin of the Sun-to a trace obtained with the SOHO SUMER imaging UV spectrometer. I also compare STIS line profiles of the active coronal dwarf to the corresponding features in the mixed-activity "hybrid-chromosphere" bright giant alpha TrA (K2 II) and the archetype "noncoronal" red giant Arcturus (alpha Boo; K2 III). The latter shows dramatic evidence for a "cool absorber" in its outer atmosphere that is extinguishing the "hot lines" (like Si IV lambda1393 and N V lambda1238) below about 1500 A, probably through absorption in the Si I lambda1525 and C I lambda1240 photoionization continua. The disappearance of coronae across the "Linsky-Haisch" dividing line near K1 III thus apparently is promoted by a dramatic overturning in the outer atmospheric structure, namely the coronae of the red giants seem to lie beneath

  14. Magnetic Fields in Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Frank, Adam; Varniére, Peggy; Blackman, Eric G.

    2007-06-01

    Although several lines of evidence suggest that jets from young stars are driven magnetically from accretion disks, existing observations of field strengths in the bow shocks of these flows imply that magnetic fields play only a minor role in the dynamics at these locations. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we performed numerical simulations of expanding magnetized jets with stochastically variable input velocities with the AstroBEAR MHD code. Because the magnetic field B is proportional to the density n within compression and rarefaction regions, the magnetic signal speed drops in rarefactions and increases in the compressed areas of velocity-variable flows. In contrast, B~n0.5 for a steady state conical flow with a toroidal field, so the Alfvén speed in that case is constant along the entire jet. The simulations show that the combined effects of shocks, rarefactions, and divergent flow cause magnetic fields to scale with density as an intermediate power 1>p>0.5. Because p>0.5, the Alfvén speed in rarefactions decreases on average as the jet propagates away from the star. Hence, a typical Alfvén velocity in the jet close to the star is significantly larger than it is in the rarefactions ahead of bow shocks at larger distances. We find that the observed values of weak fields at large distances are consistent with strong fields required to drive the observed mass loss close to the star. Typical velocity perturbations, which form shocks at large distances, will produce only magnetic waves close to the star. For a typical stellar jet the crossover point inside which velocity perturbations of 30-40 km s-1 no longer produce shocks is ~300 AU from the source.

  15. The true stellar parameters of the Kepler target list

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, R.; Kolb, U.; Norton, A. J.

    2013-08-01

    Using population synthesis tools we create a synthetic Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC) and subject it to the Kepler Stellar Classification Program (SCP) method for determining stellar parameters such as the effective temperature Teff and surface gravity g. We achieve a satisfactory match between the synthetic KIC and the real KIC in the log g versus log Teff diagram, while there is a significant difference between the actual physical stellar parameters and those derived by the SCP of the stars in the synthetic sample. We find a median difference ΔTeff = +500 K and ˜Δlog g = -0.2 dex for main-sequence (MS) stars, and ˜ΔTeff = +50 K and Δlog g = -0.5 dex for giants, although there is a large variation across parameter space. For a MS star the median difference in g would equate to a ˜3 per cent increase in stellar radius and a consequent ˜3 per cent overestimate of the radius for any transiting exoplanet. We find no significant difference between ΔTeff and Δlog g for single stars and the primary star in a binary system. We also re-created the Kepler target selection method and found that the binary fraction is unchanged by the target selection. Binaries are selected in similar proportions to single star systems; the fraction of MS dwarfs in the sample increases from about 75 to 80 per cent, and the giant star fraction decreases from 25 to 20 per cent.

  16. A Dream of a Mission: Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe (SISP) is a mission to understand the various effects of magnetic fields of stars, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best-possible forecasting of solar activity on times scales ranging up to decades, and an understanding of the impact of stellar magnetic activity on astrobiology and life in the Universe. The road to that goal will revolutionize our understanding of stars and stellar systems, the building blocks of the Universe. SISP will zoom in on what today - with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool to astrophysics as fundamental as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SISP is an ultraviolet aperture-synthesis imager with 8-10 telescopes with meter-class apertures, and a central hub with focal-plane instrumentation that allows spectrophotometry in passbands as narrow as a few Angstroms up to hundreds of Angstroms. SISP will image stars and binaries with one hundred to one thousand resolution elements on their surface, and sound their interiors through asteroseismology to image internal structure, differential rotation, and large-scale circulations; this will provide accurate knowledge of stellar structure and evolution and complex transport processes, and will impact numerous branches of (astro)physics ranging from the Big Bang to the future of the Universe. Fitting naturally within the NASA long-term time line, SISP complements defined missions, and with them will show us entire other solar systems, from the central star to their orbiting planets.

