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Sample records for hypercoordinate silicon compounds

  1. On the nature of hypercoordination in dihalogenated perhalocyclohexasilanes.

    PubMed

    Vedha, Swaminathan Angeline; Solomon, Rajadurai Vijay; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2013-04-25

    Hypercoordination in silicon has long been reviewed. Dihalogenated perhalocyclohexasilane inverse sandwich complexes (ISCs) are the only group of hypercoordinate Si complexes with anion donors that contact six neutral silicon atoms; opening prospective applications in Si self-assembled nanostructures. Hypercoordinate bonds in 16 such ISCs were studied and their anion ring interactions have been understood with respect to halides. μ(6) mode of coordination was confirmed by the presence of 6 equivalent (3,-1) bond critical points through Bader's QTAIM perspective. The presence of Lewis acid sites above and below the flat Si rings were examined through a reduced density gradient (RDG) analysis, and the ability of halide anions (X' = F, Cl, Br, I) to hypercoordinate has been understood. Role of the ring halides (X) in tuning size and acidity of Lewis sites has been addressed. While the total interaction between the two anions and the ring is quantified through EDA, each SiX' hypercoordinate bond was identified as either purely ionic or transient through QTAIM computations. CDA shows that these complexes are of donor-acceptor type with significant back-donation. The analysis shows that BrF' and IF' were found to reach maximum covalency within the group. Hence in future, tuning these ISCs for construction of nanocrystalline Si structures for optoelectronic properties can essentially utilize the collective, weak yet hypercoordinate Si in these complexes. PMID:23530734

  2. Compounding with Silicones.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1940s, methylchlorosilanes have been used to treat glassware to prevent blood from clotting. The use of silicones in pharmaceutical and medical applications has grown to where today they are used in many life-saving devices (pacemakers, hydrocephalic shunts) and pharmaceutical applications from tubing, to excipients in topical formulations, to adhesives to affix transdermal drug delivery systems, and are also being used in products as active pharmaceutical ingredients, such as antiflatulents. About 60% of today's skin-care products now contain some type of silicone where they are considered safe and are known to provide a pleasant "silky-touch," non-greasy, and non-staining feel. Silicones exhibit many useful characteristics, and the safety of these agents supports their numerous applications; their biocompatibility is partially due to their low-chemical reactivity displayed by silicones, low-surface energy, and their hydrophobicity. Silicones are used both as active ingredients and as excipients. In addition is their use for "siliconization," or surface treatment, of many parenteral packaging components. Dimethicone and silicone oil are used as lubricants on stoppers to aid machineability, in syringes to aid piston movement, or on syringe needles to reduce pain upon injection. Silicones are also useful in pharmaceutical compounding as is discussed in this artiele included with this article are in developing formulations with silicones. PMID:26714363

  3. Silicon compounds in the Jupiter atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howland, G.; Harteck, P.; Reeves, R. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The formation of colored silicon compounds under nonequilibrium conditions is discussed with reference to the composition of the Jupiter atmosphere. It is shown that many of these reactions produce strongly colored intermediates that are relatively stable and similar in appearance to those observed on Jupiter. It is suggested that the silicon compounds could substantially contribute to the colors observed on Jupiter. The colored intermediates may be the result of relatively rapid amorphous silicon monoxide formation in vertical atmospheric currents in the region near the red spot and in the red spot itself.

  4. [Biological function of some elements and their compounds. IV. Silicon, silicon acids, silicones].

    PubMed

    Puzanowska-Tarasiewicz, Helena; Kuźmicka, Ludmiła; Tarasiewicz, Mirosław

    2009-11-01

    The review is devoted for the occurance, meaning of silicon and their compounds, especially silicon acids and silicones. Silicon participates in biosynthesis of collagen, the basic component of connective tissue. It strengthens and makes the walls of blood vessels more flexible, diminishes capillaries permeability, accelerates healing processes, has a sebostatic activity, strengthens hair and nails. This element has a beneficial effect on phosphorylation of proteins saccharides, and nucleotides. It is also essential for the formation of cytoskeleton and other cellular structures of mechanical or supportive function. Silicon is an initial substrate for obtaining silicones. These are synthetic polymers, in which silicon atoms are bound by oxygen bridges. They are used in almost all kinds of products due to their most convenient physical and chemical properties: moistening and film-forming, giving liquid form increasing solubility. Silicon acids form colloid gel, silica gel, with absorptive abilities, like active carbon. PMID:19999810

  5. Compound FDTD method for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyaee, Abbas; Hamadani, Farzad T.

    2011-09-01

    Attempt to manufacture photonics devices on silicon requires theoretical and numerical prediction. This essay presents Compound FDTD (C-FDTD) method for comprehensive simulation of silicon photonics devices. Although this method is comprehensive, it maintains conventional Yee algorithm. The method involves variation of refractive index due to nonlinear effects. With the help of this simulator, refractive index change due to free-carriers created through two photon absorption and Kerr effect in silicon waveguide is considered. Results indicate how to choose pump pulse shape to optimum operation of active photonics devices. Also conductivity variation of Si waveguide due to change in free-carrier density is studied. By considering variations in conductivity profile, we are able to design better schemes for sweep free carriers away with reverse bias or nonlinear photovoltaic effect for fast devices and Raman amplifiers.

  6. Dilithium hexaorganostannate(IV) compounds.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Ireen; Zeckert, Kornelia; Zahn, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Hypercoordination of main-group elements such as the heavier Group 14 elements (silicon, germanium, tin, and lead) usually requires strong electron-withdrawing ligands and/or donating groups. Herein, we present the synthesis and characterization of two hexaaryltin(IV) dianions in form of their dilithium salts [Li2(thf)2{Sn(2-py(Me))6}] (py(Me)=C5H3N-5-Me) (2) and [Li2{Sn(2-py(OtBu))6}] (py(OtBu)=C5H3N-6-OtBu) (3). Both complexes are stable in the solid state and solution under inert conditions. Theoretical investigations of compound 2 reveal a significant valence 5s-orbital contribution of the tin atom forming six strongly polarized tin-carbon bonds. PMID:25314245

  7. Silicones As Connector-Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Bickler, Marjorie S.

    1988-01-01

    Report evaluates silicone potting materials for electrical connectors. Describes tests of connector specimens made with CV-2510 and DC-6-1104 silicones with dibutyl tin dilaurate catalyst and evaluates test results in light of previously published test results for polyurethanes. Discusses requirements for connector-potting materials, methods used to evaluate silicones, techniques for preparing specimens, and results of tests. Identifies commercial sources of silicone potting materials.

  8. Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

  9. FeB6 Monolayers: The Graphene-like Material with Hypercoordinate Transition Metal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijun; Li, Yafei; Hou, Jianhua; Tu, Kaixiong; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-05-01

    By means of density functional theory (DFT) computations and global minimum search using particle-swarm optimization (PSO) method, we predicted three FeB6 monolayers, namely α-FeB6, β-FeB6 and γ-FeB6, which consist of the Fe©Bx (x = 6, 8) wheels with planar hypercoordinate Fe atoms locating at the center of six- or eight-membered boron rings. In particular, the α-FeB6 sheet constructed by Fe©B8 motifs is the global minimum due to completely shared and well delocalized electrons. The two-dimensional (2D) boron networks are dramatically stabilized by the electron transfer from Fe atoms, and the FeB6 monolayers have pronounced stabilities. The α-FeB6 monolayer is metallic, while the β-FeB6 and γ-FeB6 sheets are semiconductors with indirect band gaps and significant visible-light absorptions. Besides the novel chemical bonding, the high feasibility for experimental realization, and unique electronic and optical properties, render them very welcome new members to the graphene-like materials family. PMID:27035286

  10. Volatile organic silicon compounds: the most undesirable contaminants in biogases.

    PubMed

    Ohannessian, Aurélie; Desjardin, Valérie; Chatain, Vincent; Germain, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Recently a lot of attention has been focused on volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiC) present in biogases. They induce costly problems due to silicate formation during biogas combustion in valorisation engine. The cost of converting landfill gas and digester gas into electricity is adversely affected by this undesirable presence. VOSiC in biogases spark off formation of silicate deposits in combustion chambers. They engender abrasion of the inner surfaces leading to serious damage, which causes frequent service interruptions, thus reducing the economic benefit of biogases. It is already known that these VOSiC originate from polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) hydrolysis. PDMS (silicones) are used in a wide range of consumer and industrial applications. PDMS are released into the environment through landfills and wastewater treatment plants. There is a lack of knowledge concerning PDMS biodegradation during waste storage. Consequently, understanding PDMS behaviour in landfill cells and in sludge digester is particularly important. In this article, we focused on microbial degradation of PDMS through laboratory experiments. Preliminary test concerning anaerobic biodegradation of various PDMS have been investigated. Results demonstrate that the biotic step has an obvious influence on PDMS biodegradation. PMID:19029718

  11. Sputtering of silicon and its compounds in the electronic stopping region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Y.; Griffith, J. E.; Meng, W. J.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon, silicon dioxide, and silicon nitride have been sputtered with chlorine ions at 5 MeV and 20 MeV. While the yield from the silicon target was unmeasurably low, the insulating compounds exhibited the enhanced yields observed in other insulating targets. The yield follows the electronic stopping power and seems to be independent of the target's thermal properties. Some of the data suggest that the enhanced sputtering mechanism may be active in extremely thin films (not less than 3 monolayers).

  12. Modifying a silicone potting compound for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Clatterbuck, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    RTV-615 has been devolatilized by subjecting the uncatalyzed resin to a temperature of between 125 and 150 C for 24 hours in a vacuum of about 10 to the -6th torr. The resultant resin can be catalyzed and after a room temperature cure the outgassing of the resin is sufficiently low when tested according to ASTM E-595 that it is suitable for space flight use. Tests of physical properties of the cured devolatilized resin were compared with those of the as received silicone. The devolatilized silicones are slightly harder, have a higher tear resistance and higher tensile strengths.

  13. A Technique for Reducing the Outgassing of Silicone Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Clatterbuck, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    A technique was developed to heat silicone resins in vacuum and thereby remove the low molecular weight molecules which contribute to the high outgassing of the untreated resins. The technique was successfully applied to two silicone resins. Heating the monomer to a temperature about 398 K (125 C) in a vacuum of about 0.0001 N/sq m removes about 10% of the resin weight, and the resultant resin when catalyzed can meet the outgassing requirements when tested according to ASTM E-595. The physical properties of RTV-615 when devolatilized at 398 K (125 C) or at 423 K (150 C) were measured.

  14. Self-Assembly in Systems Containing Silicone Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Maira Silva; Loh, Watson

    2009-01-29

    Chemical systems formed by silicone solvents and surfactants have potential applications in a variety of industrial products. In spite of their technological relevance, there are few reports on the scientific literature that focus on characterizing such ternary systems. In this work, we have aimed to develop a general, structural investigation on the phase diagram of one system that typically comprises silicone-based chemicals, by means of the SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) technique. Important features such as the presence of diverse aggregation states in the overall system, either on their own or in equilibrium with other structures, have been detected. As a result, optically isotropic chemical systems (direct and/or reversed microemulsions) and liquid crystals with lamellar or hexagonal packing have been identified and characterized.

  15. Synthesis and photoluminescence studies of silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon compound films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rao; Ma, Li-Bo; Ye, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yong-Qian; Cao, Ze-Xian

    2008-06-01

    High-density silicon nanoparticles with well-controlled sizes were grown onto cold substrates in amorphous SiN x and SiC matrices by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Strong, tunable photoluminescence across the whole visible light range has been measured at room temperature from such samples without invoking any post-treatment, and the spectral features can find a qualitative explanation in the framework of quantum confinement effect. Moreover, the decay time was for the first time brought down to within one nanosecond. These excellent features make the silicon nanostructures discussed here very promising candidates for light-emitting units in photonic and optoelectronic applications.

  16. Volatile organic silicon compounds in biogases: development of sampling and analytical methods for total silicon quantification by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Chottier, Claire; Chatain, Vincent; Julien, Jennifer; Dumont, Nathalie; Lebouil, David; Germain, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Current waste management policies favor biogases (digester gases (DGs) and landfill gases (LFGs)) valorization as it becomes a way for energy politics. However, volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs) contained into DGs/LFGs severely damage combustion engines and endanger the conversion into electricity by power plants, resulting in a high purification level requirement. Assessing treatment efficiency is still difficult. No consensus has been reached to provide a standardized sampling and quantification of VOSiCs into gases because of their diversity, their physicochemical properties, and the omnipresence of silicon in analytical chains. Usually, samplings are done by adsorption or absorption and quantification made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this objective, this paper presents and discusses the optimization of a patented method consisting in VOSiCs sampling by absorption of 100% ethanol and quantification of total Si by ICP-OES. PMID:25379538

  17. Volatile Organic Silicon Compounds in Biogases: Development of Sampling and Analytical Methods for Total Silicon Quantification by ICP-OES

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Jennifer; Dumont, Nathalie; Lebouil, David; Germain, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Current waste management policies favor biogases (digester gases (DGs) and landfill gases (LFGs)) valorization as it becomes a way for energy politics. However, volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs) contained into DGs/LFGs severely damage combustion engines and endanger the conversion into electricity by power plants, resulting in a high purification level requirement. Assessing treatment efficiency is still difficult. No consensus has been reached to provide a standardized sampling and quantification of VOSiCs into gases because of their diversity, their physicochemical properties, and the omnipresence of silicon in analytical chains. Usually, samplings are done by adsorption or absorption and quantification made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this objective, this paper presents and discusses the optimization of a patented method consisting in VOSiCs sampling by absorption of 100% ethanol and quantification of total Si by ICP-OES. PMID:25379538

  18. Interaction of 1,2,5-chalcogenadiazole derivatives with thiophenolate: hypercoordination with formation of interchalcogen bond versus reduction to radical anion.

    PubMed

    Suturina, Elizaveta A; Semenov, Nikolay A; Lonchakov, Anton V; Bagryanskaya, Irina Yu; Gatilov, Yuri V; Irtegova, Irina G; Vasilieva, Nadezhda V; Lork, Enno; Mews, Rüdiger; Gritsan, Nina P; Zibarev, Andrey V

    2011-05-12

    According to the DFT calculations, [1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (4), [1,2,5]selenadiazolo[3,4-c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (5), 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-thiadiazole (6), and 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-selenadiazole (7) have nearly the same positive electron affinity (EA). Under the CV conditions they readily produce long-lived π-delocalized radical anions (π-RAs) characterized by EPR. Whereas 4 and 5 were chemically reduced into the π-RAs with thiophenolate (PhS(-)), 6 did not react and 7 formed a product of hypercoordination at the Se center (9) isolated in the form of the thermally stable salt [K(18-crown-6)][9] (10). The latter type of reactivity has never been observed previously for any 1,2,5-chalcogenadiazole derivatives. The X-ray structure of salt 10 revealed that the Se-S distance in the anion 9 (2.722 Å) is ca. 0.5 Å longer than the sum of the covalent radii of these atoms but ca. 1 Å shorter than the sum of their van der Waals radii. According to the QTAIM and NBO analysis, the Se-S bond in 9 can be considered a donor-acceptor bond whose formation leads to transfer of ca. 40% of negative charge from PhS(-) onto the heterocycle. For various PhS(-)/1,2,5-chalcogenadiazole reaction systems, thermodynamics and kinetics were theoretically studied to rationalize the interchalcogen hypercoordination vs reduction to π-RA dichotomy. It is predicted that interaction between PhS(-) and 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-telluradiazole (12), whose EA slightly exceeds that of 6 and 7, will lead to hypercoordinate anion (17) with the interchalcogen Te-S bond being stronger than the Se-S bond observed in anion 9. PMID:21500829

  19. Standard operating procedure (SOP) for the quantitative determination of organic silicon compounds at the surface of elastomeric sealants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Th; Treu, D.; Unger, W.

    2001-07-01

    Elastomeric sealants may contain organic silicon compounds. The use of these sealants for housings for electronic components is harmful for the reliability of electric contacts inside. In order to prevent electronic components from malfunction, quality control of elastomeric sealants is required. An analytical procedure developed to fulfil this requirement was developed. It is based on electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). Information on the silicon compounds existing at the surface of elastomeric sealants is provided by this method. Silicon in organic and inorganic compounds can be differentiated with the help of Si 2p photoelectron spectra. Quantitative results can be obtained too. The uncertainty budget of the quantitative procedure is estimated.

  20. Phase diagram and electrical behavior of silicon-rich iridium silicide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allevato, C. E.; Vining, Cronin B.

    1992-01-01

    The iridium-silicon phase diagram on the silicon-rich side was investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction, density, differential thermal analysis, metalography, microprobe analysis, and electrical resistivity. Attempts were made to prepare eight previously reported silicon-rich iridium silicide compounds by arc melting and Bridgman-like growth. However, microprobe analysis identified only four distinct compositions: IrSi, Ir3Si4, Ir3Si5 and IrSi sub about 3. The existence of Ir4Si5 could not be confirmed in this study, even though the crystal structure has been previously reported. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) in conjunction with X-ray powder diffraction confirm polymorphism in IrSi sub about 3, determined to have orthorhombic and monoclinic unit cells in the high and low temperature forms. A eutectic composition alloy of 83 +/- 1 atomic percent silicon was observed between IrSi sub about 3 and silicon. Ir3Si4 exhibits distinct metallic behavior while Ir3Si5 is semiconducting. Both and IrSi and IrSi sub about 3 exhibit nearly temperature independent electrical resistivities on the order of 5-10 x 10 exp -6 ohms-m.

  1. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  2. Evaluation of a Silicone Membrane as an Alternative to Human Skin for Determining Skin Permeation Parameters of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Takashi; Yakumaru, Masafumi; Nishioka, Keisuke; Higashi, Yoshihiro; Sano, Tomohiko; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a silicone membrane as an alternative to human skin using the skin permeation parameters of chemical compounds. An in vitro permeation study using 15 model compounds was conducted, and permeation parameters comprising permeability coefficient (P), diffusion parameter (DL(-2)), and partition parameter (KL) were calculated from each permeation profile. Significant correlations were obtained in log P, log DL(-2), and log KL values between the silicone membrane and human skin. DL(-2) values of model compounds, except flurbiprofen, in the silicone membrane were independent of the lipophilicity of the model compounds and were 100-fold higher than those in human skin. For antipyrine and caffeine, which are hydrophilic, KL values in the silicone membrane were 100-fold lower than those in human skin, and P values, calculated as the product of a DL(-2) and KL, were similar. For lipophilic compounds, such as n-butyl paraben and flurbiprofen, KL values for silicone were similar to or 10-fold higher than those in human skin, and P values for silicone were 100-fold higher than those in human skin. Furthermore, for amphiphilic compounds with log Ko/w values from 0.5 to 3.5, KL values in the silicone membrane were 10-fold lower than those in human skin, and P values for silicone were 10-fold higher than those in human skin. The silicone membrane was useful as a human skin alternative in an in vitro skin permeation study. However, depending on the lipophilicity of the model compounds, some parameters may be over- or underestimated. PMID:27581638

  3. Detection of high-energy compounds using photoluminescent silicon nanocrystal paper based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Christina M.; Iqbal, Muhammad; Dasog, Mita; Piercey, Davin G.; Lockwood, Ross; Klapötke, Thomas M.; Veinot, Jonathan G. C.

    2014-02-01

    Luminescent silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) surface functionalized with dodecyl groups were exposed to solutions of nitroaromatic compounds including nitrobenzene, nitrotoluene, and dinitrotoluene. It was found that Si-NC luminescence was quenched upon exposure to nitroaromatics via an electron transfer mechanism as indicated by Stern-Volmer analysis. This quenching was exploited and a straightforward paper-based Si-NC sensor was developed. This paper motif was found to be sensitive to solution, vapor, and solid phase nitroaromatics, as well as solution borne RDX and PETN.Luminescent silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) surface functionalized with dodecyl groups were exposed to solutions of nitroaromatic compounds including nitrobenzene, nitrotoluene, and dinitrotoluene. It was found that Si-NC luminescence was quenched upon exposure to nitroaromatics via an electron transfer mechanism as indicated by Stern-Volmer analysis. This quenching was exploited and a straightforward paper-based Si-NC sensor was developed. This paper motif was found to be sensitive to solution, vapor, and solid phase nitroaromatics, as well as solution borne RDX and PETN. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, Si-NC characterization, fluorescence spectra, solid residue testing and vapor study images. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06271f

  4. Ionisation effects on the permeation of pharmaceutical compounds through silicone membrane.

    PubMed

    Waters, L J; Bhuiyan, A K M M H

    2016-05-01

    Silicone membrane is frequently used as an in vitro skin mimic whereby experiments incorporate a range of buffered media which may vary in pH. As a consequence of such variability in pH there is a corresponding variability in the degree of ionisation which in turn, could influence permeation through the mainly hydrophobic-rich membrane structure. This study reports the effect of pH on the permeation of five model compounds (benzoic acid, benzotriazole, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and lidocaine). For the five compounds analysed, each at three distinct percentages of ionisation, it was found that the greater extent of permeation was always for the more 'neutral', i.e. more greatly unionised, species rather than the anionic or cationic species. These findings fit with the theory that the hydrophobic membrane encourages permeation of 'lipid-like' structures, i.e. the more unionised form of compounds. However, results obtained with an Inverse Gas Chromatography Surface Energy Analyser (iGC SEA) indicate the membrane surface to be an electron dense environment. In the knowledge that unionised forms of compounds permeate (rather than the charged species) this negatively charged surface was not anticipated, i.e. the basic membrane surface did not appear to affect permeation. PMID:26896663

  5. Facet-Selective Epitaxy of Compound Semiconductors on Faceted Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Gao, Ruixuan; No, You-Shin; Kim, Sun-Kyung; McClelland, Arthur A; Bell, David C; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Integration of compound semiconductors with silicon (Si) has been a long-standing goal for the semiconductor industry, as direct band gap compound semiconductors offer, for example, attractive photonic properties not possible with Si devices. However, mismatches in lattice constant, thermal expansion coefficient, and polarity between Si and compound semiconductors render growth of epitaxial heterostructures challenging. Nanowires (NWs) are a promising platform for the integration of Si and compound semiconductors since their limited surface area can alleviate such material mismatch issues. Here, we demonstrate facet-selective growth of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on Si NWs. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that crystalline CdS is grown epitaxially on the {111} and {110} surface facets of the Si NWs but that the Si{113} facets remain bare. Further analysis of CdS on Si NWs grown at higher deposition rates to yield a conformal shell reveals a thin oxide layer on the Si{113} facet. This observation and control experiments suggest that facet-selective growth is enabled by the formation of an oxide, which prevents subsequent shell growth on the Si{113} NW facets. Further studies of facet-selective epitaxial growth of CdS shells on micro-to-mesoscale wires, which allows tuning of the lateral width of the compound semiconductor layer without lithographic patterning, and InP shell growth on Si NWs demonstrate the generality of our growth technique. In addition, photoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy show that the epitaxial shells display strong and clean band edge emission, confirming their high photonic quality, and thus suggesting that facet-selective epitaxy on NW substrates represents a promising route to integration of compound semiconductors on Si. PMID:26057208

  6. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  7. A study of the dynamic flammability of radiation cross-linked flame-retardant HDPE/EPDM/silicon-elastomer compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shaojin; Zhang, Zhicheng; Du, Zhiwen; Teng, Renrui; Wang, Zhengzhou

    2003-04-01

    A dynamic flammability study of flame-retardant compound consisting of HDPE, EPDM and silicon elastomer blended with additives, as wire and cable insulation was made before and after irradiation. The data of RHR, EHC, SEC and the concentration of CO and CO 2 from cone colorimeter shown in the burning process were accessed. By blending silicon elastomer, CO release rate was reduced and the thermal endurance was improved. Oxygen index, mechanical property, morphology of the char formed in dynamical flame and thermal stability were also investigated.

  8. Behavior of tensioactive compounds in the solutions for silicon anisotropic etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubel, Irena; Rola, Krzysztof; Zalewska, Joanna

    2013-07-01

    In this work, results of measurements of surface tension of KOH and TMAH solutions containing alcohol additives were used to assess the behavior of the alcohols during silicon anisotropic etching. Surface tension of KOH and TMAH solutions containing additives of alcohols with one or more hydroxyl groups as well as etching rates and surface roughness of Si(100) and Si(110) surfaces etched in these solutions were analyzed. An improvement in roughness of both the planes was observed after addition of the alcohols to the KOH and TMAH solutions, however reduction of etching rates of Si(110) planes occurred only in KOH solutions. Based on surface tension measurements, it was stated that reduction of etching rates results from selective adsorption of the surface active compound on Si surfaces, which is possible due to adsorption layer formed on the solution surface of KOH etchant. The adsorption layer does not appear in TMAH + alcohols solutions, which accounts for a different behavior of TMAH-based etchants.

  9. Corrosion Processes of the CANDU Steam Generator Materials in the Presence of Silicon Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lucan, Dumitra; Fulger, Manuela; Velciu, Lucian; Lucan, Georgiana; Jinescu, Gheorghita

    2006-07-01

    The feedwater that enters the steam generators (SG) under normal operating conditions is extremely pure but, however, it contains low levels (generally in the {mu}g/l concentration range) of impurities such as iron, chloride, sulphate, silicate, etc. When water is converted into steam and exits the steam generator, the non-volatile impurities are left behind. As a result of their concentration, the bulk steam generator water is considerably higher than the one in the feedwater. Nevertheless, the concentrations of corrosive impurities are in general sufficiently low so that the bulk water is not significantly aggressive towards steam generator materials. The impurities and corrosion products existing in the steam generator concentrate in the porous deposits on the steam generator tubesheet. The chemical reactions that take place between the components of concentrated solutions generate an aggressive environment. The presence of this environment and of the tubesheet crevices lead to localized corrosion and thus the same tubes cannot ensure the heat transfer between the fluids of the primary and secondary circuits. Thus, it becomes necessary the understanding of the corrosion process that develops into SG secondary side. The purpose of this paper is the assessment of corrosion behavior of the tubes materials (Incoloy-800) at the normal secondary circuit parameters (temperature = 2600 deg C, pressure = 5.1 MPa). The testing environment was demineralized water containing silicon compounds, at a pH=9.5 regulated with morpholine and cyclohexyl-amine (all volatile treatment - AVT). The paper presents the results of metallographic examinations as well as the results of electrochemical measurements. (authors)

  10. Toxic Compounds in Our Food: Arsenic Uptake By Rice and Potential Mitigation By Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfferth, A.; Gill, R.; Penido, E.

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous element in soils worldwide and has the potential to negatively impact human and ecosystem health under certain biogeochemical conditions. While arsenic is relatively immobile in most oxidized soils due to a high affinity for soil solids, arsenic becomes mobilized under reduced soil conditions due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxides thereby releasing soil-bound arsenic. Since arsenic is a well-known carcinogen, this plant-soil process has the potential to negatively impact the lives of billions of rice consumers worldwide upon plant uptake and grain storage of released arsenic. Moreover, arsenic uptake by rice is excacerbated by the use of As-laden groundwater for rice irrigation. One proposed strategy to decrease arsenic uptake by rice plants is via an increase in dissolved silicon in paddy soil solution (pore-water), since silicic acid and arsenous acid share an uptake pathway. However, several soil processes that influence arsenic cycling may be affected by silicon including desorption from bulk soil, formation and mineralogy of iron(III) oxide plaque, and adsorption/desorption onto/from iron plaque; the effect of silicon on these soil processes will ultimately dictate the effectiveness of altered dissolved silicon in decreasing arsenic uptake at the root, which in turn dictates the concentration of arsenic found in grains. Furthermore, the source of silicon may impact carbon cycling and, in particular, methane emissions. Here, impacts of altered dissolved silicon on processes that affect rhizospheric biogeochemical cycling of arsenic and subsequent plant-uptake, and how it influences other biogeochemical cycles such as carbon and iron are investigated. We show that silicon can decrease arsenic uptake and grain storage under certain conditions, and that altered silicon affects the type of iron (III) oxide that comprises iron plaque.

  11. Effect of embedded metal compound on porosity of silica colloids prepared by spray reaction of silicon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hayano, Tomoe; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Kohzoh; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2006-03-15

    Attempts to prepare macroporous silica particles and metal-compound-nanoparticle-embedded silica microspheres were carried out using reactions between silicon tetrachloride and ultrasonic generating microdroplets including metal (Na, K, Al, Ni, Ti, Pt) compounds. Samples were collected by dry and wet processes. In the case of using nickel and aluminum compounds, acid-treated samples were also prepared. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, mercury porosimetry, and the nitrogen adsorption method. The macroporous silica particles were prepared by removing the salt crystals, such as NaCl and KCl, formed in the silica frame. For acid-resistant metals, platinum- and titanium-compound nanoparticles are easily embedded in silica microspheres using these metal-compound solutions. For acid-soluble metals, aluminum- and nickel-compound-nanoparticle-embedded silicas were prepared by applying neutralization of the collection water. Micropores and mesopores were produced in wet-process samples. Acid treatment induced the increase of micropore volumes. PMID:16246356

  12. Coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin: the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korlyukov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The review is devoted to analysis and generalization of the results of (i) quantum chemical studies on the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin in crystals, in solutions and in the gas phase and (ii) experimental investigations of the electron density distribution in these systems. The bibliography includes 147 references. In memoriam of Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences M Yu Antipin (1951 - 2013), Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences M G Voronkov (1921 - 2014) and Dr. S P Knyazev, Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology (1949 - 2012).

  13. Structural and magnetothermal properties of compounds: ytterbium silicon germanium, samarium silicon germanium, europium monooxide, and europium tetroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyunghan

    The family of R5Si xGe4-x alloys demonstrates a variety of unique physical phenomena related to magneto-structural transitions associated with reversible breaking and reforming of specific bonds that can be controlled by numerous external parameters such as chemical composition, magnetic field, temperature, and pressure. Therefore, R 5SixGe4-x systems have been extensively studied to uncover the mechanism of the extraordinary magneto-responsive properties including the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and colossal magnetostriction, as well as giant magnetocaloric effect (GMCE). Here, we report on phase relationships and structural, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties in the Yb5SixGe4- x and Sm5SixGe 4-x pseudobinary systems, which may exhibit mixed valence states. The crystallography, phase relationships, and physical properties of Yb5SixGe4- x alloys with 0 ≤ x ≤ 4 have been examined by using single crystal and powder x-ray diffraction at room temperature, and dc magnetization and heat capacity measurements between 1.8 K and 400 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 7 T. Both the crystallographic and magnetic property data indicate that Yb5SixGe 4-x alloys are mixed valence systems, in which the majority (60%) of Yb atoms is divalent, while the minority (40%) is trivalent. This finding is supported by recent Mossbauer spectroscopy data. The magnetic properties of the Sm5SixGe 4-x compounds can be well described by considering the temperature-independent Van Vleck term due to small energy separation between the ground state and the first excited state of Sm3+ ions. All Sm5SixGe4- x compounds have unusually high magnetic ordering temperatures. The change in both the magnetic and structural behaviors with the substitution of Ge by Si is similar to that observed in the Gd5Si xGe4-x system. The external magnetic field seems to have no effect on the magnetism of the Sm5Si xGe4-x alloys. Europium oxides, EuO with the divalent state and Eu3O 4 with the mixed

  14. Lewis Acidity of Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane: Aldehyde Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by a Neutral Silicon Compound

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L.; Bergman, Robert G.; Tilley, T. Don

    2015-04-16

    Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane Si(cat(F)2 was prepared, and stoichiometric binding to Lewis bases was demonstrated with fluoride, triethylphosphine oxide, and N,N'-diisopropylbenzamide. The potent Lewis acidity of Si(cat(F)2 was suggested from catalytic hydrosilylation and silylcyanation reactions with aldehydes. Mechanistic studies of hydrosilylation using an optically active silane substrate, R-(+)-methyl-(1-naphthyl)phenylsilane, proceeded with predominant stereochemical retention at silicon, consistent with a carbonyl activation pathway. The enantiospecificity was dependent on solvent and salt effects, with increasing solvent polarity or addition of NBu4BAr(F)4 leading to a diminished enantiomeric ratio. The medium effects are consistent with an ionic mechanism, wherein hydride transfer occurs prior to silicon-oxygen bond formation.

