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Sample records for hyperlipidemic rat model

  1. Hypolipidemic and antioxidant activity of the aqueous extract from the uneaten pulp of the fruit from Cordia dichotoma in healthy and hyperlipidemic Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    El-Newary, Samah A; Sulieman, A M; El-Attar, S R; Sitohy, M Z

    2016-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. Hyperlipidemia increases the incidence of myocardial ischemia and cardiac events. This study evaluated the potential hypolipidemic and antioxidant action of the aqueous extract from the uneaten pulp of the fruit from Cordia dichotoma ("CDNP extract"). In vivo studies were performed for 10 weeks on dietary hyperlipidemic and healthy Wistar albino rat models that received two dose levels of the CDNP extract (0.50 and 1.00 g/kg body weight). Serum lipid profiles were determined for the experimental animals. Dietary hyperlipidemic rats were characterized by an elevated lipid profile compared to the healthy control, i.e., increased levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), and triglycerides (TG), although the level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) was reduced. Levels of antioxidant enzymes, i.e., glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), were significantly higher in the dietary hyperlipidemic rats than in the normal healthy ones, while the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was significantly lower. Force-feeding hyperlipidemic Wistar albino rats with the CDNP extract at two doses decreased TC, LDL-C, VLDL-C, and TG to normal levels. The risk ratio, which was as high as 870 % for the hyperlipidemic rats was decreased by the treatment to levels close to that calculated for the healthy control rats. Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were very low in the hyperlipidemic Wistar albino rats but increased significantly when CDNP extract was adminstered, attaining similar HDL-C levels to those of healthy control rats. Treatment with the CDNP extract also improved the levels of antioxidant enzymes (GR, GST, GPx, SOD, and CAT) in hyperlipidemic Wistar albino rats. Thus, the CDNP extract improves the lipid

  2. Effect of zinc supplements in the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Sunil Kumar; Jyoti, Uma; Sharma, Samridhi; Kaura, Arun; Deshmukh, Rahul; Goyal, Sandeep

    2015-06-01

    Hyperlipidemia is regarded as independent risk factor in the development of ischemic heart disease, and it can increase the myocardial susceptibility to ischemia-/reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury. Hyperlipidemia attenuates the cardioprotective response of ischemic preconditioning (IPC). The present study investigated the effect of zinc supplements in the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat hearts. Hyperlipidemia was induced in rat by feeding high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks then the serum lipid profile was observed. In experiment, the isolated Langendorff rat heart preparation was subjected to 4 cycles of ischemic preconditioning (IPC), then 30 min of ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size was elaborated morphologically by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and biochemically by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) release from coronary effluent and left ventricular collagen content. However, the effect of zinc supplement, i.e., zinc pyrithione (10 μM) perfused during reperfusion for 120 min, significantly abrogated the attenuated cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in hyperlipidemic rat heart whereas administration of chelator of this zinc ionophore, i.e., N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylene diamine (TPEN; 10 μM), perfused during reperfusion 2 min before the perfusion of zinc pyrithione abrogated the cardioprotective effect of zinc supplement during experiment in hyperlipidemic rat heart. Thus, the administration of zinc supplements limits the infarct size, LDH, and CK-MB and enhanced the collagen level which suggests that the attenuated cardioprotective effect of IPC in hyperlipidemic rat is due to zinc loss during reperfusion caused by ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25743572

  3. Anti-hyperlipidemic activity of spider brake (Pteris multifida) with rats fed a high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Chun-Ching; Lee, Hou-I; Yang, Clinton; Yang, Chi-Ching

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluates the possible potency of the anti-hyperlipidemic effect of spider brake [(Pteris multifida Poiret (Pteridaceae)]. We investigated this by feeding the hyperlipidemic Sprague-Dawley rats, caused by a high cholesterol diet, with lyophilized powder of spider brake (LSB) and compared the result with the rats fed with beta-sitosterol. The results indicated that the administration of lyophilized powder of spider brake (LSB) lowered the hyperlipidemic level on rats. The relative weights of the liver, adipose tissue, and relative adipose tissue of 10% substitutions of LSB group (LSB-10) showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) by 6%, 15.9%, and 14.3% in contrast to the untreated counterparts (control), respectively. A significantly lower (P < 0.05) plasma TG, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, liver CH, and TG contents were also observed in LSB-10 compared to the untreated counterparts (by 36.8%, 21%, 18.7%, 10.2% and 14.3% reduction, respectively). Simultaneously, the wet fecal weight, dry fecal weight, nitrogen compounds, excretion of neutral steroids, and bile acids significantly (P < 0.05) increased by 9.6%, 10.6%, 23.7%, 9.7%, and 3.4% respectively. The results showed that LSB could cause not only a reduction in CH and TG, but also could increase the excretion of lipids and metabolic by-products via the intestinal tract. PMID:20645845

  4. Antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities of Terminalia pallida Linn. fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, M T; Kasetti, R B; Nabi, S A; Sudarshan, P Renuka; Swapna, S; Apparao, C

    2011-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia contributes significantly in the manifestation and development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Although synthetic lipid-lowering drugs are useful in treating hyperlipidemia, there are number of adverse effects. So the current interest has stimulated the search for new lipid-lowering agents with minimal side effects from natural sources. The present study was designed to investigate the antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic potentiality of ethanolic extract of Terminalia pallida fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. T. pallida fruits ethanolic extract (TPEt) was prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. Sprague-Dawley male rats were made hyperlipidemic by giving high fat diet, supplied by NIN (National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad, India. TPEt was administered in a dose of 100 mg/kg.b.w./day for 30 days in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. The body weights, plasma lipid, and lipoprotein levels were measured before and after the treatment. TPEt showed significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities as evidenced by significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels coupled together with elevation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and diminution of atherogenic index in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. There was a significantly reduced body weight gain in TPEt-treated hyperlipidemic rats than in the control group. The present study demonstrates that TPEt possesses significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic properties, thus suggesting its beneficial effect in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21966168

  5. Antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities of Terminalia pallida Linn. fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, M. T.; Kasetti, R. B.; Nabi, S. A.; Sudarshan, P. Renuka; Swapna, S.; Apparao, C.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia contributes significantly in the manifestation and development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Although synthetic lipid-lowering drugs are useful in treating hyperlipidemia, there are number of adverse effects. So the current interest has stimulated the search for new lipid-lowering agents with minimal side effects from natural sources. The present study was designed to investigate the antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic potentiality of ethanolic extract of Terminalia pallida fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. T. pallida fruits ethanolic extract (TPEt) was prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. Sprague-Dawley male rats were made hyperlipidemic by giving high fat diet, supplied by NIN (National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad, India. TPEt was administered in a dose of 100 mg/kg.b.w./day for 30 days in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. The body weights, plasma lipid, and lipoprotein levels were measured before and after the treatment. TPEt showed significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities as evidenced by significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels coupled together with elevation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and diminution of atherogenic index in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. There was a significantly reduced body weight gain in TPEt-treated hyperlipidemic rats than in the control group. The present study demonstrates that TPEt possesses significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic properties, thus suggesting its beneficial effect in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21966168

  6. DIVERSITY OF VASCULAR REACTIVITY AND THE TREATMENT RESPONSE IN DIABETIC, HYPERTENSIVE, HYPERLIPIDEMIC, AND HEALTHY RATS SUBJECTED TO HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Xiang-Yun; Liu, Liang-Ming; Li, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The current diagnosis and treatment guidelines for severe trauma and shock are all for healthy population. Few studies focused on the pathophysiological features and treatments in metabolic diseases after severe trauma and shock. Vascular reactivity is significantly decreased after severe trauma and shock. Improving the vascular reactivity with arginine vasopressin (AVP) and phorbol-12 myristate-13-acetate (PMA) is beneficial to trauma and shock. Whether the cardiovascular function and treatment responses have the own features in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic patients after traumatic hemorrhagic shock is not known. Using hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic and healthy rats, we compared the change patterns in cardiovascular function including vascular reactivity, tissue perfusion, and the hemodynamics after hemorrhagic shock and their responses to AVP, PMA, and common antishock agents including dopamine and norepinephrine. A same degree of hemorrhagic shock (40% hemorrhage or mean arterial pressure maintained at 40 mm Hg for 2 h) resulted in a more obvious decrease in vascular reactivity, hemodynamics, tissue perfusion, and mitochondrial function of liver and kidney in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats, and a more rapidly natural death than in healthy rats. The effectiveness of AVP and PMA in these diseased rats was lower than in healthy rats. The effective dosage of common antishock agents including norepinephrine, dopamine, and AVP in healthy rats was wider than that in these diseased rats. Among the antishock agents used in the current study, AVP had the best effect in improving animal survival and vascular reactivity both in healthy and in diseased rats. These findings suggest that hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats have a worse vascular reactivity and organ function than the healthy rats after traumatic hemorrhagic shock, which result in the worse treatment responses and effects to vasoactive agents. Lower dose

  7. N-Acetylneuraminic acid attenuates hypercoagulation on high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Yida, Zhang; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Wong, WaiTeng; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini; Ideris, Aini; Ismail, Norsharina

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a type of sialic acid, has close links with cholesterol metabolism and is often used as a biomarker in evaluating the risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, most studies on the health implications of Neu5Ac have focused on its effects on the nervous system, while its effects on cardiovascular risk factors have largely been unreported. Thus, the effects of Neu5Ac on coagulation status in high fat diet (HFD)-induced hyperlipidemic rats were evaluated in this study. Methods Sprague Dawley male rats were divided into five different groups and fed with HFD alone, HFD low-dose Neu5Ac, HFD high-dose Neu5Ac, HFD simvastatin (10 mg/kg day), and normal pellet alone. Food was given ad libitum while body weight of rats was measured weekly. After 12 weeks of intervention, rats were sacrificed and serum and tissue samples were collected for biochemistry and gene expression analysis, respectively. Results The results showed that Neu5Ac could improve lipid metabolism and hyperlipidemia-associated coagulation. Neu5Ac exerted comparable or sometimes better physiological effects than simvastatin, at biochemical and gene expression levels. Conclusions The data indicated that Neu5Ac prevented HFD-induced hyperlipidemia and associated hypercoagulation in rats through regulation of lipid-related and coagulation-related genes and, by extension, induced metabolite and protein changes. The implications of the present findings are that Neu5Ac may be used to prevent coagulation-related cardiovascular events in hyperlipidemic conditions. These findings are worth studying further. PMID:26642300

  8. Effect of Hypericum perforatum Aqueous Extracts on Serum Lipids, Aminotransferases, and Lipid Peroxidation in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghosian Moghaddam, Mohammad Hassan; Roghani, Mehrdad; Maleki, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with high levels of total cholesterol (TCH), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-CH), and triglyceride (TG) are at increased risk of coronary heart disease. Studies have shown that flavonoids and antioxidant compounds have beneficial effects on hyperlipidemia. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of extract of Hypericum perforatum (EHP) on the serum lipid profile (TCH, TG, and LDL-CH), aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lipid peroxidation in hyperlipidemic rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two male rats weighting 200 ± 10 g were randomly divided into four experimental groups: 1) control, 2) control + EHP, 3) hyperlipidemia, and 4) hyperlipidemia + EHP. The rats in the hyperlipidemic groups were fed a high-fat diet for 60 days, and EHP (300 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 2 weeks in the rats in the second and fourth groups. At the end of the experimental period, blood samples from each group were analyzed. Results: There was a significant reduction in LDL-CH in the control + EHP group and the hyperlipidemia + EHP group (P < 0.05). TCH was significantly reduced in the control + EHP group (P < 0.05). There were no significant changes in the levels of TG and HDL-CH. Malondialdehyde, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were significantly reduced in the hyperlipidemia + EHP group (P < 0.05), with no significant change in alkaline phosphatase. Conclusions: EHP was able to both reduce LDL-CH and to significantly decrease markers of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation induced by hyperlipidemia. Therefore, this herb, as a new pharmacological component, could be used to reduce certain blood lipids, lipid peroxidation, and aminotransferase markers. PMID:26949689

  9. The Regulation of Alfalfa Saponin Extract on Key Genes Involved in Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolism in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yinghua; Guo, Rui; Wang, Xianke; Yuan, Dedi; Zhang, Senhao; Wang, Jie; Yan, Xuebing; Wang, Chengzhang

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the cholesterol-lowering effects of alfalfa saponin extract (ASE) and its regulation mechanism on some key genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, 40 healthy 7 weeks old male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups with 10 rats in each group: control group, hyperlipidemic group, ASE treatment group, ASE prevention group. The body weight gain, relative liver weight and serum lipid 1evels of rats were determined. Total cholesterol (TC) and total bile acids (TBA) levels in liver and feces were also measured. Furthermore, the activity and mRNA expressions of Hmgcr, Acat2, Cyp7a1 and Ldlr were investigated. The results showed the following: (1) The abnormal serum lipid levels in hyperlipidemic rats were ameliorated by ASE administration (both ASE prevention group and treatment group) (P<0.05). (2) Both ASE administration to hyperlipidemic rats significantly reduced liver TC and increased liver TBA level (P<0.05). TC and TBA levels in feces of hyperlipidemic rats were remarkably elevated by both ASE administration (P<0.05). (3) mRNA expressions of Hmgcr and Acat2 in the liver of hyperlipidemic rats were remarkably down-regulated (P<0.05), as well as mRNA expressions of Cyp7a1 and Ldlr were dramatically up-regulated by both ASE administration (P<0.05). The activities of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA levels. (4) There was no significant difference between ASE treatment and ASE prevention group for most parameters evaluated. Our present study indicated that ASE had cholesterol-lowering effects. The possible mechanism could be attributed to (1) the down-regulation of Hmgcr and Acat2, as well as up-regulation of Cyp7a1 and Ldlr in the liver of hyperlipidemic rats, which was involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and efflux pathway; (2) the increase in excretion of cholesterol. The findings in our study suggested ASE had great potential usefulness as a natural agent for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID

  10. Loss of Fcgamma receptors ameliorates initiation and progression of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OxLDL generated during hyperlipidemia is known to induce an autoimmune response resulting in the production of anti-oxLDL IgG. In humans and in the hyperlipidemic mouse model, the titer of autoantibodies against oxLDL correlates with the progression of atherosclerosis. Although the presence of anti-...

  11. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  12. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  13. Antioxidant Effects of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Supplementation in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Heui; Park, Jae-Hee; Kim, So-Yun; Lee, Seon Woo; Chun, Soon-Sil; Park, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fresh vegetables that are high in polyphenols has been associated with a reduced risk of oxidative stress-induced disease. The present study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of spinach in vitro and in vivo in hyperlipidemic rats. For measurement of in vitro antioxidant activity, spinach was subjected to hot water extraction (WE) or ethanol extraction (EE) and examined for total polyphenol content (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), cellular antioxidant activity (CAA), and antigenotoxic activity. The in vivo antioxidant activity of spinach was assessed using blood and liver lipid profiles and antioxidant status in rats fed a high fat-cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 6 weeks. The TPC of WE and EE were shown as 1.5±0.0 and 0.5±0.0 mg GAE/g, respectively. Increasing the concentration of the extracts resulted in increased ORAC value, CAA, and antigenotoxic activity for all extracts tested. HFCD-fed rats displayed hyperlipidemia and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by a significant rise in blood and liver lipid profiles, an increase in plasma conjugated diene concentration, an increase in liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, and a significant decrease in manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity compared with rats fed normal diet. However, administration of 5% spinach showed a beneficial effect in HFCD rats, as indicated by decreased liver TBARS level and DNA damage in leukocyte and increased plasma conjugated dienes and Mn-SOD activity. Thus, the antioxidant activity of spinach may be an effective way to ameliorate high fat and cholesterol diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24772405

  14. Antioxidant Effects of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Supplementation in Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Heui; Park, Jae-Hee; Kim, So-Yun; Lee, Seon Woo; Chun, Soon-Sil; Park, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fresh vegetables that are high in polyphenols has been associated with a reduced risk of oxidative stress-induced disease. The present study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of spinach in vitro and in vivo in hyperlipidemic rats. For measurement of in vitro antioxidant activity, spinach was subjected to hot water extraction (WE) or ethanol extraction (EE) and examined for total polyphenol content (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), cellular antioxidant activity (CAA), and antigenotoxic activity. The in vivo antioxidant activity of spinach was assessed using blood and liver lipid profiles and antioxidant status in rats fed a high fat-cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 6 weeks. The TPC of WE and EE were shown as 1.5±0.0 and 0.5±0.0 mg GAE/g, respectively. Increasing the concentration of the extracts resulted in increased ORAC value, CAA, and antigenotoxic activity for all extracts tested. HFCD-fed rats displayed hyperlipidemia and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by a significant rise in blood and liver lipid profiles, an increase in plasma conjugated diene concentration, an increase in liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, and a significant decrease in manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity compared with rats fed normal diet. However, administration of 5% spinach showed a beneficial effect in HFCD rats, as indicated by decreased liver TBARS level and DNA damage in leukocyte and increased plasma conjugated dienes and Mn-SOD activity. Thus, the antioxidant activity of spinach may be an effective way to ameliorate high fat and cholesterol diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24772405

  15. Hypolipidemic effects of chitosan and its derivatives in hyperlipidemic rats induced by a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haitao; Yang, Qingyun; Huang, Guidong; Ding, Chen; Cao, Peiqiu; Huang, Lanlan; Xiao, Tiancun; Guo, Jiao; Su, Zhengquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperlipidemia (HLP) is the primary risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Various factors, including genetics, physical inactivity, and daily nutritional habits, affect the prevalence of HLP. Recently, it was revealed that dietary fibers, such as pectin, psyllium, and especially chitosan (CTS), may play important roles in hypolipidemic management. Thus, this study aims to determine the hypolipidemic effect and mechanism of CTS and its water-soluble derivatives, chitosan oligosaccharides (MN≤1,000 Da (COSI) and MN≤3,000 Da (COSIII)), in male hyperlipidemic rats induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). Design After the model creation, 120 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were equally assigned to 12 groups fed various diets as follows: the normal group with basic diet, an HFD group, an HFD group supplemented with three doses of CTS, COSI and COSIII groups, and an HFD group treated with simvastatin (7 mg/kg·d). After 6 weeks, body weight, fat/body ratio, and the relevant biomarkers of serum, liver, and feces were measured. Additionally, the histological analysis of liver and adipose tissue was performed, and the mRNA expressions of liver peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and hepatic lipase (HL) were examined. Results Compared with HFD group, rats fed CTS, COSI, and COSIII showed a better ability to regulate their body weight, liver and cardiac indices, fat/body ratio, as well as serum, liver, and fecal lipids, and simultaneously to maintain the appropriate activity of liver and serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), as well as liver and fecal total bile acids (TBA). Simultaneously, there had been a higher mRNA expression of PPARα and HL in the treatment groups. Conclusion The obtained results suggested that these three function foods can effectively improve liver lipid metabolism by normalizing the expressions of PPARα and HL, and protect liver from the oxidized trauma by

  16. Beneficial effects of natural Jeju groundwaters on lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-chao; Lu, Jin-miao; Jin, Hui-zi; Ma, Ai-niu; Zhang, Jin-yang; Gong, Nian; Xiao, Qi; Zhu, Bin; Lv, Ying-fang; Yu, Na; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Groundwater is believed to possess many beneficial effects due to its natural source of various minerals. In this study, we examined the effects of natural Jeju groundwater S1 (Samdasoo™), S2 and S3 pumped up from different locations of Jeju Island, Korea, along with local tap water, on body weight gain, serum lipids and lipoproteins, and liver histopathology in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Rats were randomly and equally divided into 6 groups. Different water samples were supplied to the hyperlipidemic rats as their daily drinking water and the widely-used anti-hyperlipidemic drug simvastatin was used as a positive control. Body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins were measured weekly. Liver weight, liver index and liver histopathology were examined after the execution of the rats. RESULTS After drinking Jeju groundwaters for two months, S2 but not S3 significantly reduced weight growth and serum triglycerides levels and increased high density lipoprotein-C (HDL-C) without affecting total cholesterol or LDL-C. S1 and particularly S2 significantly reduced the severity of liver hypertrophy and steatosis. All Groundwaters had much higher contents of vanadium (S3>S2>S1>>tap water) whereas S1 and S2 but not S3 markedly blocked autoxidation of ferrous ions. CONCLUSION Jeju Groundwater S1 and particularly S2 exhibit protective effects against hyperlipidemia and fatty liver and hypothesize that the beneficial effect of Jeju Groundwaters may be contributed from blockade of autoxidation of ferrous ions rather than their high contents of vanadium. PMID:24741400

  17. Effects of Tanshinone IIA on the modulation of miR‑33a and the SREBP‑2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lianqun; Song, Nan; Yang, Guanlin; Ma, Yixin; Li, Xuetao; Lu, Ren; Cao, Huimin; Zhang, Ni; Zhu, Meilin; Wang, Junyan; Leng, Xue; Cao, Yuan; Du, Ying; Xu, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Tanshinone IIA is the active compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza bunge, which is a traditional Chinese medicine known as Danshen. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of Tanshinone IIA on the regulation of lipid metabolism in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and the underlying molecular events. An in vivo model of hyperlipidemia was established in rats, with the animals receiving a daily dose of Tanshinone IIA. The serum lipid profiles were analyzed using an automatic biochemical analyzer, and the histopathological alterations and lipid deposition in liver tissue were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and oil red O staining, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of microRNA (miR)‑33a, ATP‑binding cassette transporter (ABC)A1, ABCG1, sterol regulatory element‑binding protein 2 (SREBP‑2), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9) and low‑density lipoprotein receptor (LDL‑R) in liver tissues were measured using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, SREBP‑2, Pcsk9, and LDL‑R were analyzed using western blotting. Tanshinone IIA reduced lipid deposition and improved histopathology in the rat liver tissue, however, did not alter the lipid profile in rat serum. In addition, Tanshinone IIA treatment suppressed the expression of miR‑33a, whereas the protein expression levels of ABCA1, SREBP‑2, Pcsk9 in addition to LDL‑R mRNA and protein were upregulated. In conclusion, the present study indicated that Tanshinone IIA attenuated lipid deposition in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and modulated the expression of miR‑33a and SREBP‑2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway proteins. PMID:27082100

  18. Effects of Tanshinone IIA on the modulation of miR-33a and the SREBP-2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway in hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    JIA, LIANQUN; SONG, NAN; YANG, GUANLIN; MA, YIXIN; LI, XUETAO; LU, REN; CAO, HUIMIN; ZHANG, NI; ZHU, MEILIN; WANG, JUNYAN; LENG, XUE; CAO, YUAN; DU, YING; XU, YUE

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is the active compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza bunge, which is a traditional Chinese medicine known as Danshen. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of Tanshinone IIA on the regulation of lipid metabolism in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and the underlying molecular events. An in vivo model of hyperlipidemia was established in rats, with the animals receiving a daily dose of Tanshinone IIA. The serum lipid profiles were analyzed using an automatic biochemical analyzer, and the histopathological alterations and lipid deposition in liver tissue were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and oil red O staining, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of microRNA (miR)-33a, ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC)A1, ABCG1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) in liver tissues were measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, SREBP-2, Pcsk9, and LDL-R were analyzed using western blotting. Tanshinone IIA reduced lipid deposition and improved histopathology in the rat liver tissue, however, did not alter the lipid profile in rat serum. In addition, Tanshinone IIA treatment suppressed the expression of miR-33a, whereas the protein expression levels of ABCA1, SREBP-2, Pcsk9 in addition to LDL-R mRNA and protein were upregulated. In conclusion, the present study indicated that Tanshinone IIA attenuated lipid deposition in the livers of hyperlipidemic rats and modulated the expression of miR-33a and SREBP-2/Pcsk9 signaling pathway proteins. PMID:27082100

  19. The effects of the decaffeination of coffee samples on platelet aggregation in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Silvério, Alessandra dos Santos Danziger; Pereira, Rosemary Gualberto Fonseca Alvarenga; Lima, Adriene Ribeiro; Paula, Fernanda Borges de Araújo; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; Baldissera, Lineu; Duarte, Stella Maris da Silveira

    2013-09-01

    The effect of coffee on cardiovascular diseases is still controversial. It is known that the process of decaffeination may influence the chemical constitution and, therefore, the biological effects of coffee. This study thus evaluated the effects of decaffeination on the levels of total phenols and chlorogenic acids in Coffea arabica L. samples, as well as the effects of ingesting both integral and decaffeinated coffee on the lipid profile and hemostatic and hematological parameters in normal and hyperlipidemic rats. Samples of integral and decaffeinated lyophilized coffee (Coffea arabica L., planted in Brazil) were used for chemical analysis (total phenols, chlorogenic acid and caffeine contents). For the bioassays, coffee beverages were prepared with non-lyophilized samples (10% w/v) and were filtered and administered to animals by gavage (7.2 mL/kg/day) over 30 days. On the 31st day after beginning the treatment with coffee beverages, hyperlipidemia was induced to the animals by administering Triton WR-1339 (300 mg/kg body weight). On day 32, blood was taken to determine the lipid profile, platelet aggregation, prothrombin time, partially activated thromboplastin time and hemogram. The contents of both phenolic compounds and chlorogenic acid in the integral coffee beverage were significantly lower than those in the decaffeinated coffee beverage. The animals treated with Triton WR-1339 presented a mixed hyperlipidemia. Although the decaffeination process caused a relative increase in total phenols and chlorogenic acids, the coffee drinks were unable to change the lipid profile or the hemostatic and hematological parameters in the studied animals. PMID:23780748

  20. The hypolipidemic activity of Ayurvedic medicine, Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic rats: A comparison with fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor of coronary heart disease. Currently available hypolipidemic drugs have been associated with number of side effects. Arogyavardhini vati, an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation has been used for liver disorders. Therefore, present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Objectives: Anti-hyperlipidemic activity evaluation of Arogyavardhini vati against Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Materials and Methods: Overnight fasted male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were randomly divided into normal control group [4% Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO), i.p.], positive control group (Triton WR-1339 in 4% DMSO, 400 mg/kg, i.p.), standard drug treated (fenofibrate 65 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia) and Arogyavardhini vati treated (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia). Rat doses were calculated by extrapolating the equivalent human dose (therapeutic dose, sub-maximum, and maximum dose). Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein HDL, liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were estimated at end of experiments. Results: Arogyavardhini vati significantly decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and significantly increased serum HDL in a dose-dependent manner. Decreased MDA and increased GSH levels in liver were observed at all doses of Arogyavardhini vati (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and fenofibrate-treated groups when compared with Triton-treated group. Atherogenic Index (AI) level was significantly decreased in fenofibrate and Arogyavardhini vati (200 mg/kg) treated rats when compared with normal control. Conclusion: Arogyavardhini vati, a traditionally used Ayurvedic medicine may be a useful therapy for hypercholesterolemia through reducing oxidative stress (decreasing MDA and increasing GSH) and lipid levels

  1. Rosiglitazone attenuates the severity of hyperlipidemic severe acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    NIYAZ, BATUR; ZHAO, KAI-LIANG; LIU, LI-MIN; CHEN, CHEN; DENG, WEN-HONG; ZUO, TENG; SHI, QIAO; WANG, WEI-XING

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) ligand regulates adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity, and exerts antihyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms by which PPAR-γ ligands affect hyperlipidemia with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have not been fully elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of rosiglitazone, a PPAR-γ ligand, on hyperlipidemia with SAP in a rat model. The hyperlipidemia was induced with a high-fat diet and SAP was induced by the administration of sodium taurocholate (TCA). The hyperlipidemia was shown to aggravate the severity of the sodium taurocholate-induced SAP. However, rosiglitazone demonstrated significant antihyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects in the rats with high-lipid diet-induced hyperlipidemia and SAP. PMID:24137303

  2. Antihyperlipidemic and Antioxidant Activities of Edible Tunisian Ficus carica L. Fruits in High Fat Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Belguith-Hadriche, Olfa; Ammar, Sonda; Contreras, Maria Del Mar; Turki, Mouna; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Makni-Ayedi, Fatma; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    The phenolic constituents of the aqueous-ethanolic extract of Tunisian Ficus carica (F. carica) fruit (FE) and its antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant activities in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats (HFD) were evaluated. The obtained results demonstrated that the FE improved the lipid profile by decreasing the total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. It also reduced the content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and increased the antioxidant enzymes in liver, heart and kidney in HFD-fed rats. These antihyperlipidemic effects and in vivo antioxidative effects correlated with the in vitro phenolic content scavenging ability. Thus, the major phenolic compounds were identified using reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-UHPLC) coupled with two detection systems: diode-array detection (DAD) and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Therefore, in the negative ionization mode, 28 phenolic compounds, including hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, flavanoids and hydroxycoumarins were characterized. Dihydroxybenzoic acid di-pentoside, the flavonol quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and the flavone assigned as apigenin 8-C-glucoside were the main representative compounds in 'Tounsi' fruits. This work was complemented by the detection of seven other phenolic compounds in the positive ionization mode, including anthocyanins and furanocoumarins. Overall, these results have shown that the FE has a significant hypocholesterolemic effect and antioxidant activity in HFD-fed rats. This beneficial effect may be partly due to these phenolic constituents, especially vitexin, dihydroxybenzoic acid di-pentoside as well as rutin. PMID:27086310

  3. Diosmin exhibits anti-hyperlipidemic effects in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Queenthy, S Sharmila; John, Babu

    2013-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of diosmin on experimentally induced myocardial infarcted rats. Diosmin (5 and 10mg/kg body weight) was administered orally as pretreatment daily for a period of 10 days. Then isoproterenol (100mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously into rats at an interval of 24h for 2 days (on 11th and 12th day). Isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarcted rats showed significant changes in electrocardiogram and an increase in the levels of cardiac markers, compared with normal rats. Additionally, increased plasma lipid peroxidation products and altered lipid metabolism in the plasma were observed in the isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarcted rats. Pretreatment with diosmin (5 and 10mg/kg body weight) minimized the electrocardiographic changes, decreased the levels of serum cardiac marker enzymes reduced plasma lipid peroxidation and minimized the alterations in the lipid metabolism of isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarcted rats. Also, diosmin inhibited the enhanced activity of liver HMG CoA reductase. The in vitro study revealed the free radical scavenging activity of diosmin. The free radical scavenging and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects are the reasons for the cardioprotective effects of diosmin. PMID:24036254

  4. Camphene, a Plant-Derived Monoterpene, Reduces Plasma Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Hyperlipidemic Rats Independently of HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). Methodology/Principal Findings The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001), 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p<0.001) and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001). Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Conclusions Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent

  5. Anti-hyperglycemic and Anti-hyperlipidemic Effects of Bryonia Laciniosa Seed Extract and its Saponin Fraction in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, SB; Santani, D; Shah, MB; Patel, VS

    2012-01-01

    Bryonia laciniosa Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) seed is used in traditional medicine for a number of ailments including metabolic disorders. This investigation was carried out to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic potential of the ethanolic extract of seeds of B. laciniosa Linn. and its saponin fraction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The ethanolic extract (250 and 500 mg/kg; p.o.) and saponin fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg; p.o.) were administered to diabetic rats and standard drug insulin (5 IU/kg; i.p.) to the group serving as a positive control. Effects of the ethanolic extract and saponin fraction on various biochemical parameters were studied in diabetic rats. Data were statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's t-test. Oral administration of the ethanolic extract and saponin fraction for 28 days to streptozotocin-induced diabetes rats significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the levels of blood glucose and improved the levels of plasma insulin. The levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase, urea, and creatinine were markedly altered in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of the ethanolic extract and saponin fraction restored all these biochemical parameters to near control levels. This study reveals the efficacy of B. laciniosa seed extract and its saponin fraction in the amelioration of diabetes and its associated complications. PMID:23112536

  6. Effects of Monascus-fermented grain extracts on plasma antioxidant status and tissue levels of ubiquinones and α-tocopherol in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Young-Hee; Seong, Ki-Seung

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effects of Monascus-fermented mixed grain extracts (MFGEs) enriched with bioactive mevinolins (natural statins) and coenzyme Qs (CoQ9+CoQ10) on the blood lipids, antioxidant status, and tissue levels of CoQs and α-tocopherol (α-Toc) in hyperlipidemic rats. The oral administration of MFGEs (300 mg/kg body weight per day) for 8 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in blood levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and LDL-C/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio compared to the control and lovastatin supplement group of a dosage of 20mg/kg per day (p<0.05). Furthermore, a significant increase in the ratios of α-Toc/LDL-C and CoQs/LDL-C in plasma and tissues and improvement in plasma antioxidant status as measured by TBARS and TRAP were observed in hypercholesterolemic rats (p<0.05). Regarding the effects of MFGEs on antioxidant levels of plasma and tissues, there were significant increases in the levels of α-Toc (p<0.05) and CoQs (p<0.01) after the 8-week MFGEs treatment. These data indicate that MFGEs supplementation not only decreases blood lipids and lipid peroxidation but also increases levels of antioxidants such as α-Toc and CoQs and may improve plasma antioxidant status as well as a hypolipidemic effect. PMID:23768376

  7. Antihyperlipidemic potential of Albizia amara (Roxb) Boiv. bark against Triton X-100 induced hyperlipidemic condition in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gundamaraju, Rohit; Hwi, Kim Kah; Singla, Rajeev K.; Vemuri, Ravi Chandra; Mulapalli, Sartaj Banu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The plant Albizia amara (Roxb.) Boiv. bark was used in traditional medical practices of India to treat cardiovascular diseases. Hyperlipidemia is the greatest risk factor of coronary heart disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to screen the potential of A. amara against the condition of hyperlipidemia in rats. Materials and Methods: The antihyperlipidemic activity of A. amara ethanolic extract (AAEE) was studied on Triton X-100 induced model of hyperlipidemia in rats. Hyperlipidemia in experimental rats was evidenced by an enhancement in the levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), low density lipoprotein (LDL), very LDL (VLDL) and decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL). Results: AAEE showed significant antihyperlipidemic effect by lowering the serum levels of biochemical parameters such as a significant reduction in the level of serum cholesterol, TG (104.1 ± 3.39), LDL (48.2 ± 2.19), VLDL (20.81 ± 0.67) and increase in HDL (47.25 ± 2.05) level with an increase in a dose of AAEE (41.39 ± 1.24) < (47.25 ± 2.05), which was similar to the standard drug atorvastatin. The results of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase also revealed that the plant extract was found to be safe on liver. Histopathological evaluation also revealed the positive effect of the plant extract. Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of phytoconstituents such as saponins, glycosides and tannins. The preliminary chemical constituents stood as a strong evidence for the study. Conclusion: Summing up the evidences of the pragmatic study, we can conclude that the extract of A. amara (Roxb.) Boiv. Bark aids in declining the condition of hyperlipidemia in rats. PMID:25276061

  8. Influence of Sorghum Kafirin on Serum Lipid Profile and Antioxidant Activity in Hyperlipidemic Rats (In Vitro and In Vivo Studies)

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz Cruz, Raquel A.; Cárdenas López, José L.; González Aguilar, Gustavo A.; Astiazarán García, Humberto; Gorinstein, Shela; Canett Romero, Rafael; Robles Sánchez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the antioxidant potential of sorghum kafirin and sorghum flour and their influence on lipids and antioxidant capacity in rats. The antioxidant activity in sorghum kafirin extract measured by the DPPH and TEAC methods was increased 30 and 65 times, respectively, compared to that of its counterpart, sorghum flour. According to electrophoresis assay, the kafirins tert-butanol extract showed a high proportion of α-kafirin monomers, and its amino acid composition revealed higher hydrophobic amino acid content such as alanine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine than sorghum flour extract. Diets supplemented with sorghum kafirin extract have improved lipid metabolism and increased the serum antioxidant potential (67%) especially in rats fed with added cholesterol. The bioactive peptides generated from kafirin in vivo hydrolysis appear to be associated with the positive effect on serum lipids and antioxidant activity. According to these results, sorghum kafirin extract at the levels used in this study apparently could be used for prevention of atherosclerosis and other chronic diseases. PMID:26634202

  9. Protective role of melatonin and retinol palmitate in oxidative stress and hyperlipidemic nephropathy induced by adriamycin in rats.

    PubMed

    Montilla, P L; Túnez, I F; Muñoz de Agueda, C; Gascón, F L; Soria, J V

    1998-09-01

    We have studied the effects of melatonin and retinol palmitate (RP) on the nephropathy and oxidative stress induced by a single and high dose of adriamycin (AD) in Wistar male rats. A dose of melatonin (75 microg/kg/day) and a dose of RP (0.25 g oily solution/kg/day, s.c.) were injected 3 and 9 days before and after the administration of AD (25 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. After the decapitation, samples were taken from the neck vascular trunk in order to determine the triglycerides, total cholesterol, phospholipids, HDL-cholesterol, total proteins, urea, lipoperoxides, and reduced glutathione (GSH). We estimated the lipoperoxide and glutathione (GSH) contents in renal homogenates, and the excretion of proteins in urine over a 24 hr period. The administration of AD caused significant increases in proteinuria and in the other parameters studied [lipids (triglycerides, total cholesterol, phospholipids, and HDL-cholesterol), non-protein nitrogen compounds, and lipoperoxides]. AD increased the lipoperoxide content, but it decreased the GSH content in the kidney. Both melatonin and RP, although melatonin more significantly, decreased the intensity of the changes produced by the administration of AD alone. In fact, melatonin was quite efficient in reducing the formation of lipoperoxides, restoring renal GSH content and decreasing remarkably the severity of proteinuria. These results support the powerful antioxidant action of melatonin at renal level and a lower antioxidant action of retinol. Likewise, these data reinforce the hypothesis which supports the pathogenetic role and the close relation between the oxidative stress and the expression of the nephropathy induced by AD. However, in spite of this obvious antioxidant effect of melatonin in the kidney, additional studies are required to establish accurately the role of this pineal indole in the regulation and dynamics of the antioxidative defense enzyme system, which neutralizes the damaging effect of free radicals

  10. Aorta Atherosclerosis Lesion Analysis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Sarajo; Yin, Changjun; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Habenicht, Andreas JR

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium-sized arteries. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice are used as experimental models to study human atherosclerosis. ApoE-/- mice are constitutively hyperlipidemic and develop intima plaques that resemble human plaques. Various issues including experimental design for lesion analysis, dietary conditions, isolation of the aorta, staining methods, morphometry, group size, age, the location within the arterial tree, and statistical analyses are important parameters that need to be addressed to obtain robust data. Here, we provide detailed methods to quantify aorta atherosclerosis. PMID:27366759

  11. Alterations in plasma total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in hyperlipidemic rats fed diets with varied content of selenium and vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Boylan, L M

    1994-07-01

    The effect of dietary selenium and vitamin E on plasma total (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) was evaluated in 54 Sprague Dawley rats fed cholesterol/cholic acid enriched diets. Diets 1, 2, and 3 had no added selenium (low Se) and 0 (low), 60 (adequate), and 600 (high) mg/kg dL alpha tocopheryl acetate added respectively. Sodium selenite at 0.2 mg/kg (adequate Se) was added to diets 4, 5, and 6 and at 4.0 mg/kg (toxic Se) to diet 7, 8, and 9 with the same pattern of vitamin E added to the diet as described above. TC and HDLC were measured using the Kodak Ectachem system. Rats in the low and adequate Se groups fed high vitamin E had lower TC values than rats fed lower vitamin E levels but differences were not significant. In the toxic Se groups, rats fed high vitamin E had significantly (p < 0.05) higher plasma TC values than did lower Vitamin E groups. Rats on the high vitamin E diets with low or adequate Se had significantly (p < 0.05) higher mean plasma HDLC values when compared to rats fed low or adequate vitamin E diets. HDLC values for animals on Se toxic diets were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in rats fed a low vitamin E diet. In rats fed Se deficient and adequate diets, a high vitamin E intake resulted in a decrease in TC and an increase in HDLC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7986664

  12. Anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic activities of Melastoma malabathricum Linn. leaves in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Melastoma malabathricum (MM) Linn leaves traditionally use in the treatment of diabetic conditions. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the antioxidant, antihyperlipidemic and antidiabetic activity of methanolic extract taken from Melastoma malabathricum Linn (Melastomaceae). Methods The methanolic leaves extract of MM Linn leaves used for the study. Chemical test of different extract, acute toxicity study and oral glucose test was performed. Diabetes was induced in rat by single intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg). The rats were divided into following groups: Group I – normal control, Group II (Vehicle) – diabetic control, Group III (STZ-toxic) – MM I (100 mg/kg, p.o.), Group IV – MM II (250 mg/kg, p.o.), Group V – MM III (500 mg/kg, p.o.), Group VI – glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o.). Bodyweight of each rat in the different groups was recorded daily. Biochemical and antioxidant enzyme parameters were determined on day 28. Histology of different organ (heart, liver, kidney, and pancreas) was performed after sacrificing the rats with euthanasia. Results The methanolic extract of MM did not show any acute toxicity up-to the dose of 2000 mg/kg and shown better glucose utilization in oral glucose tolerance test. Orally treatment of different doses of MM leaves extract decreased the level of serum glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1-6-biphosphate and increased the level of plasma insulin, hexokinase. MM treatment decreased liver malondialdehyde but increased the level of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. In oral glucose tolerance test observed increased utilization of glucose. Streptozotocin induced diabetes groups rat treated with different doses of MM leaves extract and glibenclamide significantly increased the body weight. Histopathology analysis on different organ of STZ (streptozotocin) induced diabetic rat show there regenerative effect on the liver

  13. Experimental study of osthole on treatment of hyperlipidemic and alcoholic fatty liver in animals

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fang; Xie, Mei-Lin; Zhu, Lu-Jia; Zhang, Ke-Ping; Xue, Jie; Gu, Zhen-Lun

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of osthole on fatty liver, and investigate the possible mechanism. METHODS: A quail model with hyperlipidemic fatty liver and rat model with alcoholic fatty liver were set up by feeding high fat diet and alcohol, respectively. These experimental animals were then treated with osthole 5-20 mg/kg for 6 wk, respectively. Whereafter, the lipid in serum and hepatic tissue, and coefficient of hepatic weight were measured. RESULTS: After treatment with osthole the levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), lower density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), coefficient of hepatic weight, and the hepatic tissue contents of TC and TG were significantly decreased. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver was improved. In alcohol-induced fatty liver rats, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver was decreased. In high fat-induced fatty liver quails, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) in liver was significantly improved. The histological evaluation of liver specimens demonstrated that the osthole dramatically decreased lipid accumulation. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that osthole had therapeutic effects on both alcohol and high fat-induced fatty liver. The mechanism might be associated with its antioxidation. PMID:16865778

  14. Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Hardik; Patel, Sejal; Patel, Ghanshyam; Paranjape, Archana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucova Active Tablet is a proprietary Ayurvedic formulation with ingredients reported for anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic activity and antioxidant properties. Objective: Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental Type I diabetes was induced in 24 albino rats with intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Type II diabetes was induced in 18 albino rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg) along with high fat diet. The rats were divided in 5 groups for Type I model and 4 groups for Type II model. Normal control group was kept common for both experimental models. Glucova Active Tablet (108 mg/kg) treatment was provided for 28 days twice daily orally. Fasting blood glucose level, serum lipid profile and liver anti-oxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione was carried out in both experimental models. Pancreas histopathology was also done. Statistical analysis were done by ‘analysis of variance’ test followed by post hoc Tukey's test, with significant level of P < 0.05. Results and Discussion: Glucova Active Tablet showed significant effect on fasting blood glucose level. It also showed significant alteration in lipid profile and antioxidant parameters. Histopathology study revealed restoration of beta cells in pancreas in Glucova Active Tablet treated group. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Glucova Active Tablet has shown promising anti-diabetic activity in Type I and Type II diabetic rats. It was also found showing good anti-hyperlipidemic activity and anti-oxidant property. PMID:24948860

  15. Rat Endovascular Perforation Model

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided a wealth of information on the mechanisms of brain injury. The Rat endovascular perforation model (EVP) replicates the early pathophysiology of SAH and hence is frequently used to study early brain injury following SAH. This paper presents a brief review of historical development of the EVP model, details the technique used to create SAH and considerations necessary to overcome technical challenges. PMID:25213427

  16. Stimulation of cholesteryl ester synthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages by cholesterol-rich very low density lipoproteins from the Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit, an animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, T.; Yokode, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Narumiya, S.; Kawai, C.

    1986-05-01

    Cholesterol-rich very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) from the homozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit induced marked cholesteryl ester accumulation in mouse peritoneal macrophages. This WHHL rabbit, an animal model of human familial hypercholesterolemia, has severe hypercholesterolemia, cutaneous xanthomas, and fulminant atherosclerosis due to the deficiency of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. When incubated with mouse peritoneal macrophages, the VLDL from WHHL rabbit (WHHL-VLDL) stimulated cholesteryl (/sup 14/C)oleate synthesis 124-fold more than did VLDL from the normal Japanese White rabbit (control-VLDL). The enhancement in cholesteryl ester synthesis and accumulation of WHHL-VLDL was due to the presence of a high affinity binding receptor site on the macrophage cell surface that mediated the uptake and lysosomal degradation of WHHL-VLDL. Competition studies showed that the uptake and degradation of /sup 125/I-WHHL-VLDL was inhibited by unlabeled excess WHHL-VLDL and beta-migrating VLDL (beta-VLDL), but not LDL. Furthermore, the degradation of WHHL-VLDL was not blocked by either fucoidin, polyinosinic acid, or polyguanylic acid, potent inhibitors of the acetylated (acetyl)-LDL binding site, or by acetyl-LDL. These results suggest that macrophages possess a high affinity receptor that recognizes the cholesterol-rich VLDL present in the plasma of the WHHL rabbit and that the receptor which mediates ingestion of WHHL-VLDL seems to be the same as that for beta-VLDL and leads to cholesteryl ester deposition within macrophages. Thus, the uptake of the cholesterol-rich VLDL from the WHHL rabbit by macrophages in vivo may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the WHHL rabbit.

  17. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rat

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuanhong; Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Hui; Xiong, Lixia; Gao, Xiuzhi; Jia, Hui; Lian, Zhengxing; Tong, Nengsheng; Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats, female Wistar rats were fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) for 28 d to generate hyperlipidemic models. Hyperlipidemic rats were assigned to four groups, which were individually treated with three different dosages of K. marxianus M3+HCD or physiological saline+HCD via oral gavage for 28 d. The total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in the serum and liver of the rats were measured using commercially available enzyme kits. In addition, the liver morphology was also examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and optical microscopy. According to our results, the serum and liver TC, TG, LDL-C levels and atherogenic index (AI) were significantly decreased in rats orally administered K. marxianus M3 (p <0.01), and the HDL-C levels and anti atherogenic index (AAI) were significantly increased (p <0.01) compared to the control group. Moreover, K. marxianus M3 treatment also reduced the build-up of lipid droplets in the liver and exhibited normal hepatocytes, suggesting a protective effect of K. marxianus M3 in hyperlipidemic rats. PMID:26273253

  18. Chronic treatment with bark infusion from Croton cajucara lowers plasma triglyceride levels in genetic hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Bighetti, Eliete J B; Souza-Brito, Alba R M; de Faria, Eliana C; Oliveira, Helena C F

    2004-06-01

    Aqueous infusion and preparations containing dehydrocrotonin (DHC) and essential oil from Croton cajucara bark were tested for plasma lipid-lowering effects in genetically modified hyperlipidemic mice. Two mouse models were tested: 1) primary hypercholesterolemia resulting from the LDL-receptor gene knockout, and 2) combined hyperlipidemia resulting from crosses of LDL-receptor knockout mice with transgenic mice overexpressing apolipo protein (apo) CIII and cholesteryl ester-transfer protein. Mice treated with bark infusion, DHC, essential oil, or placebos for 25 days showed no signals of toxicity as judged by biochemical tests for liver and kidney functions. The bark infusion reduced triglyceride plasma levels by 40%, while essential oil and DHC had no significant effects on plasma lipid levels. The bark infusion treatment promoted a redistribution of cholesterol among the lipoprotein fractions in combined hyperlipidemic mice. There was a marked reduction in the VLDL fraction and an increase in the HDL fraction, in such a way that the (VLDL + LDL)/HDL ratio was reduced by half. The bark infusion treatment did not modify cholesterol distribution in hypercholesterolemic mice. In conclusion, C. cajucara bark infusion reduced plasma triglycerides levels and promoted a redistribution of cholesterol among lipoproteins in genetically combined hyperlipidemic mice. These changes modify risk factors for the development of atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:15381962

  19. Animal Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Pathophysiological Resemblance to the Human Condition Induced by Multiple Factors (Nutritional, Pharmacological, and Stress) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Aziz, Siti Hajar; Nordin, Massita; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Adam, Aishah

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to develop an experimental gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) animal model in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were fed with high fat sucrose diet, impregnated, and induced with Streptozotocin and Nicotinamide on gestational day 0 (D0). Sleeping patterns of the rats were also manipulated to induce stress, a lifestyle factor that contributes to GDM. Rats were tested for glycemic parameters (glucose, C-peptide, and insulin), lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL), genes affecting insulin signaling (IRS-2, AKT-1, and PCK-1), glucose transporters (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and antioxidants (SOD, CAT, and GPX) on D6 and D21. GDM rats showed possible insulin resistance as evidenced by high expression of proinflammatory cytokines, PCK-1 and CRP. Furthermore, low levels of IRS-2 and AKT-1 genes and downregulation of GLUT-4 from the initial to final phases indicate possible defect of insulin signaling. GDM rats also showed an impairment of antioxidant status and a hyperlipidemic state. Additionally, GDM rats exhibited significantly higher body weight and blood glucose and lower plasma insulin level and C-peptide than control. Based on the findings outlined, the current GDM animal model closely replicates the disease state in human and can serve as a reference for future investigations. PMID:27379252

  20. Animal Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Pathophysiological Resemblance to the Human Condition Induced by Multiple Factors (Nutritional, Pharmacological, and Stress) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Abdul Aziz, Siti Hajar; John, Cini Mathew; Mohamed Yusof, Nur Intan Saidaah; Nordin, Massita; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Adam, Aishah; Mohd Fauzi, Fazlin

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to develop an experimental gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) animal model in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were fed with high fat sucrose diet, impregnated, and induced with Streptozotocin and Nicotinamide on gestational day 0 (D0). Sleeping patterns of the rats were also manipulated to induce stress, a lifestyle factor that contributes to GDM. Rats were tested for glycemic parameters (glucose, C-peptide, and insulin), lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL), genes affecting insulin signaling (IRS-2, AKT-1, and PCK-1), glucose transporters (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and antioxidants (SOD, CAT, and GPX) on D6 and D21. GDM rats showed possible insulin resistance as evidenced by high expression of proinflammatory cytokines, PCK-1 and CRP. Furthermore, low levels of IRS-2 and AKT-1 genes and downregulation of GLUT-4 from the initial to final phases indicate possible defect of insulin signaling. GDM rats also showed an impairment of antioxidant status and a hyperlipidemic state. Additionally, GDM rats exhibited significantly higher body weight and blood glucose and lower plasma insulin level and C-peptide than control. Based on the findings outlined, the current GDM animal model closely replicates the disease state in human and can serve as a reference for future investigations. PMID:27379252

  1. Hypolipidemic effect of gypenosides in experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the anti-hyperlipidemic effect of gynosaponins (GPs) in hyperlipidemic rats induced by high lipid diet. Methods Animal model of hyperlipidemia was established by high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. Rats were randomly divided into 6 groups, except the normal and model groups, rats in GPs groups were daily administered intragastrically with GPs (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg), and rats in simvastatin group were daily administered intragastrically with simvastatin (10 mg/kg). It was measured that the contents of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) in the serum, TG and TC in the liver during this experiment, respectively. The left lobe of liver was observed by histopathological staining, and the immunohistochemical staining was used to observe the effects on the effect of GPs on liver functions. Results Compared with the model group, GPs groups could remarkably decrease the content of lipids, GSH-Px, SOD, CAT and MDA in the serum and TC and TG in the liver of the hyperlipidemic rats. The pathomorphological results of hepatic tissue showed that fatty degeneration and inflammatory reaction of GPs groups were lightened compared with the model group. Conclusions The results show that GPs has good effects on the treatment of hyperlipidemia induced by high lipid diet in rats. The possible anti-hyperlipidemia mechanism maybe those GPs can regulate the disorder of lipid metabolism as well as ameliorate hepatic function. PMID:24160562

  2. Pitavastatin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent in the rat paw model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Farida; Alam, Syed Mahboob; Siddiqi, Abeer Qamar; Kamran, Afshan

    2014-11-01

    Statins are used extensively as anti-hyperlipidemic agents. In addition to curtailing cholesterol synthesis they have been found to have multiple actions unrelated to cholesterol lowering "the pleiotropic effects," which includes inhibition of inflammation. We aimed at investigating the effect of pitavastatin a 3rd generation statin, in suppressing acute inflammation in rat paw edema model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of five groups (n=8): Control, indomethacin and pitavastatin (0.2mg/kg, 0.4mg/kg, 0.8mg/kg) treated. 1hour following treatment, inflammation was induced by sub-planter injection of egg albumin into the hind paw. Anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by measurement of edema formation every half hour for three hours, assessment of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) infiltration and measurement of tissue damage in skin biopsies. Ascending doses of pitavastatin were found to attenuate these parameters. The lowest dose of pitavastatin (0.2mg/kg) was found to significantly reduce edema volume, PMNL infiltration and tissue damage. The efficacy of the smallest dose was found comparable to indomethacin. PMID:26045381

  3. Modeling nicotine addiction in rats.

    PubMed

    Caille, Stephanie; Clemens, Kelly; Stinus, Luis; Cador, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Among the human population, 15% of drug users develop a pathological drug addiction. This figure increases substantially with nicotine, whereby more than 30% of those who try smoking develop a nicotine addiction. Drug addiction is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors (craving), and loss of control over intake despite impairment in health, social, and occupational functions. This behavior can be accurately modeled in the rat using an intravenous self-administration (IVSA) paradigm. Initial attempts at establishing nicotine self-administration had been problematic, yet in recent times increasingly reliable models of nicotine self-administration have been developed. The present article reviews different characteristics of the nicotine IVSA model that has been developed to examine nicotine reinforcing and motivational properties in rats. PMID:22231818

  4. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  5. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Attenuates Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Sarbani; Loftin, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a chronic inflammatory disease that increase the risk of life-threatening aortic rupture. In humans, AAAs have been characterized by increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and the inactivation of COX-2 prior to disease initiation reduces AAA incidence in a mouse model of the disease. The current study examined the effectiveness of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition on reducing AAA progression when administered after the initiation of AAA formation. AAAs were induced in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice by chronic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion and the effect of treatment with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib was examined when initiated at different stages of the disease. Celecoxib treatment that was started 1 week after initiating AngII infusion reduced AAA incidence by 61% and significantly decreased AAA severity. Mice treated with celecoxib also showed significantly reduced aortic rupture and mortality. Treatment with celecoxib that was started at a late stage of AAA development also significantly reduced AAA incidence and severity. Celecoxib treatment significantly increased smooth muscle alpha-actin expression in the abdominal aorta and did not reduce expression of markers of macrophage-dependent inflammation. These findings indicate that COX-2 inhibitor treatment initiated after formation of AngII-induced AAAs effectively reduces progression of the disease in hyperlipidemic mice. PMID:23209546

  7. Bisphenol A exposure induces metabolic disorders and enhances atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chao; Ning, Bo; Waqar, Ahmed Bilal; Niimi, Manabu; Li, Shen; Satoh, Kaneo; Shiomi, Masashi; Ye, Ting; Dong, Sijun; Fan, Jianglin

    2015-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an artificial environmental endocrine disrupter. Excess exposure to BPA may induce many disorders in the metabolism and cardiovascular system. However, the underlying toxicological mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we administered genetically hyperlipidemic Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL-MI) rabbits (male, 14 week old), which have more common features with humans than the mouse and rat especially in the metabolism and cardiovascular system, with BPA at 40 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) for 8 weeks by gavage and compared their plasma lipids, glucose and insulin response with those of the vehicle group. All of the rabbits were sacrificed, and their pancreas, liver, adipose tissue, heart and aorta were analyzed using histological and morphometric methods. Furthermore, we treated human hepatoma HepG2 cells and human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), with different doses of BPA based on the serum BPA levels in the WHHL rabbits for 6 h to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that BPA-treated rabbits showed insulin resistance, prominent adipose accumulation and hepatic steatosis. Additionally, BPA exposure also caused myocardial injury and enhanced the development of atherosclerosis in the aortic arch with increased macrophage number (86%) and advanced lesion areas (69%). Increased expression of inflammatory genes found in the liver of BPA-treated rabbits along with the up-regulation of ER stress, lipid and glucose homeostasis and inflammatory genes in the cultured HepG2 cells and HUVECs suggest that BPA may induce metabolic disorders and enhance atherosclerosis through regulating above molecular pathways in the liver and endothelium. PMID:25619500

  8. PBPK MODELING OF DELTAMETHRIN IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin is cleared nearly twice as rapidly in human liver microsomes compared to rat liver microsomes. A species difference such as this could influence the toxic potency of deltamethrin between rats and humans. PBPK modeling is a tool that can be ut...

  9. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  10. Effect of Eclipta prostrata on lipid metabolism in hyperlipidemic animals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Peng, Lu; Lu, Wei; Wang, Yiqing; Huang, Xuefeng; Gong, Chen; He, Lin; Hong, Junhao; Wu, Songsong; Jin, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Eclipta prostrata (Linn.) Linn. is a traditional Chinese medicine and has previously been reported to have hypolipidemic effects. However, its mechanism of action is not well understood. This study was conducted to identify the active fraction of Eclipta, its toxicity, its effect on hyperlipidemia, and its mechanism of action. The ethanol extract (EP) of Eclipta and fractions EPF1-EPF4, obtained by eluting with different concentrations of ethanol from a HPD-450 macroporous resin column chromatography of the EP, were screened in hyperlipidemic mice for lipid-lowering activity, and EPF3 was the most active fraction. The LD50 of EPF3 was undetectable because no mice died with administration of EPF3 at 10.4 g/kg. Then, 48 male hamsters were used and randomly assigned to normal chow diet, high-fat diet, high-fat diet with Xuezhikang (positive control) or EPF3 (75, 150 and 250 mg/kg) groups. We evaluated the effects of EPF3 on body weight gain, liver weight gain, serum lipid concentration, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in hyperlipidemic hamsters. The results showed that EPF3 significantly decreased body-weight gain and liver-weight gain and reduced the serum lipid levels in hyperlipidemic hamsters. EPF3 also increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes; up-regulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), lecithin-cholesterol transferase (LCAT) and scavenger receptor class B type Ι receptor (SR-BI); and down-regulated the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) in the liver. These results indicate that EPF3 ameliorates hyperlipidemia, in part, by reducing oxidative stress and modulating the transcription of genes involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:25562812

  11. Traumatic arteriogenic erectile dysfunction: a rat model.

    PubMed

    El-Sakka, A; Yen, T S; Lin, C S; Lue, T F

    2001-06-01

    We developed a rat model of traumatic arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) for the study of vasculogenic ED. Bilateral ligation of the internal iliac artery was performed on 30 three-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats as an experimental group. The control group consisted of 12 rats which underwent dissection of the internal iliac artery without ligation. Before their euthanization at 3 days, 7 days, and 1 month (10 rats in the experimental group and four rats in the control group at each time point), erectile function was assessed by electrostimulation of the cavernous nerves. Penile tissues were collected for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase staining, trichrome staining, electron microscopy and RT-PCR for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1), insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and fibroblast growth factors (FGF) mRNA expression. Electrostimulation of the cavernous nerves revealed a highly significant declining of the intracavernous pressure after 3 and 7 days. No significant recovery of erectile function was noted at 1 month. Histology showed degeneration of the dorsal nerve fibers in all experimental rats. There was little decrease in the bulk of intracavernous smooth muscle in the experimental rats euthanazed 7 and 30 days. NADPH diaphorase staining revealed a significant decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) containing nerve fibers in the dorsal and intracavernosal nerves in all rats in the experimental group. Electron microscopy showed a variety of changes such as collapse of sinusoids, increased cell debris, fibroblast and myofibroblast loss, intracellular deposition of fat and collagen and fatty degeneration. RT-PCR revealed up-regulation of TGF-beta1 after 3 days but not after 7 days or 1 month. There is no significant difference in IGF-I or FGF expression between the experimental and control group. Bilateral ligation of internal iliac arteries produces a reliable animal model for traumatic arteriogenic ED. Further

  12. Consensus Modeling of Oral Rat Acute Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acute toxicity dataset (oral rat LD50) with about 7400 compounds was compiled from the ChemIDplus database. This dataset was divided into a modeling set and a prediction set. The compounds in the prediction set were selected so that they were present in the modeling set used...