  17. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, P. E.; Chen, Y. Q.; Carigi, L.; Schuster, W. J.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stars are important in many fields of astrophysics including nucleosynthesis, stellar structure, evolution of galaxies, and formation of planetary systems. Still, our knowledge of the abundances of these elements in different stellar populations is uncertain because of difficulties in observing and analyzing atomic and molecular lines of C and O. Aims: Abundances of C, O, and Fe are determined for F and G main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood with metallicities in the range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < +0.4 in order to study trends and possible systematic differences in the C/Fe, O/Fe, and C/O ratios for thin- and thick-disk stars as well as high- and low-alpha halo stars. In addition, we investigate if there is any connection between C and O abundances in stellar atmospheres and the occurrence of planets. Methods: Carbon abundances are determined from the λλ 5052,5380 C i lines and oxygen abundances from the λ7774 O i triplet and the forbidden [O i] line at 6300 Å. MARCS model atmospheres are applied and non-LTE corrections for the O i triplet are included. Results: Systematic differences between high- and low-alpha halo stars and between thin- and thick-disk stars are seen in the trends of [C/Fe] and [O/Fe]. The two halo populations and thick-disk stars show the same trend of [C/O] versus [O/H], whereas the thin-disk stars are shifted to higher [C/O] values. Furthermore, we find some evidence of higher C/O and C/Fe ratios in stars hosting planets than in stars for which no planets have been detected. Conclusions: The results suggest that C and O in both high- and low-alpha halo stars and in thick-disk stars are made mainly in massive (M> 8 M⊙) stars, whereas thin-disk stars have an additional carbon contribution from low-mass AGB and massive stars of high metallicity causing a rising trend of the C/O ratio with increasing metallicity. However, at the highest metallicities investigated ([Fe/H] ≃ + 0.4), C/O does not

  18. A LARGE STELLAR EVOLUTION DATABASE FOR POPULATION SYNTHESIS STUDIES. V. STELLAR MODELS AND ISOCHRONES WITH CNONa ABUNDANCE ANTICORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrinferni, Adriano; Cassisi, Santi; Salaris, Maurizio

    2009-05-20

    We present a new grid of stellar models and isochrones for old stellar populations, covering a large range of [Fe/H] values, for an heavy element mixture characterized by CNONa abundance anticorrelations as observed in Galactic globular cluster stars. The effect of this metal abundance pattern on the evolutionary properties of low-mass stars, from the main sequence to the horizontal branch phase, is analyzed. We perform comparisons between these new models, and our reference {alpha}-enhanced calculations, and discuss briefly implications for color-magnitude diagrams showing multiple main sequence or subgiant branches. A brief qualitative discussion of the effect of CN abundances on color-T {sub eff} transformations is also presented, highlighting the need to determine theoretical color transformations for the appropriate metal mixture, if one wants to interpret observations in the Stroemgren system, or broadband filters blueward of the Johnson V band.

  19. Progress in the engineering design of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    SciTech Connect

    Reiersen, W.T.; Brooks, A.; Brown, T.

    2000-01-21

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a proof-of-principle experiment whose objective is to demonstrate high beta operation in a quasi-axisymmetric stellarator. NCSX will be housed in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX-M) test cell. Many of the existing site assets including the test cell, TF and PF coils, power supplies, neutral beam heating systems, and site utilities can be re-used, minimizing the cost of the project. Saddle coils are used in the reference design. The stellarator core is pre-fabricated and dropped into place on the PBX-M platform. The existing TF and PF coils are then reassembled around the stellarator core. Alternate coil topologies are also being explored.

  20. ASTERIA: A CubeSat for Exoplanet Transit and Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Mary; Seager, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We present ASTERIA, a 6U CubeSat demonstrator for exoplanet transit photometry. ASTERIA, currently in development at JPL and due to be launched in mid to late 2016, is a testbed for a two-stage pointing system capable of <10 arcsecond pointing as well as active thermal control. These two features will allow ASTERIA to achieve very high photometric precision (<100 ppm) in a very small and cost effective package. ASTERIA will be used to search for transits of known RV planets as well as perform long duration, high cadence stellar photometry. The stellar photometry data will be used to study flares and stellar activity on a variety of stellar types. This presentation will focus on ASTERIA's science mission.