  15. Lewis Acidity of Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane: Aldehyde Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by a Neutral Silicon Compound

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L.; Bergman, Robert G.; Tilley, T. Don

    2015-04-16

    Bis(perfluorocatecholato)silane Si(cat(F)2 was prepared, and stoichiometric binding to Lewis bases was demonstrated with fluoride, triethylphosphine oxide, and N,N'-diisopropylbenzamide. The potent Lewis acidity of Si(cat(F)2 was suggested from catalytic hydrosilylation and silylcyanation reactions with aldehydes. Mechanistic studies of hydrosilylation using an optically active silane substrate, R-(+)-methyl-(1-naphthyl)phenylsilane, proceeded with predominant stereochemical retention at silicon, consistent with a carbonyl activation pathway. The enantiospecificity was dependent on solvent and salt effects, with increasing solvent polarity or addition of NBu4BAr(F)4 leading to a diminished enantiomeric ratio. The medium effects are consistent with an ionic mechanism, wherein hydride transfer occurs prior to silicon-oxygen bond formation.

  16. Elastic and Thermal Properties of Silicon Compounds from First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haijun; Zhu, H. J.; Cheng, W. H.; Xie, L. H.

    2016-07-01

    The structural and elastic properties of V-Si (V3Si, VSi2, V5Si3, and V6Si5) compounds are studied by using first-principles method. The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters and formation enthalpy are in good agreement with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. The calculated results indicate that the V-Si compounds are mechanically stable. Elastic properties including bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio are also obtained. The elastic anisotropies of V-Si compounds are investigated via the three-dimensional (3D) figures of directional dependences of reciprocals of Young's modulus. Finally, based on the quasi-harmonic Debye model, the internal energy, Helmholtz free energy, entropy, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, Grüneisen parameter, and Debye temperature of V-Si compounds have been calculated.

  17. Photoluminescence-based measurement technique of surface recombination velocity for high efficiency silicon and compound semiconductor solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.; Nakagawa, T.; Yoh, K.; Hasegawa, H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows that the recently proposed photoluminescence surface state spectroscopy (PLS{sup 3}) technique allows an in-situ, contactless and non-destructive determination of the value of the effective surface recombination velocity (S) under sunlight illumination and the surface/interface state density (N{sub ss}) distributions. This technique is successfully applied to measurement of the values of S at variously passivated Si surfaces. A best value of 3,000 cm/s is obtained under 1 sun condition for thermal oxidation. S is greatly reduced under concentrated sunlight. N{sub ss} distributions at compound semiconductor surfaces and heterointerfaces are also characterized to optimize the fabrication process of compound semiconductor solar cells. Formation of Si interface control layer (ICL) between InGaAs and SiO{sub 2} greatly reduces the interface states. Growth interruption at AlGaAs/GaAs hetero-interface produces high density of interface states. InAlAs/InGaAs heterointerfaces are also investigated. These results indicate that the new PLS{sup 3} technique is useful for the characterization and optimization of the fabrication processes of the silicon and compound semiconductor solar cells.

  18. Development of a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for measuring partial pressures of volatile organic compounds in natural water.

    PubMed

    Ooki, Atsushi; Yokouchi, Yoko

    2008-08-01

    Methods for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water and air are required so that the VOCs' fluxes in water environments can be estimated. We developed a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for collecting gas-phase samples containing VOCs at equilibrium with natural water. The equilibrator consists of six silicone tubes housed in a polyvinyl chloride pipe. Equilibrated air samples collected from the equilibrator were analyzed with an automated preconcentration gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system for hourly measurements of VOC partial pressures. The partial pressures of all the target VOCs reached equilibrium within 1 h in the equilibrator. The system was used to determine VOC partial pressures in Lake Kasumigaura, a shallow eutrophic lake with a high concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Compressed air was used daily to remove SPM deposited on the inner wall of the equilibrator and to maintain the equilibrium conditions for more than a week without the need to shut the system down. CH2Br2, CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CH2BrCl, C2H5I, C2Cl4, CH3I, and CH3Br in the lake were supersaturated with respect to the air, whereas CH3CI was undersaturated. CHCl3 had the highest flux (6.2 nmol m(-2) hr(-1)) during the observation period. PMID:18754497

  19. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of sodium atoms encapsulated type-I silicon-clathrate compound under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Qing-Yun; Zeng, Zhao-Yi; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-10-01

    We calculated the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of alkali metal Na atoms doped type-I silicon-clathrate compound (Na8Si46) under pressure using first-principles methods. The obtained dependencies of bond lengths and bond angles on pressure show heterogeneous behaviors which may bring out a structural transition. By using the elastic stability criteria from the calculated elastic constants, we confirm that the Na8Si46 is elastically unstable under high pressure. Some of the mechanical and thermal quantities include bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Debye temperature, sound velocity, melting point, and hardness, which are also derived from the elastic constants. The calculated total and partial electron densities of states of Na8Si46 indicate a weak interaction between the encapsulated Na atoms and the silicon framework. Moreover, the effect of pressure on its electronic structure is also investigated, which suggests that pressure is not a good choice to enhance the thermoelectricity performance of Na8Si46. Project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11347134 and 11304254) and the Doctor Foundation of Southwest University of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 13zx7125).

  20. Low power consumption silicon photonics tuning filters based on compound microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, C.; Contreras, P.; Vargas, S.

    2013-02-01

    Scalable integrated optics platforms based on silicon-on-insulator allow to develop optics and electronics functions on the same chip. Developments in this area are fostered by its potential as an I/O technology that can meet the throughputs demand of future many-core processors. Most of the optical interconnect designs rely on small footprint and high power efficiency microring resonators. They are used to filter out individual channels from a shared bus guide. Second-order microring filters enable denser channel packing by having sharper pass-band to stop-band slopes. Taking advantage of using a single physical ring with clockwise and counter-clockwise propagation, we implement second order filters with lower tuning energy consumption as being more resilient to some fabrication errors. Cascade ability, remote stabilization potential, energy efficiency along with simple design equations on coupling coefficients are described. We design second-order filters with FWHM from 45 GHz to 20 GHz, crosstalk between channels from -40 dB to -20 dB for different channel spacing at a specific FSR, with energy efficiencies of single ring configurations and compatible with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) state of the art platforms.

  1. Incorporation of the silicon germanium carbon compound in the realization of a bipolar inversion channel field-effect transistor (BICFET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharer, Deborah Louise

    The feasibility of fabrication of an inversion base transistor in the BICFET (Bipolar Inversion Channel Field Effect Transistor) configuration is investigated in this project. The requisite heterostructure will be realized through the extensive use of the silicon germanium carbon compound Si1-x-yGexCy. It is anticipated that band offsets comparable to Si1-xGex(x ˜ 0.5) will be achieved without the inherent difficulties associated with induced strains and epilayer thickness limitations present in this system. Initial explorations will be carried out through utilization of software acquired from Technology Modeling Associates, Sunnyvale, California. Simulations will be accomplished through the use of the Medici software, which is capable of modeling semiconductor devices comprised of conventional and/or user defined materials, impurities, structures and operating conditions. The Medici package, in conjunction with the Heterojunction Device Advanced Application Module (AAM), the Lattice Temperature AAK the Trapped Charge AAK and the Anisotropic Material AAK will also allow prediction of the electrical properties and characteristics of semiconductor devices composed of anisotropic media that possess a discontinuous band structure and inevitable defect constraints under variable thermal conditions. Through the capability of user defined compounds, the effect of incorporating carbon into Si1--xGex will be explored and internal device operation, as well as any breakdown or failure mechanisms allowed for in the software, will be determined.

  2. Polar intermetallic compounds of the silicon and arsenic family elements and their ternary hydrides and fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Escamilla, E.A.

    1996-10-17

    An investigation has been made on the effects of hydrogen and fluoride in the solid state chemistry of alkaline-earth and divalent rare-earth metal pnictide (Pn) and tetrelide (Tt) phases A{sub 5}(Pn,Tt,){sub 3}Z{sub x}, where A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Sm, Eu, Yb; Pn = As, Sb, Bi; Tt = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb and Z = H, F. Several trivalent rare-earth-metal pnictides, RE{sub 5}Pn{sub 3} (RE = Y, La, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) and alkaline-earth-metal trielides, A{sub 5}Tr{sub 3}Z{sub x} (Tr = Ga, In, Tl) have been included in an effort to complete observed structural trends. Two main experimental techniques were followed throughout this work, (a) reactions in absence of hydrogen or under continuous high vacuum, and (b) reactions with binary metal hydrides, AH{sub x}, in closed containers. The results demonstrate that all the phases reported with the {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}-type structure in the A{sub 5}Pn{sub 3} systems are hydrogen-stabilized compounds. Reactions in absence of hydrogen lead to compounds with the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type structure. The structure type {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} (= Ca{sub 5}SB{sub 3}F) was found to be characteristic of ternary systems and inaccurately associated with phases that form in the Y{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}-type. A new series of isomorphous Zintl compounds with the Ca{sub 16}Sb{sub 11}-type structure were prepared and studied as well. All the alkaline-earth-metal tetrelides, A{sub 5}Tt{sub 3}, that crystallize in the Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}-type structure can be interstitially derivatized by hydrogen or fluoride. Binary and ternary compounds were characterized by Guinier powder patterns, single crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. In an effort to establish property-structure relationships, electrical resistivity and magnetic measurements were performed on selected systems, and the results were explained in terms of the Zintl concepts, aided by extended Hueckel band calculations.

  3. Silicon- and Tin-Containing Open-Chain and Eight-Membered-Ring Compounds as Bicentric Lewis Acids toward Anions.

    PubMed

    Wendji, Anicet Siakam; Dietz, Christina; Kühn, Silke; Lutter, Michael; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Hiller, Wolf; Jurkschat, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the syntheses of silicon- and tin-containing open-chain and eight-membered-ring compounds Me2 Si(CH2 SnMe2 X)2 (2, X=Me; 3, X=Cl; 4, X=F), CH2 (SnMe2 CH2 I)2 (7), CH2 (SnMe2 CH2 Cl)2 (8), cyclo-Me2 Sn(CH2 SnMe2 CH2 )2 SiMe2 (6), cyclo-(Me2 SnCH2 )4 (9), cyclo-Me(2-n) Xn Sn(CH2 SiMe2 CH2 )2 SnXn Me(2-n) (5, n=0; 10, n=1, X=Cl; 11, n=1, X=F; 12, n=2, X=Cl), and the chloride and fluoride complexes NEt4 [cyclo- Me(Cl)Sn(CH2 SiMe2 CH2 )2 Sn(Cl)Me⋅F] (13), PPh4 [cyclo-Me(Cl)Sn(CH2 SiMe2 CH2 )2 Sn(Cl)Me⋅Cl] (14), NEt4 [cyclo-Me(F)Sn(CH2 SiMe2 CH2 )2 Sn(F)Me⋅F] (15), [NEt4 ]2 [cyclo-Cl2 Sn(CH2 SiMe2 CH2 )2 SnCl2 ⋅2 Cl] (16), M[Me2 Si(CH2 Sn(Cl)Me2 )2 ⋅Cl] (17 a, M=PPh4 ; 17 b, M=NEt4 ), NEt4 [Me2 Si(CH2 Sn(Cl)Me2 )2 ⋅F] (18), NEt4 [Me2 Si(CH2 Sn(F)Me2 )2 ⋅F] (19), and PPh4 [Me2 Si(CH2 Sn(Cl)Me2 )2 ⋅Br] (20). The compounds were characterised by electrospray mass-spectrometric, IR and (1) H, (13) C, (19) F, (29) Si, and (119) Sn NMR spectroscopic analysis, and, except for 15 and 18, single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:26616743

  4. Study of properties of SiC layer in TRISO coated particles grown using different alkyl-silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Jyoti; Ghosh, Sunil; Venugopalan, Ramani; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2013-06-01

    The silicon carbide (SiC) layer used for the formation of Tri-isostatic (TRISO) coated fuel particles is normally produced at high temperatures via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) in a hydrogen environment. In this work, we show the deposition of uniform SiC layers using different organosilicon precursors such as MTS and hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) via spouted bed chemical vapor deposition. From the X-ray diffraction pattern it could be inferred that the SiC deposits obtained through different precursors have the β-SiC phase. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the fabricated SiC coating were studied. The hardness and fracture toughness of the fabricated SiC coatings using MTS and HMDS were nearly the same and close to the theoretical value for pure silicon carbide.

  5. Annealing group III-V compound doped silicon-germanium alloy for improved thermo-electric conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W. (Inventor); Wood, Charles (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The thermoelectric conversion efficiency of a GaP doped SiGe alloy is improved about 30 percent by annealing the alloy at a temperature above the melting point of the alloy, preferably stepwise from 1200 C to 1275 C in air to form large grains having a size over 50 microns and to form a GeGaP rich phase and a silicon rich phase containing SiP and SiO2 particles.

  6. Boron-silicon solid solution: synthesis and crystal structure of a carbon-doped boron-rich SiB{sub n} (n{approx}30) compound

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, Jerome; Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Halet, Jean-Francois; Guerin, Roland . E-mail: roland.guerin@univ-rennes1.fr

    2004-11-01

    The carbon-doped SiB{sub 3}{approx}{sub 30} compound was obtained during attempts to synthesize by arc-melting boron-rich binaries belonging to the SiB{sub n} solid solution (13n<32). Its crystal structure was determined from X-ray single-crystal intensity data (R-3m, Z=1, a=11.0152(3)A, and c=23.8625(8)A) and led to the final formula SiB{sub {approx}}{sub 30}C{sub 0.35}. Carbon is incorporated fortuitously in the structure. The boron framework of these phases slightly differs from that encountered in {beta}-boron. The salient characteristic is the partial occupancy of three interstitial boron sites by silicon and one by carbon atoms. This is in contrast with the structurally related compounds such as SiB{sub {approx}}{sub 36}, CrB{sub {approx}}{sub 41}, or FeB{sub {approx}}{sub 40}, in which only two interstitial sites are partially occupied.

  7. Contrasting effect of silicon on iron, zinc and manganese status and accumulation of metal-mobilizing compounds in micronutrient-deficient cucumber.

    PubMed

    Bityutskii, Nikolai; Pavlovic, Jelena; Yakkonen, Kirill; Maksimović, Vuk; Nikolic, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Although the beneficial role of silicon (Si) in alleviation of abiotic stress is well established, little is known of the relevance of Si nutrition under microelement deficiency. The aim of our work was to investigate the physiological role of Si in relation to micronutrient (Fe, Zn and Mn) deficiencies in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Cucumber (cv. Semkross) plants were grown hydroponically in a complete nutrient solution (control) and in nutrient solutions free from Fe, Zn or Mn, with or without Si supply. Plant tissue concentrations of microelements, organic acids and phenolics were measured. Si supply effectively mitigated the symptoms of Fe deficiency, but only in part, the symptoms of Zn- or Mn deficiency. Leaf Fe concentration significantly increased in plants deprived of Fe but treated with Si, whereas the concentrations of other microelements were not affected by Si supply. The effects of Si supply in increasing accumulation of both organic acids and phenolic compounds in cucumber tissues were exclusively related to Fe nutrition. Enhancement of Fe distribution towards apical shoot parts, along with the tissue accumulation of Fe-mobilizing compounds such as citrate (in leaves and roots) or cathechin (in roots) appears to be the major alleviating effect of Si. Si nutrition, however, was without effect on the mobility and tissue distribution of either Zn or Mn. PMID:24316009

  8. Hypercoordinate ketone adducts of electrophilic η3-H2SiRR' ligands on ruthenium as key intermediates for efficient and robust catalytic hydrosilation.

    PubMed

    Lipke, Mark C; Tilley, T Don

    2014-11-19

    The electrophilic η(3)-H2SiRR' σ-complexes [PhBP(Ph)3]RuH(η(3)-H2SiRR') (RR' = MePh, 1a; Ph2, 1b; [PhBP(Ph)3](-) = [PhB(CH2PPh2)3](-)) are efficient catalysts (0.01-2.5 mol % loading) for the hydrosilation of ketones with PhMeSiH2, Ph2SiH2, or EtMe2SiH. An alkoxy complex [PhBP(Ph)3]Ru-OCHPh2 (4b) was observed (by (31)P{(1)H} NMR spectroscopy) as the catalyst resting state during hydrosilation of benzophenone with EtMe2SiH. A different catalyst resting state was observed for reactions using PhMeSiH2 or Ph2SiH2, and was identified as a silane σ-complex [PhBP(Ph)3]RuH[η(2)-H-SiRR'(OCHPh2)] (RR' = MePh, 5a; Ph2, 5b) using variable temperature multinuclear NMR spectroscopy (-80 to 20 °C). The hydrosilation of benzophenone with PhMeSiH2 and 1a was examined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy at -18 °C (in CD2Cl2), and this revealed that either 1a, 5a, or both 1a and 5a could be observed as resting states of the catalytic cycle, depending on the initial [PhMeSiH2]:[benzophenone] ratio. Kinetic studies revealed two possible expressions for the rate of product formation, depending on which catalyst resting state was present (rate = kobs[PhMeSiH2][5a] and rate = k'obs[benzophenone][1a]). Computational methods (DFT, b3pw91, 6-31G(d,p)/LANL2DZ) were used to determine a model catalytic cycle for the hydrosilation of acetone with PhMeSiH2. A key step in this mechanism involves coordination of acetone to the silicon center of 1a-DFT, which leads to insertion of the carbonyl group into an Si-H bond (that is part of a Ru-H-Si 3c-2e bond). This generates an intermediate analogous to 5a (5a-i-DFT), and the final product is displaced from 5a-i-DFT by an associative process involving PhMeSiH2. PMID:25347044

  9. High piezoelectricity of Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}-based ternary compound thin films on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tao; Zhang Shuyi; Chen Zhaojiang; Zhou Fengmei; Zhang Zhongning; Yang Yuetao; Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2009-03-23

    Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT)-based ternary compound thin films, 0.06PMnN-0.94PZT(50/50) (PMnN-PZT), are deposited on Si-based heterostructures by rf magnetron sputtering system. The intrinsic PZT(50/50) thin films are also deposited on the same kind of substrates for comparison. The PMnN-PZT thin films show the similar polycrystalline structures as those of PZT with highly (111) oriented perovskite phase. The PMnN-PZT thin films show excellent piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity which are distinctly better than those of PZT thin films prepared with the same deposition conditions. Besides, the cantilevers of PMnN-PZT thin films on the heterostructure substrates also exhibit higher sensitivities than the PZT thin film cantilevers.

  10. Superconductivity, Magnetism, and Charge Density Wave Formation in Ternary Compounds with the SCANDIUM(5)COBALT(4)SILICON(10) - Structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung-Duen

    1987-05-01

    The variation of the superconducting transition temperature T(,c) with hydrostatic pressure up to 23.7 kbar is reported for eleven compounds with the Sc(,5)Co(,4)Si(,10) -type structure. Most of these compounds display a modest linear depression of T(,c) with pressure (dT(,c)/dp (TURN) 10('-5) K/bar), however, two materials, Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10) and Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), undergo a discontinuous transformation above a critical pressure of about 20 kbar to a state with a significantly higher T(,c). The resistivity and magnetic susceptibility show an anomaly in Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10) and Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10) at T(,o) = 83 K and 155 K respectively. It is interpreted that this phase transformation may involve a charge density wave (CDW) formation that opens an energy gap over a portion of the Fermi surface. The P-T phase diagram for Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), given to demonstrate the correlation between T(,o) and T(,c), provides the clear evidence that the pressure enhancement of T(,c) is due to a progressive removal of the charge density wave in the crystal. Combining the magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity data, we give a quantitative estimate of a 36% loss in the electronic density of states at the Fermi level due to this energy gap in Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10). The pseudoternary system (Lu(,1-x)Sc(,x))(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), 0 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 0.05, is used to study the doping (impurity) effect on the CDW and the competition between T(,o) and T(,c) in Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10). It is found that (dT(,o)/dx)(,x=0) = -18.5 K/at % and (dT(,c)/dx)(,x=0) = 0.5 K/at %, are comparable to another CDW system (Ta(,1 -x)Nb(,x))S(,3). The electrical and magnetic properties for R(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10) (R = Dy-Yb) are also reported. All of these compounds exhibit an anomaly in resistivity, which is considered to be due to the formation of a CDW, similar to the one observed in Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10). Two distinct magnetic transitions with different features, seen in the ac magnetic susceptibility and heat

  11. Particle size distribution of aerosols sprayed from household hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based and silicone-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Japan has published safety guideline on waterproof aerosol sprays. Furthermore, the Aerosol Industry Association of Japan has adopted voluntary regulations on waterproof aerosol sprays. Aerosol particles of diameter less than 10 µm are considered as "fine particles". In order to avoid acute lung injury, this size fraction should account for less than 0.6% of the sprayed aerosol particles. In contrast, the particle size distribution of aerosols released by hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based or silicone-based compounds have not been investigated in Japan. Thus, the present study investigated the aerosol particle size distribution of 16 household hand-pump sprays. In 4 samples, the ratio of fine particles in aerosols exceeded 0.6%. This study confirmed that several hand-pump sprays available in the Japanese market can spray fine particles. Since the hand-pump sprays use water as a solvent and their ingredients may be more hydrophilic than those of aerosol sprays, the concepts related to the safety of aerosol-sprays do not apply to the hand pump sprays. Therefore, it may be required for the hand-pump spray to develop a suitable method for evaluating the toxicity and to establish the safety guideline. PMID:26821469

  12. 1-Boraadamantane: reactivity towards di(1-alkynyl)silicon and -tin compounds: first access to 7-metalla-2,5-diboranorbornane derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wrackmeyer, B; Milius, W; Klimkina, E V; Bubnov, Y N

    2001-01-01

    1-Boraadamantane (1) reacts with di(1-alkynyl)silicon and -tin compounds 2 (Me2M(C...CR)2: M=Si; R=Me (a), tBu (b), SiMe3 (c); M=Sn, R=SiMe3 (e)) in a 1:1 ratio by intermolecular 1,1-alkylboration, followed by intramolecular 1,1-vinylboration, to give siloles 5a-c and the stannole 5e, respectively, in which the tricyclic 1-boraadamantane system is enlarged by two carbon atoms. Owing to the high reactivity of 1, a second fast intermolecular 1,1-alkylboration competes with the intramolecular 1,1-vinylboration as the second major step in the reaction if the substituent R at the C...C bond is small (2a) and/or if the M-C... bond is also highly reactive, as in 2d (M=Sn, R= Me) and 2e (M=Sn, R=SiMe3). This leads finally to the novel octacyclic 7-metalla-2,5-diboranorbornane derivatives 8a, 8d, and 8e, of which 8e was characterized by X-ray analysis in the solid state. 1,1,2,2-Tetramethyldi(1-propynyl)disilane, MeC...C-SiMe2SiMe2-C...CMe (3), reacts with 1 to give mainly a 1,2-dihydro-1,2,5-disilaborepine derivative 9 and the octacyclic compound 11, which is analogous to 8a but with an Me4Si2 bridge. All new products were characterized in solution by 1H, 11B, 13C, 29Si, and 119Sn NMR spectroscopy. For 8 and 11, highly resolved 29Si and 119Sn NMR spectra revealed the first two-bond isotope-induced chemical shifts, 2delta10/11B(29Si) and 2delta10/11B(119Sn) respectively, to be reported. PMID:11288867

  13. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  14. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  15. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems. PMID:27136720

  16. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  17. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  18. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  19. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  20. Group-IV semiconductor compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Berding, M.A.; Sher, A.; van Schilfgaarde, M.

    1997-08-01

    Properties of ordered group-IV compounds containing carbon, silicon, and germanium are calculated within the local density approximation. Twenty-seven fully relaxed compounds represented by seven different compound structures are compared and, with the exception of SiC, all compounds are found to be metastable. Two trends emerge: carbon-germanium bonds are disfavored, and compounds that have carbon on a common sublattice are the least unbound because of their relatively low strain. When carbon shares a sublattice with silicon or germanium, the large strain results in a narrowing of the band gap, and in some cases the compound is metallic. The most promising structures with the lowest excess energy contain carbon on one sublattice and although they do not lattice match to silicon, they match rather well to silicon carbide. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Replacement of silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B and the subsequent characterization of the new cellular silicone materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to replace silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B produced by Vendor B. Silicone polymer B and the resulting B-50 cellular silicone have been used to produce cushions for the W87 program. Approximately 5.5 years of stress relaxation aging study data as well as actual part surveillance data have been collected, characterizing the stockpile life performance of the B-50 cellular silicone cushion material. Process characterization of new cellular silicone materials as a result of replacing silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B has been completed. Load deflection requirements for the new cellular silicone materials based on silicone polymer B have been met. The silicone polymer B based cellular silicone materials must be compounded at densities of approximately 0.03 g/cm{sup 3} less than the silicone polymer A based cellular silicone materials in order to achieve the same load deflection requirements has also been demonstrated. The change in silicone polymers from A to B involved a decrease in volatile content as well as a decrease in part shrinkage.

  2. Silicon applications in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  3. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100.degree. C.

  4. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

  5. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1994-12-27

    An iron-based alloy is described containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100 C. 8 figures.

  6. Liquid-phase-sintering phenomena of non-oxide silicon compounds. Technical progress report, 1 July 1979-29 February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.R.; Lange, F.F.

    1980-03-01

    The noncrystalline intergranular phase in three hot-pressed silicon nitride alloys containing MgO has been found to have a composition close to the SiO/sub 2/-Mg/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/ tie line. This finding of a composition removed from the ternary eutectic in the Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/-Si/sub 2/N/sub 2/O-Mg/sub 2/SiO/sub 4/ phase field suggests that phase equilibrium during hot-pressing is not totally attained despite the x-ray diffraction evidence that the bulk of the materials has reached equilibrium. The exact composition of the noncrystalline phase varies from one location to another in the microstructure and incorporates impurities including Ca, Al, and Cl. These impurities will unquestionably affect the high temperature properties of the intergranular phase.

  7. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-01-01

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  8. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-05-05

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  9. High-temperature- and high-pressure-induced formation of the Laves-phase compound XeS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Yangmei; Xiang, Shikai; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    We explore the reactivity of xenon with sulfur under high pressure, using unbiased structure searching techniques combined with first-principles calculations, which identify a stable XeS2 compound crystallized in a Laves phase with hypercoordinated (16-fold) Xe at 191 GPa and 0 K. Taking the thermal effects into account, we find that increasing the temperature could further stabilize it. The formation of XeS2 is a consequence of pressure-induced charge transfer from Xe to S atoms and the delocalization of Xe 5 p and S 3 p electrons. Meanwhile, the stabilization into a Laves phase of XeS2 is the result of delocalized chemical bonding and the need for optimum structure packing. The present discussion of the formation mechanism in XeS2 is general, and conclusions can be used to understand the formation of other Laves-phase compounds and the Xe chemistry that allows closed-shell Xe to participate in chemical reactions.

  10. Ionization of the Nitroaromatic Compounds in an Ion Mobility Spectrometer with an Ion Source based on Porous Silicon Under Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, Igor; Kuzishchin, Yury; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Kotkovskii, Genadii; Chistyakov, Alexander

    Nowadays surface assisted laser desorption/ionization is widely used in different analytical methods. Some of the most interest methods are based on laser irradiation of nanostructured surfaces, porous silicon (pSi) in particular. This method already proved itself in mass spectrometry due to the combination of high sensitivity and possibility of investigation of small molecules because of the absence of the influence of a substrate on the ion signal. In this work we present summarized results of our investigations dedicated to the use of the surface assisted laser desorption/ionization on pSi in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), which is one of the most promising analytical methods in the area of fast detection of low concentrations of organic molecules. We use trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a substance to be investigated. Obtained results show that TNT ionization mechanism under laser irradiation is complicated and relates both to the electron emission process from the pSi surface and subsequent ion-molecular reactions in gas phase and to the surface proton transfer as well.

  11. Syntheses and studies of organosilicon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, R.

    1999-02-12

    The syntheses of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as silicon carbide ceramic precursors have been active research areas in the Barton Research Group. In this thesis, the work is focused on the preparation of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as stoichiometric silicon carbide precursor polymers. The syntheses of the precursor polymers are discussed and the conversions of these precursors to silicon carbide via pyrolysis are reported. The XRD pattern and elemental analyses of the resulting silicon carbide ceramics are presented. Silicon monoxide is an important intermediate in the production of silicon metal. The existence of silicon monoxide in gap phase has been widely accepted. In the second part of this thesis, the generation of gaseous silicon monoxide in four different reactors and the reactions of gaseous silicon monoxide towards organic compounds are discussed.

  12. Vinyl ether silicones

    SciTech Connect

    Herzig, C.; Dauth, J.; Deubzer, B.; Weis, J.

    1995-12-01

    Siloxanes with vinyl ether groups are prepared by hydrosilylation reaction of dihydrosiloxanes with divinyl ethers in excess. Different stoichiometry, produces linear copolymers of different viscosities and double bond concentrations always with an active vinyl ether group at each chain end. Polymerisations triggered by UV light were done with mixtures of these compounds and a series of onium salts. Very fast cure is observed even with low doses at 290 nm. V.E. silicones are found to cure essentially quantitative. The comparison with other highly reactive cationic monomers revealed that compounds are among the fastest curing prepolymers in cationic chemistry.

  13. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-01-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  14. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-03-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  15. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  16. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  17. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  18. Powder containing 2H-type silicon carbide produced by reacting silicon dioxide and carbon powder in nitrogen atmosphere in the presence of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuramoto, N.; Takiguchi, H.