  13. Impact of Light/Dark Cycle Patterns on Oxidative Stress in an Adriamycin-Induced Nephropathy Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tasset, Inmaculada; Túnez, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The principal goal of this study was to determine the effect of the photoperiod on oxidative damage biomarkers in rats submitted to different light/darkness patterns, in a hyperlipidemic nephropathy model (induced by adriamycin), as well as its possible relationship with melatonin and leptin secretion rhythms. To test this hypothesis, six different groups were used (N = 6 rats per group): control (12 h/12h light:dark); exposure to permanent illumination (24 h light); exposure to darkness (22 h dark); injected with adriamycin, 12h/12h light:dark; injected with adriamycin + exposure to permanent illumination and injected with adriamycin + exposure to darkness (22 h dark). The different photoperiods were begun two weeks prior to medication and were maintained up to the day of the animal's sacrifice, ten days after medication. The following parameters were analysed: i) weight evolution; ii) in plasma: urea, creatinine, uric acid, total proteins, albumen, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine-quinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total cholesterol; iii) in urine: urea, creatinine, total proteins and microalbumen; iv) biomarkers of oxidative damage in kidneys, heart, liver and brain: lipoperoxides, total glutathione, reduced glutathione, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione transferase; v) melatonin (pineal gland tissue and plasma) and leptin (plasma). From the results obtained it was concluded that the administration of adriamycin generated oxidative stress in renal, cerebral, hepatic and cardiac tissue. Additionally, in the healthy animal, but of a lesser relevance in the adriamycin animal, permanent light worsened the oxidative stress, whereas darkness improved it. This could be related to the circadian rhythm of the inverse release shown by melatonin and leptin, accentuating the release of melatonin in the darkness phase and that of leptin in the light phase. The correlation between melatonin and leptin

  14. The rat choledochojejunostomy model for microsurgical training

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Suh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The feasibility of a rat choledochojejunostomy (CJ) training model was investigated, as an introductory model to microsurgery for general surgeons. Methods Roux-en-Y CJ was performed on 20 rats. Interrupted 10-0 prolene sutures were used to perform CJ. The animals were observed for 7 days and sacrificed and examined. Results The rats were divided into 2 groups of 10 based on surgical order. The CJ time showed a significant decrease from 36.2 ± 5.6 minutes in group 1 to 29.4 ± 5.7 minutes in group 2 (P = 0.015). The bile leakage rate was 40% in group 1 and 10% in group 2. The survival time was 5.4 ± 2.2 days in group 1 and 7 days in group 2 (P = 0.049). Conclusion The rat CJ training model is a feasible introductory model for general surgeons with no previous experience in microsurgery. PMID:27186568

  15. On the rat model of human osteopenias and osteoporoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Harold M.; Jee, Webster S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea that rats cannot model human osteopenias errs. The same mechanisms control gains in bone mass (longitudinal bone growth and modeling drifts) and losses (BMU-based remodeling), in young and aged rats and humans. Furthermore, they respond similarly in rats and man to mechanical influences, hormones, drugs and other agents.

  16. Effect of melatonin on hyperlipidemic nephropathy under constant light exposure.

    PubMed

    Túnez, L; Muñoz, M C; Feijoo-López, A L; Valdvira, E; Bujalance-Arenas, L; Montilla, P

    2002-06-01

    Studies have shown anti-hyperlipidemic actions of melatonin, with pharmacological doses inducing changes in cholesterol levels. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of melatonin on adriamycin-induced (25mg/kg b.w., i.p.) hyperlipidemia under constant light exposure. Melatonin was injected i.p. (1,000 microg/kg b.w./day). Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, light-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-proteic nitrogen compounds (urea and creatinine levels), total protein in serum, proteins eliminated in the urine and melatonin levels in serum and kidney were determined. Results show a decrease in melatonin levels induced by both adriamycin and constant light. Likewise, adriamycin induced significant increases in triglycerides, total cholesterol and light-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lowered high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Constant light exposure also prompted an increase in LDL-c levels and a decrease in HDL-c values, and intensified the effects of adriamycin on these two lipoproteins. All changes induced by adriamycin and constant light were reverted toward normality by melatonin administration. PMID:12435086

  17. Interleukin-10 overexpression in macrophages suppresses atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xinbing; Kitamoto, Shiro; Wang, Hongwei; Boisvert, William A.

    2010-01-01

    In atherogenesis, macrophage foam cell formation is modulated by pathways involving both the uptake and efflux of cholesterol. We recently showed that interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates lipid metabolism by enhancing both uptake and efflux of cholesterol in macrophages. However, the mechanistic details of these properties in vivo have been unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether expression of IL-10 in macrophages would alter susceptibility to atherosclerosis and whether IL-10 exerts its antiatherosclerotic properties by modulating lipid metabolism in macrophages. We utilized a macrophage-specific retroviral vector that allows long-term in vivo expression of IL-10 in macrophages through transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow cells (BMCs). IL-10 expressed by macrophages derived from transduced BMCs inhibited atherosclerosis in LDLR−/− mice by reducing cholesteryl ester accumulation in atherosclerotic sites. Experiments with primary macrophages indicated that macrophage source of IL-10 stimulated both the uptake (by up-regulating scavenger receptors) and efflux of cholesterol (by activating the PPARγ-LXR-ABCA1/ABCG1 pathway), thereby reducing inflammation and apoptosis in atherosclerosis. These findings indicate that BMC-transduced macrophage IL-10 production can act as a strong antiatherogenic agent, and they highlight a novel antiatherosclerotic therapy using a simple, yet effective, stem cell transduction system that facilitates long-term expression of IL-10 in macrophages.—Han, X., Kitamoto, S., Wang, H., Boisvert, W. A. Interleukin-10 overexpression in macrophages suppresses atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. PMID:20354139

  18. Rat Model of Parkes Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Janusz, Gabriela; Grabowska, Iwona; Zegrocka-Stendel, Oliwia; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Maciejko, Dorota; Koziak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The Parkes Weber syndrome is a congenital vascular malformation, characterized by varicose veins, arterio-venous fistulas and overgrown limbs. No broadly accepted animal model of Parkes Weber syndrome has been described. We created side-to-side arterio-venous fistula between common femoral vessels with proximal non-absorbable ligature on common femoral vein limiting the enlargement of the vein diameter in Wistar rats. Contralateral limb was sham operated. Invasive blood pressure measurements in both iliac and inferior cava veins were performed in rats 30 days after fistula creation. Tight circumference and femoral bone length were measured. Histopathology and morphology of soleus muscle, extensor digitorum longus muscle, and the common femoral vessel were analyzed. 30 days following arterio-venous fistula creation, a statistically significant elevation of blood pressure in common iliac vein and limb overgrowth was observed. Limb enlargement was caused by muscle overgrowth, varicose veins formation and bone elongation. Arterio-venous fistula with proximal outflow limitation led to significant increase of femoral vein circumference and venous wall thickness. Our study indicates that the described rat model mimics major clinical features characteristic for the human Parkes Weber syndrome: presence of arterio-venous fistula, venous hypertension and dilatation, varicose veins formation, and the limb hypertrophy. We reveal that limb overgrowth is caused by bone elongation, muscle hypertrophy, and venous dilatation. The newly established model will permit detailed studies on the mechanisms underlying the disease and on the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for the Parkes Weber syndrome treatment. PMID:26217941

  19. Rat Model of Parkes Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Janusz, Gabriela; Grabowska, Iwona; Zegrocka-Stendel, Oliwia; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Maciejko, Dorota; Koziak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The Parkes Weber syndrome is a congenital vascular malformation, characterized by varicose veins, arterio-venous fistulas and overgrown limbs. No broadly accepted animal model of Parkes Weber syndrome has been described. We created side-to-side arterio-venous fistula between common femoral vessels with proximal non-absorbable ligature on common femoral vein limiting the enlargement of the vein diameter in Wistar rats. Contralateral limb was sham operated. Invasive blood pressure measurements in both iliac and inferior cava veins were performed in rats 30 days after fistula creation. Tight circumference and femoral bone length were measured. Histopathology and morphology of soleus muscle, extensor digitorum longus muscle, and the common femoral vessel were analyzed. 30 days following arterio-venous fistula creation, a statistically significant elevation of blood pressure in common iliac vein and limb overgrowth was observed. Limb enlargement was caused by muscle overgrowth, varicose veins formation and bone elongation. Arterio-venous fistula with proximal outflow limitation led to significant increase of femoral vein circumference and venous wall thickness. Our study indicates that the described rat model mimics major clinical features characteristic for the human Parkes Weber syndrome: presence of arterio-venous fistula, venous hypertension and dilatation, varicose veins formation, and the limb hypertrophy. We reveal that limb overgrowth is caused by bone elongation, muscle hypertrophy, and venous dilatation. The newly established model will permit detailed studies on the mechanisms underlying the disease and on the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for the Parkes Weber syndrome treatment. PMID:26217941

  20. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes. PMID:26421020

  1. Rat injury model of docetaxel extravasation

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, JING-JING; FU, JIAN-FEI; YANG, JIAO; HU, BING; ZHANG, HUI; YU, JIAN-HUA

    2014-01-01

    Docetaxel is a novel type of chemotherapy drug that actively treats a number of malignant tumors. The aim of the present study was to explore the severity and natural course of tissue damage induced by docetaxel extravasation and to confirm the vesicant potential of docetaxel. Rats were selected for the establishment of the ulcer model. Different volumes and concentrations were explored to induce the skin ulcer and to confirm the optimum rational injection model. The natural course of tissue injury and pathological changes produced by docetaxel extravasation were observed by comparing to vinorelbine extravasation. A 0.4 ml volume and a 6 mg/ml concentration were the optimum rational injection model for the induction of the skin ulcer. The docetaxel extravasation induced local tissue necrosis, followed by granuloma formation and hyperpigmentation or scar formation. The severity of the injury depended on the concentration of the extravasation used in the rat model. The injury occurred on the first day following extravasation and lasted 4–6 weeks. The damage from docetaxel was weaker than vinorelbine in association with the depth and extension of necrosis. In conclusion, docetaxel extravasation can induce tissue necrosis. However, the severity of necrosis was weaker than that of vinorelbine. Docetaxel has superficial vesicant properties. PMID:25054005

  2. Effects of Apple Consumption on Lipid Profile of Hyperlipidemic and Overweight Men

    PubMed Central

    Vafa, Mohammad Reza; Haghighatjoo, Elham; Shidfar, Farzad; Afshari, Shirin; Gohari, Mahmood Reza; Ziaee, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Fruits and vegetables may be beneficial on lipid profile of hyperlipidemic subjects. The present study was aimed to verify the effect of golden delicious apple on Lipid Profile in hyperlipidemic and overweight men. Methods: Forty six hyperlipidemic and overweight men were randomly divided into two groups. Intervention group received 300g golden delicious apple per day for 8 weeks. Control group had the regular dietary regimen for the same period of time. Blood samples were analyzed for serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL), apolipoprotein B (Apo B), lipoprotein a (Lp a) and LDL/HDL ratio at baseline and after intervention. Results: Total polyphenols and fibers were 485 mg/kg and 4.03 g/100g in fresh apple respectively. After 8 weeks, significant statistical differences were observed considering the TG and VLDL levels between two groups, but no significant differences were observed regarding TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, Apo (B), Lp (a) and LDL/HDL ratio. Conclusions: Consumption of Golden delicious apple may be increased serum TG and VLDL in hyperlipidemic and overweight men. We need more studies to assay the effect of apple consumption on serum TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, Apo (B), Lp (a) and LDL/HDL ratio. PMID:21603015

  3. Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2010-01-01

    i. Summary Numerous and diverse experimental animal models have been used over the years to examine reactions to various forms of blood vessel disease and/or injury across species and in multiple vascular beds in a cumulative effort to relate these findings to the human condition. In this context, the rat carotid artery balloon injury model is highly characterized and commonly used for investigating gross morphological, cellular, biochemical, and molecular components of the response to experimentally-induced arterial injury. The mechanical damage caused by the balloon catheter completely removes the intimal endothelial lining and creates a distending mural injury in the operated vessel. This elicits a reproducible remodeling response characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) mitogenesis and migration (via phenotypic switching), SMC apoptosis, partial vascular endothelial cell regeneration, enhanced matrix synthesis, and establishment of an invasive neointima in time-dependent fashion. This multi-factorial process allows for investigation of these many important pathophysiological processes and can serve as a valuable “proof-of-concept” tool to verify and substantiate in vitro results; however, inherent anatomical and adaptive constraints of this in vivo model ration comparison to the diseased human system (see Note 1). In this chapter, brief overview of the materials needed and the methodologies commonly employed for successful routine performance of this important experimental animal model will be provided. Individual sub-sections will cover animal care and handling, pre- and post-operative procedures, and the surgery proper. Protocols for histopathology and morphometry and procedures for data management and interpretation pertinent to the rat carotid artery balloon injury model will be discussed in Chapter __ of this series. Notes will conclude with important caveats, limitations, and considerations for practical use of this technique. PMID:18287662

  4. Znf202 Affects High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Promotes Hepatosteatosis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vrins, Carlos L. J.; Out, Ruud; van Santbrink, Peter; van der Zee, André; Mahmoudi, Tokameh; Groenendijk, Martine; Havekes, Louis M.; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The zinc finger protein Znf202 is a transcriptional suppressor of lipid related genes and has been linked to hypoalphalipoproteinemia. A functional role of Znf202 in lipid metabolism in vivo still remains to be established. Methodology and Principal Findings We generated mouse Znf202 expression vectors, the functionality of which was established in several in vitro systems. Next, effects of adenoviral znf202 overexpression in vivo were determined in normo- as well as hyperlipidemic mouse models. Znf202 overexpression in mouse hepatoma cells mhAT3F2 resulted in downregulation of members of the Apoe/c1/c2 and Apoa1/c3/a4 gene cluster. The repressive activity of Znf202 was firmly confirmed in an apoE reporter assay and Znf202 responsive elements within the ApoE promoter were identified. Adenoviral Znf202 transfer to Ldlr−/− mice resulted in downregulation of apoe, apoc1, apoa1, and apoc3 within 24 h after gene transfer. Interestingly, key genes in bile flux (abcg5/8 and bsep) and in bile acid synthesis (cyp7a1) were also downregulated. At 5 days post-infection, the expression of the aforementioned genes was normalized, but mice had developed severe hepatosteatosis accompanied by hypercholesterolemia and hypoalphalipoproteinemia. A much milder phenotype was observed in wildtype mice after 5 days of hepatic Znf202 overexpression. Interestingly and similar to Ldl−/− mice, HDL-cholesterol levels in wildtype mice were lowered after hepatic Znf202 overexpression. Conclusion/Significance Znf202 overexpression in vivo reveals an important role of this transcriptional regulator in liver lipid homeostasis, while firmly establishing the proposed key role in the control of HDL levels. PMID:23469003

  5. Sulfation pattern of fucose branches affects the anti-hyperlipidemic activities of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nian; Zhang, Yu; Ye, Xingqian; Hu, Yaqin; Ding, Tian; Chen, Shiguo

    2016-08-20

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (fCSs) are glycosaminoglycans extracted from sea cucumbers, consisting of chondroitin sulfate E (CSE) backbones and sulfated fucose branches. The biological properties of fCSs could be affected by the sulfation pattern of their fucose branches. In the present study, two fCSs were isolated from sea cucumbers Isostichopus badionotus (fCS-Ib) and Pearsonothuria graeffei (fCS-Pg). Their monosaccharide compositions of glucuronic acid (GlcA), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), fucose (Fuc) and sulfate were at similar molar ratio with 1.0/0.7/0.9/3.1 for fCS-Ib and 1.0/0.8/1.5/2.6 for fCS-Pg. The two fCSs have different sulfation patterns on their fucose branches, fCS-Pg with 3,4-O-disulfation while fCS-Ib with 2,4-O-disulfation. Their antihyperlipidemic effects were compared using a high-fat high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice model. Both fCS-Ib and fCS-Pg had significant effects on lipid profile improvement, liver protection, blood glucose diminution and hepatic glycogen synthesis. Specifically, fCS-Pg with 3,4-O-disulfation fucose branches was more effective in reduction of blood cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and atherogenic index (AI). Our results indicate that both fCSs, especially fCS-Pg, could be used as a potential anti-hyperlipidemic drug. PMID:27178902

  6. Oxytocin administration attenuates atherosclerosis and inflammation in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Angela; Rossetti, Maria A; Mendez, Armando J; Noller, Crystal M; Herderick, Edward E; Gonzales, Julie A; Schneiderman, Neil; McCabe, Philip M

    2013-05-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neurohypophyseal peptide traditionally associated with female reproductive functioning, and more recently with prosocial behavior. OT and its receptor are also expressed in the heart and vascular tissue and play a role in cardiovascular homeostasis. In vitro, it has been demonstrated that OT decreases NADPH-dependent superoxide production and pro-inflammatory cytokine release from vascular endothelial cells and macrophages, suggesting that OT may attenuate pathophysiological processes involved with atherosclerotic lesion formation. The present study sought to determine the effect of chronic exogenous OT administration on inflammation and atherosclerosis in an animal model of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis, the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit. Twenty-two, 3-month-old WHHLs were surgically implanted with osmotic mini-pumps containing OT (n=11) or vehicle (n=11), and then were individually housed for the entire study. Blood and 24-h urine samples were taken at baseline and after 8 (midpoint) and 16 (endpoint) weeks of treatment. At endpoint, the aortas and visceral fat samples were dissected and stored for analyses. There were no group differences in body weight, serum lipids, plasma/urinary measures of oxidative stress, plasma cortisol or urinary catecholamines over the 16-week treatment. OT-treated animals exhibited significantly lower plasma C-reactive protein levels at midpoint and endpoint and developed significantly less atherosclerosis in the thoracic aorta relative to vehicle control animals at endpoint (p<0.05). Cytokine gene expression from visceral adipose tissue samples suggested that there was a decrease in adipose tissue inflammation in the OT-treated group compared to the vehicle control group, however these differences were not statistically significant. These results suggest that chronic peripheral OT administration can inhibit inflammation and atherosclerotic lesion development. PMID:22998949

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some novel cyclic-imides as hypoglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidemic agents.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Alaa A-M; El-Azab, Adel S; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Obaid, Abdulrahman M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; El-Subbagh, Hussein I

    2011-09-01

    Certain new halogenated cyclic-imides related to N-substituted phthalimide moiety were synthesized. Spacers of one or two carbon atom distances were inserted to connect the N-terminus of the cyclic-imide nuclei to the used heteroaryl groups to evaluate the effect of such alteration on biological activity. The synthesized compounds were subjected to hypoglycaemic and anti-hyperlipidemic evaluation. Some of the tested compounds proved to be more potent than the reference drugs glibenclamide and clofibrate. Compound 5e remarkably reduced serum glucose level by 55%; while 5c, 5e, 7d and 8e reduced total serum cholesterol by 58, 56, 54 and 53%, respectively. Those new cyclic-imides could be considered as useful template for future development to obtain more potent hypoglycaemic and anti-hyperlipidemic agents. PMID:21783284

  8. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  9. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  10. Cardiopulmonary bypass model in the rat: a new minimal invasive model with a low flow volume†

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Guillaume; Tamion, Fabienne; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Doguet, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Numerous cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) models in the rat have already been described, but these models often have an important mortality and differ a lot from human clinical conditions thus making them hardly usable. The CPB model in the rat we describe allows a femoro-femoral support CPB with a low priming volume, minimal surgical approach and excellent peroperative survival. This CPB model in the rat allows evaluating extracorporeal circulation effects. PMID:22345055

  11. Animal models of neurological deficits: how relevant is the rat?

    PubMed

    Cenci, M Angela; Whishaw, Ian Q; Schallert, Timothy

    2002-07-01

    Animal models of neurological deficits are essential for the assessment of new therapeutic options. It has been suggested that rats are not as appropriate as primates for the symptomatic modelling of disease, but a large body of data argues against this view. Comparative analyses of movements in rats and primates show homology of many motor patterns across species. Advances have been made in identifying rat equivalents of akinesia, tremor, postural deficits and dyskinesia, which are relevant to Parkinson's disease. Rat models of hemiplegia, neglect and tactile extinction are useful in assessing the outcome of ischaemic or traumatic brain injury, and in monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions. Studies in rodents that emphasize careful behavioural analysis should continue to be developed as effective and inexpensive models that complement studies in primates. PMID:12094213

  12. Modeling Alzheimer's disease with non-transgenic rat models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), for which there is no cure, is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Despite tremendous efforts by the scientific community, the AD drug development pipeline remains extremely limited. Animal models of disease are a cornerstone of any drug development program and should be as relevant as possible to the disease, recapitulating the disease phenotype with high fidelity, to meaningfully contribute to the development of a successful therapeutic agent. Over the past two decades, transgenic models of AD based on the known genetic origins of familial AD have significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of the disease. These models were extensively used in AD drug development. The numerous reported failures of new treatments for AD in clinical trials indicate that the use of genetic models of AD may not represent the complete picture of AD in humans and that other types of animal models relevant to the sporadic form of the disease, which represents 95% of AD cases, should be developed. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of non-transgenic rat models of AD and how these models may open new avenues for drug development. PMID:23634826

  13. The Carbohydrate Sensitive Rat as a Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Nachiket A.; Chaumontet, Catherine; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Piedcoq, Julien; Fromentin, Gilles; Tomé, Daniel; Even, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sensitivity to obesity is highly variable in humans, and rats fed a high fat diet (HFD) are used as a model of this inhomogeneity. Energy expenditure components (basal metabolism, thermic effect of feeding, activity) and variations in substrate partitioning are possible factors underlying the variability. Unfortunately, in rats as in humans, results have often been inconclusive and measurements usually made after obesity onset, obscuring if metabolism was a cause or consequence. Additionally, the role of high carbohydrate diet (HCD) has seldom been studied. Methodology/Findings Rats (n=24) were fed for 3 weeks on HCD and then 3 weeks on HFD. Body composition was tracked by MRI and compared to energy expenditure components measured prior to obesity. Results: 1) under HFD, as expected, by adiposity rats were variable enough to be separable into relatively fat resistant (FR) and sensitive (FS) groups, 2) under HCD, and again by adiposity, rats were also variable enough to be separable into carbohydrate resistant (CR) and sensitive (CS) groups, the normal body weight of CS rats hiding viscerally-biased fat accumulation, 3) HCD adiposity sensitivity was not related to that under HFD, and both HCD and HFD adiposity sensitivities were not related to energy expenditure components (BMR, TEF, activity cost), and 4) only carbohydrate to fat partitioning in response to an HCD test meal was related to HCD-induced adiposity. Conclusions/Significance The rat model of human obesity is based on substantial variance in adiposity gains under HFD (FR/FS model). Here, since we also found this phenomenon under HCD, where it was also linked to an identifiable metabolic difference, we should consider the existence of another model: the carbohydrate resistant (CR) or sensitive (CS) rat. This new model is potentially complementary to the FR/FS model due to relatively greater visceral fat accumulation on a low fat high carbohydrate diet. PMID:23935869

  14. Effect of curcumin on diabetic rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mingsan; Cheng, Bolin; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of curcumin on cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats the effects and features. intravenous injection alloxan diabetes model, to give alloxan first seven days the tail measured blood glucose value, the election successful model rats were fed with large, medium and small doses of curcumin suspension, Shenqijiangtang suspension and the same volume of saline, administered once daily. The first 10 days after administration 2h (fasting 12h) rat tail vein blood glucose values measured in the first 20 days after administration of 2h (fasting 12h), do cerebral ischemia surgery; rapid carotid artery blood after 30min rats were decapitated, blood serum, blood glucose and glycated serum protein levels; take part of the brain homogenates plus nine times the amount of normal saline, made 10 percent of brain homogenates. Another part of the brain tissue, in the light microscope observation of pathological tissue. Compared with model group, large, medium and small doses of curcumin can significantly lower blood sugar and glycated serum protein levels, significantly reduced brain homogenates lactic acid content and lactate dehydrogenase activity; large, medium-dose curcumin can significantly increase brain homogenates Na(+)-K(+)-ATP activity, dose curcumin can significantly improve brain homogenates Ca(+)-Mg(+)- ATP activity. Curcumin can reduce blood sugar in diabetic rat model of cerebral ischemia and improve brain energy metabolism, improve their brain tissue resistance to ischemia and hypoxia, cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats have a good drop the role of sugar and protect brain tissue. PMID:25631517

  15. Ciclamilast Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Shui-juan; Jin, Bo; Wu, Yujin; Yang, Xin-fu; Yu, Bing; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a novel and selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, ciclamilast, on chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and acute inflammation in the rat and mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis. Our results showed that daily oral administration of ciclamilast at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the increase in hind paw volume of rats with AIA. The inhibition of paw edema was associated with inhibition of both the production of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and cell infiltration assessed in subcutaneous paw tissue. Moreover, there was significantly less tissue destruction in the ciclamilast-treated rats compared to the vehicle-treated rats, as assessed by radiographic analysis and histopathological evaluation. In the two acute inflammation models, ciclamilast inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and inflammatory cell migration into the peritoneal cavity in mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results not only suggest that ciclamilast, as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), can attenuate RA but also provide proof of principle that a PDE4 inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26000303

  16. ANIMAL MODELS OF DYSTONIA: LESSONS FROM A MUTANT RAT

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a motor sign characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which produce abnormal postures. Genetic factors contribute significantly to primary dystonia. In comparison, secondary dystonia can be caused by a wide variety of metabolic, structural, infectious, toxic and inflammatory insults to the nervous system. Although classically ascribed to dysfunction of the basal ganglia, studies of diverse animal models have pointed out that dystonia is a network disorder with important contributions from abnormal olivocerebellar signaling. In particular, work with the dystonic (dt) rat has engendered dramatic paradigm shifts in dystonia research. The dt rat manifests generalized dystonia caused by deficiency of the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies have shown that defects at the climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in the dt rat lead to abnormal bursting firing patterns in the cerebellar nuclei, which increases linearly with postnatal age. In a general sense, the dt rat has shown the scientific and clinical communities that dystonia can arise from dysfunctional cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, work with the dt rat has provided evidence that dystonia (1) is a neurodevelopmental network disorder and (2) can be driven by abnormal cerebellar output. In large part, work with other animal models has expanded upon studies in the dt rat and shown that primary dystonia is a multi-nodal network disorder associated with defective sensorimotor integration. In addition, experiments in genetically-engineered models have been used to examine the underlying cellular pathologies that drive primary dystonia. PMID:21081162

  17. Novel rat model for neurocysticercosis using Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Manuela R; Mejia, Alan; Clark, Taryn; Gavidia, Cesar M; Mamani, Javier; Ccopa, Fredy; Angulo, Noelia; Chile, Nancy; Carmen, Rogger; Medina, Roxana; García, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infecting the central nervous system and is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and convulsive conditions worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of the disease and appropriate treatment is hindered by lack of cost-effective and physiologically similar animal models. We generated a novel rat neurocysticercosis model using intracranial infection with activated T. solium oncospheres. Holtzman rats were infected in two separate groups: the first group was inoculated extraparenchymally and the second intraparenchymally, with different doses of activated oncospheres. The groups were evaluated at three different ages. Histologic examination of the tissue surrounding T. solium cysticerci was performed. Results indicate that generally infected rats developed cysticerci in the brain tissue after 4 months, and the cysticerci were observed in the parenchymal, ventricle, or submeningeal brain tissue. The route of infection did not have a statistically significant effect on the proportion of rats that developed cysticerci, and there was no dependence on infection dose. However, rat age was crucial to the success of the infection. Epilepsy was observed in 9% of rats with neurocysticercosis. In histologic examination, a layer of collagen tissue, inflammatory infiltrate cells, perivascular infiltrate, angiogenesis, spongy change, and mass effect were observed in the tissue surrounding the cysts. This study presents a suitable animal model for the study of human neurocysticercosis. PMID:26216286

  18. Novel Rat Model for Neurocysticercosis Using Taenia solium

    PubMed Central

    Verastegui, Manuela R.; Mejia, Alan; Clark, Taryn; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Mamani, Javier; Ccopa, Fredy; Angulo, Noelia; Chile, Nancy; Carmen, Rogger; Medina, Roxana; García, Hector H.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infecting the central nervous system and is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and convulsive conditions worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of the disease and appropriate treatment is hindered by lack of cost-effective and physiologically similar animal models. We generated a novel rat neurocysticercosis model using intracranial infection with activated T. solium oncospheres. Holtzman rats were infected in two separate groups: the first group was inoculated extraparenchymally and the second intraparenchymally, with different doses of activated oncospheres. The groups were evaluated at three different ages. Histologic examination of the tissue surrounding T. solium cysticerci was performed. Results indicate that generally infected rats developed cysticerci in the brain tissue after 4 months, and the cysticerci were observed in the parenchymal, ventricle, or submeningeal brain tissue. The route of infection did not have a statistically significant effect on the proportion of rats that developed cysticerci, and there was no dependence on infection dose. However, rat age was crucial to the success of the infection. Epilepsy was observed in 9% of rats with neurocysticercosis. In histologic examination, a layer of collagen tissue, inflammatory infiltrate cells, perivascular infiltrate, angiogenesis, spongy change, and mass effect were observed in the tissue surrounding the cysts. This study presents a suitable animal model for the study of human neurocysticercosis. PMID:26216286

  19. Surgical Intervention to Rescue Hirschsprung Disease in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Stamp, Lincon A; Obermayr, Florian; Pontell, Louise; Young, Heather M; Xie, Dan; Croaker, David H; Song, Zan-Min; Furness, John B

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Rats with a spontaneous null mutation in endothelin receptor type B or Ednrb (sl/sl; spotting lethal) lack enteric neurons in the distal bowel and usually die within the first week after birth. This early postnatal lethality limits their use for examining the potential of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease, and for studies of the influence of EDNRB on the mature CNS and vascular systems. Methods We have developed a surgical intervention to prolong the life of the spotting lethal sl/sl rat, in which we perform a colostomy on postnatal (P) day 4–6 rats to avoid the fatal obstruction caused by the lack of colonic enteric neurons. Results The stomas remained patent and functional and the rats matured normally following surgery. Weight gains were comparable between control and Hirschsprung phenotype (sl/sl) rats, which were followed until 4 weeks after surgery (5 weeks old). We confirmed the absence of enteric neurons in the distal colon of rats whose lives were saved by the surgical intervention. Conclusions This study provides a novel approach for studying EDNRB signalling in multiple organ systems in mature rats, including an animal model to study the efficacy of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease. PMID:26424040

  20. Hypolipidemic Effects of Alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis in Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Hamsters.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Kou, Shuming; Zou, Zongyao; Hu, Yinran; Feng, Min; Han, Bing; Li, Xuegang; Ye, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic activity of five major alkaloids in Rhizoma Coptidis using high-fat- and high-cholesterol-induced hyperlipidemic hamsters. Hyperlipidemic hamsters were treated with coptisine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, epiberberine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids with a dose of 46.7 mg/kg × day for 140 days. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids were examined after alkaloid treatment. The results showed that all therapy agents prevented body weight gain, reduced the serum total cholesterol, and increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol of hamsters. Berberine, jatrorrhizine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids decreased the triglyceride level in hyperlipidemic hamsters, while coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids significantly suppressed the elevation of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. The fecal excretion of bile acids was significantly elevated by berberine, coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids, and orlistat. Notably, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids possess a much stronger lipid-lowering effect than the pure Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids could retard the synthesis of cholesterol by downregulating the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and accelerate the clearance of lipids by upregulating the low-density lipoprotein receptor, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and uncoupling protein-2 expression. These findings highlight the critical role of Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids in hyperlipidemia treatment. Thus, they need to be considered in future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26848702

  1. Fat Preference: a novel model of eating behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Kasper, James M; Johnson, Sarah B; Hommel, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing problem in the United States of America, with more than a third of the population classified as obese. One factor contributing to this multifactorial disorder is the consumption of a high fat diet, a behavior that has been shown to increase both caloric intake and body fat content. However, the elements regulating preference for high fat food over other foods remain understudied. To overcome this deficit, a model to quickly and easily test changes in the preference for dietary fat was developed. The Fat Preference model presents rats with a series of choices between foods with differing fat content. Like humans, rats have a natural bias toward consuming high fat food, making the rat model ideal for translational studies. Changes in preference can be ascribed to the effect of either genetic differences or pharmacological interventions. This model allows for the exploration of determinates of fat preference and screening pharmacotherapeutic agents that influence acquisition of obesity. PMID:24998978

  2. A novel rat model for chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Wikramanayake, T. C.; Amini, S.; Simon, J.; Mauro, L. M.; Elgart, G.; Schachner, L. A.; Jimenez, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background More than half of all people diagnosed with cancer receive chemotherapy, and approximately 65% of these develop chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), a side-effect that can have considerable negative psychological repercussions. Currently, there are very few animal models available to study the mechanism and prevention of CIA. Aim To develop a clinically relevant adult rat model for CIA. Methods We first tested whether neonatal pigmented Long–Evans (LE) rats developed alopecia in response to the chemotherapeutic agents etoposide and cyclophosphamide. We then determined whether the rats developed CIA as adults. In the latter experiment, rat dorsal hair was clipped during the early telogen stage to synchronize the hair cycle. and starting 15 days later, the rats were treated with etoposide for 3 days. Results Neonatal LE pups developed CIA in response to etoposide and cyclophosphamide, similar to other murine models for CIA. Clipping of the hair shaft during early telogen resulted in synchronized anagen induction and subsequent alopecia after etoposide treatment in the clipped areas only. Hair follicles in the clipped areas had the typical chemotherapy-induced follicular dystrophy (dystrophic catagen). When the hair in the pigmented alopecic areas regrew, it had normal pigmentation. Conclusions A novel, pigmented adult rat model has been established for CIA. By hair shaft clipping during early telogen, synchronized anagen entry was induced that resulted in alopecia in response to chemotherapy. This is the first clinically relevant adult rat model for CIA and will be a useful tool to test agents for the prevention and treatment of CIA. PMID:22409523

  3. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinxiu; Cheng, Henry; Atti, Elisa; Shih, Diana M.; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  4. The isolated working heart model in infarcted rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Itter, G; Jung, W; Schoelkens, B A; Linz, W

    2005-04-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is one of the most common causes of death in western countries. The aim of this study was to establish and validate the working heart model in rat hearts with CHF. In the rat model the animals show parameters and symptoms that can be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure. The focus of attention was the evaluation of cardiodynamics (e.g.contractility) in the isolated 'working heart' model. The geometric properties of the left ventricle were measured by planimetry (stereology). Formulae available in the past for determining certain parameters in the working heart model (e.g.external heart work) have to be fitted to the circumstances of the infarcted rat hearts with its different organ properties.CHF was induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY/NHsd) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR/NHsd) by creating a permanent (8 week) occlusion of the left coronary artery, 2 mm distal to the origin from the aorta, by a modified technique (Itter et al. 2004). This resulted in a large infarction of the free left ventricular wall. We were able to establish and adapt a new and predictive working heart model in spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts with myocardial infarction (MI) 8-12 weeks after coronary artery ligation. At this stage the WKY rat did not show any symptoms of CHF. The SHR rat represented characteristic parameters and symptoms that could be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure (NYHA III-IV). Upon inspection, severe clinical symptoms of CHF such as dyspnoea, subcutaneous oedema, palebluish limbs and impaired motion were prominent. On necropsy the SHR showed lung oedema, hydrothorax, large dilated left and right ventricular chambers and hypertrophy of the septum. In the working heart model the infarcted animals showed reduced heart power, diminished contractility and enhanced heart work, much more so in the SHR/NHsd than in the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY/NHsd). The

  5. Detection of visual signals by rats: A computational model

    EPA Science Inventory

    We applied a neural network model of classical conditioning proposed by Schmajuk, Lam, and Gray (1996) to visual signal detection and discrimination tasks designed to assess sustained attention in rats (Bushnell, 1999). The model describes the animals’ expectation of receiving fo...

  6. Modeling Hypercalciuria in the Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-Forming Rat

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Kevin K.; Krieger, Nancy S.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review In this review we discuss how the Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-Forming (GHS) rats, which closely model idiopathic hypercalciuria and stone formation in humans, provide insights into the pathophysiology and consequences of clinical hypercalciuria. Recent Findings Hypercalciuria in the GHS rats is due to a systemic dysregulation of calcium transport, as manifest by increased intestinal calcium absorption, increased bone resorption and decreased renal tubule calcium reabsorption. Increased levels of vitamin D receptor in intestine, bone and kidney appear to mediate these changes. The excess receptors are biologically active and increase tissue sensitivity to exogenous vitamin D. Bones of GHS rats have decreased bone mineral density (BMD) as compared with Sprague Dawley rats, and exogenous 1,25(OH)2D3 exacerbates the loss of BMD. Thiazide diuretics improve the BMD in GHS rats. Summary Studying GHS rats allows direct investigation of the effects of alterations in diet and utilization of pharmacologic therapy on hypercalciuria, urine supersaturation, stone formation and bone quality in ways that are not possible in humans. PMID:26050120

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  8. Combined effects of aerobic exercise and omega-3 fatty acids in hyperlipidemic persons.

    PubMed

    Warner, J G; Ullrich, I H; Albrink, M J; Yeater, R A

    1989-10-01

    Because both aerobic exercise and fish oil ingestion have been shown to decrease plasma lipids, we examined the effects of combining these modalities in hyperlipidemic subjects. Thirty-four subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups as follows: fish oil and exercise (FE), N = 7, 50 ml of oil daily and 3 d.wk-1 of aerobic exercise; fish oil (F), N = 7, 50 ml of oil daily; corn oil (CN), N = 10, 50 ml of oil daily; and control (C), N = 10. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and at the end of 4, 8, and 12 wk. The FE and F groups showed significantly lower triglycerides with respect to treatment as compared to the CN and C groups. The FE, F, and CN groups exhibited lower total cholesterol values than the control group but were not different from each other. HDL cholesterol was significantly increased after treatment in the FE and F groups as compared to the CN and C groups. Serum apo-B, LDL cholesterol, and LDL protein decreased significantly in the FE group but not the F group from baseline to 12 wk. VO2max increased and percent fat decreased only in the FE group. In conclusion, aerobic exercise improved the effects of fish oil on LDL cholesterol and apo-B and improved fitness and body composition in hyperlipidemic subjects. PMID:2691812

  9. The Effect of Moderate Loss in Overweight and Obese Hyperlipidemic Women on Cholesterol Absorption, Synthesis and Turnover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The effect of weight loss in women on cholesterol metabolism and the relationship between cholesterol absorption, synthesis and turnover (CAST) has not been examined. Objective: It was hypothesized that significant weight loss in overweigh and obese, hyperlipidemic women would lead to ...

  10. A novel rat contact lens model for Fusarium keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Abou Shousha, Mohamed; Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Oechsler, Rafael A.; Iovieno, Alfonso; Maestre-Mesa, Jorge; Ruggeri, Marco; Echegaray, Jose J.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Perez, Victor L.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a new contact lens–associated fungal keratitis rat model and to assess the ability of non-invasive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to detect pathological changes in vivo in fungal keratitis. Methods We used SD-OCT to image and measure the cornea of Sprague Dawley rats. Fusarium infection was initiated in the rat eye by fitting Fusarium solani–soaked contact lenses on the experimental eye, while the control animals received contact lenses soaked in sterile saline. The fungal infection was monitored with periodic slit-lamp examination and in vivo SD-OCT imaging of the rat eye, and confirmed by histology, counting of viable fungi in the infected rat cornea, and PCR with specific primers for Fusarium sp. Results We imaged and measured the rat cornea with SD-OCT. Custom-made contact lenses were developed based on the OCT measurements. Incubation of contact lenses in a F. solani suspension resulted in biofilm formation. We induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis by fitting the rat eyes for 4 h with the Fusarium-contaminated contact lenses. The SD-OCT images of the cornea correlated well with the slit-lamp and histopathological results and clearly defined clinical signs of infection, namely, increased corneal thickening, loss of epithelial continuity, hyper-reflective areas representing infiltrates, and endothelial plaques characteristic of fungal infection. Moreover, in three cases, SD-OCT detected the infection without any clear findings on slit-lamp examination. Infection was confirmed with histological fungal staining, PCR, and microbiological culture positivity. Conclusions We developed a highly reproducible rat contact lens model and successfully induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in this model. The clinical presentation of contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in the rat model is similar to the human condition. SD-OCT is a valuable tool that

  11. Bacterial translocation in the rat model of lectin induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shoda, R; Mahalanabis, D; Wahed, M A; Albert, M J

    1995-03-01

    Red kidney beans were fed to weanling Long-Evans rats to cause diarrhoea (mean (SD) faecal wet weight: 2.66 (0.73) g/day in six rats fed beans v 1.12 (0.47) g/day in six control rats, p < 0.01) and increased faecal energy loss (4.87 (0.41) v 2.14 (0.23) kcal/day, p < 0.01). In addition, the rats fed beans had heavier small intestines (80.6 (4.6) v 51.9 (8.4) g/kg body weight, p < 0.01), heavier mesenteric lymph nodes (0.72 (0.27) v 0.08 (0.08) g/kg body weight, p < 0.05), and translocation of indigenous intestinal bacteria, Citrobacter Spp and Escherichia coli, to the mesenteric lymph nodes. (Translocation positive, that is, > 100 colonies per g of nodal tissue: 75% v 0%, p < 0.005.) These data suggest that diarrhoea induced by red kidney beans is a suitable model for studies of an important cause of persistent diarrhoea--that is, systemic complications. This rat model of lectin induced diarrhoea with translocation of intraluminal enteric bacteria into mesenteric lymph nodes should be useful in understanding the well known septicaemic complications associated with prolonged diarrhoea in infants and small children and in studies on factors that may modify or prevent bacterial translocation. PMID:7698696

  12. Calcium Balance in A Rat Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, M.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of calcium (Ca) metabolism during space flight and the human bed rest model for microgravity is negative Ca balance, attributed, to an increase in urinary Ca excretion and depressed intestinal Ca absorption. No differences or less positive Ca balances are reported after skeletal unloading in similar studies in weaning or juvenile rats. To determine Ca balances and evaluate the Ca endocrine system in mature rats exposed to a space flight model which unloaded the hind limbs by tail suspension, we modified the cage to quantify dietary, fecal and urinary Ca. Five 2-5 d balance periods in 8 loaded (C) and 8 unloaded (S) rats were compared during a 4 week study in 6 month old 490 g male rats. The first period revealed negative balances of -16+/-3 and -14+/-5 mg/d which reflected adaptation to the cages, the change in diet from Purina to AIN 76 and weight loss in both C and S. Average Ca balances in rats fed 0.1% Ca and 0.3% phosphorus (Pi) diets, remained negative in S and were less than C after 6 -10 d (-2.9 vs 0.12 mg/d, p<.05) but not thereafter. In spite of eating 10% more food than C, initial weight loss, restored in C, was never recovered in S. Fecal excretion exceeded dietary intake by -3.7% in S and reflected absorption and retention of 8.4% dietary Ca in C. Urinary Ca was the same fraction of dietary intake in S and C (9.0 vs 8.6%, NS). Serum Ca, Pi, parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were the same in both groups after 28 days. In contrast to the human, a major determinant of negative Ca balance in the mature rat exposed to a space flight model appears to be losses from gastrointestinal Ca secretion, rather than urinary Ca excretion.

  13. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  14. [Effects of buyang huan wu decoction on rat hyperlipemia model].

    PubMed

    Bian, H; Zhou, J

    1995-11-01

    Buyang Huan Wu Decoction can obviously lower the blood-lipid in rat hyperlipemia model, as well as drop the cholesterol in the aortic wall. Moreover, the decoction can drop the rising specific viscosity of blood and plasma, raise SOD and lower LPO in the blood. PMID:8737474

  15. The mathematical whisker: A review of numerical models of the rat׳s vibrissa biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lucianna, Facundo Adrián; Albarracín, Ana Lía; Vrech, Sonia Mariel; Farfán, Fernando Daniel; Felice, Carmelo José

    2016-07-01

    The vibrissal system of the rat refers to specialized hairs the animal uses for tactile sensory perception. Rats actively move their whiskers in a characteristic way called "whisking". Interaction with the environment produces elastic deformation of the whiskers, generating mechanical signals in the whisker-follicle complex. Advances in our understanding of the vibrissal complex biomechanics is of interest not only for the biological research field, but also for biomimetic approaches. The recent development of whisker numerical models has contributed to comprehending its sophisticated movements and its interactions with the follicle. The great diversity of behavioral patterns and complexities of the whisker-follicle ensemble encouraged the creation of many different biomechanical models. This review analyzes most of the whisker biomechanical models that have been developed so far. This review was written so as to render it accessible to readers coming from different research areas. PMID:27260019

  16. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Kuijk, Ewart W.; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah−/− Il2rg−/− rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat. PMID:26915950

  17. A new rat model for studies of hypokinesia and antiorthostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Deavers, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A new rat model (suspension and immobilization) is described for induction of hypokinesia and orthostatic manipulations. Hypokinetic responses were comparable to those in prolonged bed rest and weightlessness in humans, body or limb casted and small cage restrained animals. Responses to antiorthostasis (15 to 20 deg head down tilt) in rats were similar to those in neutral bouyancy tests in humans and animals and to those in prolonged bed rest in humans. During seven days of hypokinesia there was an atrophy of the gastrocnemius and increased excretion of urinary nitrogeneous end products. The antiorthostatic (AOH) 15 to 20 deg head down tilt resulted in diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis. No comparable responses were observed in orthostatic hypokinetic (OH) rats. Readaptation from AOH and OH occurred during one week recovery in metabolic cage conditions.

  18. Comparison of starvation and elastase models of emphysema in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Mauderly, J.L.; Gregory, R.E.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Starvation and elastase-induced changes in rat lung structure, biochemistry, and function were compared as models of human pulmonary emphysema. Ten-week-old male rats were instilled intratracheally with either porcine pancreatic elastase in saline (E) or with saline alone. A group of the saline-instilled rats were fed one third of their normal food intake until a 45% loss of body weight occurred (S). The remaining saline-instilled rats served as control animals (C). Post-treatment evaluations included in vivo respiratory function, lung histopathologic and morphometric analyses, lung tissue proteinolytic activity, and lung collagen. The E rats had in vivo respiratory function changes more similar to human emphysema than those of S rats. All lung volume subdivisions were decreased in S rats and increased in E rats. The volume-pressure curve of S rats was shifted to the right of the C curve, whereas that of E rats was shifted to the left. Forced expiratory flow rates of E rats were decreased at all lung volumes, but those of S rats were not. Both E and S rats had larger terminal air spaces and less alveolar surface area than did C rats. The S rats had more collagen per gram lung and higher proteinolytic activity than did C or E rats. These results show that, although starvation induces some changes characteristic of human emphysema, elastase-treatment provides a model more similar to the human disease. 44 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Rat model of Achilles tendon disorder. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Messner, K; Wei, Y; Andersson, B; Gillquist, J; Räsänen, T

    1999-01-01

    Three-month-old male rats were subjected 3 times weekly for 1 h to eccentric exercise of one triceps surae muscle (30 stimulations/min) under general anesthesia in order to induce Achilles tendon disorder corresponding to paratenonitis and tendinosis in man. Net muscle work during the sessions ranged between 0.67 and 4.37 mJ (mean 1.72, SD 0.77). After 9 and 13 sessions, respectively, 2 rats started to show gait alterations during the functional test which was performed 2-3 times weekly. These rats were killed after additional sessions which showed a worsening of the limp. The other trained rats and controls did not limp and were killed after 7-11 weeks. Histologic evaluation of the Achilles tendons from the exercised limb showed in the majority of the cases hypervascularization, increased number of nerve filaments and increased immunoreactivity for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. The tendons from the nonstimulated limb looked normal. The distribution of collagen types I and II appeared normal in the tendon and its insertion to the calcaneus. Inflammation of the epi- and paratenon could be provoked in the rat, but tendon changes corresponding to chronic tendinosis did not develop within 11 weeks with the used training regime. The clinical relevance of this model for chronic tendon disease needs to be evaluated further. PMID:10460971

  20. Experimental model of heterotopic ossification in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.; Moser, A.D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues adjacent to large joints, resulting in joint mobility deficit. In order to determine which treatment techniques are more appropriate for such condition, experimental models of induced heterotopic bone formation have been proposed using heterologous demineralized bone matrix implants and bone morphogenetic protein and other tissues. The objective of the present experimental study was to identify a reliable protocol to induce HO in Wistar rats, based on autologous bone marrow (BM) implantation, comparing 3 different BM volumes and based on literature evidence of this HO induction model in larger laboratory animals. Twelve male Wistar albino rats weighing 350/390 g were used. The animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction in order to quantify serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP). HO was induced by BM implantation in both quadriceps muscles of these animals, experimental group (EG). Thirty-five days after the induction, another blood sample was collected for ALP determination. The results showed a weight gain in the EG and no significant difference in ALP levels when comparing the periods before and after induction. Qualitative histological analysis confirmed the occurrence of heterotopic ossification in all 12 EG rats. In conclusion, the HO induction model was effective when 0.35 mL autologous BM was applied to the quadriceps of Wistar rats. PMID:22473322

  1. Pentamidine-induced dysglycaemia: experimental models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Assan, R; Assan, D; Delaby, J; Debussche, X; Toublanc, M

    1993-01-01

    In order to analyse further the pathophysiology of pentamidine effects on blood glucose regulation, the following experimental models were established in rats: impairment of the renal function, bile duct ligation, inhibition of the P450 cytochrome enzyme system. In otherwise intact rats, 7.5 mg/day pentamidine was well tolerated whereas doses of 15 mg/day induced severe, relapsing and eventually lethal hypoglycaemia within a few days. Induction of a renal insufficiency of graded severity by treatment with gentamycin, subtotal nephrectomy and total bilateral nephrectomy resulted in repetitive, severe (sometimes lethal) hypoglycaemia, alternating with hyperglycaemia, glucosuria and ketonuria in pentamidine-treated rats (7.5 mg/d). No long-standing insulin-dependent diabetes was observed. In the dysglycemic animals, plasma insulin levels were inappropriate to the concomitant glycaemia; no stimulation was obtained by i.v. glucose. Glucagon levels were higher than normal, suppressible by i.v. glucose, responsive to IV arginine and to hypoglycaemia. Dysglycemic events were more frequent and marked in the rats with the most severe renal functional derangement. They were more frequent in the rats treated with pentamidine mesylate than in those treated with the isethionate salt. Control uremic rats (free of pentamidine) remained euglycaemic. The islets of Langerhans displayed severe vascular congestion and degranulation and necrosis of the B cells, while the non B cells (and particularly the A cells) were intact. Exocrine pancreatitis was occasionally observed in the most severely uremic rats. In contrast with uremic rats, neither surgical ligation of choledocus, nor treatment by P450 cytochrome inhibitors (particularly ketoconazole) precipitated dysglycaemia in the pentamidine-treated rats. These experimental data: 1) strengthen the concept of inappropriate insulin release from pentamidine-lesioned islet B cells due to pentamidine accumulation; 2) indicate a predominant

  2. Attenuation of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by aqueous extract of seed of Tamarindus indica.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Rajkumar; Das, Uttam Kumar; Ghosh, Debidas

    2005-07-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were divided into mild diabetic (MD) and severe diabetic (SD) on the basis of fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels. Diabetes was confirmed here by intravenous glucose tolerance test (GTT), biochemical assay of glycogen content in liver and skeletal muscle, glucose-6-phosphatase activity in liver, and serum insulin levels. Hyperlipidemia developed in these experimental diabetic rats was assessed by quantification of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) and triglyceride (TG) in serum. Aqueous extract of seed of Tamarindus indica was given to MD and SD rats at the dose of 80 mg and 120 mg/0.5 ml distilled water/100 g body weight/d respectively for 14 d. Significant attenuation of hyperglycemia was indicated by measuring FBG, glycogen level and glucose-6-phosphatase activity along with monitoring of intravenous GTT and serum insulin level. Similarly, correction of hyperlipidemia in diabetic rats after this extract supplementation was confirmed by significant reduction in the levels of above-mentioned hyperlipidemic indicators. Intravenous GTT was performed that highlights the antidiabetic action of this extract is not due to its effect on the intestinal rate of glucose absorption but may be due to modulation of intracellular glucose utilization in target organs. This study focus the efficacy of this extract for the management of experimental diabetes in rat model which may shed some light on the scientific basis of ancient herbal therapy in this line using this seed. PMID:15997092

  3. The rat as an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Kloskowska, Ewa; Winblad, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    As a disease model, the laboratory rat has contributed enormously to neuroscience research over the years. It has also been a popular animal model for Alzheimer’s disease but its popularity has diminished during the last decade, as techniques for genetic manipulation in rats have lagged behind that of mice. In recent years, the rat has been making a comeback as an Alzheimer’s disease model and the appearance of increasing numbers of transgenic rats will be a welcome and valuable complement to the existing mouse models. This review summarizes the contributions and current status of the rat as an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19432812

  4. Emphysema model in rats treated intratracheally with elastase

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, E.; Nambu, Z.; Uchiyama, I.; Kyono, H.

    1987-04-01

    Pulmonary functions, morphology, and morphometry were examined in rats at 3, 7, and 10 weeks after a single intratracheal administration of 6.5 units of porcine pancreatic elastase in order to obtain a model of pulmonary emphysema which would be suitable for studying the responses of emphysematous lungs to atmospheric pollutants. Functional residual capacity and residual volume of the elastase-treated rats increased at all the times studied, but their total lung capacity increased only at 7 and 10 weeks compared with those of the saline-treated control rats. The increase in static lung compliance and the decrease in peak flow and maximum flow at 50% of total lung capacity during forced expiration were also observed in all except the 3-week elastase animals. The elastase-treated lungs showed morphological changes characteristic of emphysematous lesions. The increase in mean linear intercept length and the decrease in total alveolar surface area were demonstrated by these elastase-treated lungs. Based on these results, they conclude that an adequate and suitable model of pulmonary emphysemia could be obtained in rats 7-10 weeks after treatment with the present dose of elastase.

  5. Validation of the rat model of cryptogenic infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    Chachua, Tamar; Yum, Mi-Sun; Velíšková, Jana; Velíšek, Libor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a new model of cryptogenic infantile spasms consisting of prenatal priming with betamethasone and postnatal trigger of spasms by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid responds to chronic ACTH treatment, and has similar EEG signature, efficacy of treatments, and behavioral impairments as human infantile spasms. Methods Rats prenatally primed with betamethasone on gestational day 15 were used. Spasms were triggered with N-methyl-D-aspartic acid between postnatal days (P) 10-15 in a single session or in multiple sessions in one subject. The expression of spasms was compared to prenatally saline-injected controls. Effects of relevant treatments (ACTH, vigabatrin, methylprednisolone, rapamycin) were determined in betamethasone-primed rats. In the rats after spasms, behavioral evaluation was performed in the open field and and elevated plus maze on P20-22. Key Findings NMDA at P10-15 (the rat “infant” period) triggers the spasms significantly earlier and in greater numbers in the prenatal betamethasone-exposed brain compared to controls. Similar to human condition, the spasms occur in clusters. Repeated trigger of spasms is associated with ictal EEG electrodecrements and interictal large-amplitude waves, a possible rat variant of hypsarrhythmia. Chronic ACTH treatment in a randomized experiment, and chronic pretreatment with methylprednisolone significantly suppress number of spasms similar to human condition. Pretreatment with vigabatrin, but not rapamycin, suppressed the spasms. Significant behavioral changes occurred following multiple bouts of spasms. Significance The model of infantile spasms has remarkable similarities with the human condition in semiology, EEG, pharmacological response, and long-term outcome. Thus, the model can be used for search of novel and more effective treatments for infantile spasms. PMID:21854372

  6. Particulate matter inhalation exacerbates cardiopulmonary injury in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure is linked to cardiovascular events and death, especially among individuals with heart disease. A model of toxic cardiomyopathy was developed in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats to explore potential mechanisms. Rats were...