    1984-01-01

    The production of powder which contains silicon carbide consisting of 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide, beta type silicon carbide and less than 3% of nitrogen is discussed. The reaction temperature to produce the powder containing 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide is set at above 1550 degrees C in an atmosphere of aluminum or aluminum compounds and nitrogen gas or an antioxidation atmosphere containing nitrogen gas. The mixture ratio of silicon dioxide and carbon powder is 0.55 - 1:2.0 and the contents of aluminum or aluminum compounds within silicon dioxide is less than 3% in weight.

  19. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  20. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  1. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  2. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-11-25

    This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  3. Silicon microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Pola, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    Silicon detectors are being studied as microdosemeters since they can provide sensitive volumes of micrometric dimensions. They can be applied for assessing single-event effects in electronic instrumentation exposed to complex fields around high-energy accelerators or in space missions. When coupled to tissue-equivalent converters, they can be used for measuring the quality of radiation therapy beams or for dosimetry. The use of micrometric volumes avoids the contribution of wall effects to the measured spectra. Further advantages of such detectors are their compactness, cheapness, transportability and a low sensitivity to vibrations. The following problems need to be solved when silicon devices are used for microdosimetry: (i) the sensitive volume has to be confined in a region of well-known dimensions; (ii) the electric noise limits the minimum detectable energy; (iii) corrections for tissue-equivalency should be made; (iv) corrections for shape equivalency should be made when referring to a spherical simulated site of tissue; (v) the angular response should be evaluated carefully; (vi) the efficiency of a single detector of micrometric dimensions is very poor and detector arrays should be considered. Several devices have been proposed as silicon microdosemeters, based on different technologies (telescope detectors, silicon on insulator detectors and arrays of cylindrical p-n junctions with internal amplification), in order to satisfy the issues mentioned above. PMID:21112892

  4. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  5. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Impurity ion implantation into silicon single crystals: efficiency and radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, V. S.; Chelyadinskii, Aleksei R.

    1995-03-01

    The ion implantation method is analysed from the point of view of its efficiency as a technique for doping silicon with donor and acceptor impurities, for synthesising silicon-based compounds and for producing gettering layers and optoelectronic structures. The introduction, agglomeration, and annealing of radiation-produced defects in ion-implanted silicon are considered. The role of interstitial defects in radiation-related defect formation is estimated. Mechanisms of athermal migration of silicon atoms in the silicon lattice are analysed.

  6. A general classification of silicon utilizing organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.; Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon utilizing organisms may be defined as organisms with high silicon content (≥ 1% dry weight) and they can metabolize silicon with or without demonstrable silicon transporter genes (SIT) in them(Das,2010). Silicon is the second most abundant element in the lithosphere (27.70%) and it is as important as phosphorus and magnesium (0.03%) in the biota. Hydrated silica represents the second most abundant biogenic mineral after carbonate minerals. Silicon is accumulated and metabolized by some prokaryotes, and Si compounds can stimulate the growth of a range of fungi. It is well known that Si is essential for diatoms. In mammals, Si is considered an essential trace element, required in bone, cartilage and connective tissue formation, enzymatic activities and other metabolic processes. Silicon was suggested to act as a phosphoprotein effector in bone. In mammals, Si is also reported to positively influence the immune system and to be required for lymphocyte proliferation. The aqueous chemistry of Si is dominated by silicic acid at biological pH ranges. Monosilicic acid can form stable complexes with organic hydroxy-containing molecules . Biosilica also has been identified associated with various biomolecules including proteins and carbohydrates. There are main seven groups of silicon utilizing organisms belonging to Gram positive bacteria, algae, protozoa, sponges, fungi, lichens, and monocotyledon plants. In each group again all the members are not silicon utilizing organisms, thus selective members in each group are further classified depending their degree of silicon utilization. Important silicon utilizing bacteria are Mycobacteria, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus spp. etc., Important silicon utilizing algae are Centrobacillariophyceae, Pennatibacillariophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Many protozoa belonging to Heterokonta, Choanoflagellida, Actinopoda are well known silicon utilizing microorganisms. Hexactinellida ( glass sponges

  7. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824

  8. Reversible transformation of a stable monomeric silicon(II) compound into a stable disilene by phase transfer: experimental and theoretical studies of the system {[(Me3Si)2N](Me5C5)Si}n with n = 1,2.

    PubMed

    Jutzi, Peter; Mix, Andreas; Neumann, Beate; Rummel, Britta; Schoeller, Wolfgang W; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Rozhenko, A B

    2009-09-01

    The salt (eta(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)silicon(II) tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (5) reacts at -78 degrees C with lithium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide in dimethoxyethane (DME) as solvent to give quantitatively the compound [bis(trimethylsilyl)amino][pentamethylcyclopentadienyl]silicon(II) 6A in the form of a colorless viscous oil. The reaction performed at -40 degrees C leads to the silicon(IV) compound 7, the formal oxidative addition product of 6A with DME. Cycloaddition is observed in the reaction of 6A with 2,3-dimethylbutadiene to give the silicon(IV) compound 8. Upon attempts to crystallize 6A from organic solvents such as hexane, THF, or toluene, the deep yellow compound trans-1,2-bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amino]-1,2-bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)disilene (6B), the formal dimer of 6A, crystallizes from the colorless solution, but only after several days or even weeks. Upon attempts to dissolve the disilene 6B in the described organic solvents, a colorless solution is obtained after prolonged vigorous shaking or ultrasound treatment. From this solution, pure 6A can be recovered after solvent evaporation. This transformation process can be repeated several times. In a mass spectroscopic investigation of 6B, Si=Si bond cleavage is observed to give the molecular ion with the composition of 6A as the fragment with the highest mass. The X-ray crystal structure analysis of the disilene 6B supports a molecule with a short Si=Si bond (2.168 A) with efficiently packed, rigid sigma-bonded cyclopentadienyl substituents and silylamino groups. The conformation of the latter does not allow electron donation to the central silicon atom. Theoretical calculations at the density functional level (RI-BP86 and B3LYP, TZVP basis set) confirm the structure of 6B and reveal for silylene 6A the presence of an eta(2)-bonded cyclopentadienyl ligand and of a silylamino group in a conformation that prevents electron back-donation. Further theoretical calculations for the silicon

  9. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  10. Determination of silicon in petroleum products by ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, S.G.; Williams, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    The determination of silicon in petroleum and related products is an important issue due to the effects it has in its various compound forms. Silicone fluids are used in many lubricants as foam inhibitors and serve a vital function as performance additives. Likewise, silicates are used in coolant formulations. The beneficial effects of these additives can be seen at very low treatment levels. Silicon can also occur as an unwanted contaminant in refined products as carryover of foam inhibitor used in refinery units or as silica deposited as fines from catalyst supports. Silicon compounds can poison refinery catalysts and their presence in certain products can ruin machinery. Traditionally, the presence of foam inhibitor in lubricants has been indicated by a foam test (ASTMD 8924P 146) rather than by spectroscopic determination of silicon. Aspects of determining silicon by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy in petroleum and related products will be presented.

  11. Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin A.

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Overview * Silicon cell development * Substrate production * Cell processing * Cell costs * Opportunities for improvement * Silicon-supported thin films * Summary * Acknowledgement * References

  12. Emerging heterogeneous integrated photonic platforms on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2015-05-01

    Silicon photonics has been established as a mature and promising technology for optoelectronic integrated circuits, mostly based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide platform. However, not all optical functionalities can be satisfactorily achieved merely based on silicon, in general, and on the SOI platform, in particular. Long-known shortcomings of silicon-based integrated photonics are optical absorption (in the telecommunication wavelengths) and feasibility of electrically-injected lasers (at least at room temperature). More recently, high two-photon and free-carrier absorptions required at high optical intensities for third-order optical nonlinear effects, inherent lack of second-order optical nonlinearity, low extinction ratio of modulators based on the free-carrier plasma effect, and the loss of the buried oxide layer of the SOI waveguides at mid-infrared wavelengths have been recognized as other shortcomings. Accordingly, several novel waveguide platforms have been developing to address these shortcomings of the SOI platform. Most of these emerging platforms are based on heterogeneous integration of other material systems on silicon substrates, and in some cases silicon is integrated on other substrates. Germanium and its binary alloys with silicon, III-V compound semiconductors, silicon nitride, tantalum pentoxide and other high-index dielectric or glass materials, as well as lithium niobate are some of the materials heterogeneously integrated on silicon substrates. The materials are typically integrated by a variety of epitaxial growth, bonding, ion implantation and slicing, etch back, spin-on-glass or other techniques. These wide range of efforts are reviewed here holistically to stress that there is no pure silicon or even group IV photonics per se. Rather, the future of the field of integrated photonics appears to be one of heterogenization, where a variety of different materials and waveguide platforms will be used for different purposes with

  13. High performance compound semiconductor SPAD arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Eric S.; Naydenkov, Mikhail; Bowling, Jared

    2016-05-01

    Aggregated compound semiconductor single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays are emerging as a viable alternative to the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). Compound semiconductors have the potential to surpass SiPM performance, potentially achieving orders of magnitude lower dark count rates and improved radiation hardness. New planar processing techniques have been developed to enable compound semiconductor SPAD devices to be produced with pixel pitches of 11 - 25 microns, with thousands of SPADs per array.

  14. Highly crosslinked silicon polymers for gas chromatography columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A new highly crosslinked silicone polymer particle for gas chromatography application and a process for synthesizing such copolymer are described. The new copolymer comprises vinyltriethoxysilane and octadecyltrichlorosilane. The copolymer has a high degree of crosslinking and a cool balance of polar to nonpolar sites in the porous silicon polymer assuring fast separation of compounds of variable polarity.

  15. Method to prevent recession loss of silica and silicon-containing materials in combustion gas environments

    DOEpatents

    Brun, Milivoj Konstantin; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2003-01-01

    While silicon-containing ceramics or ceramic composites are prone to material loss in combustion gas environments, this invention introduces a method to prevent or greatly reduce the thickness loss by injecting directly an effective amount, generally in the part per million level, of silicon or silicon-containing compounds into the combustion gases.

  16. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  17. Compound matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravvaritis, Christos; Mitrouli, Marilena

    2009-02-01

    This paper studies the possibility to calculate efficiently compounds of real matrices which have a special form or structure. The usefulness of such an effort lies in the fact that the computation of compound matrices, which is generally noneffective due to its high complexity, is encountered in several applications. A new approach for computing the Singular Value Decompositions (SVD's) of the compounds of a matrix is proposed by establishing the equality (up to a permutation) between the compounds of the SVD of a matrix and the SVD's of the compounds of the matrix. The superiority of the new idea over the standard method is demonstrated. Similar approaches with some limitations can be adopted for other matrix factorizations, too. Furthermore, formulas for the n - 1 compounds of Hadamard matrices are derived, which dodge the strenuous computations of the respective numerous large determinants. Finally, a combinatorial counting technique for finding the compounds of diagonal matrices is illustrated.

  18. Upgrading Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, L. M.; Moore, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    Closed-loop process produces semiconductor-grade silicon. Metallurgical-grade silicon converted to ultrapure silicon by reacting with hydrogen and silicon tetrahalide to form trihalosilane, purifying this intermediate and again decomposing to high purity silicon in third stage. Heterogeneously and homogeneously nucleated polycrystalline silicon used in semiconductor device applications and in silicon photovoltaic solar cell fabrication.

  19. Silicon Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwenspoek, Miko; Jansen, Henri V.

    2004-08-01

    This comprehensive book provides an overview of the key techniques used in the fabrication of micron-scale structures in silicon. Recent advances in these techniques have made it possible to create a new generation of microsystem devices, such as microsensors, accelerometers, micropumps, and miniature robots. The authors underpin the discussion of each technique with a brief review of the fundamental physical and chemical principles involved. They pay particular attention to methods such as isotropic and anisotropic wet chemical etching, wafer bonding, reactive ion etching, and surface micromachining. There is a special section on bulk micromachining, and the authors also discuss release mechanisms for movable microstructures. The book is a blend of detailed experimental and theoretical material, and will be of great interest to graduate students and researchers in electrical engineering and materials science whose work involves the study of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

  20. Preparation of Graphene Encapsulated Silicon Nanoball.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huijin; So, Deasup; Park, Sungjin; Huh, Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Concerning application of graphene, a lot of efforts have been made to improve performance of nanomaterials in many fields, such as electric and electronic devices. Some examples are preparation of 3-dimension structured nanomaterials like nanoballs by CVD process and hybridizing with silicon. These graphene-based materials are proven to be available for secondary battery, EMI and ACF in electronics. Especially, some research has shown that they were very effective to enhance safety and volumetric capacity when they were used as anode materials of secondary battery. Although graphite and its compound with metal have been used as an anode material due to their high stability and reversibility, it still has lower charge capacity. On the contrary, silicon is known as a material which increases the charge capacity up to four times, compared with carbon-based materials, but it has lower stability and reversibility. For that reason, a few researchers just started to improve the charge capacity by hybridization of carbon-based material with silicon. In this paper, we prepared nanocarbon based material which has a new structure of graphene encapsulated silicon nanoball as an anode material which is applicable to high-capacity secondary battery. In order to form a graphene encapsulated silicon nanoballs, the polystyrene encapsulated silicon nanoballs were prepared by emulsion polymerization of styrene monomer with silicon nanoparticles. The resulting nanoballs were immersed in iron chloride solution and then dried. Finally they were treated in high temperature through CVD and etched by hydrogen chloride. Morphology of the graphene encapsulated silicon nanoballs was observed by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and the field emission transmission electron microscope (FETEM) to search for core-shell structured nanoball. Spherical structure of graphene encapsulated silicon nanoball was investigated by the Raman, the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to

  1. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  2. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  3. Preparation and characterization of silicone rubber/functionalized carbon nanotubes composites via in situ polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun-Sik; Kwon, Soon-Min; Lee, Kwang Hee; Yoon, Jin-San; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2008-10-01

    The dispersion of the nanometer-sized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a silicone matrix leads to a marked improvement in the properties of the silicone based composite. In this study, silicone rubber/MWCNTs nanocomposite was successfully prepared by functionalizing MWCNTs with silane compound. This allowed a homogeneous dispersion of functionalized MWCNTs in the silicone matrix. The morphology of functionalized MWCNTs was observed using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer. The silicone rubber/functionalized MWCNTs (1 wt%) composites showed that the tensile strength and modulus of the composites improved dramatically by about 50% and 28%, respectively, compared with silicone rubber. PMID:19198496

  4. Vapor Pressure and Evaporation Coefficient of Silicon Monoxide over a Mixture of Silicon and Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation coefficient and equilibrium vapor pressure of silicon monoxide over a mixture of silicon and vitreous silica have been studied over the temperature range (1433 to 1608) K. The evaporation coefficient for this temperature range was (0.007 plus or minus 0.002) and is approximately an order of magnitude lower than the evaporation coefficient over amorphous silicon monoxide powder and in general agreement with previous measurements of this quantity. The enthalpy of reaction at 298.15 K for this reaction was calculated via second and third law analyses as (355 plus or minus 25) kJ per mol and (363.6 plus or minus 4.1) kJ per mol respectively. In comparison with previous work with the evaporation of amorphous silicon monoxide powder as well as other experimental measurements of the vapor pressure of silicon monoxide gas over mixtures of silicon and silica, these systems all tend to give similar equilibrium vapor pressures when the evaporation coefficient is correctly taken into account. This provides further evidence that amorphous silicon monoxide is an intimate mixture of small domains of silicon and silica and not strictly a true compound.

  5. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  6. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Carleton, Karen L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  7. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  8. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  9. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. PMID:26057244

  10. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  11. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  12. The Electrochemical Fluorination of Organosilicon Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaver, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    The electrochemical fluorination of tetramethylsilane, hexamethyl-disiloxane, diethyldichlorosilane, amyltrichlorosilane, and phenyltri-chlorosilane was conducted in an Inconel cell equipped with nickel electrodes. A potential of approximately 5.0 volts and a current of approximately 1.0 ampere were used for the electrolysis reaction. In all cases the fluorinations resulted in considerable scission of the carbon-silicon bonds yielding hydrogen and the various fluorinated decomposition products; no fluoroorganosilicon compounds were identified. The main decomposition products were silicon tetrafluoride, the corresponding fluorinated carbon compounds, and the various organofluorosilanes. It is suggested that this is due to the nucleophilic attack of the fluoride ion (or complex fluoride ion) on the carbon-silicon bond.

  13. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  14. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  15. Silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Steven G; Kincl, Laurel D; Anderson, Kim A

    2014-03-18

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual's exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log K(ow) from -0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application. PMID:24548134

  16. Silicone Wristbands as Personal Passive Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual’s exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log Kow from −0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application. PMID:24548134

  17. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  18. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  19. A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Performance and Materials Chemistry of a Sililcone-Based Replicating Compound

    SciTech Connect

    Kalan, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this project was to characterize the performance and chemistry of a siliconebased replicating compound. Some silicone replicating compounds are useful for critical inspection of surface features. Common applications are for examining micro-cracks, surface pitting, scratching, and other surface defects. Materials characterization techniques were used: FTIR, XPS, ToF-SIMS, AFM, and Confocal Microscopy to evaluate the replicating compound. These techniques allowed for the characterization and verification of the resolution capabilities and surface contamination that may be a result of using the compound. FTIR showed the compound is entirely made from silicone constituents. The AFM and Confocal Microscopy results showed the compound does accurately replicate the surface features to the claimed resolution. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed there is a silicone contaminant layer left behind when a cured replica is peeled off a surface. Attempts to clean off the contamination could not completely remove all silicone residues.

  20. Silicone Contamination Camera for Developed for Shuttle Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On many shuttle missions, silicone contamination from unknown sources from within or external to the shuttle payload bay has been a chronic problem plaguing experiment payloads. There is currently a wide range of silicone usage on the shuttle. Silicones are used to coat the shuttle tiles to enhance their ability to shed rain, and over 100 kg of RTV 560 silicone is used to seal white tiles to the shuttle surfaces. Silicones are also used in electronic components, potting compounds, and thermal control blankets. Efforts to date to identify and eliminate the sources of silicone contamination have not been highly successful and have created much controversy. To identify the sources of silicone contamination on the space shuttle, the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a contamination camera. This specially designed pinhole camera utilizes low-Earth-orbit atomic oxygen to develop a picture that identifies sources of silicone contamination on shuttle-launched payloads. The volatile silicone species travel through the aperture of the pinhole camera, and since volatile silicone species lose their hydrocarbon functionalities under atomic oxygen attack, the silicone adheres to the substrate as SiO_x. This glassy deposit should be spatially arranged in the image of the sources of silicone contamination. To view the contamination image, one can use ultrasensitive thickness measurement techniques, such as scanning variable-angle ellipsometry, to map the surface topography of the camera's substrate. The demonstration of a functional contamination camera would resolve the controversial debate concerning the amount and location of contamination sources, would allow corrective actions to be taken, and would demonstrate a useful tool for contamination documentation on future shuttle payloads, with near negligible effect on cost and weight.

  1. Incorporation of capsaicin in silicone coatings for enhanced antifouling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Jaggari, Karunakar; Zhang Newby, Bi-Min

    2002-03-01

    Successful use of capsaicin as insect and animal repellant propelled us to use it as a possible antifouling agent. Its non-toxic, non-biocidal, non-leaching properties make it a viable alternative to organotin compounds. In order to optimize the anti-fouling performance of the coating, silicone, the most effective foul-release marine coating, was chosen as the carrier. We have incorporated capsaicin into silicone coating, by both bulk entrapment and surface immobilization. Contact angle measurements on capsaicin-incorporated silicone exhibited an increase in wettability, owing to the presence of capsaicin. FTIR study further confirmed the incorporation of capsaicin in silicone. Bacterial attachment studies were conducted using lake Erie water. While bacteria liberally inhabited the control coating, their presence on the capsaicin-incorporated coating was found to be minimal. These preliminary studies indicate that capsaicin incorporated silicone could be a viable environment friendly alternative to currently used antifouling coatings.

  2. Carbonitriding of silicon using plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbar, S.; Khan, I. A.; Ahmad, R.; Zakaullah, M.; Pan, J. S.

    2009-03-15

    Carbonitride thin films have been deposited on silicon substrate by the irradiation of energetic nitrogen ions emanated from dense plasma focus device. The carbon ions are ablated by the irradiation of relativistic electrons from the insert material (graphite) placed at the anode tip. The x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates that a polycrystalline thin film consisting of various compounds such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC, and C{sub 3}N{sub 4} is formed on the silicon (100) substrate. Crystallinity of different compounds decreases with the increase in angular positions (0 deg., 10 deg., and 20 deg. ). Raman spectroscopy shows the appearance of graphitic and disordered bands with silicon nitride and silicon carbide indicating the formation of carbonitride. Raman spectra also indicate that broadening of bands increases with the increase in focus deposition shots, leading to the amorphization of the thin film. The amorphization of the thin films depends on the ion energy flux as well as on the sample angular position. The scanning electron microscopy exhibits the damaging of the substrate surface at 0 deg. angular position. The microstructure shows the tubular shape for higher ion dose (40 focus shots). At 10 deg. angular position, a two phase phenomenon is observed with the ordered phase in the solid solution. A smooth and uniform surface morphology showing a small cluster is observed for the 20 deg. angular position.

  3. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  4. [Silicone breast implants].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M; Brandt, B; Breiting, V B; Christensen, L H; Thomsen, J L

    1989-12-18

    A brief review of the use of silicone breast implants, their structure, methods of implantation and complications is presented. Acute complications are rare, being mainly infection and hematoma. Long-term complications, on the contrary, are common, consisting mainly of capsular contracture around the prosthesis with subsequent pain and deformation of the breast. More rarely silicone granulomas form, and prosthesis rupture or herniation occurs. The importance of silicone leakage for these complications is discussed separately as well as the treatment of and prevention of capsular contracture and demonstration of silicone in tissue. A critical attitude towards the use of silicone breast implants, when these are used for purely cosmetic purposes, is recommended at present. New improved types of silicone breast implants are currently being tested clinically. PMID:2692262

  5. Growth of silicon bump induced by swift heavy ion at the silicon oxide-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Carlotti, J.-F.; Touboul, A.D.; Ramonda, M.; Caussanel, M.; Guasch, C.; Bonnet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    2006-01-23

    Thin silicon oxide layers on silicon substrates are investigated by scanning probe microscopy before and after irradiation with 210 MeV Au+ ions. After irradiation and complete chemical etching of the silicon oxide layer, silicon bumps grown on the silicon surface are observed. It is shown that each impinging ion induces one silicon bump at the interface. This observation is consistent with the thermal spike theory. Ion energy loss is transferred to the oxide and induces local melting. Silicon-bump formation is favored when the oxide and oxide-silicon interface are silicon rich.

  6. Mist Ejection of Silicon Microparticle Using a Silicon Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Yoshinori; Murakami, Takaaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa; Itoh, Toshihiro

    The novel mist-jet technology using a silicon nozzle and a silicon reflector has been developed. Ejection of water mist containing the silicon microparticles is demonstrated. Impurities of the silicon microparticles ejected on the substrate are analyzed. It has been verified for the first time that the contamination is reduced by the silicon head. The silicon pattern drawn by the head is successfully formed.

  7. Heat-treatment effects in neutron transmutation doped epitaxial silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from a gaseous silicon compound onto a heated silicon substrate may be used to deposit an epitaxial SI layer and to obtain an electrical p-n junction. The dopant concentration in the epi-Si layer is a function of the gaseous dopant ion content, flow rate, temperature gradient, and any migration of impurities (autodoping) from the heated substrate. This technical note describes some results of carrier concentration, mobility, and resistivity measurements on small (0.5 cm/sup 2/) epi-Si samples using the van der Pauw (vdP) technique.

  8. Micromachined Silicon Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, William R.; Tai, Yu-Chong; Yap, Markus; Walker, Christopher K.

    1994-01-01

    Components that handle millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths fabricated conveniently. Micromachining rectangular waveguide involves standard steps of masking, etching, and deposition of metal on silicon. Parts made assembled into half-waveguide and finally into full waveguide. Silicon-micromachining approach enables simultaneous fabrication of several versions of waveguide, with variations in critical parameter, on single wafer of silicon. Performances of versions compared and optimized more quickly and at lower cost than is possible if different versions are fabricated sequentially, by conventional machining techniques.

  9. Highly porous silicon membranes fabricated from silicon nitride/silicon stacks.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chengzhu; Striemer, Christopher C; Gaborski, Thomas R; McGrath, James L; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2014-07-23

    Nanopore formation in silicon films has previously been demonstrated using rapid thermal crystallization of ultrathin (15 nm) amorphous Si films sandwiched between nm-thick SiO2 layers. In this work, the silicon dioxide barrier layers are replaced with silicon nitride, resulting in nanoporous silicon films with unprecedented pore density and novel morphology. Four different thin film stack systems including silicon nitride/silicon/silicon nitride (NSN), silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon nitride (OSN), silicon nitride/silicon/silicon dioxide (NSO), and silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon dioxide (OSO) are tested under different annealing temperatures. Generally the pore size, pore density, and porosity positively correlate with the annealing temperature for all four systems. The NSN system yields substantially higher porosity and pore density than the OSO system, with the OSN and NSO stack characteristics fallings between these extremes. The higher porosity of the Si membrane in the NSN stack is primarily due to the pore formation enhancement in the Si film. It is hypothesized that this could result from the interfacial energy difference between the silicon/silicon nitride and silicon/silicon dioxide, which influences the Si crystallization process. PMID:24623562

  10. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  11. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  12. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  13. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  14. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  15. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  16. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  17. Silicone-Rubber Tooling for Hollow Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Wave-free contour surface obtained by using flexible mold. Silicone-rubber layup tool, when used in conjunction with hard plastic laminating mold defining desired contour, produces panel with wave-free surface that accurately reproduces shape of mold. In addition to providing porous hollow-panel wing structure that acts as duct for transporting sucked boundary layer tooling, also used to fabricate high-strength lightweight door panels and any single-or compound-contour panel.

  18. Dianionic species with a bond consisting of two pentacoordinated silicon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Naokazu; Miyake, Hideaki; Sasaki, Keishi; Kawashima, Takayuki; Mizorogi, Naomi; Nagase, Shigeru

    2010-02-01

    Silicon can form bonds to other tetracoordinated silicon atoms and these bonds form the framework of many organosilicon compounds and crystalline silicon. Silicon can also form a pentacoordinated anionic structure-a so-called `silicate'. No compounds containing a direct bond between two silicate moieties-`disilicates' where two silicate structures are combined in one species-have been reported because of the electronic repulsion between the anionic halves and difficulty preventing the release of anions. Here we report the synthesis of thermally stable and isolable disilicates by the reductive coupling reaction of a silane bearing two electron-withdrawing bidentate ligands. Two pentacoordinated silicons, positively charged despite the formal negative charge, constitute a single σ-bond and bind eight negatively charged atoms. They can be reversibly protonated, cleaving two Si-O bonds, to afford a tetracoordinated disilane. Their unique electronic properties could be promising for the construction of functional materials with silicon wire made up of silicate chains.

  19. Incorporation of dopant impurities into a silicon oxynitride matrix containing silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Fabien; Ulhaq-Bouillet, Corinne; Muller, Dominique; Slaoui, Abdelilah; Ferblantier, Gérald

    2016-05-01

    Dopant impurities, such as gallium (Ga), indium (In), and phosphorus (P), were incorporated into silicon-rich silicon oxynitride (SRSON) thin films by the ion implantation technique. To form silicon nanoparticles, the implanted layers were thermally annealed at temperatures up to 1100 °C for 60 min. This thermal treatment generates a phase separation of the silicon nanoparticles from the SRSON matrix in the presence of the dopant atoms. We report on the position of the dopant species within the host matrix and relative to the silicon nanoparticles, as well as on the effect of the dopants on the crystalline structure and the size of the Si nanoparticles. The energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy technique is thoroughly used to identify the chemical species. The distribution of the dopant elements within the SRSON compound is determined using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray mapping coupled with spectral imaging of silicon plasmons was performed to spatially localize at the nanoscale the dopant impurities and the silicon nanoparticles in the SRSON films. Three different behaviors were observed according to the implanted dopant type (Ga, In, or P). The In-doped SRSON layers clearly showed separated nanoparticles based on indium, InOx, or silicon. In contrast, in the P-doped SRSON layers, Si and P are completely miscible. A high concentration of P atoms was found within the Si nanoparticles. Lastly, in Ga-doped SRSON the Ga atoms formed large nanoparticles close to the SRSON surface, while the Si nanoparticles were localized in the bulk of the SRSON layer. In this work, we shed light on the mechanisms responsible for these three different behaviors.

  20. Method and apparatus for stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon grown in silicon nitride ambient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. A.; Wheeler, R. K. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and apparatus for thermally growing stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon is disclosed. A previously etched and baked silicon nitride tube placed in a furnace is used to grow the silicon dioxide. First, pure oxygen is allowed to flow through the tube to initially coat the inside surface of the tube with a thin layer of silicon dioxide. After the tube is coated with the thin layer of silicon dioxide, the silicon is oxidized thermally in a normal fashion. If the tube becomes contaminated, the silicon dioxide is etched off thereby exposing clean silicon nitride and then the inside of the tube is recoated with silicon dioxide. As is disclosed, the silicon nitride tube can also be used as the ambient for the pyrolytic decomposition of silane and ammonia to form thin layers of clean silicon nitride.

  1. Wet-chemical systems and methods for producing black silicon substrates

    DOEpatents

    Yost, Vernon; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Page, Matthew

    2015-05-19

    A wet-chemical method of producing a black silicon substrate. The method comprising soaking single crystalline silicon wafers in a predetermined volume of a diluted inorganic compound solution. The substrate is combined with an etchant solution that forms a uniform noble metal nanoparticle induced Black Etch of the silicon wafer, resulting in a nanoparticle that is kinetically stabilized. The method comprising combining with an etchant solution having equal volumes acetonitrile/acetic acid:hydrofluoric acid:hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  3. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  4. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  5. Silicon research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of solar cells suitable for space applications are discussed, along with the advantages and disadvantages of silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells. The goal of a silicon solar cell with 18% efficiency has not been reached and does not appear promising in the near future.

  6. Producing silicon continuously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, W. M.; Rosler, R. S.; Thompson, S.

    1981-01-01

    Fluid-bed vaporization followed by chemical vapor deposition generates large, semiconductor-grade silicon particles. Method is economical, high-volume alternative to conventional batch-processing methods. Harvested chunks, extracted in cyclone separator, are about 0.5 to 1.3 centimeters in diameter. Process is not limited to polymer feedstock; it utilizes any halosilane intermediate used in silicon production.

  7. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  8. Cervical silicone lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Latoni Kaysha; Thiruchelvam, Janavikulam

    2016-07-01

    A patient presented to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery with a rare case of cervical silicone lymphadenopathy. She had a painless ovoid mass in the left side of her neck and had had cosmetic breast augmentation 10 years before. Radiological imaging and core biopsy examination were consistent with silicone lymphadenopathy. PMID:26830068

  9. Silicon nitride sintered body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    The sintering of silicon carbide and it production are described. The method of production is by calcination in which molding is followed by sintering without compression. The invention improves the composition of the silicon carbide ceramic. Six examples of the invention are illustrated and discussed.

  10. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  11. Biologically active compounds of semi-metals.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Sigler, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Semi-metals (boron, silicon, arsenic and selenium) form organo-metal compounds, some of which are found in nature and affect the physiology of living organisms. They include, e.g., the boron-containing antibiotics aplasmomycin, borophycin, boromycin, and tartrolon or the silicon compounds present in "silicate" bacteria, relatives of the genus Bacillus, which release silicon from aluminosilicates through the secretion of organic acids. Arsenic is incorporated into arsenosugars and arsenobetaines by marine algae and invertebrates, and fungi and bacteria can produce volatile methylated arsenic compounds. Some prokaryotes can use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor while others can utilize arsenite as an electron donor to generate energy. Selenium is incorporated into selenocysteine that is found in some proteins. Biomethylation of selenide produces methylselenide and dimethylselenide. Selenium analogues of amino acids, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-infective drugs are often used as analogues of important pharmacological sulfur compounds. Other metalloids, i.e. the rare and toxic tellurium and the radioactive short-lived astatine, have no biological significance. PMID:17991498

  12. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  13. Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagiwa, Y.; Matsuura, Y.; Kimura, K.

    2014-06-01

    We have focused on the binary narrow-bandgap intermetallic compounds FeGa3 and RuGa3 as thermoelectric materials. Their crystal structure is FeGa3-type (tetragonal, P42/ mnm) with 16 atoms per unit cell. Despite their simple crystal structure, their room temperature thermal conductivity is in the range 4-5-W-m-1-K-1. Both compounds have narrow-bandgaps of approximately 0.3-eV near the Fermi level. Because their Seebeck coefficients are quite large negative values in the range 350-<-| S 373K|-<-550- μV-K-1 for undoped samples, it should be possible to obtain highly efficient thermoelectric materials both by adjusting the carrier concentration and by reducing the thermal conductivity. Here, we report the effects of doping on the thermoelectric properties of FeGa3 and RuGa3 as n and p-type materials. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, was significantly improved by substitution of Sn for Ga in FeGa3 (electron-doping) and by substitution of Zn for Ga in RuGa3 (hole-doping), mainly as a result of optimization of the electronic part, S 2 σ.

  14. Reversible Cycling of Silicon and Silicon Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrovac, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Lithium ion batteries typically use a graphite negative electrode. Silicon can store more lithium than any other element and has long been considered as an attractive replacement for graphite. The theoretical lithium storage capacity of silicon is nearly ten times higher than graphite volumetrically and three times higher gravimetrically. The equilibrium Si-Li binary system is well known. Completely new phase behaviors are observed at room temperature. This includes the formation of a new phase, Li15Si4, which is the highest lithium containing phase at room temperature [1]. The formation of Li15Si4 is accompanied by a 280 percent volume expansion of silicon. During de-alloying this phase contracts, forming amorphous silicon. The volume expansion of alloys can cause intra-particle fracture and inter-particle disconnection; leading to loss of cycle life. To overcome issues with volume expansion requires a detailed knowledge of Li-Si phase behavior, careful design of the composition and nanostructure of the alloy and the microstructure of the negative electrode [2]. In this presentation the phase behavior of the Li-Si system will be described. Using this knowledge alone, strategies can be developed so that silicon can be reversibly cycled in a battery hundreds of times. Further increases in energy density and efficiency can be gained by alloying silicon with other elements, while controlling microstructure [2]. Coupled with negative electrode design strategies, practical negative electrodes for lithium ion cells can be developed based on bulk materials, with significant energy density improvement over conventional electrodes. [4pt] [1] M.N. Obrovac and L.J. Krause, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A103. [0pt] [2] M.N. Obrovac, Leif Christensen, Dinh Ba Le, and J.R. Dahn, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A849

  15. Spin Transport in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2008-03-01

    Silicon has been broadly viewed as the ideal material for spintronics due to its low atomic weight, lattice inversion symmetry, and near lack of nuclear spin, resulting in exceptionally long spin lifetime. Despite this appeal, however, the experimental difficulties of achieving coherent spin transport in silicon were overcome for the first time only recently, by using unique spin-polarized hot-electron injection and detection techniques. [1] Our subsequent observations of very long spin lifetimes and transit lengths [2] have impact on prospects for Silicon spintronics as the basis for a new paradigm of information processing. [1] Ian Appelbaum, Biqin Huang, and Douwe J. Monsma, ``Electronic measurement and control of spin transport in silicon,'' Nature 447, 295 (2007). [2] Biqin Huang, Douwe J. Monsma, and Ian Appelbaum, ``Coherent spin transport through a 350-micron-thick silicon wafer,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 177209 (2007).

  16. Intraventricular Silicone Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Boissonnot, Michèle; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Simonet, Charles; Ciron, Jonathan; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial silicone oil is a rare complication of intraocular endotamponade with silicone oil. We describe a case of intraventricular silicone oil fortuitously observed 38 months after an intraocular tamponade for a complicated retinal detachment in an 82 year-old woman admitted in the Department of Neurology for a stroke. We confirm the migration of silicone oil along the optic nerve. We discuss this rare entity with a review of the few other cases reported in the medical literature. Intraventricular migration of silicone oil after intraocular endotamponade is usually asymptomatic but have to be known of the neurologists and the radiologists because of its differential diagnosis that are intraventricular hemorrhage and tumor. PMID:26735537

  17. Silicone-containing composition

    DOEpatents

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  18. In-situ formation of nanoparticles within a silicon-based matrix

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Wilcoxon, Jess P.; Abrams, Billie L.

    2008-06-10

    A method for encapsulating nanoparticles with an encapsulating matrix that minimizes aggregation and maintains favorable properties of the nanoparticles. The matrix comprises silicon-based network-forming compounds such as ormosils and polysiloxanes. The nanoparticles are synthesized from precursors directly within the silicon-based matrix.

  19. Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Fehring, Jr., Edward J.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2001-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  20. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  1. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kovačević, Goran Pivac, Branko

    2014-01-28

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  2. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  3. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  4. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  5. Process for purification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rath, H. J.; Sirtl, E.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1981-01-01

    The purification of metallurgically pure silicon having a silicon content of more than 95% by weight is accomplished by leaching with an acidic solution which substantially does not attack silicon. A mechanical treatment leading to continuous particle size reduction of the granulated silicon to be purified is combined with the chemical purification step.

  6. Transformational silicon electronics.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Torres Sevilla, Galo Andres; Ghoneim, Mohamed Tarek; Inayat, Salman Bin; Ahmed, Sally M; Hussain, Aftab Mustansir; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-02-25

    In today's traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry's most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. PMID:24476361

  7. Process for making silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  8. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  9. Monitoring of Malodorous Compounds from a Swine Waste Lagoon by an Equilibrium Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The levels of malodorous compounds in the air above an anaerobic lagoon of a large swine farrowing operation were measured. Compounds were adsorbed onto silicone stir bars and retained compounds measured by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Equilibration times were previously determined by exper...

  10. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O’Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  11. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  12. Note: A portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for rapid sampling and analysis of silicon-containing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, R. P.; Mason, G. S.; Miller, A. L.; Stipe, C. B.; Kearns, J. D.; Prier, M. W.; Rarick, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument has been developed for measuring silicon-containing aerosols in near real-time using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The instrument uses a vacuum system to collect and deposit airborne particulate matter onto a translatable reel of filter tape. LIBS is used to analyze the deposited material, determining the amount of silicon-containing compounds present. In laboratory testing with pure silica (SiO2), the correlation between LIBS intensity for a characteristic silicon emission and the concentration of silica in a model aerosol was determined for a range of concentrations, demonstrating the instrument's plausibility for identifying hazardous levels of silicon-containing compounds.

  13. Note: A portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for rapid sampling and analysis of silicon-containing aerosols.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, R P; Mason, G S; Miller, A L; Stipe, C B; Kearns, J D; Prier, M W; Rarick, J D

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument has been developed for measuring silicon-containing aerosols in near real-time using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The instrument uses a vacuum system to collect and deposit airborne particulate matter onto a translatable reel of filter tape. LIBS is used to analyze the deposited material, determining the amount of silicon-containing compounds present. In laboratory testing with pure silica (SiO2), the correlation between LIBS intensity for a characteristic silicon emission and the concentration of silica in a model aerosol was determined for a range of concentrations, demonstrating the instrument's plausibility for identifying hazardous levels of silicon-containing compounds. PMID:27250478

  14. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  15. Silicon Nitride For Gallium Arsenide Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagle, J.; Morgan, David V.

    1987-04-01

    Gallium Arsenide, unlike silicon does not have a natural oxide with the dielectric and interface qualities of SiO2. As a consequence alternative techniques have to be developed for device and IC processing applications. Plasma deposited silicon nitride films are currently being investigated in many laboratories. This paper will deal with the characterization of such films deposited under a range of gas and plasma deposition conditions. The techniques of Infra Red Spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering have been used for characterization of both "as deposited layers" and layers which have been annealed up to temperatures of 800 °C, after deposition. The use of RBS for silicon nitride on GaAs is limited since the relatively small nitride spectrum is superimposed on much larger GaAs spectrum. The problem can be removed by placing carbon test substrates alongside the GaAs wafers. This separates the silicon and nitrogen spectra from the substrate enabling enhanced accuracy to be obtained. In this paper the range of results obtained will be discussed in the context of the deposition condition in order to identify the optimum conditions for obtaining a stoichiometric compound and a high quality interface.

  16. Respiratory Disease following Illicit Injection of Silicone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex Charles; Astani, Seyed Amin

    2013-01-01

    Unregulated, pseudomedical procedures risk serious sequelae even when otherwise safe compounds are used. Silicone is commonly used legally in cosmetic procedures owing to its durability, resistance to heat and aging, and low immunogenicity. However, inappropriate or illegal silicone injection can pose severe local and systemic complications including serious pulmonary compromise. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with hemoptysis and progressive shortness of breath following illicit silicone injections to the gluteal fat and was found to have new, diffuse, bilateral, ground-glass opacities on contrast-enhanced pulmonary computed tomography. Transbronchial biopsy elucidated that this was a lipoid pneumonia-type injury secondary to silicone infiltration. PMID:23956752

  17. Respiratory Disease following Illicit Injection of Silicone: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Essenmacher, Alex Charles; Astani, Seyed Amin

    2013-01-01

    Unregulated, pseudomedical procedures risk serious sequelae even when otherwise safe compounds are used. Silicone is commonly used legally in cosmetic procedures owing to its durability, resistance to heat and aging, and low immunogenicity. However, inappropriate or illegal silicone injection can pose severe local and systemic complications including serious pulmonary compromise. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with hemoptysis and progressive shortness of breath following illicit silicone injections to the gluteal fat and was found to have new, diffuse, bilateral, ground-glass opacities on contrast-enhanced pulmonary computed tomography. Transbronchial biopsy elucidated that this was a lipoid pneumonia-type injury secondary to silicone infiltration. PMID:23956752

  18. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-06-20

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  19. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  20. Novel axially disubstituted non-aggregated silicon phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Çakır, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of a range of new axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines with 2-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy] or 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy] groups as axial ligands. 2-[2-(Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethanol 2, 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy]ethanol 4 are reacted with silicon phthalocyanine 1, to give an axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines 3 and 5. Axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanine complexes were synthesized at the first time. Newly synthesized silicon phthalocyanines were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry. These new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 showed excellent solubility in organic solvents such as CHCl3, CH2Cl2, acetone, DMF, DMSO, THF, EtOAc. The aggregation behavior of these compounds were investigated in different concentrations of DMSO. The effect of solvents on absorption spectra were studied in various organic solvents. The thermal stabilities of the silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 were determined by thermogravimetric analysis.

  1. Silicone azide fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Finely powdered titanium oxide was added to silicone azide as the sintering agent to produce a nonflammable material. Mixing proportions, physical properties, and chemical composition of the fireproofing material are included.

  2. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  3. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  4. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  5. Towards silicon speciation in light petroleum products using gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry equipped with a dynamic reaction cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainet, Fabien; Lienemann, Charles-Philippe; Ponthus, Jeremie; Pécheyran, Christophe; Castro, Joaudimir; Tessier, Emmanuel; Donard, Olivier François Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Silicon speciation has recently gained interest in the oil and gas industry due to the significant poisoning problems caused by silicon on hydrotreatment catalysts. The poisoning effect clearly depends on the structure of the silicon species which must be determined and quantified. The hyphenation of gas chromatography (GC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows a specific detection to determine the retention times of all silicon species. The aim of this work is to determine the retention indices of unknown silicon species to allow their characterization by a multi-technical approach in order to access to their chemical structure. The optimization of the dynamic reaction cell (DRC) of the ICP-MS using hydrogen as reactant gas successfully demonstrated the resolution of the interferences (14N14N+ and 12C16O+) initially present on 28Si. The linearity was excellent for silicon compounds and instrumental detection limits ranged from 20 to 140 μg of Si/kg depending on the response of the silicon compounds. A continuous release of silicon in the torch was observed most likely due to the use of a torch and an injector which was made of quartz. A non-universal response for silicon was observed and it was clearly necessary to use response coefficients to quantify silicon compounds. Known silicon compounds such as cyclic siloxanes (D3-D16) coming from PDMS degradation were confirmed. Furthermore, more than 10 new silicon species never characterized before in petroleum products were highlighted in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) degradation samples produced under thermal cracking of hydrocarbons. These silicon species mainly consisted of linear and cyclic structures containing reactive functions such as ethoxy, peroxide and hydroxy groups which can be able to react with the alumina surface and hence, poison the catalyst. This characterization will further allow the development of innovative solutions such as trapping silicon compounds or

  6. Turbulent flow model for vapor collection efficiency of a high-purity silicon reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    In this study a mathematical model and a computer code based on this model was developed to allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors for converting gaseous silicon compounds to condensed-phase silicon. Specifically, the model formulated describes the silicon vapor separation/collection from the developing turbulent flow stream within reactors of the Westinghouse type. Migration of the silicon vapor to the reactor walls was described by the parametric solutions presented here, in order to reduce the experimentation necessary in the design of such reactors. Calculations relating to the collection efficiencies of such reactors are presented as a function of the reactor throughflow and distance along its length.

  7. Silicon sheet surface studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1985-06-01

    Results of the program are presented on developing an understanding of the basic mechanisms of abrasion and wear of silicon and on the nondestructive measurement of residual stresses in sheet silicon. Experiments were conducted at various temperatures and in the presence of various fluids. In abrasive wear, it was shown that dislocations, microtwins, and cracks are generated beneath the contact surface. Residual stresses in ribbon by the edge defined film growth process were measured by use of a shadow moire interferometry technique.

  8. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  9. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  10. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  11. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  12. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  13. Silicon and silicone: theoretical and clinical implications of breast implants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S H; Chang, C C; Teuber, S S; Gershwin, M E

    1993-02-01

    In the past 10 years, there have been multiple published reports associating silicone breast implants with scleroderma, morphea, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, CREST syndrome and "human adjuvant disease." The alleged offending material, silicone, is a synthetic polymer containing a silicon-oxygen backbone. Beginning with the heating of SiO2 in the presence of carbon, elemental silicon is produced. Methylchloride is added and the resulting product is hydrolyzed to form low molecular weight prepolymers which are linked to form linear silicone polymers and cross-linked to yield silicone rubbers or elastomers. The polymeric and hydrophobic characteristics of silicone and the presence of electrostatic charges and organic sidegroups make silicone a potentially ideal immunogen, leading to cross-reactivity with autoantigens. Silicon is an essential constituent of proteoglycans which theoretically could result in immunological cross-reactions between silicone and connective tissues. Although the literature contains numerous examples of silicone-associated autoimmune disease, there is no consistent pattern of immunological abnormalities observed. There are, however, some intriguing and interesting observations. Further large-scale studies are needed to determine if a link between silicone exposure and autoimmunity exists. Also, since the inducing events of autoimmune diseases are unknown, studies on silicone could provide a model for autoimmune diseases associated with toxicological factors. PMID:8441826

  14. Electronic structure and stability of some silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kovač, Branka

    2010-05-01

    The electronic structures of N,1,3-tris(1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclodisilazan-2-amine ( I) and 2,3,5,5-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene ( II) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss the influence of substituent effects on their electronic structure and thermodynamic stability. Our study shows that trimethylsilyl substituents have strong influence on the electronic structure of cyclopentadiene via inductive effect. Their influence on thermodynamic stability is also pronounced. In substituted cyclodisilazanes hyperconjugative influence of alkylsilyl groups was shown to cause relative thermodynamic stabilization of the cyclodisilazane system.

  15. Improved mold release for filled-silicone compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accountius, O. E.

    1973-01-01

    Ceramic and filled-plastic materials used for fabrication of tiles are relatively brittle and easily break as they are being removed from molds. Dusting mold surfaces with commercially available glass microspheres provides mold release superior to existing spray releases. Glass-microsphere dusting also permits removal of uncured tile which has very little strength.

  16. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  17. Silicone breast implant materials.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U

    2012-01-01

    This opinion article has been written on request because of the recent public controversy over silicone breast implants produced by a now-defunct company, Poly Implant Prosthese (PIP) in France. More than 300,000 PIP devices have been implanted. The purposes of my article are to (1.) provide a general overview of silicone breast implant materials, (2.) to describe the general safety of these materials as reported to date, and (3.) to summarise current publicly available information about these aspects of the PIP prostheses. The materials covered are the silicone rubber from which the implant shells are made and the silicone gel used to fill the shell. The materials safety issues are biocompatibility (especially of the gel) and biodurability of the shell. The literature reviewed indicates that biocompatibility is not an issue with other current generation implants. However, biodurability is. A rough estimate of implant shell rupture rate is ~10+% at 10 years. Information is still emerging about the PIP implants. Initial regulatory disclosures suggest the PIP implants may have both biocompatibility and biodurability problems. They also suggest that PIP implants may have been produced using silicone materials not certified as medical grade. Governmental health and regulatory agencies are just now in the process of deciding what actions should be taken to protect patients. PMID:22826101

  18. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  19. Liquidus of Silicon Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv; Tangstad, Merete

    2011-08-01

    Thermodynamic knowledge about liquid silicon is crucial for the production of solar-grade silicon feedstock from molten silicon. In the current study, liquidus for silicon binary alloys is formulated using a previously developed method in which the liquidus curve is calculated using two constants. The liquidus measurements for the silicon portion of the silicon alloys with Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, Zn, Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, Sn, Pb, Bi, Sb, Ga, In, Ni, Pd, Mn, and Rh are reviewed, and the consistent data were used to determine the liquidus constants. The liquidus curves for silicon binary systems are calculated and plotted. It is indicated that the calculated liquidus curves fit well with the experimental data. A correlation between the determined liquidus constants is also observed, which can be used to gain a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the silicon binary melts.

  20. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  1. Bondability of RTV silicon rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delollis, N. J.; Montoya, O.

    1972-01-01

    Glow discharge method for producing a bondable Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) silicone is described. Mechanical and chemical properties of silicone specimens are described. Theory concerning the relationship between surface characteristics and bondability is examined with respect to the polymer specimen.

  2. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits.

    PubMed

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  3. Emissivity of microstructured silicon.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick G; Smith, Peter; King, Vernon; Billman, Curtis; Winkler, Mark; Mazur, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Infrared transmittance and hemispherical-directional reflectance data from 2.5 to 25 microm on microstructured silicon surfaces have been measured, and spectral emissivity has been calculated for this wavelength range. Hemispherical-total emissivity is calculated for the samples and found to be 0.84 before a measurement-induced annealing and 0.65 after the measurement for the sulfur-doped sample. Secondary samples lack a measurement-induced anneal, and reasons for this discrepancy are presented. Emissivity numbers are plotted and compared with a silicon substrate, and Aeroglaze Z306 black paint. Use of microstructured silicon as a blackbody or microbolometer surface is modeled and presented, respectively. PMID:20197803

  4. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor.

    PubMed

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E; Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Johnson, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  5. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  6. Scriber for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.; Fortier, E. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for dividing silicon wafers into rectangular chips is characterized by a base including a horizontally oriented bed with a planar support surface, a vacuum chuck adapted to capture a silicon wafer seated on the support for translation in mutually perpendicular directions. A stylus support mounted on the bed includes a shaft disposed above and extended across the bed and a truck mounted on the shaft and supported thereby for linear translation along a path extended across the bed a vertically oriented scribe has a diamond tip supported by the truck also adapted as to engage a silicon wafer captured by the chuck and positioned beneath it in order to form score lines in the surface of the wafer as linear translation is imparted to the truck. A chuck positioning means is mounted on the base and is connected to the chuck for positioning the chuck relative to the stylus.

  7. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The flow instabilities in floating zones of silicon were investigated and methods for investigation of these instabilities in microgravity were defined. Three principal tasks were involved: (1) characterization of the float zone in small diameter rods; (2) investigation of melt flow instabilities in circular melts in silicon disks; and (3) the development of a prototype of an apparatus that could be used in near term space experiments to investigate flow instabilities in a molten zone. It is shown that in a resistance heated zoner with 4 to 7 mm diameter silicon rods that the critical Marangoni number is about 1480 compared to a predicted value of 14 indicative that viable space experiments might be performed. The prototype float zone apparatus is built and specifications are prepared for a flight zoner should a decision be reached to proceed with a space flight experimental investigation.

  8. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  9. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  10. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  11. Palladium contamination in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Ceresoli, M.; Codegoni, D.; Somaini, F.; Bianchi, I.; Volonghi, D.

    2015-04-01

    In this work palladium is characterized as a silicon contaminant by recombination lifetime, DLTS, C-V and C-t measurements of palladium-implanted wafers. Palladium introduced by ion implantation is found to remain in the solid solution in silicon after rapid thermal treatments, and to be a very effective recombination center. For this reason recombination lifetime measurements are the most sensitive method to detect palladium in silicon. Two palladium-related levels were found by DLTS in p-type material. One of these levels corresponds to a level reported in the literature as the single donor level of substitutional palladium. For what concerns MOS capacitors, palladium is responsible for negative oxide charge and for degradation of the generation lifetime. In addition, palladium is confirmed to be a very fast diffuser, which segregates at the wafer surface even with low temperature treatments (250 °C). Microscopy inspections showed that palladium precipitates and surface defects were formed upon segregation.

  12. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1994-12-31

    In the field of microelectronics, and in particular the fabrication of microelectronics during plasma etching processes, electrostatic chucks have been used to hold silicon wafers during the plasma etching process. Current electrostatic chucks that operate by the {open_quotes}Johnson-Rahbek Effect{close_quotes} consist of a metallic base plate that is typically coated with a thick layer of slightly conductive dielectric material. A silicon wafer of approximately the same size as the chuck is placed on top of the chuck and a potential difference of several hundred volts is applied between the silicon and the base plate of the electrostatic chuck. This causes an electrostatic attraction proportional to the square of the electric field in the gap between the silicon wafer and the chuck face. When the chuck is used in a plasma filled chamber the electric potential of the wafer tends to be fixed by the effective potential of the plasma. The purpose of the dielectric layer on the chuck is to prevent the silicon wafer from coming into direct electrical contact with the metallic part of the chuck and shorting out the potential difference. On the other hand, a small amount of conductivity appears to be desirable in the dielectric coating so that much of its free surface between points of contact with the silicon wafer is maintained near the potential of the metallic base plate; otherwise, a much larger potential difference would be needed to produce a sufficiently large electric field in the vacuum gap between the wafer and chuck. Typically, the face of the chuck has a pattern of grooves in which about 10 torr pressure of helium gas is maintained. This gas provides cooling (thermal contact) between the wafer and the chuck. A pressure of 10 torr is equivalent to about 0.2 psi.

  13. Silicon sheet technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1982-09-01

    A classification of silicon sheet growth methods by meniscus geometry permits them to be discussed in three groups: short meniscus techniques, high meniscus techniques, and extended meniscus or large solid/liquid interface area techniques. A second parameter, meniscus shaper interaction with the liquid silicon, is also instrumental in determining the characteristics of the various sheet processes. The current status of each process is discussed in the context of meniscus geometry and shaper/melt interaction. One aspect of sheet growth, surface area generation rate, is quantitatively compared with combined ingot growth and wafering surface area generation rates.

  14. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  15. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  16. Nanoscale doping of compound semiconductors by solid phase dopant diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jaehyun; Chou, Harry; Koh, Donghyi; Kim, Taegon; Roy, Anupam; Song, Jonghan; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving damage-free, uniform, abrupt, ultra-shallow junctions while simultaneously controlling the doping concentration on the nanoscale is an ongoing challenge to the scaling down of electronic device dimensions. Here, we demonstrate a simple method of effectively doping ΙΙΙ-V compound semiconductors, specifically InGaAs, by a solid phase doping source. This method is based on the in-diffusion of oxygen and/or silicon from a deposited non-stoichiometric silicon dioxide (SiOx) film on InGaAs, which then acts as donors upon activation by annealing. The dopant profile and concentration can be controlled by the deposited film thickness and thermal annealing parameters, giving active carrier concentration of 1.4 × 1018 cm-3. Our results also indicate that conventional silicon based processes must be carefully reviewed for compound semiconductor device fabrication to prevent unintended doping.

  17. Hybrid Silicon Nanophotonic Devices: Enhancing Light Emission, Modulation, and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Ryan Morrow

    Silicon has become an increasingly important photonic material for communications, information processing, and sensing applications. Silicon is inexpensive compared to compound semiconductors, and it is well suited for confining and guiding light at standard telecommunication wavelengths due to its large refractive index and minimal intrinsic absorption. Furthermore, silicon-based optical devices can be fabricated alongside microelectronics while taking advantage of advanced silicon processing technologies. In order to realize complete chip-based photonic systems, certain critical components must continue to be developed and refined on the silicon platform, including compact light sources, modulators, routers, and sensing elements. However, bulk silicon is not necessarily an ideal material for many active devices because of its meager light emission characteristics, limited refractive index tunability, and fundamental limitations in confining light beyond the diffraction limit. In this thesis, we present three examples of hybrid devices that use different materials to bring additional optical functionality to silicon photonics. First, we analyze high-index-contrast silicon slot waveguides and their integration with light-emitting erbium-doped glass materials. Theoretical and experimental results show significant enhancement of spontaneous emission rates in slot structures. We then demonstrate the integration of vanadium dioxide, a thermochromic phase-change material, with silicon waveguides to form micron-scale absorption modulators. It is shown experimentally that a 2-mum long waveguide-integrated device exhibits broadband modulation of more than 6.5 dB at wavelengths near 1550 nm. Finally, we demonstrate polymer-on-gold dielectric-loaded surface-plasmon waveguides and ring resonators coupled to silicon waveguides with 1.0+/-0.1 dB insertion loss. The plasmonic waveguides are shown to support a single surface mode at telecommunication wavelengths, with strong

  18. Light emission from porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penczek, John

    The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from porous silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the porous silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for porous silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between porous silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for porous silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of porous silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the porous silicon layer. The selective etching properties of porous silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the porous silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to

  19. Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon electrodes connected by indium phosphide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; VJ, Logeeswaran; Saif Islam, M.; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Stanley Williams, R.; Chen, Yong

    2007-09-01

    The authors report the connection of two planar hydrogenated silicon (Si:H) electrodes by intersecting and bridging indium phosphide nanowires (InP NWs). A simple metal-semiconductor-metal photoconductor was used as a test vehicle to measure electrical and optical characteristics of the connected InP NWs. This implementation of III-V compound semiconductor nanowires on Si:H combines the characteristics of a direct bandgap semiconductor with the flexible fabrication processes of non-single-crystal silicon platforms that do not require single-crystal substrates.

  20. Fabrication of sinterable silicon nitride by injection molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, C. L.; French, K.; Neil, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Transformation of structural ceramics from the laboratory to production requires development of near net shape fabrication techniques which minimize finish grinding. One potential technique for producing large quantities of complex-shaped parts at a low cost, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material. Binder selection methodology, compounding of ceramic and binder components, injection molding techniques, and problems in binder removal are discussed. Strength, oxidation resistance, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material.

  1. Integration of InP-based optoelectronics with silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Kapulainen, Markku; Ylinen, Sami; Ollila, Jyrki; Vilokkinen, Ville; Mörl, Ludwig; Möhrle, Martin; Hamelin, Régis

    2009-02-01

    Compound semiconductors provide state-of-the-art performance in optoelectronics, while silicon-on-insulator (SOI) is an ideal platform for many passive functions in integrated optics. By combining them one can realise optical devices with high performance and low cost. This paper discusses the various applications and technologies for integrating InP chips with SOI waveguides. Bonding of lasers, SOA arrays and detectors for practical applications is described. Experimental results are given for visually aligned thermo-compression bonding and self-aligned flip-chip bonding with Indium bumps. Flip-chip bonding is reported directly on SOI chips, as well as on a separate silicon-optical-bench.

  2. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  3. Analysis of copper-rich precipitates in silicon: chemical state,gettering, and impact on multicrystalline silicon solar cellmaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Buonassisi, Tonio; Marcus, Matthew A.; Istratov, Andrei A.; Heuer, Matthias; Ciszek, Theodore F.; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Weber,Eicke R.

    2004-11-08

    In this study, synchrotron-based x-ray absorption microspectroscopy (mu-XAS) is applied to identifying the chemical states of copper-rich clusters within a variety of silicon materials, including as-grown cast multicrystalline silicon solar cell material with high oxygen concentration and other silicon materials with varying degrees of oxygen concentration and copper contamination pathways. In all samples, copper silicide (Cu3Si) is the only phase of copper identified. It is noted from thermodynamic considerations that unlike certain metal species, copper tends to form a silicide and not an oxidized compound because of the strong silicon-oxygen bonding energy; consequently the likelihood of encountering an oxidized copper particle in silicon is small, in agreement with experimental data. In light of these results, the effectiveness of aluminum gettering for the removal of copper from bulk silicon is quantified via x-ray fluorescence microscopy (mu-XRF),and a segregation coefficient is determined from experimental data to beat least (1-2)'103. Additionally, mu-XAS data directly demonstrates that the segregation mechanism of Cu in Al is the higher solubility of Cu in the liquid phase. In light of these results, possible limitations for the complete removal of Cu from bulk mc-Si are discussed.

  4. Characterization of high purity Silicon derived from Rice husk through improved Leaching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, Gbadebo; Awodugba, Ayodeji; Raimi, Adepoju; Babatola, Babatunde

    2014-03-01

    Rice husk is an abundant source of silicon and silicon compounds. High purity Silicon are required in high technology products such as semiconductors and solar cell. In this work, the possibility of obtaining pure silicon compounds through leaching process was investigated. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles with amorphous morphology have been synthesized from rice husk which was further subjected to improved leaching process to obtain pure silicon. XRD analysis shows the crystal structure of the as-received RHA with major reflections or peaks of crystalline quartz from ICSD powder diffraction occur at Bragg 2 θ angles of 20.856°, 26.636° and 36.541°. The purity of silicon obtained in terms of silica content was improved by leaching in 10 wt% hydrochloric acid. Advance future works on characterizing the electrical properties of the refined Rice Husk will eventually add value to the Rice Husk Silicon product and make it more attractive not only to the Photovoltaic industry but also other industries that require high purity silicon at reasonable cost. We wish to thank the Managements of Osun state Polytechnic-Iree and Ladoke Akintola University of Technology-Ogbomoso for creating enabling environment for this research work.