  7. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    In experimental musculoskeletal oncology, there remains a need for animal models that can be used to assess the efficacy of new and innovative treatment methodologies for bone tumors. Rat plays a very important role in the bone field especially in the evaluation of metabolic bone diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a rat osteosarcoma model for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatment for extremity sarcoma. One hundred male SD rats weighing 125.45+/-8.19 g were divided into 5 groups and anesthetized intraperitoneally with 10% chloral hydrate. Orthotopic implantation models of rat osteosarcoma were performed by injecting directly into the SD rat femur with a needle for inoculation with SD tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, 2x10(5) to 1x10(6) UMR106 cells in 50 microl were injected intraosseously into median or distal part of the femoral shaft and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from ultrasound with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. In the third stage, the orthotopically implanted tumors and lung nodules were resected entirely, sectioned, and then counter stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic evaluation. The tumor take rate was 100% for implants with 8x10(5) tumor cells or more, which was much less than the amount required for subcutaneous implantation, with a high lung metastasis rate of 93.0%. Ultrasound and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.942; p<0.01), which demonstrated that Doppler ultrasonography is a convenient and reliable technique for measuring cancer at any stage. Tumor growth curve showed that orthotopically implanted tumors expanded vigorously with time-lapse, especially in the first 3 weeks. The median time of survival was 38 days and surgical mortality was 0%. The UMR106 cell line has strong carcinogenic capability and high lung metastasis frequency. The present rat

  8. A New Rat Model for Orthotopic Abdominal Wall Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lao, William W.; Wang, Yen-Ling; Ramirez, Alejandro E.; Cheng, Hui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall, one of the most commonly transplanted composite tissues, is less researched and lacking animal models. Its clinical necessities were emphasized in multiple case series to reconstruct large abdominal defects. Previous animal models have only studied components of the abdominal wall transplant. We describe findings from a new model that more likely reflect clinical transplantation. Methods: Full-thickness hemiabdominal wall flap was procured from Brown Norway (BN) rats and transplanted to an orthotopic defect on Lewis rats. Three groups were studied: group 1: Lewis to Lewis syngeneic; group 2: BN to Lewis control; and group 3: BN to Lewis with postoperative cyclosporine. Vascular imaging and cross vessel section were performed along with full-thickness abdominal wall. Immune cell profiling with flow cytometry at different time points was studied in all groups. Results: Syngeneic group had no rejection. Control group consistently showed rejection around postoperative day 6. With cyclosporine treatment, however, transplant and recipient tissue integration was observed. Flow cytometry revealed that innate immunity is responsible for the initial inflammatory events following abdominal wall engraftment. Adaptive immunity cells, specifically interferon-γ-producing T helper (Th) 1 and interleukin-17-producing Th17 cells, dramatically and positively correlate with rejection progression of abdominal wall transplants. Conclusions: Technical, histological, and immunological aspects of a new rat model are described. These results give clues to what occurs in human abdominal wall transplantation. In addition, Th1, a proinflammatory cell, was found to be a potential biomarker for allograft rejection. PMID:25289329

  9. Fat Preference: A Novel Model of Eating Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, James M; Johnson, Sarah B; Hommel, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a growing problem in the United States of America, with more than a third of the population classified as obese. One factor contributing to this multifactorial disorder is the consumption of a high-fat diet, a behavior that has been shown to increase both caloric intake and body fat content. However, the elements regulating preference for high-fat food over other foods remain understudied. To overcome this deficit, a model to quickly and easily test changes in the preference for dietary fat was developed. The Fat Preference model presents rats with a series of choices between foods with differing fat content. Like humans, rats have a natural bias toward consuming high-fat food, making the rat model ideal for translational studies. Changes in preference can be ascribed to the effect of either genetic differences or pharmacological interventions. This model allows for the exploration of determinates of fat preference and screening pharmacotherapeutic agents that influence acquisition of obesity. PMID:24998978

  10. Creation of Consistent Burn Wounds: A Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Ang, Chuan Han; Raju, Ashvin; Tan, Kong Bing; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Loo, Yihua; Wong, Yong Chiat; Lee, Hanjing; Lim, Jane; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Hauser, Charlotte AE

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn infliction techniques are poorly described in rat models. An accurate study can only be achieved with wounds that are uniform in size and depth. We describe a simple reproducible method for creating consistent burn wounds in rats. Methods Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and dorsum shaved. A 100 g cylindrical stainless-steel rod (1 cm diameter) was heated to 100℃ in boiling water. Temperature was monitored using a thermocouple. We performed two consecutive toe-pinch tests on different limbs to assess the depth of sedation. Burn infliction was limited to the loin. The skin was pulled upwards, away from the underlying viscera, creating a flat surface. The rod rested on its own weight for 5, 10, and 20 seconds at three different sites on each rat. Wounds were evaluated for size, morphology and depth. Results Average wound size was 0.9957 cm2 (standard deviation [SD] 0.1845) (n=30). Wounds created with duration of 5 seconds were pale, with an indistinct margin of erythema. Wounds of 10 and 20 seconds were well-defined, uniformly brown with a rim of erythema. Average depths of tissue damage were 1.30 mm (SD 0.424), 2.35 mm (SD 0.071), and 2.60 mm (SD 0.283) for duration of 5, 10, 20 seconds respectively. Burn duration of 5 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage. Burn duration of 10 seconds and 20 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage, involving subjacent skeletal muscle. Conclusions This is a simple reproducible method for creating burn wounds consistent in size and depth in a rat burn model. PMID:25075351

  11. Numerical modeling of odorant uptake in the rat nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Geoffrey C; Scherer, Peter W; Zhao, Kai; Mozell, Maxwell M

    2007-03-01

    An anatomically accurate 3-dimensional numerical model of the right rat nasal cavity was developed and used to compute low, medium, and high flow rate inspiratory and expiratory mucosal odorant uptake (imposed patterning) for 3 odorants with different mucus solubilities. The computed surface mass flux distributions were compared with anatomic receptor gene expression zones identified in the literature. In general, simulations predicted that odorants that were highly soluble in mucus were absorbed dorsally and medially, corresponding roughly to receptors from one of the gene expression zones. Insoluble odorants tended to be absorbed more peripherally in the rat olfactory region corresponding to the other 2 zones. These findings also agreed in general with the electroolfactogram measurements and the voltage-sensitive dye measurements reported in the literature. This numerical approach is the first to predict detailed odorant flux information across the olfactory mucosa in the rat nasal cavity during inspiratory and expiratory flow and to relate it to anatomic olfactory receptor location, physiological function, and biochemical experiment. This numerical technique can allow us to separate the contributions of imposed and inherent patterning mechanisms on the rat olfactory mucosa. PMID:17220517

  12. A simple and stable galactosemic cataract model for rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lixia; Li, Caina; Shen, Ning; Huan, Yi; Liu, Quan; Liu, Shuainan; Shen, Zhufang

    2015-01-01

    Rat galactosemic cataract is commonly used in the investigation of sugar cataract. In current study, 21-day sprague-dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into two groups (n=42), which were fed by normal water and galactose solution (12.5%-10%) for 18 days respectively. Every 3 days, lens opacity was observed by a slit lamp, and 6 rats of each group were executed for the analysis of aldose reductase (AR) activity, galactitol level and AR mRNA expression. Morphological results showed that small vacuoles initially appeared in the equatorial area before the 6th day, then subsequently extended to the whole anterior capsule, and eventually developed to mature cataract on the 18th day. AR of galactosemic lenses was significantly activated in the first stage and then slowly dropped to the end accompanied by the related changes of galactitol. AR mRNA expression also was upregulated and reached the peak at the 6th day. This study appears to confirm that galactosemic cataract can be induced for 21-day SD rats by only drinking 12.5% to 10% galactose solution, and this model is simple, economical and stable as to meet the research needs. PMID:26550203

  13. Capsular Contracture In Silicone Breast Implants: Insights From Rat Models.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Vilberto J; D'Acampora, Armando; Neves, Fernanda S; Mendes, Paulo R; Vasconcellos, Zulmar A DE; Neves, Rodrigo D'Eça; Figueiredo, Claudia P

    2016-09-01

    Breast augmentation with silicone implants is one of the most common procedures performed by plastic surgeons around the world. Capsular contracture is a frequent complication in breast augmentation and reconstructive surgery, that requires invasive intervention. The inflammatory response to implanted mammary prostheses appears to be directly associated to capsular contracture. This review discusses the evidences from rat models studies, on the role of inflammation and fibrosis in capsular contraction and its relation to silicone breast implants surface. PMID:27627068

  14. Culture Model of Rat Portal Myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    El Mourabit, Haquima; Loeuillard, Emilien; Lemoinne, Sara; Cadoret, Axelle; Housset, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are matrix-producing cells with contractile properties, usually characterized by de novo expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, that arise in fibrotic diseases. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), known as perisinusoidal cells containing auto-fluorescent vitamin A, are the major although not exclusive source of myofibroblasts in the injured liver. Portal myofibroblasts (PMFs) have been defined as liver myofibroblasts derived from cells that are distinct from HSCs and located in the portal tract. Here, we describe the protocol we have established to obtain rat PMFs in culture. In this method, the biliary tree is (i) separated from the liver parenchyma by in situ enzymatic perfusion of the liver, (ii) minced and further digested in vitro, until bile duct segments are isolated by sequential filtration. Bile duct isolates free of HSC contaminants, form small cell clusters, which initially comprise a large majority of epithelial cells. In culture conditions (fetal bovine serum) that provide a growth advantage to mesenchymal cells over epithelial cells, the epithelial cells die and detach from the substrate, while spindle-shaped cells outgrow from the periphery of the cell clusters, as shown by video-microscopy. These cells are highly proliferative and after 4-5 days, the culture is composed exclusively of fully differentiated myofibroblasts, which express alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1, and secrete abundant collagen. We found no evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, i.e., no co-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin at any stage, while cytokeratin becomes undetectable in the confluent cells. PMFs obtained by this method express the genes that were previously reported to be overexpressed in non-HSC or portal fibroblast-derived liver myofibroblasts as compared to HSC-derived myofibroblasts, including the most discriminant, collagen 15, fibulin 2, and Thy-1. After one passage, PMFs retain the same phenotypic features as in

  15. Culture Model of Rat Portal Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    El Mourabit, Haquima; Loeuillard, Emilien; Lemoinne, Sara; Cadoret, Axelle; Housset, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are matrix-producing cells with contractile properties, usually characterized by de novo expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, that arise in fibrotic diseases. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), known as perisinusoidal cells containing auto-fluorescent vitamin A, are the major although not exclusive source of myofibroblasts in the injured liver. Portal myofibroblasts (PMFs) have been defined as liver myofibroblasts derived from cells that are distinct from HSCs and located in the portal tract. Here, we describe the protocol we have established to obtain rat PMFs in culture. In this method, the biliary tree is (i) separated from the liver parenchyma by in situ enzymatic perfusion of the liver, (ii) minced and further digested in vitro, until bile duct segments are isolated by sequential filtration. Bile duct isolates free of HSC contaminants, form small cell clusters, which initially comprise a large majority of epithelial cells. In culture conditions (fetal bovine serum) that provide a growth advantage to mesenchymal cells over epithelial cells, the epithelial cells die and detach from the substrate, while spindle-shaped cells outgrow from the periphery of the cell clusters, as shown by video-microscopy. These cells are highly proliferative and after 4–5 days, the culture is composed exclusively of fully differentiated myofibroblasts, which express alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1, and secrete abundant collagen. We found no evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, i.e., no co-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin at any stage, while cytokeratin becomes undetectable in the confluent cells. PMFs obtained by this method express the genes that were previously reported to be overexpressed in non-HSC or portal fibroblast-derived liver myofibroblasts as compared to HSC-derived myofibroblasts, including the most discriminant, collagen 15, fibulin 2, and Thy-1. After one passage, PMFs retain the same phenotypic features as in

  16. High-fat diet-induced obesity Rat model: a comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia; Meireles, Manuela; Norberto, Sónia; Leite, Joana; Freitas, Joana; Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past decades, obesity and associated metabolic complications have reached epidemic proportions. For the study of these pathologies, a number of animal models have been developed. However, a direct comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) Rat as models of high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity has not been adequately evaluated so far. Wistar and SD rats were assigned for 2 experimental groups for 17 weeks: standard (St) and high-fat (HF) diet groups. To assess some of the features of the metabolic syndrome, oral glucose tolerance tests, systolic blood pressure measurements and blood biochemical analysis were performed throughout the study. The gut microbiota composition of the animals of each group was evaluated at the end of the study by real-time PCR. HF diet increased weight gain, body fat mass, mesenteric adipocyte's size, adiponectin and leptin plasma levels and decreased oral glucose tolerance in both Wistar and SD rats. However, the majority of these effects were more pronounced or earlier detected in Wistar rats. The gut microbiota of SD rats was less abundant in Bacteroides and Prevotella but richer in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus comparatively to the gut microbiota of Wistar rats. Nevertheless, the modulation of the gut microbiota by HF diet was similar in both strains, except for Clostridium leptum that was only reduced in Wistar rats fed with HF diet. In conclusion, both Wistar and SD Rat can be used as models of HF diet-induced obesity although the metabolic effects caused by HF diet seemed to be more pronounced in Wistar Rat. Differences in the gut microbial ecology may account for the worsened metabolic scenario observed in Wistar Rat. PMID:27144092

  17. Modeling the mechanical properties of liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Siping; Shen, Yuanyuan; Song, Liang

    2016-06-14

    The progression of liver fibrosis changes the biomechanical properties of liver tissue. This study characterized and compared different liver fibrosis stages in rats in terms of viscoelasticity. Three viscoelastic models, the Voigt, Maxwell, and Zener models, were applied to experimental data from rheometer tests and then the elasticity and viscosity were estimated for each fibrosis stage. The study found that both elasticity and viscosity are correlated with the various stages of liver fibrosis. The study revealed that the Zener model is the optimal model for describing the mechanical properties of each fibrosis stage, but there is no significant difference between the Zener and Voigt models in their performance on liver fibrosis staging. Therefore the Voigt model can still be effectively used for liver fibrosis grading. PMID:27017300

  18. Stem cell therapy in intracerebral hemorrhage rat model.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Marcos F; Horn, Ana P

    2015-04-26

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a very complex pathology, with many different not fully elucidated etiologies and prognostics. It is the most severe subtype of stroke, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Unfortunately, despite the numerous promising preclinical assays including neuroprotective, anti-hypertensive, and anti-inflammatory drugs, to this moment only symptomatic treatments are available, motivating the search for new alternatives. In this context, stem cell therapy emerged as a promising tool. However, more than a decade has passed, and there is still much to be learned not only about stem cells, but also about ICH itself, and how these two pieces come together. To date, rats have been the most widely used animal model in this research field, and there is much more to be learned from and about them. In this review, we first summarize ICH epidemiology, risk factors, and pathophysiology. We then present different methods utilized to induce ICH in rats, and examine how accurately they represent the human disease. Next, we discuss the different types of stem cells used in previous ICH studies, also taking into account the tested transplantation sites. Finally, we summarize what has been achieved in assays with stem cells in rat models of ICH, and point out some relevant issues where attention must be given in future efforts. PMID:25914768

  19. Stem cell therapy in intracerebral hemorrhage rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Marcos F; Horn, Ana P

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a very complex pathology, with many different not fully elucidated etiologies and prognostics. It is the most severe subtype of stroke, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Unfortunately, despite the numerous promising preclinical assays including neuroprotective, anti-hypertensive, and anti-inflammatory drugs, to this moment only symptomatic treatments are available, motivating the search for new alternatives. In this context, stem cell therapy emerged as a promising tool. However, more than a decade has passed, and there is still much to be learned not only about stem cells, but also about ICH itself, and how these two pieces come together. To date, rats have been the most widely used animal model in this research field, and there is much more to be learned from and about them. In this review, we first summarize ICH epidemiology, risk factors, and pathophysiology. We then present different methods utilized to induce ICH in rats, and examine how accurately they represent the human disease. Next, we discuss the different types of stem cells used in previous ICH studies, also taking into account the tested transplantation sites. Finally, we summarize what has been achieved in assays with stem cells in rat models of ICH, and point out some relevant issues where attention must be given in future efforts. PMID:25914768

  20. Evaluation of the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of an ethylacetate fraction of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jak) leaves in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Chackrewarthy, S.; Thabrew, M. I.; Weerasuriya, M. K. B.; Jayasekera, S.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of mature leaves of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jak) are used by traditional medical practitioners in Sri Lanka and India for the treatment of diabetes. This study was conducted to investigate the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of an ethylacetate (EA) fraction of the mature leaves of A. heterophyllus in a streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rat model. In normoglycemic rats, administration of a single dose (20 mg/kg) of the EA fraction resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in the fasting blood glucose concentration and a significant improvement in glucose tolerance (P < 0.05), compared to the controls. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, chronic administration of the EA fraction of A. heterophyllus leaves daily for 5 weeks resulted in a significant lowering of serum glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) levels. Compared to control diabetic rats, the extract-treated rats had 39% less serum glucose, 23% lower serum total cholesterol and 40% lower serum TG levels and 11% higher body weight at the end of the fifth week. The percentage reductions in the serum parameters mediated by the test fraction were comparable with those produced by glibenclamide (0.6 mg/kg), the reference drug used in this study. It can be concluded that the EA fraction of A. heterophyllus leaves contains one or more hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic principles which have the potential to be developed further for the treatment of diabetes specifically associated with a hyperlipidemic state. PMID:20931077

  1. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K. M.; Fannin, J. C.; Gillette, C.; Blough, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into humans. To compound the complication of aging gender has also been indicated as a risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system associated with aging and gender for aging research with regard to the applicability of rat derived data for translational application to human aging. PMID:25610649

  2. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of osteosarcoma in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Yu, Menglei; Ye, Fei; Xing, Da

    2011-02-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant tumors of the bone and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the pediatric age group. Confirmed diagnosis and prompt treatment of osteosarcoma are critical for effective prognosis. In this study, we investigate the application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for the detection of osteosarcoma in an animal model. Cross-section images of a normal rat leg and a tumorous rat leg were successfully reconstructed in vivo. Morphological changes and the development of the implanted osteosarcoma were accurately mapped with time-dependent photoacoustic images. Furthermore, we evaluate the use of gold nanorods as contrast agents for imaging osteosarcoma with PAI. This is the first study that uses PAI to detect osteosarcoma in vivo, and the results suggest that PAI has the potential clinical application for detecting osteosarcoma in the early stage.

  3. Rat models of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Tamaoka, Meiyo

    2006-01-01

    The rat has been extensively used to model asthma and somewhat less extensively to model chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The features of asthma that have been successfully modeled include allergen-induced airway constriction, eosinophilic inflammation and allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. T-cell involvement has been directly demonstrated using adoptive transfer techniques. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are activated in response to allergen challenge in the sensitized rat and express Thelper2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Repeated allergen exposure causes airway remodeling. Dry gas hyperpnea challenge also evokes increases in lung resistance, allowing exercise-induced asthma to be modeled. COPD is modeled using elastase-induced parenchymal injury to mimic emphysema. Cigarette smoke-induced airspace enlargement occurs but requires months of cigarette exposure. Inflammation and fibrosis of peripheral airways is an important aspect of COPD that is less well modeled. Novel approaches to the treatment of COPD have been reported including treatments aimed at parenchymal regeneration. PMID:16337418

  4. Novel isolated cecal pouch model for endoscopic observation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Koshino, Kurodo; Kanai, Nobuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To create a new rat model for drug administration, cell transplantation, and endoscopic examination for the treatment of intestinal diseases. METHODS: F344/NJc l-rnu/rnu rats (10-wk-old males, 350-400 g) were used in this study. The rats were anesthetized via 2% isoflurane inhalation. The rat’s cecum was isolated from the intestines, and a pouch was created. The remainder of the intestines was rejoined to create an anastomosis. The “side-to-side” anastomosis (SSA) technique initially involves the creation of a 2-cm longitudinal incision into each intestinal wall. To create an anastomosis along the ileal and colonic walls, both intestines were cut, and a continuous suture procedure was performed that included all layers of both intestines. The serous membrane was sutured along the edge and on the anterior wall of the anastomosis. The “end-to-end” anastomosis (EEA) technique was compared with the SSA technique. In the EEA technique, the frontal surfaces of both cut intestinal lumens were joined together by continuous sutures. Additional sutures were made at the serosa. After the anastomotic intestine was successfully constructed, the two intestinal lumens that were cut at the isolated cecum were managed. In addition, one luminal side of the pouch remained open to create an artificial anus on the dorsum as a passage for the residual substances in the pouch. Finally, small animal endoscopy was used to observe the inside of the pouch. RESULTS: In this animal model, mucus and feces are excreted through the reconstructed passage. Accordingly, the cecal pouch mucosa was not obstructed or contaminated by feces, thus facilitating observations of the luminal surface of the intestine. The endoscopic observation of the cecal pouch provided clear visualization given the absence of feces. The membrane surface of the cecum was clearly observed. Two methods of creating an anastomotic intestine, the “SSA” and “EEA” techniques, were compared with regard to

  5. Exercise exerts neuroprotective effects on Parkinson's disease model of rats.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Yasuhara, Takao; Shingo, Tetsuro; Kondo, Akihiko; Yuan, Wenji; Kadota, Tomohito; Wang, Feifei; Baba, Tanefumi; Tayra, Judith Thomas; Morimoto, Takamasa; Jing, Meng; Kikuchi, Yoichiro; Kuramoto, Satoshi; Agari, Takashi; Miyoshi, Yasuyuki; Fujino, Hidemi; Obata, Futoshi; Takeda, Isao; Furuta, Tomohisa; Date, Isao

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies demonstrate that rehabilitation ameliorates physical and cognitive impairments of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and other neurological diseases and that rehabilitation also has potencies to modulate brain plasticity. Here we examined the effects of compulsive exercise on Parkinson's disease model of rats. Before 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 20 microg) lesion into the right striatum of female SD rats, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected to label the proliferating cells. Subsequently, at 24 h after the lesion, the rats were forced to run on the treadmill (5 days/week, 30 min/day, 11 m/min). As behavioral evaluations, cylinder test was performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks and amphetamine-induced rotational test was performed at 2 and 4 weeks with consequent euthanasia for immunohistochemical investigations. The exercise group showed better behavioral recovery in cylinder test and significant decrease in the number of amphetamine-induced rotations, compared to the non-exercise group. Correspondingly, significant preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in the striatum and TH-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) was demonstrated, compared to the non-exercise group. Additionally, the number of migrated BrdU- and Doublecortin-positive cells toward the lesioned striatum was increased in the exercise group. Furthermore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor increased in the striatum by exercise. The results suggest that exercise exerts neuroprotective effects or enhances the neuronal differentiation in Parkinson's disease model of rats with subsequent improvement in deteriorated motor function. PMID:19900418

  6. Evaluating antithrombotic activity of HY023016 on rat hypercoagulable model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiu-Fang; Li, Yun-Zhan; Wang, Xin-Hui; Su, You-Rui; Cui, Shuang; Miao, Ming-Xing; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Jiang, Mei-Ling; Jiang, Ai-Dou; Chen, Xiang; Xu, Yun-Gen; Gong, Guo-Qing

    2016-06-15

    The generation of thrombus is not considered as an isolated progression without other pathologic processes, which may also enhance procoagulant state. The purpose of this study was to assess whether HY023016, a novel dabigatran prodrug and an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, or dabigatran etexilate, another thrombin inhibitor can improve the state of whole blood hypercoagulability in vitro/vivo. By using whole blood flow cytometry we explored the effects of HY023016 and dabigatran etexilate on thrombin and ADP-induced human platelet-leukocyte aggregation generated in vitro. With the method of continuous infusion of thrombin intravenous, we successfully established a rat hypercoagulable model and evaluated the effect of HY023016 or dabigatran etexilate in vivo. HY023016 was able to inhibit thrombin- or ADP-induced platelet P-selectin or CD40L expression, leukocyte CD11b expression and formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in dose-dependent manner. Dabigatran etexilate was unable to affect ADP-induced platelet P-selectin or CD40L expression, leukocyte CD11b expression and formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates. Based on rat hypercoagulable model, dabigatran etexilate could reverse thrombin-induced circulatory system hypercoagulable state in a concentration-dependent manner. Dabigatran etexilate also inhibited electrical stimulation induced formation of arterial thrombus in rat under hypercoagulable state, and extracorporal circulation-induced formation of thrombus in dose-dependent manner. Compared with dabigatran etexilate, HY023016 showed nearly equal or even better antithrombotic activity, regardless of reversing the cycle of rat hypercoagulable state or inhibiting platelet-leukocyte aggregation. In surrmary, HY023016 could effectively improve hypercoagulable state of circulatory system. PMID:27085896

  7. Experience Modulates Vicarious Freezing in Rats: A Model for Empathy

    PubMed Central

    Atsak, Piray; Orre, Marie; Bakker, Petra; Cerliani, Leonardo; Roozendaal, Benno

    2011-01-01

    The study of the neural basis of emotional empathy has received a surge of interest in recent years but mostly employing human neuroimaging. A simpler animal model would pave the way for systematic single cell recordings and invasive manipulations of the brain regions implicated in empathy. Recent evidence has been put forward for the existence of empathy in rodents. In this study, we describe a potential model of empathy in female rats, in which we studied interactions between two rats: a witness observes a demonstrator experiencing a series of footshocks. By comparing the reaction of witnesses with or without previous footshock experience, we examine the role of prior experience as a modulator of empathy. We show that witnesses having previously experienced footshocks, but not naïve ones, display vicarious freezing behavior upon witnessing a cage-mate experiencing footshocks. Strikingly, the demonstrator's behavior was in turn modulated by the behavior of the witness: demonstrators froze more following footshocks if their witness froze more. Previous experiments have shown that rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) when receiving footshocks. Thus, the role of USV in triggering vicarious freezing in our paradigm is examined. We found that experienced witness-demonstrator pairs emitted more USVs than naïve witness-demonstrator pairs, but the number of USVs was correlated with freezing in demonstrators, not in witnesses. Furthermore, playing back the USVs, recorded from witness-demonstrator pairs during the empathy test, did not induce vicarious freezing behavior in experienced witnesses. Thus, our findings confirm that vicarious freezing can be triggered in rats, and moreover it can be modulated by prior experience. Additionally, our result suggests that vicarious freezing is not triggered by USVs per se and it influences back onto the behavior of the demonstrator that had elicited the vicarious freezing in witnesses, introducing a paradigm to study empathy

  8. The elusive rat model of conditioned placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    McNabb, Christopher T; White, Michelle M; Harris, Amber L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2014-10-01

    Recent research on human placebo analgesia has suggested the need for rodent models to further elucidate the neural substrates of the placebo effect. This series of 3 experiments therefore was performed in an attempt to develop a model of placebo analgesia in rats. In each study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received an L5 spinal nerve ligation to induce a neuropathic pain condition. Each rat then underwent a 4-day conditioning procedure in which an active analgesic drug or its vehicle (unconditioned stimulus) was associated with the following cues (conditioned stimuli): novel testing room (environmental), vanilla scent cue (olfactory), dim incandescent lighting (visual), restraint procedure/injection (tactile), and time of day and injection-test latency (temporal). The analgesics for each experiment were as follows: Experiment 1 used 90 mg/kg gabapentin, experiment 2 used 3mg/kg loperamide hydrochloride, and experiment 3 used 6 mg/kg morphine sulfate. On the following test day, half of the animals received the opposite treatment, resulting in 4 conditioning manipulations: drug/drug, drug/vehicle, vehicle/drug, and vehicle/vehicle. Nociceptive thresholds were assessed with the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold test each day after the conditioning procedure. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were detected on test day between control and placebo groups, indicating a lack of a conditioned placebo analgesic response. Our results contrast with prior research that implies the existence of a reliable and robust response to placebo treatment. We conclude that placebo analgesia in rats is not particularly robust and that it is difficult to achieve using conventional procedures and proper experimental design. PMID:25026214

  9. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  10. Generation of a New Model Rat: Nrf2 Knockout Rats Are Sensitive to Aflatoxin B1 Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Keiko; Takaku, Misaki; Egner, Patricia A; Morita, Masanobu; Kaneko, Takehito; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kensler, Thomas W; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    THE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR NRF2: (NF-E2-related-factor 2) REGULATES A BATTERY OF ANTIOXIDATIVE STRESS-RESPONSE GENES AND DETOXICATION GENES, AND NRF2 KNOCKOUT LINES OF MICE HAVE BEEN CONTRIBUTING CRITICALLY TO THE CLARIFICATION OF ROLES THAT NRF2 PLAYS FOR CELL PROTECTION HOWEVER, THERE ARE APPARENT LIMITATIONS IN USE OF THE MOUSE MODELS FOR INSTANCE, RATS EXHIBIT MORE SUITABLE FEATURES FOR TOXICOLOGICAL OR PHYSIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS THAN MICE IN THIS STUDY, WE GENERATED 2 LINES OF NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS BY USING A GENOME EDITING TECHNOLOGY; 1 LINE HARBORS A 7-BP DELETION Δ7 AND THE OTHER LINE HARBORS A 1-BP INSERTION +1 IN THE NRF2 GENE IN THE LIVERS OF RATS HOMOZYGOUSLY DELETING THE NRF2 GENE, AN ACTIVATOR OF NRF2 SIGNALING, CDDO-IM, COULD NOT INDUCE EXPRESSION OF REPRESENTATIVE NRF2 TARGET GENES TO EXAMINE ALTERED TOXICOLOGICAL RESPONSE, WE TREATED THE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS WITH AFLATOXIN B1 AFB1, A CARCINOGENIC MYCOTOXIN THAT ELICITS GENE MUTATIONS THROUGH BINDING OF ITS METABOLITES TO DNA AND FOR WHICH THE RAT HAS BEEN PROPOSED AS A REASONABLE SURROGATE FOR HUMAN TOXICITY INDEED, IN THE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RAT LIVERS THE ENZYMES OF THE AFB1 DETOXICATION PATHWAY WERE SIGNIFICANTLY DOWNREGULATED SINGLE DOSE ADMINISTRATION OF AFB1 INCREASED HEPATOTOXICITY AND BINDING OF AFB1-N7-GUANINE TO HEPATIC DNA IN NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS COMPARED WITH WILD-TYPE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS REPEATEDLY TREATED WITH AFB1 WERE PRONE TO LETHALITY AND CDDO-IM WAS NO LONGER PROTECTIVE THESE RESULTS DEMONSTRATE THAT NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS ARE QUITE SENSITIVE TO AFB1 TOXICITIES AND THIS RAT GENOTYPE EMERGES AS A NEW MODEL ANIMAL IN TOXICOLOGY. PMID:27071940

  11. Orchiectomized Fischer 344 male rat models body composition in hypogonadal state.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Conover, Christine F

    2006-06-20

    The hypogonadal state in men is accompanied by substantial decreases in muscle and bone mass and by an increase in adiposity. Most of the strains of orchiectomized (ORX) rat that have been used to model this state display substantial losses in bone, but only subtle changes in adiposity and muscle mass. In order to identify a rat model displaying a robust catabolic response to ORX, we studied three strains: Fischer 344 (F344), Brown Norway and Wistar. ORX caused a significant and sustained decrease in weight gained by F344, but only a trend toward reduced weight gain in Brown Norway rats and a modest reduction weight gain in Wistar rats that was significant only after 56days. ORX suppressed food intake in F344 rats, and to a lesser degree in Brown Norway and Wistar rats. ORX reduced muscle mass significantly in F344 rats, but not in Brown Norway or Wistar rats. ORX increased adiposity moderately in F344 rats and substantially in Wistar rats. ORX caused a marked reduction in prostate mass and increase in bone resorption in all three strains. Thus, F344 was the only strain in which ORX produced substantial decreases in food intake, body weight and muscle mass with increased adiposity and increased bone resorption. We conclude that the F344 rat displays a broad range of catabolic effects following ORX and is the best rat model for studying the androgenic pathway and strategies for reversing catabolic changes induced by hypogonadism. PMID:16507309

  12. Studies on sensitivity of zebrafish as a model organism for Parkinson's disease: Comparison with rat model

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Dinesh T.; Jagtap, Aarti G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the utility of zebra fish as an animal model for Parkinson's disease (PD) in comparison with rat model. Materials and Methods: MTT assay was performed on rat and zebrafish brain synaptosomal fractions using rotenone as a neurotoxic agent. Quercetin and resveratrol were used as standards to compare anti-apoptotic activity in both organisms. Catalepsy was induced in zebrafish by exposing them to haloperidol (9 μM) solution. Drug-treated groups were exposed to bromocriptine and pramipexole, 30 min prior to haloperidol exposure at the dose of 2, 5, and 10 μg/mL. Swimming speed, time spent in the bottom of the tank, and complete cataleptic time were evaluated to assess behavioral changes. In rats, catalepsy was induced using haloperidol (1.25 mg/kg i.p.). Drug-treated groups received bromocriptine (2.5 mg/kg.) and pramipexole (1 mg/kg) orally. Bar test, block test, and locomotor activity were carried out to assess behavioral changes. Results: Resveratrol and quercetin showed comparable inhibition of apoptosis in rats and zebrafish. In anti-cataleptic study, bromocriptine and pramipexole-treated groups showed significant difference (P < 0.05) in behavioral parameters as compared to haloperidol control group in both the experimental organisms. Results obtained from fish model were in correlation with rat model. Conclusion: Findings of the present study revealed that zebrafish model is highly sensitive and can be used for basic screening of drugs against PD. PMID:24554909

  13. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  14. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    TAO, QINGSONG; WANG, BAOCHAI; ZHENG, YU; LI, GUANWEI; REN, JIANAN

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn’s disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  15. Mindspan: Lessons from Rat Models of Neurocognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Michela; Stocker, Amy; Koh, Ming Teng

    2011-01-01

    Research on the biology of aging seeks to enhance understanding of basic mechanisms and thus support improvements in outcomes throughout the lifespan, including longevity itself, susceptibility to disease, and life-long adaptive capacities. The focus of this review is the use of rats as an animal model of cognitive change during aging, and specifically lessons learned from aging rats in behavioral studies of cognitive processes mediated by specialized neural circuitry. An advantage of this approach is the ability to compare brain aging across species where functional homology exists for specific neural systems; in this article we focus on behavioral assessments that target the functions of the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex. We also take a critical look at studies using calorie restriction (CR) as a well-defined experimental approach to manipulating biological aging. We conclude that the effects of CR on cognitive aging in rats are less well established than commonly assumed, with much less supportive evidence relative to its benefits on longevity and susceptibility to disease, and that more research in this area is necessary. PMID:21411856

  16. Studies of different female rat models of hypothalamic obesity.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Clinton; Ralston, Melissa; Roth, Christian L

    2011-01-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HO) is a major and unsolved problem in patients with medial hypothalamic lesions and is associated with hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia. The purpose of this study was to create a rodent model that mimics metabolic changes in HO for use in therapeutic testing. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used to test the individual and combined effects of two types of medial hypothalamic lesions: arcuate nucleus (ARC) lesions by injection of monosodium glutamate at neonatal age, and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) lesions by passing an anodal current through an electrode placed in the VMN at age 80 days. Adiposity in ARC-lesioned animals was associated with decreased food intake and stunted growth, while VMN lesions were associated with hyperphagia but not reduced growth. The greatest weight gain (weight at age 200 days 712 +/- 65 vs. 451 +/- 19 g in controls), hyperphagia (food intake 10 days following surgery 33 +/- 0.8 vs. 18.5 +/- 0.7 g/day in sham-treated rats), hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia occurred in rats that received both ARC and VMN lesions. Thus, the combined medial hypothalamic lesions result in an obesity phenotype similar to that of patients that suffer from HO and are consequently more suitable for testing potential therapeutics for this disorder than lesions of single hypothalamic nuclei. PMID:21648279

  17. Antifibrotic effect of heparin on liver fibrosis model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Shah, Gaurang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of chronic thrombin inhibition by heparin on experimentally induced chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) in rats. METHODS: Chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) was induced in Wistar rats by oral administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 7 wk, an animal model with persistent severe hepatic fibrosis. Intravenous administration of the thrombin antagonist (heparin) started 1 wk after the start of CCl4 intoxication for 6 wk. After completion of treatment (7 wk), markers of hepatic dysfunction were measured and changes evaluated histopathologically. RESULTS: Higher serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels, as well as lower fibrinogen levels, were found in CCl4 intoxicated rats. Heparin, silymarin and combination of drug (heparin and silymarin) treatment for 6 wk prevented a rise in SGOT, SGPT, ALP, total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels and improved fibrinogen levels. Deterioration in hepatic function determined by the fibrosis area was retarded, as evident from hepatic histopathology. Total protein levels were not changed in all groups. CONCLUSION: Heparin, a thrombin antagonist, preserved hepatic function and reduced severity of hepatic dysfunction/fibrogenesis. Combination of heparin and silymarin produced additional benefits on liver fibrosis. PMID:23494756

  18. Studies on the antihyperlipidemic properties of Averrhoa bilimbi fruit in rats.

    PubMed

    Ambili, Savithri; Subramoniam, Appian; Nagarajan, Natesan Shanmugam

    2009-01-01

    Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. fruit and its extracts were screened for antihypercholesterolemic activity using Triton-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats as a model. The fruit and its water extract, but not alcohol and hexane extracts, showed remarkable antihypercholesterolemic activity. An active fraction, which showed activity at a low dose of 0.8 mg/kg, was purified from the water extract. An active component was isolated from the active fraction, which showed optimum activity at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg. The efficacy of the fruit was tested in chronic high-fat diet fed hyperlipidemic rats. The fruit (125 mg/kg) as well as its water extract (50 mg/kg) were found to be effective in lowering lipids in the high-fat diet fed rats. The fruit was subjected to preliminary general toxicity evaluation in mice. Oral administration of the fruit homogenate daily for 15 days did not result in any toxic symptoms up to a dose of 1 g/kg studied. Thus, this fruit can be used as a dietary ingredient to prevent as well as treat hyperlipidemia. PMID:19031370

  19. Cocaine sensitization models an anhedonia-like condition in rats.

    PubMed

    Scheggi, Simona; Marchese, Giovanna; Grappi, Silvia; Secci, Maria Elena; De Montis, Maria Graziella; Gambarana, Carla

    2011-04-01

    Anhedonia is a core symptom of depression that also characterizes substance abuse-related mood disorders, in particular those secondary to stimulant abuse. This study investigated the long-lasting condition of cocaine sensitization as an inducing condition for anhedonia in rats. Cortical-mesolimbic dopamine plays a central role in assessing the incentive value of a stimulus and an increased dopamine output in these areas after a novel palatable meal seems to correlate with the ability to acquire an instrumental behaviour aimed at earning it again. This dopaminergic response is associated with consistent modifications in the phosphorylation pattern of some cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) substrates and it is mediated by dopamine D1 receptor stimulation. Thus, since behavioural cocaine sensitization is characterized by tonically increased levels of phospho-Thr75 DARPP-32 that is a potent PKA inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine-sensitized rats might reveal deficits in palatable food responding. Indeed, non-food-deprived cocaine-sensitized rats showed no interest in palatable food, no dopaminergic response after a palatable meal in terms of increased dopamine output and DARPP-32 phosphorylation changes, and no ability to acquire a palatable food-sustained instrumental behaviour. Repeated administration of an established antidepressant compound, imipramine, corrected these deficits and reinstated the dopaminergic response in the cortico-mesolimbic areas to control values. Thus, the behavioural modifications observed in cocaine-sensitized rats satisfy some requirements for an experimental model of anhedonia since they are induced by repeated cocaine administration (aetiological validity), they mimic an anhedonia-like symptom (construct validity), and are reversed by the administration of imipramine (predictive validity). PMID:20519061

  20. Photon and electron absorbed fractions calculated from a new tomographic rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, P. H. R.; Vieira, J. W.; Yoriyaz, H.; Lima, F. R. A.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a tomographic model of a rat developed using CT images of an adult male Wistar rat for radiation transport studies. It also presents calculations of absorbed fractions (AFs) under internal photon and electron sources using this rat model and the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All data related to the developed phantom were made available for the scientific community as well as the MCNP inputs prepared for AF calculations in that phantom and also all estimated AF values, which could be used to obtain absorbed dose estimates—following the MIRD methodology—in rats similar in size to the presently developed model. Comparison between the rat model developed in this study and that published by Stabin et al (2006 J. Nucl. Med. 47 655) for a 248 g Sprague-Dawley rat, as well as between the estimated AF values for both models, has been presented.

  1. Photon and electron absorbed fractions calculated from a new tomographic rat model.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, P H R; Vieira, J W; Yoriyaz, H; Lima, F R A

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a tomographic model of a rat developed using CT images of an adult male Wistar rat for radiation transport studies. It also presents calculations of absorbed fractions (AFs) under internal photon and electron sources using this rat model and the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All data related to the developed phantom were made available for the scientific community as well as the MCNP inputs prepared for AF calculations in that phantom and also all estimated AF values, which could be used to obtain absorbed dose estimates--following the MIRD methodology--in rats similar in size to the presently developed model. Comparison between the rat model developed in this study and that published by Stabin et al (2006 J. Nucl. Med. 47 655) for a 248 g Sprague-Dawley rat, as well as between the estimated AF values for both models, has been presented. PMID:18758003

  2. Modeling postpartum depression in rats: theoretic and methodological issues

    PubMed Central

    Ming, LI; Shinn-Yi, CHOU

    2016-01-01

    The postpartum period is when a host of changes occur at molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioral levels to prepare female humans for the challenge of maternity. Alteration or prevention of these normal adaptions is thought to contribute to disruptions of emotion regulation, motivation and cognitive abilities that underlie postpartum mental disorders, such as postpartum depression. Despite the high incidence of this disorder, and the detrimental consequences for both mother and child, its etiology and related neurobiological mechanisms remain poorly understood, partially due to the lack of appropriate animal models. In recent decades, there have been a number of attempts to model postpartum depression disorder in rats. In the present review, we first describe clinical symptoms of postpartum depression and discuss known risk factors, including both genetic and environmental factors. Thereafter, we discuss various rat models that have been developed to capture various aspects of this disorder and knowledge gained from such attempts. In doing so, we focus on the theories behind each attempt and the methods used to achieve their goals. Finally, we point out several understudied areas in this field and make suggestions for future directions. PMID:27469254

  3. Modeling postpartum depression in rats: theoretic and methodological issues.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chou, Shinn-Yi

    2016-07-18

    The postpartum period is when a host of changes occur at molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioral levels to prepare female humans for the challenge of maternity. Alteration or prevention of these normal adaptions is thought to contribute to disruptions of emotion regulation, motivation and cognitive abilities that underlie postpartum mental disorders, such as postpartum depression. Despite the high incidence of this disorder, and the detrimental consequences for both mother and child, its etiology and related neurobiological mechanisms remain poorly understood, partially due to the lack of appropriate animal models. In recent decades, there have been a number of attempts to model postpartum depression disorder in rats. In the present review, we first describe clinical symptoms of postpartum depression and discuss known risk factors, including both genetic and environmental factors. Thereafter, we discuss various rat models that have been developed to capture various aspects of this disorder and knowledge gained from such attempts. In doing so, we focus on the theories behind each attempt and the methods used to achieve their goals. Finally, we point out several understudied areas in this field and make suggestions for future directions. PMID:27469254

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  5. Emodin attenuates systemic and liver inflammation in hyperlipidemic mice administrated with lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuemei; Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Saaoud, Fatma; Yu, Fang; Wang, Yuzhen; Hu, Jun; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Wang, Qian; Fan, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major epidemics of the modern societies and has an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis. However, approved anti-inflammatory therapies are not currently available for the prevention of the transition from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We aimed to test if a Chinese herb-derived compound, emodin could halt the simple steatosis to NASH transition. LDLR−/− mice were fed a western-type diet for 10 weeks; and during the last four weeks, the mice were intra-peritoneally injected daily with LPS with or without emodin. Systemic inflammation was evaluated by measurement of serum levels of cytokines and chemokines and flow cytometric analysis of spleen leukocytes. Liver inflammation was determined by histology, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to examine the effects of emodin on LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. Our data showed that emodin ameliorated systemic inflammation, reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, and attenuated liver function impairment. In vitro experiments showed emodin inhibited LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages through suppressing Erk1/2 and p38 signaling. In conclusion, emodin inhibited the transition from simple steatosis to NASH in hyperlipidemic mice challenged with LPS through suppressing systemic and macrophage inflammation. Emodin may be developed as a therapy for NAFLD by the virtue of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24740873

  6. Pentosan polysulfate inhibits atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: differential modulation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9.

    PubMed

    Lupia, Enrico; Zheng, Feng; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Tack, Ivan; Doublier, Sophie; Elliot, Sharon J; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E

    2012-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS), a heparinoid compound essentially devoid of anticoagulant activity, modulates cell growth and decreases inflammation. We investigated the effect of PPS on the progression of established atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. After severe atherosclerosis developed on an atherogenic diet, WHHL rabbits were treated with oral PPS or tap water for 1 month. The aortic intima-to-media ratio and macrophage infiltration were reduced, plaque collagen content was increased, and plaque fibrous caps were preserved by PPS treatment. Plasma lipid levels and post-heparin hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged. However, net collagenolytic activity in aortic extracts was decreased, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) activity were increased by PPS. Moreover, PPS treatment decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-stimulated proinflammatory responses, in particular activation of nuclear factor-κB and p38, and activation of MMPs in macrophages. In conclusion, oral PPS treatment prevents progression of established atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. This effect may be partially mediated by increased MMP-2 and TIMP activities in the aortic wall and reduced TNFα-stimulated inflammation and MMP activation in macrophages. Thus, PPS may be a useful agent in inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:22042083

  7. Metabolic Cages for a Space Flight Model in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Jennifer S.; Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Evans, Juli; Navidi, Meena; Wolinsky, Ira; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of space flight models are available to mimic the physiologic changes seen in the rat during weightlessness. The model reported by Wronski and Morey-Holton has been widely used by many investigators, in musculoskeletal physiologic studies especially, resulting in accumulation of an extensive database that enables scientists to mimic space flight effects in the 1-g environment of Earth. However, information on nutrition or gastrointestinal and renal function in this space flight model is limited by the difficulty in acquiring uncontaminated metabolic specimens for analysis. In the Holton system, a traction tape harness is applied to the tail, and the rat's hindquarters are elevated by attaching the harness to a pulley system. Weight-bearing hind limbs are unloaded, and there is a headward fluid shift. The tail-suspended rats are able to move freely about their cages on their forelimbs and tolerate this procedure with minimal signs of stress. The cage used in Holton's model is basically a clear acrylic box set on a plastic grid floor with the pulley and tail harness system attached to the open top of the cage. Food is available from a square food cup recessed into a corner of the floor. In this system, urine, feces, and spilled food fall through the grid floor onto absorbent paper beneath the cage and cannot be separated and recovered quantitatively for analysis in metabolic balance studies. Commercially available metabolic cages are generally cylindrical and have been used with a centrally located suspension apparatus in other space flight models. The large living area, three times as large as most metabolic cages, and the free range of motion unique to Holton's model, essential for musculoskeletal investigations, were sacrificed. Holton's cages can accommodate animals ranging in weight from 70 to 600 g. Although an alternative construction of Holton's cage has been reported, it does not permit collection of separate urine and fecal samples. We describe

  8. Febuxostat improves outcome in a rat model of cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Masaaki; Pelgrim, Loes; Tschirner, Anika; Baumgarten, Anna; von Haehling, Stephan; Palus, Sandra; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; Springer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Background Activity of xanthine oxidase is induced in cancer cachexia, and its inhibition by allopurinol or oxypurinol improves survival and reduces wasting in the Yoshida hepatoma cancer cachexia model. Here, we tested the effects of the second-generation xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat compared with placebo in the same model as used previously by our group. Methods Wistar rats (∽200 g) were treated daily with febuxostat at 5 mg/kg/day or placebo via gavage for a maximum of 17 days. Weight change, quality of life, and body composition were analysed. After sacrifice, proteasome activity in the gastrocnemius muscle was measured. Muscle-specific proteins involved in metabolism were analysed by western blotting. Results Treatment of the tumour-bearing rats with febuxostat led to a significantly improved survival compared with placebo (hazard ratio: 0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.22–0.93, P = 0.03). Loss of body weight was reduced (−26.3 ± 12.4 g) compared with placebo (−50.2 ± 2.1 g, P < 0.01). Wasting of lean mass was attenuated (−12.7 ± 10.8 g) vs. placebo (−31.9 ± 2.1 g, P < 0.05). While we did not see an effect of febuxostat on proteasome activity at the end of the study, the pAkt/Akt ratio was improved by febuxostat (0.94 ± 0.09) vs. placebo (0.41 ± 0.05, P < 0.01), suggesting an increase in protein synthesis. Conclusions Febuxostat attenuated cachexia progression and improved survival of tumour-bearing rats. PMID:26136193

  9. Rehabilitative exercise in a rat model of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hydock, David S; Lien, Chia-Ying; Jensen, Brock T; Parry, Traci L; Schneider, Carole M; Hayward, Reid

    2012-12-01

    The use of exercise to minimize doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity is gaining attention. However, very few clinically relevant reports exist investigating the effects of exercise performed during and following DOX treatments. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to examine the effects of voluntary wheel running during and following DOX treatment using two models of late-onset DOX cardiotoxicity in the rat. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received either DOX or saline injections using one of two separate treatment regimens. These regimens involved either daily or weekly DOX injections with cumulative doses for both protocols totaling 15 mg/kg. Daily DOX injections were 1 mg/kg and lasted for 15 consecutive days while weekly DOX injections were 2.5 mg/kg and lasted for six consecutive weeks with control animals receiving matched saline injection regimens. Immediately following the initial DOX/saline injection, animals were randomly housed in cages with voluntary running wheels or standard rat cages throughout DOX/saline treatments and continued until reaching 10 weeks. Cardiac function was then assessed using echocardiography and an isolated working heart model, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform distribution was assessed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When compared wth controls, daily DOX treatment resulted in reduced running wheel distances at weeks 2-10 (P < 0.05), and weekly DOX treatment resulted in reduced running wheel distances at weeks 2, 6 and 10 (P < 0.05). Nonetheless, wheel running during and following daily and weekly DOX dosing protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by preserving maximal mitral and aortic blood flow velocities, left ventricular developed pressure and MHC isoform expression. In conclusion, the overall reduced volume of activity during and following daily and weekly DOX treatments attenuated DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction suggesting that low-volume endurance training may be an effective

  10. Hypertension and vulnerability to hemorrhagic shock in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Penny S; Song, Kyle Seokhan; Tamariz, Francisco J; Wayne Barbee, R

    2015-02-01

    Trauma mortality may be increased in the presence of preexisting diseases such as chronic hypertension. We hypothesized that systemic and microvascular alterations accompanying chronic hypertension would increase the vulnerability to hemorrhage relative to normotensive controls in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. We present a novel comparative hemorrhage model of shock vulnerability, quantified by "vulnerability curves" expressing physiological response to hemorrhage as a function of three matched shock metrics: cumulative blood volume, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and oxygen delivery (Do2). Responses were central hemodynamics and respiratory and muscle oxygenation obtained for one hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive [SHR]) and two normotensive (Sprague-Dawley, Wistar-Kyoto) rat strains. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by incremental (0.5 mL) hemorrhage to cardiovascular collapse in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated animals. Shock vulnerability of SHR rats was primarily pressure-driven; in general, SHR exhibited the expected patterns of more rapid deterioration in MAP and Vo2 over smaller ranges of blood loss and Do2. Sternotomy-related depression of CO and thus Do2 in SHR meant that we could not test hypotheses related to the role of Do2 and contribution to perfusion differences between normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Insensitivity of lactate to strain effects suggests that lactate may be a reliable biomarker of shock status. Unexpected similarities between Wistar-Kyoto and SHR suggest strain-related effects other than those related to hypertension per se contribute to hemorrhage response; body size effects and genetic relationships could not be ruled out. Future studies should incorporate phylogenetically based methods to examine the role of hypertension and physiological response to hemorrhage across multiple strains. PMID:25300030

  11. 2015 Guidelines for Establishing Genetically Modified Rat Models for Cardiovascular Research

    PubMed Central

    Flister, Michael J.; Prokop, Jeremy W.; Lazar, Jozef; Shimoyama, Mary; Dwinell, Melinda; Geurts, Aron

    2015-01-01

    The rat has long been a key physiological model for cardiovascular research; most of the inbred strains having been previously selected for susceptibility or resistance to various cardiovascular diseases (CVD). These CVD rat models offer a physiologically relevant background on which candidates of human CVD can be tested in a more clinically translatable experimental setting. However, a diverse toolbox for genetically modifying the rat genome to test molecular mechanisms has only recently become available. Here, we provide a high-level description of several strategies for developing genetically modified rat models of CVD. PMID:25920443

  12. Grape powder prevents cognitive, behavioral and biochemical impairments in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Naimesh; Alkadhi, Isam; Atrooz, Fatin; Patki, Gaurav; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Previously, using the single-prolonged stress (SPS) rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder, we reported that moderate treadmill exercise, via modulation of oxidative stress related mechanisms, rescued anxiety and depression-like behaviors and reversed SPS-induced memory impairment. In this study using the SPS model (2 h restrain, 20 min forced swimming, 15 min rest, and 1–2 min diethyl ether exposure), we hypothesized that antioxidant rich grape powder (GP) prevents SPS-induced behavioral and memory impairment in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into: Control (CON; provided tap water), SPS (provided tap water), GP-SPS (provided 15 g/L GP in tap water for 3 wk followed by SPS), or GP-CON (3 wk of GP followed by control exposure). Anxiety and depression-like behaviors were significantly greater in SPS rats when compared to CON or GP treated rats and GP reversed these behavioral deficits. SPS rats made significantly more errors in both short- and long-term memory tests compared to CON or GP treated rats, which were prevented in GP-SPS rats. GP prevented SPS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone level. Furthermore, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were significantly decreased in amygdala of SPS rats but not in GP-SPS rats compared to CON or GP-CON rats. Additionally, GP significantly increased acetylated Histone3, Histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC 5) in hippocampus and amygdala of SPS rats as compared to CON or GP-CON rats. In conclusion, we suggest protective role of GP in SPS-induced behavioral, cognitive and biochemical impairments in rats. Perhaps, epigenetic regulation of BDNF enables GP-mediated prevention of SPS-induced deficits in rats. PMID:25533441

  13. Grape powder prevents cognitive, behavioral, and biochemical impairments in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Naimesh; Alkadhi, Isam; Atrooz, Fatin; Patki, Gaurav; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Previously, using the single-prolonged stress (SPS) rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder, we reported that moderate treadmill exercise, via modulation of oxidative stress-related mechanisms, rescued anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and reversed SPS-induced memory impairment. In this study using the SPS model (2-hour restrain, 20-minute forced swimming, 15-minute rest, and 1-2-minute diethyl ether exposure), we hypothesized that antioxidant rich grape powder (GP) prevents SPS-induced behavioral and memory impairment in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into control (CON) (provided tap water), SPS (provided tap water), GP-SPS (provided 15 g/L GP in tap water for 3 weeks followed by SPS), or GP-CON (3 weeks of GP followed by CON exposure). Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors were significantly greater in SPS rats, when compared with CON- or GP-treated rats, and GP reversed these behavioral deficits. Single-prolonged stress rats made significantly more errors in both short- and long-term memory tests compared with CON- or GP-treated rats, which were prevented in GP-SPS rats. Grape powder prevented SPS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone level. Furthermore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were significantly decreased in amygdala of SPS rats but not in GP-SPS rats compared with CON or (GP-CON) rats. In addition, GP significantly increased acetylated histone 3 and histone deacetylase 5 in hippocampus and amygdala of SPS rats as compared with CON or GP-CON rats. In conclusion, we suggest protective role of GP in SPS-induced behavioral, cognitive, and biochemical impairments in rats. Perhaps, epigenetic regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor enables GP-mediated prevention of SPS-induced deficits in rats. PMID:25533441

  14. Effects of poloxamer 407-induced hyperlipidemia on the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and its 10,11-epoxide metabolite in rats: Impact of decreased expression of both CYP3A1/2 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sun; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Sang Geon; Lee, Inchul; Lee, Myung Gull; Kang, Hee Eun

    2012-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine (CBZ) and its active 10,11-epoxide metabolite (CBZ-E) were evaluated after intravenous and oral administration of 5 mg/kg CBZ to rats with hyperlipidemia induced by poloxamer 407 (HL rats) and controls. The total area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of CBZ in HL rats after intravenous administration was significantly greater than that in controls due to their slower non-renal clearance (CL(NR)). This was due to slower hepatic CL(int) for metabolism of CBZ to CBZ-E in HL rats via CYP3A1/2. This result was consistent with a previous study indicating reduced hepatic CYP3A1/2 expression in HL rats. Interestingly, the AUC of CBZ-E was also increased in HL rats, while AUC(CBZ-E)/AUC(CBZ) ratios remained unchanged. These results suggested that further metabolism of CBZ-E to the inactive metabolite trans-10,11-dihydoxyl-10,11-dihydro-CBZ (CBZ-D) via microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) was also slowed in HL rats. The significantly reduced hepatic mRNA level and expression of mEH protein in HL rats compared to controls confirmed the above hypothesis. Similar pharmacokinetic changes were observed in HL rats after oral administration of CBZ. These findings have potential therapeutic implications assuming that the HL rat model qualitatively reflects similar changes in patients with hyperlipidemia. Caution is required regarding pharmacotherapy in the hyperlipidemic state in cases where drugs that are metabolized principally by CYP3A1/2 or mEH and have a narrow therapeutic range are in use. PMID:22137858

  15. Effect of low density lipoprotein receptor deficiency on the metabolism of apolipoprotein B-100 in blood plasma. Kinetic studies in normal and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, N; Shames, D M; Havel, R J

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 in particles containing apo E (B,E particles) or lacking apo E (B particles) were studied in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits deficient in low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and compared with those of normal rabbits after injection of radioiodinated very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), and LDL. In both groups results of kinetic modeling were consistent with the hypothesis that all apo B enters the plasma in VLDL, mainly as B,E particles, followed by delipidation and partial conversion to IDL and LDL, with concomitant conversion of some B,E particles to B particles. In WHHL rabbits, production of VLDL apo B was reduced by 40%, but LDL production was increased threefold. Defective removal of B,E and B particles in all three lipoprotein classes, coupled with preserved processes of delipidation, can account for the observed increases in the concentration of apo B (threefold in VLDL, fivefold in IDL, and twenty-twofold in LDL) in WHHL rabbits. PMID:3611356

  16. A rat model of concurrent combined injuries (polytrauma)

    PubMed Central

    Akscyn, Robert M; Franklin, J Lee; Gavrikova, Tatyana A; Schwacha, Martin G; Messina, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    Polytrauma, a combination of injuries to more than one body part or organ system, is common in modern warfare and in automobile and industrial accidents. The combination of injuries can include burn injury, fracture, hemorrhage, trauma to the extremities, and trauma to specific organ systems. To investigate the effects of combined injuries, we have developed a new and highly reproducible model of polytrauma. This model combines burn injury with soft tissue and gastrointestinal (GI) tract trauma. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to a 15-20% total body surface area scald burn, or a single puncture of the cecum with a G30 needle, or the combination of both injuries (polytrauma). Unlike many ‘double hit’ models, the injuries in our model were performed simultaneously. We asked whether multiple minor injuries, when combined, would result in a distinct phenotype, different from single minor injuries or a more severe single injury. There were differences between the single injuries and polytrauma in the maintenance of blood glucose, body temperature, body weight, hepatic mRNA and circulating levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and hepatic ER-stress. It has been suggested that models utilizing combinatorial injuries may be needed to more accurately model the human condition. We believe our model is ideal for studying the complex sequelae of polytrauma, which differs from single injuries. Insights gained from this model may suggest better treatment options to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26884923

  17. A Model of Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Saccomanno, Stefania; Ferretti, Gianna; Bachetti, Tiziana; Marzioni, Marco; De Minicis, Samuele; Nobili, Liliana; Salzano, Renata; Omenetti, Alessia; Pacetti, Deborah; Sigmund, Soeren; Benedetti, Antonio; Casini, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance induces nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We used a high-fat, high-calorie solid diet (HFD) to create a model of insulin resistance and NASH in nongenetically modified rats and to study the relationship between visceral adipose tissue and liver. Obesity and insulin resistance occurred in HFD rats, accompanied by a progressive increase in visceral adipose tissue tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA and in circulating free fatty acids. HFD also decreased adiponectin mRNA and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α expression in the visceral adipose tissue and the liver, respectively, and induced hepatic insulin resistance through TNF-α-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent insulin receptor substrate-1Ser307 phosphorylation. These modifications lead to hepatic steatosis accompanied by oxidative stress phenomena, necroinflammation, and hepatocyte apoptosis at 4 weeks and by pericentral fibrosis at 6 months. Supplementation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, a PPARα ligand, to HFD-treated animals restored hepatic adiponectin and PPARα expression, reduced TNF-α hepatic levels, and ameliorated fatty liver and the degree of liver injury. Thus, our model mimics the most common features of NASH in humans and provides an ideal tool to study the role of individual pathogenetic events (as for PPARα down-regulation) and to define any future experimental therapy, such as n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, which ameliorated the degree of liver injury. PMID:16936261

  18. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  19. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  20. A BBDR-HPT Axis Model for the Pregnant Rat and Fetus: Evaluation of Iodide Deficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitarythyroid (HPT) axis for the pregnant rat and fetus is being developed to advance understanding of thyroid hormone disruptions and developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). The model for the pregnant rat and fet...

  1. Laser thresholds in pulp exposure: a rat animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel M.; Goodis, Harold E.; Kudler, Joel J.

    1995-05-01

    Laser technology is now being clinically investigated for the removal of carious enamel and dentin. This study used an animal model to evaluate histological pulpal effects from laser exposure. The molars of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats (n equals 264) were exposed to either a pulsed 1.06 micrometers Nd:YAG laser (120 microseconds, 320 micrometer diameter fiber), air rotor drill preparation or left untreated as controls. The following treatment conditions were investigated: control group (n equals 54); high speed drill with carbide bur (n equals 39); laser exposure at 50 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 27), 100 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 66) and 100 mJ/p at 20 Hz (n equals 39). A sixth treatment condition was investigated: root surface hypersensitivity, which included incremental laser exposure from 30 to 100 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 39). The animals were euthanized either immediately after treatment, at one week, or at one month. The jaws were fixed and bioprepared. Remaining dentin thickness was measured, and ranged from 0.17 +/- 0.04 mm to 0.35 +/- 0.09 mm. The pulp tissue was examined for histologic inflammatory response. No evidence of pulpal involvement or adverse pulpal effects were found at any time period in teeth receiving 50 mJ/p. When histologic samples were compared with controls, all observations were similar. Of the 210 exposed teeth, 2 teeth receiving 100 mJ/p demonstrated abscess formation and were exfoliated. Further, in the rat molar when remaining dentin thickness was less than 0.5 mm, exposed to 100 mJ/p, threshold pulpal effects occurred. The response of rat pulp to laser exposure indicated no histologically measurable response to pulsed laser energy at 50 mJ/p.

  2. Anti-diabetic and Anti-hyperlipidemic Effects and Safety of Salacia reticulata and Related Species.

    PubMed

    Stohs, Sidney J; Ray, Sidhartha

    2015-07-01

    Extracts of Salacia reticulata Wight (Hypocrataceae) roots, stems, and leaves have been used in Asia for hundreds of years for the folkloric treatment of diabetes and other health problems. Constituents that have been identified as exhibiting anti-diabetic effects include salacinol, kotalanol, ponkorinol, salaprinol, and their corresponding de-0-sulfonated compounds. Mangiferin, kotalagenin 16-acetate and various proanthocyanidin oligomers have also been isolated. Studies indicate that Salacia extracts modulate multiple targets that influence carbohydrate and lipid metabolism including α-glucosidase, aldose reductase, pancreatic lipase, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-α, glucose transporter-4 mediated glucose uptake, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor. Furthermore, Salacia extracts exhibit free radical scavenging, antioxidant and hepatoprotectant activities. In human studies, Salacia extracts have been shown to decrease plasma glucose and insulin levels, decrease HbA1c, and modulate serum lipid levels with no adverse effects being reported. Similar results have been demonstrated in rat and mouse models as well as in vitro systems. Safety of S. reticulata and other Salacia species as S. oblonga and S. chinensis in rats and mice indicate that extracts are exceedingly safe. No clinical studies have examined the effects of Salacia extracts on human weight loss, although weight loss and decreases in weight gain have been demonstrated in animal models. Because of the large number of pharmacologically active compounds, it is difficult to establish standards for extracts. PMID:26031882

  3. [Histostructural changes of rat cerebral cortex during hemorrhagic stroke modeling].

    PubMed

    Savos'ko, S I; Chaĭkovs'kyĭ, Iu B; Pogoriela, N Kh; Makarenko, O M

    2012-01-01

    Pathological changes during modeling of primary and secondary acute hemorrhagic stroke were studied in rats. We revealed differences in the activity of pharmacological action of medications under condition of acute stroke. The action of medications increased viability of neurons in both hemispheres of rat cerebrum at a right-side primary and secondary hemorrhagic stroke. Following secondary stroke, the amount of degenerative neurons amounted 25.5 +/- 0.8 cells/mm2, following the action ofcerebrolysin this value was 17.6 +/- 1.7 cells/ mm2 and after the action of cortexine and cerebral this value amounted 18.0 +/- 0.9 cells/mm2 and 10.7 +/- 0.4 cells/ mm2, respectively. In control animals the number of degenerative neurons did not exceed 2% and averaged 1.5 +/- 0.1 cells/mm2. Analysis of the morphological and statistical data showed that the most effective remedies under the primary and secondary hemorrhagic insult are cortexine and cerebral. Cerebral was found to be more effective. PMID:23233944

  4. [Scintigraphic imaging of macrophages involved in lung vasoreflex: rat model].