  5. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Strongly adhering films of silicon are deposited directly on such materials as Pyrex and Vycor (or equivalent materials) and aluminum by a non-equilibrium plasma jet. Amorphous silicon films are formed by decomposition of silicon tetrachloride or trichlorosilane in the plasma. Plasma-jet technique can also be used to deposit an adherent silicon film on aluminum from silane and to dope such films with phosphorus. Ability to deposit silicon films on such readily available, inexpensive substrates could eventually lead to lower cost photovoltaic cells.

  6. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  7. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Jones (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H20. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  8. Silicon cladding for mirror substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duston, Christopher J.; Gunda, Nilesh; Schwartz, Jay R.; Robichaud, Joseph L.

    2009-08-01

    To reduce the finishing costs of silicon carbide mirror substrates, silicon claddings are applied allowing the surfaces to be more easily diamond turned and polished than the bare chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide or bimodal reaction bonded SiC (RB-SiC). The benefits of using silicon as the optical face will be reviewed as will the process for applying plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PE-CVD) deposited amorphous silicon cladding on substrates. Using one mirror as an example, the successful finishing results will be shared.

  9. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for new physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charm hadrons produced at the LHC. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities. The Silicon Tracker is part of the tracking system and measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. The LHCb Silicon Tracker covers a total sensitive area of about 12 m2 using silicon micro-strip detectors with long readout strips. It consists of one four-layer tracking station before the LHCb dipole magnet and three stations after. The detector has performed extremely well since the start of the LHC operation despite the fact that the experiment is collecting data at instantaneous luminosities well above the design value. This paper reports on the operation and performance of the Silicon Tracker during the Physics data taking at the LHC during the last two years.

  10. Sintering silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  11. Silicone/Acrylate Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two-step process forms silicone/acrylate copolymers. Resulting acrylate functional fluid is reacted with other ingredients to produce copolymer. Films of polymer were formed by simply pouring or spraying mixture and allowing solvent to evaporate. Films showed good weatherability. Durable, clear polymer films protect photovoltaic cells.

  12. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  13. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  14. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  15. Electroluminescence from silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, J.; Solanki, R.; Freeouf, J. L.; Carruthers, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Room temperature electroluminescence has been demonstrated from undoped silicon nanowires that were grown from disilane. Ensembles of nanowires were excited by capacitively coupling them to an ac electric field. The emission peak occurred at about 600 nm from wires of average diameter of about 4 nm. The emission appears to result from band-to-band electron-hole recombination.

  16. Channeling of aluminum in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.G.; Hopkins, C.G.

    1985-05-15

    A systematic study of channeling of aluminum in the silicon crystal is reported. Depth distributions measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry are reported for 40-, 75-, and 150-keV aluminum channeled in the <100> and <110> directions of silicon. The profile dependence on alignment angle is shown for 150-keV aluminum in the <110> of silicon. Aluminum has low electronic stopping in silicon and corresponding deep channeled profiles are observed for aligned implants and deep channeling tails are observed on random implants. The maximum channeling range for 150-keV Al in <100> silicon is about 2.8 ..mu..m and is about 6.4 ..mu..m in <110> silicon. Some ions will reach the maximum channeling range even for 2/sup 0/ misalignment. Many of the deep channeling tails and ''supertails'' reported in earlier literature can be explained by the normal channeling of aluminum in silicon.

  17. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  18. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  19. Silicon Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamins, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    Metal-catalyzed, self-assembled, one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires are being considered as possible device elements to augment and supplant conventional electronics and to extend the use of CMOS beyond the physical and economic limits of conventional technology. Such nanowires can create nanostructures without the complexity and cost of extremely fine scale lithography. The well-known and controllable properties of silicon make silicon nanowires especially attractive. Easy integration with conventional electronics will aid their acceptance and incorporation. For example, connections can be formed to both ends of a nanowire by growing it laterally from a vertical surface formed by etching the top silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator structure into isolated electrodes. Field-effect structures are one class of devices that can be readily built in silicon nanowires. Because the ratio of surface to volume in a thin nanowire is high, conduction through the nanowire is very sensitive to surface conditions, making it effective as the channel of a field-effect transistor or as the transducing element of a gas or chemical sensor. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a greater fraction of the mobile charge can be modulated by a given external charge, increasing the sensitivity. Having the gate of a nanowire transistor completely surround the nanowire also enhances the sensitivity. For a field-effect sensor to be effective, the charge must be physically close to the nanowire so that the majority of the compensating charge is induced in the nanowire and so that ions in solution do not screen the charge. Because only induced charge is being sensed, a coating that selectively binds the target species should be added to the nanowire surface to distinguish between different species in the analyte. The nanowire work at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories was supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  20. Pnictogen-Silicon Analogues of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Andreas E; Eckhardt, Maria; Erlebach, Andreas; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Sierka, Marek; Scheer, Manfred

    2016-08-24

    Since the discovery of the first "inorganic benzene" (borazine, B3N3H6), the synthesis of other noncarbon derivatives is an ongoing challenge in Inorganic Chemistry. Here we report on the synthesis of the first pnictogen-silicon congeners of benzene, the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene [(PhC(NtBu)2)3Si3E3] (E = P (1a), As (1b)) by a simple metathesis reaction. These compounds are formed by the reaction of [Cp″2Zr(η(1:1)-E4)] (E = P, As; Cp″ = C5H3tBu2) with [PhC(NtBu)2SiCl] in toluene at room temperature along with the silicon pnictogen congeners of the cyclobutadiene, [(PhC(NtBu)2)2Si2E2] (E = P (2a), As (2b)), which is unprecedented for the arsenic system 2b. All compounds were comprehensively characterized, and density functional theory calculations were performed to verify the stability and the aromatic character of the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene. PMID:27513314

  1. Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufflebotham, P. K.; Card, H. C.; Kao, K. C.; Thanailakis, A.

    1986-09-01

    Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloy thin films were fabricated by coevaporation over the composition range of 0-82 at. % Te. The electronic and optical properties of these films were systematically investigated over this same range of composition. The optical gap of these films was found to decrease monotonically with increasing Te content. Conduction near room temperature was due to extended state conduction, while variable range hopping dominated below 250 K. The incorporation of Te in concentrations of less than 1 at. % was found to produce an increase in the density of localized states at the Fermi level and a decrease in the activation energy. This was attributed to the Te being incorporated as a substitutional, fourfold coordinated, double donor in a-Si. At approximately 60 at. % Te, a decrease in the density of localized states at the Fermi level, and an increase in the activation energy and photoresponse was indicated. This was attributed to the possible formation of a less defective a-Si:Te compound.

  2. Compounding in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Zdoryk, Oleksandr A; Georgiyants, Victoriya A; Gryzodub, Oleksandr I; Schnatz, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding in modern Ukraine has a rich history and goes back to ancient times. Today in the Ukraine, there is a revival of compounding practice, the opening of private compounding pharmacies, updating of legislative framework and requirements of the State Pharmacopeia of Ukraine for compounding preparations, and the introduction of Good Pharmaceutical Practice. PMID:23696172

  3. New doping method to obtain n-type silicon ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. A.; Platte, B.; Brito, M. C.; Serra, J. M.

    2015-10-01

    A method to dope silicon ribbons is presented. The method consists on the spraying of the ribbons with a phosphoric acid solution followed by a recrystallization in an optical heating furnace. During the sample heating, as phosphoric acid is dehydrated the resulting phosphorous compounds are either evaporated or serve as source for phosphorous diffusion. Phosphorous is efficiently incorporated in silicon by solid-state diffusion during heating and directly mixed in the melted silicon. Experimental results show significant incorporation gradients along the samples' length. The origin of the incorporation gradient is analysed, by testing the effect of experimental parameters such as the argon flux and the recrystallization velocity and direction. It is shown that samples recrystallized in a downward direction have homogeneous doping profiles over most of the length.

  4. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  5. Top-Coating Silicon Onto Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Nelson, L. D.; Zook, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon for solar cells produced at low cost. Molten silicon poured from quartz trough onto moving carbon-coated ceramic substrate. Doctor blade spreads liquid silicon evenly over substrate. Molten material solidifies to form sheet of polycrystalline silicon having photovoltaic conversion efficiency greater than 10 percent. Method produces 100-um-thick silicon coatings at speed 0.15 centimeter per second.

  6. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  7. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  8. Making silicon stronger.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Brad Lee

    2010-11-01

    Silicon microfabrication has seen many decades of development, yet the structural reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is far from optimized. The fracture strength of Si MEMS is limited by a combination of poor toughness and nanoscale etch-induced defects. A MEMS-based microtensile technique has been used to characterize the fracture strength distributions of both standard and custom microfabrication processes. Recent improvements permit 1000's of test replicates, revealing subtle but important deviations from the commonly assumed 2-parameter Weibull statistical model. Subsequent failure analysis through a combination of microscopy and numerical simulation reveals salient aspects of nanoscale flaw control. Grain boundaries, for example, suffer from preferential attack during etch-release thereby forming failure-critical grain-boundary grooves. We will discuss ongoing efforts to quantify the various factors that affect the strength of polycrystalline silicon, and how weakest-link theory can be used to make worst-case estimates for design.

  9. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  10. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  11. The LHCb silicon tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeva, B.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bay, A.; Bernhard, R. P.; Bernet, R.; Blouw, J.; Carron, B.; Ermoline, Y.; Esperante, D.; Frei, R.; Gassner, J.; Hofmann, W.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Köstner, S.; Lehner, F.; Löchner, S.; Lois, C.; Needham, M.; Pugatch, V.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Tran, M. T.; Vazquez, P.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voss, H.

    2005-07-01

    LHCb is a dedicated B-physics and CP-violation experiment for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Efficient track reconstruction and excellent trigger performances are essential in order to exploit fully its physics potential. Silicon strip detectors providing fast signal generation, high resolution and fine granularity are used for this purpose in the large area Trigger Tracker station in front of the spectrometer magnet and the LHCb Inner Tracker covering the area close to the beam pipe behind the magnet. Long read-out strips of up to 38 cm are used together with fast signal shaping adapted to the 25 ns LHC bunch crossing. The design of these tracking stations, the silicon sensor strip geometries and the latest test results are presented here.

  12. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  13. Germanium epitaxy on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Yu, Jinzhong

    2014-04-01

    With the rapid development of on-chip optical interconnects and optical computing in the past decade, silicon-based integrated devices for monolithic and hybrid optoelectronic integration have attracted wide attention. Due to its narrow pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si technology, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become a significant material for optoelectronic device applications. In this paper, we describe recent research progress on heteroepitaxy of Ge flat films and self-assembled Ge quantum dots on Si. For film growth, methods of strain modification and lattice mismatch relief are summarized, while for dot growth, key process parameters and their effects on the dot density, dot morphology and dot position are reviewed. The results indicate that epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials will play a bigger role in silicon photonics.

  14. Friction, wear, and thermal stability studies of some organotin and organosilicon compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal decomposition temperatures were determined for a number of organotin and organosilicon compounds. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used to determine the friction and wear characteristics of two representative compounds, (1) 3-tri-n-butylstannyl (diphenyl) and (2) 3-tri-n-butylsilyl (diphenyl). Friction and wear test conditions included a 1-kg load, 25 to 225 C disk temperatures, and a dry air atmosphere. The tin and silicon compounds yielded friction and wear results either lower than or similar to those obtained with a polyphenyl ether and a C-ether. The maximum thermal decomposition temperatures obtained in the silicon and tin series were 358 and 297 C, respectively. Increasing the steric hindrance around the silicon or tin atoms increased the thermal stability. Future work with these compounds will emphasize their use as antiwear additives rather than base fluids.

  15. Pickled luminescent silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukherroub, R.; Morin, S.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    In freshly prepared porous Si, the newly exposed silicon-nanostructure surface is protected with a monolayer of hydrogen, which is very reactive and oxidizes in air leading to a loss of luminescence intensity and a degradation of the electronic properties. We report a surface passivation approach based on organic modification that stabilizes the luminescence. This novel 'pickling' process not only augments the desired optoelectronic properties, but also is adaptable to further chemical modification for integration into chemical and biophysical sensors.

  16. Micromachined Silicon Cantilever Magnetometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparala, M. V.

    1998-03-01

    Magnetic torque measurements give us a simple and attractive method for characterizing the anisotropic properties of magnetic materials. Silicon torque and force magnetometers have many advantages over traditional torsion fiber torque magnetometers. We have fabricated micromachined silicon torque and force magnetometers employing both capacitive(``Capacitance platform magnetometer for thin film and small crystal superconductor studies'', M. Chaparala et al.), AIP Conf. Proc. (USA), AIP Conference Proceedings, no.273, p. 407 1993. and strain dependent FET detection(``Strain Dependent Characterstics of Silicon MOSFETs and their Applications'', M. Chaparala et al.), ISDRS Conf. Proc. 1997. schemes which realize some of these gains. We will present the pros and cons of each of the different detection schemes and the associated design constraints. We have developed a feedback scheme which enables null detection thus preserving the integrity of the sample orientation. We will present a method of separating out the torque and force terms in the measured signals and will discuss the errors associated with each of the designs. Finally, we present the static magnetic torque measurements on various materials with these devices, including equilibrium properties on sub microgram specimens of superconductors, and dHvA measurements near H_c2. We will also discuss their usefulness in pulsed magnetic fields(``Cantilever magnetometry in pulsed magnetic fields", M. J. Naughton et al.), Rev. of Sci. Instrum., vol.68, p. 4061 1997..

  17. Silicon Pore Optics Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijersbergen, Marco; Collon, M. J.; Günther, R.; Partapsing, R.; Ackermann, M.; Olde Riekerink, M.; Cooper-Jensen, C.; Christensen, F.; Freyberg, M.; Krumrey, M.; Erhard, M.; van Baren, C.; Wallace, K.; Bavdaz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon pore optics have been developed over the last years to enable future astrophysical X-ray telescopes and have now become a candidate mirror technology for the IXO mission. Scientific requirements demand an angular resolution better than 5” and a large effective area of several square meters at photon energies of 1 keV. This paper discusses the performance of the latest generation of these novel light, stiff and modular X-ray optics, based on ribbed plates made from commercial high grade 12” silicon wafers. Stacks with several tens of silicon plates have been assembled in the course of an ESA technology development program, by bending the plates into an accurate shape and directly bonding them on top of each other. Several mirror modules, using two stacks each, have been aligned and integrated to form the conical approximation of a Wolter-I design. This paper presents the status of the technology, addresses and discusses a number of activities in the ongoing ESA technology development and shows the latest results of full area measurements at the long-beamline MPE X-ray test facility (PANTER) and the PTB beam line at the BESSY electron storage ring in Berlin.

  18. Silicone based artificial skin for humanoid facial expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Yonas; Moore, David; Thayer, Nick; Priya, Shashank

    2009-03-01

    Artificial skin materials were synthesized using platinum-cured silicone elastomeric material (Reynolds Advanced Materials Inc.) as the base consisting of mainly polyorganosiloxanes, amorphous silica and platinum-siloxane complex compounds. Systematic incorporation of porosity in this material was found to lower the force required to deform the skin in axial direction. In this study, we utilized foaming agents comprising of sodium bicarbonate and dilute form of acetic acid for modifying the polymeric chain and introducing the porosity. Experimental determination of functional relationship between the concentration of foaming agent, slacker and non-reactive silicone fluid and that of force - deformation behavior was conducted. Tensile testing of material showed a local parabolic relationship between the concentrations of foaming agents used (per milliliter of siloxane compound) and strain. This data can be used to optimize the amount of additives in platinum cured silicone to obtain desired force - displacement characteristics. Addition of "silicone thinner" and "slacker" showed a monotonically increasing strain behavior. A mathematical model was developed to arrive at the performance metrics of artificial skin.

  19. Evaluation of a compound eye type tactile endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Sasaki, Nagisa; Takeda, Maki; Shimizu, Sachiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Ohno, Yuko

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques for endoscope become widely used, for example, laparoscopic operation, NOTES (Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery), robotic surgery and so on. There are so many demand and needs for endoscopic diagnosis. Especially, palpation is most important diagnosis on any surgery. However, conventional endoscopic system has no tactile sensibility. There are many studies about tactile sensor for medical application. These sensors can measure object at a point. It is necessary to sense in areas for palpation. To overcome this problem, we propose compound eye type tactile endoscope. The proposed system consists of TOMBO (Thin Observation Module by Bound Optics) and clear silicon rubber. Our proposed system can estimate hardness of target object by measuring deformation of a projected pattern on the silicon rubber. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the proposed system. At first, we introduce approximated models of the silicone and the object. We formulate the stiffness of object, the deformation of silicone, and the whole object. We investigate the accuracy of measured silicone's lower surface for deformation of silicone by prototype system. Finally, we evaluate the calculated stiffness of the soft object.

  20. A novel crystalline SiCO compound.

    PubMed

    Marqués, Miriam; Morales-García, Angel; Menéndez, José Manuel; Baonza, Valentín G; Recio, José Manuel

    2015-10-14

    Ab initio evolutionary structural searches have been performed on SixCyO2(x+y) compounds. A novel structure, with SiC2O6 stoichiometry and the P21/c space group is calculated to be stable against decomposition within a wide pressure window from 7.2 to 41 GPa, and metastable under ambient conditions. It consists of CO3 units, linked to SiO6 octahedra, supporting previous experimental studies. The evolution of the carbon environment towards tetrahedral CO4 units, thus resembling the crystal chemistry of silicon, is predicted at higher pressures. PMID:26345349

  1. Direct Human Contact with Siloxanes (Silicones) – Safety or Risk Part 1. Characteristics of Siloxanes (Silicones)

    PubMed Central

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna; Jamrógiewicz, Marzena; Szymkowska, Katarzyna; Krenczkowska, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Siloxanes are commonly known as silicones. They belong to the organosilicon compounds and are exclusively obtained by synthesis. Their chemical structure determines a range of physicochemical properties which were recognized as unique. Due to the susceptibility to chemical modifications, ability to create short, long or complex polymer particles, siloxanes found an application in many areas of human life. Siloxanes differ in particle size, molecular weight, shape and chemical groups. As a result, this determines the different physico-chemical properties, that directly affect the safety or the risk of their use. The areas that can be a source of danger to human health will be commented in this paper. PMID:27303296

  2. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  3. Special Issue: The Silicon Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of articles about different aspects of current silicon research and applications, ranging from basic investigations of mono- and polycrystalline silicon materials and nanostructures to technologies for device fabrication in silicon photovoltaics, micro- and optoelectronics. Guest Editors are Martin Kittler and Deren Yang, the organizers of a recent Sino-German symposium held in Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005.The cover picture shows four examples of The Silicon Age: the structure of a thin film solar cell on low-cost SSP (silicon sheet from powder) substrate (upper left image) [1], a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image and diffraction pattern of a single-crystalline Si nanowire (upper right) [2], a carrier lifetime map from an n-type multicrystalline silicon wafer after gettering by a grain boundary (lower left) [3], and a scanning acoustic microscopy image of a bonded 150 mm diameter wafer pair (upper right) [4].

  4. Bonding analysis of planar hypercoordinate atoms via the generalized BLW-LOL.

    PubMed

    Bomble, Laetitia; Steinmann, Stephan N; Perez-Peralta, Nancy; Merino, Gabriel; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2013-10-01

    The multicenter bonding pattern of the intriguing hexa-, hepta-, and octacoordinate boron wheel series (e.g., CB62-, CB7-, B82-, and SiB8 as well as the experimentally detected CB7- isomer) is revised using the block-localized wave function analyzed by the localized orbital locator (BLW-LOL). The more general implementation of BLW combined with the LOL scalar field is not restricted to the analysis of the out-of-plane π-system but can also provide an intuitive picture of the σ-radial delocalization and of the role of the central atom. The results confirm the presence of a π-ring current pattern similar to that of benzene. In addition, the LOLπ isosurfaces along with the maximum intensity in the ΔLOL profiles located above and below the ring suggest that the central atom plays a minor role in the π-delocalized bonding pattern. Finally, the analysis of the σ-framework in these boron wheels is in line with a moderated inner cyclic rather than disk-type delocalization. PMID:23897739

  5. Retention Indices for Frequently Reported Compounds of Plant Essential Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushok, V. I.; Linstrom, P. J.; Zenkevich, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Gas chromatographic retention indices were evaluated for 505 frequently reported plant essential oil components using a large retention index database. Retention data are presented for three types of commonly used stationary phases: dimethyl silicone (nonpolar), dimethyl silicone with 5% phenyl groups (slightly polar), and polyethylene glycol (polar) stationary phases. The evaluations are based on the treatment of multiple measurements with the number of data records ranging from about 5 to 800 per compound. Data analysis was limited to temperature programmed conditions. The data reported include the average and median values of retention index with standard deviations and confidence intervals.

  6. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical models, and computer codes based on these models were developed which allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors in which gaseous silicon compounds are converted to condensed phase silicon. The reactors to be modeled are flow reactors in which silane or one of the halogenated silanes is thermally decomposed or reacted with an alkali metal, H2 or H atoms. Because the product of interest is particulate silicon, processes which must be modeled, in addition to mixing and reaction of gas-phase reactants, include the nucleation and growth of condensed Si via coagulation, condensation, and heterogeneous reaction.

  7. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  8. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  9. Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-01

    Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  10. Silicon Utilizing Microbial Bioactivities in the Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, M. M.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms are unicellular eukaryotic algae and an important member of the silicon utilizing organisms, that generate ~20% of the ~100 billion metric tons of organic carbon produced through photosynthesis on Earth each year. Fragilariopsis is a dominating psychrophilic diatom genus in polar sea ice. The two species Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Fragilariopsis curta are able to grow and divide below freezing temperature. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), involved in cold adaptation in several psychrophilic organisms, are widespread in this two polar species. Achanthes minutissima isolated as dominant diatom has degradable effects involving petroleum hydocarbons. Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have antibacterial activity and the fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has been identified as one compound responsible for this activity. Other antibacterial compounds are monounsaturated fatty acid (9Z)-hexadecenoic acid (palmitoleic acid; C16:1 n-7) and the relatively unusual polyunsaturated fatty acid (6Z, 9Z, 12Z)-hexadecatrienoic acid (HTA; C16:3 n-4). Both are active against Gram-positive bacteria and many Gram-negative pathogen. Palmitoleic acid is active at micro-molar concentrations, kills bacteria rapidly, and is highly active against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Domoic acid -a neurotoxin produced by Pseudo-nitzschia accumulates in marine invertebrates. Evidences of sea lion (Zalophus californianus) and human poisoning following consumption of contaminated blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) is mainly due to this toxin. Among the most prominent features described in human beings was memory impairment which led to the name Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning [ASP]. Silicon utilizing organisms can act as a bioindicator of environmental contamination, thus a rapid change in phytochelatins to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress was found in Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii. Some of them also can produce biofuels particularly diatoms have significant

  11. InGaAlAsPN: A Materials System for Silicon Based Optoelectronics and Heterostructure Device Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broekaert, T. P. E.; Tang, S.; Wallace, R. M.; Beam, E. A., III; Duncan, W. M.; Kao, Y. -C.; Liu, H. -Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new material system is proposed for silicon based opto-electronic and heterostructure devices; the silicon lattice matched compositions of the (In,Ga,Al)-(As,P)N 3-5 compounds. In this nitride alloy material system, the bandgap is expected to be direct at the silicon lattice matched compositions with a bandgap range most likely to be in the infrared to visible. At lattice constants ranging between those of silicon carbide and silicon, a wider bandgap range is expected to be available and the high quality material obtained through lattice matching could enable applications such as monolithic color displays, high efficiency multi-junction solar cells, opto-electronic integrated circuits for fiber communications, and the transfer of existing 3-5 technology to silicon.

  12. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  13. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  14. Dinitroso and polynitroso compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gowenlock, Brian G.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2005-01-01

    The growing interest in the chemistry of C-nitroso compounds (RN=O; R = alkyl or aryl group) is due in part to the recognition of their participation in various metabolic processes of nitrogen-containing compounds. C-Nitroso compounds have a rich organic chemistry in their own right, displaying interesting intra- and intermolecular dimerization processes and addition reactions with unsaturated compounds. In addition, they have a fascinating coordination chemistry. While most of the attention has been directed towards C-nitroso compounds containing a single –NO moiety, there is an emerging area of research dealing with dinitroso and polynitroso compounds. In this critical review, we present and discuss the synthetic routes and properties of these relatively unexplored dinitroso and polynitroso compounds, and suggest areas of further development involving these compounds. (126 references.) PMID:16100619

  15. Caulking compound poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Caulking compounds are substances used to seal cracks and holes around windows and other openings. Caulking compound poisoning occurs when someone swallows these substances. This is for information only and not for use in the ...

  16. Tough silicon nitride matrix composites using Textron silicon carbide monofilaments

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, W.; Lecostaouec, J.F.; Landry, C.; Dipietro, S.; Vasilos, T.

    1989-10-01

    The use of Textron SCS silicon carbide monofilament fibers as a reinforcement for silicon nitride is described. Samples were processed by both chemical vapor infiltration and hot pressing. Mechanical tests were performed in flexure, tension, and in shear. A ballistic test demonstrated high velocity impact toughness. 5 refs.

  17. Field Evaluation of Anti-Biofouling Compounds on Optical Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, Scott; Schofield, Bryan; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Lewis, Marlon; Hooker, Stanford; Weidemann, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Biofouling has been a serious question in the stability of optical measurements in the ocean, particularly in moored and drifting buoy applications. Many investigators coat optical surfaces with various compounds to reduce the amount of fouling; to our knowledge, however, there are no objective, in-situ comparative testing of these compounds to evaluate their effectiveness with respect to optical stability relative to untreated controls. We have tested a wide range of compounds at in-situ locations in Halifax Harbour and in the Adriatic Sea on passive optical sensors. Compounds tested include a variety of TBT formulations, antifungal agents, and low-friction silicone-based compounds; time-scales of up to four months were evaluated. The results of these experiments are discussed.

  18. Comparison of silicon oxide and silicon carbide absorber materials in silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Cordula; Kellermann, Martin; Wendler, Elke; Rensberg, Jura; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Since solar energy conversion by photovoltaics is most efficient for photon energies at the bandgap of the absorbing material the idea of combining absorber layers with different bandgaps in a multijunction cell has become popular. In silicon thin-film photovoltaics a multijunction stack with more than two subcells requires a high bandgap amorphous silicon alloy top cell absorber to achieve an optimal bandgap combination. We address the question whether amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) or amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO:H) is more suited for this type of top cell absorber. Our single cell results show a better performance of amorphous silicon carbide with respect to fill factor and especially open circuit voltage at equivalent Tauc bandgaps. The microstructure factor of single layers indicates less void structure in amorphous silicon carbide than in amorphous silicon oxide. Yet photoconductivity of silicon oxide films seems to be higher which could be explained by the material being not truly intrinsic. On the other hand better cell performance of amorphous silicon carbide absorber layers might be connected to better hole transport in the cell.

  19. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  20. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  1. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  2. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  3. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  4. In vivo contaminant partitioning to silicone implants: Implications for use in biomonitoring and body burden.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Steven G; Kerkvliet, Nancy I; Carozza, Susan; Rohlman, Diana; Pennington, Jamie; Anderson, Kim A

    2015-12-01

    Silicone polymers are used for a wide array of applications from passive samplers in environmental studies, to implants used in human augmentation and reconstruction. If silicone sequesters toxicants throughout implantation, it may represent a history of exposure and potentially reduce the body burden of toxicants influencing the risk of adverse health outcomes such as breast cancer. Objectives of this research included identifying a wide variety of toxicants in human silicone implants, and measuring the in vivo absorption of contaminants into silicone and surrounding tissue in an animal model. In the first study, eight human breast implants were analyzed for over 1400 organic contaminants including consumer products, chemicals in commerce, and pesticides. A total of 14 compounds including pesticides such as trans-nonachlor (1.2-5.9ng/g) and p,p'-DDE (1.2-34ng/g) were identified in human implants, 13 of which have not been previously reported in silicone prostheses. In the second project, female ICR mice were implanted with silicone and dosed with p,p'-DDE and PCB118 by intraperitoneal injection. After nine days, silicone and adipose samples were collected, and all implants in dosed mice had p,p'-DDE and PCB118 present. Distribution ratios from silicone and surrounding tissue in mice compare well with similar studies, and were used to predict adipose concentrations in human tissue. Similarities between predicted and measured chemical concentrations in mice and humans suggest that silicone may be a reliable surrogate measure of persistent toxicants. More research is needed to identify the potential of silicone implants to refine the predictive quality of chemicals found in silicone implants. PMID:26408946

  5. Design, Synthesis, and Identification of Silicon Incorporated Oxazolidinone Antibiotics with Improved Brain Exposure.

    PubMed

    Seetharamsingh, B; Ramesh, Remya; Dange, Santoshkumar S; Khairnar, Pankaj V; Singhal, Smita; Upadhyay, Dilip; Veeraraghavan, Sridhar; Viswanadha, Srikant; Vakkalanka, Swaroop; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2015-11-12

    Therapeutic options for brain infections caused by pathogens with a reduced sensitivity to drugs are limited. Recent reports on the potential use of linezolid in treating brain infections prompted us to design novel compounds around this scaffold. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of various oxazolidinone antibiotics with the incorporation of silicon. Our findings in preclinical species suggest that silicon incorporation is highly useful in improving brain exposures. Interestingly, three compounds from this series demonstrated up to a 30-fold higher brain/plasma ratio when compared to linezolid thereby indicating their therapeutic potential in brain associated disorders. PMID:26617962

  6. Method of producing silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, C. B.; Meyer, T. N.

    1980-02-01

    A liquid reactant injector assembly suited for the injection of liquid reactant into a high temperature metal reductant vapor and carrier gas stream for the production of metal is presented. The assembly is especially adapted for the continuous production of high purity silicon by the reduction of SiCl4 with sodium. The assembly includes a refractory-lined, hollow metal shell having ten equally-spaced, concentric, radially directed ports provided in the shell and wall. A hydraulic, atomizing type spray nozzle is mounted in each of the ports recessed from the inner wall surface.