    PubMed

    Ndoye, O; Mbodj, M; Gassama Seck, S; Sizaret, P Y; Abeille, B; Le Pape, A

    2003-01-01

    At time of pathological situations, a pulmonary fixation of labelled substances injected by intravenous way is observed. This fixation would result from a phagocytosis of these substances by abnormal cells whose presence was induced in the endothelium: Pulmonary Intravascular Macrophages (PIM's). After activation by phagocytosis, these cells are able to secrete powerful vasoactive mediators capable of inducing cardiopulmonary accidents. Hepatic cholestase was induced in Wistar rats by ligation and section of common bile duct. The recruitment of PIM's was followed in vivo by phagocytosis scintigraphic imaging after labelled colloid injection. During the 35 days of evolution of the pathology, we observe a pulmonary fixation of the colloid agents which progresses up to 70% as well as a concomitant decease in the hepatic activity. Histologic examination showed numerous cells related to pulmonary capillaries' endothelium belonging to mononuclear phagocytes line and expressing an activated phenotype of monocytes. The scintigraphic and histological tests carried out enabled us to validate the model of induction of PIM's in rat by ligation of the choledoque one. The study of the vasoactive response via certain mediators can from now be approached, a Doppler technique on the pig aorta is being in the course of evaluation. PMID:15770812

  5. Effects of benidipine in a rat model for experimental angina.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun-ichi; Matsubara, Masahiro; Yao, Kozo

    2006-12-01

    To compare the antianginal effects of 1,4-dihydropyridine-type calcium-channel blockers, we evaluated the effects of benidipine, amlodipine, nifedipine, and efonidipine on vasopressin-induced myocardial ischemia in rats, an experimental model of angina. Intravenous administration of benidipine (3 microg/kg), amlodipine (1000 microg/kg), and nifedipine (100 microg/kg) suppressed the vasopressin-induced S-wave depression, an index of myocardial ischemia. Efonidipine (100 microg/kg, i.v.) tended to inhibit the S-wave depression. At the antianginal dose of each drug, amlodipine, nifedipine, and efonidipine decreased blood pressure significantly, whereas benidipine had little effect on blood pressure at a dose of 3 microg/kg. These results indicate that benidipine, unlike the other 1,4-dihydropyridine-type calcium-channel blockers examined in this study, inhibits vasopressin-induced coronary vasospasm with fewer undesirable effects such as hypotension in rats, suggesting that benidipine may be useful in the treatment of angina pectoris. PMID:17139163

  6. A new model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Gelzleichter, T.R.; Pinkerton, K.E.; Walker, R.M.; Witschi, H. )

    1993-08-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 6 h daily to 0.8 ppm of ozone and 14.4 ppm of nitrogen dioxide. Approximately 7 to 10 wk after the initiation of exposure, animals began to demonstrate respiratory insufficiency and severe weight loss. About half of the rats died between Days 55 and 78 of exposure; no overt ill effects were observed in animals exposed to filtered air, to ozone alone, or to nitrogen dioxide. Biochemical findings in animals exposed to ozone and nitrogen dioxide included increased lung content of DNA, protein, collagen, and elastin, which was about 300% higher than the control values. The collagen-specific crosslink hydroxy-pyridinium, a biomarker for mature collagen in the lung, was decreased by about 40%. These results are consistent with extensive breakdown and remodeling of the lung parenchyma and its associated vasculature. Histopathologic evaluation showed severe fibrosis, alveolar collapse, honeycombing, macrophage and mast cell accumulation, vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy, and other indications of severe progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and end-stage lung disease. This unique animal model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis resembles the final stages of human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and should facilitate studying underlying mechanisms and potential therapy of progressive pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Experimental models for cancellous bone healing in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardsson, Magnus; Sandberg, Olof; Aspenberg, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Cancellous bone appears to heal by mechanisms different from shaft fracture healing. There is a paucity of animal models for fractures in cancellous bone, especially with mechanical evaluation. One proposed model consists of a screw in the proximal tibia of rodents, evaluated by pull-out testing. We evaluated this model in rats by comparing it to the healing of empty drill holes, in order to explain its relevance for fracture healing in cancellous bone. To determine the sensitivity to external influences, we also compared the response to drugs that influence bone healing. Methods — Mechanical fixation of the screws was measured by pull-out test and related to the density of the new bone formed around similar, but radiolucent, PMMA screws. The pull-out force was also related to the bone density in drill holes at various time points, as measured by microCT. Results — The initial bone formation was similar in drill holes and around the screw, and appeared to be reflected by the pull-out force. Both models responded similarly to alendronate or teriparatide (PTH). Later, the models became different as the bone that initially filled the drill hole was resorbed to restore the bone marrow cavity, whereas on the implant surface a thin layer of bone remained, making it change gradually from a trauma-related model to an implant fixation model. Interpretation — The similar initial bone formation in the different models suggests that pull-out testing in the screw model is relevant for assessment of metaphyseal bone healing. The subsequent remodeling would not be of clinical relevance in either model. PMID:26200395

  8. Modeling the Nonlinear Motion of the Rat Central Airways.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, G; Rona, A; Hainsworth, S V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in volumetric medical imaging techniques allowed the subject-specific modeling of the bronchial flow through the first few generations of the central airways using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a reliable CFD prediction of the bronchial flow requires modeling of the inhomogeneous deformation of the central airways during breathing. This paper addresses this issue by introducing two models of the central airways motion. The first model utilizes a node-to-node mapping between the discretized geometries of the central airways generated from a number of successive computed tomography (CT) images acquired dynamically (without breath hold) over the breathing cycle of two Sprague-Dawley rats. The second model uses a node-to-node mapping between only two discretized airway geometries generated from the CT images acquired at end-exhale and at end-inhale along with the ventilator measurement of the lung volume change. The advantage of this second model is that it uses just one pair of CT images, which more readily complies with the radiation dosage restrictions for humans. Three-dimensional computer aided design geometries of the central airways generated from the dynamic-CT images were used as benchmarks to validate the output from the two models at sampled time-points over the breathing cycle. The central airway geometries deformed by the first model showed good agreement to the benchmark geometries within a tolerance of 4%. The central airway geometry deformed by the second model better approximated the benchmark geometries than previous approaches that used a linear or harmonic motion model. PMID:26592166

  9. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper shows that rat models of cardiovascular diseases have differential degrees of underlying pathologies at a young age. Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. How...

  10. Effects of anethum graveolens and garlic on lipid profile in hyperlipidemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Kojuri, Javad; Vosoughi, Amir R; Akrami, Majid

    2007-01-01

    Background hyperlipidemia as a major risk factor of atherosclerosis is treated with different drugs. Concerning length of therapy and vast majority of side effects, herbal medication may be suitable substitute for these drugs. Methods In this single-blind, placebo controlled study, lipid profiles of 150 hyperlipidemic patients in cardiology outpatient department of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were checked at same conditions. They were divided into three equal groups randomly (each composing of 50 patients). They were given enteric-coated garlic powder tablet (equal to 400 mg garlic, 1 mg allicin) twice daily, anethum tablet (650 mg) twice daily, and placebo tablet. All patients were put on NCEP type Π diet and Six weeks later, lipid profiles were checked. Results In garlic group: total cholesterol (decreased by 26.82 mg/dl, 12.1% reduction, and P-value: .000), and LDL-cholesterol (decreased by 22.18 mg/dl, 17.3% reduction, and P-value: .000) dropped. HDL-cholesterol (increased by 10.02 mg/dl, 15.7% increase, and P-value: .000) increased. Although triglyceride dropped by 13.72 mg/dl (6.3%) but this was not significant statistically (P-value: .222). In anethum group: surprisingly, triglyceride increased by 14.74 mg/dl (6.0%). Anethum could reduce total cholesterol by 0.4 % and LDL-cholesterol by 6.3% but these were not significant statistically (P-value: .828, and .210, respectively). Conclusion Anethum has no significant effect on lipid profile, but garlic tablet has significant favorable effect on cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Garlic may play an important role in therapy of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:17328819

  11. [Risk factors in hyperlipidemic patients with coronary heart disease one year after PTCA].

    PubMed

    Kimmerle, R; Wimmer, T; Markus, M; Heinemann, L; Vester, E; Berger, M

    1994-01-01

    The reduction of modifiable risk factors in hyperlipidemic patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) receiving standard medical care in Germany has not been evaluated before. We identified all patients < 65 yrs of age with marked hyperlipidemia (Cholesterol (Chol) > 250 mg/dl, HDL < 20% Chol) among all patients who underwent PTCA during defined periods 1991/92 in the Cardiology department of the Heinrich-Heine-University. The study patients (n = 93, age 54 +/- 8 yrs, 75 men, 18 women) were evaluated 13 +/- 2 months after PTCA for modification of their risk factors, treatments, knowledge, medications and dietary habits with a structured questionnaire and a 5-day dietary protocol. At follow-up Chol and LDL were significantly reduced from 299 +/- 47 to 253 +/- 43, and from 228 +/- 47 to 189 +/- 42 mg/dl, respectively (p < 0.001). 10% of patients had an LDL < 135 mg/dl. In contrast, HDL (43 +/- 9 mg/dl) and triglycerides (242 +/- 138 mg/dl), the percentage of smokers (40%), of overweight patients (38%) and of patients with elevated blood pressure (43%) remained unchanged. During the observation period the number of contacts with physicians was high (12 (1-40)). 32% of patients participated in dietary counselling by a dietician and 42% in an in-patient rehabilitation programme. In 2/3 of patients the knowledge related to hyperlipidemia and a lipid-lowering diet was good. However, according to the dietary protocols the fat intake was high (37 +/- 7% of total calories). Lipid lowering drugs had been prescribed in 68% of patients, predominantly as monotherapy and in low dosage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8147073

  12. Effectiveness of Saccharomyces boulardii in a rat model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Soyturk, Mujde; Saygili, Saba Mukaddes; Baskin, Huseyin; Sagol, Ozgul; Yilmaz, Osman; Saygili, Fatih; Akpinar, Hale

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) in an experimental rat model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. METHODS: Thirty-two Wistar albino female rats were categorized into five groups. On the first day of the study, 50 mg TNBS was administered via a rectal catheter in order to induce colitis in all rats, except those in the control group. For 14 d, the rats were fed a standard diet, without the administration of any additional supplements to either the control or TNBS groups, in addition to 1 mg/kg per day S. boulardii to the S. boulardii group, 1 mg/kg per day methyl prednisolone (MP) to the MP group. The animals in the S. boulardii + MP group were coadministered these doses of S. boulardii and MP. During the study, weight loss, stool consistency, and the presence of obvious blood in the stool were evaluated, and the disease activity index (DAI) for colitis was recorded. The intestines were examined and colitis was macro- and microscopically scored. The serum and tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined, and fungemia was evaluated in the blood samples. RESULTS: The mean DAI scores for the MP and S. boulardii + MP groups was significantly lower than the TNBS group (3.69 ± 0.61 vs 4.46 ± 0.34, P = 0.018 and 3.77 ± 0.73 vs 4.46 ± 0.34, P = 0.025, respectively). While no significant differences between the TNBS and the S. boulardii or MP groups could be determined in terms of serum NO levels, the level of serum NO in the S. boulardii + MP group was significantly higher than in the TNBS and S. boulardii groups (8.12 ± 4.25 μmol/L vs 3.18 ± 1.19 μmol/L, P = 0.013; 8.12 ± 4.25 μmol/L vs 3.47 ± 1.66 μmol/L, P = 0.012, respectively). The tissue NO levels in the S. boulardii, MP and S. boulardii + MP groups were significantly lower than the TNBS group (16.62 ± 2.27 μmol/L vs 29.72 ± 6.10 μmol/L, P = 0.002; 14.66 ± 5.18 μmol/L vs 29.72 ± 6.10 μmol/L, P

  13. The influence of aging on poststroke depression using a rat model via middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Kutz, Ruslan; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Cohen, Hagit; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Shapira, Yoram; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is the most frequent psychological sequela following stroke. While previous studies describe the impact of age on brain infarct volume, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown following ischemia, the role of age on PSD has yet to be described. Here, we examine the influence of age on PSD progression in a rat model of PSD by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). One hundred forty-three rats were divided into three groups. 48 rats 20 weeks of age underwent a sham procedure, 51 rats 20 weeks of age had MCAO, and 44 rats 22-26 months of age had MCAO. Groups were further divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup was used to measure infarct lesion volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown at 24 h. In the second subgroup at 3 weeks after MCAO, rats were subjected to a sucrose preference test, two-way shuttle avoidance task, forced swimming test, and a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein level measurement. Total and striatal infarct volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown in the striatum were increased in older rats, as compared with younger rats. While both old and young rats exhibited depressive-like behaviors on each of the behavioral tests and lower BDNF levels post-MCAO, as compared with control rats, there were no differences between old and young rats. Although older rats suffered from larger infarct volumes, increased brain edema and more BBB disruption following MCAO, the lack of behavioral differences between young and old rats suggests that there was no effect of rat age on the incidence of PSD. PMID:23761136

  14. Determinants of renal tissue hypoxia in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ow, Connie P C; Abdelkader, Amany; Hilliard, Lucinda M; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Evans, Roger G

    2014-11-15

    Renal tissue oxygen tension (PO2) and its determinants have not been quantified in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Therefore, we measured kidney tissue PO2 in the Lewis rat model of PKD (LPK) and in Lewis control rats. We also determined the relative contributions of altered renal oxygen delivery and consumption to renal tissue hypoxia in LPK rats. PO2 of the superficial cortex of 11- to 13-wk-old LPK rats, measured by Clark electrode with the rat under anesthesia, was higher within the cysts (32.8 ± 4.0 mmHg) than the superficial cortical parenchyma (18.3 ± 3.5 mmHg). PO2 in the superficial cortical parenchyma of Lewis rats was 2.5-fold greater (46.0 ± 3.1 mmHg) than in LPK rats. At each depth below the cortical surface, tissue PO2 in LPK rats was approximately half that in Lewis rats. Renal blood flow was 60% less in LPK than in Lewis rats, and arterial hemoglobin concentration was 57% less, so renal oxygen delivery was 78% less. Renal venous PO2 was 38% less in LPK than Lewis rats. Sodium reabsorption was 98% less in LPK than Lewis rats, but renal oxygen consumption did not significantly differ between the two groups. Thus, in this model of PKD, kidney tissue is severely hypoxic, at least partly because of deficient renal oxygen delivery. Nevertheless, the observation of similar renal oxygen consumption, despite markedly less sodium reabsorption, in the kidneys of LPK compared with Lewis rats, indicates the presence of inappropriately high oxygen consumption in the polycystic kidney. PMID:25209412

  15. The touchscreen operant platform for assessing cognitive functions in a rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Phuong; Christensen, Helle Lyng; Bertelsen, Freja Cecilia Brandt; Bouzinova, Elena; Møller, Arne; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we assessed alterations in cognitive functions in a chronic mild stress (CMS) rat model of depression. Cognitive functions were assessed in two different tasks applying the translational operant platform touchscreen technology; the visual discrimination/acquisition task was used to assess the ability to perceive and distinguish visual stimuli and to assess associative stimulus-reward learning. The visual discrimination/reversal learning task was used to assess functional brain plasticity or reprogramming of previously acquired stimulus-reward associations. These tasks permit the dissociation of multiple cognitive domains. The CMS model is a validated depression model with the useful feature that rats upon stress exposure show a graduated, individual stress response allowing the segregation of rats into different phenotypes including stress-resilient and anhedonic-like subgroups. Anhedonic-like rats are less likely to acquire the pairwise discrimination task, and they have a slower acquisition rate than controls. In the reversal learning task, resilient rats performed significantly better than anhedonic-like rats over time and 50% passed criterion as opposed to 25% for controls and only 14% for anhedonic-like rats. This indicates that resilient rats have higher cognitive flexibility than anhedonic-like rats. Thus they perform better in learning a novel task, which at the same time potentially implies an increased ability to inhibit previously rewarded behavior. PMID:27083126

  16. Curcumin reduces injury progression in a rat comb burn model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Taira, Breena R; Lin, Fubao; Lim, Taeho; Anderson, Ryon; McClain, Steve A; Clark, Richard A F

    2011-01-01

    The oriental spice curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. When given orally before injury, curcumin reduces burn progression in a rat comb burn model. The authors hypothesized that intravenous administration of curcumin after injury would reduce burn progression and that its effects are mediated through iron chelation. Two comb burns were created on the dorsum of Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 300 g) using a brass comb with four rectangular prongs preheated in boiling water and applied for 30 seconds resulting in four rectangular 10 × 20 mm full-thickness burns separated by three 5 × 20 mm unburned interspaces (zone of ischemia). Animals were randomized to receive one of four doses of crude curcumin or one of six doses of purified curcumin intravenously 1 and 24 hours after injury. Another set of animals were randomized to deferoxamine or control vehicle. Wounds were observed at 7 days after injury for visual evidence of necrosis in the unburned interspaces. Full-thickness biopsies from the interspaces were evaluated with Hematoxylin and Eosin staining 7 days after injury for evidence of necrosis. The percentage of unburned interspaces undergoing necrosis at 1 week by purified curcumin doses was 0 μg/kg, 74%; 0.3 μg/kg, 58%; 1 μg/kg, 53%; 3 μg/kg, 37%; 10 μg/kg, 63%; 30 μg/kg, 53%; and 100 μg/kg, 26%. The differences among the groups were significant (P = .03). When compared with controls, the 1 and 3 μg/kg curcumin treatment groups had significantly less progression of interspaces to necrosis (P = .04 and .002) as did the 30 and 100 μg/kg treatment groups (P = .03 and <.001). Deferoxamine did not reduce burn progression. When administered intravenously 1 and 24 hours after injury, both crude and purified curcumin reduce the percentage of unburned interspaces that undergo necrosis in a rat hot comb burn model. The effects of purified curcumin appear to be bimodal, suggesting more than one mechanism of action. The effects of curcumin do not

  17. Fractional ventilation mapping using inert fluorinated gas MRI in rat models of inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Fox, Matthew S; Viel, Chris; Gajawada, Gowtham; Li, Tao; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend established methods for fractional ventilation mapping using (19) F MRI of inert fluorinated gases to rat models of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, five rats were instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs two days prior to imaging, six rats were instilled with bleomycin in the lungs two weeks prior to imaging and an additional four rats were used as controls. (19) F MR lung imaging was performed at 3 T with rats continuously breathing a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and O2 . Fractional ventilation maps were obtained using a wash-out approach, by switching the breathing mixture to pure O2 , and acquiring images following each successive wash-out breath. The mean fractional ventilation (r) was 0.29 ± 0.05 for control rats, 0.23 ± 0.10 for LPS-instilled rats and 0.19 ± 0.03 for bleomycin-instilled rats. Bleomycin-instilled rats had a significantly decreased mean r value compared with controls (P = 0.010). Although LPS-instilled rats had a slightly reduced mean r value, this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.556). Fractional ventilation gradients were calculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction, and the mean A/P gradient was -0.005 ± 0.008 cm(-1) for control rats, 0.013 ± 0.005 cm(-1) for LPS-instilled rats and 0.009 ± 0.018 cm(-1) for bleomycin-instilled rats. Fractional ventilation gradients were significantly different for control rats compared with LPS-instilled rats only (P = 0.016). The ventilation gradients calculated from control rats showed the expected gravitational relationship, while ventilation gradients calculated from LPS- and bleomycin-instilled rats showed the opposite trend. Histology confirmed that LPS-instilled rats had a significantly elevated alveolar wall thickness, while bleomycin-instilled rats showed signs of substantial fibrosis. Overall, (19) F MRI may be able to detect the effects of pulmonary

  18. Modeling interpopulation dispersal by banner-tailed kangaroo rats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skvarla, J.L.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Waser, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Many metapopulation models assume rules of population connectivity that are implicitly based on what we know about within-population dispersal, but especially for vertebrates, few data exist to assess whether interpopulation dispersal is just within-population dispersal "scaled up." We extended existing multi-stratum mark-release-recapture models to incorporate the robust design, allowing us to compare patterns of within- and between-population movement in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Movement was rare among eight populations separated by only a few hundred meters: seven years of twice-annual sampling captured >1200 individuals but only 26 interpopulation dispersers. We developed a program that implemented models with parameters for capture, survival, and interpopulation movement probability and that evaluated competing hypotheses in a model selection framework. We evaluated variants of the island, stepping-stone, and isolation-by-distance models of interpopulation movement, incorporating effects of age, season, and habitat (short or tall grass). For both sexes, QAICc values clearly favored isolation-by-distance models, or models combining the effects of isolation by distance and habitat. Models with probability of dispersal expressed as linear-logistic functions of distance and as negative exponentials of distance fit the data equally well. Interpopulation movement probabilities were similar among sexes (perhaps slightly biased toward females), greater for juveniles than adults (especially for females), and greater before than during the breeding season (especially for females). These patterns resemble those previously described for within-population dispersal in this species, which we interpret as indicating that the same processes initiate both within- and between-population dispersal.

  19. HIV-1 Nef Breaches Placental Barrier in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Poonam; Agnihotri, Saurabh Kumar; Tewari, Mahesh Chandra; Kumar, Sadan; Sachdev, Monika; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2012-01-01

    The vertical transmission of HIV-1 from the mother to fetus is known, but the molecular mechanism regulating this transmission is not fully characterized. The fetus is highly protected by the placenta, which does not permit microbial pathogens to cross the placental barrier. In the present study, a rat model was established to observe the effect of HIV-1 protein Nef on placental barrier. Evans blue dye was used to assay permeability of placental barrier and fourteen day pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were injected intravenously with 2% Evans blue dye along with various concentrations of recombinant Nef. After an hour, animals were sacrificed and dye migration was observed through the assimilation of peripheral blood into fetus. Interestingly, traces of recombinant Nef protein were detected in the embryo as well as amniotic fluid and amniotic membrane along with placenta and uterus. Our study indicates that recombinant HIV-1-Nef protein breaches the placental barrier and allows the migration of Evans blue dye to the growing fetus. Further the concentration of Nef protein in blood is directly proportional to the intensity of dye migration and to the amount of Nef protein detected in uterus, placenta, amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid and embryo. Based on this study, it can be concluded that the HIV-1 Nef protein has a direct effect on breaching of the placental barrier in the model we have established in this study. Our observations will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanisms related to this breach of placental barrier by Nef in humans and may be helpful to identify specific Nef inhibitors. PMID:23240037

  20. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates. PMID:25891783

  1. Polymorphisms of ATP binding cassette G5 and G8 transporters: their effect on cholesterol metabolism after moderate weight loss in overweight and obese hyperlipidemic women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the effect of polymorphisms ABCG5 and ABCG8 transporters on changes in lipid levels, cholesterol absorption rate (ABS), fractional synthesis rate (FSR), and turnover (TO) after moderate weight loss (WtL) in women. Cholesterol metabolism was measured pre and post WtL in 35 hyperlipidemic...

  2. MODELLING WORKING AND REFERENCE MEMORY IN RATS: EFFECTS OF SCOPOLAMINE ON DELAYED MATCHING-TO-POSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model of working and reference memory in rats is described, based on a discrete-trial operant procedure with concurrent spatial matching and nonspatial discrimination components. orking memory was assessed by delivery food to rats for pressing one of two retractable levers afte...

  3. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  4. Sodium Salicylate Reduced Insulin Resistance in the Retina of a Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youde; Thakran, Shalini; Bheemreddy, Rajini; Coppess, William; Walker, Robert J.; Steinle, Jena J.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate has been reported to reduce markers of diabetic retinopathy in a type 1 rat model. Because rates of type 2 diabetes are on the rise, we wanted to determine whether salicylate could improve insulin resistance in a type 2 rat model, as well as improve retinal function. We treated lean and obese BBZDR/Wor type 2 diabetic rats with salicylate in their chow for 2 months. Prior to salicylate treatment, rats underwent an electroretinogram to measure retinal function. After 2 months of treatment, rats underwent an additional electroretinogram prior to sacrifice. In addition to the animal model, we also treated retinal endothelial cells (REC) and rat Müller cells with salicylate and performed the same analyses as done for the rat retinal lysates. To investigate the role of salicylate in insulin signaling, we measured TNFα and caspase 3 levels by ELISA, as well as performed Western blotting for insulin receptor substrate 1, insulin receptor, SOCS3, and pro- and anti-apoptotic markers. Data demonstrated that salicylate significantly improved retinal function, as well as reduced TNFα and SOCS3-induced insulin resistance in all samples. Overall, results suggest that salicylate is effective in reducing insulin resistance in the retina of type 2 diabetic rat models. PMID:25874611

  5. Grape powder treatment prevents anxiety-like behavior in a rat model of aging.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Ali, Quaisar; Pokkunuri, Indira; Asghar, Mohammad; Salim, Samina

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we have reported that grape powder (GP) treatment prevented pharmacologic and psychological stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats. Protective effects of GP were attributed to its antioxidant effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that age-associated behavioral and cognitive deficits such as anxiety and memory impairment will be ameliorated with GP treatment. Using a National Institute of Aging recommended rodent model of aging, we examined a potentially protective role of antioxidant-rich GP in age-associated anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: young rats (3 months old) provided with tap water or with 15 g/L GP dissolved in tap water for 3 weeks, aged rats (21 months old) provided with tap water or with GP-treated tap water for 3 weeks (AG-GP). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in aged rats compared with young rats, GP-treated young rats, or aged control rats (P < .05). Also, GP treatment prevented age-induced anxiety-like behavior in AG-GP rats (P < .05). Neither short-term nor long-term age-associated memory deficits improved with GP treatment in AG-GP rats. Furthermore, aged rats showed increased level of physiological stress (corticosterone) and increased oxidative stress in the plasma (8-isoprostane) as well as in selected brain areas (protein carbonylation). Grape powder treatment prevented age-induced increase in corticosterone levels and plasma 8-isoprostane levels in aged rats (P < .05), whereas protein carbonylation was recovered in the amygdala region only (P < .05). Grape powder by regulating oxidative stress ameliorates age-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats, whereas age-associated memory deficits seem unaffected with GP treatment. PMID:26022140

  6. Effective Rat Lung Tumor Model for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Wodzak, Michelle; Belzile, Olivier; Zhou, Heling; Sishc, Brock; Yan, Hao; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Mason, Ralph P; Brekken, Rolf A; Chopra, Rajiv; Story, Michael D; Timmerman, Robert; Saha, Debabrata

    2016-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has found an important role in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, demonstrating improvements in dose distribution and even tumor cure rates, particularly for early-stage disease. Despite its emerging clinical efficacy, SBRT has primarily evolved due to advances in medical imaging and more accurate dose delivery, leaving a void in knowledge of the fundamental biological mechanisms underlying its activity. Thus, there is a critical need for the development of orthotropic animal models to further probe the biology associated with high-dose-per-fraction treatment typical of SBRT. We report here on an improved surgically based methodology for generating solitary intrapulmonary nodule tumors, which can be treated with simulated SBRT using the X-RAD 225Cx small animal irradiator and Small Animal RadioTherapy (SmART) Plan treatment system. Over 90% of rats developed solitary tumors in the right lung. Furthermore, the tumor response to radiation was monitored noninvasively via bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and complete ablation of tumor growth was achieved with 36 Gy (3 fractions of 12 Gy each). We report a reproducible, orthotopic, clinically relevant lung tumor model, which better mimics patient treatment regimens. This system can be utilized to further explore the underlying biological mechanisms relevant to SBRT and high-dose-per-fraction radiation exposure and to provide a useful model to explore the efficacy of radiation modifiers in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:27223828

  7. Standardised Models for Inducing Experimental Peritoneal Adhesions in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Bernhard; Wallwiener, Christian; Rajab, Taufiek K.; Brochhausen, Christoph; Wallwiener, Markus; Rothmund, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Animal models for adhesion induction are heterogeneous and often poorly described. We compare and discuss different models to induce peritoneal adhesions in a randomized, experimental in vivo animal study with 72 female Wistar rats. Six different standardized techniques for peritoneal trauma were used: brushing of peritoneal sidewall and uterine horns (group 1), brushing of parietal peritoneum only (group 2), sharp excision of parietal peritoneum closed with interrupted sutures (group 3), ischemic buttons by grasping the parietal peritoneum and ligating the base with Vicryl suture (group 4), bipolar electrocoagulation of the peritoneum (group 5), and traumatisation by electrocoagulation followed by closure of the resulting peritoneal defect using Vicryl sutures (group 6). Upon second look, there were significant differences in the adhesion incidence between the groups (P < 0.01). Analysis of the fraction of adhesions showed that groups 2 (0%) and 5 (4%) were significantly less than the other groups (P < 0.01). Furthermore, group 6 (69%) was significantly higher than group 1 (48%) (P < 0.05) and group 4 (47%) (P < 0.05). There was no difference between group 3 (60%) and group 6 (P = 0.2). From a clinical viewpoint, comparison of different electrocoagulation modes and pharmaceutical adhesion barriers is possible with standardised models. PMID:24809049

  8. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficult to study the interaction between HIV and substance abuse in human populations. Several rodent models have been developed in an attempt to study the transmission and pathogenesis of the HIV-1 virus. The HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat is a reliable model of neuroHIV because it mimics the condition of HIV-infected patients on cART. Research using this model supports the hypothesis that the presence of HIV-1 viral proteins in the central nervous system increases the sensitivity and susceptibility of HIV-positive individuals to substance abuse. PMID:25733103

  9. The Dimethylnitrosamine Induced Liver Fibrosis Model in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Kum Fai; Kuppan Rajendran, Dinesh Babu; Phang, Siew Siang Gary; Toh, Han Hui Alden

    2016-01-01

    Four to six week old, male Wistar rats were used to produce animal models of liver fibrosis. The process requires four weeks of administration of 10 mg/kg dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), given intraperitoneally for three consecutive days per week. Intraperitoneal injections were performed in the fume hood as DMN is a known hepatoxin and carcinogen. The model has several advantages. Firstly, liver changes can be studied sequentially or at particular stages of interest. Secondly, the stage of liver disease can be monitored by measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzymes. Thirdly, the severity of liver damage at different stages can be confirmed by sacrifice of animals at designated time points, followed by histological examination of Masson's Trichome stained liver tissues. After four weeks of DMN dosing, the typical fibrosis score is 5 to 6 on the Ishak scale. The model can be reproduced consistently and has been widely used to assess the efficacy of potential anti-fibrotic agents. PMID:27340889

  10. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Montgomery, David W; Merkle, Carrie J

    2011-10-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ± 2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ± 1.1%) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin-coated 24-well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 μm pores. Additionally, AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel(®) to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  11. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Montgomery, David W.; Merkle, Carrie J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ±2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ±1.1 %) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin coated 24 well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 micron pores. Additionally AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel® to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cell cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  12. The Characterization of Obese Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Rat Model Suitable for Exercise Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shuwei; Jiang, Zhongli

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a new polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) rat model suitable for exercise intervention. Method Thirty six rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: PCOS rats with high-fat diet (PF, n = 24), PCOS rats with ordinary diet (PO, n = 6), and control rats with ordinary diet (CO, n = 6). Two kinds of PCOS rat model were made by adjustment diet structure and testosterone injection for 28 days. After a successful animal model, PF model rats were randomly assigned to three groups: exercise with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-EF, n = 6), sedentary with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-SF, n = 6), exercise with an ordinary diet (PF-EO, n = 6). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin (FINS), estrogen (E2), progesterone (P), and testosterone (T) in serum were determined by RIA, and ovarian morphology was evaluated by Image-Pro plus 6.0. Results Body weight, Lee index, FINS increased significantly in PF rat model. Serum levels of E2 and T were significantly higher in PF and PO than in CO. Ovary organ index and ovarian areas were significant lower in PF than in CO. After intervention for 2 weeks, the levels of 1 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG1), 2 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG2), FINS and the serum levels of T decreased significantly in PF-EF rats and PF-EO rats. The ratio of FBG/FINS was significant higher in PF-EO rats than in PF-SF rats. Ovarian morphology showed that the numbers of preantral follicles and atretic follicles decreased significantly, and the numbers of antral follicles and corpora lutea increased significantly in the rats of PF-EF and PF-EO. Conclusion By combination of high-fat diet and testosterone injection, the obese PCOS rat model is conformable with the lifestyle habits of fatty foods and insufficient exercise, and has metabolic and reproductive characteristics of human PCOS. This model can be applied to study exercise intervention. PMID:24905232

  13. Simulating certain aspects of hypogravity: Effects on the mandibular incisors of suspended rats (PULEH model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Winter, F.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a hypogravity simulating model on the rate of mandibular incisor formation, dentinogenesis and, amelogenesis in laboratory rats was studied. The model is the partial unloading by elevating the hindquarters. In this system, rat hindquarters are elevated 30 to 40 deg from the cage floors to completely unload the hindlimbs, but the animals are free to move about using their forelimbs. This model replicates the fluid sift changes which occur during the weightlessness of spaceflight and produces an osteopenia in the weight bearing skeletons. The histogenesis and/or mineralization rates of the mandibular incisor during the first 19d of PULEH in young growing rats are recorded.

  14. A Novel Model of Intravital Platelet Imaging Using CD41-ZsGreen1 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Makoto; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Ohno, Kousaku; Jakubowski, Joseph A.; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play pivotal roles in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Although models of intravital platelet imaging are available for thrombosis studies in mice, few are available for rat studies. The present effort aimed to generate fluorescent platelets in rats and assess their dynamics in a rat model of arterial injury. We generated CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats, in which green fluorescence protein ZsGreen1 was expressed specifically in megakaryocytes and thus platelets. The transgenic rats exhibited normal hematological and biochemical values with the exception of body weight and erythroid parameters, which were slightly lower than those of wild-type rats. Platelet aggregation, induced by 20 μM ADP and 10 μg/ml collagen, and blood clotting times were not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type rats. Saphenous arteries of transgenic rats were injured with 10% FeCl3, and the formation of fluorescent thrombi was evaluated using confocal microscopy. FeCl3 caused time-dependent increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of injured arteries of vehicle-treated rats. Prasugrel (3 mg/kg, p.o.), administered 2 h before FeCl3, significantly inhibited fluorescence compared with vehicle-treated rats (4.5 ± 0.4 vs. 14.9 ± 2.4 arbitrary fluorescence units at 30 min, respectively, n = 8, P = 0.0037). These data indicate that CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats represent a useful model for intravital imaging of platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the evaluation of antithrombotic agents. PMID:27128503

  15. A Novel Model of Intravital Platelet Imaging Using CD41-ZsGreen1 Transgenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Makoto; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Ohno, Kousaku; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play pivotal roles in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Although models of intravital platelet imaging are available for thrombosis studies in mice, few are available for rat studies. The present effort aimed to generate fluorescent platelets in rats and assess their dynamics in a rat model of arterial injury. We generated CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats, in which green fluorescence protein ZsGreen1 was expressed specifically in megakaryocytes and thus platelets. The transgenic rats exhibited normal hematological and biochemical values with the exception of body weight and erythroid parameters, which were slightly lower than those of wild-type rats. Platelet aggregation, induced by 20 μM ADP and 10 μg/ml collagen, and blood clotting times were not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type rats. Saphenous arteries of transgenic rats were injured with 10% FeCl3, and the formation of fluorescent thrombi was evaluated using confocal microscopy. FeCl3 caused time-dependent increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of injured arteries of vehicle-treated rats. Prasugrel (3 mg/kg, p.o.), administered 2 h before FeCl3, significantly inhibited fluorescence compared with vehicle-treated rats (4.5 ± 0.4 vs. 14.9 ± 2.4 arbitrary fluorescence units at 30 min, respectively, n = 8, P = 0.0037). These data indicate that CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats represent a useful model for intravital imaging of platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the evaluation of antithrombotic agents. PMID:27128503

  16. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  17. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Hee Choi, Seong; Bless, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method Twenty four 4-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to one of four experimental groups: Chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100 ng basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), chronic vocal fold scar treated with saline (sham treatment), and unscarred untreated control. Following tissue harvest, histological and immunohistochemical data were collected to confirm extracellular matrix alteration in the chronic scar group, and acoustic, aerodynamic and high speed digital imaging data were collected using an excised larynx setup in all groups. Phonation threshold pressure (Pth), glottal resistance (Rg), glottal efficiency (Eg), vibratory amplitude and vibratory area were employed as dependent variables. Results Chronically scarred vocal folds were characterized by elevated collagen I and III and reduced hyaluronic acid abundance. Phonation was achieved and data were collected from all control and bFGF treated larynges, however phonation was not achieved with 3 of 6 chronically scarred and 1 of 6 saline treated larynges. Compared to control, the chronic scar group was characterized by elevated Pth, reduced Eg, and intra-larynx vibratory amplitude and area asymmetry. The bFGF group was characterized by Pth below control group levels, Eg comparable to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. The sham group was characterized by Pth comparable to control, Eg superior to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. Conclusions The excised larynx model reported here demonstrated robust deterioration across phonatory indices under the scar condition and sensitivity to treatment induced change under the bFGF condition. The improvement observed under the sham condition may reflect

  18. Virgin Coconut Oil Supplementation Prevents Bone Loss in Osteoporosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hayatullina, Zil; Muhammad, Norliza; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Therefore, antioxidant compounds have the potential to be used in the prevention and treatment of the disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on bone microarchitecture in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model. VCO is a different form of coconut oil as it is rich with antioxidants. Three-month-old female rats were randomly grouped into baseline, sham-operated, ovariectomized control (Ovx), and ovariectomized rats fed with 8% VCO in their diet for six weeks (Ovx+VCO). Bone histomorphometry of the right femora was carried out at the end of the study. Rats supplemented with VCO had a significantly greater bone volume and trabecular number while trabecular separation was lower than the Ovx group. In conclusion, VCO was effective in maintaining bone structure and preventing bone loss in estrogen-deficient rat model. PMID:23024690

  19. Establishment and identification of a hypoxia-ischemia brain damage model in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    YAO, DAN; ZHANG, WEIRAN; HE, XUE; WANG, JINHU; JIANG, KEWEN; ZHAO, ZHENGYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to set up a reliable model of severe hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) in neonatal rats and several methods were used to identify whether the model was successful. A total of 40 healthy 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: The sham-surgery group (n=18) and the HIBD model group (n=22). The HIBD model was produced according to the traditional Rice method. The rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether. The left common carotid artery (CCA) was exposed, ligated and cut. Following this, the rats were exposed to hypoxia in a normobaric chamber filled with 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen for 2 h. In the sham-surgery group, the left CCA was exposed but was not ligated, cut or exposed to hypoxia. The neurobehavioral changes of the rats were observed in the 24 h after HIBD. The brains were collected after 72 h to observe the pathological morphological changes of the brain tissue. The behavioral ability and neurobehavioral changes were studied in each group. The water maze test was used for evaluating the learning-memory ability when the rats were 28 days old. Compared with the sham-surgery group, all the HIBD model rats had a lag of motor development. The rats had evident changes in anatomy and Nissl staining, and cognitive impairment was shown through the result of the water maze. Therefore, the model of HIBD in neonatal rats is feasible and provides a reliable model for subsequent studies. PMID:27073628

  20. Model for voluntary wine and alcohol consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    Arola, L; Roig, R; Cascón, E; Brunet, M J; Fornós, N; Sabaté, M; Raga, X; Batista, J; Salvadó, M J; Bladé, C

    1997-08-01

    It has been suggested that moderate consumption of ethanol and wine has a protective effect on human health. Animal models used to date for alcohol consumption can not mimic real situations in humans because the consumption is forced and/or excessive. The present study proposes to determine the effects of a voluntary and ad lib consumption model more similar to that of human behavior. Male Wistar rats had free access to either standard diet and water or the same diet plus red wine, sweet wine, or a solution equivalent to red wine (13.5% ethanol) or to sweet wine (20% ethanol + 130 g/L sucrose) for 30 days or 6 months. Daily wine consumption was 15.8 +/- 0.9 and 2.0 +/- 0.2 ml/day for sweet and red wines, respectively. The consumption of each of the alcoholic solutions was similar to that of the wine they were simulating. Drinking wine or ethanol did not affect food and water intakes or growth rate. Plasma metabolites were not substantially affected by consumption of wine or ethanol. Although moderate and high wine consumption did not change the activity of plasma marker enzymes of tissue damage, the consumption of the 2 alcoholic solutions caused a long-term increase in the activity of aspartate aminotransferase. It seems that wine consumption protects the organism from hepatic lesions induced by ethanol alone. PMID:9251979

  1. Modeling fibrosis using fibroblasts isolated from scarred rat vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yo; Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Ye, Shuyun; Kendziorski, Christina; Welham, Nathan V

    2016-07-01

    Following injury, pathologically activated vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) can engage in disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, leading to VF fibrosis and impaired voice function. Given the importance of scar VFFs to phenotypically appropriate in vitro modeling of VF fibrosis, we pursued detailed characterization of scar VFFs obtained from surgically injured rat VF mucosae, compared with those obtained from experimentally naïve, age-matched tissue. Scar VFFs initially exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype characterized by increased proliferation, increased Col1a1 transcription and collagen, type I synthesis, increased Acta2 transcription and α-smooth muscle actin synthesis, and enhanced contractile function. These features were most distinct at passage 1 (P1); we observed a coalescence of the scar and naïve VFF phenotypes at later passages. An empirical Bayes statistical analysis of the P1 cell transcriptome identified 421 genes that were differentially expressed by scar, compared with naïve, VFFs. These genes were primarily associated with the wound response, ECM regulation, and cell proliferation. Follow-up comparison of P1 scar VFFs and their in vivo tissue source showed substantial transcriptomic differences. Finally, P1 scar VFFs responded to treatment with hepatocyte growth factor and transforming growth factor-β3, two biologics with reported therapeutic value. Despite the practical limitations inherent to working with early passage cells, this experimental model is easily implemented in any suitably equipped laboratory and has the potential to improve the applicability of preclinical VF fibrosis research. PMID:27111284

  2. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and NH4+, and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  3. Compensatory UTE/T2W Imaging of Inflammatory Vascular Wall in Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Han; Kim, Myeong-Hoon; Heo, Dan; Lee, Eugene; Suh, Jin-Suck; Haam, Seungjoo; Huh, Yong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To obtain compensatory ultra-short echo time (UTE) imaging and T2-weighted (T2W) imaging of Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits following dextran-coated magnetic nanocluster (DMNC) injection for the effective in vivo detection of inflammatory vascular wall. Methods Magnetic nanoparticle was synthesized by thermal decomposition and encapsulated with dextran to prepare DMNC. The contrast enhancement efficiency of DMNC was investigated using UTE (repetition time [TR] = 5.58 and TE = 0.07 ms) and T2W (TR = 4000 and TE = 60 ms) imaging sequences. To confirm the internalization of DMNC into macrophages, DMNC-treated macrophages were visualized by cellular transmission electron microscope (TEM) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. WHHL rabbits expressing macrophage-rich plaques were subjected to UTE and T2W imaging before and after intravenous DMNC (120 μmol Fe/kg) treatment. Ex vivo MR imaging of plaques and immunostaining studies were also performed. Results Positive and negative contrast enhancement of DMNC solutions with increasing Fe concentrations were observed in UTE and T2W imaging, respectively. The relative signal intensities of the DMNC solution containing 2.9 mM Fe were calculated as 3.53 and 0.99 in UTE and T2W imaging, respectively. DMNC uptake into the macrophage cytoplasm was visualized by electron microscopy. Cellular MR imaging of DMNC-treated macrophages revealed relative signals of 3.00 in UTE imaging and 0.98 in T2W imaging. In vivo MR images revealed significant brightening and darkening of plaque areas in the WHHL rabbit 24 h after DMNC injection in UTE and T2W imaging, respectively. Ex vivo MR imaging results agreed with these in vivo MR imaging results. Histological analysis showed that DMNCs were localized to areas of inflammatory vascular wall. Conclusions Using compensatory UTE and T2W imaging in conjunction with DMNC is an effective approach for the noninvasive in vivo imaging of atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:25978437

  4. The rat: a laboratory model for studies of the diving response.

    PubMed

    Panneton, W Michael; Gan, Qi; Juric, Rajko

    2010-04-01

    Underwater submersion in mammals induces apnea, parasympathetically mediated bradycardia, and sympathetically mediated peripheral vasoconstriction. These effects are collectively termed the diving response, potentially the most powerful autonomic reflex known. Although these physiological responses are directed by neurons in the brain, study of neural control of the diving response has been hampered since 1) it is difficult to study the brains of animals while they are underwater, 2) feral marine mammals are usually large and have brains of variable size, and 3) there are but few references on the brains of naturally diving species. Similar responses are elicited in anesthetized rodents after stimulation of their nasal mucosa, but this nasopharyngeal reflex has not been compared directly with natural diving behavior in the rat. In the present study, we compared hemodynamic responses elicited in awake rats during volitional underwater submersion with those of rats swimming on the water's surface, rats involuntarily submerged, and rats either anesthetized or decerebrate and stimulated nasally with ammonia vapors. We show that the hemodynamic changes to voluntary diving in the rat are similar to those of naturally diving marine mammals. We also show that the responses of voluntary diving rats are 1) significantly different from those seen during swimming, 2) generally similar to those elicited in trained rats involuntarily "dunked" underwater, and 3) generally different from those seen from dunking naive rats underwater. Nasal stimulation of anesthetized rats differed most from the hemodynamic variables of rats trained to dive voluntarily. We propose that the rat trained to dive underwater is an excellent laboratory model to study neural control of the mammalian diving response, and also suggest that some investigations may be done with nasal stimulation of decerebrate preparations to decipher such control. PMID:20093670

  5. Assessment of pharmacokinetic interaction of spirulina with glitazone in a type 2 diabetes rat model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Annu; Nair, Anroop; Kumria, Rachna; Al-Dhubiab, Bandar-E; Chattopadhyaya, Ipshita; Gupta, Sumeet

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the current study was to assess the possible pharmacokinetic interactions of spirulina with glitazones in an insulin resistance rat model. Wistar male albino rats were equally divided into five groups: insulin resistant rats+spirulina (500 mg/kg)+pioglitazone (10 mg/kg), insulin resistant rats+pioglitazone (10 mg/kg), insulin resistant rats+spirulina (500 mg/kg)+rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg), insulin resistant rats+rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg), and insulin resistant rats+spirulina (500 mg/kg). Described doses of pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, or spirulina were per orally administered and the plasma drug concentrations were determined. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as Tmax, Cmax, AUC(0-α), t1/2, and Kel were determined by plotting the drug concentration as a function of time. The data observed in this acute study indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters (Tmax, Cmax, AUC(0-α), t1/2, and Kel) of glitazones (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone) or spirulina, when they were coadministered. Given the promising results, this study concludes that the coadministration of spirulina does not influence the pharmacokinetics of glitazones in a type 2 diabetes rat model. Further chronic in vivo studies are recommended to assess the real time effect. PMID:24328701

  6. Degraded neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds in a rat model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Borland, Michael S; Buell, Elizabeth P; Centanni, Tracy M; Fink, Melyssa K; Im, Kwok W; Wilson, Linda G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome have greatly impaired speech and language abilities. Auditory brainstem responses to sounds are normal, but cortical responses are highly abnormal. In this study, we used the novel rat Mecp2 knockout model of Rett syndrome to document the neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds. We hypothesized that both speech discrimination ability and the neural response to speech sounds would be impaired in Mecp2 rats. We expected that extensive speech training would improve speech discrimination ability and the cortical response to speech sounds. Our results reveal that speech responses across all four auditory cortex fields of Mecp2 rats were hyperexcitable, responded slower, and were less able to follow rapidly presented sounds. While Mecp2 rats could accurately perform consonant and vowel discrimination tasks in quiet, they were significantly impaired at speech sound discrimination in background noise. Extensive speech training improved discrimination ability. Training shifted cortical responses in both Mecp2 and control rats to favor the onset of speech sounds. While training increased the response to low frequency sounds in control rats, the opposite occurred in Mecp2 rats. Although neural coding and plasticity are abnormal in the rat model of Rett syndrome, extensive therapy appears to be effective. These findings may help to explain some aspects of communication deficits in Rett syndrome and suggest that extensive rehabilitation therapy might prove beneficial. PMID:26321676

  7. Pulmonary Transcriptional Response to Ozone in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genetic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and associated metabolic impairments can influence the lung injury from inhaled pollutants. We hypothesized that comparative assessment of global pulmonary expression profile of healthy and CVD-prone rat models will provide mechanistic ins...

  8. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  9. Structure-Activity Relationship Models for Rat Carcinogenesis and Assessing the Role Mutagens Play in Model Predictivity

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquer, C. Alex; Batey, Kaylind; Qamar, Shahid; Cunningham, Albert R.; Cunningham, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that fragment based cat-SAR carcinogenesis models consisting solely of mutagenic or non-mutagenic carcinogens varied greatly in terms of their predictive accuracy. This led us to investigate how well the rat cancer cat-SAR model predicted mutagens and non-mutagens in their learning set. Four rat cancer cat-SAR models were developed: Complete Rat, Transgender Rat, Male Rat, and Female Rat, with leave-one-out (LOO) validation concordance values of 69%, 74%, 67%, and 73%, respectively. The mutagenic carcinogens produced concordance values in the range of 69–76% as compared to only 47–53% for non-mutagenic carcinogens. As a surrogate for mutagenicity comparisons between single site and multiple site carcinogen SAR models was analyzed. The LOO concordance values for models consisting of 1-site, 2-site, and 4+-site carcinogens were 66%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. As expected, the proportion of mutagens to non-mutagens also increased, rising from 54% for 1-site to 80% for 4+-site carcinogens. This study demonstrates that mutagenic chemicals, in both SAR learning sets and test sets, are influential in assessing model accuracy. This suggests that SAR models for carcinogens may require a two-step process in which mutagenicity is first determined before carcinogenicity can be accurately predicted. PMID:24697549

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Maxing Shigan decoction in normal rats and RSV pneumonia model rats by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Gao, Meng; Qu, Fei; Li, Hui-lan; Yu, Lan-bin; Rao, Yi; Wang, Yue-sheng; Xu, Guo-liang

    2015-07-01

    To establish a LC-MS/MS method to determine the concentrations of liquiritin, glycyrrhizin, glycyrrhetinic acid, amygdalin, amygdalin prunasin, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and methylephedrine of Maxing Shigan decoction in rat plasma, and study the differences on their pharmacokinetic process in normal rats and RSV pneumonia model rats. After normal rats and RSV pneumonia model rats were orally administered with Maxing Shigan decoction, the blood was collected from retinal vein plexus of different time points. Specifically, tetrahydropalmatine was taken as internal standard for determining ephedrine, while chloramphenicol was taken as internal standard for determining other components. After plasma samples were pre-treated as the above, the supernatant was dried with nitrogen blowing concentrator and then redissolved with methylalcohol. The chromatography was eluted with mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid solution in a gradient manner. ESI sources were adopted to scan ingredients in ephedra in a positive ion scanning mode and other ingredientsin a negative ion scanning mode. The multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) method was developed the plasma concentration of each active component. The pharmacokinetic parameters of each group were calculated by using Win-Nonlin 4.1 software and put into the statistical analysis. The result showed the plasma concentration of the eight active ingredients, i.e., liquiritin, glycyrrhizin, glycyrrhetinic acid, amygdalin, amygdalin prunasin, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and methylephedrine within the ranges of 1.04-1040, 1.04-1040, 0.89-445, 1.05-4200, 1.25-2490, 0.3-480, 0.3-480, 0.3-480 microg x L(-1), with a good linearity and satisfactory precision, recovery and stability in the above ingredients. After modeling, except for glycyrrhetinic acid whose pharmacokinetic parameters were lacked due to the data missing, all of the rest components showed significant higher Cmax, AUC(0-1) and lower clearance rate (CL

  11. Hcn1 Is a Tremorgenic Genetic Component in a Rat Model of Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Shimizu, Saki; Tatara, Ayaka; Imaoku, Takuji; Ishii, Takahiro; Sasa, Masashi; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors are thought to play a major role in the etiology of essential tremor (ET); however, few genetic changes that induce ET have been identified to date. In the present study, to find genes responsible for the development of ET, we employed a rat model system consisting of a tremulous mutant strain, TRM/Kyo (TRM), and its substrain TRMR/Kyo (TRMR). The TRM rat is homozygous for the tremor (tm) mutation and shows spontaneous tremors resembling human ET. The TRMR rat also carries a homozygous tm mutation but shows no tremor, leading us to hypothesize that TRM rats carry one or more genes implicated in the development of ET in addition to the tm mutation. We used a positional cloning approach and found a missense mutation (c. 1061 C>T, p. A354V) in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 1 channel (Hcn1) gene. The A354V HCN1 failed to conduct hyperpolarization-activated currents in vitro, implicating it as a loss-of-function mutation. Blocking HCN1 channels with ZD7288 in vivo evoked kinetic tremors in nontremulous TRMR rats. We also found neuronal activation of the inferior olive (IO) in both ZD7288-treated TRMR and non-treated TRM rats and a reduced incidence of tremor in the IO-lesioned TRM rats, suggesting a critical role of the IO in tremorgenesis. A rat strain carrying the A354V mutation alone on a genetic background identical to that of the TRM rats showed no tremor. Together, these data indicate that body tremors emerge when the two mutant loci, tm and Hcn1A354V, are combined in a rat model of ET. In this model, HCN1 channels play an important role in the tremorgenesis of ET. We propose that oligogenic, most probably digenic, inheritance is responsible for the genetic heterogeneity of ET. PMID:25970616

  12. Transgenic rat model of childhood-onset dermatitis by overexpressing telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Sato, Atsuko; Hamada, Shun; Yagi, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Childhood-onset dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children. Although various mouse models that mirror aspects of dermatitis have become available, there is still a need for an animal model that develops dermatitis in childhood and is more suitable for performing tissue transplantation experiments. There is emerging evidence that peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with dermatitis have significantly increased telomerase activity. Here, we developed telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-expressing transgenic (Tg) rats that spontaneously developed eczematous skin inflammation in childhood. Newborn TERT-Tg rats developed visible dermatitis in 56 % of cases, and the skin lesions microscopically showed spongiosis and acanthosis with infiltration of lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis exhibited increased CD4 (2.5-fold) and CD8 (fivefold) T cell numbers compared with dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. Stronger TERT activity was observed in the peripheral lymphocytes of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats than those of dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that IL-4 was markedly elevated in the spleen of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats, and that interferon-gamma was increased in the dermatitis lesions. Moreover, skin grafting of TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis onto T cell-deficient nude rats demonstrated that the inflamed skin lesions could not be maintained. Taken together, the results suggest that TERT activation in T lymphocytes is one of the potential predisposing factors for dermatitis. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the TERT-Tg rats mirror aspects of human childhood-onset dermatitis and that these animals represent a potential animal model system for studying childhood-onset dermatitis. PMID:26885830

  13. Scavenger receptor function of mouse FcγRIII contributes to progression of atherosclerosis in apoE hyperlipidemic mice1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinmei; Ng, Hang Pong; Lai, Yen-Chun; Craigo, Jodi K.; Nagilla, Pruthvi S.; Raghani, Pooja; Nagarajan, Shanmugam

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed loss of CD36 or scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A) does not ameliorate atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mouse model, suggesting receptors other than CD36 and SR-A may also contribute to atherosclerosis. In this report, we show that apoE-CD16 double knockout mice (apoE-CD16 DKO) have reduced atherosclerotic lesions compared with apoE KO mice. In vivo and in vitro foam cells analyses showed apoE-CD16 DKO macrophages accumulated less neutral lipids. Reduced foam cell formation in apoE-CD16 DKO mice is not due to change in expression of CD36, SR-A and LOX-1. This led to a hypothesis that CD16 may have scavenger receptor activity. We presented evidence that a soluble form of recombinant mouse CD16 (sCD16) bound to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDALDL), and this binding is blocked by molar excess of MDA-BSA and anti-MDA mAbs, suggesting CD16 specifically recognizes MDA epitopes. Interestingly, sCD16 inhibited MDALDL binding to macrophage cell line as well as sCD36, sSR-A and sLOX-1, indicating CD16 can cross-block MDALDL binding to other scavenger receptors. Anti-CD16 mAb inhibited IC binding to sCD16, while partially inhibited MDALDL binding to sCD16, suggesting MDALDL binding site may be in close proximity to the IC binding site in CD16. Loss of CD16 expression resulted in reduced levels of MDALDL induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Finally, CD16 deficient macrophages showed reduced MDALDL-induced Syk phosphorylation. Collectively our findings suggest scavenger receptor activity of CD16 may in part contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25038257

  14. Extended duration local anesthetic agent in a rat paw model.

    PubMed

    Ickowicz, D E; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Weiniger, C F

    2014-07-01

    Encapsulated local anesthetics extend postoperative analgesic effect following site-directed nerve injection; potentially reducing postoperative complications. Our study aim was to investigate efficacy of our improved extended duration formulation - 15% bupivacaine in poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 synthesized by ring opening polymerization. In vitro, around 70% of bupivacaine was released from the p(DLLA-CO) 3:7 after 10 days. A single injection of the optimal formulation of 15% bupivacaine-polymer or plain (0.5%) bupivacaine (control), was injected via a 22G needle beside the sciatic nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under anesthesia; followed (in some animals) by a 1cm longitudinal incision through the skin and fascia of the paw area. Behavioral tests for sensory and motor block assessment were done using Hargreave's hot plate score, von Frey filaments and rearing count. The 15% bupivacaine formulation significantly prolonged sensory block duration up to at least 48 h. Following surgery, motor block was observed for 48 h following administration of bupivacaine-polymer formulation and rearing was reduced (returning to baseline after 48 h). No significant differences in mechanical nociceptive response were observed. The optimized bupivacaine-polymer formulation prolonged duration of local anesthesia effect in our animal model up to at least 48 h. PMID:24726301

  15. Expression of bone matrix proteins in urolithiasis model rats.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Fujita, K; Sasaki, S; Sato, M; Sugimoto, M; Hirota, S; Kitamura, Y; Nomura, S; Kohri, K

    1999-08-01

    Urinary calcium stones are a pathological substance, and they show similarities to physiological mineralization and other pathological mineralizations. The expression of messenger (m) RNAs of osteopontin (OPN), matrix Gla protein (MGP), osteonectin (ON) and osteocalcin (OC) in bones and teeth has been described. We previously identified OPN as an important stone matrix protein. In addition, the spontaneous calcification of arteries and cartilage in mice lacking MGP was recently reported, a finding which indicates that MGP has a function as an inhibitor of mineralization. Here, we examined the mRNA expressions of OPN, MGP, ON, and OC in the kidneys of stone-forming model rats administered an oxalate precursor, ethylene glycol (EG) for up to 28 days. The Northern blotting showed that the mRNA expressions of OPN and MGP were markedly increased with the administration of EG, but their expression patterns differed. The OPN mRNA expression reached the maximal level at day 7 after the initiation of the EG treatment and showed no significant difference after 14 and 28 days, whereas the MGP mRNA expression rose gradually to day 28. The in situ hybridization demonstrated that the cell type expressing OPN mRNA was different from that expressing MGP. We suggest that OPN acts on calcification and MGP acts on suppression. PMID:10460895

  16. Modeling CICR in rat ventricular myocytes: voltage clamp studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The past thirty-five years have seen an intense search for the molecular mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcium-release (CICR) in cardiac myocytes, with voltage clamp (VC) studies being the leading tool employed. Several VC protocols including lowering of extracellular calcium to affect Ca2+ loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and administration of blockers caffeine and thapsigargin have been utilized to probe the phenomena surrounding SR Ca2+ release. Here, we develop a deterministic mathematical model of a rat ventricular myocyte under VC conditions, to better understand mechanisms underlying the response of an isolated cell to calcium perturbation. Motivation for the study was to pinpoint key control variables influencing CICR and examine the role of CICR in the context of a physiological control system regulating cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]myo). Methods The cell model consists of an electrical-equivalent model for the cell membrane and a fluid-compartment model describing the flux of ionic species between the extracellular and several intracellular compartments (cell cytosol, SR and the dyadic coupling unit (DCU), in which resides the mechanistic basis of CICR). The DCU is described as a controller-actuator mechanism, internally stabilized by negative feedback control of the unit's two diametrically-opposed Ca2+ channels (trigger-channel and release-channel). It releases Ca2+ flux into the cyto-plasm and is in turn enclosed within a negative feedback loop involving the SERCA pump, regulating[Ca2+]myo. Results Our model reproduces measured VC data published by several laboratories, and generates graded Ca2+ release at high Ca2+ gain in a homeostatically-controlled environment where [Ca2+]myo is precisely regulated. We elucidate the importance of the DCU elements in this process, particularly the role of the ryanodine receptor in controlling SR Ca2+ release, its activation by trigger Ca2+, and its refractory characteristics

  17. Candida albicans Airway Colonization Facilitates Subsequent Acinetobacter baumannii Pneumonia in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Chen, Ruilan; Zhu, Song; Wang, Huijun; Yan, Dongxing; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of Candida albicans respiratory tract colonization on Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia in a rat model. Rats were colonized with C. albicans by instillation of 3 × 10(6) CFU into their airways, while sterile saline was instilled in the control group. The colonized rats were further divided into two groups: treated with amphotericin B or not. The rats were subsequently infected with A. baumannii (10(8) CFU by tracheobronchial instillation). A. baumannii lung CFU counts, cytokine lung levels, and rates of A. baumannii pneumonia were compared between groups. In vitro expression of A. baumannii virulence genes was measured by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR after 24-hour incubation with C. albicans or with Mueller-Hinton (MH) broth alone. Rats with Candida colonization developed A. baumannii pneumonia more frequently and had higher A. baumannii CFU burdens and heavier lungs than controls. After A. baumannii infection, lung interleukin 17 (IL-17) concentrations were lower and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) concentrations were higher in Candida-colonized rats than in controls. Candida-colonized rats treated with amphotericin B had a decreased rate of A. baumannii pneumonia and lower IFN-γ levels but higher IL-17 levels than untreated rats. Expression of basC, barB, bauA, ptk, plc2, and pld2 was induced while expression of ompA and abaI was suppressed in A. baumannii cultured in the presence of C. albicans C. albicans colonization facilitated the development of A. baumannii pneumonia in a rat model. Among Candida-colonized rats, antifungal treatment lowered the incidence of A. baumannii pneumonia. These findings could be due to modification of the host immune response and/or expression of A. baumannii virulence genes by Candida spp. PMID:27001817

  18. A Model of Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Stanton, J. Brett; Yocom, John; Bakall, Benjamin; Schiavone, Marc T.; Wadelius, Claes; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The VMD2 gene, mutated in Best macular dystrophy (BMD) encodes bestrophin, a 68-kDa basolateral plasma membrane protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. BMD is characterized by a depressed light peak (LP) in the electro-oculogram. Bestrophin is thought to be the Cl channel that generates the LP. The goal was to generate an animal model of BMD and to determine the effects of bestrophin overexpression on the RPE-generated components of the ERG. METHODS Bestrophin or bestrophin mutants (W93C or R218C) were overexpressed in the RPE of rats by injection of replication-defective adenovirus. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ERG recordings were used to study subsequent effects. RESULTS Bestrophin was confined to the basolateral plasma membrane of the RPE. Neither wild-type (wt) nor mutant bestrophin affected the a- or b-waves of the ERG. Wt bestrophin, however, increased the c-wave and fast oscillation (FO), but not the LP. In contrast, both mutants had little or no effect on the c-wave and FO, but did reduce LP amplitude. LP amplitudes across a range of stimuli were not altered by wt bestrophin, though the luminance response function was desensitized. LP response functions were unaffected by bestrophin R218C but were significantly altered by bestrophin W93C. CONCLUSIONS A model of BMD was developed in the present study. Because overexpression of wt bestrophin shifted luminance response but did not alter the range of LP response amplitudes, the authors conclude that the rate-limiting step for generating LP amplitude occurs before activation of bestrophin or that bestrophin does not directly generate the LP conductance. PMID:15452084

  19. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  20. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26537128

  1. Autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we have sought to isolate in vitro, from acutely diabetic BB rats, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which exhibit specific cytotoxicity toward islet cells. Thoracic duct lymphocytes (TDL) from acutely diabetic BB rats cultured with irradiated MHC matched (RT1.u) islet cells and dendritic cells in vitro were shown to be specifically cytotoxic to MHC matched and mismatched allogeneic (RT1.1) and xenogeneic (hamster) islet target cells in a /sup 3/H-leucine release assay. Two cell lines (V1A8 and V1D11) derived from the TDL culture showed similar patterns of non-MHC restricted islet cell killing which could be blocked by islet cells and cultured rat insulinoma cells (RIN5mF) but not by non-islet cells of various tissue origins. Both V1A8 and V1D11 were not cytotoxic to Natural Killer (NK) sensitive target cells, G1TC and YAC-1. Conventional surface markers for rat helper and suppressor/cytotoxic T cells were not detectable on either cell lines. The V1D11 cell line was positive for W 3/13 (rat T/NK marker) on OX-19 (rat T/macrophage marker), whereas the V1A8 cell line was only positive for W 3/13.