  7. Integrated hybrid silicon triplexer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsu-Hao; Kuo, Ying-hao; Jones, Richard; Barkai, Assia; Bowers, John E

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an integrated triplexer on silicon with a compact size of 1mm by 3.5mm by utilizing a selective area wafer bonding technique. The wavelength demultiplexer on the triplexer chip successfully separates signals at wavelengths of 1310 nm, 1490 nm and 1550 nm with more than 10 dB extinction ratio. The measured 3 dB bandwidth of the integrated laser and photodetectors are 2 GHz and 16 GHz, respectively. Open eye diagrams are also measured for the integrated photodetector up to 12.5 GHz PRBS inputs. PMID:21164734

  8. Potentialities of silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, R.; Libertino, S.; Corso, D.; Valvo, G.; Sanfilippo, D.; Fallica, P. G.; Lombardo, S.

    2014-03-01

    The Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is a novel pixelated photon detector able to detect single photon arrival with good timing resolution and high gain. In this work we present a complete study of the performances of different SiPMs produced by STMicroelectronics. Their potentialities and limits were identified using experimental measurements and electrical simulations performed both on single pixel and SiPM having up to ˜4000 pixels. SiPM was tested in different experiments such as photoluminescence emission measurement, lifetime measurement of semiconductor materials and light diffusion in highly scattering material in the near infrared spectrum showing its aptitude to replace PMT in those applications.

  9. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  10. Colloidal luminescent silicon nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaotang; Hessel, Colin M; Yu, Yixuan; Bogart, Timothy D; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-07-10

    Silicon nanorods are grown by trisilane decomposition in hot squalane in the presence of tin (Sn) nanocrystals and dodecylamine. Sn induces solution-liquid-solid nanorod growth with dodecylamine serving as a stabilizing ligand. As-prepared nanorods do not luminesce, but etching with hydrofluoric acid to remove residual surface oxide followed by thermal hydrosilylation with 1-octadecene induces bright photoluminescence with quantum yields of 4-5%. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the ligands prevent surface oxidation for months when stored in air. PMID:23731184

  11. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  12. Silicon material task review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project Silicon Material Task are to evaluate technologies, new and old; to develop the most promising technologies; to establish practicality of the processes to meet production, energy use, and economic criteria; and to develop an information base on impurities in polysilicon and to determine their effects on solar cell performance. The approach involves determining process feasibility, setting milestones for the forced selection of the processes, and establishing the technical readiness of the integrated process.

  13. Micromachined Silicon Waveguide Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    Rectangular waveguides are commonly used as circuit elements in remote-sensing heterodyne receivers at millimeter wavelengths. The advantages of waveguides are low loss and mechanical tunability. However, conventional machining techniques for waveguide components operating above a few hundred GHz are complicated and costly. Waveguides micromachined from silicon however would have several important advantages including low-cost; small size for very high frequency (submillimeter wave) operation; high dimensional accuracy (important for high-Q circuits); atomically smooth walls, thereby reducing rf losses; and the ability to integrate active and passive devices directly in the waveguide on thin membranes, thereby solving the traditional problem of mounting thin substrates.

  14. Silicon Web Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of techniques to grow silicon web at 25 wq cm/min output rate is reported. Feasibility of web growth with simultaneous melt replenishment is discussed. Other factors covered include: (1) tests of aftertrimmers to improve web width; (2) evaluation of growth lid designs to raise speed and output rate; (3) tests of melt replenishment hardware; and (4) investigation of directed gas flow systems to control unwanted oxide deposition in the system and to improve convective cooling of the web. Compatibility with sufficient solar cell performance is emphasized.

  15. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-07-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  16. Direct Imprinting of Liquid Silicon.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takashi; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Ken; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2016-04-20

    A polymeric precursor solution for semiconducting silicon called "liquid silicon" was synthesized and directly imprinted to form well-defined and fine amorphous silicon patterns. The spin-coated film was cured and imprinted followed by annealing at 380 °C to complete the polymer-to-silicon conversion. A pattern with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers or less was obtained on a substrate. We demonstrated that the curing step before imprinting is particularly important in the imprinting process. A curing temperature of 140-180 °C was found to be optimal in terms of the film's deformability and molding properties. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis clarified that the cross-linking of the polymer due to the 1,2-hydrogen shift reaction was induced exponentially with the release of a large amount of SiH4/H2 gases at temperatures between 140 and 220 °C, leading to the solidification of the film. Consequently, the film completely lost its deformability at higher temperatures. Despite a volume shrinkage as large as 53-56% during the polymer-to-silicon conversion, well-defined angular patterns were preserved. Fine silicon patterns were formed via the direct imprinting of liquid silicon with high resolution and high throughput, demonstrating the usefulness of this technique for the future manufacturing of silicon electronics. PMID:27028558

  17. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  18. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  19. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  20. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  1. Cryolite Byproduct in Silicon Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Process reacts alumina hydrate with HF and NaF from silicon-production process. Cryolite is produced by adding reaction step to process that makes high-purity silicon from fluorosilicic acid. New extended process has been demonstrated in laboratory and could be used in commercial plants.

  2. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamic maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of Region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicon carbide is the single stable solid phase in Region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4, and SiH. Analysis of the kinetics of reaction for Region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to Regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  3. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamics maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicone carbide is the single stable solid phase in region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4 and SiH. Analyses of the kinetics of reaction for region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  4. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  5. Silicone Granulomas, a Growing Problem?

    PubMed

    Park, Michelle E; Curreri, Alexis T; Taylor, Gina A; Burris, Katy

    2016-05-01

    The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a growing population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled "practitioners" not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors' medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this growing medical problem. PMID:27386046

  6. Silicone Granulomas, a Growing Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Curreri, Alexis T.; Taylor, Gina A.; Burris, Katy

    2016-01-01

    The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a growing population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled “practitioners” not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors’ medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this growing medical problem. PMID:27386046

  7. Cross-coupling reactions of organosilicon compounds: new concepts and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott Eric; Sweis, Ramzi Farah

    2002-12-01

    This review highlights the rapid evolution of the newly-developed class of palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of organosilicon compounds. A myriad of heteroatom-containing silicon moieties (silyl hydrides, siletanes, silanols, silyl ethers, orthosiliconates, di- and polysiloxanes and pyridylsilanes) undergo mild and stereospecific cross-coupling. The diversity of methods for introduction of silicon groups into organic molecules and the range of organic electrophiles that can be used are emphasized. PMID:12499586

  8. Cordierite silicon nitride filters

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. ); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. ); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  9. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  10. Haematic silicon in drowning.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, Giovanni; Merlano, Federica; Chen, Yao; Sturini, Michela; Maraschi, Federica; Profumo, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate silicon (Si) concentration in human whole ventricular blood as a further potential chemical marker in the diagnosis of drowning. We employed an acidic digestion for the extraction of soluble Si, and an alkaline digestion for the determination of total Si, including particulate matter, both arising from drowning medium. 29 suspected drowning situations, 24 in fresh water (Fw) and 5 in seawater (Sw), were examined. The difference in Si concentration between the left and right ventricular blood (Si ΔL-R) was measured and alkaline Si ΔL-R seems, indeed, a potentially significant complementary tool in the diagnosis of Fw drowning, because insoluble silicon fraction does not undergo hemo-dilution or hemo-concentration, and the ΔL-R is not affected by exogenous factors. In spite of the limited number of cases investigated, a good correlation was observed between the analytical results and the macro-microscopic autoptic findings. PMID:26807996

  11. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  12. Multimode silicon nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Glassner, Sebastian; Zeiner, Clemens; Periwal, Priyanka; Baron, Thierry; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2014-11-12

    The combined capabilities of both a nonplanar design and nonconventional carrier injection mechanisms are subject to recent scientific investigations to overcome the limitations of silicon metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. In this Letter, we present a multimode field effect transistors device using silicon nanowires that feature an axial n-type/intrinsic doping junction. A heterostructural device design is achieved by employing a self-aligned nickel-silicide source contact. The polymorph operation of the dual-gate device enabling the configuration of one p- and two n-type transistor modes is demonstrated. Not only the type but also the carrier injection mode can be altered by appropriate biasing of the two gate terminals or by inverting the drain bias. With a combined band-to-band and Schottky tunneling mechanism, in p-type mode a subthreshold swing as low as 143 mV/dec and an ON/OFF ratio of up to 10(4) is found. As the device operates in forward bias, a nonconventional tunneling transistor is realized, enabling an effective suppression of ambipolarity. Depending on the drain bias, two different n-type modes are distinguishable. The carrier injection is dominated by thermionic emission in forward bias with a maximum ON/OFF ratio of up to 10(7) whereas in reverse bias a Schottky tunneling mechanism dominates the carrier transport. PMID:25303290

  13. Process for removal of water and silicon mu-oxides from chlorosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; McManus, James V.

    1992-03-10

    A scavenger composition having utility for removal of water and silicon mu-oxide impurities from chlorosilanes, such scavenger composition comprising: (a) a support; and (b) associated with the support, one or more compound(s) selected from the group consisting of compounds of the formula: R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x wherein: M is a metal selected from the group consisting of the monovalent metals lithium, sodium, and potassium; the divalent metals magnesium, strontium, barium, and calcium; and the trivalent metal aluminum; R is alkyl; a is a number equal to the valency of metal M; and x is a number having a value of from 0 to a, inclusive; and wherein said compound(s) of the formula R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x have been activated for impurity-removal service by a reaction scheme selected from those of the group consisting of: (i) reaction of such compound(s) with hydrogen chloride to form a first reaction product therefrom, followed by reaction of the first reaction product with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y, wherein y is a number having a value of from 1 to 3, inclusive; and (ii) reaction of such compound(s) with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y wherein y is a number having a value of 1 to 3, inclusive. A corresponding method of making the scavenger composition, and of purifying a chlorosilane which contains oxygen and silicon mu-oxide impurities, likewise are disclosed, together with a purifier apparatus, in which a bed of the scavenger composition is disposed. The composition, purification process, and purifier apparatus of the invention have utility in purifying gaseous chlorosilanes which are employed in the semiconductor industry as silicon source reagents for forming epitaxial silicon layers.

  14. Composition, process, and apparatus, for removal of water and silicon mu-oxides from chlorosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; McManus, James V.

    1991-10-15

    A scavenger composition having utility for removal of water and silicon mu-oxide impurities from chlorosilanes, such scavenger composition comprising: (a) a support; and (b) associated with the support, one or more compound(s) selected from the group consisting of compounds of the formula: R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x wherein: M is a metal selected from the group consisting of the monovalent metals lithium, sodium, and potassium; the divalent metals magnesium, strontium, barium, and calcium; and the trivalent metal aluminum; R is alkyl; a is a number equal to the valency of metal M; and x is a number having a value from 0 to a, inclusive; and wherein said compound(s) of the formula R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x have been activated for impurity-removal service by a reaction scheme selected from those of the group consisting of: (i) reaction of such compound(s) with hydrogen chloride to form a first reaction product therefrom, followed by reaction of the first reaction product with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4"y Cl.sub.y, wherein y is a number having a value of from 1 to 3, inclusive; and (ii) reaction of such compound(s) with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y wherein y is a number having a value of 1 to 3, inclusive. A corresponding method of making the scavenger composition, and of purifying a chlorosilane which contains oxygen and silicon mu-oxide impurities, likewise are disclosed, together with a purifier apparatus, in which a bed of the scavenger composition is disposed. The composition, purification process, and purifier apparatus of the invention have utility in purifying gaseous chlorosilanes which are employed in the semiconductor industry as silicon source reagents for forming epitaxial silicon layers.

  15. Silicon: Child and Progenitor of Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahn, R. W.

    Antoine Lavoisier, the pioneering French chemist who (together with Joseph Priestley in England) identified oxygen as an element and gave it its name, in 1789 concluded that quartz was probably a compound with an as-yet undiscovered but presumably extremely common element. That was also the year in which the French Revolution broke out. Five years later, the Jacobins accused Lavoisier of offences against the people and cut off his head, thereby nearly cutting off the new chemistry. It was not until 1824 that Jöns Berzelius in Sweden succeeded in confirming Lavoisier's speculation by isolating silicon. Argument at once broke out among the scientific elite as to whether the newly found element was a metal or an insulator. It took more than a century to settle that disagreement decisively: As so often, when all-or-nothing alternatives are fiercely argued, the truth turned out to be neither all nor nothing.

  16. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project, directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulation system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials, are reported. Results of the following are discussed: (1) weather-ometer stressing vs. weathering history of silicon and silicon modified materials; (2) humidity/temperature cycling exposure; (3) exposure at high humidity/high temperature; (4) outdoor exposure stress; (5) thermal cycling stress; and (6) UV screening agents. The plans for the next quarter are outlined.

  17. Crystalline silicon growth in nickel/a-silicon bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiddon, Md Ahamad; Naidu, K. Lakshun; Dalba, G.; Rocca, F.; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2013-02-05

    The effect of substrate temperature on amorphous Silicon crystallization, mediated by metal impurity is reported. Bilayers of Ni(200nm)/Si(400nm) are deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporator at 200 and 500 Degree-Sign C. Raman mapping shows that, 2 to 5 micron size crystalline silicon clusters are distributed over the entire surface of the sample. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies demonstrate silicon crystallizes over the metal silicide seeds and grow with the annealing temperature.

  18. Reactions of Persistent Carbenes with Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr V; Mavros, Michael G; Queeney, K T; Wu, Tony; Voorhis, Troy Van; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2016-07-13

    Surface passivation has enabled the development of silicon-based solar cells and microelectronics. However, a number of emerging applications require a paradigm shift from passivation to functionalization, wherein surface functionality is installed proximal to the silicon surface. To address this need, we report here the use of persistent aminocarbenes to functionalize hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces via Si-H insertion reactions. Through the use of model compounds (H-Si(TMS)3 and H-Si(OTMS)3), nanoparticles (H-SiNPs), and planar Si(111) wafers (H-Si(111)), we demonstrate that among different classes of persistent carbenes, the more electrophilic and nucleophilic ones, in particular, a cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene (CAAC) and an acyclic diaminocarbene (ADAC), are able to undergo insertion into Si-H bonds at the silicon surface, forming persistent C-Si linkages and simultaneously installing amine or aminal functionality in proximity to the surface. The CAAC (6) is particularly notable for its clean insertion reactivity under mild conditions that produces monolayers with 21 ± 3% coverage of Si(111) atop sites, commensurate with the expected maximum of ∼20%. Atomic force and transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron, and infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry provided evidence for the surface Si-H insertion process. Furthermore, computational studies shed light on the reaction energetics and indicated that CAAC 6 should be particularly effective at binding to silicon dihydride, trihydride, and coupled monohyride motifs, as well as oxidized surface sites. Our results pave the way for the further development of persistent carbenes as universal ligands for silicon and potentially other nonmetallic substrates. PMID:27366818

  19. Production of epoxy compounds from olefinic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbein, A.P.; Kwon, J.T.

    1985-01-29

    Chlorine and tertiary alkanol dissolved in an inert organic solvent are reacted with aqueous alkali to produce tertiary alkyl hypochlorite which is recovered in the organic solvent and reacted with water and olefinically unsaturated compound to produce chlorohydrin and tertiary alkanol. Chlorohydrin and tertiary alkanol recovered in the organic solvent are contacted with aqueous alkali to produce the epoxy compound, and tertiary alkanol recovered in the organic solvent is recycled to hypochlorite production. The process may be integrated with the electrolytic production of chlorine, with an appropriate treatment of the recycle aqueous stream when required.

  20. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  1. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  2. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  3. Ceramic for Silicon-Shaping Dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekercioglu, I.; Wills, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon beryllium oxynitride (SiBON) is a promising candidate material for manufacture of shaping dies used in fabricating ribbons or sheets of silicon. It is extremely stable, resists thermal shock, and has excellent resistance to molten silicon. SiBON is a solid solution of beryllium silicate in beta-silicon nitride.

  4. Silicene: silicon conquers the 2D world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    We live in the digital age based on the silicon chip and driven by Moore's law. Last July, IBM created a surprise by announcing the fabrication of a 7 nm test chip with functional transistors using, instead of just silicon, a silicon-germanium alloy. Will silicon be dethroned?

  5. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  6. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  7. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B.

    1992-05-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for US products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon US government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United State, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the US Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W{sub p} for plants with 10 MW/year capacities. 10 refs.

  8. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B. )

    1992-12-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for U.S. products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon U.S. government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United States, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the U.S. Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W[sub [ital p

  9. Apparatus for making molten silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  10. Determination of Silicon in Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Mast, Dion; Greene, Ben; Maes, Miguel J.

    2006-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a highly sensitive technique sometimes used for the trace determination of silicon at a mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of 28, the most abundant natural isotope of silicon. Unfortunately, ICP-MS is unable to differentiate between other sources of m/z 28 and false positive results for silicon will result when other sources of m/z 28 are present. Nitrogen was a major source of m/z 28 and contributes to the m/z 28 signal when hydrazine sample or nitric acid preservative is introduced into the plasma. Accordingly, this work was performed to develop a sample preparation step coupled with an ICP-MS analysis that minimized non-silicon sources of m/z 28. In the preparatory step of this method, the hydrazine sample was first decomposed predominately to nitrogen gas and water with copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide. In the analysis step, ICP-MS was used without nitric acid preservative in samples or standards. Glass, a potential source of silicon contamination, was also avoided where possible. The method was sensitive, accurate, and reliable for the determination of silicon in monopropellant grade hydrazine (MPH) in AF-E-332 elastomer leaching tests. Results for silicon in MPH were comparable to those reported in the literature for other studies.

  11. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  12. Ecotoxicology of organofluorous compounds.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret B; Loi, Eva I H; Kwok, Karen Y; Lam, Paul K S

    2012-01-01

    Organofluorous compounds have been developed for myriad purposes in a variety of fields, including manufacturing, industry, agriculture, and medicine. The widespread use and application of these compounds has led to increasing concern about their potential ecological toxicity, particularly because of the stability of the C-F bond, which can result in chemical persistence in the environment. This chapter reviews the chemical properties and ecotoxicology of four groups of organofluorous compounds: fluorinated refrigerants and propellants, per- and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), fluorinated pesticides, and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. These groups vary in their environmental fate and partitioning, but each raises concern in terms of ecological risk on both the regional and global scale, particularly those compounds with long environmental half-lives. Further research on the occurrence and toxicities of many of these compounds is needed for a more comprehensive understanding of their ecological effects. PMID:21952849

  13. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  14. Interior phase transformations and mass-radius relationships of silicon-carbon planets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2014-09-20

    Planets such as 55 Cancri e orbiting stars with a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio may consist primarily of silicon and carbon, with successive layers of carbon, silicon carbide, and iron. The behavior of silicon-carbon materials at the extreme pressures prevalent in planetary interiors, however, has not yet been sufficiently understood. In this work, we use simulations based on density functional theory to determine high-pressure phase transitions in the silicon-carbon system, including the prediction of new stable compounds with Si{sub 2}C and SiC{sub 2} stoichiometry at high pressures. We compute equations of state for these silicon-carbon compounds as a function of pressure, and hence derive interior structural models and mass-radius relationships for planets composed of silicon and carbon. Notably, we predict a substantially smaller radius for SiC planets than in previous models, and find that mass radius relationships for SiC planets are indistinguishable from those of silicate planets. We also compute a new equation of state for iron. We rederive interior models for 55 Cancri e and are able to place more stringent restrictions on its composition.

  15. Interior Phase Transformations and Mass-Radius Relationships of Silicon-Carbon Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2014-09-01

    Planets such as 55 Cancri e orbiting stars with a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio may consist primarily of silicon and carbon, with successive layers of carbon, silicon carbide, and iron. The behavior of silicon-carbon materials at the extreme pressures prevalent in planetary interiors, however, has not yet been sufficiently understood. In this work, we use simulations based on density functional theory to determine high-pressure phase transitions in the silicon-carbon system, including the prediction of new stable compounds with Si2C and SiC2 stoichiometry at high pressures. We compute equations of state for these silicon-carbon compounds as a function of pressure, and hence derive interior structural models and mass-radius relationships for planets composed of silicon and carbon. Notably, we predict a substantially smaller radius for SiC planets than in previous models, and find that mass radius relationships for SiC planets are indistinguishable from those of silicate planets. We also compute a new equation of state for iron. We rederive interior models for 55 Cancri e and are able to place more stringent restrictions on its composition.

  16. Dianionic species with a bond consisting of two pentacoordinated silicon atoms.

    PubMed

    Kano, Naokazu; Miyake, Hideaki; Sasaki, Keishi; Kawashima, Takayuki; Mizorogi, Naomi; Nagase, Shigeru

    2010-02-01

    Silicon can form bonds to other tetracoordinated silicon atoms and these bonds form the framework of many organosilicon compounds and crystalline silicon. Silicon can also form a pentacoordinated anionic structure-a so-called 'silicate'. No compounds containing a direct bond between two silicate moieties-'disilicates' where two silicate structures are combined in one species-have been reported because of the electronic repulsion between the anionic halves and difficulty preventing the release of anions. Here we report the synthesis of thermally stable and isolable disilicates by the reductive coupling reaction of a silane bearing two electron-withdrawing bidentate ligands. Two pentacoordinated silicons, positively charged despite the formal negative charge, constitute a single σ-bond and bind eight negatively charged atoms. They can be reversibly protonated, cleaving two Si-O bonds, to afford a tetracoordinated disilane. Their unique electronic properties could be promising for the construction of functional materials with silicon wire made up of silicate chains. PMID:21124401

  17. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  18. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  19. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of porous silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daeyoon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Moon, Taeho; Sohn, Honglae

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of porous silicon nanowires through the metalassisted chemical etching of porous silicon in a solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The morphology of porous silicon nanowires was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The etch rate of the porous silicon nanowires was faster than that of silicon nanowires, but slower than that of porous silicon. The porous silicon nanowires distributed uniformly on the entire porous silicon layer and the tips of the porous silicon nanowires congregated together. The single crystalline and sponge-like porous structure with the pore diameters of less than 5 nm was confirmed for the porous silicon nanowires. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fludized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  2. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C. (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fluidized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  3. Nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds and processes

    DOEpatents

    Lerom, M.W.; Peters, H.M.

    1975-07-08

    This patent relates to the nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds: 3,3''-bis (difluoramino)-2,2'' 4,4', 4'',6,6',6''-octanitro-m-terphenyl (DDONT) and 3,3''-bis(difluoramino)-2,2',2''4,4',4'',6,6',6''-nonanitro-m-terphenyl (DDNONA). Procedures are described wherein diamino precursors of the indicated compounds are prepared and the final compounds are obtained by a fluorination operation. The compounds are highly energetic and suitable for use as explosives and particularly in exploding bridge wire (EBW) detonators. (auth)

  4. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Using a Novel Silylamine Precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Yusup, Luchana L; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-08-17

    We report the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of silicon nitride thin film using a silylamine compound as the silicon precursor. A series of silylamine compounds were designed by replacing SiH3 groups in trisilylamine by dimethylaminomethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl groups to obtain sufficient thermal stability. The silylamine compounds were synthesized through redistribution, amino-substitution, lithiation, and silylation reactions. Among them, bis(dimethylaminomethylsilyl)trimethylsilyl amine (C9H29N3Si3, DTDN2-H2) was selected as the silicon precursor because of the lowest bond dissociation energy and sufficient vapor pressures. The energies for adsorption and reaction of DTDN2-H2 with the silicon nitride surface were also calculated by density functional theory. PEALD silicon nitride thin films were prepared using DTDN2-H2 and N2 plasma. The PEALD process window was between 250 and 400 °C with a growth rate of 0.36 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 400 °C with a RF power of 100 W. The PEALD film prepared showed good bottom and sidewall coverages of ∼80% and ∼73%, respectively, on a trench-patterned wafer with an aspect ratio of 5.5. PMID:27447839

  5. Effect of organo-clay on actuation response of silicone rubber actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavi, N.; Razzaghi Kashani, M.; Moradi, A.

    2009-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers are light weight, low-cost, and highly deformable smart materials widely in used as sensors and actuators. Compounding of silicone rubber with various fillers can enhance efficiency of smart materials. Effect of organically modified Montmorillonite (OMMT) nanoclay on improvement of dielectric properties and actuation stress was considered in this study. Room Temperature Vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber was compound with 2% and 5% of OMMT by solution method and a composite film was cast. Dielectric measurements show enhancement of both dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss in these composites. Actuation stress for different composites was measured by using an in-house actuation set-up, which showed that actuation stress for a given electric field intensity is higher for composites than that for pristine silicone rubber. Furthermore, time dependent actuation response of the samples was evaluated. Dielectric properties of the composites were measured under AC electric fields, and results were compared with the reference silicone rubbers with no filler. Results shows increase in both storage and loss dielectric constants of base silicone rubber when it is compounded with OMMT.

  6. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  7. Thick film silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Jewett, D. N.; Mlavsky, A. I.; White, V. E.

    1974-01-01

    One inch wide silicon ribbons up to 14 inches long have been produced from graphite dies. Several different techniques have been employed to improve the semiconductor purity of silicon. This has resulted in a general increase in quality although the techniques involved have not been optimized. The power factor of uncoated ribbon solar cells produced for material evaluation has increased to approximately 75% of those evaluation cells made from commercial silicon. The present limitation is believed due to low lifetime. Additional work has continued with new die materials; however, only composite dies of SiO2 and C show significant potential at this time.

  8. Three-dimensional silicon micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, S.; Song, J.; Dang, Z. Y.; Liang, H. D.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2012-11-01

    A process for fabricating arbitrary-shaped, two- and three-dimensional silicon and porous silicon components has been developed, based on high-energy ion irradiation, such as 250 keV to 1 MeV protons and helium. Irradiation alters the hole current flow during subsequent electrochemical anodization, allowing the anodization rate to be slowed or stopped for low/high fluences. For moderate fluences the anodization rate is selectively stopped only at depths corresponding to the high defect density at the end of ion range, allowing true three-dimensional silicon machining. The use of this process in fields including optics, photonics, holography and nanoscale depth machining is reviewed.

  9. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A cost effective encapsulant system was identified and a silicone acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent was prepared. The effectiveness of the cover material in protecting photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers was demonstrated.

  10. Concentrator silicon cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  11. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  12. Crystallization of Silicon Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Purity constraints for reasonable solar-cell efficiency require that silicon-ribbon growth for photovoltaics occur in a regime in which constitutional supercooling or other compositional effects on the crystallization front are not important. A major consideration in the fundamentals of crystallization is the removal of the latent heat of fusion. The direction of removal, compared with the growth direction, has a major influence on the crystallization rate and the development of localized stresses. The detailed shape of the crystallization front appears to have two forms: that required for dendritic-web growth, and that occurring in all others. After the removal of the latent heat of fusion, the thermal-mechanical behavior of all ribbons appears similar within the constraints of the exothermal gradient. The technological constraints in achieving the required thermal and mechanical conditions vary widely among the growth processes.

  13. Silicone plesiotherapy molds

    SciTech Connect

    Karolis, C.; Reay-Young, P.S.; Walsh, W.; Velautham, G.

    1983-04-01

    Plesiotherapy, the treatment of superficial lesions by radioactive molds has largely been replaced by teletherapy techniques involving high energy photon and electron beams. There are, however, situations for which a short distance type treatment, in one form or another, is superior to any other presently available. Traditionally, molds have taken the form of rigid devices incorporating clamps to attach them to the patient. This ensures a reproducible geometry about a localized region since the molds are applied on a daily basis. To make such devices requires considerable skill and patience. This article describes an alternative method that eliminates the use of cumbersome devices in many situations. Silicone molds made from a plaster cast model have been found suitable for the treatment of surface lesions and especially for lesions in the oral and nasal cavities. With the use of radioactive gold seeds the molds may be left in place for a few days without fear of them moving.

  14. Silicon tracker data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Large particle physics experiments are making increasing technological demands on the design and implementation of real-time data acquisition systems. The LHC will have bunch crossing intervals of 25 nanoseconds and detectors, such as CMS, will contain over 10 million electronic channels. Readout systems will need to cope with 100 kHz rates of 1 MByte-sized events. Over 70% of this voluminous flow will stem from silicon tracker and MSGC devices. This paper describes the techniques currently being harnessed from ASIC devices through to modular microprocessor-based architectures around standards such as VMEbus and PCI. In particular, the experiences gained at the HERA H1 experiment are highlighted where many of the key technological concepts have already been im implemented.

  15. Silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hovel, H.J.

    1983-03-01

    A high efficiency silicon solar cell may be constructed by providing a two-stage drift field emitter with a 1 micron thickness on a drift field base region with a back surface field region. The stage of the drift field emitter adjacent to the junction is moderately doped from 1018 to 1016 atoms/cc adjacent the junction to minimize bandgap shrin and to maximize carrier lifetime while the stage of the emitter adjacent the surface is highly doped at 1019 atoms/cc to minimize sheet resistance. The drift field is aiding in both the emitter and base regions. The size of the base is less than an effective diffusion length. There is a difference in doping level in the base depending on the conductivity type of the silicon. For n-conductivity type the base is doped 1013 atoms/cc at the pn junction, increasing to 1016 atoms/cc in the drift field region. For p-conductivity type the base is doped 1016 at the junction, increasing to 1018 atoms/cc in the drift field. A back surface field is provided adjacent the ohmic contact on the part of the base remote from the junction by doping to 1020 to 1021 atoms/cc. A passivating antireflective layer is added to the light incident surface. The 1 micron emitter region contains a 0.1 to 0.2 mu m thick high conducting region adjacent the antireflective coating on the light incident surface and a drift field region 0.3 to 0.9 mu m thick. The base region has a drift field region 20 to 100 mu m thick and the overall base region is 50 to 450 mu m thick. The back surface field region is 1 mu m thick.

  16. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  17. Acute toxicities to larval rainbow trout of representative compounds detected in Great Lakes fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the National Fisheries Research Center-Great Lakes has ranked the potential hazard to fish and invertebrates of various chemical compounds detected in two Great Lakes fishes-- lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, and walleye, Stizostedion vitreum vitreum (Hesselberg and Seelye 1982). This hazard assessment has included the identification of the potential sources of the compounds, determination of the occurrence and abundance of the compounds in Great Lakes fish, and the determination of acute toxicities of representative compounds of 19 chemical classes (Passino and Smith 1987a). In further studies Smith et al. (1988) focused on 6 of the 19 classes of compounds using the zooplankter Daphnia pulex as the test organism. They ranked the six classes as follows (in decreasing order of toxicity): polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, and silicon-containing compounds.