  2. Novel PPAR Pan Agonist, ZBH Ameliorates Hyperlipidemia and Insulin Resistance in High Fat Diet Induced Hyperlipidemic Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xinni; Xue, Nina; Jin, Xueyuan; Wang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Effective and safe pharmacological interventions for hyperlipidemia remains badly needed. By incorporating the key pharmacophore of fibrates into the natural scaffold of resveratrol, a novel structural compound ZBH was constructed. In present study, we found ZBH reserved approximately one third of the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activation produced by resveratrol at in-vitro enzyme activity assay, directly bound to and activated all three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes respectively in PPAR binding and transactivation assays. Moreover, ZBH (EC50, 1.75 µM) activate PPARα 21 fold more efficiently than the well-known PPAR pan agonist bezafibrate (EC50, 37.37 µM) in the cellular transactivation assays. In the high fat diet induced hyperlipidemic hamsters, 5-week treatment with ZBH significantly lowered serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-C, FFA, hyperinsulinemia, and improved insulin sensitivity more potently than bezafibrate. Meanwhile, serum transaminases, creatine phosphokinase and CREA levels were found not altered by ZBH intervention. Mechanism study indicated ZBH promoted the expression of PPARα target genes and SIRT1 mRNA. Hepatic lipogenesis was markedly decreased via down-regulation of lipogenic genes, and fatty acid uptake and oxidation was simultaneously increased in the liver and skeletal muscle via up-regulation of lipolysis genes. Glucose uptake and utilization was also significantly promoted in skeletal muscle. These results suggested that ZBH significantly lowered hyperlipidemia and ameliorated insulin resistance more efficiently than bezafibrate in the hyperlipidemic hamsters primarily by activating of PPARα, and SIRT1 promotion and activation. ZBH thus presents a potential new agent to combat hyperlipidemia. PMID:24759758

  3. Noninvasive Detection of Macrophage-rich Atherosclerotic Plaque in Hyperlipidemic Rabbits using ‘Positive Contrast’ Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Weiss, Robert G.; Kedziorek, Dorota A.; Walczak, Piotr; Gilson, Wesley D.; Schär, Michael; Sosnovik, David; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Boston, Raymond C.; Bulte, Jeff W.M; Weissleder, Ralph; Stuber, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To identify macrophage-rich atherosclerotic plaque non-invasively by the combined use of systemic administration of superparamagnetic nanoparticles with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using a positive contrast off-resonance imaging sequence (Inversion Recovery with ON-resonant water suppression: IRON). Background The sudden rupture of macrophage-rich atherosclerotic plaques can trigger the formation of an occlusive thrombus in coronary vessels, resulting in acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, a noninvasive technique that can identify macrophage-rich plaques and thereby assist with risk stratification of patients with atherosclerosis would be of great potential clinical utility. Methods Experiments were conducted on a clinical 3T MRI scanner in seven heritable hyperlipidemic and four control rabbits. Monocrystalline iron-oxide nanoparticles (MION)-47 were administrated intravenously (two doses of 250μmol Fe/kg), and animals underwent serial IRON-MRI before injection of the nanoparticles and serially after 1, 3 and 6 days. Results After administration of MION-47, a striking signal enhancement was found in areas of plaque only in hyperlipidemic rabbits. The magnitude of enhancement on MR-images had a high correlation with the number of macrophages determined by histology (p<0.001) and allowed for the detection of macrophage-rich plaque with high accuracy (AUC=0.92, SE=0.04, 95% CI=0.84-0.96, p<0.001). No significant signal enhancement was measured in remote areas without plaque by histology and in controls without atherosclerosis. Conclusion IRON-MRI in conjunction with superparamagnetic nanoparticles is a promising approach for the noninvasive evaluation of macrophage-rich, vulnerable plaques. PMID:18672170

  4. Novel PPAR pan agonist, ZBH ameliorates hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance in high fat diet induced hyperlipidemic hamster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Fan, Shiyong; Xie, Xinni; Xue, Nina; Jin, Xueyuan; Wang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Effective and safe pharmacological interventions for hyperlipidemia remains badly needed. By incorporating the key pharmacophore of fibrates into the natural scaffold of resveratrol, a novel structural compound ZBH was constructed. In present study, we found ZBH reserved approximately one third of the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activation produced by resveratrol at in-vitro enzyme activity assay, directly bound to and activated all three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes respectively in PPAR binding and transactivation assays. Moreover, ZBH (EC₅₀, 1.75 µM) activate PPARα 21 fold more efficiently than the well-known PPAR pan agonist bezafibrate (EC₅₀ 37.37 µM) in the cellular transactivation assays. In the high fat diet induced hyperlipidemic hamsters, 5-week treatment with ZBH significantly lowered serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-C, FFA, hyperinsulinemia, and improved insulin sensitivity more potently than bezafibrate. Meanwhile, serum transaminases, creatine phosphokinase and CREA levels were found not altered by ZBH intervention. Mechanism study indicated ZBH promoted the expression of PPARα target genes and SIRT1 mRNA. Hepatic lipogenesis was markedly decreased via down-regulation of lipogenic genes, and fatty acid uptake and oxidation was simultaneously increased in the liver and skeletal muscle via up-regulation of lipolysis genes. Glucose uptake and utilization was also significantly promoted in skeletal muscle. These results suggested that ZBH significantly lowered hyperlipidemia and ameliorated insulin resistance more efficiently than bezafibrate in the hyperlipidemic hamsters primarily by activating of PPARα, and SIRT1 promotion and activation. ZBH thus presents a potential new agent to combat hyperlipidemia. PMID:24759758

  5. BAFF Receptor mAb Treatment Ameliorates Development and Progression of Atherosclerosis in Hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kyaw, Tin; Cui, Peng; Tay, Christopher; Kanellakis, Peter; Hosseini, Hamid; Liu, Edgar; Rolink, Antonius G.; Tipping, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Aims Option to attenuate atherosclerosis by depleting B2 cells is currently limited to anti-CD20 antibodies which deplete all B-cell subtypes. In the present study we evaluated the capacity of a monoclonal antibody to B cell activating factor-receptor (BAFFR) to selectively deplete atherogenic B2 cells to prevent both development and progression of atherosclerosis in the ApoE−/− mouse. Methods and Results To determine whether the BAFFR antibody prevents atherosclerosis development, we treated ApoE−/− mice with the antibody while feeding them a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. Mature CD93− CD19+ B2 cells were reduced by treatment, spleen B-cell zones disrupted and spleen CD20 mRNA expression decreased while B1a cells and non-B cells were spared. Atherosclerosis was ameliorated in the hyperlipidemic mice and CD19+ B cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were reduced in atherosclerotic lesions. Expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, IL1β, TNFα, and IFNγ in the lesions were also reduced, while MCP1, MIF and VCAM-1 expressions were unaffected. Plasma immunoglobulins were reduced, but MDA-oxLDL specific antibodies were unaffected. To determine whether anti-BAFFR antibody ameliorates progression of atherosclerosis, we first fed ApoE−/− mice a HFD for 6 weeks, and then instigated anti-BAFFR antibody treatment for a further 6 week-HFD. CD93− CD19+ B2 cells were selectively decreased and atherosclerotic lesions were reduced by this treatment. Conclusion Anti-BAFFR monoclonal antibody selectively depletes mature B2 cells while sparing B1a cells, disrupts spleen B-cell zones and ameliorates atherosclerosis development and progression in hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice. Our findings have potential for clinical translation to manage atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23560095

  6. The response of Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant female rats to a space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Cephas, Stacy; Cleek, Tammy; Sayavongsa, Phouyong; Arnaud, Sara B.

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat, a model of salt-induced hypertension, differs from that in the Dahl salt-resistant (R) rat. We have tested the hypothesis that differences in vitamin D metabolism would render the Dahl S rat more susceptible than the Dahl R rat to the effects of a space flight model. Dahl female rats were tail suspended (hind limb unloaded) for 28 days, while fed a low salt (3 g/kg sodium chloride) diet. Plasma 25-OHD concentrations of S rats were significantly lower than that of R rats. Plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentration was 50% lower in unloaded than in loaded S rats, but was unaffected in unloaded R rats. The left soleus muscle weight and breaking strength of the left femur (torsion test) were 50% and 25% lower in unloaded than in loaded S and R rats. The mineral content of the left femur, however, was significantly lower (by 11%) only in unloaded S rats. We conclude that female S rats are more vulnerable than female R rats to decreases in plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentration and femur mineral content during hind limb unloading, but equally vulnerable to muscle atrophy and reduced breaking strength of the femur.

  7. Voluntary Alcohol Intake following Blast Exposure in a Rat Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yi Wei; Meyer, Nathan P.; Shah, Alok S.; Budde, Matthew D.; Stemper, Brian D.; Olsen, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a frequent comorbidity following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), even in patients without a previous history of alcohol dependence. Despite this correlational relationship, the extent to which the neurological effects of mTBI contribute to the development of alcoholism is unknown. In this study, we used a rodent blast exposure model to investigate the relationship between mTBI and voluntary alcohol drinking in alcohol naïve rats. We have previously demonstrated in Sprague Dawley rats that blast exposure leads to microstructural abnormalities in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other brain regions that progress from four to thirty days. The mPFC is a brain region implicated in alcoholism and drug addiction, although the impact of mTBI on drug reward and addiction using controlled models remains largely unexplored. Alcohol naïve Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to a blast model of mTBI (or sham conditions) and then tested in several common measures of voluntary alcohol intake. In a seven-week intermittent two-bottle choice alcohol drinking test, sham and blast exposed rats had comparable levels of alcohol intake. In a short access test session at the conclusion of the two-bottle test, blast rats fell into a bimodal distribution, and among high intake rats, blast treated animals had significantly elevated intake compared to shams. We found no effect of blast when rats were tested for an alcohol deprivation effect or compulsive drinking in a quinine adulteration test. Throughout the experiment, alcohol drinking was modest in both groups, consistent with other studies using Sprague Dawley rats. In conclusion, blast exposure had a minimal impact on overall alcohol intake in Sprague Dawley rats, although intake was increased in a subpopulation of blast animals in a short access session following intermittent access exposure. PMID:25910266

  8. [Metabolic therapy of nephrolithiasis in two different rat models of kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Trashkov, A P; Vasiliev, A G; Kovalenko, A L; Tagirov, N S

    2015-01-01

    108 albino male rats were used in two experimental rat models reproducing urolithiasis for the assessment of metabolic drug medicine Remaxol nephroprotective effect upon the development of this disease. "Ethyleneglycol" model consisted of adding 1% ethylene glycol solution in drinking water for 37 days and "fructose-induced" one--of adding 10% fructose solution in drinking water for the same period. Therapy included a 10-day course of daily i.v. injections of Remaxol (14 ml/kg). Both experimental models were successful in producing urolithiasis with considerable disturbances in the structure and functioning of kidneys up to revealing microconcrement formation. The "ethyleneglycol" model proved to cause maximum changes while the "Fructose-induced" model--only moderate ones. Metabolic correction of these changes was successful in nephroprotection effectively normalizing kidney functions and the total protein concentration, eliminating hyperglycemia and reducing creatinine and urea blood plasma concentration in both rat experimental models. PMID:26036006

  9. Streptozotocin induced diabetes as a model of phrenic nerve neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Filho, Omar Andrade; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2006-03-15

    Phrenic neuropathies are increasingly recognized in peripheral neuropathies but reports on experimental models of the phrenic nerves diabetic neuropathy are scanty. In the present study, we investigated the phrenic nerve neuropathy, due to experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and the evolution of this neuropathy in diabetic rats treated with insulin. Proximal and distal segments of the left and right phrenic nerves were morphologically and morphometrically evaluated, from rats rendered diabetic for 12 weeks, by injection of STZ. Control rats received vehicle. Treated rats received a single subcutaneous injection of insulin on a daily basis. The nerves were prepared for light microcopy study by means of conventional techniques. Morphometry was carried out with the aid of computer software. The phrenic nerves of diabetic rats showed smaller myelinated axon diameters compared to controls. The g ratio was significantly smaller for myelinated fibers from diabetic rats compared to controls. Insulin treatment prevented these alterations. Histograms of size distribution for myelinated fibers and axons from control rats were bimodal. For diabetic animals, the myelinated fiber histogram was bimodal while the axon distribution turned to be unimodal. Insulin treatment also prevented these alterations. Our results confirm the phrenic nerve neuropathy in this experimental model of diabetes and suggest that conventional insulin treatment was able to prevent and/or correct the myelinated axon commitment by diabetes. PMID:16125783

  10. In vitro modeling of rat mucosal mast cell function in Trichinella spiralis infection

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Seana M.; Scalfone, Lisa K.; Holowka, David; Appleton, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intestinal infection with the parasitic nematode, Trichinella spiralis, provides a robust context for the study of mucosal mast cell function. In rats, mucosal mast cells are exposed to parasites during the earliest stage of infection, affording an opportunity for mast cells to contribute to an innate response to infection. During secondary infection, degranulation of rat mucosal mast cells coincides with expulsion of challenge larvae from the intestine. The goal of this study was to evaluate rat bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) and the rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) as models for mucosal mast cells, using parasite glycoproteins and antibody reagents that have been tested extensively in rats in vivo. We found that BMMC displayed a more robust mucosal phenotype. Although T. spiralis glycoproteins bound to mast cell surfaces in the absence of antibodies, they did not stimulate degranulation, nor did they inhibit degranulation triggered by immune complexes. Parasite glycoproteins complexed with specific monoclonal IgGs provoked release of RMCPII and β-hexosaminidase from both cell types in a manner that replicated results observed previously in passively immunized rats. Our results document that RBL-2H3 cells and BMMC model rat mucosal mast cells in the contexts of innate and adaptive responses to T. spiralis. PMID:23094823

  11. A novel model of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huawei; Pan, Hui; Yu, Fang; Chen, Kai; Shang, Guangwei; Xu, Yuanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish a rat model of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) that realistically mimics major clinical manifestations of the disease. Methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats received intravenous zoledronate 80 μg/kg once a week via the tail vein. Three weeks after intravenous injection, maxillary first molars were extracted under general anesthesia. Then 1, 4 and 12 weeks after tooth extraction, the rats were euthanized, and the intact maxillas were harvested en bloc. Macroscopic analysis, histological analysis and cytokine analysis were performed. Untreated rats with tooth extraction were used as controls. Results: 12 weeks after extraction, rats treated with zoledronate developed BRONJ-like disease, including characteristic features of impaired soft tissue healing, exposed necrotic bone or sequestra, increased inflammatory infiltrates, while the controls showed normal bone healing. 4 weeks after extraction, rats treated with zoledronate exhibited the decreased receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) values, the increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) values and the remarkable decreased RANKL/OPG ratio when compared with the controls. Conclusion: The rats treated with zoledronate can be considered a novel, reliable and reproducible animal model to better understand the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of BRONJ and to develop a therapeutic approach. PMID:26191212

  12. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Welch, Ian; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Underhill, T. Michael; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-04-01

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 µm. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 ± 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 ± 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  13. A model of chronic heart failure in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).

    PubMed

    Itter, G; Jung, W; Juretschke, P; Schoelkens, B A; Linz, W

    2004-04-01

    Common models of chronic heart failure (CHF) do not always result in parameters and symptoms that can be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure. The aim of this study was to establish and validate a new model of CHF in the rat. CHF was induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY/NHsd) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR/NHsd) rats by creating a permanent (8-week) occlusion of the left coronary artery 2 mm distal to the origin from the aorta by a modified technique. This resulted in a large infarction of the free left ventricular wall. The focus of attention was the validation of the geometric properties of the left ventricle and its contractility. The validation of the geometric properties of the left ventricle was done by a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and by planimetry (stereology). Cardiodynamics (e.g. contractility) were evaluated in the isolated 'working heart' model. We were able to establish a new and predictive model of heart failure in the spontaneously hypertensive rat 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation. At this time point, the WKY rat did not show any symptoms of CHF. The model represents characteristic parameters and symptoms that can be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure (NYHA III-IV). Upon inspection, severe clinical symptoms of congestive heart failure were prominent, such as dyspnoea, subcutaneous oedema, pale-bluish limbs and impaired motion. Non-invasive sequential measurements by NMR techniques showed lung oedema, hydrothorax, large dilated left and right ventricular chambers and hypertrophy of the septum. The infarcted animals showed a reduced heart power, diminished contractility and enhanced heart work, much more so in the SHR/NHsd rat than in the WKY/NHsd rat. Furthermore the infarcted animals showed enhanced levels of hydroxyproline/proline ratios, again much more so in the SHR/NHsd rat than in the WKY/NHsd rat. PMID:15070453

  14. An acute model for IgA-mediated glomerular inflammation in rats induced by monoclonal polymeric rat IgA antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Stad, R K; Bruijn, J A; van Gijlswijk-Janssen, D J; van Es, L A; Daha, M R

    1993-01-01

    An acute model for IgA-mediated glomerular inflammation in rats was induced by the in situ deposition of IgA directly into the glomerular mesangium. F(ab')2 anti-Thy1 MoAb was used to anchor an antigen, DNP (2,4-dinitrophenol), in the glomeruli of rats. Subsequent infusion of rat polymeric (p-) or monomeric (m-) IgA MoAb with specificity for DNP resulted in mesangial deposition of IgA in both groups of rats. However, acute proteinuria was observed only in p-IgA-treated rats and not in PBS- or m-IgA-treated rats. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed deposition of C3 in an identical pattern to that of IgA in the glomeruli of p-IgA-treated rats. No mesangial deposits of C4 or C1q were seen in these animals. Rats receiving m-IgA or PBS displayed no detectable C3, C4 or C1q deposition. The amount of proteinuria in p-IgA-treated rats was related to the amount of deposited C3. The presence of intraglomerular monocytes was only observed 2 days after p-IgA injection. By light microscopy, aneurysm formation, mesangial hypercellularity and matrix expansion were seen only in p-IgA-treated rats. However, by 37 days post-injection complete resolution of the lesions was observed. No histological renal changes were observed in PBS- or m-IgA-treated rats. In conclusion, an acute form of IgA-mediated nephritis in rats was induced by p-IgA but not by m-IgA. This reproducible model provides a basis for further study into the mechanisms of IgA-mediated glomerular inflammation. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8099859

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, Noha M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M.; Algandaby, Mardi M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-κB expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ► Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ► MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ► MP and EP decreased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ► MP and EP reduced NF-κB expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ► MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  16. Fractal analysis of alveolarization in hyperoxia-induced rat models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Guidolin, Diego; Macchi, Veronica; Sarasin, Gloria; Grisafi, Davide; Tortorella, Cinzia; Dedja, Arben; Zaramella, Patrizia; De Caro, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    No papers are available about potentiality of fractal analysis in quantitative assessment of alveolarization in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Thus, we here performed a comparative analysis between fractal [fractal dimension (D) and lacunarity] and stereological [mean linear intercept (Lm), total volume of alveolar air spaces, total number of alveoli, mean alveolar volume, total volume and surface area of alveolar septa, and mean alveolar septal thickness] parameters in experimental hyperoxia-induced models of BPD. At birth, rats were distributed between the following groups: 1) rats raised in ambient air for 2 wk; 2) rats exposed to 60% oxygen for 2 wk; 3) rats raised in normoxia for 6 wk; and 4) rats exposed to 60% hyperoxia for 2 wk and to room air for further 4 wk. Normoxic 6-wk rats showed increased D and decreased lacunarity with respect to normoxic 2-wk rats, together with changes in all stereological parameters except for mean alveolar volume. Hyperoxia-exposed 2-wk rats showed significant changes only in total number of alveoli, mean alveolar volume, and lacunarity with respect to equal-in-age normoxic rats. In the comparison between 6-wk rats, the hyperoxia-exposed group showed decreased D and increased lacunarity, together with changes in all stereological parameters except for septal thickness. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves showed a comparable discriminatory power of D, lacunarity, and total number of alveoli; Lm and mean alveolar volume were less discriminative. D and lacunarity did not show significant changes when different segmentation thresholds were applied, suggesting that the fractal approach may be fit to automatic image analysis. PMID:26851258

  17. Protective Effect of Dihydromyricetin Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Tao; Jiao, Peng; Zhou, Yun; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study investigated the effect of dihydromyricetin (DHM) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury in a rat model. Material/Methods Kidney injury was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by injection of LPS through the tail vein. The rats were treated with 5 μg/kg body weight DHM within 12 h of the LPS administration. The urine of the rats was collected over a period of 48 h for determination of calcium and creatinine concentrations. Blood urea nitrogen in the serum was analyzed using a BC-2800 Vet Animal Auto Biochemistry Analyzer. On day 3 after treatment, the rats were sacrificed to extract the kidneys. Results Treatment of the endotoxemia rats with DHM caused a significant (P<0.05) decrease in the level of kidney injury molecule-1 and blood urea nitrogen. DHM treatment significantly (P<0.05) decreased the level of calcium in the kidney tissues compared to those of the untreated endotoxemia rats. The level of malonaldehyde (MDA) in the kidney tissues was significantly reduced in the endotoxemia rats by DHM treatment. The results from immunohistochemistry reveled a significant decrease in the expression of osteopontin (OPN) and CD44 levels. The endotoxemia rats showed significantly higher levels of TUNEL-positive stained nuclei compared to the normal controls. However, treatment of the endotoxemia rats with DHM resulted in a significant decrease in the population of TUNEL-positive cells. Conclusions DHM may be a promising candidate for the treatment of acute kidney injury. PMID:26866356

  18. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED KINETIC MODEL OF RAT AND MOUSE GESTATION: DISPOSITION OF A WEAK ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic model of gestation in the rat mouse has been developed. The model is superimposed on the normal growth curve for nonpregnant females. It describes the entire gestation period including organogenesis. The model consists of uterus, mammary tiss...

  19. Deep brain stimulation exacerbates hypokinetic dysarthria in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    King, Nathaniel O; Anderson, Collin J; Dorval, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. This study proposes an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We use the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. The individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-OHDA rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life. PMID:26498277

  20. Impaired function of the intestinal barrier in a novel sub-health rat model

    PubMed Central

    FENG, SISI; LIU, WEIDONG; ZUO, SHENGNAN; XIE, TINGYAN; DENG, HUI; ZHANG, QIUHUAN; ZHONG, BAIYUN

    2016-01-01

    Sub-health is a state featuring a deterioration in physiological function between health and illness, and the sub-health condition has surfaced as life-threatening in humans. The aim of the present study was to establish a sub-health model in rats, and investigate the function of the intestinal barrier in the sub-health rats and rats following intervention. To establish a sub-health model, the rats were subjected to a high-fat and sugar diet, motion restriction and chronic stress. Their serum glucose and triglyceride levels, immune function and adaptability were then measured. The levels of diamine oxidase and D-lactic acid in the plasma were analyzed as markers of the intestinal permeability. The protein and mRNA expression levels of anti-apoptotic YWHAZ in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemical and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses In the present study, the sub-health rat model was successfully established, and sub-health factors increased the intestinal permeability and reduced the expression of YWHAZ. Providing sub-health rats with normal living conditions did not improve the function of the intestinal barrier. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that intestinal disorders in the sub-health rat model may result from the damage caused by reduce intestinal barrier function as well as the decreased expression levels of YWHAZ. Additionally, rats in the sub-health condition did not recover following subsequent exposure to normal living conditions, suggesting that certain exercises or medical intervention may be necessary to improve sub-health symptoms. PMID:26957295

  1. β-D-Glucan Assay in Diagnosis and Monitoring the Systemic Candidiasis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, Hossein; Mirhendi, Hossein; Makimura, Koichi; Satoh, Kazuo; Karimi, Ladan; Izadi, Shahrokh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Determination of β-D-Glucan (BDG) in the serum aids to diagnose the invasive fungal infections. The current study evaluated the diagnostic potential value of BDG assay in monitoring the disease in experimental systemic candidiasis in a rat model. The results can provide a useful preliminary data to improve this approach in developing countries. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate β-D-Glucan assay in diagnosis and monitoring the systemic candidiasis in a rat model. Materials and Methods: Twenty one rats were infected with 106 Candida albicans blastospore per rat. Twelve rats were considered as the negative controls (six immunocompromised rats without infection and six intact rats). During a week, every 24 hours the BDG sera level was determined by both Fungitell and Wako kits. To confirm the systemic infection in each rat, the suspensions of their internal organs were cultivated on agar plates and the number of colony forming units (CFU) of C. albicans was counted. Results: All the infected rats were positive with BDG tests. An increasing level of BDG was observed during early days after injection. The cutoff value for discrimination of BDG positive sera was obtained from the negative sera by the Fungitell kit. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values assessed for the Fungitell kit were 95%, 66.6%, 90.47% and 80%, respectively. These criteria for those of Wako were 90%, 83.3%, 94.7% and 71.4%, respectively. Conclusions: While BDG assay seems to be a sensitive and specific adjunctive tool to diagnose and monitor the experimental systemic candidiasis, it seems that measuring the positive cutoff value in different laboratory conditions is necessary for favorable establishment of these tests. PMID:25371794

  2. Effect of Ozone on Intestinal Epithelial Homeostasis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sukhotnik, Igor; Starikov, Alona; Coran, Arnold G.; Pollak, Yulia; Sohotnik, Rima; Shaoul, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background: The positive effects of ozone therapy have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The mechanisms of this positive effect of ozone therapy are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the use of ozone may potentiate the gut intestinal mucosal homeostasis in a rat model. Methods: Adult rats weighing 250–280 g were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1) Control rats were given 2 mL of water by gavage and intraperitoneally (IP) for 5 days; 2) O3-PO rats were treated with 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture by gavage and 2 mL of water IP for 5 days; 3) O3-IP rats were treated with 2 mL of water by gavage and 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture IP for 5 days. Rats were sacrificed on day 6. Bowel and mucosal weight, mucosal DNA and protein, villus height and crypt depth, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated following sacrifice. Results: The group of O3-IP rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal villus height and crypt depth, a greater enterocyte proliferation index in jejunum, and lower enterocyte apoptosis in ileum compared to control animals. Oral administration of the ozone/oxygen mixture resulted in a less significant effect on cell turnover. Conclusions: Treatment with an ozone/oxygen mixture stimulates intestinal cell turnover in a rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of ozone resulted in a more significant intestinal trophic effect than oral administration. PMID:25717388

  3. Phenotypic characterization of recessive gene knockout rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kuldip D; De Silva, Shehan; Sheth, Niketa P; Ramboz, Sylvie; Beck, Melissa J; Quang, Changyu; Switzer, Robert C; Ahmad, Syed O; Sunkin, Susan M; Walker, Dan; Cui, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Daniel A; McCoy, Aaron M; Gamber, Kevin; Ding, Xiaodong; Goldberg, Matthew S; Benkovic, Stanley A; Haupt, Meredith; Baptista, Marco A S; Fiske, Brian K; Sherer, Todd B; Frasier, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1(Pink1), DJ-1 (Park7) and Parkin (Park2) genes are linked to familial cases of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). As part of its strategy to provide more tools for the research community, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) funded the generation of novel rat models with targeted disruption ofPink1, DJ-1 or Parkin genes and determined if the loss of these proteins would result in a progressive PD-like phenotype. Pathological, neurochemical and behavioral outcome measures were collected at 4, 6 and 8months of age in homozygous KO rats and compared to wild-type (WT) rats. Both Pink1 and DJ-1 KO rats showed progressive nigral neurodegeneration with about 50% dopaminergic cell loss observed at 8 months of age. ThePink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats also showed a two to three fold increase in striatal dopamine and serotonin content at 8 months of age. Both Pink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats exhibited significant motor deficits starting at 4months of age. However, Parkin KO rats displayed normal behaviors with no neurochemical or pathological changes. These results demonstrate that inactivation of the Pink1 or DJ-1 genes in the rat produces progressive neurodegeneration and early behavioral deficits, suggesting that these recessive genes may be essential for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). These MJFF-generated novel rat models will assist the research community to elucidate the mechanisms by which these recessive genes produce PD pathology and potentially aid in therapeutic development. PMID:24969022

  4. Beneficial effects of melatonin in a rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rudnitskaya, Ekaterina A; Maksimova, Kseniya Yi; Muraleva, Natalia A; Logvinov, Sergey V; Yanshole, Lyudmila V; Kolosova, Nataliya G; Stefanova, Natalia A

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin synthesis is disordered in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To determine the role of melatonin in the pathogenesis of AD, suitable animal models are needed. The OXYS rats are an experimental model of accelerated senescence that has also been proposed as a spontaneous rat model of AD-like pathology. In the present study, we demonstrate that disturbances in melatonin secretion occur in OXYS rats at 4 months of age. These disturbances occur simultaneously with manifestation of behavioral abnormalities against the background of neurodegeneration and alterations in hormonal status but before the signs of amyloid-β accumulation. We examined whether oral administration of melatonin could normalize the melatonin secretion and have beneficial effects on OXYS rats before progression to AD-like pathology. The results showed that melatonin treatment restored melatonin secretion in the pineal gland of OXYS rats as well as the serum levels of growth hormone and IGF-1, the level of BDNF in the hippocampus and the healthy state of hippocampal neurons. Additionally, melatonin treatment of OXYS rats prevented an increase in anxiety and the decline of locomotor activity, of exploratory activity, and of reference memory. Thus, melatonin may be involved in AD progression, whereas oral administration of melatonin could be a prophylactic strategy to prevent or slow down the progression of some features of AD pathology. PMID:25515660

  5. Characterization of Dystrophin Deficient Rats: A New Model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD. PMID:25310701

  6. Effect of electroacupuncture on gastric interstitial cells of Cajal in a rat model of diabetic gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    LIN, GUOHUA; ZHANG, JIAWEI; LI, LIXIA; ZOU, ZHUOCHENG; CHEN, CHUYUN; XUE, LIFEI; ZHAO, LANFENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on the gastric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in a rat model of diabetic gastroparesis (DGP). The gastric tissues were collected from 75 rats, which had been divided into three equal groups (n=25/group): Blank, model and EA. Hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining were used to observe the cellular morphology and distribution of c-kit-positive gastric ICCs; light microscopy was used to count the number of ICCs; and electron microscopy was used to observe the ultrastructure of the rat ICCs. Compared with the model group, the gastromucosal glandular and smooth muscle cells of the EA group were more regularly arranged, with fewer vacuoles; there was an increased cellular gap and the vacuolar degeneration on the gastric walls was mild. Image analysis showed that the blank group exhibited the greatest number of c-kit-positive ICCs, and the number of c-kit-positive ICCs in the blank group was significantly different from that in the model and EA groups (P<0.01): Blank group > EA group > model group. In conclusion, DGP rats exhibited a reduced number of gastric ICCs, altered ultrastructural morphology and a reduced number of cell organelles, particularly mitochondria, compared with the blank group. EA may help to reverse the various pathological changes of gastric ICCs in rat models of DGP. PMID:27284337

  7. Calcium Balance in Mature Rats Exposed to a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolinsky, Ira

    1996-01-01

    Negative calcium balances are seen in humans during spaceflight and bed rest, an analog of space flight. Due to the infrequency and costliness of space flight and the difficulties, cost, and restraints in using invasive procedures in bed rest studies, several ground based animal models of space flight have been employed. The most useful and well developed of these models is hind limb unloading in the rat. In this model the hind limbs are non-weight bearing (unloaded) but still mobile; there is a cephalad fluid shift similar to that seen in astronauts in flight; the animals are able to feed, groom and locomote using their front limbs; the procedure is reversible; and, importantly, the model has been validated by comparison to space flight. Several laboratories have studied calcium balance using rats in hind limb unweighting. Roer and Dillaman used young male rats to study calcium balance in this model for 25 days. They found no differences in dietary calcium intake, percent calcium absorption, urinary and fecal excretion, hence indicating no differences in calcium balance between control and unloaded rats. In another study, employing 120 day old females, rats' hind limbs were unloaded for 28 days. While negative calcium balances were observed during a 25 day recovery period no balance measurements were possible during unweighting since the researchers did not employ appropriate metabolic cages. In a recent study from this laboratory, using 200 g rats in the space flight model for two weeks, we found depressed intestinal calcium absorption and increased fecal calcium excretion (indicating less positive calcium balances) and lower circulating 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The above studies indicate that there remains a dearth of information on calcium balance during the hind limb unloading rat space flight model, especially in mature rats, whose use is a better model for planned manned space flight than juvenile or growing animals. With the aid of a newly designed

  8. Metabolic Cage for a Space Flight Model in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Jennifer S.; Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Evans, Juli; Navidi, Meena; Wolinsky, Ira; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1994-01-01

    The new cage facilitates the collection of 24-h specimens of separated urine and feces apparently uncontaminated by food, as required for precise nutritional and metabolic studies, while maintaining the large floor area and suspension method of Holton's design (3). Although the cage was evaluated, using 6-month-old rats weighing 408 to 488 g, it can be easily adjusted for smaller rats. It also was successfully used to collect post-flight urine after the recent Spacelab Life Sciences-2 space shuttle flight. With its flexibility and ease of use, this new cage design adds a new tool to study the physiologic effects of simulated space flight and other disuse conditions.

  9. Effect of Bile Acid on Fetal Lung in Rat Model of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ling; Ding, Yiling; Huang, Ting; Huang, Xiaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the correlation between maternal bile acid (BA) level and fetal pulmonary surfactant in rats and study the effects of BA on fetal lung in rat model of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Methods. Forty pregnant rats were treated with (A) 5.5 mg/kg BA, (B) 1.4 mg/kg BA, and (C) 1 ml physiological saline. Levels of total bile acid (TBA), ALT, AST, TBIL, DBIL, and SP-A were determined and the lungs of fetal rats were analyzed for pathological changes. Results. Groups A and B intervened with BA showed significant higher level of TBA in both maternal and fetal serum, more mortality rate of fetal rats, more concentration of SP-A in fetal serum, and wider alveolus mesenchyme of fetal rats than the control Group C. Higher level of BA associated with increased fetal risk and lower numerical density of mitochondria in type II alveolar epithelial cells. The levels of TBA in maternal serum were found to have significant positive correlation with those in fetal serum and SP-A level but negatively with the area of alveolus and the numerical density of lamellar body. Conclusions. The TBA level in maternal serum showed significant association with lung pathological changes in fetal rats. PMID:24778648

  10. Sensitization of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis in a Male Rat Chronic Stress Model.

    PubMed

    Franco, Alier J; Chen, Chun; Scullen, Tyler; Zsombok, Andrea; Salahudeen, Ahmed A; Di, Shi; Herman, James P; Tasker, Jeffrey G

    2016-06-01

    Stress activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is regulated by rapid glucocorticoid negative feedback. Chronic unpredictable stress animal models recapitulate certain aspects of major depression in humans, which have been attributed to impaired glucocorticoid negative feedback. We tested for an attenuated HPA sensitivity to fast glucocorticoid feedback inhibition in male rats exposed to a chronic variable stress (CVS) paradigm. In vitro, parvocellular neuroendocrine cells of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus recorded in slices from CVS rats showed an increase in basal excitatory synaptic inputs and a decrease in basal inhibitory synaptic inputs compared with neurons from control rats. There was no difference between control and CVS-treated rats in the rapid glucocorticoid suppression of excitatory synaptic inputs, a fast feedback mechanism. In vivo, CVS-treated rats showed an increase in ACTH secretion at baseline and after both iv CRH and acute stress and no impairment of the corticosterone suppression of the ACTH response, compared with controls. In an in vitro pituitary preparation, an increase in basal ACTH release, a small increase in CRH-induced ACTH release, and no decrement in the glucocorticoid suppression of ACTH release were seen in pituitaries from CVS rats. Thus, CVS does not suppress rapid glucocorticoid negative feedback at the hypothalamus or pituitary, but increases the synaptic excitability of paraventricular nucleus CRH neurons and the CRH sensitivity of the pituitary. Therefore, increased HPA activity in chronically stressed male rats is due to sensitization of the HPA axis, rather than to desensitization to rapid glucocorticoid feedback. PMID:27054552

  11. The Effects of Methylphenidate on Goal-directed Behavior in a Rat Model of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Natsheh, Joman Y.; Shiflett, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Although attentional and motor alterations in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been well characterized, less is known about how this disorder impacts goal-directed behavior. To investigate whether there is a misbalance between goal-directed and habitual behaviors in an animal model of ADHD, we tested adult [P75–P105] Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR; ADHD rat model) and Wistar–Kyoto rats (WKY), the normotensive control strain, on an instrumental conditioning paradigm with two phases: a free-operant training phase in which rats separately acquired two distinct action–outcome contingencies, and a choice test conducted in extinction prior to which one of the food outcomes was devalued through specific satiety. To assess the effects of Methylphenidate (MPH), a commonly used ADHD medication, on goal-directed behavior, we injected rats with either MPH or saline prior to the choice test. Both rat strains acquired an instrumental response, with SHR responding at greater rates over the course of training. During the choice test WKY demonstrated goal-directed behavior, responding more frequently on the lever that delivered, during training, the still-valued outcome. In contrast, SHR showed no goal-directed behavior, responding equally on both levers. However, MPH administration prior to the choice test restored goal-directed behavior in SHR, and disrupted this behavior in WKY rats. This study provides the first experimental evidence for selective impairment in goal-directed behavior in rat models of ADHD, and how MPH acts differently on SHR and WKY animals to restore or impair this behavior, respectively. PMID:26635568

  12. The Effects of Methylphenidate on Goal-directed Behavior in a Rat Model of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Natsheh, Joman Y; Shiflett, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Although attentional and motor alterations in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been well characterized, less is known about how this disorder impacts goal-directed behavior. To investigate whether there is a misbalance between goal-directed and habitual behaviors in an animal model of ADHD, we tested adult [P75-P105] Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR; ADHD rat model) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), the normotensive control strain, on an instrumental conditioning paradigm with two phases: a free-operant training phase in which rats separately acquired two distinct action-outcome contingencies, and a choice test conducted in extinction prior to which one of the food outcomes was devalued through specific satiety. To assess the effects of Methylphenidate (MPH), a commonly used ADHD medication, on goal-directed behavior, we injected rats with either MPH or saline prior to the choice test. Both rat strains acquired an instrumental response, with SHR responding at greater rates over the course of training. During the choice test WKY demonstrated goal-directed behavior, responding more frequently on the lever that delivered, during training, the still-valued outcome. In contrast, SHR showed no goal-directed behavior, responding equally on both levers. However, MPH administration prior to the choice test restored goal-directed behavior in SHR, and disrupted this behavior in WKY rats. This study provides the first experimental evidence for selective impairment in goal-directed behavior in rat models of ADHD, and how MPH acts differently on SHR and WKY animals to restore or impair this behavior, respectively. PMID:26635568

  13. Spaceflight and bone turnover - Correlation with a new rat model of weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    Earlier manned spaceflight studies have revealed that the near-weightless environment of orbital flight produce certain biological effects in humans, including abnormalities in mineral metabolism. The data collected were compatible with bone mineral loss. Cosmos 782 and 936 experiments have shown a decrease in rat bone formation rate. In this paper, a rat model of weightlessness is described, which is unique in that the animal is free to move about a 360-deg arc. The model meets the requirements for an acceptable system. Data from the model and spaceflight are presented. Many of the responses noted in suspended animals indicate that the model closely mimics results from rats and man exposed to near-weightlessness during orbital spaceflight.

  14. Behavioral outcome measures used for human neural stem cell transplantation in rat stroke models

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Matthew B.; Han, Dong Y.; Sawaf, Abdullah Al; Krishnaney-Davison, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, leading to the development of various stroke models to test new treatments, most commonly in the rat. Human stroke trials focus on disability, related primarily to neurological deficits. To better model the clinical application of these treatments, many behavioral tests have been developed using the rat stroke model. We performed a systematic review of all the behavioral outcome measures used in published studies of human neural stem cell transplantation in rat stroke models. The reviewed tests include motor, sensory, cognitive, activity, and combination tests. For each test, we give a brief description, trace the origin of the test, and discuss test performance in the reviewed studies. We conclude that while many behavioral tests are available for this purpose, there does not appear to be consensus on an optimal testing strategy. PMID:22053257

  15. Beneficial Metabolic Effects of 2′,3′,5′-tri-acetyl-N6- (3-Hydroxylaniline) Adenosine in the Liver and Plasma of Hyperlipidemic Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunying; Wang, Yinghong; Zhu, Haibo

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical research of hyperlipidemia has been commonly pursued using traditional approaches. However, unbiased metabonomics attempts to explore the metabolic signature of hyperlipidemia in a high-throughput manner to understand pathophysiology of the disease process. Methodology/Principal Findings As a new way, we performed 1H NMR-based metabonomics to evaluate the beneficial effects of 2′,3′,5′-tri-acetyl-N6- (3-hydroxylaniline) adenosine (WS070117) on plasma and liver from hyperlipidemic Syrian golden hamsters. Both plasma and liver profiles provided a clearer distinction between the control and hyperlipidemic hamsters. Compared to control animals, hyperlipidemic hamsters showed a higher content of lipids (triglyceride and cholesterol), lactate and alanine together with a lower content of choline-containing compounds (e.g., phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine, and glycerophosphocholine) and betaine. As a result, metabonomics-based findings such as the PCA and OPLS-DA plotting of metabolic state and analysis of potential biomarkers in plasma and liver correlated well to the assessment of biochemical assays, Oil Red O staining and in vivo ultrasonographic imaging suggesting that WS070117 was able to regulate lipid content and displayed more beneficial effects on plasma and liver than simvastatin. Conclusions/Significance This work demonstrates the promise of applying 1H NMR metabonomics to evaluate the beneficial effects of WS070117 which may be a good drug candidate for hyperlipidemia. PMID:22470419

  16. Herbal compound Naoshuantong capsule attenuates retinal injury in ischemia/reperfusion rat model by inhibiting apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuangxin; Gao, Yang; Yu, Qiang; Feng, Liangqi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Ischemic ophthalmopathy threatens people’s lives and health. The herbal compound medication, Naoshuantong capsule, plays a critical role in the treatment of cardiac-cerebral vascular diseases; however, the roles and mechanisms of action of Naoshuantong capsule in ischemic ophthalmopathy is unknown. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect and mechanism of action of Naoshuantong capsule on ischemic ophthalmopathy in rats. Methods: In this study a rat model of ischemic ophthalmopathy was constructed using a high intra-ocular pressure-induced ischemia/reperfusion model. The effects of Naoshuantong capsule on ischemic ophthalmopathy were detected using electroretinography, and changes in retinal ultrastructure were examined by HE staining and electron microscopy. The mechanism of action of Naoshuantong capsule on ischemic ophthalmopathy was explored by immunofluorescence and real-time PCR. Results: Rat models of ischemic ophthalmopathy were successfully constructed by intra-ocular hypertension, which presented decreased amplitudes of the electroretinogram (ERG-b) wave and total retinal thickness, intracellular damage, increased expression of Bax and caspase 3, and decreased expression of Bcl-2. Treatment with Naoshuantong capsule attenuated the changes and damage to the ischemic retina in the rat model, inhibited the over-expression of Bax and caspase 3, and increased the expression of Bcl-2. Conclusion: Our study indicated that Naoshuantong capsule attenuates retinal damage in rat models of ischemic ophthalmopathy, possibly by inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26550135

  17. The Effects and Possible Mechanisms of Puerarin to Treat Endometriosis Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Zhang, Danying; Zhai, Dongxia; Shen, Wei; Bai, Lingling; Liu, Yiqun; Cai, Zailong; Li, Ji; Yu, Chaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the effects of puerarin to treat endometriosis (EMT) model rats and the possible regulatory mechanisms. Methods. EMT model rats were surgically induced by autotransplantion of endometrial tissues. The appropriate dosage of puerarin to treat EMT model rats was determined by observing the pathologic morphology of ectopic endometrial tissues and by detecting the levels of estradiol (E2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) of both serum and ectopic endometrial tissues. The related genes and proteins of ectopic endometrial tissues were analyzed by Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to explore the possible mechanisms. Results. Puerarin could reduce the levels of E2 and PGE2 and prevent the growth of ectopic endometrium tissues by inhibiting the expression of aromatase cytochrome P450 (p450arom) and cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2); puerarin could adjust the anabolism of E2 by upregulating the expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid-2 (17β-hsd-2) and downregulating the expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid-1 (17β-hsd-1) of the ectopic endometrium tissues; puerarin could increase the expression of ERβ and improve the inflammatory microenvironment of EMT model rats. Conclusions. Our data suggest that puerarin has a therapeutic effect on EMT model rats and could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of EMT in clinic. PMID:25815028

  18. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  19. Antipsychotic-like effect of minocycline in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Dokuyucu, Recep; Kokacya, Hanifi; Inanir, Sema; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Erbas, Oytun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Tetracycline antibiotic drug minocycline has strongly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Minocycline has also remarkable brain tissue penetration, is clinically entirely tolerated and properly absorbed when taken orally. In our study, we class with the effects of minocycline and chlorpromazine, a conventional antipsychotic drug, by evaluating the novelty-induced rearing, apomorphine-induced stereotypic behavior, and brain MDA levels in rats. Materials and Methods: Four groups of rat (n = 7) were applied with minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.), chlorpromazine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), or isotonic saline (1 mL/kg, i.p.). One hour later, apomorphine (2 mg/kg, s.c.) was applied to each rat. Result: Our results showed that both doses of minocycline significantly decreased the rearing behavior in rats, whereas the decrease with chlorpromazine was higher. Minocycline also decreased the stereotypy scores in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: We concluded that minocycline has beneficial effects on rearing behavior and stereotypy, which are accepted to be indicators of antipsychotic effect. Taken together, minocycline, as an anti-oxidant and cytoprotective agent, can be useful in neuroprotection especially on early stages of psychosis or prepsychotic patients with insignificant symptoms. Minocycline is worthy of being investigated for its anti-psychotic effects as a primary or an adjunctive drug. PMID:25419368

  20. Effect of Angiotensin(1-7) on Heart Function in an Experimental Rat Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Katja; Schlegel, Franziska; Raasch, Walter; Bader, Michael; Dähnert, Ingo; Dhein, Stefan; Salameh, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Obesity is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Recently it was shown that overexpression of the Mas-receptor antagonist angiotensin(1-7) could prevent from diet-induced obesity. However, it remained unclear whether diet-induced obesity and angiotensin(1-7) overexpression might also have effects on the cardiovascular system in these rats. Methods:Twenty three male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with standard chow (SD+chow, n = 5) or a cafeteria diet (SD+CD, n = 6) for 5 months. To investigate the effect of angiotensin(1-7) transgenic rats, expressing an angiotensin(1-7)-producing fusion protein in testis were used. These transgenic rats also received a 5 month's feeding period with either chow (TGR+chow, n = 6) or cafeteria diet (TGR+CD, n = 6), respectively. Hemodynamic measurements (pressure-volume loops) were carried out to assess cardiac function and blood pressure. Subsequently, hearts were explanted and investigated according to the Langendorff technique. Furthermore, cardiac remodeling in these animals was investigated histologically. Results:After 5 months cafeteria diet feeding rats showed a significantly increased body weight, which could be prevented in transgenic rats. However, there was no effect on cardiac performance after cafeteria diet in non-transgenic and transgenic rats. Moreover, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) deteriorated cardiac contractility as indicated by impaired dp/dt. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed that cafeteria diet led to myocardial fibrosis in both, control and transgenic rats and this was not inhibited by an overproduction of angiotensin(1-7). Conclusion:These results indicate that an overexpression of circulating angiotensin(1-7) prevents a cafeteria diet-induced increase in body weight, but does not affect cardiac performance in this experimental rat model of obesity. Furthermore, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) alone resulted in an impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26733884

  1. Rat molar teeth as a study model for direct pulp capping research in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dammaschke, Till

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the suitability of rat molar teeth in preclinical evaluation of medical devices for direct pulp capping. The ISO standard 7405 states clearly that only non-rodent mammals are suitable species for animal research in dentistry. Furthermore, without clear justification a considerable number of researchers previously rejected results of animal experiments concerning preclinical evaluation of the biocompatibility of dental materials undertaken in rat molar teeth. However, in the past 50 years about 70 studies have been published using rat molar teeth in order to evaluate direct pulp capping, pulpotomies and tissue reactions after pulp exposure. Numerous studies showed that the healing of rat molar pulp tissue after direct pulp capping is histologically comparable with humans and other animal species pulp tissue. Rat molar teeth, including pulp tissue, can be seen anatomically, histologically, biologically, and physiologically as miniature human molar teeth. Hence, the essential biological reactions of the pulp tissue and the interaction during the different stages of wound healing of rat molar teeth are comparable with that of other mammals. Rat molar teeth are a valid study model in order to provide valuable data concerning pulp tissue reaction after direct pulp capping and related questions in dentistry. Therefore, the use of rats may significantly reduce the number of currently used higher animals in research. Tests in higher developed animals should be limited to experiments which clarify inconsistent results. However, some technical difficulties, like the small size of rat molar teeth must be dealt with before undertaking any research. PMID:19854755

  2. Erectile response to topical, intraurethral and intracorporal pharmacotherapy in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Rivas, D A; Chancellor, M B; Huang, B; Salzman, S K

    1995-10-01

    In order to compare the erectile response to topical, intraurethral and intracorporal administration of vasoactive substances in neurologically intact and spinal cord injured (SCI) rats, a standard rat model of SCI using impact trauma at the level of T10 was employed, comparing the tumescence of 24 SCI and 25 control rats. Four weeks after SCI, the effect of vasoactive substances on erectile function was evaluated. Under ketamine anesthesia, the penis was exposed and intracorporal pressure (ICP) was monitored using saline infusion cavernosometry through a 24-gauge catheter inserted into one corpus cavernosum. Changes in ICP were recorded in response to the topical and intraurethral (IU) application of minoxidil (0.1 ml, 2% solution) and 2% nitroglycerin (NTG) ointment (0.1 gm), as well as the intracorporal (IC) administration of papaverine (0.0001-0.10 mg/kg). Results indicated that the mean baseline ICP was 8 +/- 5 mmHg for SCI and 9 +/- 4 mmHg for control rats. No response to topical therapy onto the undegloved penis was noted in either SCI or control rats. IU application of minoxidil to the degloved phallus developed ICP greater than that achieved with topical minoxidil; the topical application of NTG was less effective. In SCI rats, IC papaverine injection achieved an ICP of 56.9 +/- 24.3 mmHg, whereas papaverine in control rats generated an ICP of 43.5 +/- 38.8 mmHg. A greater increase in ICP at lower doses of each agent occurred in SCI than in control rats. We conclude that only the degloved phallus responded to topical vasoactive pharmacotherapy. Although both topical and IU applications of NTG and minoxidil increase ICP, tumescence was significantly less than that achieved with IC injection of papaverine. The IU application of minoxidil demonstrated significantly greater activity than other topical therapies. SCI rats displayed a supersensitive response to all modes of pharmacologic erectile therapy. PMID:8591071

  3. Functional mitochondrial analysis in acute brain sections from adult rats reveals mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Moffat, Cynthia; Seifert, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in many neurological disorders that only develop or are much more severe in adults, yet no methodology exists that allows for medium-throughput functional mitochondrial analysis of brain sections from adult animals. We developed a technique for quantifying mitochondrial respiration in acutely isolated adult rat brain sections with the Seahorse XF Analyzer. Evaluating a range of conditions made quantifying mitochondrial function from acutely derived adult brain sections from the cortex, cerebellum, and trigeminal nucleus caudalis possible. Optimization of this technique demonstrated that the ideal section size was 1 mm wide. We found that sectioning brains at physiological temperatures was necessary for consistent metabolic analysis of trigeminal nucleus caudalis sections. Oxygen consumption in these sections was highly coupled to ATP synthesis, had robust spare respiratory capacities, and had limited nonmitochondrial respiration, all indicative of healthy tissue. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by identifying a decreased spare respiratory capacity in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis of a rat model of chronic migraine, a neurological disorder that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This technique allows for 24 acutely isolated sections from multiple brain regions of a single adult rat to be analyzed simultaneously with four sequential drug treatments, greatly advancing the ability to study mitochondrial physiology in adult neurological disorders. PMID:25252946

  4. Role of oxidative stress in surgical cavernous nerve injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ding, Xie-Gang; Li, Shi-Wen; Zheng, Hang; Zheng, Xin-Min; Navin, Shrestha; Li, Lu; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the role of oxidative stress in surgical cavernous nerve (CN) injury in a rat model. Eighty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, sham-operated rats; group 2, bilateral CN-crushed rats; and group 3, bilateral CN-transection-and-sutured-immediately rats. Oxidative stress was evaluated by malondialdehyde levels, super oxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities in serum. Erectile function was assessed by CN electrostimulation at 3 months with mean maximal intracavernous pressure (ICP) and maximal ICP per mean arterial pressure. Nerve injury was assessed by toluidine blue staining of CNs and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase staining of penile tissue. GPX protein expression and nitrotyrosine-3 (NT-3) levels in penile tissue were measured. Erectile function and the number of myelinated axons of CNs and NADPH-diaphorase-positive nerve fibers were statistically decreased between groups, from sham to crush to transection. For markers, both nerve-injury groups showed increased oxidative stress markers at early time points, with the transection group showing greater oxidative stress than the crushed group and values normalizing to sham levels by week 12. GPX expression and NT-3 levels in penile tissue were in concordance with the results of SOD and GPX. These results show that oxidative stress plays an important role in injured CNs, and different methods of CN injury can lead to different degrees of oxidative stress in a rat model. PMID:25597854

  5. Generation of muscular dystrophy model rats with a CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Fujii, Wataru; Tsuboi, Masaya; Tanihata, Jun; Teramoto, Naomi; Takeuchi, Shiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene encoding Dystrophin. DMD model animals, such as mdx mice and canine X-linked muscular dystrophy dogs, have been widely utilized in the development of a treatment for DMD. Here, we demonstrate the generation of Dmd-mutated rats using a clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system, an RNA-based genome engineering technique that is also adaptive to rats. We simultaneously targeted two exons in the rat Dmd gene, which resulted in the absence of Dystrophin expression in the F0 generation. Dmd-mutated rats exhibited a decline in muscle strength, and the emergence of degenerative/regenerative phenotypes in the skeletal muscle, heart, and diaphragm. These mutations were heritable by the next generation, and F1 male rats exhibited similar phenotypes in their skeletal muscles. These model rats should prove to be useful for developing therapeutic methods to treat DMD. PMID:25005781

  6. A rat model of slow Wallerian degeneration (WldS) with improved preservation of neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Adalbert, Robert; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Haley, Jane E; Bridge, Katherine; Beirowski, Bogdan; Berek, Livia; Wagner, Diana; Grumme, Daniela; Thomson, Derek; Celik, Arzu; Addicks, Klaus; Ribchester, Richard R; Coleman, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    The slow Wallerian degeneration phenotype, Wld(S), which delays Wallerian degeneration and axon pathology for several weeks, has so far been studied only in mice. A rat model would have several advantages. First, rats model some human disorders better than mice. Second, the larger body size of rats facilitates more complex surgical manipulations. Third, rats provide a greater yield of tissue for primary culture and biochemical investigations. We generated transgenic Wld(S) rats expressing the Ube4b/Nmnat1 chimeric gene in the central and peripheral nervous system. As in Wld(S) mice, their axons survive up to 3 weeks after transection and remain functional for at least 1 week. Protection of axotomized nerve terminals is stronger than in mice, particularly in one line, where 95-100% of neuromuscular junctions remained intact and functional after 5 days. Furthermore, the loss of synaptic phenotype with age was much less in rats than in mice. Thus, the slow Wallerian degeneration phenotype can be transferred to another mammalian species and synapses may be more effectively preserved after axotomy in species with longer axons. PMID:15654865

  7. A rat model of saliva secretory immunoglobulin: a suppression caused by intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Kimura, F; Aizawa, K; Tanabe, K; Shimizu, K; Kon, M; Lee, H; Akimoto, T; Akama, T; Kono, I

    2008-06-01

    We aimed to develop a valid model of immunosuppression induced by intense exercise in rats. Rats were divided into three groups. In the rest (Rest) group, saliva was collected from resting rats on 4 consecutive days. In the exercise (Ex) group, rats ran on a treadmill until exhaustion (exercise time: 60.0 +/- 3.7 min), and their saliva was collected before and after exercise; the salivary glands were removed after exercise. In the control (Con) group, saliva collection and gland removal were also performed, but the rats did not exercise. Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) concentrations in saliva and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) mRNA expression in the glands were measured. There was no significant change in SIgA concentration in the Rest group over 4 days. In the Ex group, SIgA concentration decreased significantly after exercise compared with before, whereas there was no significant change in the Con group. The expression of pIgR mRNA was significantly lower in the Ex group post-exercise than in the Con group. Our procedure for saliva collection appeared suitable, and the exercise-induced SIgA suppression was probably caused by a decline in pIgR mRNA expression. We propose to use this reproducible and reliable rat model of exercise-induced SIgA suppression in future studies. PMID:17555544

  8. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with minocycline improve spinal cord injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dayong; Zeng, Wei; Fu, Yunfeng; Gao, Meng; Lv, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess that the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) combination with minocycline improve spinal cord injury (SCI) in rat model. In the present study, the Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: control group, SCI group, BMSCs group, Minocycline group and BMSCs + minocycline group. Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) test and MPO activity were used to assess the effect of combination therapy on locomotion and neutrophil infiltration. Inflammation factors, VEGF and BDNF expression, caspase-3 activation, phosphorylation-p38MAPK, proNGF, p75NTR and RhoA expressions were estimated using commercial kits or western blot, respectively. BBB scores were significantly increased and MPO activity was significantly undermined by combination therapy. In addition, combination therapy significantly decreased inflammation factors in SCI rats. Results from western blot showed that combination therapy significantly up-regulated the protein of VEGF and BDNF expression and down-regulated the protein of phosphorylation-p38MAPK, proNGF, p75NTR and RhoA expressions in SCI rats. Combination therapy stimulation also suppressed the caspase-3 activation in SCI rats. These results demonstrated that the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combination with minocycline improve SCI in rat model. PMID:26722382

  9. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) as a putative animal model of childhood hyperkinesis: SHR behavior compared to four other rat strains.

    PubMed

    Sagvolden, T; Pettersen, M B; Larsen, M C

    1993-12-01

    Childhood hyperkinesis or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a behavior disorder of which the main symptoms are attention problems and hyperactivity. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) strain is a useful animal model of ADHD. Five different rat strains were tested: SHR, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), Wistar, Sprague-Dawley (SPRD), and PVG (hooded) rats. The protocol consisted of three different test procedures: 1) A 7.5-min free-exploration open-field test (home cage accessible), where the SHR was less active than Wistar and SPRD but more active than WKY; SHR showed longer latencies to leave the home cage than both Wistar and SPRD rats, spending less time in the field, ambulating and rearing less than Wistar and SPRD but more than WKY. Within session, the SHR tended to be more active at the end of the session than at the start, while the opposite tended to be the case in the other groups. 2) A 7.5-min forced exploration open-field test (home cage not accessible), where the results showed that the SHR is less active than both the Wistar and Sprague-Dawley strains, but more active than PVG and WKY. 3) A two-component multiple schedule of reinforcement with a fixed interval 2 min signalled by houselight on and a 5-min extinction signalled by houselight off. Lever pressing by SHR was markedly different from that of the other four strains, which were quite Except early in the interval, SHR pressed the lever more than any of the other groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8295939

  10. Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes,, Don; Black, Sylvester M.

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and “pearls of wisdom”/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  11. Method of isolated ex vivo lung perfusion in a rat model: lessons learned from developing a rat EVLP program.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes, Don; Black, Sylvester M; Ghadiali, Samir; Whitson, Bryan A

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and "pearls of wisdom"/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  12. Segmental Transarterial Embolization in a Translational Rat Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Terence P.F.; Hunt, Stephen J.; Harrison, Neil; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Weber, Charles; Pickup, Stephen; Furth, Emma E.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Soulen, Michael C.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically relevant, minimally invasive technique for transarterial embolization in a translational rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Oral diethylnitrosamine was administered to 53 male Wistar rats ad libitum for 12 weeks. Tumor induction was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging. Minimally invasive lobar or segmental transarterial embolization was performed through a left common carotid artery approach. Necropsy was performed to evaluate periprocedural mortality. Histologic analysis of tumors that received embolization was performed to assess percent tumor necrosis. Results Severe cirrhosis and autochthonous HCCs were characterized in a cohort of rats composed of two groups of rats identically treated with diethylnitrosamine with median survival times of 101 days and 105 days (n = 10/group). A second cohort was used to develop minimally invasive transarterial embolization of HCCs (n = 10). In a third cohort, lobar embolization was successfully performed in 9 of 10 rats and demonstrated a high rate of periprocedural mortality (n = 5). Necropsy performed for periprocedural mortality after lobar embolization demonstrated extensive tissue necrosis within the liver (n = 3) and lungs (n = 2), indicating nontarget embolization as the likely cause of mortality. In a fourth cohort of rats, a segmental embolization technique was successfully applied in 10 of 13 rats. Segmental embolization resulted in a reduction in periprocedural mortality (P = .06) relative to selective embolization and a 19% increase in average tumor necrosis (P = .04). Conclusions Minimally invasive, segmental embolization mimicking the currently applied clinical approach is feasible in a translational rat model of HCC and offers the critical advantage of reduced nontarget embolization relative to lobar embolization. PMID:25863596

  13. Emission-particle-induced ventilatory abnormalities in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Sarah Y; McGee, John K; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Winsett, Darrell W; Doerfler, Donald L; Costa, Daniel L

    2004-01-01

    Preexistent cardiopulmonary disease in humans appears to enhance susceptibility to the adverse effects of ambient particulate matter. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated enhanced inflammation and mortality after intratracheal instillation (IT) and inhalation (INH) of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline (MCT). The present study was conducted to examine the effects of ROFA in this model on ventilatory function in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals. Sixty-day-old male CD rats were injected with MCT (60 mg/kg) or vehicle (VEH) intraperitoneally 10 days before IT of ROFA (8.3 mg/kg) or saline (SAL) (control) or nose-only INH of ROFA [15 mg/m3 for 6 hr on 3 consecutive days or air (control)]. At 24 and 72 hr after exposure, rats were studied individually in a simultaneous gas uptake/whole-body plethysmograph. Lungs were removed at 72 hr for histology. Pulmonary test results showed that tidal volume (VT) decreased 24 hr after IT of ROFA in MCT-treated rats. Breathing frequency, minute volume (VE), and the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen increased in MCT- and VEH-treated rats 24 hr after IT or INH of ROFA and remained elevated 72 hr post-IT. O2 uptake (VO2) decreased after IT of ROFA in MCT-treated rats. Carbon monoxide uptake decreased 24 hr after IT of ROFA, returning to control values in VEH-treated rats but remaining low in MCT-treated rats 72 hr post-IT. ROFA exposure induced histologic changes and abnormalities in several ventilatory parameters, many of which were enhanced by MCT treatment. PMID:15175175

  14. SYSTEMIC BIOMARKERS AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES OF RAT DISEASE MODELS EMPLOYED IN AIR POLLUTION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) models are used for identification of mechanisms of susceptibility to air pollution. We hypothesized that baseline systemic biomarkers and cardiac gene expression in CVD rat models will have influence on their ozone-induced lung inflammation. Male 12-...

  15. A Comparison of Neuroinflammation to Implanted Microelectrodes in Rat and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Burke, Alan A.; Meador, William D.; Householder, Kyle T.; Buck, Amy C.; Sunil, Smrithi; Stewart, Wade G.; Anna, Jake P.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Rat models have emerged as a common tool to study neuroinflammation to intracortical microelectrodes. While a number of studies have attempted to understand the factors resulting in neuroinflammation using rat models, a complete understanding of key mechanistic pathways remains elusive. Transgenic mouse models, however, could facilitate a deeper understanding of mechanistic pathways due to an ease of genetic alteration. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to compare neuroinflammation following microelectrode implantation s between the rat and the mouse model. Our study suggests that subtle differences in the classic neuroinflammatory markers exist between the animal models at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Most notably, neuronal densities surrounding microelectrodes were significantly lower in the rat model at two weeks, while similar densities were observed between the animal models at sixteen weeks. Physiological differences between the species and slight alterations in surgical methods are likely key contributors to the observed differences. Moving forward, we propose that differences in the time course of neuroinflammation between the animal models should be considered when trying to understand and prevent intracortical microelectrode failure. PMID:24755527

  16. A comparison of neuroinflammation to implanted microelectrodes in rat and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Burke, Alan A; Meador, William D; Householder, Kyle T; Buck, Amy C; Sunil, Smrithi; Stewart, Wade G; Anna, Jake P; Tomaszewski, William H; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2014-07-01

    Rat models have emerged as a common tool to study neuroinflammation to intracortical microelectrodes. While a number of studies have attempted to understand the factors resulting in neuroinflammation using rat models, a complete understanding of key mechanistic pathways remains elusive. Transgenic mouse models, however, could facilitate a deeper understanding of mechanistic pathways due to an ease of genetic alteration. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to compare neuroinflammation following microelectrode implantation between the rat and the mouse model. Our study suggests that subtle differences in the classic neuroinflammatory markers exist between the animal models at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Most notably, neuronal densities surrounding microelectrodes were significantly lower in the rat model at two weeks, while similar densities were observed between the animal models at sixteen weeks. Physiological differences between the species and slight alterations in surgical methods are likely key contributors to the observed differences. Moving forward, we propose that differences in the time course of neuroinflammation between the animal models should be considered when trying to understand and prevent intracortical microelectrode failure. PMID:24755527

  17. Efficacy of Polaprezinc for Acute Radiation Proctitis in a Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Takada, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Tsuboi, Keita; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tanooka, Masao; Nakamura, Takeshi; Shikata, Toshiyuki; Tsujimura, Tohru; Hirota, Shozo

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to standardize the experimental rat model of radiation proctitis and to examine the efficacy of polaprezinc on radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 54 female Wistar rats (5 weeks old) were used. The rats were divided into three groups: those treated with polaprezinc (PZ+), those treated with base alone, exclusive of polaprezinc (PZ-), and those treated without any medication (control). All the rats were irradiated to the rectum. Polaprezinc was prepared as an ointment. The ointment was administered rectally each day after irradiation. All rats were killed on the 10th day after irradiation. The mucosal changes were evaluated endoscopically and pathologically. The results were graded from 0 to 4 and compared according to milder or more severe status, as applicable. Results: According to the endoscopic findings, the proportion of mild changes in the PZ+, PZ-, and control group was 71.4%, 25.0%, and 14.3% respectively. On pathologic examination, the proportion of low-grade findings in the PZ+, PZ-, and control group was 80.0%, 58.3%, and 42.9% for mucosal damage, 85.0%, 41.7%, and 42.9% for a mild degree of inflammation, and 50.0%, 33.3%, and 4.8% for a shallow depth of inflammation, respectively. The PZ+ group tended to have milder mucosal damage than the other groups, according to all criteria used. In addition, significant differences were observed between the PZ+ and control groups regarding the endoscopic findings, degree of inflammation, and depth of inflammation. Conclusions: This model was confirmed to be a useful experimental rat model for radiation proctitis. The results of the present study have demonstrated the efficacy of polaprezinc against acute radiation-induced rectal disorders using the rat model.

  18. Rat model of cholelithiasis with human gallstones implanted in cholestasis-induced virtual gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; Liu, Yewei; Yin, Ting; Feng, Yuanbo; Chen, Feng; Mulier, Stefaan; Li, Yue; Zhang, Jian; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To facilitate translational research on cholelithiasis, we have developed a rat model of human gallstones by exploiting the unique biliopancreatic features of this species. METHODS: Under anesthesia, 16 adult rats of equal genders underwent two times of abdominal surgery. First, their common bile duct (CBD) was ligated to cause cholestasis by total biliary obstruction (TBO). On day 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after TBO, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted to monitor the dilatation of the CBD, and blood was sampled to analyze total serum bilirubin (TSB). Secondly, on day 30, the abdomen was re-opened and gallstone(s) collected from human patients were implanted in the dilated CBD as a virtual gallbladder (VGB), which was closed by suture ligation. This rat cholelithiasis model was examined by MRI, clinical observation, microcholangiography and histology. RESULTS: All rats survived two laparotomies. After ligation, the CBD was dilated to a stable size of 4 to 30 mm in diameter on day 21-28, which became a VGB. The rats initially showed signs of jaundice that diminished over time, which paralleled with the evolving TSB levels from 0.6 ± 0.3 mg/dL before ligation, through a peak of 10.9 ± 1.9 mg/dL on day 14, until a nearly normalized value after day 28. The dilated CBD with thickened wall allowed an incision for implantation of human gallstones of 1-10 mm in diameter. The rat cholelithiasis was proven by in vivo MRI and postmortem microcholangiography and histomorphology. CONCLUSION: A rat model cholelithiasis with human gallstones has been established, which proves feasible, safe, reliable, nontoxic and cost-effective. Given the gallstones of human origin, applications of this model may be of help in translational research such as optical detection and lysis of gallstones by systemic drug administration. PMID:27376020

  19. Fused pulmonary lobes is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyozumi, Daiji; Nakano, Itsuko; Takahashi, Ken L.; Hojo, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Hiroaki; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) mutant rats exhibit similar phenotypes to Fraser syndrome. {yields} The fpl gene harbors a nonsense mutation in Fraser syndrome-associated gene Frem2. {yields} Fpl mutant is defined as a first model of human Fraser syndrome in rats. -- Abstract: Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) is a mutant gene that is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and causes various developmental defects, including fusion of pulmonary lobes, and eyelid and digit anomalies in rats. Since these developmental defects closely resemble those observed in patients with Fraser syndrome, a recessive multiorgan disorder, and its model animals, we investigated whether the abnormal phenotypes observed in fpl/fpl mutant rats are attributable to a genetic disorder similar to Fraser syndrome. At the epidermal basement membrane in fpl/fpl mutant neonates, the expression of QBRICK, a basement membrane protein whose expression is attenuated in Fraser syndrome model mice, was greatly diminished compared with control littermates. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of Fraser syndrome-related genes revealed that Frem2 transcripts were markedly diminished in QBRICK-negative embryos. Genomic DNA sequencing of the fpl/fpl mutant identified a nonsense mutation that introduced a stop codon at serine 2005 in Frem2. These findings indicate that the fpl mutant is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome.

  20. Paeoniflorin ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis in rat models through oxidative stress, inflammation and cyclooxygenase 2

    PubMed Central

    JIA, ZHILIN; HE, JIAO

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, immune regulatory and pain-relieving effects, amongst other roles. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of paeoniflorin on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain under investigation; the objective of the current study was to evaluate these protective effects in the context of an RA model. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, as follows: The control group, the RA rat model group, and the paeoniflorin groups, in which paeoniflorin was administered at concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg for 3 weeks. The pain thresholds and arthritic symptoms of the RA rats were measured. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also analyzed and western blot analysis was used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression levels. Paeoniflorin significantly increased the pain threshold and decreased the arthritic symptoms in the RA rat model. Notably, paeoniflorin reduced the malondialdehyde concentration and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, paeoniflorin attenuated the activity of nuclear factor-κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and reduced the COX-2 protein expression level. The present study indicates that paeoniflorin ameliorates disease in rat models of RA through oxidative stress, inflammation and alterations to COX-2 expression. PMID:26893662

  1. AGN-2979, an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase activation, does not affect serotonin synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line rats, a rat model of depression, but produces a significant effect in Flinders Resistant Line rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Nishi, Kyoko; Diksic, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter, serotonin, is involved in several brain functions, including both normal, physiological functions, and pathophysiological functions. Alterations in any of the normal parameters of serotonergic neurotransmission can produce several different psychiatric disorders, including major depression. In many instances, brain neurochemical variables are not able to be studied properly in humans, thus making the use of good animal models extremely valuable. One of these animal models is the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) of rats, which has face, predictive and constructive validities in relation to human depression. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activation inhibitor, AGN-2979, on the FSL rats (rats with depression-like behaviour), and compare it to the effect on the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) of rats used as the control rats. The effect was evaluated by measuring changes in regional serotonin synthesis in the vehicle treated rats (FSL-VEH and FRL-VEH) relative to those measured in the AGN-2979 treated rats (FSL-AGN and FRL-AGN). Regional serotonin synthesis was measured autoradiographically in more than thirty brain regions. The measurements were performed using α-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan as the tracer. The results indicate that AGN-2979 did not produce a significant reduction of TPH activity in the AGN-2979 group relative to the vehicle group (a reduction would have been observed if there had been an activation of TPH by the experimental set up) in the FSL rats. On the other hand, there was a highly significant reduction of synthesis in the FRL rats treated by AGN-2979, relative to the vehicle group. Together, the results demonstrate that in the FSL rats, AGN-2979 does not affect serotonin synthesis. This suggests that there was no activation of TPH in the FSL rats during the experimental procedure, but such activation did occur in the FRL rats. Because of this finding, it could be

  2. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6-42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  3. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6–42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  4. Rethinking food anticipatory activity in the activity-based anorexia rat model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hemmings; van Kuyck, Kris; Tambuyzer, Tim; Luyten, Laura; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Nuttin, Bart

    2014-01-01

    When a rat is on a limited fixed-time food schedule with full access to a running wheel (activity-based anorexia model, ABA), its activity level will increase hours prior to the feeding period. This activity, called food-anticipatory activity (FAA), is a hypothesized parallel to the hyperactivity symptom in human anorexia nervosa. To investigate in depth the characteristics of FAA, we retrospectively analyzed the level of FAA and activities during other periods in ABA rats. To our surprise, rats with the most body weight loss have the lowest level of FAA, which contradicts the previously established link between FAA and the severity of ABA symptoms. On the contrary, our study shows that postprandial activities are more directly related to weight loss. We conclude that FAA alone may not be sufficient to reflect model severity, and activities during other periods may be of potential value in studies using ABA model. PMID:24473370

  5. Evaluation of deltamethrin kinetics and dosimetry in the maturing rat using a PBPK model

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Kim, Hyo J.; Haines, Wendy T.; Bruckner, James V.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-04-15

    Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study (Kim et al., in press) revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90 days old. The objective of the current study was to modify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DLM disposition in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat (Mirfazaelian et al., 2006), so blood and target organ dosimetry could be accurately predicted during maturation. Age-specific organ weights and age-dependent changes in the oxidative and hydrolytic clearance of DLM were modeled with a generalized Michaelis-Menten model for growth and the summary equations incorporated into the PBPK model. The model's simulations compared favorably with empirical DLM time-courses in plasma, blood, brain and fat for the four age-groups evaluated (10, 21, 40 and 90 days old). PND 10 pups' area under the 24-h brain concentration time curve (AUC{sub 0-24h}) was 3.8-fold higher than that of the PND 90 adults. Our maturing rat PBPK model allows for updating with age- and chemical-dependent parameters, so pyrethroid dosimetry can be forecast in young and aged individuals. Hence, this model provides a methodology for risk assessors to consider age-specific adjustments to oral Reference Doses on the basis of PK differences.

  6. The effect of adropin on lipid and glucose metabolism in rats with hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Akcılar, Raziye; Emel Koçak, Fatma; Şimşek, Hasan; Akcılar, Aydın; Bayat, Zeynep; Ece, Ezgi; Kökdaşgil, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, whether the effects of low-dose adropin administration is effective in rats with hyperlipidemia. Materials and Methods: Twenty one Wistar albino female rats were randomly divided into 3 groups and fed with high-fat diet for 4 weeks to establish the hyperlipidemia model. Meanwhile, adropin was administrated intraperitonealy (2.1 μg/kg/day), once a day for continuous 10 days. Then, body weights and serum biochemical parameters, adropin, insulin and blood glucose levels were determined. Additionally, in liver tissue, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA gene expressions were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results: The results showed that intraperitoneal administration of adropin to hyperlipidemic rats for 10 days were extremely effective in decreasing the levels of serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and gamma glutamil transferase (GGT) and increasing the levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). It could decrease mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 via regulating the expressions of iNOS. In addition, treatment with adropin showed a significant reduction in blood glucose, serum insulin levels, HbA1c (%), and HOMA-IR, and increase in serum adropin levels. Conclusion: Adropin may ameliorate lipid metabolism, reduce insulin resistance, and inhibit hepatocytes inflammation. Thus, adropin had significant therapeutic benefits and could be suggested as a potential candidate agent against hyperlipidemia. PMID:27114793

  7. Abnormal Expression of Urea Transporter Protein in a Rat Model of Hepatorenal Syndrome Induced by Succinylated Gelatin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiping; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhao, C Yingying; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a serious complication of advanced chronic liver disease. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs with dysfunction of multiple organs when abdominal pressure increases. Here, we report on a novel model of ACS with ascites and a model of HRS in rats to observe the urea transporter protein (UT) expression in the 2 models. Material/Methods A liver cirrhosis model was induced by CCl4. After changes of liver histopathology were observed, rats were injected intraperitoneally with succinylated gelatin to establish a model of ACS and HRS. Then, changes in BUN, Cr, and renal histopathology were detected. Moreover, the UT in ACS and HRS were also quantified. Results The surfaces of liver in the cirrhotic group became coarse, with visible small nodules and became yellow and greasy. The normal structure of the hepatic lobules were destroyed, and hyperplasia of fibrotic tissue and pseudo-lobe was observed. The levels of BUN and Cr were significantly increased in rats suffering from ACS and HRS, respectively, compared to their control groups. In addition, the mRNA levels of UT-A2 and UT-A3 decreased in rats with HRS compared to cirrhotic rats. However, there was no significant difference between the mRNA levels of UT-A2, UT-A3, and UT-B in rats with ACS vs. normal rats. Conclusions It is feasible to model ACS in rats by injecting succinylated gelatin into the abdominal cavity. Increasing the intra-abdominal pressure by succinylated gelatin is also a novel approach for modeling HRS in cirrhotic rats. Compared with control rats, there is an abnormal mRNA expression of UT in ACS rats and HRS rats. PMID:26414230

  8. Preventive effect of American ginseng against premature ovarian failure in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pengling; Xing, Nannan; Ren, Yanhai; Zhu, Lei; Han, Dongwei; Kuang, Haixue; Li, Ji

    2014-12-01

    Preclinical Research Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined by the WHO as the loss of physiological ovarian function before the age of 40. The effect of American ginseng and its underlying mechanisms in preventing and treating premature ovarian failure (POF) was studied in female Sprague-Dawley rats where POF was induced by ip administration of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD). Rat behavior, serum hormone levels, ovarian and uterine size, pathological features, and ovarian tissue expression of genes associated with POF were assessed in controls, untreated POF model rats, and POF model rats treated with low- (1.125 g/kg), medium- (2.25 g/kg), and high-dose (4.5 g/kg) American ginseng. Compared with untreated POF model rats, those treated with medium- and high-dose American ginseng had more stable behavior and better coat appearance as well as serum hormone levels closer to those in control rats. Moreover, treatment with medium- or high-dose American ginseng increased ovarian and uterine size. Hematoxylin and eosin-staining revealed mature follicles and endometrium with an alternating concave/convex surface structure with visible capillaries and glands in ginseng- treated POF rats. PLA2G4A expression was positively correlated with POF, while the expression levels of PAPPA, STC2, CCL2, and NELL1 were negatively correlated with POF. Our study showed that American ginseng may effectively prevent POF and alleviate POF symptoms by regulating serum hormone levels and altering the expression levels of genes related to POF in ovarian tissue. PMID:25424468

  9. Modeling perimenopause in Sprague-Dawley rats by chemical manipulation of the transition to ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Frye, Jennifer B; Lukefahr, Ashley L; Wright, Laura E; Marion, Sam L; Hoyer, Patricia B; Funk, Janet L

    2012-06-01

    Various age-related diseases increase in incidence during perimenopause. However, our understanding of the effects of aging compared with hormonal changes of perimenopause in mediating these disease risks is incomplete, in part due to the lack of an experimental perimenopause model. We therefore aimed to determine whether manipulation of the transition to ovarian failure in rats via the use of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) could be used to model and accelerate hormonal changes characteristic of perimenopause. We examined long-term (11 to 20 mo), dose-dependent effects of VCD on reproductive function in 1- and 3-mo-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Twenty-five daily doses of VCD (80 or 160 mg/kg daily compared with vehicle alone) depleted ovarian follicles in a dose-dependent fashion in rats of both ages, accelerated the onset of acyclicity, and caused dose-dependent increases in follicle-stimulating hormone that exceeded those naturally occurring with age in control rats but left serum levels of 17β-estradiol unchanged, with continued ovarian production of androstenedione. High-dose VCD caused considerable nonovarian toxicities in 3-mo-old Sprague-Dawley rats, making this an unsuitable model. In contrast, 1-mo-old rats had more robust dose-dependent increases in follicle-stimulating hormone without evidence of systemic toxicity in response to either VCD dose. Because perimenopause is characterized by an increase in follicle-stimulating hormone with continued secretion of ovarian steroids, VCD acceleration of an analogous hormonal milieu in 1-mo-old Sprague-Dawley rats may be useful for probing the hormonal effects of perimenopause on age-related disease risk. PMID:22776052

  10. Modeling Perimenopause in Sprague–Dawley Rats by Chemical Manipulation of the Transition to Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Jennifer B; Lukefahr, Ashley L; Wright, Laura E; Marion, Sam L; Hoyer, Patricia B; Funk, Janet L

    2012-01-01

    Various age-related diseases increase in incidence during perimenopause. However, our understanding of the effects of aging compared with hormonal changes of perimenopause in mediating these disease risks is incomplete, in part due to the lack of an experimental perimenopause model. We therefore aimed to determine whether manipulation of the transition to ovarian failure in rats via the use of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) could be used to model and accelerate hormonal changes characteristic of perimenopause. We examined long-term (11 to 20 mo), dose-dependent effects of VCD on reproductive function in 1- and 3-mo-old female Sprague–Dawley rats. Twenty-five daily doses of VCD (80 or 160 mg/kg daily compared with vehicle alone) depleted ovarian follicles in a dose-dependent fashion in rats of both ages, accelerated the onset of acyclicity, and caused dose-dependent increases in follicle-stimulating hormone that exceeded those naturally occurring with age in control rats but left serum levels of 17β−estradiol unchanged, with continued ovarian production of androstenedione. High-dose VCD caused considerable nonovarian toxicities in 3-mo-old Sprague–Dawley rats, making this an unsuitable model. In contrast, 1-mo-old rats had more robust dose-dependent increases in follicle-stimulating hormone without evidence of systemic toxicity in response to either VCD dose. Because perimenopause is characterized by an increase in follicle-stimulating hormone with continued secretion of ovarian steroids, VCD acceleration of an analogous hormonal milieu in 1-mo-old Sprague–Dawley rats may be useful for probing the hormonal effects of perimenopause on age-related disease risk. PMID:22776052

  11. Beneficial influence of dietary curcumin, capsaicin and garlic on erythrocyte integrity in high-fat fed rats.

    PubMed

    Kempaiah, Rayavara K; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2006-07-01

    In rats rendered hyperlipidemic by maintaining them on a high-fat diet (30%) for 8 weeks, inclusion of spice principles [curcumin (0.2%) or capsaicin (0.015%)] or garlic (2.0%) in the diet produced significant hypotriglyceridemic effect. Plasma cholesterol remained unaffected in high-fat treatment. Hepatic triglyceride content was significantly higher in high-fat fed rats, and this increase was effectively countered by inclusion of the hypolipidemic spice agents -- curcumin, capsaicin or garlic in the diet. The lipid profile of erythrocyte membranes of hyperlipidemic rats was similar to basal controls. An examination of the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes in various groups indicated that the red blood cells of hyperlipidemic rats display a slight resistance to osmotic lysis. Inclusion of spice principles [curcumin (0.2%) or capsaicin (0.015%)] or garlic (2.0%) in the diet, which produced the hypotriglyceridemic effect, appeared to beneficially correct this altered osmotic fragility of erythrocytes. Activities of ouabain-sensitive Na(+),K(+)-ATPase as well as acetylcholinesterase of erythrocyte membranes in high-fat fed rats remained unaltered. Activity of Ca(2+),Mg(2+)-ATPase in erythrocyte membrane was significantly decreased in high-fat fed animals, whereas dietary spice principles and garlic countered this reduction in enzyme activity. In the absence of any change in the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio in the erythrocyte membrane, a decreased activity of membrane-bound Ca(2+),Mg(2+)-ATPase could have probably contributed to the accumulation of intracellular calcium leading to the diminished deformability of the erythrocytes in high-fat fed rats. PMID:16263255

  12. A New Model for Inducing Malignant Ovarian Tumours in Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Hilfrich, J.

    1973-01-01

    After the implantation of ovarian tissue into the spleen of gonadectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats (splenic ovary), luteomata and later benign granulosa or granulosa-theca cell tumours develop. Treatment of these rats with 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), given intravenously, 2 mg/kg body weight weekly, total dosage 40 mg/kg, immediately and especially 25 weeks after implantation of ovarian tissue into the spleen, led to malignant, partially metastasizing granulosa, and in one case theca cell tumours, 16-46 weeks after beginning the carcinogen treatment. No malignant neoplastic growth was seen when diethylnitrosamine (DEN), 20 mg/kg once weekly for life, was injected subcutaneously immediately or 25 weeks after implanting ovarian tissue. Since the normal, non-implanted rat ovary was not affected by DMBA treatment the malignant transformation of splenic ovaries in the respective experimental groups may be related to the increased stimulation by pituitary gonadotrophins and formation of luteomata or beginning granulosa and theca cell proliferations. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4353388

  13. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  14. Auditory steady state responses in a schizophrenia rat model probed by excitatory/inhibitory receptor manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Vohs, Jenifer L.; Chambers, R. Andrew; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Krishnan, Giri P.; Morzorati, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in neural synchrony and oscillations may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and reflect aberrations in cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. We tested the effects of a GABA agonist and a NMDA antagonist on auditory steady state responses (ASSRs) in awake rats with neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions (NVHLs) as a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. NVHL vs. SHAM lesioned rats were injected with saline then either ketamine (NMDA antagonist) or muscimol (GABAA agonist). Time-frequency analyses examined alterations in phase locking (consistency) across trials and changes in total power (magnitude). ASSRs were compared at 5 stimulation frequencies (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Hz). In SHAM rats, phase locking and power generally increased with stimulation frequency. Both ketamine and muscimol also increased phase locking and power in SHAM rats, but mostly in the 20 to 40 Hz range. NVHL and ketamine altered the frequency dependence of phase locking, while only ketamine changed power frequency dependence. Muscimol affected power, but not phase locking, in the NVHL rats. NVHL and ketamine models of schizophrenia produce similar independent effects on ASSR, potentially representing similar forms of cortical network/glutamatergic dysfunction, albeit the effects of ketamine were more robust. Muscimol produced NVHL-dependent reductions in ASSR measures, suggesting that cortical networks in this model are intolerant to post-synaptic GABAergic stimulation. These findings suggest the utility of combining lesion, pharmacological, and ASSR approaches in understanding neural mechanisms underlying disturbed synchrony in schizophrenia. PMID:22504207

  15. Characterising bone material composition and structure in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mathavan, Neashan; Turunen, Mikael J; Tägil, Magnus; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-08-01

    The ovariectomized (OVX) rat model is well established in investigations of osteoporosis and osteoporotic therapies. Advent of techniques such as Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) facilitate characterization of bone composition and mineral structure, respectively, which are key determinants of bone strength. Limited publications exist on the implementation of these techniques in the OVX rat model. At 12 weeks of age, female Sprague-Dawley rats were either sham-operated (n = 6) or ovariectomized (n = 6) and sacrificed 18 weeks later. L2 lumbar vertebrae and proximal tibiae were assessed by µCT, FTIR and SAXS. Presence of extensive trabecular deterioration in the µCT data confirmed the onset of osteoporosis. FTIR compositional parameters were determined including measures of degree of mineralization, crystallinity, collagen maturity and acid phosphate content. Mineral crystal thickness was determined from the SAXS data using two approaches available in literature. Compositionally, a decline in the heterogeneity of acid phosphate content was observed while measures of crystallinity and collagen maturity remained unaltered. Using an iterative curve fitting method, OVX-induced increases in the mineral crystal thickness of 3.8 and 7.8 % (p < 0.05) were noted in the trabecular of the vertebra and tibia, respectively. In conclusion, implementation of FTIR and SAXS techniques in the OVX rat model, identified no significant compositional changes while substantiating thickening of the mineral crystals as a general structural feature of OVX-induced osteoporosis in rats. PMID:25894067

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation. PMID:24553102

  17. Metabolic acetate therapy improves phenotype in the tremor rat model of Canavan disease

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N.; Moffett, John R.; Hamilton, Kristen; Grunberg, Neil E.; Ariyannur, Prasanth S.; Gahl, William A.; Anikster, Yair; Mog, Steven; Hallows, William C.; Denu, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic mutations that severely diminish the activity of aspartoacylase (ASPA) result in the fatal brain dysmyelinating disorder, Canavan disease. There is no effective treatment. ASPA produces free acetate from the concentrated brain metabolite, N-acetylaspartate (NAA). Because acetyl coenzyme A is a key building block for lipid synthesis, we postulated that the inability to catabolize NAA leads to a brain acetate deficiency during a critical period of CNS development, impairing myelination and possibly other aspects of brain development. We tested the hypothesis that acetate supplementation during postnatal myelination would ameliorate the severe phenotype associated with ASPA deficiency using the tremor rat model of Canavan disease. Glyceryltriacetate (GTA) was administered orally to tremor rats starting 7 days after birth, and was continued in food and water after weaning. Motor function, myelin lipids, and brain vacuolation were analyzed in GTA-treated and untreated tremor rats. Significant improvements were observed in motor performance and myelin galactocerebroside content in tremor rats treated with GTA. Further, brain vacuolation was modestly reduced, and these reductions were positively correlated with improved motor performance. We also examined the expression of the acetyl coenzyme A synthesizing enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthase 1 and found upregulation of expression in tremor rats, with a return to near normal expression levels in GTA-treated tremor rats. These results confirm the critical role played by NAA-derived acetate in brain myelination and development, and demonstrate the potential usefulness of acetate therapy for the treatment of Canavan disease. PMID:20464498

  18. Progesterone Treatment Shows Benefit in Female Rats in a Pediatric Model of Controlled Cortical Impact Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Rastafa I.; Peterson, Bethany L.; Stein, Donald G.; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We recently showed that progesterone treatment can reduce lesion size and behavioral deficits after moderate-to-severe bilateral injury to the medial prefrontal cortex in immature male rats. Whether there are important sex differences in response to injury and progesterone treatment in very young subjects has not been given sufficient attention. Here we investigated progesterone’s effects in the same model of brain injury but with pre-pubescent females. Methods Twenty-eight-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats received sham (n = 14) or controlled cortical impact (CCI) (n = 21) injury, were given progesterone (8 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle injections on post-injury days (PID) 1–7, and underwent behavioral testing from PID 9–27. Brains were evaluated for lesion size at PID 28. Results Lesion size in vehicle-treated female rats with CCI injury was smaller than that previously reported for similarly treated age-matched male rats. Treatment with progesterone reduced the effect of CCI on extent of damage and behavioral deficits. Conclusion Pre-pubescent female rats with midline CCI injury to the frontal cortex have reduced morphological and functional deficits following progesterone treatment. While gender differences in susceptibility to this injury were observed, progesterone treatment produced beneficial effects in young rats of both sexes following CCI. PMID:26799561

  19. Hyperglycemia inhibits complement-mediated immunological control of S. aureus in a rat model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Mauriello, Clifford T; Hair, Pamela S; Rohn, Reuben D; Rister, Nicholas S; Krishna, Neel K; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia from diabetes is associated with increased risk of infection from S. aureus and increased severity of illness. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that elevated glucose (>6 mM) dramatically inhibited S. aureus-initiated complement-mediated immune effectors. Here we report in vivo studies evaluating the extent to which a hyperglycemic environment alters complement-mediated control of S. aureus infection in a rat peritonitis model. Rats were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes or sham-treated and then inoculated i.p. with S. aureus. Rats were euthanized and had peritoneal lavage at 2 or 24 hours after infection to evaluate early and late complement-mediated effects. Hyperglycemia decreased the influx of IgG and complement components into the peritoneum in response to S. aureus infection and decreased anaphylatoxin generation. Hyperglycemia decreased C4-fragment and C3-fragment opsonization of S. aureus recovered in peritoneal fluids, compared with euglycemic or insulin-rescued rats. Hyperglycemic rats showed decreased phagocytosis efficiency compared with euglycemic rats, which correlated inversely with bacterial survival. These results suggest that hyperglycemia inhibited humoral effector recruitment, anaphylatoxin generation, and complement-mediated opsonization of S. aureus, suggesting that hyperglycemic inhibition of complement effectors may contribute to the increased risk and severity of S. aureus infections in diabetic patients. PMID:25610878

  20. Hyperglycemia Inhibits Complement-Mediated Immunological Control of S. aureus in a Rat Model of Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, Clifford T.; Hair, Pamela S.; Rohn, Reuben D.; Rister, Nicholas S.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia from diabetes is associated with increased risk of infection from S. aureus and increased severity of illness. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that elevated glucose (>6 mM) dramatically inhibited S. aureus-initiated complement-mediated immune effectors. Here we report in vivo studies evaluating the extent to which a hyperglycemic environment alters complement-mediated control of S. aureus infection in a rat peritonitis model. Rats were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes or sham-treated and then inoculated i.p. with S. aureus. Rats were euthanized and had peritoneal lavage at 2 or 24 hours after infection to evaluate early and late complement-mediated effects. Hyperglycemia decreased the influx of IgG and complement components into the peritoneum in response to S. aureus infection and decreased anaphylatoxin generation. Hyperglycemia decreased C4-fragment and C3-fragment opsonization of S. aureus recovered in peritoneal fluids, compared with euglycemic or insulin-rescued rats. Hyperglycemic rats showed decreased phagocytosis efficiency compared with euglycemic rats, which correlated inversely with bacterial survival. These results suggest that hyperglycemia inhibited humoral effector recruitment, anaphylatoxin generation, and complement-mediated opsonization of S. aureus, suggesting that hyperglycemic inhibition of complement effectors may contribute to the increased risk and severity of S. aureus infections in diabetic patients. PMID:25610878

  1. Probucol inhibits LPS-induced microglia activation and ameliorates brain ischemic injury in normal and hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yeon Suk; Park, Jung Hwa; Kim, Hyunha; Kim, So Young; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Bae, Sun Sik; Choi, Byung Tae; Lee, Sae-Won; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Increasing evidence suggests that probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-oxidant activities, may be useful for the treatment of ischemic stroke with hyperlipidemia via reduction in cholesterol and neuroinflammation. In this study we examined whether probucol could protect against brain ischemic injury via anti-neuroinflammatory action in normal and hyperlipidemic mice. Methods: Primary mouse microglia and murine BV2 microglia were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3 h, and the release NO, PGE2, IL-1β and IL-6, as well as the changes in NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways were assessed. ApoE KO mice were fed a high-fat diet containing 0.004%, 0.02%, 0.1% (wt/wt) probucol for 10 weeks, whereas normal C57BL/6J mice received probucol (3, 10, 30 mg·kg-1·d-1, po) for 4 d. Then all the mice were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia through middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The neurological deficits were scored 24 h after the surgery, and then brains were removed for measuring the cerebral infarct size and the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Results: In LPS-treated BV2 cells and primary microglial cells, pretreatment with probucol (1, 5, 10 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the release of NO, PGE2, IL-1β and IL-6, which occurred at the transcription levels. Furthermore, the inhibitory actions of probucol were associated with the downregulation of the NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways. In the normal mice with MCAO, pre-administration of probucol dose-dependently decreased the infarct volume and improved neurological function. These effects were accompanied by the decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators (iNOS, COX-2, IL-1, IL-6). In ApoE KO mice fed a high-fat diet, pre-administration of 0.1% probucol significantly reduced the infarct volume, improved the neurological deficits following MCAO, and decreased the total- and LDL-cholesterol levels. Conclusion: Probucol inhibits LPS-induced microglia activation and

  2. A genetic rat model of cholinergic hypersensitivity: implications for chemical intolerance, chronic fatigue, and asthma.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, D H; Djuric, V

    2001-03-01

    The fact that only some individuals exposed to environmental chemicals develop chemical intolerance raises the possibility that genetic factors could be contributing factors. The present communication summarizes evidence from a genetic animal model of cholinergic supersensitivity that suggests that an abnormal cholinergic system could be one predisposing genetic factor. The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats were established by selective breeding for increased responses to an organophosphate. It was subsequently found that these FSL rats were also more sensitive to direct-acting muscarinic agonists and had elevated muscarinic receptors compared to the selectively bred parallel group, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, or randomly bred control rats. Increased sensitivity to cholinergic agents has also been observed in several human populations, including individuals suffering from chemical intolerance. Indeed, the FSL rats exhibit certain behavioral characteristics such as abnormal sleep, activity, and appetite that are similar to those reported in these human populations. In addition, the FSL rats have been reported to exhibit increased sensitivity to a variety of other chemical agents. Peripheral tissues, such as intestinal and airway smooth muscle, appear to be more sensitive to both cholinergic agonists and an antigen, ovalbumin. Hypothermia, a centrally mediated response, is more pronounced in the FSL rats after nicotine and alcohol, as well as agents that are selective for the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In some cases, the increased sensitivity has been detected in the absence of any changes in the receptors with which the drugs interact (dopamine receptors), while receptor changes have been seen in other cases (nicotine receptors). Therefore, there may be multiple mechanisms underlying the multiple chemical sensitivity-chemical intolerance of the FSL rats. An elucidation of these mechanisms may provide useful clues to those involved in

  3. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of P23H Line 1 Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, Elise; Dalkara, Deniz; Neuillé, Marion; Lechauve, Christophe; Michiels, Christelle; Picaud, Serge; Léveillard, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Naash, Muna I.; Lavail, Matthew M.; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease, for which no therapy is currently available. The P23H rat is one of the most commonly used autosomal dominant RP models. It has been created by incorporation of a mutated mouse rhodopsin (Rho) transgene in the wild-type (WT) Sprague Dawley rat. Detailed genetic characterization of this transgenic animal has however never been fully reported. Here we filled this knowledge gap on P23H Line 1 rat (P23H-1) and provide additional phenotypic information applying non-invasive and state-of-the-art in vivo techniques that are relevant for preclinical therapeutic evaluations. Transgene sequence was analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Using quantitative PCR, transgene copy number was calculated and its expression measured in retinal tissue. Full field electroretinography (ERG) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed at 1-, 2-, 3- and 6-months of age. Sanger sequencing revealed that P23H-1 rat carries the mutated mouse genomic Rho sequence from the promoter to the 3’ UTR. Transgene copy numbers were estimated at 9 and 18 copies in the hemizygous and homozygous rats respectively. In 1-month-old hemizygous P23H-1 rats, transgene expression represented 43% of all Rho expressed alleles. ERG showed a progressive rod-cone dysfunction peaking at 6 months-of-age. SD-OCT confirmed a progressive thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer leading to the disappearance of the outer retina by 6 months with additional morphological changes in the inner retinal cell layers in hemizygous P23H-1 rats. These results provide precise genotypic information of the P23H-1 rat with additional phenotypic characterization that will serve basis for therapeutic interventions, especially for those aiming at gene editing. PMID:26009893

  4. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity. PMID:20595028

  5. Analgesic effect of minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bruckert, Mitchell; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N

    2014-03-15

    The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia. PMID:24485889

  6. Analgesic effect of Minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bruckert, Mitchell; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5 min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60 min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia. PMID:24485889

  7. Transgenesis and neuroendocrine physiology: a transgenic rat model expressing growth hormone in vasopressin neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sara E; Flavell, David M; Bisset, Gordon W; Houston, Pamela A; Christian, Helen; Fairhall, Keith M; Robinson, Iain C A F

    2003-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and bovine neurophysin (bNP) DNA reporter fragments were inserted into the rat vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) genes in a 44 kb cosmid construct used to generate two lines of transgenic rats, termed JP17 and JP59. Both lines showed specific hGH expression in magnocellular VP cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON). hGH was also expressed in parvocellular neurones in suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), medial amygdala and habenular nuclei in JP17 rats; the rat OT-bNP (rOT-bNP) transgene was not expressed in either line. Immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay showed hGH protein in the hypothalamus from where it was transported in varicose fibres via the median eminence to the posterior pituitary gland. Immunogold electron microscopy showed hGH co-stored with VP-NP in the same granules. The VP-hGH transgene did not affect water balance, VP storage or release in vivo. Drinking 2 % saline for 72 h increased hypothalamic transgene hGH mRNA expression, and depleted posterior pituitary hGH and VP stores in parallel. In anaesthetised, water-loaded JP17 rats, hGH was released with VP in response to an acute hypovolumic stimulus (sodium nitrosopentacyano, 400 μg I.V.). JP17 rats had a reduced growth rate, lower anterior pituitary rGH contents, and a reduced amplitude of endogenous pulsatile rGH secretion assessed by automated blood microsampling in conscious rats, consistent with a short-loop feedback of the VP-hGH on the endogenous GH axis. This transgenic rat model enables us to study physiological regulation of hypothalamic transgene protein production, transport and secretion, as well as its effects on other neuroendocrine systems in vivo. PMID:12813157

  8. A BBDR-HPT Axis Model for the Lactating Rat and Nursing Pup: Evaluation of Iodide Deficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for the lactating rat and pup hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis is being developed to advance understanding of thyroid hormone disruptions and developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). The model for the lactating rat and pup quanti...

  9. Evaluation of survival and neurological deficit in rats in the new model of global transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, G A; Smol'yakova, V I; Osipenko, A N; Plotnikov, M B

    2014-12-01

    We propose a modification to rat model of transient global cerebral ischemia with four-vessel occlusion avoiding pneumothorax and minimizing the consequences of surgery. Survival and neurological deficit in rats in this model was studied over 5 days. PMID:25430646

  10. Cardiovascular and hormonal (aldosterone) responses in a rat model which mimics responses to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses and fluid/electrolyte shifts seen during spaceflight have been attributed to cephalad redistribution of vascular fluid. The antiorthostatic (AO) rat (suspended, head-down tilt of 15-20 deg) is used to model these responses. This study documents that elevated blood pressures in AO rats are sustained for periods of up to seven days, compared with presuspension values. Increased blood pressures in AO rats suggests a specific response to AO positioning, potentially relatable to a cephalad fluid shift. To assess a role for hormonal regulation of sodium excretion, serum aldosterone levels were measured. Circulating aldosterone concentrations were seen to increase approximately 100 percent during seven days of AO suspension, concurrently with a pronounced natriuresis. These results suggest that aldosterone may not be involved in the long term regulation of increased Na(+) excretion in AO animals. These studies continue to show the usefulness of models for the development of animal protocols for space flight.

  11. Simultaneous measurement of hemorheological and hemodynamic properties using a rat extracorporeal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon; CenterBiofluid; Biomimetics Research Team

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are closely related with the variations of hemorheological and hemodynamic properties. Accurate measurement of these properties is essential for early diagnosis of CVDs. However, in vitro measurements have technical limitation for the accurate measurement because in vitro exposure can change hemorheological properties. To resolve this problem, a rat extracorporeal model which connects the artery and vein in a rat was employed in this study. Blood flows in the rat extracorporeal model were visualized by an ultrasound imaging system and microfluidic devices for monitoring hemorheological and hemodynamic properties. As a result, the system can be effectively used to measure blood viscosity, red blood cell aggregation and flow rate under ex vivo conditions. The present results would be helpful to develop a diagnostic modality for monitoring the variations in hemorheological and hemodynamic parameters. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea Government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  12. Development of an FE model of the rat head subjected to air shock loading.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Mao, Haojie; Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Wagner, Christina; Chou, Clifford; Jin, Xin; Bir, Cynthia; Vandevord, Pamela; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2010-11-01

    As early as the 1950's, Gurdjian and colleagues (Gurdjian et al. 1955) observed that brain injuries could occur by direct pressure loading without any global head accelerations. This pressure-induced injury mechanism was "forgotten" for some time and is being rekindled due to the many mild traumatic brain injuries attributed to blast overpressure. The aim of the current study was to develop a finite element (FE) model to predict the biomechanical response of rat brain under a shock tube environment. The rat head model, including more than 530,000 hexahedral elements with a typical element size of 100 to 300 microns was developed based on a previous rat brain model for simulating a blunt controlled cortical impact. An FE model, which represents gas flow in a 0.305-m diameter shock tube, was formulated to provide input (incident) blast overpressures to the rat model. It used an Eulerian approach and the predicted pressures were verified with experimental data. These two models were integrated and an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fluid-structure coupling algorithm was then utilized to simulate the interaction of the shock wave with the rat head. The FE model-predicted pressure-time histories at the cortex and in the lateral ventricle were in reasonable agreement with those obtained experimentally. Further examination of the FE model predictions revealed that pressure amplification, caused by shock wave reflection at the interface of the materials with distinct wave impedances, was found in the skull. The overpressures in the anterior and posterior regions were 50% higher than those at the vertex and central regions, indicating a higher possibility of injuries in the coup and contrecoup sites. At an incident pressure of 85 kPa, the shear stress and principal strain in the brain remained at a low level, implying that they are not the main mechanism causing injury in the current scenario. PMID:21512910

  13. Role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells during experimental otitis media in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang Gun; Gong, Sung Ho; Kim, Hee-Bok; Song, Jae-Jun; Park, Joo Hyun; Lim, Yun-Sung; Park, Seok-Won

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) in the middle ear (ME) mucosal response to bacterial infection in a rat model. To confirm the role of ILC3 in bacterially induced otitis media (OM), the serum concentrations of IL-17 and IL-22 were determined by ELISA, and the tissue expression of IL-17 and IL-22 in infected ME mucosa was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Immunohistochemical staining of specific cell surface markers was also assessed to confirm the origin of the cells expressing IL-17 and IL-22. Twenty Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the surgically-induced animal model of OM. OM was induced by inoculation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae into the ME cavity of the rats. The rats were divided into four experimental groups: three infected groups and one control group. Infected groups were subdivided into sets of 5 rats, one for each of the three time points (1, 4 and 7 days post-inoculation). For determination of rat IL-17 and IL-22 levels in infected rats and control rats, infected or control ME mucosa sections were analyzed by immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies directed against IL-17 and IL-22. Immunohistochemical staining for CD3, RORγt, and NKp46 were also conducted on the samples to confirm the origin of cells expressing IL-17 and IL-22. IL-17 and IL-22 serum concentrations were significantly increased in the infected rats compared to control rats. Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased IL-17 and IL-22 expressions in all infected ME mucosae from the first day after inoculation. In addition, the results of tissue staining for the specific surface markers were negative for CD3 and NKp46, but were highly positive for RORγt. IL-17 and IL-22 revealed their association with the bacterially induced proliferative and hyperplastic responses of ME mucosa, which are characteristic features in pathogenesis of OM. Surface marker examination showed that the source cells for IL-17

  14. Particulate matter inhalation exacerbates cardiopulmonary injury in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Carll, Alex P; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W; Rowan, William H; Hazari, Mehdi S; Ledbetter, Allen D; Nyska, Abraham; Cascio, Wayne E; Watkinson, William P; Costa, Daniel L; Farraj, Aimen K

    2010-04-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure is linked to cardiovascular events and death, especially among individuals with heart disease. A model of toxic cardiomyopathy was developed in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats to explore potential mechanisms. Rats were infused with isoproterenol (ISO; 2.5 mg/kg/day subcutaneous [sc]), a beta-adrenergic agonist, for 28 days and subsequently exposed to PM by inhalation. ISO induced tachycardia and hypotension throughout treatment followed by postinfusion decrements in heart rate, contractility, and blood pressures (systolic, diastolic, pulse), and fibrotic cardiomyopathy. Changes in heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) 17 days after ISO cessation indicated parasympathetic dominance with concomitantly altered ventilation. Rats were subsequently exposed to filtered air or Harvard Particle 12 (HP12) (12 mg/m(3))--a metal-rich oil combustion-derived PM--at 18 and 19 days (4 h/day) after ISO infusion via nose-only inhalation to determine if cardio-impaired rats were more responsive to the effects of PM exposure. Inhalation of PM among ISO-pretreated rats significantly increased pulmonary lactate dehydrogenase, serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and heart-to-body mass ratio. PM exposure increased the number of ISO-pretreated rats that experienced bradyarrhythmic events, which occurred concomitantly with acute alterations of HRV. PM, however, did not significantly affect mean HRV in the ISO- or saline-pretreated groups. In summary, subchronic ISO treatment elicited some pathophysiologic and histopathological features of heart failure, including cardiomyopathy. The enhanced sensitivity to PM exposure in SHHF rats with ISO-accelerated cardiomyopathy suggests that this model may be useful for elucidating the mechanisms by which PM exposure exacerbates heart disease. PMID:20121584

  15. Modeling habituation in rat EEG-evoked responses via a neural mass model with feedback

    PubMed Central

    Tadmor, Gilead; Diamond, Solomon G.; Miller, Eric; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Brooks, Dana H.

    2012-01-01

    Habituation is a generic property of the neural response to repeated stimuli. Its strength often increases as inter-stimuli relaxation periods decrease. We propose a simple, broadly applicable control structure that enables a neural mass model of the evoked EEG response to exhibit habituated behavior. A key motivation for this investigation is the ongoing effort to develop model-based reconstruction of multimodal functional neuroimaging data. The control structure proposed here is illustrated and validated in the context of a biophysical neural mass model, developed by Riera et al. (Hum Brain Mapp 27(11):896–914, 2006; 28(4):335–354, 2007), and of simplifications thereof, using data from rat EEG response to medial nerve stimuli presented at frequencies from 1 to 8 Hz. Performance was tested by predictions of both the response to the next stimulus based on the current one, and also of continued stimuli trains over 4-s time intervals based on the first stimulus in the interval, with similar success statistics. These tests demonstrate the ability of simple generative models to capture key features of the evoked response, including habituation. PMID:22282292

  16. A new experimental model of acid- and endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Puig, F; Herrero, R; Guillamat-Prats, R; Gómez, M N; Tijero, J; Chimenti, L; Stelmakh, O; Blanch, L; Serrano-Mollar, A; Matthay, M A; Artigas, A

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the animal models of acute lung injury (ALI) are focused on the acute phase. This limits the studies of the mechanisms involved in later phases and the effects of long-term treatments. Thus the goal of this study was to develop an experimental ALI model of aspiration pneumonia, in which diffuse alveolar damage continues for 72 h. Rats were intratracheally instilled with one dose of HCl (0.1 mol/l) followed by another instillation of one dose of LPS (0, 10, 20, 30, or 40 μg/g body weight) 2 h later, which models aspiration of gastric contents that progresses to secondary lung injury from bacteria or bacterial products. The rats were euthanized at 24, 48, and 72 h after the last instillation. The results showed that HCl and LPS at all doses caused activation of inflammatory responses, increased protein permeability and apoptosis, and induced mild hypoxemia in rat lungs at 24 h postinstillation. However, this lung damage was present at 72 h only in rats receiving HCl and LPS at the doses of 30 and 40 μg/g body wt. Mortality (∼50%) occurred in the first 48 h and only in the rats treated with HCl and LPS at the highest dose (40 μg/g body wt). In conclusion, intratracheal instillation of HCl followed by LPS at the dose of 30 μg/g body wt results in severe diffuse alveolar damage that continues at least 72 h. This rat model of aspiration pneumonia-induced ALI will be useful for testing long-term effects of new therapeutic strategies in ALI. PMID:27317688

  17. Generation of a novel transgenic rat model for tracing extracellular vesicles in body fluids

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Aya; Kawamata, Masaki; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Katsuda, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Hisae; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Naoki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Tamai, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play an important role in the transfer of biomolecules between cells. To elucidate the intercellular transfer fate of EVs in vivo, we generated a new transgenic (Tg) rat model using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged human CD63. CD63 protein is highly enriched on EV membranes via trafficking into late endosomes and is often used as an EV marker. The new Tg rat line in which human CD63-GFP is under control of the CAG promoter exhibited high expression of GFP in various body tissues. Exogenous human CD63-GFP was detected on EVs isolated from three body fluids of the Tg rats: blood serum, breast milk and amniotic fluid. In vitro culture allowed transfer of serum-derived CD63-GFP EVs into recipient rat embryonic fibroblasts, where the EVs localized in endocytic organelles. These results suggested that this Tg rat model should provide significant information for understanding the intercellular transfer and/or mother-child transfer of EVs in vivo. PMID:27539050

  18. Partial gene deletion in LEC rat: An animal model for Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Forbes, J.R.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in which incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin and excretion of copper into bile are greatly reduced. Copper accumulates to a toxic level in the liver and also in the brain and kidney, causing a spectrum of hepatic and neurological abnormalities. We have recently cloned the gene for Wilson disease (designated ATP7B), which encodes a putative copper-transporting P-type ATPase. The inbred mutant Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat strain shows similarity to Wilson disease in many clinical and biochemical features. We have cloned cDNAs for the rat homologue (Atp7b) of the human Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) and have shown that the two genes have {approximately}82% identity at the amino acid sequence level. Rat cDNA sequences were used to identify a partial deletion in the Atp7b gene in the LEC rat. The deletion removes at least 750 bp of the coding region at the 3{prime} end, which includes the crucial ATP binding domain and extends downstream of the gene. The proximal breakpoint has been precisely localized at the cDNA level. Our results provide convincing evidence that the LEC rat is an animal model for Wilson disease. This model will be important for studying liver pathophysiology, for developing therapy for Wilson disease, and for studying the pathway of copper transport and its possible interaction with other heavy metals.