  18. Deposited silicon photonics: Optical interconnect devices in polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Kyle Jonathan

    Silicon photonics has tremendous potential to provide high-bandwidth and low-power data communication for applications such as computing and telecommunication, over length scales ranging from 100 kilometers over fiber to centimeter-length on-chip waveguides. Many silicon photonic building blocks have been demonstrated to date, but critical work remains to determine the best approaches for integrating together silicon photonics with microelectronics. In this thesis, I explore a novel method for integration of silicon photonics on the CMOS platform by using a deposited material: polycrystalline silicon. I will show the first demonstrations of electrically-active optical filters, modulators, and photodetectors in this material. In principle, this material platform would allow for the integration of silicon photonic devices and systems on top of any substrate, including complex CMOS and memory chips or even glass and plastic substrates. In Chapter 1, I introduce the state-of-the-art in silicon photonics, describe several integration schemes under development, and introduce the idea of using deposited materials. In Chapter 2, I demonstrate the use of polysilicon to make integrated microring resonators, and show the integration of different silicon materials together. Chapter 3 discusses the use of polysilicon as both an optical waveguiding layer and an electrode material in slot waveguides for the application of light emitters. Chapter 4 demonstrates the use of a pump-probe experiment to measure the free carrier lifetime in the material and demonstrate all-optical modulation. In Chapter 5, I demonstrate the first high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator in polysilicon, a necessary device for optical transmitters. In Chapter 6, I show how defects inside the same material enable integrated photodetectors at near-infrared telecommunication wavelengths. Chapter 7 shows initial results in adapting the material processing for lower temperatures, necessary for integration

  19. Making a Silicon-Nitride/Silicon-Carbide Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    Hot pressing and nitriding produce strong fiber/matrix material. Fabrication method developed for processing strong and tough silicon-based ceramic composite material, SiC/RBSN, which consists of reaction-bonded Si3N4 (RBSN) reinforced by continuous-length, high-modulus, high strength silicon carbide (SiC) fibers prepared by chemical-vapor deposition method. Increased toughness and ultimate strength of SiC/RBSN composite makes it potential structural material for advanced heat engines.

  20. Silicon Holder For Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Simple assembly of silicon wafers holds silicon-based charge-coupled device (CCD) during postprocessing in which silicon deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. Attains temperatures similar to CCD, so hotspots suppressed. Coefficients of thermal expansion of holder and CCD equal, so thermal stresses caused by differential thermal expansion and contraction do not develop. Holder readily fabricated, by standard silicon processing techniques, to accommodate various CCD geometries. Silicon does not contaminate CCD or molecular-beam-epitaxy vacuum chamber.

  1. Silicon solar cells: Past, present and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youn-Jung; Kim, Byung-Sung; Ifitiquar, S. M.; Park, Cheolmin; Yi, Junsin

    2014-08-01

    There has been a great demand for renewable energy for the last few years. However, the solar cell industry is currently experiencing a temporary plateau due to a sluggish economy and an oversupply of low-quality cells. The current situation can be overcome by reducing the production cost and by improving the cell is conversion efficiency. New materials such as compound semiconductor thin films have been explored to reduce the fabrication cost, and structural changes have been explored to improve the cell's efficiency. Although a record efficiency of 24.7% is held by a PERL — structured silicon solar cell and 13.44% has been realized using a thin silicon film, the mass production of these cells is still too expensive. Crystalline and amorphous silicon — based solar cells have led the solar industry and have occupied more than half of the market so far. They will remain so in the future photovoltaic (PV) market by playing a pivotal role in the solar industry. In this paper, we discuss two primary approaches that may boost the silicon — based solar cell market; one is a high efficiency approach and the other is a low cost approach. We also discuss the future prospects of various solar cells.

  2. [Study of purity tests for silicone resins].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kyoko; Otsuki, Noriko; Ohori, Akio; Chinda, Mitsuru; Furusho, Noriko; Osako, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    In the 8th edition of Japan's Specifications and Standards for Food Additives, the purity test for silicone resins requires the determination of the refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the extracted silicone oil, and allows for only a limited amount of silicon dioxide. In the purity test, carbon tetrachloride is used to separate the silicone oil and silicon dioxide. To exclude carbon tetrachloride, methods were developed for separating the silicone oil and silicon dioxide from silicone resin, which use hexane and 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane. For silicone oil, the measured refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the silicone oil obtained from the hexane extract were shown to be equivalent to those of the intact silicone oil. In regard to silicon dioxide, it was confirmed that, following the separation with 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane, the level of silicon dioxide in silicone resin can be accurately determined. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for testing the purity of silicone resins without the use of carbon tetrachloride, which is a harmful reagent. PMID:23243991

  3. Distribution and Chemical State of Cu-rich Clusters in Silicon: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Buonassisi, T.; Marcus, M. A.; Istratov, A. A.; Heuer, M.; Ciszek, T. F.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Weber, E. R.

    2004-08-01

    the chemical state and distribution of Cu-rich clusters were determined in four different silicon-based materials with varying contamination pathways and degrees of oxygen concentration, including as-grown multicrystalline silicon. In all four samples, Cu3Si was the only chemical state observed. Cu3Si clusters were observed at structural defects within all four materials; XBIC measurements revealed that the presence of Cu3Si corresponds to increased recombination activity. Oxidized Cu compounds are not likely to form in silicon. The +1 eV edge shift in the -XAS absorption spectrum of Cu3Si relative to Cu metal is believed to be an indication of a degree of covalent bonding between Cu atoms and their silicon neighbors.

  4. Features of compound multiplicity in heavy-ion interactions at 4. 5 A GeV/ c

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, T.; Irfan, M. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper mainly deals with some important features of compound multiplicity in the inelastic nuclear reactions induced by 4.5{ital A} GeV/{ital c} carbon and silicon ions in nuclear emulsion. The characteristics of this parameter observed in the present study are compared with the corresponding values obtained for proton-emulsion interactions at the same incident momentum per nucleon. The average compound multiplicity is found to vary linearly with black and heavy particle multiplicities. Finally, the compound multiplicity distributions for carbon- and silicon-emulsion interactions are observed to obey a Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) type of scaling law.

  5. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  6. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  7. Cryogenic Multichannel Silicon Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The dark squares are silicon pressure sensors. They are bonded to a pre-drilled substrate which supports the sensors and multiplex chips. The substrate is bonded to a metallic tubing plate which has individual pressure ports.

  8. Silicone Cerenkov-Radiator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Dyes enhance visible output. Three fluorescent dyes combine to increase output of silicone material that normally has low yield of visible Cerenkov radiation by converting large amount of available ultraviolet photons into visible light.

  9. Morphological Characterization of Silicone Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gido, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Silicone hydrogel materials are used in the latest generation of extended wear soft contact lenses. To ensure comfort and eye health, these materials must simultaneously exhibit high oxygen permeability and high water permeability / hydrophilicity. The materials achieve these opposing requirements based on bicontinuous composite of nanoscale domains of oxygen permeable (silicones) and hydrophilic (water soluble polymer) materials. The microphase separated morphology of silicone hydrogel contact lens materials was imaged using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additional morphological information was provided by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These results all indicate a nanophase separated structure of silicone rich (oxygen permeable) and carbon rich (water soluble polymer) domains separated on a length scale of about 10 nm.

  10. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry is presented that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds and contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine-structure levels of the silicon atom. As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, the model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundance of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  11. RF shaping of silicon ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelhank, D. A.; Rochat, R. D.; Marx, W.

    1976-01-01

    Electromagnetic force generated by radiofrequency coil is used to shape molten silicon. Shaping coil surrounds melt near solid-liquid interface and induces current in surface region of melt nearly equal to but opposite coil current.

  12. Photothermoelectric Effects in Nanoporous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Sheng; Tsai, Chao-Yang; Chang, Chin-Kai; Huang, Cheng-Yin; Hsiao, Vincent K S; Su, Yuhlong Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The first observation of the photothermoelectric effect in a nanoporous silicon (NPSi) device indicates that the photocurrent is dependent on the position of light-induced local heating from illumination at the Au-electrode/NPSi interface. PMID:26821828

  13. Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, J.

    2004-08-01

    This short brochure describes a milestone in solar (or photovoltaic, PV) research-namely, the 50th anniversary of the invention of the first viable silicon solar cell by three researchers at Bell Laboratories.

  14. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  15. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, S; Ariga, P; Aggarwal, P; Viswanath, A

    2014-01-01

    Patients with orocutaneous fistulas suffer from discomfort in terms of facial esthetics, food spill over and lack of psychological confidence to present them socially. Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention. PMID:24553044

  16. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  17. Silicon Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Mitchell, Robert R.; Isenberg, Hal D.; Stahle, Carl M.; Cao, Nga T.; Schneider, Gideon; Travers, Douglas E.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new type of direct detector, a silicon hot-electron bolometer, for measurements in the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral ranges. High performance bolometers can be made using the electron-phonon conductance in heavily doped silicon to provide thermal isolation from the cryogenic bath. Noise performance is expected to be near thermodynamic limits, allowing background limited performance for many far infrared and submillimeter photometric and spectroscopic applications.

  18. Multiphonon infrared absorption in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, M. M.; Garg, R. K.; Arora, M.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out on silicon crystals, grown by float zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) methods, of infrared absorption bands using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. Multiphonon bands are identified in the light of recent theoretical calculations based on the total energy of silicon crystal lattice. Theoretical results of Ihm et al. (1) and Yin and Cohen (2,3) are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations of multiphonon infrared bands.

  19. Metallization of Large Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A metallization scheme was developed which allows selective plating of silicon solar cell surfaces. The system is comprised of three layers. Palladium, through the formation of palladium silicide at 300 C in nitrogen, makes ohmic contact to the silicon surface. Nickel, plated on top of the palladium silicide layer, forms a solderable interface. Lead-tin solder on the nickel provides conductivity and allows a convenient means for interconnection of cells. To apply this metallization, three chemical plating baths are employed.

  20. Silicone-Rubber Stitching Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fabric products protected from raveling by coating threads and filling stitching holes with silicone rubber. Uncored silicone rubber applied to stitching lines with air-pressurized sealant gun. Next, plastic release film placed on coated side, and blanket flipped over so release film lies underneath. Blanket then bagged and adhesive cured under partial vacuum of about 3.5 psi or under pressure. Applications include balloons, parachutes, ultralight aircraft, sails, rescue harnesses, tents, or other fabric products highly stressed in use.

  1. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.; Serreze, H. B.; Bates, H. E.; Morrison, A. D.; Jewett, D. N.; Ho, J. C. T.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Kran, A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous growth methodology for silicon solar cell ribbons deals with capillary effects, die effects, thermal effects and crystal shape effects. Emphasis centers on the shape of the meniscus at the ribbon edge as a factor contributing to ribbon quality with respect to defect densities. Structural and electrical characteristics of edge defined, film-fed grown silicon ribbons are elaborated. Ribbon crystal solar cells produce AMO efficiencies of 6 to 10%.

  2. Polycrystalline silicon on tungsten substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Schmidt, F. A.; Shanks, H. R.; Campisi, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thin films of electron-beam-vaporized silicon were deposited on fine-grained tungsten substrates under a pressure of about 1 x 10 to the -10th torr. Mass spectra from a quadrupole residual-gas analyzer were used to determine the partial pressure of 13 residual gases during each processing step. During separate silicon depositions, the atomically clean substrates were maintained at various temperatures between 400 and 780 C, and deposition rates were between 20 and 630 A min. Surface contamination and interdiffusion were monitored by in situ Auger electron spectrometry before and after cleaning, deposition, and annealing. Auger depth profiling, X-ray analysis, and SEM in the topographic and channeling modes were utilized to characterize the samples with respect to silicon-metal interface, interdiffusion, silicide formation, and grain size of silicon. The onset of silicide formation was found to occur at approximately 625 C. Above this temperature tungsten silicides were formed at a rate faster than the silicon deposition. Fine-grain silicon films were obtained at lower temperatures.

  3. Guided photoluminescence study of Nd-doped silicon rich silicon oxide and silicon rich silicon nitride waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirasteh, Parastesh; Charrier, Joël; Dumeige, Yannick; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Camy, Patrice; Debieu, Olivier; Liang, Chuan-hui; Khomenkova, Larysa; Lemaitre, Jonathan; Boucher, Yann G.; Gourbilleau, Fabrice

    2013-07-01

    Planar waveguides made of Nd3+-doped silicon rich silicon oxide (SRSO) and silicon rich silicon nitride (SRSN) have been fabricated by reactive magnetron sputtering and characterized with special emphasis on the comparison of the guided photoluminescence (PL) properties of these two matrices. Guided fluorescence excited by top surface pumping at 488 nm on planar waveguides was measured as a function of the distance between the excitation area and the output of the waveguide, as well as a function of the pump power density. The PL intensity increased linearly with pump power without any saturation even at high power. The linear intensity increase of the Nd3+ guided PL under a non-resonant excitation (488 nm) confirms the efficient coupling between either Si-np and rare-earth ions for SRSO or radiative defects and rare earth ions for SRSN. The guided fluorescences at 945 and 1100 nm were observed until 4 mm and 8 mm of the output of the waveguide for Nd3+ doped SRSO and SRSN waveguides, respectively. The guided fluorescence decays of Nd3+-doped-SRSO and -SRSN planar waveguides have been measured and found equal to 97 μs ±7 and 5 μs ± 2, respectively. These results show notably that the Nd3+-doped silicon rich silicon oxide is a very promising candidate on the way to achieve a laser cavity at 1.06 μm.

  4. Photophysical ablation of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Valerii P.; Mikhailova, G. N.

    2004-07-01

    Laser ablation of porous silicon as a function of laser wavelength and width of silicon nanowires was studied in our experiments. The time-resolved evolution of the cloud of the porous silicon particles produced by laser ablation is studied in situ by the analysis of the kinetics of photoluminescence signal. The laser ablation of porous silicon produced by pulses of 532 nm or 337 nm radiation with addition of synchronized power pulses of 1064 nm radiation. The cloud of the nanometer-sized silicon crystallites had the high enhancement of luminescence quantum efficiency in the red region of spectra. The slow PL kinetics component, which is due to the localized carriers, decays on a millisecond time scale. The squeezed electron-hole plasma heating by IR-laser radiation may produce a damage of silicon nanowires. The fragments of nanowires in cloud must be smaller, than the critical length. The energy of excitation of e-h pair in fragment with contribution of longitude quantum modes must be lower than energy of the excited photons. Particles with lesser length don't absorb excited laser radiation and don't damage. For this case we may speak about the quantum mechanism of laser ablation of nanowires.

  5. Method of enhancing the electronic properties of an undoped and/or N-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    The dark conductivity and photoconductivity of an N-type and/or undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer fabricated by an AC or DC proximity glow discharge in silane can be increased through the incorporation of argon in an amount from 10 to about 90 percent by volume of the glow discharge atmosphere which contains a silicon-hydrogen containing compound in an amount of from about 90 to about 10 volume percent.

  6. Chlorine Free Technology for Solar-Grade Silicon Manufacturing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Strebkov, D. S.; Pinov, A. P.; Zadde, V. V.; Lebedev, E. N.; Belov, E. P.; Efimov, N. K.; Kleshevnikova, S. I.; Touryan, K.; Bleak, D.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the development of the solar energy industry, a significant increase of polysilicon feedstock (PSF) production will be required in near future. The creation of special technology of solar grade polysilicon feedstock production is an important problem. Today, semiconductor-grade polysilicon is mainly manufactured using the trichlorosilane (SiHCl3) distillation and reduction. The feed-stock for trichlorosilane is metallurgical-grade silicon, the product of reduction of natural quartzite (silica). This polysilicon production method is characterized by high energy consumption and large amounts of wastes, containing environmentally harmful chlorine based compounds. In the former USSR the principles of industrial method for production of monosilane and polycrystalline silicon by thermal decomposition of monosilane were founded. This technology was proved in industrial scale at production of gaseous monosilane and PSF. We offered new chlorine free technology (CFT). Originality and novelty of the process were confirmed by Russian and US patents.

  7. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  8. Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Seals for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Miller, Sharon K. R.; Smith, Ian M.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M

    2008-01-01

    Silicone rubber seals are being considered for a number of interfaces on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Some of these joints include the docking system, hatches, and heat shield-to-back shell interface. A large diameter molded silicone seal is being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) that forms an effective seal between the CEV and International Space Station (ISS) and other future Constellation Program spacecraft. Seals between the heat shield and back shell prevent high temperature reentry gases from leaking into the interface. Silicone rubber seals being considered for these locations have inherent adhesive tendencies that would result in excessive forces required to separate the joints if left unchecked. This paper summarizes adhesion assessments for both as-received and adhesion-mitigated seals for the docking system and the heat shield interface location. Three silicone elastomers were examined: Parker Hannifin S0899-50 and S0383-70 compounds, and Esterline ELA-SA-401 compound. For the docking system application various levels of exposure to atomic oxygen (AO) were evaluated. Moderate AO treatments did not lower the adhesive properties of S0899-50 sufficiently. However, AO pretreatments of approximately 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm did lower the adhesion of S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 to acceptable levels. For the heat shield-to-back shell interface application, a fabric covering was also considered. Molding Nomex fabric into the heat shield pressure seal appreciably reduced seal adhesion for the heat shield-to-back shell interface application.

  9. Taming the silicon dragon.

    PubMed

    Stevens, F; Pion, P D

    1996-05-01

    This article is an introduction to how computers work. Although many can begin to use this tool without any formal knowledge of its components or how they work together, only a functional understanding of these aspects can really unleash the power and capabilities available and allow you to proceed without fear that some mysterious force will come up and "eat the data" or somehow cause some other damage to the system. Through an inspection of the terminology, anatomical dissection, and physiology of our imagined "silicon dragon," we can appreciate the qualities of the beast, dispell our fears, and take real control of this potentially awesome tool. Although the basic information is perforce, quite technical in nature, the article is meant both to be readable and also provide a reference for terms and concepts mentioned both elsewhere in this issue, as well as generally. It is especially useful to be refreshed on these terms and concepts when considering an initial purchase or upgrade of computer equipment. PMID:8898565

  10. Silicon Carbide Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  11. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  12. Silicon MINP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.; Addis, F. W.; Miller, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The MINP solar cell concept refers to a cell structure designed to be a base region dominated device. Thus, it is desirable that recombination losses are reduced to the point that they occur only in the base region. The most unique feature of the MINP cell design is that a tunneling contact is utilized for the metallic contact on the front surface. The areas under the collector grid and bus bar are passivated by a thin oxide of tunneling thickness. Efforts must also be taken to minimize recombination at the surface between grid lines, at the junction periphery and within the emitter. Results of both theoretical and experimental studies of silicon MINP cells are given. Performance calculations are described which give expected efficiencies as a function of base resistivity and junction depth. Fabrication and characterization of cells are discussed which are based on 0.2 ohm-cm substrates, diffused emitters on the order of 0.15 to 0.20 microns deep, and with Mg MIS collector grids. A total area AM 1 efficiency of 16.8% was achieved. Detailed analyses of photocurrent and current loss mechanisms are presented and utilized to discuss future directions of research. Finally, results reported by other workers are discussed.

  13. Silicon Photomultipliers Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowser, Christopher; Tzolov, Marian; Barbi, Nick

    Low noise and high sensitivity photon detectors such as the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) are very common instruments used in research and many other applications. The PMTs have drawbacks such as durability, size, and sensitivity to magnetic field which make them unsuitable for some tasks. Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are compact, solid state detectors with gain close to that of a PMT, which are a promising replacement of a PMT. We have studied two types of SiPMs designed for optimum response in the visible and near-UV spectral range. We have verified the basic electrical parameters of the devices using current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectroscopy in dark. The spectral response was measured in DC mode, which is very simple to realize and still delivers very good sensitivity. We have established the linearity of the photoresponse and the limits at high intensity illumination. The pairing of the SiPMs with several common scintillators was studied with the goal of optimum performance of the SiPM/scintillator pair.

  14. Nanowire lithography on silicon.

    PubMed

    Colli, Alan; Fasoli, Andrea; Pisana, Simone; Fu, Yongqing; Beecher, Paul; Milne, William I; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2008-05-01

    Nanowire lithography (NWL) uses nanowires (NWs), grown and assembled by chemical methods, as etch masks to transfer their one-dimensional morphology to an underlying substrate. Here, we show that SiO2 NWs are a simple and compatible system to implement NWL on crystalline silicon and fabricate a wide range of architectures and devices. Planar field-effect transistors made of a single SOI-NW channel exhibit a contact resistance below 20 kOmega and scale with the channel width. Further, we assess the electrical response of NW networks obtained using a mask of SiO2 NWs ink-jetted from solution. The resulting conformal network etched into the underlying wafer is monolithic, with single-crystalline bulk junctions; thus no difference in conductivity is seen between a direct NW bridge and a percolating network. We also extend the potential of NWL into the third dimension, by using a periodic undercutting that produces an array of vertically stacked NWs from a single NW mask. PMID:18386934

  15. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications. PMID:24992278

  16. Amorphous silicon carbide films prepared using vaporized silicon ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Takashi; Shen, Zhongrong; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    The deposition of wide-band-gap silicon films using nonvacuum processes rather than conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest because it may reduce cost. Herein, we present the optical and electrical properties of p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films prepared using a nonvacuum process in a simple chamber with a vaporized silicon ink consisting of cyclopentasilane, cyclohexene, and decaborane. The incorporation of carbon into the silicon network induced by the addition of cyclohexene to the silicon ink resulted in an increase in the optical band gap (Eg) of films from 1.56 to 2.11 eV. The conductivity of films with Eg < 1.9 eV is comparable to that of conventional a-SiC:H films prepared using a vacuum process, while the films with Eg > 1.9 eV show lower conductivity than expected because of the incorporation of excess carbon without the formation of Si-C bonds.

  17. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  18. Silicone rubber selection for passive sampling of pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Martin, A; Margoum, C; Randon, J; Coquery, M

    2016-11-01

    Silicone rubber can extract organic compounds with a broad range of polarities (logKow>2-3) from aqueous samples. Such compounds include substances of major concern in the protection of aquatic ecosystems and human health, e.g. pesticides. Silicone rubbers (SRs) with various characteristics have been successfully used in sorptive methods for water sample extraction in the laboratory (SPME, SBSE), and for passive sampling in aquatic environments. However, only few studies have evaluated variability in organic compound sorption due to the origin of SRs, particularly for pesticides. The aim of this study was to select an SR for the extraction of pesticides from water samples by passive sampling. To this end we measured the impact of seven SR formulations on sorption capacity, defined by the partition coefficient (Ksw). Kinetic experiments and sorption isotherms were performed to determine extraction recovery as a selection criterion for SRs, and pesticide partition coefficients. Very large differences in affinity for pesticides were found between two kinds of SRs: "Polymerized SR kits" and "Manufactured SRs". One SR was chosen among the "Manufactured SRs", and the Ksw values of 21 pesticides were determined, filling a gap in the literature (1.50

  19. Stabilized Lanthanum Sulphur Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, George H. (Inventor); Elsner, Norbert B. (Inventor); Shearer, Clyde H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Lanthanum sulfide is maintained in the stable cubic phase form over a temperature range of from 500 C to 1500 C by adding to it small amounts of calcium, barium. or strontium. This novel compound is an excellent thermoelectric material.

  20. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Goodman, Mark M.

    1985-01-01

    The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  1. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1983-06-29

    The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  2. Anti-Fog Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tracer Chemical Corporation's TRX Anti-Fog Composition is an inexpensive product which prevents condensation on plastic and glass surfaces. It was the result from a Tech Briefs article detailing a Johnson Space Center compound.

  3. Compounding a Problem?

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-01-01

    Allergist-immunologists say a U.S. Pharmacopeia proposal will mess with an allergy treatment system that's worked for more than a century. The revised standards, if adopted, would remove a key exemption separating allergen extract preparations from the stricter requirements of other compounds. Immunologists say the exemption has allowed them to compound allergen extracts in their own offices, and they've done so safely and effectively millions of times a year. PMID:27175928

  4. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  5. Compound composite odontoma

    PubMed Central

    Girish, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Singh, Manish Kumar; Prasad, Sahana N

    2016-01-01

    The term odontoma has been used as a descriptor for any tumor of odontogenic origin. It is a growth in which both epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibits complete differentiation. Odontomas are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasm. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Odontomas, according to the World Health Organization, are classified into complex odontoma and compound odontomas. The present paper reports a case of compound composite odontomas. PMID:27194882

  6. Compound composite odontoma.

    PubMed

    Girish, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Singh, Manish Kumar; Prasad, Sahana N

    2016-01-01

    The term odontoma has been used as a descriptor for any tumor of odontogenic origin. It is a growth in which both epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibits complete differentiation. Odontomas are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasm. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Odontomas, according to the World Health Organization, are classified into complex odontoma and compound odontomas. The present paper reports a case of compound composite odontomas. PMID:27194882

  7. Internal energy deposition with silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Hua, Yimin; Boday, Dylan J.; Somogyi, Arpad; Wysocki, Ronald J.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2009-06-01

    The use of silicon nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization (LDI) is a new appealing matrix-less approach for the selective and sensitive mass spectrometry of small molecules in MALDI instruments. Chemically modified silicon nanoparticles (30 nm) were previously found to require very low laser fluence in order to induce efficient LDI, which raised the question of internal energy deposition processes in that system. Here we report a comparative study of internal energy deposition from silicon nanoparticles to previously explored benzylpyridinium (BP) model compounds during LDI experiments. The internal energy deposition in silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) with different fluorinated linear chain modifiers (decyl, hexyl and propyl) was compared to LDI from untreated silicon nanoparticles and from the organic matrix, [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). The energy deposition to internal vibrational modes was evaluated by molecular ion survival curves and indicated that the ions produced by SPALDI have an internal energy threshold of 2.8-3.7 eV. This is slightly lower than the internal energy induced using the organic CHCA matrix, with similar molecular survival curves as previously reported for LDI off silicon nanowires. However, the internal energy associated with desorption/ionization from the silicon nanoparticles is significantly lower than that reported for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The measured survival yields in SPALDI gradually decrease with increasing laser fluence, contrary to reported results for silicon nanowires. The effect of modification of the silicon particle surface with semifluorinated linear chain silanes, including fluorinated decyl (C10), fluorinated hexyl (C6) and fluorinated propyl (C3) was explored too. The internal energy deposited increased with a decrease in the length of the modifier alkyl chain. Unmodified silicon particles exhibited the highest analyte internal energy

  8. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  9. Optimizing Silicon Oxide Embedded Silicon Nanocrystal Inter-particle Distances.

    PubMed

    van Sebille, Martijn; Allebrandi, Jort; Quik, Jim; van Swaaij, René A C M M; Tichelaar, Frans D; Zeman, Miro

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate an analytical method to optimize the stoichiometry and thickness of multilayer silicon oxide films in order to achieve the highest density of non-touching and closely spaced silicon nanocrystals after annealing. The probability of a nanocrystal nearest-neighbor distance within a limited range is calculated using the stoichiometry of the as-deposited film and the crystallinity of the annealed film as input parameters. Multiplying this probability with the nanocrystal density results in the density of non-touching and closely spaced silicon nanocrystals. This method can be used to estimate the best as-deposited stoichiometry in order to achieve optimal nanocrystal density and spacing after a subsequent annealing step. PMID:27492439

  10. Optimizing Silicon Oxide Embedded Silicon Nanocrystal Inter-particle Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, Martijn; Allebrandi, Jort; Quik, Jim; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Tichelaar, Frans D.; Zeman, Miro

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an analytical method to optimize the stoichiometry and thickness of multilayer silicon oxide films in order to achieve the highest density of non-touching and closely spaced silicon nanocrystals after annealing. The probability of a nanocrystal nearest-neighbor distance within a limited range is calculated using the stoichiometry of the as-deposited film and the crystallinity of the annealed film as input parameters. Multiplying this probability with the nanocrystal density results in the density of non-touching and closely spaced silicon nanocrystals. This method can be used to estimate the best as-deposited stoichiometry in order to achieve optimal nanocrystal density and spacing after a subsequent annealing step.

  11. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  12. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  13. Oxygen, carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Corbett, J.W.; Pennycook, S.J

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on interstitial material in silicon. Topics include: hydrogen in crystalline silicon, low energy hydrogen ion bombarded silicon, oxygen in silicon, oxygen thermal donor formation, thermal donor generation and annihilation effects on oxygen precipitation oxygen effects on plastic flow during growth of dendrixic web silicon, nitrogen in silicon, off-center nitrogen and oxygen in silicon, and thermal donor hierarchies in silicon and germanium.

  14. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  15. Understanding medication compounding issues.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W

    2014-04-01

    The potential for contamination of compounded products and the resulting infections are a serious threat to patient safety. Immediate use products are used frequently in the perioperative department, and perioperative nurses should be familiar with the guidelines and practices that aim to reduce the contamination that can occur during the sterile compounding process. Four common themes lead to successful compounding: quality (eg, product identification, purity, stability, compatibility, risk level assessment), the environment (eg, using a segregated compounding area with specialized airflow capabilities, reducing particulate matter, practicing proper hand hygiene, performing gloved fingertip sampling, properly cleaning equipment and work areas), personnel activities (eg, familiarity with types of containers used and how often they can be accessed, following expiration dates and the number of times containers can be accessed), and the control process (eg, process monitoring, quality improvement). If a third-party vendor is contracted to handle compounding for a facility, perioperative personnel should be aware of the responsibilities for the facility and the vendor to ensure a quality compounding program. PMID:24674793

  16. Clathrate compounds and method of manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Nolas, George S.; Witanachchi, Sarath; Mukherjee, Pritish

    2009-05-19

    The present invention comprises new materials, material structures, and processes of fabrication of such that may be used in technologies involving the conversion of light to electricity and/or heat to electricity, and in optoelectronics technologies. The present invention provide for the fabrication of a clathrate compound comprising a type II clathrate lattice with atoms of silicon and germanium as a main framework forming lattice spacings within the framework, wherein the clathrate lattice follows the general formula Si.sub.136-yGe.sub.y, where y indicates the number of Ge atoms present in the main framework and 136-y indicates the number of Si atoms present in the main framework, and wherein y>0.

  17. Computational assessment of organic photovoltaic candidate compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borunda, Mario; Dai, Shuo; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Amador-Bedolla, Carlos; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells are emerging as a possible renewable alternative to petroleum based resources and are needed to meet our growing demand for energy. Although not as efficient as silicon based cells, OPV cells have as an advantage that their manufacturing cost is potentially lower. The Harvard Clean Energy Project, using a cheminformatic approach of pattern recognition and machine learning strategies, has ranked a molecular library of more than 2.6 million candidate compounds based on their performance as possible OPV materials. Here, we present a ranking of the top 1000 molecules for use as photovoltaic materials based on their optical absorption properties obtained via time-dependent density functional theory. This computational search has revealed the molecular motifs shared by the set of most promising molecules.