  19. Development of a standardized laparoscopic caecum resection model to simulate laparoscopic appendectomy in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) has become one of the most common surgical procedures to date. To improve and standardize this technique further, cost-effective and reliable animal models are needed. Methods In a pilot study, 30 Wistar rats underwent laparoscopic caecum resection (as rats do not have an appendix vermiformis), to optimize the instrumental and surgical parameters. A subsequent test study was performed in another 30 rats to compare three different techniques for caecum resection and bowel closure. Results Bipolar coagulation led to an insufficiency of caecal stump closure in all operated rats (Group 1, n = 10). Endoloop ligation followed by bipolar coagulation and resection (Group 2, n = 10) or resection with a LigaSure™ device (Group 3, n = 10) resulted in sufficient caecal stump closure. Conclusions We developed a LA model enabling us to compare three different caecum resection techniques in rats. In conclusion, only endoloop closure followed by bipolar coagulation proved to be a secure and cost-effective surgical approach. PMID:24934381

  20. Zinc supplementation provides behavioral resiliency in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Elise C.; Morris, Deborah R.; Scrimgeour, Angus G.; VanLandingham, Jacob W.; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2011-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and impairments in learning and memory are all associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Because of the strong link between zinc deficiency, depression, and anxiety, in both humans and rodent models, we hypothesized that dietary zinc supplementation prior to injury could provide behavioral resiliency to lessen the severity of these outcomes after TBI. Rats were fed a marginal zinc deficient (5 ppm), zinc adequate (30 ppm), or zinc supplemented (180 ppm) diet for 4 weeks followed by a moderately-severe TBI using the well-established model of controlled cortical impact (CCI). Following CCI, rats displayed depression-like behaviors as measured by the 2-bottle saccharin preference test for anhedonia. Injury also resulted in evidence of stress and impairments in Morris water maze (MWM) performance compared to sham-injured controls. While moderate zinc deficiency did not worsen outcomes following TBI, rats that were fed the zinc supplemented diet for 4 weeks showed significantly attenuated increases in adrenal weight (p<0.05) as well as reduced depression-like behaviors (p<0.001). Supplementation prior to injury improved resilience such that there was not only significant improvements in cognitive behavior compared to injured rats fed an adequate diet (p<0.01), there were no significant differences between supplemented and sham-operated rats in MWM performance at any point in the 10-day trial. These data suggest a role for supplemental zinc in preventing cognitive and behavioral deficits associated with TBI. PMID:21699908

  1. Small Animal Models for Human Metapneumovirus: Cotton Rat is More Permissive than Hamster and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Niewiesk, Stefan; Li, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is the second most prevalent causative agent of pediatric respiratory infections worldwide. Currently, there are no vaccines or antiviral drugs against this virus. One of the major hurdles in hMPV research is the difficulty to identify a robust small animal model to accurately evaluate the efficacy and safety of vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, we compared the replication and pathogenesis of hMPV in BALB/c mice, Syrian golden hamsters, and cotton rats. It was found that BALB/c mice are not permissive for hMPV infection despite the use of a high dose (6.5 log10 PFU) of virus for intranasal inoculation. In hamsters, hMPV replicated efficiently in nasal turbinates but demonstrated only limited replication in lungs. In cotton rats, hMPV replicated efficiently in both nasal turbinate and lung when intranasally administered with three different doses (4, 5, and 6 log10 PFU) of hMPV. Lungs of cotton rats infected by hMPV developed interstitial pneumonia with mononuclear cells infiltrates and increased lumen exudation. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigens were detected at the luminal surfaces of the bronchial epithelial cells in lungs. Vaccination of cotton rats with hMPV completely protected upper and lower respiratory tract from wildtype challenge. The immunization also elicited elevated serum neutralizing antibody. Collectively, these results demonstrated that cotton rat is a robust small animal model for hMPV infection. PMID:25438015

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola Mixed Microbial Infection in a Rat Model of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Raj K.; Rajapakse, Sunethra; Meka, Archana; Hamrick, Clayton; Pola, Sheela; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Nair, Madhu; Wallet, Shannon M.; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2010-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are periodontal pathogens that express virulence factors associated with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that P. gingivalis and T. denticola are synergistic in terms of virulence; using a model of mixed microbial infection in rats. Groups of rats were orally infected with either P. gingivalis or T. denticola or mixed microbial infections for 7 and 12 weeks. P. gingivalis genomic DNA was detected more frequently by PCR than T. denticola. Both bacteria induced significantly high IgG, IgG2b, IgG1, IgG2a antibody levels indicating a stimulation of Th1 and Th2 immune response. Radiographic and morphometric measurements demonstrated that rats infected with the mixed infection exhibited significantly more alveolar bone loss than shaminfected control rats. Histology revealed apical migration of junctional epithelium, rete ridge elongation, and crestal alveolar bone resorption; resembling periodontal disease lesion. These results showed that P. gingivalis and T. denticola exhibit no synergistic virulence in a rat model of periodontal disease. PMID:20592756

  3. Generation of a novel transgenic rat model for tracing extracellular vesicles in body fluids.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Aya; Kawamata, Masaki; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Katsuda, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Hisae; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Naoki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Tamai, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play an important role in the transfer of biomolecules between cells. To elucidate the intercellular transfer fate of EVs in vivo, we generated a new transgenic (Tg) rat model using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged human CD63. CD63 protein is highly enriched on EV membranes via trafficking into late endosomes and is often used as an EV marker. The new Tg rat line in which human CD63-GFP is under control of the CAG promoter exhibited high expression of GFP in various body tissues. Exogenous human CD63-GFP was detected on EVs isolated from three body fluids of the Tg rats: blood serum, breast milk and amniotic fluid. In vitro culture allowed transfer of serum-derived CD63-GFP EVs into recipient rat embryonic fibroblasts, where the EVs localized in endocytic organelles. These results suggested that this Tg rat model should provide significant information for understanding the intercellular transfer and/or mother-child transfer of EVs in vivo. PMID:27539050

  4. Bamboo leaf extract improves spatial learning ability in a rat model with senile dementia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-xiang; Zhu, Min-ying; Feng, Ci-yuan; Ding, Hai-bin; Zhan, Ying; Zhao, Zhan; Ding, Yue-min

    2015-07-01

    Senile dementia (SD) is a syndrome characterized by progressive neurological deterioration. Treatment for the disease is still under investigation. Bamboo leaf extract (B-extract) has been known for its biological efficacy in anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, study on B-extract for its protection against dementia is very limited. The effect of B-extract on a rat model with SD was examined. B-extract improved spatial learning ability of the dementia rats. The hippocampus of dementia model rats showed reduced levels of acetylcholine (ACh), epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA), and increased activities of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO). Treatment with B-extract 20 mg/(kg·d) for 7 weeks significantly inhibited the enzyme activity compared with untreated dementia rats, and raised the levels of ACh, E, and DA in the hippocampus. In addition, treatment with B-extract elevated the level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but reduced the level of glutamate (Glu) in the brain. These data suggest that B-extract might be a potential drug in treating impairment of spatial memory in dementia rats by regulating the central neurotransmitter function. PMID:26160717

  5. The Establishment of Metabolic Syndrome Model by Induction of Fructose Drinking Water in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thent, Zar Chi; Sapri, Shaiful Ridzwan; Sahruddin, Natasya Nadia; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Rafizul; Haji Suhaimi, Farihah

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndrome can be caused by modification of diet by means of consumption of high carbohydrate and high fat diet such as fructose. Aims. To develop a metabolic syndrome rat model by induction of fructose drinking water (FDW) in male Wistar rats. Methods. Eighteen male Wistar rats were fed with FDW 20% and FDW 25% for a duration of eight weeks. The physiological changes with regard to food and fluid intake, as well as calorie intake, were measured. The metabolic changes such as obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, and hyperglycaemia were determined. Data was presented in mean ± SEM subjected to one-way ANOVA. Results. Male Wistar rats fed with FDW 20% for eight weeks developed significant higher obesity parameters compared to those fed with FDW 25%. There was hypertrophy of adipocytes in F20 and F25. There were also systolic hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and hyperglycemia in both groups. Conclusion. We conclude that the metabolic syndrome rat model is best established with the induction of FDW 20% for eight weeks. This was evident in the form of higher obesity parameter which caused the development of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25045660

  6. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M.; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  7. Manifestation of Hyperandrogenism in the Continuous Light Exposure-Induced PCOS Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xuezhi; Jia, Lina; Shen, Xueyong

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder, and its pathogenesis has yet to be completely clarified. A fully convincing animal model has not been established for PCOS. In earlier studies, researchers have shown that the exposure of rats to continuous light can induce PCOS; nevertheless, hyperandrogenism, a key characteristic observed in human PCOS, has not been reported previously. In the present study, we found that (1) body weights decreased in female rats in a continuous light environment with both ovarian and uterine augmentation; (2) the estrous cycle in rats under continuous light environment was disordered, and polycystic ovary-like changes occurred, accompanied with fur loss and lethargy; and (3) serum testosterone levels in rats in a continuous light environment significantly increased. Our data suggest that continuous light can lead to the occurrence of PCOS in female rats without the need for drugs; this is a reasonable PCOS animal model that is more consistent with the natural disease state in humans; and poor sleep habits or negligence of sleep hygiene may be an important lifestyle factor in pathogenesis of PCOS. PMID:26064969

  8. Zinc supplementation provides behavioral resiliency in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cope, Elise C; Morris, Deborah R; Scrimgeour, Angus G; VanLandingham, Jacob W; Levenson, Cathy W

    2011-10-24

    Depression, anxiety, and impairments in learning and memory are all associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Because of the strong link between zinc deficiency, depression, and anxiety, in both humans and rodent models, we hypothesized that dietary zinc supplementation prior to injury could provide behavioral resiliency to lessen the severity of these outcomes after TBI. Rats were fed a marginal zinc deficient (5 ppm), zinc adequate (30 ppm), or zinc supplemented (180 ppm) diet for 4 weeks followed by a moderately-severe TBI using the well-established model of controlled cortical impact (CCI). Following CCI, rats displayed depression-like behaviors as measured by the 2-bottle saccharin preference test for anhedonia. Injury also resulted in evidence of stress and impairments in Morris water maze (MWM) performance compared to sham-injured controls. While moderate zinc deficiency did not worsen outcomes following TBI, rats that were fed the zinc supplemented diet for 4 weeks showed significantly attenuated increases in adrenal weight (p<0.05) as well as reduced depression-like behaviors (p<0.001). Supplementation prior to injury improved resilience such that there was not only significant improvements in cognitive behavior compared to injured rats fed an adequate diet (p<0.01), there were no significant differences between supplemented and sham-operated rats in MWM performance at any point in the 10-day trial. These data suggest a role for supplemental zinc in preventing cognitive and behavioral deficits associated with TBI. PMID:21699908

  9. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminaryin vitroandin vivoimaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  10. Functional MRI and neural responses in a rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Herman, Peter; Behar, Kevin L.; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that brain plaques and tangles can affect cortical functions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus modify functional activity, we investigated functional responses in an AD rat model (called the Samaritan Alzheimer’s rat achieved by ventricular infusion of amyloid peptide) and age-matched healthy control. High-field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and extracellular neural activity measurements were applied to characterize sensory-evoked responses. Electrical stimulation of the forepaw led to BOLD and neural responses in the contralateral somatosensory cortex and thalamus. In AD brain we noted much smaller BOLD activation patterns in the somatosensory cortex (i.e., about 50% less activated voxels compared to normal brain). While magnitudes of BOLD and neural responses in the cerebral cortex were markedly attenuated in AD rats compared to normal rats (by about 50%), the dynamic coupling between the BOLD and neural responses in the cerebral cortex, as assessed by transfer function analysis, remained unaltered between the groups. However thalamic BOLD and neural responses were unaltered in AD brain compared to controls. Thus cortical responses in the AD model were indeed diminished compared to controls, but the thalamic responses in the AD and control rats were quite similar. Therefore these results suggest that Alzheimer’s disease may affect cortical function more than subcortical function, which may have implications for interpreting altered human brain functional responses in fMRI studies of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23648961

  11. Analgesic Effect of Intrathecal Gabapentin in a Rat Model of Persistent Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae-Wook; Sohn, Min Kyun; Park, Noh Kyoung; Ko, Sang Hyung; Cho, Kyoung Jin; Beom, Jaewon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the analgesic effect of intrathecal gabapentin therapy on secondary hyperalgesia in a rat model of persistent muscle pain. Methods Intrathecal catheters were implanted into rats. Mechanical secondary hyperalgesia was induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic solution into the gastrocnemius muscle. Gabapentin was administrated intrathecally. Rats were allocated to control and experimental (gabapentin 30, 100, 300, and 1,000 µg) group. After gabapentin administration, mechanical withdrawal threshold was measured every 15 minutes and the motor function was measured 30 minutes later. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked after the second acidic buffer injection. There was a significant improvement on the mechanical threshold after administration of 100, 300, and 1,000 µg gabapentin compared to pre-injection and the control group. The analgesic effect continued for 105, 135, and 210 minutes, respectively. To discern side effects, motor function was measured. Motor function was preserved in both groups after gabapentin administration, except for rats who received 1,000 µg gabapentin. Conclusion Intrathecal gabapentin administration produces dose-dependent improvements in mechanical hyperalgesia in a persistent muscle pain rat model. This implicates the central nervous system as having a strong influence on the development of persistent mechanical hyperalgesia. These results are helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of secondary hyperalgesia and in the treatment of patients with chronic muscle pain. PMID:25379498

  12. Evaluation of the response of rat skeletal muscle to a model of weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Glasberg, M.; Manton, J.; Silver, P.; Sutko, J.

    1982-01-01

    Suspension of rats in a head-down tilt position such that their hind limbs are non-load bearing has been proposed as a model for weightlessness. Changes observed in metabolism, bone formation (Morey et al., 1979), and muscle catabolism (Mussachia et al., 1980) support the validity of the model. To further document this model, the effects of suspension on the mechanical, biochemical and histochemical characteristics of two hind limb skeletal muscles, the gastrocnemius and the soleus, are investigated.

  13. Effects of Astragalus polysaccharides on memory impairment in a diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Changping; Liu, Junqian; Qiu, Fucheng; Wu, Xueda; Wang, Yakun; Zhao, Yongyan; Gu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) are active constituents of Astragalus membranaceus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of APS on memory impairment in a diabetic rat model and their mechanisms. Methods A diabetic model was established in 50 male Wistar rats with streptozotocin intra-peritoneal injection. A blood glucose level higher than 16.7 mmol/L obtained 72 hours after the injection was regarded as a successful diabetic model. The modeled rats were divided into model group, high, medium, and low doses of APS, and piracetam groups (positive control). A group of ten rats without streptozotocin-induced diabetes were used as a normal control. After respective consecutive 8-week treatments, the levels of blood fasting plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c, memory performance, hippocampal malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase were determined. Results After the 8-week APS treatment, serum fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin levels were decreased compared with those of the model group (P<0.05). Importantly, memory impairment in the diabetic model was reversed by APS treatments. In addition, hippocampal malondialdehyde concentration was lowered, whereas that of superoxide dismutase was higher after APS treatments. Conclusion APS are important active components responsible for memory improvement in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. The potential mechanism of action is associated with the effects of APS on glucose and lipid metabolism, and antioxidative and insulin resistance. APS are constituents of A. membranaceus that are potential candidate therapeutic agents for the treatment of memory deficit in diabetes. PMID:27445477

  14. Pathogenicity of enterococci in a rat model of fecal peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Matlow, A G; Bohnen, J M; Nohr, C; Christou, N; Meakins, J

    1989-07-01

    The pathogenicity of enterococci in intraabdominal sepsis has not been clarified. Therefore, fecal-type peritonitis was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of barium sulfate along with a bacterial inoculum consisting of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens with or without Streptococcus faecalis. Mortality at 19 d and characteristics of intraabdominal abscesses in survivors at 19 d were analyzed. The presence of S. faecalis in the original inoculum was significantly associated with death or large (greater than 20 mm) abscess formation when these two end points were examined together. S. faecalis may synergize with other bacteria in intraabdominal sepsis to augment morbidity and possibly mortality. PMID:2543707

  15. Beneficial effect of farnesoid X receptor activation on metabolism in a diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Zhao-Hong; Liu, Hui-Ling; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Chen, Dan; Zeng, Tian-Shu

    2016-03-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. However, the exact role of FXR in diabetes remains to be fully elucidated. The present study examined the effects of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), an agonist of FXR, on metabolism profile in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Male Wistar rats (8‑week‑old; n=40) were randomized into the following four groups (n=10): Untreated control, CDCA‑treated, T2DM, and CDCA‑treated T2DM. To establish the T2DM model, the rats were fed a high‑fat diet (HFD) for 4 weeks and received a single low‑dose intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (30 mg/kg), followed by an additional 4 weeks of HFD feeding. CDCA was administrated (10 mg/kg/d) intraperitoneally for 10 days. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting assays were performed to determine the RNA and protein expression of FXR, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, G6Pase, proliferator‑activated receptor‑γ coactivator‑1 and short heterodimer partner in rat liver tissue. The results revealed that FXR activation by CDCA did not reduce body weight, but it lowered the plasma levels of fasting glucose, insulin and triglycerides in the T2DM rats. CDCA administration reversed the downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of FXR in the T2DM rat liver tissue samples. Furthermore, treatment with CDCA reduced the mRNA and protein expression levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, glucose 6‑phosphatase and peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor‑γ coactivator‑1 in the liver tissue samples of the T2DM rats. By contrast, CDCA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of short heterodimer partner in the liver tissue samples of the T2DM rats. In conclusion, FXR agonist treatment induces beneficial effects on metabolism in the rat T2DM model. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the FXR agonist may be useful for the treatment

  16. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice and activate platelets via TLR2.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Byzova, Tatiana V; Salomon, Robert G; Podrez, Eugene A

    2016-05-26

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  17. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice and activate platelets via TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Byzova, Tatiana V.; Salomon, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  18. Irbesartan attenuates atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: noninvasive imaging of inflammation by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Fukao, Keita; Zhao, Songji; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Hamada, Tadateru; Yamasaki, Kazuaki; Shimizu, Yoichi; Kubo, Naoki; Ukon, Naoyuki; Nakano, Toru; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in evaluating the antiatherogenic effects of irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were divided into the irbesartan-treated group (75 mg/kg/d; n  =  14) and the control group (n  =  14). After a 9-month treatment, rabbits underwent 18F-FDG PET. Using the aortic lesions, autoradiography and histologic examinations were performed. PET imaging clearly visualized the thoracic lesions of control rabbits and showed a significant decrease in the 18F-FDG uptake level of irbesartan-treated rabbits (78.8% of controls; p < .05). Irbesartan treatment significantly reduced the plaque size (43.1% of controls) and intraplaque macrophage infiltration level (48.1% of controls). The 18F-FDG uptake level in plaques positively correlated with the plaque size (r  =  .65, p < .05) and macrophage infiltration level (r  =  .57, p < .05). Noninvasive imaging by 18F-FDG PET is useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of irbesartan and reflects inflammation, a key factor involved in the therapeutic effects. PMID:25812568

  19. Berberine ameliorates cartilage degeneration in interleukin-1β-stimulated rat chondrocytes and in a rat model of osteoarthritis via Akt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honghai; Zhang, Tongen; Xia, Chun; Shi, Lei; Wang, Shaojie; Zheng, Xinpeng; Hu, Tianhui; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Berberine, a plant alkaloid used in Chinese medicine, has broad cell-protective functions in a variety of cell lines. Chondrocyte apoptosis contributes to the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA). However, little is known about the effect and underlying mechanism of berberine on OA chondrocytes. Here, we assessed the effects of berberine on cartilage degeneration in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated rat chondrocytes and in a rat model of OA. The results of an MTT assay and western blotting analysis showed that berberine attenuated the inhibitory effect of IL-1β on the cell viability and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in rat chondrocytes. Furthermore, berberine activated Akt, which triggered p70S6K/S6 pathway and up-regulated the levels of aggrecan and Col II expression in IL-1β-stimulated rat chondrocytes. In addition, berberine increased the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage, with the elevated levels of Col II, p-Akt and p-S6 expression in a rat OA model, as demonstrated by histopathological and immunohistochemistry techniques. The data thus strongly suggest that berberine may ameliorate cartilage degeneration from OA by promoting cell survival and matrix production of chondrocytes, which was partly attributed to the activation of Akt in IL-1β-stimulated articular chondrocytes and in a rat OA model. The resultant chondroprotective effects indicate that berberine merits consideration as a therapeutic agent in OA. PMID:24286347

  20. Bisphenol A Induces Hepatotoxicity through Oxidative Stress in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Zeinab K.; Elobeid, Mai A.; Virk, Promy; Omer, Sawsan A.; ElAmin, Maha; Daghestani, Maha H.; AlOlayan, Ebtisam M.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cytotoxic agents that lead to significant oxidative damage. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a contaminant with increasing exposure to it and exerts both toxic and estrogenic effects on mammalian cells. Due to limited information concerning the effect of BPA on liver, this study investigates whether BPA causes hepatotoxicity by induction of oxidative stress in liver. Rats were divided into five groups: The first four groups, BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 50 mg/kg/day) were administrated orally to rats for four weeks. The fifth group was taken water with vehicle. The final body weights in the 0.1 mg group showed a significant decrease compared to control group. Significant decreased levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase activity were found in the 50 mg BPA group compared to control groups. High dose of BPA (50 mg/kg) significantly increased the biochemical levels of ALT, ALP and total bilirubin. BPA effect on the activity of antioxidant genes was confirmed by real time PCR in which the expression levels of these genes in liver tissue were significantly decrease compared to control. Data from this study demonstrate that BPA generate ROS and reduce the antioxidant gene expression that causes hepatotoxicity. PMID:22888396

  1. Hyperbilirubinemia Diminishes Respiratory Drive in a Rat Pup Model

    PubMed Central

    Mesner, Oded; Miller, Martha J.; Iben, Sabine C.; Kc, Prabha; Mayer, Catherine A.; A. Haxhiu, Musa; Martin, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Although apnea is common in premature babies, there is a paucity of information concerning the pathophysiologic basis of these episodes and their relationship to other perinatal conditions such as hyperbilirubinemia. Unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in premature infants, even in moderately high levels, may cause encephalopathy affecting brainstem functions and has been linked to increased incidence of apnea in these infants. Thus, there is a need to clarify mechanisms by which bilirubin may alter respiratory control and induce apnea of prematurity. In this study, bilirubin or placebo was infused intravenously in 9 day-old rat pups, n=36. Serum hyperbilirubinemia peaked in the first hours after bilirubin infusion. Twenty four hours after bilirubin infusion, respiration was recorded by plethysmography at rest and under hypercapnic and hypoxic conditions. In treated pups, minute ventilation on room air was significantly reduced, hyperventilatory response to CO2 was blunted and hypoxic ventilatory depression was increased, as compared to placebo injected rat pups. Brainstem bilirubin deposition and immunoreactivity to bilirubin was detected in the brainstem on histologic analysis. We speculate that high serum bilirubin levels may cause prolonged inhibition of brainstem autonomic function and that this could underlie the exacerbation of apnea noted in premature babies who have experienced jaundice. PMID:18458654

  2. Microglial Activation in Rat Experimental Spinal Cord Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Abdanipour, Alireza; Tiraihi, Taki; Taheri, Taher; Kazemi, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to evaluate the secondary microglial activation processes after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A quantitative histological study was performed to determine ED-1 positive cells, glial cell density, and cavitation size in untreated SCI rats at days 1, 2, and 4, and weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4. Results: The results of glial cell quantification along the 4900-µm long injured spinal cord showed a significant increase in glial cell density percentage at day 2 as compared to other days. Whereas the highest increase in ED-1 immunoreactive cells (monocyte/phagocyte marker in rats) was observed at day 2 (23.15%) post-injury. Evaluation of cavity percentage showed a significant difference between weeks 3 and 4 post-injury groups. Conclusions: This study provides a new insight into the multiphase immune response to SCI, including cellular inflammation, macrophages/microglia activation, glial cell density, and cavitation. Better understanding of the inflammatory processes associated with acute SCI would permit the development of better therapeutic strategies. PMID:23999718

  3. Apricot ameliorates alcohol induced testicular damage in rat model.

    PubMed

    Kurus, Meltem; Ugras, Murat; Ates, Burhan; Otlu, Ali

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we intended to determine the possible preventive effects of dietary apricot on oxidative stress due to ethanol usage in rat testes. The animals were divided into six groups as follows: Group 1 was control. Group 2 received ethanol. Group 3 were fed with apricot diet for 3 months. Group 4 were fed with apricot diet for 6 months. Group 5 received ethanol and apricot diet for 3 months. Group 6 were fed apricot diet for 3 months, and then ethanol+apricot diet for 3 months. Following sacrification, the testes were treated for morphological (tubular and germ cell histology, Sertoli and Leydig cell counts) and biochemical (superoxide dismutase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase, malondialdehyde) analyses. In Group 2, severe histopathological changes in seminiferous tubules and germ cells were determined as well as tubular degeneration and atrophy. Sertoli and Leydig cell counts in the interstitial tissue were decreased. Biochemical parameters revealed tissue oxidative stress. Similar alterations existed in Group 5, although to a lesser extent. In Groups 1, 3 and 4, no histopathological alterations were noted. Results of Group 6 were similar to the controls. Apricot rich diet may have a preventive role on histopathological changes caused by alcohol in rat testes. PMID:19651185

  4. Aspergillus infection monitored by multimodal imaging in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Pluhacek, Tomas; Petrik, Milos; Luptakova, Dominika; Benada, Oldrich; Palyzova, Andrea; Lemr, Karel; Havlicek, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Although myriads of experimental approaches have been published in the field of fungal infection diagnostics, interestingly, in 21st century there is no satisfactory early noninvasive tool for Aspergillus diagnostics with good sensitivity and specificity. In this work, we for the first time described the fungal burden in rat lungs by multimodal imaging approach. The Aspergillus infection was monitored by positron emission tomography and light microscopy employing modified Grocott's methenamine silver staining and eosin counterstaining. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry imaging has revealed a dramatic iron increase in fungi-affected areas, which can be presumably attributed to microbial siderophores. Quantitative elemental data were inferred from matrix-matched standards prepared from rat lungs. The iron, silver, and gold MS images collected with variable laser foci revealed that particularly silver or gold can be used as excellent elements useful for sensitively tracking the Aspergillus infection. The limit of detection was determined for both (107) Ag and (197) Au as 0.03 μg/g (5 μm laser focus). The selective incorporation of (107) Ag and (197) Au into fungal cell bodies and low background noise from both elements were confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray scattering utilizing the submicron lateral resolving power of scanning electron microscopy. The low limits of detection and quantitation of both gold and silver make ICP-MS imaging monitoring a viable alternative to standard optical evaluation used in current clinical settings. PMID:27060291

  5. Phospholipase A2 in Experimental Allergic Bronchitis: A Lesson from Mouse and Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Mruwat, Rufayda; Yedgar, Saul; Lavon, Iris; Ariel, Amiram; Krimsky, Miron; Shoseyov, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) hydrolyzes phospholipids, initiating the production of inflammatory lipid mediators. We have previously shown that in rats, sPLA2 and cPLA2 play opposing roles in the pathophysiology of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced experimental allergic bronchitis (OVA-EAB), an asthma model: Upon disease induction sPLA2 expression and production of the broncho-constricting CysLTs are elevated, whereas cPLA2 expression and the broncho-dilating PGE2 production are suppressed. These were reversed upon disease amelioration by treatment with an sPLA2 inhibitor. However, studies in mice reported the involvement of both sPLA2 and cPLA2 in EAB induction. Objectives To examine the relevance of mouse and rat models to understanding asthma pathophysiology. Methods OVA-EAB was induced in mice using the same methodology applied in rats. Disease and biochemical markers in mice were compared with those in rats. Results As in rats, EAB in mice was associated with increased mRNA of sPLA2, specifically sPLA2gX, in the lungs, and production of the broncho-constricting eicosanoids CysLTs, PGD2 and TBX2 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). In contrast, EAB in mice was associated also with elevated cPLA2 mRNA and PGE2 production. Yet, treatment with an sPLA2 inhibitor ameliorated the EAB concomitantly with reverting the expression of both cPLA2 and sPLA2, and eicosanoid production. Conclusions In both mice and rats sPLA2 is pivotal in OVA-induced EAB. Yet, amelioration of asthma markers in mouse models, and human tissues, was observed also upon cPLA2 inhibition. It is plausible that airway conditions, involving multiple cell types and organs, require the combined action of more than one, essential, PLA2s. PMID:24204651

  6. Establishment of a rat model for osteoarthritis resulting from anterior cruciate ligament rupture and its significance

    PubMed Central

    OUYANG, XIAO; WANG, JIAN; HONG, SHI DONG; XIN, FENG; WANG, LIN; YANG, XIAO WEI; WANG, JING RONG; WANG, LI MING; WEI, BO; WANG, QING; CUI, WEI DING

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of a model concerned with osteoarthritis resulting from the anterior cruciate ligament rupture of rats and investigate the associated mechanism, as well as provide a theoretical basis for clinical treatment of the disease. Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 20 rats each and the anterior cruciate ligament transaction model and knee joint brake model were successfully established. Two rats in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group (10%) and 3 rats in the knee joint brake group (15.0%) died. The survival rate of the two groups was not statistically significant (χ2<0.001, P=1.000). Swelling of the knee joint and synovium of rats in the two experimental groups was aggravated. The Mankin score was significantly higher in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group than that in the experimental group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, no significant difference was observed for osteoarthritis severity for the two experimental groups (P>0.05). Analysis of the subgroups showed that the proportion of the anterior cruciate ligament in the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the knee joint brake group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, the difference was not statistically significant in the comparison of the medium and early proportion (P>0.05). The content of protein polysaccharide and II collagen fiber in the experimental group of the anterior cruciate ligament transection was lower than that of the knee joint brake group, and this difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Thus the mechanism of osteoarthritis may be associated with the decrease in the content of protein and II collagen fibers. PMID:26668592

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DELTAMETHRIN IN DEVELOPING SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work describes the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, in the developing male Sprague-Dawley rat. Generalized Michaelis-Menten equations were used to calculate metabolic rate constants and organ weights ...

  8. ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    Linskey, C.F.1, Harrison, R.A.2., Zhao, G.3., Barton, H.A., Lipscomb, J.C4., and Evans, M.V2., 1UNC, ESE, Chapel Hill, NC ; 2USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC; 3 UN...

  9. [Effect and mechanism of icariin on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury model in diabetes rats].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-wu; Liu, Kai; Yan, Meng-tong

    2015-11-01

    To study the therapeutic effect and possible mechanism of icariin on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury ( MIRI) model in diabetes rats. The model of diabetic rats were induced by Streptozotocin (STZ), then the model of MIRI was established by ligating the reversible left anterior descending coronary artery for 30 min, and then reperfusing for 120 min. totally 40 male SD were randomly divided into five groups: the control group (NS), the ischemia reperfusion group (NIR), the diabetes control group (MS), the diabetic ischemia reperfusion group (MIR) and the diabetic ischemia reperfusion with icariin group (MIRI). The changes in blood glucose, body weight and living status were observed; the enzyme activity of serum CK-MB, LDH, GSH-Px and myocardium SOD and the content MDA and NO in myocardium were detected; the myocardial pathological changes were observed by HE staining; the myocardial Caspase-3, the Bcl-2, Bax protein expressions were detected by Western blot. The result showed that the diabetes model was successfully replicated; myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury was more serious in diabetes rats; icariin can increase NO, SOD, GSH-Px, Bcl-2 protein expression, decrease MDA formation, CK-MB and LDH activities and Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 protein expressions and myocardial damage. The result suggested that icariin may play a protective role against ischemia reperfusion myocardial injury in diabetes rats by resisting oxidative stress and inhibiting cell apoptosis. PMID:27071263

  10. Strain Differences in Antioxidants in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Exposed to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the hypothesis that antioxidant substances and enzymes in lung, heart and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) are altered in response to 03 in cardiovascular disease and/or metabolic syndrome (CVD)-prone rat models. CVD strains [spontaneously hypertensive (SH), SH ...

  11. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  12. ASSESSMENT OF ESTROGENICITY BY USING THE DELAYED IMPLANTING RAT MODEL AND EXAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of estrogenicity by using the delayed implanting rat model and examples.

    Cummings AM, Laws SC.

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N...

  13. Procaine Attenuates Pain Behaviors of Neuropathic Pain Model Rats Possibly via Inhibiting JAK2/STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghua; Yan, Yurong; Yu, Lingzhi; Duan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NPP) is the main culprit among chronic pains affecting the normal life of patients. Procaine is a frequently-used local anesthesia with multiple efficacies in various diseases. However, its role in modulating NPP has not been reported yet. This study aims at uncovering the role of procaine in NPP. Rats were pretreated with procaine by intrathecal injection. Then NPP rat model was induced by sciatic nerve chronic compression injury (CCI) and behavior tests were performed to analyze the pain behaviors upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations. Spinal expression of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was detected by qRT-PCR and western blot. JAK2 was also overexpressed in procaine treated model rats for behavior tests. Results showed that procaine pretreatment improved the pain behaviors of model rats upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations, with the best effect occurring on the 15th day post model construction (p<0.05). Procaine also inhibited JAK2 and STAT3 expression in both mRNA (p<0.05) and protein levels. Overexpression of JAK2 increased STAT3 level and reversed the improvement effects of procaine in pain behaviors (p<0.01). These findings indicate that procaine is capable of attenuating NPP, suggesting procaine is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating NPP. Its role may be associated with the inhibition on JAK2/STAT3 signaling. PMID:27530113

  14. Application of Mathematical Modelling as a Tool to Analyze the EEG Signals in Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Bhattacharya, P.; Pandey, A. K.; Patnaik, R.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper envisages the application of mathematical modelling with the autoregressive (AR) model method as a tool to analyze electroencephalogram data in rat subjects of transient focal cerebral ischemia. This modelling method was used to determine the frequencies and characteristic changes in brain waveforms which occur as a result of disorders or fluctuating physiological states. This method of analysis was utilized to ensure actual correlation of the different mathematical paradigms. The EEG data was obtained from different regions of the rat brain and was modelled by AR method in a MATLAB platform. AR modelling was utilized to study the long-term functional outcomes of a stroke and also is preferable for EEG signal analysis because the signals consist of discrete frequency intervals. Modern spectral analysis, namely AR spectrum analysis, was used to correlate the conditional and prevalent changes in brain function in response to a stroke.

  15. Comparative Metabolism of Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats, Mice and Hamsters Using Gas Uptake and PBPK Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Karla D. ); Vucelick, Mark E.; Gies, Richard A. ); Zangar, Richard C. ); Weitz, Karl K. ); Poet, Torka S. ); Springer, David L. ); Grant, Donna M. ); Benson, Janet M.

    2000-08-25

    No study has comprehensively compared the rate of metabolism of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) across species. Therefore, the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 was evaluated using groups of male animals (F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Syrian hamsters) exposed to 40-1800 ppm CCl4 in a closed, recirculating gas-uptake system. For each species, an optimal fit of the family of uptake curves was obtained by adjusting Michaelis-Menten metabolic constants Km (affinity) and Vmax (capacity) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The results show that the mouse has a slightly higher capacity and lower affinity for metabolizing CCl4 compared to the rat, while the hamster has a higher capacity and lower affinity than either rat or mouse. A comparison of the Vmax to Km ratio, normalized for mg of liver protein (L/hr/mg) across species indicates that hamsters metabolize more CCl4 than either rats or mice, and should be more susceptible to CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. These species comparisons were evaluated against toxicokinetic studies conducted in animals exposed by nose-only inhalation to 20 ppm 14C-labeled CCl4 for 4 hours. The toxicokinetic study results are consistent with the in vivo rates of metabolism, with rats eliminating less radioactivity associated with metabolism (14CO2 and urine/feces) and more radioactivity associated with the parent compound (radioactivity trapped on charcoal) compared to either hamsters or mice. The in vivo metabolic constants determined here, together with in vitro constants determined using rat, mouse, hamster and human liver microsomes, were used to estimate human in vivo metabolic rates of 1.49 mg/hr/kg body weight and 0.25 mg/L for Vmax and Km, respectively. Normalizing the rate of metabolism (Vmax/Km) by mg liver protein, the rate of metabolism of CCl4 differs across species, with hamster > mouse& > rat > human.

  16. Formoterol decreases muscle wasting as well as inflammation in the rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-SanMiguel, Ana Belén; Gomez-Moreira, Carolina; Nieto-Bona, María Paz; Fernández-Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, Maria Ángeles; Martín, Ana Isabel; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists are powerful anabolic agents that trigger skeletal muscle hypertrophy and have been proposed as a promising treatment for muscle wasting in human patients. The aim of this work was to determine whether formoterol, a selective β2-adrenoreceptor agonist, is able to ameliorate muscle wasting in arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant. Control and arthritic rats were injected daily with 50 μg/kg sc formoterol or saline for 12 days. Body weight change, food intake, and arthritis index were analyzed. After euthanasia, in the gastrocnemius mRNA was analyzed by PCR, and proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Arthritis decreased gastrocnemius weight, cross-sectional area, and myofiber size, whereas formoterol increased those variables in both arthritic and control rats. Formoterol decreased the external signs of arthritis as well as NF-κB(p65) activation, TNFα, and COX-2 levels in the gastrocnemius of arthritic and control rats. Those effects of formoterol were associated with a decreased expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, and MuRF1 and in LC3b lipidation. Arthritis increased the expression of MyoD, myogenin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 and -5 in the gastrocnemius. In control and in arthritic rats, treatment with formoterol increased Akt phosphorylation and myogenin levels, whereas it decreased IGFBP-3 expression in the gastrocnemius. These data suggest that formoterol has an anti-inflammatory effect and decreases muscle wasting in arthritic rats through increasing Akt activity and myogenin and decreasing myostatin, the p-NF-κB(p65)/TNF pathway, and IGFBP-3. PMID:27245339

  17. Increased VGLUT3 involved in visceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Qing; Duan, Li-Ping; Qiao, Pei-Tang; Zhao, Li; Guo, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activity of vesicular glutamate transporter-3 (VGLUT3) in a visceral hyperalgesia rat model of irritable bowel syndrome, and the role of mast cells (MCs). METHODS: Transient intestinal infection was induced by oral administration of Trichinella spiralis larvae in rats. On the 100th day post-infection (PI), the rats were divided into an acute cold restraint stress (ACRS) group and a non-stressed group. Age-matched untreated rats served as controls. The abdominal withdrawal reflex was used to measure the visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD). The expression levels of VGLUT3 in peripheral and central neurons were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blotting. RESULTS: VGLUT3 expression in the L6S1 dorsal root ganglion cells was significantly higher in the PI group than in the control group (0.32 ± 0.009 vs 0.22 ± 0.008, P < 0.01), and there was no significant difference in the expression of VGLUT3 between MC-deficient rats and their normal wild-type littermates. Immunofluorescence showed that the expression levels of VGLUT3 in PI + ACRS rats were enhanced in the prefrontal cortex of the brain compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: VGLUT3 is involved in the pathogenesis of visceral hyperalgesia. Coexpression of c-fos, 5-hydroxytryptamine and VGLUT3 after CRD was observed in associated neuronal pathways. Increased VGLUT3 induced by transient intestinal infection was found in peripheral nerves, and was independent of MCs. Moreover, the expression of VGLUT3 was enhanced in the prefrontal cortex in rats with induced infection and stress. PMID:25780293

  18. Chronic NOS inhibition accelerates NAFLD progression in an obese rat model.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Ryan D; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Laughlin, M Harold; Rector, R Scott

    2015-03-15

    The progression in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is a serious health concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that chronic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) via N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) would intensify liver injury in a rat model of obesity, insulin resistance, and NAFLD. Obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) and lean Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats received control or L-NAME (65-70 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1))-containing drinking water for 4 wk. L-NAME treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced serum NO metabolites and food intake in both groups. Remarkably, despite no increase in body weight, L-NAME treatment increased hepatic triacylglycerol content (+40%, P < 0.05) vs. control OLETF rats. This increase was associated with impaired (P < 0.05) hepatic mitochondrial state 3 respiration. Interestingly, the opposite effect was found in LETO rats, where L-NAME increased (P < 0.05) hepatic mitochondrial state 3 respiration. In addition, L-NAME induced a shift toward proinflammatory M1 macrophage polarity, as indicated by elevated hepatic CD11c (P < 0.05) and IL-1β (P = 0.07) mRNA in OLETF rats and reduced expression of the anti-inflammatory M2 markers CD163 and CD206 (P < 0.05) in LETO rats. Markers of total macrophage content (CD68 and F4/80) mRNA were unaffected by L-NAME in either group. In conclusion, systemic NOS inhibition in the obese OLETF rats reduced hepatic mitochondrial respiration, increased hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation, and increased hepatic inflammation. These findings suggest an important role for proper NO metabolism in the hepatic adaptation to obesity. PMID:25573175

  19. Increase in osteoclastogenesis in an obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty rat model.

    PubMed

    Ootsuka, Tomoyo; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Tsukamoto, Ikuyo

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of obesity on bone metabolism were investigated using a hyperphagic and obese rat model, the Otsuka Long‑Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat, which exhibits normal glycemic control at 8 weeks of age. Body weight, food intake, fat mass, markers of bone resorption, the activities of tartrate‑resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K, the number of osteoclasts in the proximal tibia, and the serum C‑terminal crosslinking telopeptide level were higher in OLETF rats than those in control rats (Long‑Evans Tokushima Otsuka; LETO). However, no differences in markers of bone formation, alkaline phosphatase activity, the number of osteoblasts in the proximal tibia or the serum osteocalcin level were observed. mRNA and protein levels of c‑fms, receptor for activation of nuclear factor‑κB (RANK), RANK ligand (RANKL), TRAP and cathepsin K were significantly increased in OLETF rats, although those levels of macrophage colony‑stimulating factor (M‑CSF) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were similar to those in LETO rats. The level of serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and that of TNFα mRNA in bone, increased in association with the activation of NFκB. Furthermore, a frequency analysis and a colony formation assay respectively showed that the number of osteoclast precursors and the number of colony‑forming cells induced by M‑CSF each increased in OLETF rats compared with the control group. These results suggested that hyperphagia‑induced obesity with normal glycemic control induces the upregulation of osteoclastogenesis that is associated with an increase in the expression of c‑fms, RANK and RANKL, which is induced by TNFα, via the activation of NFκB. PMID:25997439

  20. Therapeutic effect of organoselenium dietary supplementation in a sporadic dementia of Alzheimer's type model in rats.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Simone; Brüning, César A; Sartori Oliveira, Carla E; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-01-01

    It is known that selenium (Se) might play different roles in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is a lack of evidence that proves whether supplementation with Se is beneficial or not for the treatment of AD. Thus, the aim of the current study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of p,p'-methoxyl-diphenyl diselenide [(MeOPhSe)(2)], an organoselenium compound, against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced sporadic dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) in rats. Male Wistar rats received STZ twice daily (1.0 mg/8 μl; 4 μl/ventricle) for 21 days. After 21 days of STZ injection, regular-diet-fed rats were supplemented with 10 ppm of (MeOPhSe)(2) during 30 days. At the end of this period, the rats were challenged in the Morris water maze and step-down passive avoidance tasks. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), deficit in cerebral energy metabolism (measurement of adenosine 5-triphosphate and adenosine 5-diphosphate levels), and oxidative and nitrosative stress were determined in the cortex and hippocampus of rats. The results demonstrated that (MeOPhSe)(2) dietary supplementation reverted STZ-induced memory impairment of rats in both cognitive tasks. The findings also indicated that (MeOPhSe)(2) dietary supplementation reverted oxidative stress in the STZ group (decreased reactive species and tyrosine nitration levels and enhanced nonprotein thiol levels). Moreover, (MeOPhSe)(2) dietary supplementation normalized AChE activity, which was enhanced by STZ injection, but did not revert the deficit in cerebral energy metabolism caused by STZ. The results of the present study indicated the therapeutic effect of the (MeOPhSe)(2)-supplemented diet in a rat model of SDAT. PMID:22959057

  1. Decreased exposure of simvastatin and simvastatin acid in a rat model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dan; Li, Feng; Zhang, Mian; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Can; Hu, Meng-yue; Zhong, Ze-yu; Jia, Ling-ling; Wang, Da-wei; Wu, Jie; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Simvastatin is frequently administered to diabetic patients with hypercholesterolemia. The aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of simvastatin and its hydrolysate simvastatin acid in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Methods: Diabetes was induced in 4-week-old rats by a treatment of high-fat diet combined with streptozotocin. After the rats received a single dose of simvastatin (20 mg/kg, po, or 2 mg/kg, iv), the plasma concentrations of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were determined. Simvastatin metabolism and cytochrome P4503A (Cyp3a) activity were assessed in hepatic microsomes, and its uptake was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes. The expression of Cyp3a1, organic anion transporting polypeptide 2 (Oatp2), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) in livers was measured using qRT-PCR. Results: After oral or intravenous administration, the plasma concentrations and areas under concentrations of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were markedly decreased in diabetic rats. Both simvastatin metabolism and Cyp3a activity were markedly increased in hepatocytes of diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of hepatic Cyp3a1 mRNA. Furthermore, the uptake of simvastatin by hepatocytes of diabetic rats was markedly increased, which was associated with increased expression of the influx transporter Oatp2, and decreased expression of the efflux transporters Mrp2 and Bcrp. Conclusion: Diabetes enhances the metabolism of simvastatin and simvastatin acid in rats via up-regulating hepatic Cyp3a activity and expression and increasing hepatic uptake. PMID:25152023

  2. Neuroprotective effect of 4-(Phenylsulfanyl)butan-2-one on optic nerve crush model in rats.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jia-Ying; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Huang, Shun-Ping

    2016-02-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of coral-related compound, 4-(phenylsulfanyl)butan-2-one (4-PSB-2) on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in a rat model subjected to ON crush. The ONs of adult male Wistar rat (150-180 g) were crushed by a standardized method. The control eyes received a sham operation. 4-PSB-2 (5 mg/kg in 0.2 mL phosphate-buffered saline) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS control) was immediately administered after ON crush once by subcutaneous injection. Rats were euthanized at 2 weeks after the crush injury. RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with FluoroGold (FG) application to the superior colliculus, and visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP). TUNEL assay, immunoblotting analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) in the retinas, and immunohistochemistry of ED1 in the ON were evaluated. Two weeks after the insult, the RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats were significantly higher than that of the corresponding ON-crushed, PBS-treated rats FVEP measurements showed a significantly better preserved latency of the P1 wave in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats than the ON-crushed, PBS treated rats. TUNEL assays showed fewer TUNEL positive cells in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats. The number of ED1 positive cells was reduced at the lesion site of the optic nerve in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated group. Furthermore, administration of 4-PSB-2 significantly attenuated ON crush insult-stimulated iNOS and COX2 expression in the retinas. These results demonstrated that 4-PSB-2 protects RGCs and helps preserve the visual function in the rat model of optic nerve crush. 4-PSB-2 may work by being anti-apoptotic and by attenuation of the inflammatory responses involving less ED1 positive cells infiltration in ON as well as suppression of iNOS/COX-2 signaling pathway in the retinas to rescue RGCs

  3. Vitamin D supplementation improves pathophysiology in a rat model of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Jessica L; Cornelius, Denise C; Amaral, Lorena M; Harmon, Ashlyn C; Cunningham, Mark W; Darby, Marie M; Ibrahim, Tarek; Thomas, D'Andrea S; Herse, Florian; Wallukat, Gerd; Dechend, Ralf; LaMarca, Babbette

    2016-02-15

    Deficiency of vitamin D (VD) is associated with preeclampsia (PE), a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy characterized by proinflammatory immune activation. We sought to determine whether VD supplementation would reduce the pathophysiology and hypertension associated with the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model of PE. Normal pregnant (NP) and RUPP rats were supplemented with VD2 or VD3 (270 IU and 15 IU/day, respectively) on gestation days 14-18 and mean arterial pressures (MAPs) measured on day 19. MAP increased in RUPP to 123 ± 2 mmHg compared with 102 ± 3 mmHg in NP and decreased to 113 ± 3 mmHg with VD2 and 115 ± 3 mmHg with VD3 in RUPP rats. Circulating CD4+ T cells increased in RUPP to 7.90 ± 1.36% lymphocytes compared with 2.04 ± 0.67% in NP but was lowered to 0.90 ± 0.19% with VD2 and 4.26 ± 1.55% with VD3 in RUPP rats. AT1-AA, measured by chronotropic assay, decreased from 19.5 ± 0.4 bpm in RUPPs to 8.3 ± 0.5 bpm with VD2 and to 15.4 ± 0.7 bpm with VD3. Renal cortex endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression was increased in RUPP rats (11.6 ± 2.1-fold change from NP) and decreased with both VD2 (3.3 ± 1.1-fold) and VD3 (3.1 ± 0.6-fold) supplementation in RUPP rats. Plasma-soluble FMS-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) was also reduced to 74.2 ± 6.6 pg/ml in VD2-treated and 91.0 ± 16.1 pg/ml in VD3-treated RUPP rats compared with 132.7 ± 19.9 pg/ml in RUPP rats. VD treatment reduced CD4+ T cells, AT1-AA, ET-1, sFlt-1, and blood pressure in the RUPP rat model of PE and could be an avenue to improve treatment of hypertension in response to placental ischemia. PMID:26676250

  4. Dual restoring effects of gastrodin on dopamine in rat models of Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Anyuan

    2015-02-19

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) occurs commonly in children, and dysfunction of dopaminergic system has long been postulated to underlie the disorder. Here, we used two TS rat models induced by 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) and Apomorphine (Apo) to assess an unique dopamine (DA) modulating property of gastrodin (GAS), the main bioactive component isolated from Gastrodia elata Blume, which has been widely used for treating various neurological disorders. By using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the dual restoring effects of gastrodin, at least partially, has been observed: on the one hand, gastrodin increased the down-regulated striatal DA content in IDPN-induced rats; on the other hand, gastrodin decreased the up-regulated striatal DA content in Apo-induced rats. Taken together, our data corroborated that gastrodin could restore the abnormal striatal DA dually, and this therapeutic potential might be meaningful for the anti-tic treatment. PMID:25549540

  5. The Protective Effects of Shen-Fu Injection on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Cao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of Shen-Fu injection (SFI) on a caerulein-induced rat pancreatitis (AP) model. Methods. SFI was given to rats in the SFI treated group through intraperitoneal injection. Blood and pancreas samples were collected for serological and histopathological studies. Results. Our results showed that AP caused significant decrease in tissue glutathione (GSH) and serum IL-4 and IL-10, while pancreatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were increased. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-1β, amylase, and lipase levels were also significantly increased. On the other hand, SFI treatment reserved all these biochemical indices as well as histopathologic alterations that were induced by caerulein. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the SFI protects against caerulein-induced AP in rats via modulation of cytokines, oxidative stress, and Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. PMID:24738018

  6. Cardiac Motion Analysis Using High-Speed Video Images in a Rat Model for Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Idaku; Okuda, Toshikazu; Nie, Yuman; Takaki, Takeshi; Orito, Kensuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    In this study, we performed a cardiac motion analysis by using 1000-frames per second (fps) stereo images to capture the three-dimensional motion of small color markers in a rat heart. This method of recording cardiac motion could quantify the rate of change in the myocardial area, which indicated localized myocardial activity of rhythmic expansion and contraction. We analyzed the three-dimensional motion distributions in a rat model for myocardial infarction, in which the heart rate was 4 times/s or more. In the analysis, we spatiotemporally quantified the characteristic cardiac motion in ischemic heart diseases and found that infarction due to ischemia in the rat heart was spread around the left ventricle.

  7. Interleukin-1β induces the upregulation of caveolin-1 expression in a rat brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    QIN, LI-JUAN; JIA, YONG-SEN; ZHANG, YI-BING; WANG, YIN-HUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of caveolin-1 in rat brain glioma tissue, and to determine whether interleukin-1β (IL-1β) has a role in this process. Using glioma cells, a tumor-burdened rat model was established, and the expression of caveolin-1 protein in the tumor sites was significantly increased following intracarotid infusion of IL-1β (3.7 ng/kg/min), as indicated by western blot analysis. The maximum value of the caveolin-1 expression was observed in tumor-burdened rats after 60 min of IL-1β perfusion, and which was significantly enhanced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In addition, VEGF also significantly increased IL-1β-induced blood tumor barrier (BTB) permeability. The results suggest that the IL-1β-induced BTB permeability increase may be associated with the expression of caveolin-1 protein, and VEGF may be involved in this process. PMID:27073627

  8. Protective effects of sivelestat in a caerulein-induced rat acute pancreatitis model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Liu, Quanyan

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of sivelestat on acute pancreatitis (AP) in a rat model. Sivelestat is a specific neutrophil elastase inhibitor, which has been developed in Japan in 1991. Varying doses of sivelestat in normal saline were infused continuously in sivelestat-treated groups through osmotic pumps. Blood and pancreas samples were collected for serological and histopathological studies, and ten rats in each group were taken for survival observation. Increasing doses of sivelestat inhibits the expression of lipase, amylase, corticosterone, IL-1β, TNF-α, and nuclear factor-κB. Furthermore, sivelestat reduces the inflammatory cells infiltration, histological damage, and mortality rate. Meanwhile, the total antioxidant power and serum level of IL-4 in high-dose sivelestat-treated groups were increased. Our findings suggest that the increasing doses of sivelestat protect against caerulein-induced AP in rats, and this protection is possibly associated with the anti-inflammatory ability of sivelestat. PMID:23794035

  9. Regulation of hematopoiesis in rats exposed to antiorthostatic, hypokinetic/hypodynamia. I - Model description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.; Perez, L.; Nessel, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a 7-day suspension in a jacket and harness with 20-deg head-down tilt on body weight, food and water consumption, and hematological parameters is investigated experimentally in male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150-175 g. The results are presented in graphs and compared with those for unsuspended controls and with published data on rats and humans exposed to microgravity in space flight. Suspended rats are found to have reduced red-blood-cell mass, erythropoiesis, plasma volume (leading to temporarily increased hematocrit), body weight, and food and water consumption; rightward-shifted oxyhemoglobin-dissociation curves; and unchanged platelet count, leucocyte count or PHA reactivity, and red-blood-cell shape distribution. Since many of these effects are also seen in space flight, the present experimental model is considered a promising technique for simulating the hematopoietic effects of microgravity at 1 g.

  10. The functional role of some tomato products on lipid profile and liver function in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hoda Salama; Ahmed, Lamiaa Ali; El-din, Maha Mohamed Essam

    2008-09-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the functional role of lycopene obtained from powder prepared from fresh tomato, tomato paste, and ketchup that contained equal amounts of lycopene based on levels of intake on body weight gain (BWG), feed intake, feed efficiency ratio (FER), lipid profiles, atherogenic index, and liver enzymes of hyperlipidemic rats. Forty-eight male albino rats were divided into two main groups: the first group (n = 6 rats) was kept on the basal diet as a normal control, while the second group (n = 42 rats) was fed a hyperlipidemic diet for 5 weeks to induce hyperlipidemia. The latter group was divided into seven subgroups: the first subgroup was the positive control group, while the others were supplemented with one of the tomato products at one of two levels (10 or 20 mg of lycopene/kg of diet). BWG, feed intake, and FER were calculated, and blood samples were collected to determine total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein fractions, atherogenic index, and liver function in sera. Relative organ weights were also calculated. Results revealed that administration of various tomato products produced a significant reduction in feed intake except for the hyperlipidemic group that supplemented with the lower lycopene level from tomato paste. In addition, BWG and FER were not influenced by addition of tomato products at any level of intake. Hyperlipidemic rats supplemented with tomato powder, tomato paste, or ketchup showed significant improvement in almost all the parameters studied compared to the positive control group. Results showed that the higher lycopene level from tomato paste produced significant improvement in all lipid parameters, followed by 10 mg of lycopene/kg from tomato paste, which caused significant elevation in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol comparable to that of the negative control group. The lowest atherogenic index was achieved by addition of the lower lycopene level from tomato paste followed by

  11. A rat model of liver transplantation with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiucheng; Fan, Hongkai; Xiong, Rihui; Jiang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a rat liver transplantation model with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death, reflecting clinical conditions. Rats were fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to establish the fatty liver model. This model simulates liver steatosis caused by various factors before clinical donation after cardiac death. A pneumothorax was created in the donor rat to induce hypoxia and cardiac arrest before incising the liver. This simulated the processes of hypoxia and cardiac arrest caused by withdrawal of treatment in actual clinical situations. The harvested cardiac death donor liver was then transplanted using the Kamada technique. Donor operative time was 45.7 ± 4.2 min; cardiac arrest time, 9 ± 0.8 min; recipient surgery time, 40.3 ± 4.9 min; and no-liver time, 15 ± 2.5 min. Of 40 liver-transplanted rats, 2 died within 24 h, with a surgical success rate of 95%. The transaminase levels on post-transplantation days 1, 3, 5, and 7 were 835.4 ± 71.33 U/L, 1334.5 ± 102.13 U/L, 536.4 ± 65.52 U/L, and 218.2 ± 36.77 U/L, respectively. This rat liver transplantation model with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death could improve the simulation of the pathophysiological processes of clinical donation after cardiac death, and could be used as a reliable and stable animal model. PMID:26629068

  12. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research. PMID:23828036

  13. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  14. Inflammation and Atrophy Precede Prostate Neoplasia in PhIP Induced Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Borowsky, A D; Dingley, K; Ubick, E; Turteltaub, K; Cardiff, R D; DeVere-White, R

    2006-06-01

    2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine (PhIP) has been implicated as a major mutagenic heterocyclic amine in the human diet and is carcinogenic in the rat prostate. In order to validate PhIP induced rat prostate neoplasia as a model of human prostate cancer progression, we sought to study the earliest histologic and morphologic changes in the prostate and to follow the progressive changes over time. We fed 67 male Fischer F344 5 week old rats with PhIP (400 PPM) or control diets for 20 weeks, and then sacrificed animals for histomorphologic examination at age 25 weeks, 45 weeks, and 65 weeks. Animals treated with PhIP showed significantly more inflammation (P=.002 (25wk), >.001(45wk), .016(65wk)) and atrophy (P=.003(25wk), >.001(45wk), .006 (65wk)) in their prostate glands relative to controls. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) occurred only in PhIP treated rats. PIN lesions arose in areas of glandular atrophy, most often in the ventral prostate. Atypical cells in areas of atrophy show loss of glutathione S-transferase pi immunostaining preceding development of PIN. None of the animals in this study developed invasive carcinomas differing from previous reports. Overall, these findings suggest that the pathogenesis of prostatic neoplasia in the PhIP treated rat prostate proceeds from inflammation to post-inflammatory proliferative atrophy to PIN.

  15. Weight loss and brown adipose tissue reduction in rat model of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Denis; Vasconcellos, Luiz FT; de Oliveira, Patricia G; Konrad, Signorá P

    2008-01-01

    Background - Obesity is related to obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), but its roles in OSAHS as cause or consequence are not fully clarified. Isocapnic intermittent hypoxia (IIH) is a model of OSAHS. We verified the effect of IIH on body weight and brown adipose tissue (BAT) of Wistar rats. Methods Nine-month-old male breeders Wistar rats of two groups were studied: 8 rats submitted to IIH and 5 control rats submitted to sham IIH. The rats were weighed at the baseline and at the end of three weeks, after being placed in the IIH apparatus seven days per week, eight hours a day, in the lights on period, simulating an apnea index of 30/hour. After experimental period, the animals were weighed and measured as well as the BAT, abdominal, perirenal, and epididymal fat, the heart, and the gastrocnemius muscle. Results Body weight of the hypoxia group decreased 17 ± 7 grams, significantly different from the variation observed in the control group (p = 0,001). The BAT was 15% lighter in the hypoxia group and reached marginally the alpha error probability (p = 0.054). Conclusion Our preliminary results justify a larger study for a longer time in order to confirm the effect of isocapnic intermittent hypoxia on body weight and BAT. PMID:18671859

  16. Therapeutic Effects of Melatonin On Liver And Kidney Damages In Intensive Exercise Model of Rats.

    PubMed

    Gedikli, Semin; Gelen, Volkan; Sengul, Emin; Ozkanlar, Seckin; Gur, Cihan; Agırbas, Ozturk; Cakmak, Fatih; Kara, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Extensive exercise induces inflammatory reactions together with high production of free radicals and subsequent liver and kidney tissues damage. This study was designed to investigate for effects of melatonin on liver and kidney tissues in the extensive exercise exposed rats and non-exercised rats. In this research, 24-male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. For exercise rat model, the rats were exposed to slow pace running with the velocity of 10 m/min for 5 minutes for five days just before the study. And for last ten days after adaptation period, the exercise was improved as 15 min with the speed of 20 m/min and intra-peritoneal melatonin injection has been performed to the melatonin treated groups with the dose of 10 mg/kg. Biochemical results revealed a decrease in the parameters of kidney and liver enzymes in exercise-group and an increase in the parameters of serum, liver and kidney enzymes in the group that melatonin-exercise-group. As for histological analysis, while it is observed that there are cellular degenerations in the liver and kidney tissues with exercise application, a decrease has been observed in these degenerations in the group that melatonin was applied. At the end of the research, it has been determined that exercise application causes some damages on liver and kidney, and these damages were ameliorated with melatonin treatment. PMID:26310355

  17. Green and Black Cardamom in a Diet-Induced Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhaswant, Maharshi; Poudyal, Hemant; Mathai, Michael L; Ward, Leigh C; Mouatt, Peter; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-09-01

    Both black (B) and green (G) cardamom are used as flavours during food preparation. This study investigated the responses to B and G in a diet-induced rat model of human metabolic syndrome. Male Wistar rats were fed either a corn starch-rich diet (C) or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with increased simple sugars along with saturated and trans fats (H) for 16 weeks. H rats showed signs of metabolic syndrome leading to visceral obesity with hypertension, glucose intolerance, cardiovascular remodelling and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Food was supplemented with 3% dried B or G for the final eight weeks only. The major volatile components were the closely related terpenes, 1,8-cineole in B and α-terpinyl acetate in G. HB (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + black cardamom) rats showed marked reversal of diet-induced changes, with decreased visceral adiposity, total body fat mass, systolic blood pressure and plasma triglycerides, and structure and function of the heart and liver. In contrast, HG (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + green cardamom) rats increased visceral adiposity and total body fat mass, and increased heart and liver damage, without consistent improvement in the signs of metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that black cardamom is more effective in reversing the signs of metabolic syndrome than green cardamom. PMID:26378573

  18. The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on Kidneys in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Berkovitch, Matitiahu; Tsadik, Roni; Abu-Kishk, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used for treating various medical conditions. As far as known yet, HBOT is safe with few major side effects that are easy to avoid using a proper protocol. Renal tubular damage was observed in rats exposed to HBOT in a preliminary study conducted in our institution. Aim. We aim to assess whether HBOT causes renal damage and, if so, whether this is dose dependent. Methods. Thirty-one rats were randomly assigned to three groups. The first group received 10-days HBOT, 100% oxygen at a pressure of 2 atmospheres absolute (2 ATA) for 60 minutes/day, the second received the same treatment for 5 days and the third served as the control. Rat weight, survival, renal function tests, and renal histopathology were analyzed. Results. There were no significant changes in renal function tests in the plasma (cystatin C, urea, creatinine, and electrolytes) between the groups. No significant differences were observed in weight gain or renal histopathological evaluation between all groups. Conclusion. HBOT in this protocol does not cause renal impairment in a rat model, which reinforces the assumption that HBOT is safe in healthy rats, regarding renal function. Further research should be focused on the effect/safety of HBOT on nonhealthy kidneys. PMID:25177712

  19. Green and Black Cardamom in a Diet-Induced Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhaswant, Maharshi; Poudyal, Hemant; Mathai, Michael L.; Ward, Leigh C.; Mouatt, Peter; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Both black (B) and green (G) cardamom are used as flavours during food preparation. This study investigated the responses to B and G in a diet-induced rat model of human metabolic syndrome. Male Wistar rats were fed either a corn starch-rich diet (C) or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with increased simple sugars along with saturated and trans fats (H) for 16 weeks. H rats showed signs of metabolic syndrome leading to visceral obesity with hypertension, glucose intolerance, cardiovascular remodelling and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Food was supplemented with 3% dried B or G for the final eight weeks only. The major volatile components were the closely related terpenes, 1,8-cineole in B and α-terpinyl acetate in G. HB (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + black cardamom) rats showed marked reversal of diet-induced changes, with decreased visceral adiposity, total body fat mass, systolic blood pressure and plasma triglycerides, and structure and function of the heart and liver. In contrast, HG (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + green cardamom) rats increased visceral adiposity and total body fat mass, and increased heart and liver damage, without consistent improvement in the signs of metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that black cardamom is more effective in reversing the signs of metabolic syndrome than green cardamom. PMID:26378573

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Damon S.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M.; Brat, Gabriel A.; Wu, Lehao W.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  1. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  2. Resveratrol Reduces the Incidence of Portal Vein System Thrombosis after Splenectomy in a Rat Fibrosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Xue, Wanli; Ma, Zhenhua; Bai, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the preventive effect of resveratrol (RES) on the formation of portal vein system thrombosis (PVST) in a rat fibrosis model. Methods. A total of 64 male SD rats, weighing 200–300 g, were divided into five groups: Sham operation, Splenectomy I, Splenectomy II, RES, and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), with the former two groups as nonfibrosis controls. Blood samples were subjected to biochemical assays. Platelet apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. All rats were euthanized for PVST detection one week after operation. Results. No PVST occurred in nonfibrosis controls. Compared to Splenectomy II, the incidences of PVST in RES and LMWH groups were significantly decreased (both p < 0.05). Two rats in LMWH group died before euthanasia due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage. In RES group, significant decreases in platelet aggregation, platelet radical oxygen species (ROS) production, and increase in platelet nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and platelet apoptosis were observed when compared with Splenectomy II (all p < 0.001), while in LMWH group only significant decrease in platelet aggregation was observed. Conclusion. Prophylactic application of RES could safely reduce the incidence of PVST after splenectomy in cirrhotic rat. Regulation of platelet function and induction of platelet apoptosis might be the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27433290

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Damon S; Wimmers, Eric G; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M; Brat, Gabriel A; Wu, Lehao W; Sarhane, Karim A; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  4. Effects of Spaceflight on Bone: The Rat as an Animal Model for Human Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B.; Weider, T.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1999-01-01

    The loss of weight bearing during spaceflight results in osteopenia in humans. Decrements in bone mineral reach 3-10% after as little as 75-184 days in space. Loss of bone mineral during flight decreases bone strength and increases fracture risk. The mechanisms responsible for, and the factors contributing to, the changes in bone induced by spaceflight are poorly understood. The rat has been widely used as an animal model for human bone loss during spaceflight. Despite its potential usefulness, the results of bone studies performed in the rat in space have been inconsistent. In some flights bone formation is decreased and cancellous bone volume reduced, while in others no significant changes in bone occur. In June of 1996 Drs. T. Wronski, S. Miller and myself participated in a flight experiment (STS 78) to examine the effects of glucocorticoids on bone during weightlessness. Technically the 17 day flight experiment was flawless. The results, however, were surprising. Cancellous bone volume and osteoblast surface in the proximal tibial metaphysis were the same in flight and ground-based control rats. Normal levels of cancellous bone mass and bone formation were also detected in the lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck of flight rats. Furthermore, periosteal bone formation rate was found to be identical in flight and ground-based control rats. Spaceflight had little or no effect on bone metabolism! These results prompted us to carefully review the changes in bone observed in, and the flight conditions of previous spaceflight missions.