  18. A New Process for Fabricating Random Silicon Nanotips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish

    2004-01-01

    An improved process for the fabrication of random arrays of silicon nanotips has been demonstrated to be feasible. Relative to other such processes, this process offers advantages of low cost and simplicity. Moreover, this process can readily be combined with other processes used to fabricate integrated circuits and other monolithic silicon structures. Arrays of silicon nanotips are subjects of research and development efforts directed toward utilizing them as field emitters in flat-panel displays, vacuum microelectronics, and microwave devices. Other silicon-nanotip-fabrication processes developed thus far predominantly include lithography, etching, and/or elaborate deposition steps followed by oxide sharpening steps and are both process intensive as well as expensive. In addition to being cheaper and simpler, the present process can efficiently produce silicon nanotips that range in height from a few microns to several tens of microns and are distributed over large areas. The process mentioned here can be summarized as consisting of (1) the growth of micro-etch masks on a silicon substrate, followed by (2) etching away of the masks, along with some of the substrate, to make an array of sharp tips. In the first step of the process, a cleaned silicon substrate is subjected to reactive ion etching (RIE) in a certain mixture of oxygen and carbon tetrafluoride under radio-frequency excitation. This process step results in the growth of fluorine based compounds in the form of stumps randomly distributed on the substrate. These stumps are known in the art as polymer RIE grass. The dimensions of these stumps are of the order of hundreds of nanometers, the exact values depending on process time and gas composition. The areal density of the stumps decreases with increasing process time as they grow and merge with neighboring stumps. These stumps constitute the micro-etch masks for the next step of the process. In the second step of the process, the substrate covered with

  19. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  20. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  1. Infrared Kerr measurements on ferromagnetic silicon and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jungryeol; Mukherjee, Alok; Arik, Mumtaz Murat; Cerne, John; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Shengqiang; Böttger, Roman; Song, Bo; Wang, Gang

    We measure the infrared (100-1000 meV) Kerr angle in ferromagnetic silicon and silicon carbide. The samples were either neutron irradiated or aluminum doped to induce ferromagnetic behavior. The samples are studied in the 10-300K temperature range at magnetic fields up to 7T. We also explore the dependence of the magneto-optical signal on samples with different irradiation exposure levels. This study provides new information on the optical, magnetic, and electronic properties of these materials. Work supported by NSF-DMR1410599 and the Helmholtz Postdoctoral Program PD-146.

  2. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  3. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  4. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces. PMID:27396288

  5. Inexpensive silicon sheets for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Schwuttke, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    Technique of producing silicon sheets by drawing gridlike or porous graphite gauze through silicon melt is readily adaptable to mass production, making process applicable to inexpensive manufacture of solar cell arrays.

  6. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  7. 22. 8% efficient silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Blakers, A.W.; Wang, A.; Milne, A.M.; Zhao, J.; Green, M.A. )

    1989-09-25

    A new silicon solar cell structure, the passivated emitter and rear cell, is described. The cell structure has yielded independently confirmed efficiencies of up to 22.8%, the highest ever reported for a silicon cell.

  8. The evaporation study of silicon-containing ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarov, Norbert S.; Medvedev, Artem A.; Deyko, Grigoriy S.; Kustov, Leonid M.; Chernikova, Elena A.; Glukhov, Lev M.; Polyakova, Marina V.; Ioutsi, Vitaliy A.; Markov, Vitaliy Yu.; Sidorov, Lev N.

    2016-07-01

    1,2-Dimethyl-3-(1‧,1‧,3‧,3‧-tetramethyl-3‧-phenyldisiloxanyl)methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([PhC5OSi2MMIm+][Tf2N-]) is the first silicon-containing ionic liquid which was characterized with the vaporization enthalpy, (138.5 ± 1.8) kJ mol-1, and saturated vapor pressure, ln(p/Pa) = -(16656 ± 219)/(T/K) + (30.69 ± 0.92). This compound is a unique ionic liquid giving ions, retaining both cationic and anionic portions, in the electron impact ionization (EI) mass spectrum.

  9. Nonpost mold cure compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiro

    1997-08-01

    The recent low price trend of electronic products has made IC manufacturing efficiency a top priority in the semiconductor industry. Post mold cure (PMC) process, which generally involves heating the packages in the oven at 175 C for 4 to 8 hours, takes up much longer time than most other assembly processes. If this PMC process can be reduced or eliminated, semiconductor makers will be rewarded with a much higher cost merit. We define the purpose of Non-PMC as 'to get high reliability with suitable physical and electrical properties without PMC'. We compared carious properties of molding compound before and after PMC. We found that curing reaction has almost complete through DSC and C-NMR measurement, but several properties have not stabilized yet, and that not all properties after PMC were better than before PMC. We developed new grade of molding compound considering these facts. And we found that main factors to accomplish non-PMC compound are curability and flowability, and more, increasing of fundamental properties. To accomplish non-PMC, at first, molding compound need to have very high curability. Generally speaking, too high curability causes low flowability, and causes incomplete filing, wire sweep, pad shift, and weak adhesion to inner parts of IC packages. To prevent these failures, various compound properties were studied, and we achieved in adding good flowability to very high curable molding compound. Finally, anti-popcorn property was improved by adding low moisture, high adhesion, high Tg, and high flexural strengths at high temperature. Through this study, we developed new compound grade for various package, especially large QFP using standard ECN resin.

  10. Birefringence measurements on crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Christoph; Heinert, Daniel; Khalaidovski, Alexander; Steinlechner, Jessica; Nawrodt, Ronny; Schnabel, Roman; Lück, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline silicon has been proposed as a new test mass material in third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the Einstein telescope (ET). Birefringence can reduce the interferometric contrast and can produce dynamical disturbances in interferometers. In this work we use the method of polarization-dependent resonance-frequency analysis of Fabry-Perot-cavities containing silicon as a birefringent medium. Our measurements show a birefringence of silicon along the (111) axis of the order of {{Δ }} n≈ {10}-7 at a laser wavelength of 1550 nm and room temperature. A model is presented that explains the results of different settings of our measurements as a superposition of elastic strains caused by external stresses in the sample and plastic strains possibly generated during the production process. An application of our theory on the proposed ET test mass geometry suggests no critical effect on birefringence due to elastic strains.

  11. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Blouw, J.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Schmelling, M.; Pugatch, V.; Bay, A.; Carron, B.; Frei, R.; Jiminez-Otero, S.; Tran, M.-T.; Voss, H.; Adeva, B.; Esperante, D.; Lois, C.; Vasquez, P.; Bernhard, R. P.; Bernet, R.; Ermoline, Y.; Gassner, J.; Köstner, S.; Lehner, F.; Needham, M.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.

    2006-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(IT) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry.

  12. Silicon film solar cell process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. B.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The most promising way to reduce the cost of silicon in solar cells while still maintaining performance is to utilize thin films (10 to 20 microns thick) of crystalline silicon. The method of solution growth is being employed to grow thin polycrystalline films of silicon on dissimilar substrates. The initial results indicate that, using tin as the solvent, this growth process only requires operating temperatures in the range of 800 C to 1000 C. Growth rates in the range of 0.4 to 2.0 microns per minute and grain sizes in the range of 20 to 100 microns were achieved on both quartz and coated steel substrates. Typically, an aspect ratio of two to three between the width and the Si grain thickness is seen. Uniform coverage of Si growth on quartz over a 2.5 x 2.5 cm area was observed.

  13. The effect of silicon crystallographic orientation on the formation of silicon nanoclusters during anodic electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Timokhov, D. F. Timokhov, F. P.

    2009-01-15

    Possible ways for increasing the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon layers have been investigated. The effect of the anodization parameters on the photoluminescence properties for porous silicon layers formed on silicon substrates with different crystallographic orientations was studied. The average diameters for silicon nanoclusters are calculated from the photoluminescence spectra of porous silicon. The influence of the substrate crystallographic orientation on the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon is revealed. A model explaining the effect of the substrate orientation on the photoluminescence properties for the porous silicon layers formed by anode electrochemical etching is proposed.

  14. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    SciTech Connect

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2014-06-03

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding ember adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  15. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  16. Solar Cells From Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    Epitaxial deposition produces acceptable solar cells from metallurgicalgrade silicon. Instead of diffusing dopants into silicon to form pn junction, junction is formed by growing epitaxial layer--one having crystal structure continuous with that of substrate--on metallurgical-grade silicon. Less pure forms of silicon, such as metallurgical-grade, are less expensive than semiconductor-grade material and help to lower cost of solar cells.

  17. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    DOEpatents

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2013-05-28

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding member adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  18. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  19. Advancements in silicon web technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Easoz, J.; Mchugh, J. P.; Piotrowski, P.; Hundal, R.

    1987-01-01

    Low defect density silicon web crystals up to 7 cm wide are produced from systems whose thermal environments are designed for low stress conditions using computer techniques. During growth, the average silicon melt temperature, the lateral melt temperature distribution, and the melt level are each controlled by digital closed loop systems to maintain thermal steady state and to minimize the labor content of the process. Web solar cell efficiencies of 17.2 pct AM1 have been obtained in the laboratory while 15 pct efficiencies are common in pilot production.

  20. Tunable Luminescence of Silicon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A.; Korovin, S.; Surkov, A.; Kelm, E.; Pustovoy, V.

    2010-10-01

    The luminescent properties of silicon nanoparticles were studied. The particles were prepared by laser pyrolysis of silane in a gas flow reactor. Initially non-luminescent particles were treated by the chemical etching in mixture of fluoric and nitric acids. The high and stable photoluminescence from etched particles was observed. With increasing etching time, the PL peak shifted to blue region. With decreasing of the excitation wavelength from 660 nm to 365 nm, the PL peak shifted from 820 nm to 660 nm. This allows us to use the silicon based particles for wavelength selected excitation in some practical application.

  1. The CDF silicon vertex tracker

    SciTech Connect

    A. Cerri et al.

    2000-10-10

    Real time pattern recognition is becoming a key issue in many position sensitive detector applications. The CDF collaboration is building SVT: a specialized electronic device designed to perform real time track reconstruction using the silicon vertex detector (SVX II). This will strongly improve the CDF capability of triggering on events containing b quarks, usually characterized by the presence of a secondary vertex. SVT is designed to reconstruct in real time charged particles trajectories using data coming from the Silicon Vertex detector and the Central Outer Tracker drift chamber. The SVT architecture and algorithm have been specially tuned to minimize processing time without degrading parameter resolution.

  2. Silicone breast implants and platinum.

    PubMed

    Wixtrom, Roger N

    2007-12-01

    Platinum, in a specific form, is used as a catalyst in the cross-linking reactions of the silicone gel and elastomer in breast implants. After manufacture, it remains in the devices at low-parts-per-million levels. Potential concerns have been raised as to whether this platinum might diffuse from silicone breast implants into the body and result in adverse health effects. The weight of evidence indicates that the platinum present is in its most biocompatible (zero valence) form, and the very minute levels (<0.1 percent) that might diffuse from the implants do not represent a significant health risk to patients. PMID:18090821

  3. Surgical management of silicone mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wustrack, K O; Zarem, H A

    1979-02-01

    The results of the operative treatment of 22 cases of silicone mastitis are presented. Moderate involvement can usually be managed successfully by local excision of the masses, or by a subcutaneous mastectomy with later reconstruction. Patients with severe skin infiltration and/or pectoral muscle involvement are prone to complications, however, and we now believe an aggressive approach--such as a complete mastectomy with nipple banking and excision of the infiltrated muscle, might be best. This would allow the later reconstruction to proceed in relatively uninvolved tissue, and prevent the problems of recurrent inflammation from placing bag-gel prostheses in a residual bed of silicone-infiltrated tissue. PMID:570284

  4. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  5. Electronic properties of microcrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Carius, R.; Finger, F.; Backhausen, U.; Luysberg, M.; Hapke, P.; Houben, L.; Otte, M.; Overhof, H.

    1997-07-01

    The electronic and optical properties of microcrystalline silicon films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition are investigated with Hall-effect, electrical conductivity, photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements. In particular, the influence of the grain size and the crystalline volume fraction on the conductivity, the carrier density and the Hall mobility is investigated in highly doped films. A percolation model is proposed to describe the observed transport data. Photoluminescence properties were studied in undoped films. It is proposed that the photoluminescence is due to recombination at structural defects similar to those observed in crystalline silicon.

  6. Microdefects in cast multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, E.; Klinger, D.; Bergmann, S.

    1995-08-01

    The microdefect etching behavior of cast multicrystalline BAYSIX and SILSO samples is mainly the same as that of EFG silicon, in spite of the very different growth parameters applied to these two techniques and the different carbon contents of the investigated materials. Intentional decorating of mc silicon with copper, iron and gold did not influence the results of etching and with help of infrared transmission microscopy no metal precipitates at the assumed microdefects could be established. There are many open questions concerning the origin of the assumed, not yet doubtless proved microdefects.

  7. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  8. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  9. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed...

  10. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed...

  11. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  12. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed...

  13. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  14. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  15. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  16. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-18

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

  17. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrysalline silicon solar cell research are summarized. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  18. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Alexandre P; Carpentier, Gabriel A; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates. PMID:26313002

  19. Analysis of silicon transporters in turfgrass species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silicon is an abundant element on earth and is also known to be beneficial as an amendment in some crops such as rice. Despite its abundance in many soils, accumulation of silicon in plants is species-specific and can be widely different. It has been shown that the genes responsible for silicon upta...

  20. Preventing Freezeup in Silicon Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B.

    1983-01-01

    Carefully-shaped heat conductor helps control thermal gradients crucial to growth of single-crystal silicon sheets for solar cells. Ends of die through which silicon sheet is drawn as ribbon from molten silicon. Profiled heat extractor prevents ribbon ends from solidifying prematurely and breaking.

  1. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Garneau, Alexandre P.; Carpentier, Gabriel A.; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F.; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J.; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates. PMID:26313002

  2. Inhibition of microbial adhesion to silicone rubber treated with biosurfactant from Streptococcus thermophilus A.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lígia; van der Mei, Henny; Banat, Ibrahim M; Teixeira, José; Oliveira, Rosário

    2006-02-01

    Microbial adhesion of four bacterial and two yeast strains isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber before and after conditioning with a biosurfactant obtained from the probiotic bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus A was investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber. The silicone rubber with and without an adsorbed biosurfactant layer was characterized using contact angle measurements. Water contact angles indicated that the silicone rubber surface with adsorbed biosurfactant was more hydrophilic (58 degrees) than bare silicone rubber (109 degrees). The results obtained showed that the biosurfactant was effective in decreasing the initial deposition rates, and the number of bacterial cells adhering after 4 h, for all microorganisms tested. A decrease in the initial deposition rate was observed for Rothia dentocariosa GBJ 52/2B and Staphylococcus aureus GB 2/1 from 1937+/-194 to 179+/-21 microorganisms cm(-2) s(-1) and from 1255+/-54 to 233+/-26 microorganisms cm(-2) s(-1), respectively, accounting for an 86% reduction of the initial deposition rate for both strains. The number of bacterial cells adhering to the silicone rubber with preadsorbed biosurfactant after 4 h was further reduced by 89% and 97% by the two strains, respectively. The two yeast strains tested showed less reduction in adhesion after 4 h, to values between 67% and 70%. Such a pretreatment with surface-active compounds may constitute a promising strategy to reduce the microbial colonization rate of silicone rubber voice prostheses. PMID:16420603

  3. Interaction between capillary flow and macroscopic silicon concentration in liquid siliconized carbon/carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Gern, F.H.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a model for the numerical simulation of liquid silicon infiltration into porous carbon/carbon preforms. Macroscopic silicon concentration has been calculated from capillary flow equations. As a result, time dependence of silicon concentration during infiltration as well as silicon distribution in the ceramic end product can be calculated. Simulation values of silicon concentration after infiltration are in good accordance with experimental measurements.

  4. Black Silicon Enhanced Thin Film Silicon Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin U. Pralle; James E. Carey

    2010-07-31

    SiOnyx has developed an enhanced thin film silicon photovoltaic device with improved efficiency. Thin film silicon solar cells suffer from low material absorption characteristics resulting in poor cell efficiencies. SiOnyx’s approach leverages Black Silicon, an advanced material fabricated using ultrafast lasers. The laser treated films show dramatic enhancement in optical absorption with measured values in excess of 90% in the visible spectrum and well over 50% in the near infrared spectrum. Thin film Black Silicon solar cells demonstrate 25% higher current generation with almost no impact on open circuit voltage as compared with representative control samples. The initial prototypes demonstrated an improvement of nearly 2 percentage points in the suns Voc efficiency measurement. In addition we validated the capability to scale this processing technology to the throughputs (< 5 min/m2) required for volume production using state of the art commercially available high power industrial lasers. With these results we clearly demonstrate feasibility for the enhancement of thin film solar cells with this laser processing technique.

  5. ESR in CVD silicon and silicon-carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaczi, P. J.; Booth, D. C.

    1981-03-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is reported in three groups of chemical vapor deposited silicon films. It is noted that group I films are amorphous Si(x)C(100-x) alloys prepared from silane and acetylene at a substrate temperature of 630 C that have a spin density of 3 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. The silicon-carbon films have been developed as structurally stable selective absorbers for photothermal solar energy conversion. Group II films are nonalloyed amorphous silicon films prepared below 660 C that have a spin density of 1 x 10 to the 19th, while group III films are polycrystalline films prepared above 670 C with a density of 0.5 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. The exchange interaction between spins is sufficiently strong in the group I silicon-carbon alloys so that an average g value is observed and no evidence of superposition is found in agreement with the amorphous Si-Ge results of Kumeda et al. (1977). ESR saturation and line broadening as a function of microwave power in samples representative of the three groups is observed. A trend, in the order group III, II, I, is found of increasing spin system homogeneity, indicating that the exchange coupled spin clusters contain increasing numbers of spins.

  6. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This work resulted in two basic accomplishments.The first was the identification of DOW CORNING Q1-2577 as a suitable encapsulation material for use in a cost effective encapsulation system. The second was the preparation of a silicon-acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent for the protection of photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers.

  7. Silicon microcantilevers as sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhayal, Babita

    This work focuses on the general use of microcantilever arrays for parallel detection of multiple analytes and understanding the mechanics behind it. The system employs an array of eight silicon micro cantilevers and has the capability of measuring cantilever deflection due to differential surface stress generated as well as frequency change due to added mass in both gaseous and liquid environments. In this work, we move beyond antibody-antigen binding systems and demonstrate that short peptides ligands can be used to efficiently capture Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis spores in liquids, given that specific peptides corresponding to the particular bacteria are synthesized. These peptide functionalized cantilever array can be stored under ambient conditions for days without loss of functionality, making then suitable for in-field use. A detailed experimental protocol, optimizing every step is presented. Applications of this technology can serve as a platform for the detection of pathogenic organisms including biowarfare agents. The dominant physical phenomena producing surface-stress during molecular binding are difficult to specify a priori. Differential surface stress generated due to adsorption of small molecules on gold coated cantilevers is measured to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the self-assembly process and into the origin of associated the surface stress. Our experiments indicate that the contribution from inter-molecular Lennard-Jones interactions and binding energy between the end group and the functionalized surface play a minimal role in the development of surface stress. Electrostatic repulsion between adsorbed species stress and Changes in the electronic structure of the underlying gold substrate play an important role in surface stress generation. To achieve higher sensitivity in the performance of cantilever sensors, optimized cantilevers of different dimensions are required. By adjusting cantilever dimensions, it is

  8. Compound management beyond efficiency.

    PubMed

    Burr, Ian; Winchester, Toby; Keighley, Wilma; Sewing, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Codeveloping alongside chemistry and in vitro screening, compound management was one of the first areas in research recognizing the need for efficient processes and workflows. Material management groups have centralized, automated, miniaturized and, importantly, found out what not to do with compounds. While driving down cost and improving quality in storage and processing, researchers still face the challenge of interfacing optimally with changing business processes, in screening groups, and with external vendors and focusing on biologicals in many companies. Here we review our strategy to provide a seamless link between compound acquisition and screening operations and the impact of material management on quality of the downstream processes. Although this is driven in part by new technologies and improved quality control within material management, redefining team structures and roles also drives job satisfaction and motivation in our teams with a subsequent positive impact on cycle times and customer feedback. PMID:19502566

  9. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  10. Microoptical compound lens

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Gill, David D.

    2007-10-23

    An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

  11. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  12. Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1984-08-01

    The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

  13. Stoichiometric disturbances in compound semiconductors due to ion implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, R. E.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed to calculate the depth distribution of the local stoichiometric disturbance (SD) resulting from ion implantation in binary-compound substrates. The calculation includes first-order recoils considering projected range straggle of projectiles and recoils and lateral straggle of recoils. The method uses tabulated final-range statistics to infer the projectile range distributions at intermediate energies. This approach greatly simplifies the calculation with little compromise on accuracy as compared to existing procedures. As an illustration, the SD profile is calculated for implantation of boron, silicon, and aluminum in silicon carbide. The results for the latter case suggest that the SD may be responsible for otherwise unexplained distortions in the annealed aluminum profile. A comparison with calculations by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation shows good agreement.

  14. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  15. Silicon Technologies Adjust to RF Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke Taub, Susan; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon (Si), although not traditionally the material of choice for RF and microwave applications, has become a serious challenger to other semiconductor technologies for high-frequency applications. Fine-line electron- beam and photolithographic techniques are now capable of fabricating silicon gate sizes as small as 0.1 micron while commonly-available high-resistivity silicon wafers support low-loss microwave transmission lines. These advances, coupled with the recent development of silicon-germanium (SiGe), arm silicon integrated circuits (ICs) with the speed required for increasingly higher-frequency applications.

  16. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  17. Solar silicon via the Dow Corning process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. P.; Dosaj, V. D.

    1979-01-01

    Technical feasibility for high volume production of solar cell-grade silicon is investigated. The process consists of producing silicon from pure raw materials via the carbothermic reduction of quartz. This silicon was then purified to solar grade by impurity segregation during Czochralski crystal growth. Commercially available raw materials were used to produce 100 kg quantities of silicon during 60 hour periods in a direct arc reactor. This silicon produced single crystalline ingot, during a second Czochralski pull, that was fabricated into solar cells having efficiencies ranging from 8.2 percent to greater than 14 percent. An energy analysis of the entire process indicated a 5 month payback time.

  18. Growth of silicon sheets for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Surek, T.

    1980-12-01

    The status of silicon sheet development for photovoltaic applications is critically reviewed. Silicon sheet growth processes are classified according to their linear growth rates. The fast growth processes, which include edge-defined film-fed growth, silicon on ceramic, dendritic-web growth, and ribbon-to-ribbon growth, are comparatively ranked subject to criteria involving growth stability, sheet productivity, impurity effects, crystallinity, and solar cell results. The status of more rapid silicon ribbon growth techniques, such as horizontal ribbon growth and melt quenching, is also reviewed. The emphasis of the discussions is on examining the viability of these sheet materials as solar cell substrates for low-cost silicon photovoltaic systems.

  19. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  20. Transmutation doping of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Young, R. T.; Cleland, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Normal isotopic silicon contains 3.05% of Si-30 which transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron absorption, with a half-life of 2.6 hours. This reaction is used to introduce extremely uniform concentrations of phosphorus into silicon, thus eliminating the areal and spatial inhomogeneities characteristic of chemical doping. Annealing of the lattice damage in the irradiated silicon does not alter the uniformity of dopant distribution. Transmutation doping also makes it possible to introduce phosphorus into polycrystalline silicon without segregation of the dopant at the grain boundaries. The use of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon in solar cell research and development is discussed.

  1. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  2. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

    1997-05-06

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

  3. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Landry, Marc D.; Pitts, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

  4. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  5. Mesoporous Silicon-Based Anodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peramunage, Dharmasena

    2015-01-01

    For high-capacity, high-performance lithium-ion batteries. A new high-capacity anode composite based on mesoporous silicon is being developed. With a structure that resembles a pseudo one-dimensional phase, the active anode material will accommodate significant volume changes expected upon alloying and dealloying with lithium (Li).

  6. Silicone Coating on Polyimide Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Silicone coatings applied to polyimide sheeting for variety of space-related applications. Coatings intended to protect flexible substrates of solar-cell blankets from degradation by oxygen atoms, electrons, plasmas, and ultraviolet light in low Earth orbit and outer space. Since coatings are flexible, generally useful in forming flexible laminates or protective layers on polyimide-sheet products.

  7. Applications of passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Richard; Park, Chan Ho

    2012-03-01

    We can postulate that dark matter are WIMPS, more specifically, Majorana particles called neutralinos floating through space. Upon neutralino-neutralino annihilation, they create a greater burst of other particles into space: these being all kinds of particles including anti-deuterons which are the indications of the existence of dark matter. For the study of the applications of passivated silicon detectors, this paper shows following procedures in two categories. Painting on little pieces of silicon (Polyimid and Boxcar Red) :Took clean paint brush and painted on Polyimid and Boxcar red samples onto little pieces of sample silicon and dried for a certain number of hours in different conditions. Cooling test : usually done in 7 cycles, cool until usually -35 degrees or -40 degrees Celsius with thermoelectric cooler, dry out, evapate the moisture in the fume hood, take pictures with the microscope and check for irregularities every 1, 4 and 7 times. The results show us how the passivated silicon will act in the real experiment--the vacuum chamber and x-rays (from the radioactive source), and different atmospheric pressures simulate what it will be like in space.

  8. Impurities in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metallic impurities, both singly and in combinations, affect the performance of silicon solar cells. Czochralski silicon web crystals were grown with controlled additions of secondary impurities. The primary electrical dopants were boron and phosphorus. The silicon test ingots were grown under controlled and carefully monitored conditions from high-purity charge and dopant material to minimize unintentional contamination. Following growth, each crystal was characterized by chemical, microstructural, electrical, and solar cell tests to provide a detailed and internally consistent description of the relationships between silicon impurity concentration and solar cell performance. Deep-level spectroscopy measurements were used to measure impurity concentrations at levels below the detectability of other techniques and to study thermally-induced changes in impurity activity. For the majority of contaminants, impurity-induced performance loss is due to a reduction of the base diffusion length. From these observations, a semi-empirical model which predicts cell performance as a function of metal impurity concentration was formulated. The model was then used successfully to predict the behavior of solar cells bearing as many as 11 different impurities.

  9. Let’s talk silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While silicon (Si) has been a known plant nutrient for centuries, how plants use this element is still poorly understood. Researchers have identified how plants acquire Si from the environment and transport the element to all plant tissues, including roots, stems, petioles, leaves and flowers. We ...

  10. Reciprocating Saw for Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.; Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Concept increases productivity and wafer quality. Cutting wafers from silicon ingots produces smooth wafers at high rates with reduced blade wear. Involves straight reciprocating saw blade and slight rotation of ingot between cutting strokes. Many parallel blades combined to cut many wafers simultaneously from ingot.

  11. Strain in silicon nanowire beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ureña, Ferran; Olsen, Sarah H.; Šiller, Lidija; Bhaskar, Umesh; Pardoen, Thomas; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    In this work, strain in silicon free standing beams loaded in uniaxial tension is experimentally and theoretically investigated for strain values ranging from 0 to 3.6%. The fabrication method allows multiple geometries (and thus strain values) to be processed simultaneously on the same wafer while being studied independently. An excellent agreement of strain determined by two non-destructive characterization techniques, Raman spectroscopy and mechanical displacement using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) markers, is found for all the sample lengths and widths. The measured data also show good agreement with theoretical predictions of strain based upon continuum mechanical considerations, giving validity to both measurement techniques for the entire range of strain values. The dependence of Young's modulus and fracture strain on size has also been analyzed. The Young's modulus is determined using SEM and compared with that obtained by resonance-based methods. Both methods produced a Young's modulus value close to that of bulk silicon with values obtained by resonance-based methods being slightly lower. Fracture strain is analyzed in 40 sets of samples with different beam geometries, yielding values up to 3.6%. The increase in fracture strain with decreasing beam width is compared with previous reports. Finally, the role of the surface on the mechanical properties is analyzed using UV and visible lasers having different penetration depths in silicon. The observed dependence of Raman shift on laser wavelength is used to assess the thermal conductivity of deformed silicon.

  12. Iron contamination in silicon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istratov, A. A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E. R.

    This article continues the review of fundamental physical properties of iron and its complexes in silicon (Appl. Phys. A 69, 13 (1999)), and is focused on ongoing applied research of iron in silicon technology. The first section of this article presents an analysis of the effect of iron on devices, including integrated circuits, power devices, and solar cells. Then, sources of unintentional iron contamination and reaction paths of iron during device manufacturing are discussed. Experimental techniques to measure trace contamination levels of iron in silicon, such as minority carrier lifetime techniques (SPV, μ-PCD, and ELYMAT), deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), total X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and vapor-phase decomposition TXRF (VPD-TXRF), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), mass spectrometry and its modifications (SIMS, SNMS, ICP-MS), and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are reviewed in the second section of the article. Prospective analytical tools, such as heavy-ion backscattering spectroscopy (HIBS) and synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques (XPS, XANES, XRF) are briefly discussed. The third section includes a discussion of the present achievements and challenges of the electrochemistry and physics of cleaning of silicon wafers, with an emphasis on removal of iron contamination from the wafers. Finally, the techniques for gettering of iron are presented.

  13. Vacuum Refining of Molten Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Tangstad, Merete

    2012-12-01

    Metallurgical fundamentals for vacuum refining of molten silicon and the behavior of different impurities in this process are studied. A novel mass transfer model for the removal of volatile impurities from silicon in vacuum induction refining is developed. The boundary conditions for vacuum refining system—the equilibrium partial pressures of the dissolved elements and their actual partial pressures under vacuum—are determined through thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. It is indicated that the vacuum removal kinetics of the impurities is different, and it is controlled by one, two, or all the three subsequent reaction mechanisms—mass transfer in a melt boundary layer, chemical evaporation on the melt surface, and mass transfer in the gas phase. Vacuum refining experimental results of this study and literature data are used to study the model validation. The model provides reliable results and shows correlation with the experimental data for many volatile elements. Kinetics of phosphorus removal, which is an important impurity in the production of solar grade silicon, is properly predicted by the model, and it is observed that phosphorus elimination from silicon is significantly increased with increasing process temperature.

  14. Multicrystalline silicon bifacial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimeno, J. C.; Luque, A.

    The results of several batches of multicrystalline silicon bifacial solar cells (HEM and cast) are analyzed. I-V curves are measured under front and back illuminations and also in the dark, at several temperatures. It is concluded that HEM wafers might be used to manufacture commercial bifacial cells, while the high base recombination prevents the use of cast wafers for this purpose.

  15. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  16. Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Stalford, Harold L.

    2011-07-19

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

  17. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Basore, Paul A.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1998-08-11

    A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

  18. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-11

    A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

  19. Surface property modification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1984-01-01

    The main emphasis of this work has been to determine the wear rate of silicon in fluid environments and the parameters that influence wear. Three tests were carried out on single crystal Czochralski silicon wafers: circular and linear multiple-scratch tests in fluids by a pyramidal diamond simulated fixed-particle abrasion; microhardness and three-point bend tests were used to determine the hardness and fracture toughness of abraded silicon and the extent of damage induced by abrasion. The wear rate of (100) and (111) n and p-type single crystal Cz silicon abraded by a pyramidal diamond in ethanol, methanol, acetone and de-ionized water was determined by measuring the cross-sectional areas of grooves of the circular and linear multiple-scratch tests. The wear rate depends on the loads on the diamond and is highest for ethanol and lowest for de-ionized water. The surface morphology of the grooves showed lateral and median cracks as well as a plastically deformed region. The hardness and fracture toughness are critical parameters that influence the wear rate. Microhardness tests were conducted to determine the hardness as influenced by fluids. Median cracks and the damage zone surrounding the indentations were also related to the fluid properties.

  20. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.