  5. Thymic involution in the suspended rat model for weightlessness - Decreased glucocorticoid receptor concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb muscle atrophy, thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy in rats during spaceflight can be simulated using suspension models. Skeletal muscle and thymus are sensitive to gluco-corticoids (GC), and previous studies have demonstrated that muscle atrophy in suspended rats is associated with increased GC receptor concentration. The objectives were to confirm thymic involution during suspension, and determine if involution correlated with increased GC receptor concentration. Seven days of antiorthostatic (AO) suspension of rats produced a significant (P less than 0.001) reduction in thymic wet weight not associated with an alteration of percent water content. GC receptor concentration (pmol/mg protein) decreased 20 percent (P less than 0.025) in thymus glands from 7 day AO suspended rats. Suspension, therefore, is associated with involution of the thymus, but this is not dependent upon AO positioning. Thymus GC receptor concentrations were depressed in 7-day suspended rats, in contrast with previous observations on skeletal muscle, suggesting that different mechanisms may underlie these responses.

  6. Carnosine pretreatment protects against hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in the neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Song, Lili; Cheng, Xiuyong; Yang, Yi; Luan, Bin; Jia, Liting; Xu, Falin; Zhang, Zhan

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates and lacks an effective treatment thus far. Carnosine has been demonstrated to play a neuroprotective role in the adult brain injuries. However, there is no information available concerning its neuroprotective role in the immature brains after hypoxia-ischemia insults. Therefore, we investigated whether carnosine could also confer neuroprotective effects in a neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal day 7 (P7). Carnosine (250 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 30 min prior to hypoxia-ischemia induction. Morphological brain injury and biochemical markers of apoptosis and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia induction. Cognitive performance was evaluated by the Morris Water Maze test on P28-P33. We found that pretreatment with carnosine significantly reduced the infarct volume and the number of terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the hypoxia-ischemia brain. Carnosine also inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-inducing factor(AIF) and caspase-3, which was accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase(SOD)activity and a decrease in the malondialdehyde(MDA)level in carnosine-treated rats. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the spatial learning and memory abilities of rats declined due to hypoxia-ischemia. These results demonstrate that carnosine can protect rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by antioxidation. PMID:21693116

  7. Unaltered cocaine self-administration in the prenatal LPS rat model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Santos-Toscano, Raquel; Borcel, Érika; Ucha, Marcos; Orihuel, Javier; Capellán, Roberto; Roura-Martínez, David; Ambrosio, Emilio; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Although cocaine abuse is up to three times more frequent among schizophrenic patients, it remains unclear why this should be the case and whether sex influences this relationship. Using a maternal immune activation model of schizophrenia, we tested whether animals at higher risk of developing a schizophrenia-like state are more prone to acquire cocaine self-administration behavior, and whether they show enhanced sensitivity to the reinforcing actions of cocaine or if they are resistant to extinction. Pregnant rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide on gestational day 15 and 16, and the offspring (both male and female) were tested in working memory (T-maze), social interaction and sensorimotor gating (prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response) paradigms. After performing these tests, the rats were subjected to cocaine self-administration regimes (0.5mg/kg), assessing their dose-response and extinction. Male rats born to dams administered lipopolysaccharide showed impaired working memory but no alterations to their social interactions, and both male and female rats showed prepulse inhibition deficits. Moreover, similar patterns of cocaine self-administration acquisition, responsiveness to dose shifts and extinction curves were observed in both control and experimental rats. These results suggest that the higher prevalence of cocaine abuse among schizophrenic individuals is not due to a biological vulnerability directly associated to the disease and that other factors (social, educational, economic, familial, etc.) should be considered given the multifactorial nature of this illness. PMID:27089985

  8. A preliminary study of age-related difference in resistance to sepsis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Wei, C I; Gilliam, M C; Cohen, M D; Cornell, J A; Moazam, F

    1987-11-01

    Although the pathophysiology of intraabdominal sepsis is well established in the adult animal, there is a paucity of similar information in the newborn animal. Using the Wichterman (K.A. Wichterman, A.E. Baue, and I.H. Chaudry, Journal of Surgical Research 29: 189, 1980) model of intraabdominal sepsis, 42 Sprague-Dawley suckling rat pups and 42 adults underwent cecal ligation followed by a single needle puncture of the cecum. Whereas a mortality of 47.6% was noted in the adult animals, only 7.1% of the suckling animals succumbed by the end of 1 week. After the ip LD50 of Escherichia coli was determined independently in each age group, appropriate doses of the bacteria were injected into the peritoneums of 36 suckling and 30 adult rats. The peritoneal fluid was aspirated at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hr and the bacterial concentration in the suspension was determined. The rate of bacterial clearance from the peritoneum of the suckling rats was found to be significantly greater at 2, 4, and 8 hr as compared with the adult animal. In vitro assay of the phagocytic activity of the peritoneal macrophages demonstrated a significantly higher activity in the cells obtained from the suckling rats than in those from the adult (P less than 0.05). A more efficient bacterial clearance and a higher phagocytic activity in the peritoneal macrophages of the suckling rats may contribute to the difference in the mortality between the two age groups. PMID:3316844

  9. In vivo activation of complement by IgA in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Stad, R K; Bogers, W M; Thoomes-van der Sluys, M E; Van Es, L A; Daha, M R

    1992-01-01

    In this study we investigated the capacity of rat IgA to activate complement (C) in vivo in a rat model. Rat monomeric (m-), dimeric (d-) and polymeric (p-) IgA MoAbs were injected intravenously and assessed for deposition of C3 and C4 on IgA. By ELISA it was shown that both d- and p-IgA bound C3 whereas no binding of C3 by m-IgA was observed. Polymeric IgA was more efficient in binding of C3 as compared with d-IgA. However, in haemolytic assays no consistent decrease of plasma complement levels was observed except for dimeric IgA which induced a marginal consumption of AP50. When rats were pre-treated with cobra venom factor (CVF) to deplete C3, no C3 deposition was found on m-, d- or p-IgA. Neither m- nor d- or p-IgA was able to bind C4 in vivo. In agreement with the results described above, large sized polymeric IgA was shown to be taken up by Kupffer cells (KC) together with C3. No C3 was detected when rats were depleted of C using CVF. Taken together, the experimental data suggest that d- and p-IgA are able to activate C via the alternative pathway in vivo. PMID:1733628

  10. Lack of significant promoting activity by benzene in the rat liver model of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Taningher, M.; Perrotta, A.; Malacarne, D.

    1995-08-01

    The promoting activity of benzene on rat liver carcinogenesis was investigated. The chemical was tested for its ability to enhance the growth of preneoplastic foci, as detected by gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) staining in diethylnitrosamine (DENA) initiated hepatocytes. Two weeks after receiving a single ip dose of 200 mg/kg DENA, F344 rats were given daily oral doses of 400 mg/kg benzene (5 d/wk) for 6 wk. At wk 3 after the experiment began, all animals underwent partial hepatectomy, and at wk 8 were sacrificed. Following benzene treatment, no variation in the liver/body weight ratio was observed. After scoring of foci in liver slides, no significant difference in foci number and area could be observed between rats treated with DENA plus benzene and rats treated with DENA alone. Practically no foci were observed in the liver of rats treated only with benzene. The lack of benzene promoting activity in the liver model is discussed. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Berberine Ameliorates Cold and Mechanical Allodynia in a Rat Model of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Oh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the antiallodynic properties of berberine on cold and mechanical allodynia after streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes using a rat model. Diabetic neuropathy was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of STZ. To measure cold and mechanical allodynia, a 4°C plate and von Frey filament were used, respectively. Cold and mechanical allodynia induced by diabetes were significantly decreased by single and repeated intraperitoneal treatment of amitriptyline at 10 mg/kg, and berberine at 10 and 20 mg/kg. The hepatic malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly increased in diabetic rats as compared with those in intact rats; however, in amitriptyline- and berberine-treated rats, they were significantly decreased as compared to the STZ control. The overall effects of berberine 20 mg/kg on cold and mechanical allodynia were quite similar to those of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg, and berberine exhibited similar antioxidant effects as the same dosage of amitriptyline. In conclusion, berberine (10 and 20 mg/kg) was observed to have antiallodynic effects against diabetes, which are presumed to be associated with antioxidative effects. It can be considered that the anti-inflammatory or antidepressant capacity of berberine could contribute to the antiallonynic effects shown in this study. PMID:23734996

  12. Neurochemical changes and laser Doppler flowmetry in the endothelin-1 rat model for focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, L; Scheller, D; Moonen, J; Sarre, S; Smolders, I; Ebinger, G; Michotte, Y

    2000-12-29

    Generalized neurotransmitter overflow into the extracellular space, after cerebral ischemia, has been suggested to contribute to subsequent neuronal death. This study aims to investigate the striatal release of the neurotransmitters dopamine (DA), glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of microdialysis, in a rat model for focal transient cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by the application of 120 pmol endothelin-1 (Et-1), adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in freely moving rats. Ischemia produced a large increase in extracellular striatal DA concentrations (2400%), Glu (5500%) and GABA (800%) concentrations. Laser Doppler flowmetry in anaesthetized rats, indicated that the blood flow within the striatum decreased by 75+/-11%. The period of sustained drop of blood flow, was dose-dependently related to the concentration Et-1 injected. Histological analysis of brain slices, taken from anaesthetized and conscious animals, indicated a 500 pmol dose of Et-1 was required to produce a similar infarct in anaesthetized rats to a 120 pmol dose of Et-1 in freely moving rats. The immediate drop in striatal blood flow, and the prompt increase of extracellular DA, after the micro-application of Et-1, were quite striking. This suggests that the DA release, rather than the Glu overflow may be the primary event initiating the cascade of processes ultimately leading to cell death and neurological deficits. PMID:11134615

  13. Resveratrol Reduces the Incidence of Portal Vein System Thrombosis after Splenectomy in a Rat Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Xue, Wanli; Ma, Zhenhua; Bai, Jigang; Wu, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the preventive effect of resveratrol (RES) on the formation of portal vein system thrombosis (PVST) in a rat fibrosis model. Methods. A total of 64 male SD rats, weighing 200-300 g, were divided into five groups: Sham operation, Splenectomy I, Splenectomy II, RES, and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), with the former two groups as nonfibrosis controls. Blood samples were subjected to biochemical assays. Platelet apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. All rats were euthanized for PVST detection one week after operation. Results. No PVST occurred in nonfibrosis controls. Compared to Splenectomy II, the incidences of PVST in RES and LMWH groups were significantly decreased (both p < 0.05). Two rats in LMWH group died before euthanasia due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage. In RES group, significant decreases in platelet aggregation, platelet radical oxygen species (ROS) production, and increase in platelet nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and platelet apoptosis were observed when compared with Splenectomy II (all p < 0.001), while in LMWH group only significant decrease in platelet aggregation was observed. Conclusion. Prophylactic application of RES could safely reduce the incidence of PVST after splenectomy in cirrhotic rat. Regulation of platelet function and induction of platelet apoptosis might be the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27433290

  14. Learning to use working memory: a reinforcement learning gating model of rule acquisition in rats.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kevin; Becker, Nadine; Jones, Matthew W; Bogacz, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    Learning to form appropriate, task-relevant working memory representations is a complex process central to cognition. Gating models frame working memory as a collection of past observations and use reinforcement learning (RL) to solve the problem of when to update these observations. Investigation of how gating models relate to brain and behavior remains, however, at an early stage. The current study sought to explore the ability of simple RL gating models to replicate rule learning behavior in rats. Rats were trained in a maze-based spatial learning task that required animals to make trial-by-trial choices contingent upon their previous experience. Using an abstract version of this task, we tested the ability of two gating algorithms, one based on the Actor-Critic and the other on the State-Action-Reward-State-Action (SARSA) algorithm, to generate behavior consistent with the rats'. Both models produced rule-acquisition behavior consistent with the experimental data, though only the SARSA gating model mirrored faster learning following rule reversal. We also found that both gating models learned multiple strategies in solving the initial task, a property which highlights the multi-agent nature of such models and which is of importance in considering the neural basis of individual differences in behavior. PMID:23115551

  15. Postdependent state in rats as a model for medication development in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Marcus W; Sommer, Wolfgang H

    2015-01-01

    Rational development of novel therapeutic strategies for alcoholism requires understanding of its underlying neurobiology and pathophysiology. Obtaining this knowledge largely relies on animal studies. Thus, choosing the appropriate animal model is one of the most critical steps in pre-clinical medication development. Among the range of animal models that have been used to investigate excessive alcohol consumption in rodents, the postdependent model stands out. It was specifically developed to test the role of negative affect as a key driving force in a perpetuating addiction cycle for alcoholism. Here, we will describe our approach to make rats dependent via chronic intermittent exposure to alcohol, discuss the validity of this model, and compare it with other commonly used animal models of alcoholism. We will summarize evidence that postdependent rats fulfill several criteria of a 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV/V-like' diagnostic system. Importantly, these animals show long-lasting excessive consumption of and increased motivation for alcohol, and evidence for loss of control over alcohol intake. Our conclusion that postdependent rats are an excellent model for medication development for alcoholism is underscored by a summary of more than two dozen pharmacological tests aimed at reversing these abnormal alcohol responses. We will end with open questions on the use of this model. In the tradition of the Sanchis-Segura and Spanagel review, we provide comic strips that illustrate the postdependent procedure and relevant phenotypes in this review. PMID:25403107

  16. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. RESULTS After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  17. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Material/Methods Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. Results After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. Conclusions Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  18. A new rat model exhibiting both ovarian and metabolic characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mannerås, Louise; Cajander, Stefan; Holmäng, Agneta; Seleskovic, Zamira; Lystig, Theodore; Lönn, Malin; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2007-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder associated with ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, abdominal obesity, and insulin resistance. However, its etiology is unclear, and its management is often unsatisfactory or requires a diversified approach. Here, we describe a new rat PCOS model, the first to exhibit both ovarian and metabolic characteristics of the syndrome. Female rats received the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or the aromatase inhibitor letrozole by continuous administration, beginning before puberty, to activate androgen receptors. Adult DHT rats had irregular cycles, polycystic ovaries characterized by cysts formed from atretic follicles, and a diminished granulosa layer. They also displayed metabolic features, including increased body weight, increased body fat, and enlarged mesenteric adipocytes, as well as elevated leptin levels and insulin resistance. All letrozole rats were anovulatory and developed polycystic ovaries with structural changes strikingly similar to those in human PCOS. Our findings suggest that the formation of a "hyperplastic" theca interna reflects the inclusion of luteinized granulosa cells in the cyst wall rather than true hyperplasia. We conclude that the letrozole model is suitable for studies of the ovarian features of human PCOS, while the DHT model is suitable for studies of both ovarian and metabolic features of the syndrome. PMID:17495003

  19. Characterization of CC-531 as a Rat Model of Colorectal Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah Beth; Procissi, Daniele; Chen, Jeane; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Tyler, Patrick; Yang, Yihe; Omary, Reed A.; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Surgical resection of colorectal liver metastases is not achievable in more than 70% of the cases. Although the liver directed therapies have become a part of the stand of care, lack of a preclinical model impedes the assessment of toxicity and therapeutic benefits attributed several candidate drugs or treatment regimens that can be designed. In the present study we aim develop and characterize a rat colorectal liver metastasis model. Materials and Methods Growth characteristics of CC-531 cells were determined in vitro followed by subcapsular liver implantation in syngeneic WAG/Rij rats. Tumor growth progression was followed over 3 weeks by ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Growth characteristics were also assessed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in harvested tumor tissues. Results The doubling time of CC-531 cells was found be under 24hrs and all the implanted rats grew tumors. US imaging showed hypoechoic masses and MRI showed contrast enhancement representing complex tumor microenvironments. Hematoxylin and Eosin staining confirmed tumor growth and uniform CD31 staining in tumor confirmed even vessel density. Conclusion CC-531 can be used as a metastatic rat tumor colorectal liver metastases model with well-defined characteristics that can be readily followed by imaging whilst having a therapeutic window for interventions. PMID:27171151

  20. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy in Cyclophosphamide-Induced Premature Ovarian Failure Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dan; Zhong, Yun; Qian, Chunfeng; Zou, Qinyan; Ou, Jian; Shi, Yichao; Gao, Liang; Wang, Gaigai; Liu, Zhenxing; Li, Haibo; Ding, Hailei; Wu, Huihua; Wang, Fuxin; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is one of the most common causes of infertility in women. In our present study, we established cyclophosphamide- (CTX-) induced POF rat model and elucidated its effect on ovarian function. We detected the serum estrogen, follicle stimulating hormone, and anti-Müllerian hormone of mice models by ELISA and evaluated their folliculogenesis by histopathology examination. Our study revealed that CTX administration could severely disturb hormone secretion and influence folliculogenesis in rat. This study also detected ovarian cells apoptosis by deoxy-UTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) and demonstrated marked ovarian cells apoptosis in rat models following CTX administration. In order to explore the potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) in POF treatment, the above indexes were used to evaluate ovarian function. We found that human UCMSCs transplantation recovered disturbed hormone secretion and folliculogenesis in POF rat, in addition to reduced ovarian cell apoptosis. We also tracked transplanted UCMSCs in ovaries by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The results manifested that the transplanted human UCMSCs could reside in ovarian tissues and could survive for a comparatively long time without obvious proliferation. Our present study provides new insights into the great clinical potential of human UCMSCs in POF treatment. PMID:27047962

  1. Modeling glaucoma in rats by sclerosing aqueous outflow pathways to elevate intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John C; Cepurna, William O; Johnson, Elaine C

    2015-12-01

    Injection of hypertonic saline via episcleral veins toward the limbus in laboratory rats can produce elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) by sclerosis of aqueous humor outflow pathways. This article describes important anatomic characteristics of the rat optic nerve head (ONH) that make it an attractive animal model for human glaucoma, along with the anatomy of rat aqueous humor outflow on which this technique is based. The injection technique itself is also described, with the aid of a supplemental movie, including necessary equipment and specific tips to acquire this skill. Outcomes of a successful injection are presented, including IOP elevation and patterns of optic nerve injury. These concepts are then specifically considered in light of the use of this model to assess potential neuroprotective therapies. Advantages of the hypertonic saline model include a delayed and relatively gradual IOP elevation, likely reproduction of scleral and ONH stresses and strains that may be important in producing axonal injury, and its ability to be applied to any rat (and potentially mouse) strain, leaving the unmanipulated fellow eye as an internal control. Challenges include the demanding surgical skill required by the technique itself, a wide range of IOP response, and mild corneal clouding in some animals. However, meticulous application of the principles detailed in this article and practice will allow most researchers to attain this useful skill for studying cellular events of glaucomatous optic nerve damage. PMID:26003399

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Noha M; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M; Algandaby, Mardi M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-κB expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. PMID:22842335

  3. l-Carnitine improves cognitive and renal functions in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abu Ahmad, Nur; Armaly, Zaher; Berman, Sylvia; Jabour, Adel; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Mosenego-Ornan, Efrat; Avital, Avi

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has reached epidemic proportions. The search for novel pharmacological treatment for CKD has become an area of intensive clinical research. l-Carnitine, considered as the "gatekeeper" responsible for admitting long chain fatty acids into cell mitochondria. l-Carnitine synthesis and turnover are regulated mainly by the kidney and its levels inversely correlate with serum creatinine of normal subjects and CKD patients. Previous studies showed that l-carnitine administration to elderly people is improving and preserving cognitive function. As yet, there are no clinical intervention studies that investigated the effect of l-carnitine administration on cognitive impairment evidenced in CKD patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of l-carnitine treatment on renal function and on the cognitive performance in a rat model of progressive CKD. To assess the role of l-carnitine on CKD condition, we estimated the renal function and cognitive abilities in a CKD rat model. We found that all CKD animals exhibited renal function deterioration, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and ample histopathological abnormalities. l-Carnitine treatment of CKD rats significantly reduced serum creatinine and BUN, attenuated renal hypertrophy and decreased renal tissue damage. In addition, in the two way shuttle avoidance learning, CKD animals showed cognitive impairment which recovered by the administration of l-carnitine. We conclude that in a rat model of CKD, l-carnitine administration significantly improved cognitive and renal functions. PMID:27241631

  4. A Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Bile Acid and Cholesterol Excretion and Inhibition of Hepatic Lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Downing, Laura E; Heidker, Rebecca M; Caiozzi, Gianella C; Wong, Brian S; Rodriguez, Kelvin; Del Rey, Fernando; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) exerts a triglyceride-lowering effect in a hyperlipidemic state using the fructose-fed rat model and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Rats were fed either a starch control diet or a diet containing 65% fructose for 8 weeks to induce hypertriglyceridemia. During the 9th week of the study, rats were maintained on their respective diet and administered vehicle or GSPE via oral gavage for 7 days. Fructose increased serum triglyceride levels by 171% after 9 weeks, compared to control, while GSPE administration attenuated this effect, resulting in a 41% decrease. GSPE inhibited hepatic lipogenesis via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in the fructose-fed animals. GSPE increased fecal bile acid and total lipid excretion, decreased serum bile acid levels and increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, bile acid biosynthetic gene expression was not increased in the presence of GSPE and fructose. Serum cholesterol levels remained constant, while hepatic cholesterol levels decreased. GSPE did not modulate expression of genes responsible for esterification or biliary export of the newly synthesized cholesterol, but did increase fecal cholesterol excretion, suggesting that in the presence of GSPE and fructose, the liver may secrete more free cholesterol into the plasma which may then be shunted to the proximal small intestine for direct basolateral to apical secretion and subsequent fecal excretion. Our results demonstrate that GSPE effectively lowers serum triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats after one week administration. This study provides novel insight into the mechanistic actions of GSPE in treating hypertriglyceridemia and demonstrates that it targets hepatic de novo lipogenesis, bile acid homeostasis and non-biliary cholesterol excretion as important mechanisms for

  5. A Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Bile Acid and Cholesterol Excretion and Inhibition of Hepatic Lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Brian S.; Rodriguez, Kelvin; Del Rey, Fernando; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) exerts a triglyceride-lowering effect in a hyperlipidemic state using the fructose-fed rat model and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Rats were fed either a starch control diet or a diet containing 65% fructose for 8 weeks to induce hypertriglyceridemia. During the 9th week of the study, rats were maintained on their respective diet and administered vehicle or GSPE via oral gavage for 7 days. Fructose increased serum triglyceride levels by 171% after 9 weeks, compared to control, while GSPE administration attenuated this effect, resulting in a 41% decrease. GSPE inhibited hepatic lipogenesis via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in the fructose-fed animals. GSPE increased fecal bile acid and total lipid excretion, decreased serum bile acid levels and increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, bile acid biosynthetic gene expression was not increased in the presence of GSPE and fructose. Serum cholesterol levels remained constant, while hepatic cholesterol levels decreased. GSPE did not modulate expression of genes responsible for esterification or biliary export of the newly synthesized cholesterol, but did increase fecal cholesterol excretion, suggesting that in the presence of GSPE and fructose, the liver may secrete more free cholesterol into the plasma which may then be shunted to the proximal small intestine for direct basolateral to apical secretion and subsequent fecal excretion. Our results demonstrate that GSPE effectively lowers serum triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats after one week administration. This study provides novel insight into the mechanistic actions of GSPE in treating hypertriglyceridemia and demonstrates that it targets hepatic de novo lipogenesis, bile acid homeostasis and non-biliary cholesterol excretion as important mechanisms for

  6. Chronic behavioral and cognitive deficits in a rat survival model of paraoxon toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Phillips, Kristin; Huang, Beverly; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds, including paraoxon (POX), are similar to nerve agents such as sarin. There is a growing concern that OP agents could be weaponized to cause mass civilian causalities. We have developed a rodent survival model of POX toxicity that is being used to evaluate chronic morbidity and to screen for medical countermeasures against severe OP exposure. It is well known that the survivors of nerve gas and chronic OP exposure exhibit neurobehavioral deficits such as mood changes, depression, and memory impairments. In this study we investigated whether animals surviving severe POX exposure exhibited long-term neurological impairments. POX exposure produced overt signs of cholinergic toxicity. Rats were rescued using an optimized atropine, 2-PAM and diazepam therapy. Surviving rats were studied using established behavioral assays for identifying symptoms of depression and memory impairment 3-months after POX exposure. In the forced swim test, POX rats exhibited increased immobility time indicative of a despair-like state. In the sucrose preference test, POX rats consumed significantly less sucrose water indicating anhedonia-like condition. POX rats also displayed increased anxiety as characterized by significantly lower performance in the open arm of the elevated plus maze. Further, when tested with a novel object recognition paradigm, POX rats exhibited a negative discrimination ratio indicative of impaired recognition memory. The results indicate that this model of survival from severe POX exposure can be employed to study some of the molecular bases for OP-induced chronic behavioral and cognitive comorbidities and develop therapies for their treatment. PMID:25172410

  7. Exercises in Hot and Humid Environment Caused Liver Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bang; Liu, YuZheng; Zeng, ZhiYu; Lu, LingLing; Zheng, ZhiYong; Li, Bing; Zheng, ZongFu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate injury pattern during intense exercises in hot and humid environment particularly on liver in a rat exertional heat stroke model. Methods We randomly divided 30 rats into a control group (CG), a normal temperature (25±2°C, 60%±5% humidity) exercise group (NTEG) and a high temperature and high humidity (35±2°C, 80%±10% humidity) exercising group (HTEG), each comprising 10 animals. The NTEG and HTEG rats were forced to run in a treadmill for 1 hour maximum at 20 rpm. We analyzed liver cells of all three groups with JC-1 dye and flow cytometry for apoptosis rates in addition to liver tissue 8 - hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8 - OhdG) and blood serum IL–6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), alanine aminotransferase ALT, aspartate amino transferase (AST), serum creatinine (CREA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphate kinase (CK) concentrations. Result Compared with NTEG rats, beside reduced exercise tolerance (60±5 vs. 15±3 minutes) (p = 0.002) the 8-OhdG liver tissue concentrations were significantly higher (p = 0.040) in the HTEG rats. The HTEG developed more organ tissue damage and cellular fragmentations of liver cells. In both exercise groups TNF-α and IL-6 serum concentrations were enhanced significantly (p<0.001) being highest in the HTEG animals. Serum ALT, AST, LDH, CREA, BUN and CK concentrations were significantly enhance in both exercise groups. Conclusion In our exertional heat stroke rat model, we found tissue damage particularly in livers during exercises in hot and humid environment that was related to inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:25548911

  8. A Novel Angiogenesis Inhibitor Bevacizumab Induces Apoptosis in the Rat Endometriosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Soysal, D; Kızıldağ, S; Saatlı, B; Posacı, C; Soysal, S; Koyuncuoğlu, M; Doğan, ÖE

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) antibody Bevacizumab on endometrial explants and on apoptotic gene expression levels in the rat endometriosis model. Endometriotic implants were surgically formed, and rats treated with (i) 1 mg/kg single subcutaneous injection of depot leuprolide acetate; (ii) 2.5 mg/kg of single intaperitoneal injection of bevacizumab; (iii) intraperitoneal injection of saline. Histopathologic scores and adhesion scores of endometriotic foci and levels of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), Cytochrome c (Cyt-c), B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 2 (Bcl-2) and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xl) mRNA gene expressions of endometriotic foci. Bevacizumab treatment decreased the endometriotic explant size compared with control. Bevacizumab-treated rats had lower total adhesion scores when compared with the control group. Semi-quantitative evaluation of the persistence of endometrial epithelial cells in the explants showed a lower score in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist-treated rats compared with control rats. In Bevacizumab increased expression of Bax 3.1-fold, Cyt-c 1.3-fold and decreased expression of Bcl-2 0.4-fold, Bcl-xl 0.8-fold compared with the control group. The GnRH agonist increased expression of Bax 3.0 fold, Cyt-c 1.3 fold and decreased expression of Bcl-2 0.4-fold, Bcl-xl 0.8-fold, compared with the control group. This study suggests that a novel angiogenesis inhibitor, anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab is as effective as GnRH agonist in the regression of the endometriotic lesions in rat endometriosis model. One possible mechanism of this effect is the induction of apoptosis. PMID:25937801

  9. Antiallodynic effects of vitamin C and vitamin E in chronic post-ischemia pain rat model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun-Mo; Kim, Chae Kyung; Lee, Hyung Chul; Jung, Hoon; Choi, Kwang-Uk; Hong, Seong Wook; Lim, Dong Gun; Baek, Woon-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a significant role in the development and persistence of neuropathic pain through central sensitization via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. In the present study, we examined whether the intraperitoneal administration of vitamins C and E alone or together could alleviate mechanical allodynia in a chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP) rat model. Methods Vitamins C and E were administered intraperitoneally to 48 male Sprague Dawley rats once per day for 3 days before hindpaw ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury was induced. On the third day, the CPIP rat model was produced by inducing ischemia in the left hindpaw by applying an O-ring for 3 h, followed by reperfusion. Three days after reperfusion, hindpaw mechanical allodynia was assessed by measuring the withdrawal response to von Frey filament stimulation. The rats were sacrificed immediately after behavioral testing to determine the phosphorylated NMDA receptor subunit 1 (pNR1) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (pERK) levels in the spinal cord. Results When the antioxidant vitamins C and E were administered intraperitoneally to CPIP rats, I/R injury-induced mechanical allodynia was attenuated, and pNR1 and pERK levels were decreased in the rat spinal cord. Additionally, the co-administration of both vitamins had an increased antiallodynic effect. Conclusions The reduced phosphorylated NR1 and ERK levels indicate that vitamins C and E inhibit the modulation of spinal cord neuropathic pain processing. Co-administration of vitamins C and E had a greater antiallodynic effect. PMID:24363848

  10. A model for chronic, intrahypothalamic thyroid hormone administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Bisschop, P H; Foppen, E; van Beeren, H C; Kalsbeek, A; Boelen, A; Fliers, E

    2016-04-01

    In addition to the direct effects of thyroid hormone (TH) on peripheral organs, recent work showed metabolic effects of TH on the liver and brown adipose tissue via neural pathways originating in the hypothalamic paraventricular and ventromedial nucleus (PVN and VMH). So far, these experiments focused on short-term administration of TH. The aim of this study is to develop a technique for chronic and nucleus-specific intrahypothalamic administration of the biologically active TH tri-iodothyronine (T3). We used beeswax pellets loaded with an amount of T3 based on in vitro experiments showing stable T3 release (∼5 nmol l(-1)) for 32 days. Upon stereotactic bilateral implantation, T3 concentrations were increased 90-fold in the PVN region and 50-fold in the VMH region after placing T3-containing pellets in the rat PVN or VMH for 28 days respectively. Increased local T3 concentrations were reflected by selectively increased mRNA expression of the T3-responsive genes Dio3 and Hr in the PVN or in the VMH. After placement of T3-containing pellets in the PVN, Tshb mRNA was significantly decreased in the pituitary, without altered Trh mRNA in the PVN region. Plasma T3 and T4 concentrations decreased without altered plasma TSH. We observed no changes in pituitary Tshb mRNA, plasma TSH, or plasma TH in rats after placement of T3-containing pellets in the VMH. We developed a method to selectively and chronically deliver T3 to specific hypothalamic nuclei. This will enable future studies on the chronic effects of intrahypothalamic T3 on energy metabolism via the PVN or VMH. PMID:26865639

  11. Cilengitide inhibits metastatic bone colonization in a nude rat model.

    PubMed

    Bretschi, Maren; Merz, Maximilian; Komljenovic, Dorde; Berger, Martin R; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bäuerle, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    Integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer bone metastases. This study investigates the effects of the αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin-specific inhibitor cilengitide during early metastatic bone colonization. The impact of cilengitide on the migration, invasion and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells as well as on bone resorption by osteoclasts was investigated in vitro. For in vivo experiments, nude rats were treated with cilengitide for 30 days starting one day after site-specific tumor cell inoculation in the hind leg, and the course of metastatic changes in bone was followed using flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (VCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Vascular changes in bone metastases were investigated using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI-derived parameters amplitude A and exchange rate coefficient kep. In vitro, cilengitide treatment resulted in a decrease in proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells, as well as of osteoclast activity. In vivo, the development of bone metastasis in the hind leg of rats was not prevented by adjuvant cilengitide treatment, but cilengitide reduced the volumes of osteolytic lesions and respective soft tissue tumors of developing bone metastases as assessed with VCT and MRI, respectively. DCE-MRI revealed significant changes in the A and kep parameters including decreased relative blood volume and increased vessel permeability after cilengitide treatment indicating vessel remodeling. In conclusion, during early pathogenic processes of bone colonization, cilengitide treatment exerted effects on tumor cells, osteoclasts and vasculature reducing the skeletal lesion size of experimental skeletal metastases. PMID:21725616

  12. Expression and localization of regenerating gene I in a rat liver regeneration model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jingshu; Koyota, Souichi; Zhou, Xiaoping; Ueno, Yasuharu; Ma Li; Kawagoe, Masami; Koizumi, Yukio; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2009-03-13

    Regenerating gene (Reg) I has been identified as a regenerative/proliferative factor for pancreatic islet cells. We examined Reg I expression in the regenerating liver of a rat model that had been administered 2-acetylaminofluorene and treated with 70% partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH model), where hepatocyte and cholangiocyte proliferation was suppressed and the hepatic stem cells and/or hepatic progenitor cells were activated. In a detailed time course study of activation of hepatic stem cells in the 2-AAF/PH model, utilizing immunofluorescence staining with antibodies of Reg I and other cell-type-specific markers, we found that Reg I-expressing cells are present in the bile ductules and increased during regeneration. Reg I-expressing cells were colocalized with CK19, OV6, and AFP. These results demonstrate that Reg I is significantly upregulated in the liver of the 2-AAF/PH rat model, accompanied by the formation of bile ductules during liver regeneration.

  13. [The effect of actovegin on spermatogenesis in white male rats upon clinical death modeling].

    PubMed

    Shevantaeva, O N; Kosiuga, Iu I

    2006-01-01

    The indices of spermatogenesis in white male rats have been studied after clinical death modeling by means of cardiac fascicle compression. The model disorder leads to a reliable decrease in the number of spermatogenic epithelium, Sertoli cells, and Leydig cells in the testicles. A single injection of actovegin (10 mg/kg) during the reanimation period decreases the disturbances in spermatogenesis and leads to its complete recovery by the 45th day of postreanimation period. PMID:16845939

  14. Characterization of the ZDSD Rat: A Translational Model for the Study of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Richard G; Jackson, Charles V; Zimmerman, Karen; de Winter, Willem; Huebert, Norman; Hansen, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and T2D produce significant health and economic issues. Many available animal models have monogenic leptin pathway mutations that are absent in the human population. Development of the ZDSD rat model was undertaken to produce a model that expresses polygenic obesity and diabetes with an intact leptin pathway. A lean ZDF rat with the propensity for beta-cell failure was crossed with a polygenetically obese Crl:CD (SD) rat. Offspring were selectively inbred for obesity and diabetes for >30 generations. In the current study, ZDSD rats were followed for 6 months; routine clinical metabolic endpoints were included throughout the study. In the prediabetic metabolic syndrome phase, ZDSD rats exhibited obesity with increased body fat, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, and elevated HbA1c. As disease progressed to overt diabetes, ZDSD rats demonstrated elevated glucose levels, abnormal oral glucose tolerance, increases in HbA1c levels, reductions in body weight, increased insulin resistance with decreasing insulin levels, and dyslipidemia. The ZDSD rat develops prediabetic metabolic syndrome and T2D in a manner that mirrors the development of metabolic syndrome and T2D in humans. ZDSD rats will provide a novel, translational animal model for the study of human metabolic diseases and for the development of new therapies. PMID:25961053

  15. Hippocampus and Retrograde Amnesia in the Rat Model: A Modest Proposal for the Situation of Systems Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Robert J.; Sparks, Fraser T.; Lehmann, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    The properties of retrograde amnesia after damage to the hippocampus have been explicated with some success using a rat model of human medial temporal lobe amnesia. We review the results of this experimental work with rats focusing on several areas of consensus in this growing literature. We evaluate the theoretically significant hypothesis that…

  16. Choice of diet impacts the incidence of stroke-related symptoms in the spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat model.

    PubMed

    Slemmer, Jennifer E; Shaughnessy, Kevin S; Scanlan, Adam P; Sweeney, Marva I; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine T

    2012-02-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHRSP) rat is a commonly used model of cerebrovascular disease and hypertension. SHRSP rats have been shown to develop stroke-related symptoms (SRS) by age 14 weeks when fed a purified diet, such as AIN-93G, supplemented with 1% NaCl. We conducted a pathology pilot study to compare the incidence of SRS in SHRSP rats fed either AIN-93G (with 1% NaCl in drinking water) or commercially available rat chow (with 4% NaCl in the diet), starting at 8 weeks of age. These results prompted us to analyze data from 5 earlier feeding trials using SHRSP rats. Overall, we found that SHRSP rats fed AIN-93G purified diet for 8 or 17 weeks did not demonstrate SRS (n = 18), whereas all SHRSP rats fed lab chow exhibited SRS at age 15.1 ± 0.6 weeks (n = 23). In addition, SHRSP rats fed lab chow had decreased mass gain starting at age 13 weeks, as well as decreased feed efficiencies after the first 5 weeks of feeding (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest that diet composition is a major contributor to the onset of stroke in SHRSP rats and that diet choice should be critically evaluated based on endpoint measures in the SHRSP model. PMID:22316284

  17. A comparison of different models with motor dysfunction after traumatic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Pu, Hongjian; Liu, Yingchao; Wang, Zengtao; Wang, Bomin; Xu, Wendong

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of the model that could produce reproducible and persistent motor weakness and define the accurate tasks and testing parameters for longitudinal assessment of neurological deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We compared the effects of two rat models that suffered different controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, as well as extensive motor cortex resection model, on behavior recovery and brain morphology. Behavioral tests including the skilled reaching task, limb-use asymmetry test and the grasping test were employed to evaluate neurofunctional recovery from pre- to 12 weeks after the injury. The results demonstrated that all the rats in four groups showed spontaneous functional improvement with the past of time after surgery, especially in rats with mild and moderate CCI injury. At the end of the experiment, the animals' performance reached preoperative base lines on reaching task and limb-use asymmetry test in mild and moderate groups, while severe motor weakness could be observed in rats with severe CCI injury, as well as rats with extended motor cortex resection. Overall, the results of this study indicated that both models with severe CCI injury and extended resection of the motor cortex developed reproducible and long-lasting motor weakness, comparable in severity and duration and identified skilled reaching task, as well as limb-use asymmetry test, as sensitive assessments for slight neurological deficits after brain injury. This will help to provide the basis for further research of the processes after the TBI and development of novel therapies. PMID:25385190

  18. Tissue somatostatin levels in three models of genetic obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Voyles, N R; Bhathena, S J; Kennedy, B; Wilkins, S D; Michaelis, O E; Zalenski, C M; Timmers, K I; Recant, L

    1987-05-01

    A potential role for somatostatin (SRIF) in the pathogenesis of the hyperinsulinemia of obese rats was considered. SRIF like immunoreactivity (ng/mg protein) was therefore measured in hot 2 N acetic acid extracts of pancreas, stomach, pituitary, and hypothalamus in tissues obtained from three models of genetic obesity in rats. These models included the obese and lean controls of LA/N-cp, SHR/N-cp, and Zucker rats. To assess the effects of diet on SRIF levels, mixed diets were provided ad lib which contained a carbohydrate as either sucrose or starch. Some groups were fed chow diets. No significant dietary effects on tissue levels of SRIF were obtained. However, two of the three models (Zucker and SHR/N-cp) showed phenotypic effects on SRIF levels in pancreas; namely, obese rats showed a significantly greater concentration of SRIF (P less than 0.0005 and less than 0.0002, respectively) than did the lean littermates. These findings were confirmed by measurement of total pancreas SRIF content. Gastric levels were significantly altered only in the obese Zucker rats (P less than 0.005) where obese tissues had lower concentrations than those of lean animals. However similar directional changes in pancreas and stomach were observed in all models. It is concluded that the hyperinsulinemia of the obese animals studied is not due to absolute deficiency in pancreatic SRIF content. It is postulated however that decreased pancreatic SRIF secretion (paracrine or otherwise) relative to pancreatic insulin content could still play a role. PMID:2883660

  19. A population PK model for citalopram and its major metabolite, N-desmethyl citalopram, in rats.

    PubMed

    Velez de Mendizabal, Nieves; Jackson, Kimberley; Eastwood, Brian; Swanson, Steven; Bender, David M; Lowe, Stephen; Bies, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    A population PK model was developed in order to simultaneously describe citalopram and its major metabolite, n-desmethyl citalopram, plasma concentrations in two different strain of rats after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration of citalopram. Citalopram was administered to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at doses: 0.3, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg IV and 10 mg/kg PO. The compound was dosed orally to Wistar rats at doses: 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 60 mg/kg. Plasma samples were collected for citalopram and metabolite. Pharmacokinetic analyses were conducted using NONMEM 7.2. Values below the quantification limit (BLQ < 0.1 ng/mL) were included in the analyses and treated as censored information. The disposition of citalopram was best described by a 3-compartment model and its desmethyl metabolite by a 2-compartment model. Several models for the absorption rate were explored (e.g. first, zero order and combined first and zero order absorption, Michaelis-Menten, lag time) in combination with dose and/or time dependent covariate effects. Dose dependent oral bioavailability properties were also identified in this analysis. Citalopram IV clearance and metabolite formation rate were adequately described as linear processes. Metabolite clearance was adequately described using a Michaelis-Menten clearance with different parameters depending on the strain. This analysis demonstrates a very complex absorption/metabolism process explaining the highly non-linear pharmacokinetics observed across all the doses. This is the first combined parent/metabolite population PK analysis in both SD and Wistar rats over a wide range of IV and PO dosages for citalopram, a compound that exhibits highly nonlinear oral pharmacokinetics in rats. PMID:26395999

  20. Early cartilage degeneration in a rat experimental model of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Bo, Ning; Peng, Wang; Xinghong, Pei; Ma, Ruixue

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common long-term complication of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) that is associated with a higher incidence of OA. In addition, the age of onset of OA in DDH patients is significantly younger than in the general population. In order to investigate the early degeneration in DDH cartilage, we used a rat DDH model that was established by the straight-leg swaddling position. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and an untreated control group at postnatal weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. Histology and proteoglycan levels were observed in articular cartilage using Safranin O staining. Biomarkers of cartilage degeneration, including type X collagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, were assessed using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, expressions of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 were studied using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at different ages. DDH rats showed decreased proteoglycans and derangement of chondrocytes when compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expressions were higher in the superficial zone of DDH rats than in that of controls (p < 0.05), and the increase was age-dependent. mRNA expression of Collagen X and MMP-13 showed similar results (p < 0.05). A significant increase in mRNA expression of ADAMTS-5 was found in the DDH model cartilage at 8 weeks (p < 0.05). However, no change was observed in ADAMTS-4 expression. This study shows that degenerative cartilage changes occur at an early stage in the rat DDH model and become aggravated with age. PMID:22670655

  1. Assessment of multislice CT to quantify pulmonary emphysema function and physiology in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minsong; Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Presson, Robert G., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate multi-slice computed tomography technology to quantify functional and physiologic changes in rats with pulmonary emphysema. Method: Seven rats were scanned using a 16-slice CT (Philips MX8000 IDT) before and after artificial inducement of emphysema. Functional parameters i.e. lung volumes were measured by non-contrast spiral scan during forced breath-hold at inspiration and expiration followed by image segmentation based on attenuation threshold. Dynamic CT imaging was performed immediately following the contrast injection to estimate physiology changes. Pulmonary perfusion, fractional blood volume, and mean transit times (MTTs) were estimated by fitting the time-density curves of contrast material using a compartmental model. Results: The preliminary results indicated that the lung volumes of emphysema rats increased by 3.52+/-1.70mL (p<0.002) at expiration and 4.77+/-3.34mL (p<0.03) at inspiration. The mean lung densities of emphysema rats decreased by 91.76+/-68.11HU (p<0.01) at expiration and low attenuation areas increased by 5.21+/-3.88% (p<0.04) at inspiration compared with normal rats. The perfusion for normal and emphysema rats were 0.25+/-0.04ml/s/ml and 0.32+/-0.09ml/s/ml respectively. The fractional blood volumes for normal and emphysema rats were 0.21+/-0.04 and 0.15+/-0.02. There was a trend toward faster MTTs for emphysema rats (0.42+/-0.08s) than normal rats (0.89+/-0.19s) with p<0.006, suggesting that blood flow crossing the capillaries increases as the capillary volume decreases and which may cause the red blood cells to leave the capillaries incompletely saturated with oxygen if the MTTs become too short. Conclusion: Quantitative measurement using CT of structural and functional changes in pulmonary emphysema appears promising for small animals.

  2. Salutary effect of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in two different stress urinary incontinence models in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Jandric, Ivan; Vrcic, Hrvoje; Balen, Marica Jandric; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Radic, Bozo; Drmic, Domagoj; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Background Since an originally anti-ulcer stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) was shown to promote healing of injured striated muscle and smooth muscle in the gastrointestinal tract, we explored its therapeutic potentials for leak point pressure (LPP) recovery in rat stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after transabdominal urethrolysis (TU) and prolonged vaginal dilatation (VD). Material/Methods During a 7-day period, TU-rats and VD-rats (or healthy rats) received BPC 157, either (i) intraperitoneally, 10 μg/kg or 10 ng/kg, once daily (first administration 30 min after surgery, last 24 h before LPP-testing and sacrifice), or (ii) per-orally, 10 μg/kg in drinking water (0.16 μg/mL, 12 mL/rat/day). Vesicourethral segments were harvested for immunohistochemical evaluation. Results All BPC 157 regimens counteracted decrease of LPP values in TU-rats and VD-rats. Additionally, BPC 157-TU rats (μg-intraperitoneally or per-orally) and BPC 157-VD rats (μg intraperitoneally) reached LPP values originally noted in healthy rats. Conversely, in healthy rats, BPC 157 did not alter LPP. Immunohistochemical studies revealed higher desmin (delineates striated organization of skeletal muscle), smooth muscle actin, and CD34 (angiogenic marker) positivity within the urethral wall in BPC 157-treated rats vs. controls, as well as overall preserved muscle/connective tissue ratio assessed with Mallory’s trichrome staining. Conclusions Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, applied parenterally or per-orally, appears to ameliorate the SUI in rat models, improving the otherwise detrimental course of healing after VD and TU, which may be analogous to human injury. These beneficial effects may possibly be selectively used in future strategies for treatment of SUI. PMID:23478678

  3. Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: A Feasible Animal Model for Ocular Ischemic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yacong; Fan, Yuhua; Zhang, Lihong; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Qi, Wei; Liang, Willmann; Wang, Chunmei; T W Yew, David; Ye, Cunxi; Sha, Ou

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of inducing ocular ischemic syndrome in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats had bilateral occlusion or sham surgery. They were divided into 4 groups: (1) hypertensive-ischemia, (2) hypertensive-sham, (3) normotensive-ischemia, and (4) normotensive-sham. Four months after the operation, the global changes of the eye and pupillary light reflex were assessed. Then each rat was perfused, and randomly one of the bulbuses oculi was prepared as retinal flat mounts for investigation of vascular changes. The opposite eyeball was prepared as a paraffin section for observation of the linear density of retinal ganglion cells and for thickness measurement. One hypertensive-ischemia rat had a cataract in one eye and another rat in the same group had bulbus oculi collapse in one eye. The light reflex disappeared in 13.33% of hypertensive-ischemia rats, and the rest of the hypertensive-ischemia rats and normotensive-ischemia rats had slow reflex. Compared with the respective controls, the peripheral retinal vascular network in hypertensive-ischemia and normotensive-ischemia rats was sparse; linear density of the retinal ganglion cells was significantly reduced; and the retinal thickness was reduced. Compared with normotensive-ischemia rats, the hypertensive-ischemia rats demonstrated more severe changes. After bilateral common carotic artery occlusion, the eyes of hypertensive rats developed various pathological changes similar to those of ocular ischemic syndrome. In conclusion, an animal model for ocular ischemic syndrome can be created by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Anat Rec, 299:806-814, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917224

  4. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30–70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy – oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent “t” test and within-group analysis was done using dependent “t” test. Results: At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Conclusion: Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care. PMID:25984468

  5. Statin and Resveratrol in Combination induces Cardioprotection against Myocardial Infarction in Hypercholesterolemic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Penumathsa, Suresh Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh; Koneru, Srikanth; Juhasz, Bela; Zhan, Lijun; Pant, Rima; Menon, Venugopal P; Otani, Hajime; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2007-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia (HC) is a common health problem that significantly increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Both statin (S) and resveratrol (R) demonstrated cardioprotection through nitric oxide dependent mechanism. Therefore the present study was undertaken to determine whether combination therapy with statin and resveratrol are more cardioprotective than individual treatment groups in ischemic rat heart model. The rats were fed rats with 2% high cholesterol diet and after 8 weeks of high cholesterol diet the animals were treated with statin (1mg/kg bw/day) and resveratrol (20mg/kg bw/day) for 2 weeks. The rats were assigned to: 1) Control (C) 2) HC 3) HCR 4) HCS and 5) HCRS. The hearts, subjected to 30 min global ischemia followed by 120 min reperfusion were used as experimental model. The left ventricular functional recovery (+dp/dt) was found to be significantly better in the HCRS (1926±43), HCR (1556±65) and HCS (1635±40) compared to HC group (1127±16). The infarct size in the HCRS, HCS and HCR groups were 37±3.6, 43±3.3 and 44±4.2 respectively compared to 53±4.6 in HC. The lipid level was found to be decreased in all the treatment groups when compared to HC more significantly in HCS and HCRS groups when compared to HCR. Increased phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS was also observed in all the treatment groups resulting in decreased extent of cardiomyocyte apoptosis but the extent of reduction in apoptosis was more significant in HCRS group compared to all other groups. In-vivo rat myocardial infarction (MI) model subjected to one week of permanent left descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion documented increased capillary density in HCR and HCRS treated group when compared to HCS treatment group. We also documented increased β-catenin translocation and increased VEGF mRNA expression in all treatment groups. Thus, we conclude that the acute as well as chronic protection afforded by combination treatment with statin and resveratrol may be due to

  6. USE OF EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) TO CONSTRUCT A PBPK /MODEL FOR CARBOFURAN WITH THE REPORTED EXPERIMENTAL DATA IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the relationships among carbofuran exposure, dose, and effects, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed for the rat using the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework.

  7. Development of an experimental rat model of hyperammonemic encephalopathy and evaluation of the effects of rifaximin.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, Satoru; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Okada, Mami; Fukui, Norio; Isobe, Mitsui; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with hepatic dysfunction. However, the precise mechanism of HE is unclear. To elucidate the mechanism, we developed a new rat model of HE with coma using a combination of subcutaneous splenic transposition, partial hepatectomy and portal vein stenosis. In this model, blood ammonia levels increase in the postcaval vein over time and markedly increase in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The distribution of ammonia in the various blood vessels in the HE model suggests that the origin of peripheral blood and CSF ammonia is the mesenteric veins that drain blood from the gastrointestinal tract. Behavioral analysis revealed decreased pain response, increased passivity, and decreased pinna and corneal reflexes, followed by the development of coma. The development of coma in this model was frequent and reproducible. Increased S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B: a biomarker for brain injury) in venous blood, as well as damaged brain tissue, increased intracranial pressure and cerebral edema were observed in rats with coma. A very high correlation was observed between the blood ammonia concentration in the postcaval vein and the onset of coma. Rifaximin, a poorly absorbed antibiotic that targets gut flora, significantly improved symptoms of HE. Based on these results, our rat model appears to reflect the pathological state of HE associated with acute liver failure and may be a useful model for analysis of hyperammonemic encephalopathy. PMID:26980242

  8. Hypoglycemic and Hypocholesterolemic Effects of Botryosphaeran from Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05 in Diabetes-Induced and Hyperlipidemia Conditions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Nantes, Carolina C. B. O.; Fonseca, Eveline A. I.; Zaia, Cassia T. B. V.; Dekker, Robert F. H.; Khaper, Neelam; Castro, Inar A.

    2011-01-01

    Botryosphaeran, a water-soluble exopolysaccharide of the β-(1 → 3;1 → 6)-D-glucan type that has been isolated from the culture medium of Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05 grown in submerged fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, was previously demonstrated to be non-genotoxic in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and exhibited strong anticlastogenic activity. In the present study, the effects of botryosphaeran were investigated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats as well as in high-fat diet-fed hyperlipidemic Wistar rats. The plasma glucose level was reduced by 52% in the diabetic group of rats after administration of 12 mg botryosphaeran/kg body weight of the rats (b.w.)/day by gavage over 15 days. A reduction in the median ration intake was accompanied by an increase in the median body weight gain, as well as the efficiency of food conversion. These results demonstrate that botryosphaeran has protective effects by reducing the symptoms of cachexia in Diabetes mellitus. Botryosphaeran administered by gavage at a concentration of 12 mg botryosphaeran/kg b.w./day over 15 days also reduced the plasma levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol by 18% and 27%, respectively, in hyperlipidemic rats. Based on these findings, we conclude that botryosphaeran possesses hypoglycemic and hypocholesterolemic properties in conditions of diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, respectively, and may be used as an oral anti-diabetic agent. PMID:22783102

  9. Uptake and distribution of /sup 3/H-cholesteryl oleyl ether in tissues of cholesterol-fed New Zealand White and Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Cholesterol-fed New Zealand White (CH-FED) and Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits with minimal, moderate, and severe atherosclerosis were injected with a non-degradable cholesteryl ester analogue, /sup 3/H-cholesteryl oleyl ether (/sup 3/H-COE), to identify organs and cells active in the uptake of plasma cholesteryl ester (CE) at critical stages in the progression of atherosclerosis. The iliac arteries were injured by balloon catheterization to compare the repair process between the two animals. The morphology of the antherosclerotic lesions and the physical state of the arterial lipid were also compared.

  10. Quantitative functional MRI in a clinical orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer in immunocompetent Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Zheng, Linfeng; Li, Weiguo; Gordon, Andrew C; Huan, Yi; Shangguan, Junjie; Procissi, Daniel; Bentrem, David J; Larson, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate feasibility of performing quantitative MRI measurements in an immuno-competent rat model of pancreatic cancer by comparing in vivo anatomic and quantitative imaging measurements to tumor dissemination observations and histologic assays at necropsy. Meterials and methods: Rat ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cell line and Lewis rats were used for these studies. 108 DSL-6A/C1 cells were injected subcutaneously into the right flank of donor rats. Donor tumors reaching 10 mm were excised, and 1 mm3 tumor fragments were implanted within recipient rat pancreas during mini-laparotomy. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI were performed using a Bruker 7.0T ClinScan. After MRI, all animals underwent autopsy. Primary tumor size was measured, and dissemination score was used to assess local invasion and distant metastasis. Primary tumor and all sites of metastases were harvested and fixed for H&E, Masson’s trichrome, and rat anti-CD34 staining. Trichrome slides were scanned and digitized for measurement of fibrotic tissue areas. Anti-CD34 slides were used for microvessel density (MVD) measurements. Results: Primary tumors, local invasion, and distant metastases were confirmed for all rats. No significant differences were found between in vivo MRI measurements (48.7 ± 5.3 mm) and ex vivo caliper measurements (43.6 ± 3.6 mm) of primary tumor sizes (p > .05). Spleen, liver, diaphragm, peritoneum, and abdominal wall metastases were observed on MRI but smaller lung, mediastinum, omen, and mesentery metastases were only observed at necropsy. Contrast uptake observed during DCE measurements was significantly greater in both primary and metastatic tumor tissues compared to skeletal muscle and normal liver tissues. Both primary and metastatic tumors were hyper-intense in T2-weighted images and hypo-intense in T1-weighted images, but no differences were found between quantitative T2 measurements in

  11. Trigeminal neuralgia increases cerebral blood flow in a focal cerebral ischemic model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Weiliang; Liu, Zhenxiu; Xia, Jianhua; Wu, Jingru; Shi, Xueyin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influences of trigeminal neuropathic pain on the cerebral blood flow in a ET-1 focal cerebral ischemia model. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (220-260 g) were randomly divided into a model group (trigeminal neuralgia, TN group) and a sham operation group (sham group). The TN group received bilateral infraorbital nerve chronic constriction surgery, and the sham group only underwent exposure of the infraorbital nerve. The mechanical pain threshold of the rats was continuously monitored for 30 days post surgery. On postoperative day 30, the animals were anesthetized, and 3 μL (120 pM/μL) ET-1 was injected into the surroundings of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) to establish a cerebral focal ischemia-reperfusion injury model in rats. The changes in cerebral blood flow of these two groups were monitored 30 min after the injection of ET-1. Results: The mechanic pain threshold values between rats in the two groups were not significantly different (P>0.05). The threshold value in the TN group on postoperative day 9 significantly decreased compared with that before surgery (P<0.01). Between postoperative days 9 and 30, the pain threshold values in the TN group were significantly lower than those in the sham group (P<0.01). From postoperative day 10, the mean arterial pressure in the TN group significantly increased compared with that before surgery (P<0.05), and the blood pressure (BP) in the TN group was higher than that in the sham group between postoperative days 10 and 30 (P<0.05). After 75 min of ET-1 microinjection, the cerebral blood flow in the rat frontal cortex exhibited reperfusion, and the cerebral blood flow in the TN group was significantly higher than that in the sham group (P<0.05). In addition, the content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the blood of rats in the TN group was significantly higher than that in the sham group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Trigeminal neuropathic pain may increase the mean arterial

  12. Depdc5 knockout rat: A novel model of mTORopathy.

    PubMed

    Marsan, Elise; Ishida, Saeko; Schramm, Adrien; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Muraca, Giuseppe; Lecas, Sarah; Liang, Ning; Treins, Caroline; Pende, Mario; Roussel, Delphine; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kaneko, Takehito; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Mahon, Séverine; Miles, Richard; Leguern, Eric; Charpier, Stéphane; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-05-01

    DEP-domain containing 5 (DEPDC5), encoding a repressor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway, has recently emerged as a major gene mutated in familial focal epilepsies and focal cortical dysplasia. Here we established a global knockout rat using TALEN technology to investigate in vivo the impact of Depdc5-deficiency. Homozygous Depdc5(-/-) embryos died from embryonic day 14.5 due to a global growth delay. Constitutive mTORC1 hyperactivation was evidenced in the brains and in cultured fibroblasts of Depdc5(-/-) embryos, as reflected by enhanced phosphorylation of its downstream effectors S6K1 and rpS6. Consistently, prenatal treatment with mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin rescued the phenotype of Depdc5(-/-) embryos. Heterozygous Depdc5(+/-) rats developed normally and exhibited no spontaneous electroclinical seizures, but had altered cortical neuron excitability and firing patterns. Depdc5(+/-) rats displayed cortical cytomegalic dysmorphic neurons and balloon-like cells strongly expressing phosphorylated rpS6, indicative of mTORC1 upregulation, and not observed after prenatal rapamycin treatment. These neuropathological abnormalities are reminiscent of the hallmark brain pathology of human focal cortical dysplasia. Altogether, Depdc5 knockout rats exhibit multiple features of rodent models of mTORopathies, and thus, stand as a relevant model to study their underlying pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:26873552

  13. Inflammatory Biomarkers Associated with Lethal Rift Valley Fever Encephalitis in the Lewis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Amy L.; Kujawa, Michael R.; Oury, Tim D.; Reed, Douglas S.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging viral disease that causes significant human and veterinary illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Encephalitis is one of the severe complications arising from RVF virus (RVFV) infection of people, and the pathogenesis of this form of RVF is completely unknown. We use a novel reproducible encephalitic disease model in rats to identify biomarkers of lethal infection. Lewis rats were infected with RVFV strain ZH501 by aerosol exposure, then sacrificed daily to determine the course of infection and evaluation of clinical, virological, and immunological parameters. Weight loss, fever, and clinical signs occurred during the last 1–2 days prior to death. Prior to onset of clinical indications of disease, rats displayed marked granulocytosis and thrombocytopenia. In addition, high levels of inflammatory chemokines (MCP-1, MCS-F, Gro/KC, RANTES, and IL-1β) were detected first in serum (3–5 dpi) followed by brain (5–7 dpi). The results of this study are consistent with clinical data from human RVF patients and validate Lewis rats as an appropriate small animal model for RVF encephalitis. The biomarkers we identified here will be useful in future studies evaluating the efficacy of novel vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26779164

  14. The Effect of Rosiglitazone on Bone Quality in a Rat Model of Insulin Resistance and Osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardone, Laura Donata

    Rosiglitazone (RSG) is an insulin-sensitizing drug used to treat Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Clinical trials show that women taking RSG experience more limb fractures than patients taking other T2DM drugs. The purpose of this study is to understand how RSG (3mg/kg/day and 10mg/kg/day) and the bisphosphonate alendronate (0.7mg/kg/week) alter bone quality in the male, female and female ovariectomized (OVX) Zucker fatty rat model over a 12 week period. Bone quality was evaluated by mechanical testing of cortical and trabecular bone. Microarchitecture, bone mineral density (BMD), cortical bone porosity, bone formation/resorption and mineralization were also measured. Female OVX RSG10mg/kg rats had significantly lower vertebral BMD and compromised trabecular architecture versus OVX controls. Increased cortical porosity and decreased mechanical properties occurred in these rats. ALN treatment prevented these negative effects in the OVX RSG model. Evidence of reduced bone formation and excess bone resorption was detected in female RSG-treated rats.

  15. Establishment of a rat model of adjuvant-induced osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhu, Jialiang; Song, Keran; Hou, Shuxun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chunli; Tang, Jiaguang

    2014-12-01

    To study the establishment of ad